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Sample records for active lipid oleamide

  1. Preventive effects of a fermented dairy product against Alzheimer's disease and identification of a novel oleamide with enhanced microglial phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  2. Preventive Effects of a Fermented Dairy Product against Alzheimer’s Disease and Identification of a Novel Oleamide with Enhanced Microglial Phagocytosis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  3. The sleep lipid oleamide may represent an endogenous anticonvulsant: an in vitro comparative study in the 4-aminopyridine rat brain-slice model.

    PubMed

    Dougalis, Antonios; Lees, George; Ganellin, C Robin

    2004-03-01

    cis-Oleamide (cOA) is a putative endocannabinoid, which modulates GABA(A) receptors, Na+ channels and gap-junctions (important targets for clinical and experimental anticonvulsants). Here we address the hypothesis that cOA possesses seizure limiting properties and might represent an endogenous anticonvulsant. Field potentials were recorded from the rat hippocampus and visual cortex. The effects of cOA, were compared to carbamazepine (CBZ), pentobarbital (PB) and carbenoxolone (CRX) on 4-Aminopyridine(4AP)-induced epileptiform discharges. CBZ (100 microM), PB (50 microM) and CRX (100 microM), but not cOA (64 microM), significantly attenuated the duration of the evoked epileptiform discharges in CA1. Interictal activity in CA3 was significantly depressed by CRX and cOA (irreversible by AM251), increased by CBZ and remained unaffected by PB. CBZ, PB and CRX abolished spontaneous ictal events and attenuated evoked ictal discharges in the visual cortex. cOA did not abolish spontaneous ictal events, but significantly (albeit weakly) reduced the duration of evoked ictal events. cOA and CRX, in contrast to CBZ or PB, caused a significant delay in the development of the evoked (tonic phase) epileptiform discharges. The weak effects of cOA seem independent of cannabinoid (CB1) receptors. Enzymatic cleavage and lack of specific antagonists for cOA confound simple interpretations of its actions in slices. Its high lipophilicity, imposing a permeability barrier, may also explain the lack of anticonvulsant activity. The effects of cOA may well be masked by release of the endogenous ligand upon ictal depolarisation as we demonstrate here for established endocannabinoids. cOA does not possess profound antiepileptic actions in our hands compared to CBZ, PB or CRX. PMID:14975678

  4. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  5. Antiallergic Activity of Ethanol Extracts of Arctium lappa L. Undried Roots and Its Active Compound, Oleamide, in Regulating FcεRI-Mediated and MAPK Signaling in RBL-2H3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woong-Suk; Lee, Sung Ryul; Jeong, Yong Joon; Park, Dae Won; Cho, Young Mi; Joo, Hae Mi; Kim, Inhye; Seu, Young-Bae; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Kang, Se Chan

    2016-05-11

    The antiallergic potential of Arctium lappa L. was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, ICR mice, and RBL-2H3 cells. Ethanol extract (90%) of A. lappa (ALE, 100 μg/mL) inhibited the degranulation rate by 52.9%, determined by the level of β-hexosaminidase. ALE suppressed passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats and attenuated anaphylaxis and histamine release in mice. To identify the active compound of ALE, we subsequently fractionated and determined the level of β-hexosaminidase in all subfractions. Oleamide was identified as an active compound of ALE, which attenuated the secretion of histamine and the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in cells treated with compound 48/80 or A23187/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Oleamide suppressed FcεRI-tyrosine kinase Lyn-mediated pathway, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK/SAPK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38-MAPKs). These results showed that ALE and oleamide attenuated allergic reactions and should serve as a platform to search for compounds with antiallergic activity. PMID:27087645

  6. Vasorelaxant effects of oleamide in rat small mesenteric artery indicate action at a novel cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Pui Man; Hiley, C Robin

    2006-03-01

    Oleamide (cis-9-octadecenoamide) exhibits some cannabimimetic responses despite its low affinities at the currently known cannabinoid receptors. Here we have investigated whether or not it is a vasorelaxant in rat small mesenteric arteries. Oleamide elicited vasorelaxation (EC50=1.2+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=99.1+/-3.9%, n=8) which was reduced by endothelial removal. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduced the response (EC50=5.3+/-1.6 microM, Rmax=59.2+/-7.7%, n=7; P<0.01) as did blockade of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KCa) with apamin plus charybdotoxin (both 50 nM) (EC50=2.1+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=58.4+/-1.9%, n=5; P<0.05). Desensitisation of vanilloid receptors with capsaicin (10 microM for 30 min) shifted the oleamide concentration-response curve approximately 30-fold to the right (n=7; P<0.01). Pertussis toxin (400 ng ml-1 for 2 h) caused a two-fold shift in the response curve (EC50=2.2+/-0.4 microM, Rmax=66.8+/-4.5%, n=6; P<0.01). Rimonabant (CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; SR141716A; 3 microM) significantly inhibited relaxation induced by oleamide (EC50=3.5+/-0.3 microM, Rmax=75.1+/-1.9%; n=8; P<0.05). In contrast, neither the more selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (1 microM), nor the CB2 antagonist, SR144528 (1 microM), had significant effects. O-1918 (10 microM), a putative antagonist at a novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (abnormal-cannabidiol site), markedly reduced the relaxation to oleamide (n=7; P<0.01). It is concluded that oleamide responses in the rat isolated small mesenteric artery are partly dependent on the presence of the endothelium, activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KC)) and involve capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Oleamide may share a receptor (sensitive to rimonabant and O-1918, and coupled to KC) and Gi/o) with anandamide in this vessel. This might be distinct from both of the known cannabinoid receptors and the novel abnormal-cannabidiol site. PMID:16415907

  7. [INFLUENCE OF OLEAMIDE OF WATER AND ION TRANSPORT IN THE OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS].

    PubMed

    Shakhmatova, E I; Bogolepova, A E; Dubina, M V; Natochin, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Application of oleamide (final concentration of 10 μM) at the skin basal surface of the frog, Rana temporaria L., augmented the short-circuit current (SCC) from 59.8 ± 2.5 to 78.2 ± 1.4 μA/cm2. Oleamide added to the serous membrane of the frog urinary bladder at a final dose of 1 μM induced more than 30-fold increase of osmotic permeability. The addition of arginine-vasotocin on the background of oleamide action further increased SCC across the isolated frog skin and osmotic permeability of the frog urinary bladder. Intraperitoneal injection of oleamide at a dose of 0.1 mM/100 g BW to water-loaded non-anesthetized Wistar rats decreased diuresis by 22%, enhanced solute-free water reabsorption and urinary sodium excretion by 31% and 55% respectively, but did not affect the renal potassium excretion. The results obtained provide evidence of similarity of oleamide and neurohypophyseal hormones effects on water and ion transport in epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs in vertebrates. PMID:26983280

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  9. Bactericidal Activities of Milk Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sprong, R. Corinne; Hulstein, Marco F. E.; Van der Meer, Roelof

    2001-01-01

    The bactericidal capacity of digestion products of bovine milk triglycerides and membrane lipids was tested in vitro using Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enteritidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Clostridium perfringens. C10:0 and C12:0 fatty acids and digestion products of sphingolipids appeared to be effective bactericidal agents, whereas digestion products of phosphoglycerides were moderately bactericidal. Thus, milk fat sphingolipids and triglycerides, particularly those containing C10:0 and C12:0 fatty acids, may protect against food-borne gastroenteritis. PMID:11257052

  10. Assay of Flippase Activity in Proteoliposomes Using Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Specific membrane proteins, termed lipid flippases, play a central role in facilitating the movement of lipids across cellular membranes. In this protocol, we describe the reconstitution of ATP-driven lipid flippases in liposomes and the analysis of their in vitro flippase activity based on the use of fluorescent lipid derivatives. Working with purified and reconstituted systems provides a well-defined experimental setup and allows to directly characterize these membrane proteins at the molecular level. PMID:26695033

  11. Results from in vitro and ex vivo skin aging models assessing the antiglycation and anti-elastase MMP-12 potential of glycylglycine oleamide

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanowicz, Patrick; Haure, Marie-José; Ceruti, Isabelle; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycation is an aging reaction of naturally occurring sugars with dermal proteins. Type I collagen and elastin are most affected by glycation during intrinsic chronological aging. Aim To study the in vitro and ex vivo assays in human skin cells and explants and the antiaging effects of glycylglycine oleamide (GGO). Materials and methods The antiglycation effect of GGO was assessed in a noncellular in vitro study on collagen and, ex vivo, by immunohistochemical staining on human skin explants (elastin network glycation). The ability of GGO to contract fibroblasts was assessed in a functional assay, and its anti-elastase (MMP-12) activity was compared to that of oleic acid alone, glycylglycine (GG) alone, and oleic acid associated with GG. Results In vitro, GGO reduced the glycation of type I collagen. Ex vivo, GGO restored the expression of fibrillin-1 inhibited by glycation. Furthermore, GGO induced a tissue retraction of almost 30%. Moreover, the MMP-12 activity was inhibited by up to 60%. Conclusion Under the present in vitro and ex vivo conditions, GGO prevents glycation of the major structural proteins of the dermis, helping to reduce the risk of rigidification. By maintaining the elastic function of the skin, GGO may be a promising sparring partner for other topical antiaging agents. PMID:27382322

  12. Structural heterogeneity regarding local Shwartzman activity of lipid A.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, J; Tanaka, C; Arata, S; Akiyama, Y; Hata, S; Hirayama, T; Egawa, K; Kasai, N

    1988-01-01

    The relation of chemical structure to local Shwartzman activity of lipid A preparations purified by thin-layer chromatography from five bacterial strains was examined. Two lipid A fractions from E. coli F515--Ec-A2 and Ec-A3--exhibited strong activity, similar to that of previous synthetic E. coli-type lipid A (compound 506 or LA-15-PP). The Ec-A3 fraction contained a component that appeared to be structurally identical to compound 506, and the main component of Ec-A2 fraction was structurally similar to compound 506 except that it carried a 3-hydroxytetradecanoyl group at the C-3' position of the backbone in place of a 3-tetradecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Free lipid A (12 C) and purified lipid A fractions, Ec-A2 (12 C) and Ec-A3 (12 C), respectively, obtained from bacteria grown at 12 C, exhibited activity comparable to Ec-A2 or Ec-A3. In these preparations, a large part of the 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group might be replaced by 3-hexadecenoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Salmonella minnesota R595 free lipid A also contained at least two active lipid A components as seen in E. coli lipid A, but the third component corresponding to the synthetic Salmonella-type lipid A (compound 516 or LA-16-PP) exhibited low activity. A lipid A fraction, Cv-A4 from Chromobacterium violaceum IFO 12614, which was proposed to have two acyloxyacyl groups at the C-2 and C-2' positions with other acyl groups, exhibited weaker activity than the free lipid A or LPS. The purified lipid A fractions from Pseudomonas diminuta JCM 2788 and Pseudomonas vesicularis JCM 1477 contained an unusual backbone with 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose disaccharide phosphomonoester, and these lipid A (Pd-A3 and Pv-A3) exhibited strong activity comparable to the E. coli lipid A. Thus, the present results show that the local Shwartzman reaction can be expressed by partly different lipid A structures in both hydrophilic backbone and fatty acyl residues; when they have the same backbone the potency varies

  13. Phytotoxic Activity of Quinone and Resorcinolic Lipid Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on the phytotoxic activity of sorgoleone and resorcinolic lipids identified from the roots extracts of sorghum, 8 resorcinolic lipids derivatives and 10 quinones with varying side chains size were synthesized. The compounds were submitted to phtotoxicity assay against monocot and dicot species...

  14. Adipocyte size fluctuation, mechano-active lipid droplets and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, Soazig; Briand, Nolwenn; Dugail, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell size fluctuation, a key property in adipocyte pathophysiology primarily dependent on lipid storage, is linked to a novel function of lipid droplet organelles acting as mechano-active organelles to regulate cell membrane remodeling and caveolae dynamics. PMID:26167412

  15. Structure, activity and uptake mechanism of siRNA-lipid nanoparticles with an asymmetric ionizable lipid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-08-20

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) represent the most advanced platform for the systemic delivery of siRNA. We have previously reported the discovery of novel ionizable lipids with asymmetric lipid tails, enabling potent gene-silencing activity in hepatocytes in vivo; however, the structure and delivery mechanism had not been elucidated. Here, we report the structure, activity and uptake mechanism of LNPs with an asymmetric ionizable lipid. Zeta potential and hemolytic activity of LNPs showed that LNPs were neutral at the pH of the blood compartment but become increasingly charged and fusogenic in the acidic endosomal compartment. (31)P NMR experiments indicated that the siRNA was less mobile inside particles, presumably because of an electrostatic interaction with an ionizable lipid. The role of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) was studied using recombinant human apoE both in vitro and in vivo. A comparative study in wild-type and apoE-deficient mice revealed that apoE significantly influenced the in vivo biodistribution of LNPs and enhanced the cellular uptake. Pretreatment of mice with siRNA targeting low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) impaired gene-silencing of the following siRNA treatment, demonstrating that in vivo activity of LNPs is dependent on LDLR. Our studies on the detailed mechanism should lead to the creation of more sophisticated LNP-based RNAi therapeutics. PMID:27374199

  16. Membrane-Active Peptides and the Clustering of Anionic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwani, P.; Epand, R.F.; Heidenreich, N.; Bürck, J.; Ulrich, A.S.; Epand, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is some overlap in the biological activities of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We compared nine AMPs, seven CPPs, and a fusion peptide with regard to their ability to cluster anionic lipids in a mixture mimicking the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. We also studied their bacteriostatic effect on several bacterial strains, and examined their conformational changes upon membrane binding using circular dichroism. A remarkable correlation was found between the net positive charge of the peptides and their capacity to induce anionic lipid clustering, which was independent of their secondary structure. Among the peptides studied, six AMPs and four CPPs were found to have strong anionic lipid clustering activity. These peptides also had bacteriostatic activity against several strains (particularly Gram-negative Escherichia coli) that are sensitive to lipid clustering agents. AMPs and CPPs that did not cluster anionic lipids were not toxic to E. coli. As shown previously for several types of AMPs, anionic lipid clustering likely contributes to the mechanism of antibacterial action of highly cationic CPPs. The same mechanism could explain the escape of CPPs from intracellular endosomes that are enriched with anionic lipids. PMID:22853904

  17. PPAR-γ activation by Tityus serrulatus venom regulates lipid body formation and lipid mediator production.

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV) consists of numerous peptides with different physiological and pharmacological activities. Studies have shown that scorpion venom increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production, contributing to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction, and patient death. We have previously demonstrated that TsV is a venom-associated molecular pattern (VAMP) recognized by TLRs inducing intense inflammatory reaction through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4. Lipid bodies (LBs) are potential sites for eicosanoid production by inflammatory cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) is implicated in LB formation and acts as an important modulator of lipid metabolism during inflammation. In this study, we used murine macrophages to evaluate whether the LB formation induced by TsV after TLR recognition correlates with lipid mediator generation by macrophages and if it occurs through PPAR-γ activation. We demonstrate that TsV acts through TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation and PPAR-γ activation to induce LB formation and generation of PGE2 and LTB4. Our data also show that PPAR-γ negatively regulates the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription factor. Based on these results, we suggest that during envenomation, LBs constitute functional organelles for lipid mediator production through signaling pathways that depend on cell surface and nuclear receptors. These findings point to the inflammatory mechanisms that might also be triggered during human envenomation by TsV. PMID:25450800

  18. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  19. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  20. Chemical structure and immunobiological activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipid A.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiko; Asai, Yasuyuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Tamai, Riyoko

    2007-01-01

    In 1933, Boivin et al. extracted an endotoxin from Salmonella typhimurium for the first time, after which a variety of chemical and biological studies on endotoxins have been performed. In 1952, the structural and functional properties of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), extracted by a hot phenol and water method devised by Westphal et al., were reported, which led to a number of studies of Gram-negative bacteria in regards to the host defense mechanism. Since 1960, the unique chemical structure and biological activity of Bacteroides species LPS have received a great deal of attention, and there is a long history of such studies. In addition, among oral bacterial strains that have received attention as causative periodontopathic bacteria, many have been classified as Bacteroides species. In particular, a number of researchers have investigated whether LPS of Porphyromonas gingivalis (formerly Bacteroides gingivalis), a black-pigmented oral anaerobic rod, is a virulent factor of the bacterium. The active center of the LPS of these Bacteroides species, the lipid A molecule, is known to be an active participant in endotoxic activation, though its other biological activities are weak, due to its unique chemical structure and action as an antagonist of LPS. On the other hand, many reports have noted that the LPS of those species activate cells in C3H/HeJ mice, which generally do not respond to LPS. We were the first to reveal the chemical structure of P. gingivalis lipid A and, together with other researchers, reported that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A have activities toward C3H/HeJ mice. Since that time, because of the popularity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) studies, a great deal of evidence has been reported indicating that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A are ligands that act on TLR2. In order to solve such problems as heterogeneity and contamination of the biologically active components of P. gingivalis lipid A, we produced a chemical synthesis counterpart

  1. Lipid Peroxidation Is a Consequence of Elicitor Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kim R.; Albert, Fred; Anderson, Anne J.

    1988-01-01

    Elicitor-active preparations from the fungal pathogen of bean Colletotrichum lindemuthianum stimulated the accumulation of products characteristic of lipid peroxidation in treated bean tissues. Bean suspension cells treated with crude and purified elicitors accumulated `lipofuscin-like pigment' (LEP) and malondialdehyde. The accumulation of LFP after about 6 h of treatment coincided with the onset of visible browning and production of the bean phytoalexins kievitone, phaseollin, and phaseollinisoflavan. The induction of phytoalexins and accumulation of LFP were also triggered by treatments with generators of activated oxygen species, xanthine:xanthine oxidase and Fe:ethylenediaminedi-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. These data suggest that generation of active oxygen species may be involved in lipid peroxidation triggered by elicitors. PMID:16665944

  2. Functional role of lipid rafts in CD20 activity?

    PubMed

    Janas, Eva; Priest, Richard; Malhotra, Rajneesh

    2005-01-01

    CD20 is a B-lymphocyte-specific integral membrane protein, implicated in the regulation of transmembrane calcium conductance, cell-cycle progression and B-lymphocyte proliferation. CD20 is proposed to function as a SOCC (store-operated calcium channel). SOCCs are activated by receptor-stimulated calcium depletion of intracellular stores. Sustained calcium conductivity across the plasma membrane mediated by SOCC activity is required for long-term calcium-dependent processes, such as transcriptional control and gene expression. Cross-linking of CD20 by antibodies (e.g. Rituxan) has been reported to induce a rapid redistribution of CD20 into specialized microdomains at the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts. Recruitment of CD20 into lipid rafts and its homo-oligomerization are suggested to be crucial for CD20 activity and regulation. This review outlines recent biochemical studies characterizing the role of CD20 in calcium signalling in B-lymphocytes and evaluates an engagement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD20-mediated calcium conductivity. PMID:15649140

  3. P-glycoprotein ATPase activity requires lipids to activate a switch at the first transmission interface.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) drug pump. A common feature of ABC proteins is that they are organized into two wings. Each wing contains a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Drug substrates and ATP bind at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Drug transport involves ATP-dependent conformational changes between inward- (open, NBDs far apart) and outward-facing (closed, NBDs close together) conformations. P-gps crystallized in the presence of detergent show an open structure. Human P-gp is inactive in detergent but basal ATPase activity is restored upon addition of lipids. The lipids might cause closure of the wings to bring the NBDs close together to allow ATP hydrolysis. We show however, that cross-linking the wings together did not activate ATPase activity when lipids were absent suggesting that lipids may induce other structural changes required for ATPase activity. We then tested the effect of lipids on disulfide cross-linking of mutants at the first transmission interface between intracellular loop 4 (TMD2) and NBD1. Mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C but not G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C were cross-linked with oxidant when in membranes. The mutants were then purified and cross-linked with or without lipids. Mutants G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C cross-linked only in the absence of lipids whereas mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C were cross-linked only in the presence of lipids. The results suggest that lipids activate a switch at the first transmission interface and that the structure of P-gp is different in detergents and lipids. PMID:26944019

  4. Anti-tumor activities of lipids and lipid analogues and their development as potential anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael; Hraiki, Adam; Bebawy, Mary; Pazderka, Curtis; Rawling, Tristan

    2015-06-01

    Lipids have the potential for development as anticancer agents. Endogenous membrane lipids, such as ceramides and certain saturated fatty acids, have been found to modulate the viability of tumor cells. In addition, many tumors over-express cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase or cytochrome P450 enzymes that mediate the biotransformation of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to potent eicosanoid regulators of tumor cell proliferation and cell death. In contrast, several analogous products from the biotransformation of ω-3 PUFAs impair particular tumorigenic pathways. For example, the ω-3 17,18-epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid activates anti-proliferative and proapoptotic signaling cascades in tumor cells and the lipoxygenase-derived resolvins are effective inhibitors of inflammatory pathways that may drive tumor expansion. However, the development of potential anti-cancer drugs based on these molecules is complex, with in vivo stability a major issue. Nevertheless, recent successes with the antitumor alkyl phospholipids, which are synthetic analogues of naturally-occurring membrane phospholipid esters, have provided the impetus for development of further molecules. The alkyl phospholipids have been tested against a range of cancers and show considerable activity against skin cancers and certain leukemias. Very recently, it has been shown that combination strategies, in which alkyl phospholipids are used in conjunction with established anticancer agents, are promising new therapeutic approaches. In future, the evaluation of new lipid-based molecules in single-agent and combination treatments may also be assessed. This could provide a range of important treatment options in the management of advanced and metastatic cancer. PMID:25603423

  5. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Sarah E; Martin, Ola J; Noland, Robert C; Slentz, Dorothy H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-04-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  6. Plasma lipid levels in active and sedentary premenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Shaw, M H; Hsia, L; Nash, M S; Kaplan, T; Signorile, J F; Appleyate, B

    1992-04-01

    Cross-sectional data on 19 long-distance runners (LD), 17 aerobic dancers (AD), 19 recreational joggers (RJ), and 15 inactive controls (IC) were examined for cardiovascular endurance and determination of plasma lipoproteins. Subjects included premenopausal eumenorrheic females who were non-smokers and presently not using oral contraceptives. Results indicated that all groups were similar in age, height and weight. Only the AD group had a significantly lower percent body fat (p less than .001) than the other groups. The LD, AD and RJ groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the IC group (p less than .05), and the LD and AD groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the RJ group (p less than .05). Analysis of a one-day food log indicated that the only difference in diet among the groups was a significantly lower intake of total and monounsaturated fat in the AD group (p less than .05) and a significantly lower intake of carbohydrates in the IC group than the AD group (p less than .05). Analysis of plasma lipids revealed no significant differences in any lipid variables among the groups. These findings indicate that healthy premenopausal eumenorrheic females with similar physical characteristics also have similar plasma lipid profiles regardless of their physical activity level. PMID:1601555

  7. Modification of the structure and activity of lipid A in Yersinia pestis lipopolysaccharide by growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-08-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37 degrees C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27 degrees C and lipid A-37 degrees C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27 degrees C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37 degrees C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27 degrees C than in lipid A-37 degrees C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27 degrees C were stronger inducers of TNF-alpha than those from bacteria grown at 37 degrees C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37 degrees C. PMID:12117916

  8. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis. PMID:26712622

  9. Antioxidant Activity of Flaxseed Extracts in Lipid Systems.

    PubMed

    Slavova-Kazakova, Adriana; Karamać, Magdalena; Kancheva, Vessela; Amarowicz, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the antioxidant activity of the extract of flaxseed and its alkaline hydrolysate in two model systems: lipid autoxidation of triacylglycerols of sunflower oil (TGSO)-in a homogeneous lipid media and during β-carotene-linoleate emulsion system. In addition, pure lignans were tested. The material was defatted with hexane and then phenolic compounds were extracted using dioxane-ethanol (50:50, v/v) mixture. Carbohydrates were removed from the crude extract using an Amberlite XAD-16 column chromatography. The content of total phenolic compounds in the crude extract and after alkaline hydrolysis was determined using a Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol reagent. Individual phenolic compounds were determined by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (RP-HPLC) method in gradient system. The alkaline hydrolysis increased the content of total phenolics in the extract approximately by 10%. In the extracts of flaxseed, phenolic compounds were present in the form of macromolecular complex. In the alkaline hydrolysate, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) was found as the main phenolic compound. Small amounts of p-coumaric and ferulic acids were also determined. SDG and both extracts were not able to inhibit effectively lipid autoxidation. The kinetics of TGSO autoxidation at 80 °C in absence and in presence of the extract before hydrolysis (EBH) and after hydrolysis (EAH) was monitored and compared with known standard antioxidants. Ferulic acid (FA) and butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT) showed much higher antioxidant efficiency and reactivity than that of both extracts. Secoisolariciresinol (SECO) showed a higher activity in both model systems than SDG. However, the activity of SECO was much lower than that of nordihydroquaiaretic acid (NDGA). PMID:26703558

  10. Lipid bilayer array for simultaneous recording of ion channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Nasu, Tomohiro; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an array of stable and reduced-solvent bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed in microfabricated silicon chips. BLMs were first vertically formed simultaneously and then turned 90° in order to realize a horizontal BLM array. Since the present BLMs are mechanically stable and robust, the BLMs survive this relatively tough process. Typically, a ˜60% yield in simultaneous BLM formation over 9 sites was obtained. Parallel recordings of gramicidin channel activities from different BLMs were demonstrated. The present system has great potential as a platform of BLM-based high throughput drug screening for ion channel proteins.

  11. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  12. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi . E-mail: morigaki-kenichi@aist.go.jp; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa . E-mail: himaish@kobe-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s.

  13. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s. PMID:17335776

  14. Improved antimycobacterial activity of rifampin using solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutaleb, Ehsan; Noori, Massoumeh; Gandomi, Narges; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2012-10-01

    Rifampin (RIF) is one of the front-line drugs in therapy of tuberculosis (TB). The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of mycobacteria has greatly contributed to the increased incidence of TB. Nano-based formulation of several antimicrobials has been shown to improve either antibacterial efficacy or pharmacokinetic behavior. In this study, RIF-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by a modified microemulsion-based method and their particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, morphology, and antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium fortuitum were evaluated. The resulting SLNs were spherical with diameter of about 100 nm, with low negative zeta potential, and an encapsulation efficiency of 82%. The formulation also sustained the drug release for 72 h. The antimycobacterial efficacy was greatly improved against M. fortuitum, and the minimum inhibitory concentration of drug-loaded SLNs was eight times less than free RIF. Drug-free SLNs and the ingredients showed no antibacterial effect. It can be concluded that as expected, solid lipid nanoparticles are promising vehicles for enhanced antimycobacterial effect of rifampin.

  15. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  16. Systemic complement activation, lung injury, and products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, P A; Till, G O; Hatherill, J R; Annesley, T M; Kunkel, R G

    1985-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that systemic activation of the complement system after intravenous injection of cobra venom factor (CVF) results in acute lung injury as reflected by increases in the vascular permeability of the lung as well as by morphologic evidence of damage to lung vascular endothelial cells. In using the vascular permeability of the lung as the reference, the current studies show a quantitative correlation between lung injury and the appearance in plasma of lipid peroxidation products (conjugated dienes) as well as increased concentrations of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and one of its isoenzymes (LDH-4). After injection of CVF, extracts of lungs also showed elevated levels of conjugated dienes, whereas no elevations were found in extracts of liver, kidney, and spleen. There was no evidence in CVF-injected rats of renal or hepatic injury as reflected by the lack of development of proteinuria and the failure to detect increased serum levels of liver-related enzymes. Other peroxidation products identified in plasma of CVF-injected rats involved hydroperoxides and fluorescent compounds with features of Schiff bases. Not surprisingly, malondialdehyde was not found to be a reliable plasma indicator of lipid peroxidation associated with oxygen radical-mediated lung vascular injury. In using a model of oxygen radical-independent lung injury induced by oleic acid, although large amounts of LDH and LDH-4 were found in the plasma, no increases in plasma levels of conjugated dienes were detected. In CVF-injected animals treated with interventions protective against lung injury (neutrophil depletion, catalase, hydroxyl radical scavengers, or iron chelators), there were striking reductions in the plasma levels of conjugated dienes, hydroperoxides, and fluorochromic products. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that the protective interventions did not interfere with the accumulation of neutrophils in lung interstitial capillaries after systemic

  17. Thermal activation of superheated lipid-coated perfluorocarbon drops.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2015-04-28

    This study explored the thermal conditions necessary for the vaporization of superheated perfluorocarbon nanodrops. Droplets C3F8 and C4F10 coated with a homologous series of saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines were formed by condensation of 4 μm diameter microbubbles. These drops were stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but they vaporized back into microbubbles at higher temperatures. The vaporization transition was measured as a function of temperature by laser light extinction. We found that C3F8 and C4F10 drops experienced 90% vaporization at 40 and 75 °C, respectively, near the theoretical superheat limits (80-90% of the critical temperature). We therefore conclude that the metastabilty of these phase-change agents arises not from the droplet Laplace pressure altering the boiling point, as previously reported, but from the metastability of the pure superheated fluid to homogeneous nucleation. The rate of C4F10 drop vaporization was quantified at temperatures ranging from 55 to 75 °C, and an apparent activation energy barrier was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. Interestingly, the activation energy increased linearly with acyl chain length from C14 to C20, indicating that lipid interchain cohesion plays an important role in suppressing the vaporization rate. The vaporized drops (microbubbles) were found to be unstable to dissolution at high temperatures, particularly for C14 and C16. However, proper choice of the fluorocarbon and lipid species provided a nanoemulsion that could undergo at least ten reversible condensation/vaporization cycles. The vaporization properties presented in this study may facilitate the engineering of tunable phase-shift particles for diagnostic imaging, targeted drug delivery, tissue ablation, and other applications. PMID:25853278

  18. Effects of Oxidized Tallow on the Rabbit Serum Lipids and Antioxidant Activity of the In-vitro Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Alam; Rahman, Waheed ur

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of thermally oxidized tallow on the serum lipids profile and radical scavenging activity (RSA) of the lipids extracted from the different tissues of the rabbits. Tallow was thermally oxidized at 130℃ for 9, 18, 27, 36 and 45 h respectively. Thermally oxidized tallow was fed to the local strain of Himalayan rabbits for one week. Results show that oxidation increases the formation of hydroperoxides and decrease the level of radical scavenging activity of the tallow. The rabbit serum lipids profile showed a dose dependent increase in triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. However, no statistically significant increase was observed in the HDL-cholesterol with an increase of oxidation time. Serum glucose and rabbits body weight decrease significantly (p < 0.05) and was highly correlated with the serum lipids profile. The percent RSA of the lipids extracted from the liver, brain and muscles tissues showed a significant decrease with respect to 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 g/body weight as well as oxidation time. Data suggests that thermal oxidation and use of thermally oxidized beef tallow is harmful and therefore an alternative way of cooking should be used. PMID:24278604

  19. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  20. Antioxidant activity of alkyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers in unsaturated lipids.

    PubMed

    Cert, Rosa; Madrona, Andrés; Espartero, José Luis; Pérez-Camino, M Carmen

    2015-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of ethyl and octyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers toward lipids was determined using the Rancimat and open cup methods at high temperatures and 50 °C, respectively. The effect of the unsaturation of the matrix was evaluated using sunflower, soya, and fish refined oils. The antioxidant activities of alkyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers (HTy ethers), hydroxytyrosyl esters, and free hydroxytyrosol are similar, and are much higher than that of α-tocopherol at the same millimolar concentration. The relationship between the induction period and the concentration of the HTy ethers is a sigmoidal curve; an accurate concentration of HTy ethers is necessary to achieve maximum activity, as it increases with the level of matrix unsaturation. The presence of tocopherols in commercial oils affects the antioxidant effect of HTy ethers. Thus, the addition of a low concentration of HTy ethers results in a positive effect, whereas the effect of the addition of high amounts of ethers is slightly less than that of the phenol alone. The addition of HTy ethers to commercial refined oils increases the stability of the oils and preserves tocopherols and polyunsaturated fatty acids from oxidation, enabling the oils to maintain their nutritional properties for longer periods of time. PMID:26018773

  1. Modification of the Structure and Activity of Lipid A in Yersinia pestis Lipopolysaccharide by Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-01-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37°C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27°C and lipid A-37°C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27°C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37°C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27°C than in lipid A-37°C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27°C were stronger inducers of TNF-α than those from bacteria grown at 37°C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37°C. PMID:12117916

  2. The effect of charged lipids on bacteriorhodopsin membrane reconstitution and its photochemical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhen; Bai Jing; Xu Yuhong

    2008-07-11

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was reconstituted into artificial lipid membrane containing various charged lipid compositions. The proton pumping activity of BR under flash and continuous illumination, proton permeability across membrane, as well as the decay kinetics of the photocycle intermediate M{sub 412} were studied. The results showed that lipid charges would significantly affect the orientation of BR inserted into lipid membranes. In liposomes containing anionic lipids, BRs were more likely to take natural orientation as in living cells. In neutral or positively charged liposomes, most BRs were reversely assembled, assuming an inside out orientation. Moreover, the lipids charges also affect BR's M intermediate kinetics, especially the slow component in M intermediate decay. The half-life M{sub 412s} increased significantly in BRs in liposomes containing cationic lipids, while decreased in those in anionic liposomes.

  3. ARF1 activation dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets to promote HCV assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yin, Peiqi; Zhou, Liya; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Leiliang

    2016-06-17

    Lipid droplets are the place for HCV assembly and ADRP is an abundant lipid droplets-associated protein. However, little is known about the mechanisms how ADRP is involved in HCV life cycle. Here we demonstrate that activation of ARF1 dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets. A constitute active form of ARF1 (ARF1Q71I) promotes HCV assembly. We found that ADRP plays a positive role in HCV replication and a negative role in HCV assembly. Overexpression of ADRP increases the size of lipid droplets, while silencing ADRP reduces the size of lipid droplets. These findings provide new insight into the role of lipid droplets proteins in life cycle of HCV. PMID:27157138

  4. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition. PMID:25272757

  5. Docetaxel in cationic lipid nanocapsules for enhanced in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankitkumar S; Makhija, Dinesh T; Goel, Peeyush N; Shah, Sanket M; Nikam, Yuvraj; Gude, Rajiv P; Jagtap, Aarti G; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of Docetaxel (DT) as an anti-cancer agent is limited to parenteral route owing to its very poor oral bioavailability. Thus, to improve its oral efficacy, DT was loaded in novel cationic lipid nanocapsules (DT CLNC). The DT CLNC possessed size of 130-150 nm, zeta potential of +72mV, adequate DT loading and over 95% encapsulation efficiency. TEM revealed capsular structure of DT CLNC. Lipolysis study indicated improved solubilization of DT by nanocapsules in comparison to DT solution. DT CLNC exhibited significantly higher release of DT in comparison to DT solution during in vitro permeation studies employing non-reverted rat-intestinal sac. Superior uptake of DT in zebra fishes exposed to DT CLNC resulted in greater apoptosis-based cell death as compared to those exposed to DT solution. This correlated well with the significantly superior (p < 0.05) anti-angiogenic activity of DT CLNC system over DT solution, in zebra fish model. DT CLNC also inhibited tumor growth in melanoma cell line induced tumors in C57BL/6 mice significantly, as compared to DT solution (p < 0.05). The DT CLNC system demonstrated adequate stability, with tremendous potential to improve oral efficacy of DT and can serve as an alternative to existing DT formulations available commercially for parenteral use. PMID:25329444

  6. Lipid Vesicle-mediated Affinity Chromatography using Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (LIMACS): a Novel Method to Analyze Protein-lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of lipid protein interaction is difficult because lipids are embedded in cell membranes and therefore, inaccessible to most purification procedures. As an alternative, lipids can be coated on flat surfaces as used for lipid ELISA and Plasmon resonance spectroscopy. However, surface coating lipids do not form microdomain structures, which may be important for the lipid binding properties. Further, these methods do not allow for the purification of larger amounts of proteins binding to their target lipids. To overcome these limitations of testing lipid protein interaction and to purify lipid binding proteins we developed a novel method termed lipid vesicle-mediated affinity chromatography using magnetic-activated cell sorting (LIMACS). In this method, lipid vesicles are prepared with the target lipid and phosphatidylserine as the anchor lipid for Annexin V MACS. Phosphatidylserine is a ubiquitous cell membrane phospholipid that shows high affinity to the protein Annexin V. Using magnetic beads conjugated to Annexin V the phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles will bind to the magnetic beads. When the lipid vesicles are incubated with a cell lysate the protein binding to the target lipid will also be bound to the beads and can be co-purified using MACS. This method can also be used to test if recombinant proteins reconstitute a protein complex binding to the target lipid. We have used this method to show the interaction of atypical PKC (aPKC) with the sphingolipid ceramide and to co-purify prostate apoptosis response 4 (PAR-4), a protein binding to ceramide-associated aPKC. We have also used this method for the reconstitution of a ceramide-associated complex of recombinant aPKC with the cell polarity-related proteins Par6 and Cdc42. Since lipid vesicles can be prepared with a variety of sphingo- or phospholipids, LIMACS offers a versatile test for lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles closely that of the cell membrane

  7. Lithogenic activity and clinical relevance of lipids extracted from urines and stones of nephrolithiasis patients.

    PubMed

    Boonla, Chanchai; Youngjermchan, Phantip; Pumpaisanchai, Somkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana

    2011-02-01

    We investigated contents and classes of urinary and stone matrix lipids, and evaluated their clinical relevance in nephrolithiasis patients. Lithogenic role of major lipid classes was explored. Urine (24 h) and stone samples were collected from 47 patients with nephrolithiasis. Control urines were obtained from 29 healthy subjects. Urinary 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), malondialdehyde (MDA), N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity and total proteins were measured. Total lipids were extracted from centrifuged urines (10,000 rpm, 30 min) and stones by chloroform/methanol method. Major classes of lipids were identified using multi-one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (MOD-TLC). Influence of each lipid class purified from stone matrices on stone formation was evaluated using crystallization and crystal aggregation assays. Urinary NAG activity and 8-OHdG were significantly elevated in nephrolithiasis patients. Total lipids in centrifuged urines of the patients were not significantly different from that of controls. In nephrolithiasis, urinary excretion of total lipids was linearly correlated to urinary MDA, 8-OHdG, NAG activity and total proteins. Lipid contents in stone matrices varied among stone types. Uric acid stone contained lower amount of total lipids than calcium oxalate and magnesium ammonium phosphate stones. MOD-TLC lipid chromatograms of healthy urines, nephrolithiasis urines and stone matrices were obviously different. Triacylglyceride was abundant in urines, but scarcely found in stone matrices. Stone matrices were rich in glycolipids and high-polar lipids (phospholipids/gangliosides). Partially purified glycolipids significantly induced crystal aggregation while cholesterol was a significant inducer of both crystal formation and agglomeration. In conclusion, total lipids in centrifuged urines did not differ between nephrolithiasis and healthy subjects. Our finding suggests that the significant sources of lipids in patients' urine may be

  8. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  9. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  10. Enhanced Lipid and Biodiesel Production from Glucose-Fed Activated Sludge: Kinetics an Microbial Community Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach to increase biofuel feedstock lipid yields from municipal sewage sludge via manipulation of carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio and glucose loading in activated sludge bioreactors was investigated. Sludge lipid and fatty acid methyl ester (biodiesel) yields (% cel...

  11. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  12. Duodenal Lipid Sensing Activates Vagal Afferents to Regulate Non-Shivering Brown Fat Thermogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blouet, Clémence; Schwartz, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous evidence indicates that duodenal lipid sensing engages gut-brain neurocircuits to determine food intake and hepatic glucose production, but a potential role for gut-brain communication in the control of energy expenditure remains to be determined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut–brain–brown adipose tissue neuraxis to regulate thermogenesis. We demonstrate that direct administration of lipids into the duodenum increases brown fat temperature. Co-infusion of the local anesthetic tetracaine with duodenal lipids abolished the lipid-induced increase in brown fat temperature. Systemic administration of the CCKA receptor antagonist devazepide blocked the ability of duodenal lipids to increase brown fat thermogenesis. Parenchymal administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker MK-801 directly into the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract also abolished duodenal lipid-induced activation of brown fat thermogenesis. These findings establish that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut–brain–brown fat axis to determine brown fat temperature, and thereby reveal a previously unappreciated pathway that regulates thermogenesis. PMID:23251649

  13. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  14. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  15. Branched phospholipids render lipid vesicles more susceptible to membrane-active peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Natalie J; Seaton, Pamela; Pokorny, Antje

    2016-05-01

    Iso- and anteiso-branched lipids are abundant in the cytoplasmic membranes of bacteria. Their function is assumed to be similar to that of unsaturated lipids in other organisms - to maintain the membrane in a fluid state. However, the presence of terminally branched membrane lipids is likely to impact other membrane properties as well. For instance, lipid acyl chain structure has been shown to influence the activity of antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents in Staphylococcus aureus is accompanied by a shift in the fatty acid composition toward a higher fraction of anteiso-branched lipids. Little is known about how branched lipids and the location of the branch point affect the activity of membrane-active peptides. We hypothesized that bilayers containing lipids with low phase transition temperatures would tend to exclude peptides and be less susceptible to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from higher temperature melting lipids. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized a series of asymmetric phospholipids that only differ in the type of fatty acid esterified at the sn-2 position of the lipid glycerol backbone. We tested the influence of acyl chain structure on peptide activity by measuring the kinetics of release from dye-encapsulated lipid vesicles made from these synthetic lipids. The results were compared to those obtained using vesicles made from S. aureus and Staphylococcus sciuri membrane lipid extracts. Anteiso-branched phospholipids, which melt at very low temperatures, produced lipid vesicles that were only slightly less susceptible to peptide-induced dye release than those made from the iso-branched isomer. However, liposomes made from bacterial phospholipid extracts were generally much more resistant to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from any of the synthetic lipids. The results suggest that the increase in the fraction of anteiso-branched fatty acids in antibiotic-resistant strains

  16. Effects of different dietary lipid contents on growth and lipase activity of Eriocheir sinensis larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Debin; Pan, Luqing; Fang, Bo

    2011-03-01

    The effects of different dietary lipid content on the growth and lipase activity of Eriocheir sinensis larvae were studied in the paper. The results showed that the survival, metamorphic rate and weight gain of E. sinensis larvae at different stages of growth all varied significantly with lipid content ( P<0.05). Further, the survival and metamorphosis rates were the highest during the larval phases Z3 to Z4, and the weight gain was the highest during the larval phases Z5 to M. During the first 20 h after metamorphosis of every larval stage, the lipase activity increased over time at Z1, Z2, Z3 and M and declined at Z4 and Z5, and was influenced significantly by lipid content ( P<0.05). In addition, lipase activity at each larval stage began to respond to dietary lipid contents 4 h after the larvae were fed, and tended to be stable after 12 h. The diets with higher lipase activity and lower lipid content were selected to give the suitable recipe of lipid requirements at each larval stage. It was concluded that the suitable lipid requirements at Z1, Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5 and M were 6%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 8% and 10%, respectively.

  17. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  18. Anionic Lipids Modulate the Activity of the Aquaglyceroporin GlpF

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Noreen; Hellmann, Nadja; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The structure and composition of a biological membrane can severely influence the activity of membrane-embedded proteins. Here, we show that the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF has only little activity in lipid bilayers formed from native E. coli lipids. Thus, at first glance, GlpF appears to not be optimized for its natural membrane environment. In fact, we found that GlpF activity was severely affected by negatively charged lipids regardless of the exact chemical nature of the lipid headgroup, whereas GlpF was not sensitive to changes in the lateral membrane pressure. These observations illustrate a potential mechanism by which the activity of an α-helical membrane protein is modulated by the negative charge density around the protein. PMID:26287624

  19. Charge Requirements of Lipid II Flippase Activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Emily K.; Tan, Wee Boon; Joseph, Hildy

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an extracytoplasmic glycopeptide matrix essential for the integrity of the envelope of most bacteria. The PG building block is a disaccharide-pentapeptide that is synthesized as a lipid-linked precursor called lipid II. The translocation of the amphipathic lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is required for subsequent incorporation of the disaccharide-pentapeptide into PG. In Escherichia coli, the essential inner membrane protein MurJ is the lipid II flippase. Previous studies showed that 8 charged residues in the central cavity region of MurJ are crucial for function. Here, we completed the functional analysis of all 57 charged residues in MurJ and demonstrated that the respective positive or negative charge of the 8 aforementioned residues is required for proper MurJ function. Loss of the negative charge in one of these residues, D39, causes a severe defect in MurJ biogenesis; by engineering an intragenic suppressor mutation that restores MurJ biogenesis, we found that this charge is also essential for MurJ function. Because of the low level of homology between MurJ and putative orthologs from Gram-positive bacteria, we explored the conservation of these 8 charged residues in YtgP, a homolog from Streptococcus pyogenes. We found that only 3 positive charges are similarly positioned and essential in YtgP; YtgP possesses additional charged residues within its predicted cavity that are essential for function and conserved among Gram-positive bacteria. From these data, we hypothesize that some charged residues in the cavity region of MurJ homologs are required for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport. PMID:25225268

  20. Charge requirements of lipid II flippase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Butler, Emily K; Tan, Wee Boon; Joseph, Hildy; Ruiz, Natividad

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an extracytoplasmic glycopeptide matrix essential for the integrity of the envelope of most bacteria. The PG building block is a disaccharide-pentapeptide that is synthesized as a lipid-linked precursor called lipid II. The translocation of the amphipathic lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is required for subsequent incorporation of the disaccharide-pentapeptide into PG. In Escherichia coli, the essential inner membrane protein MurJ is the lipid II flippase. Previous studies showed that 8 charged residues in the central cavity region of MurJ are crucial for function. Here, we completed the functional analysis of all 57 charged residues in MurJ and demonstrated that the respective positive or negative charge of the 8 aforementioned residues is required for proper MurJ function. Loss of the negative charge in one of these residues, D39, causes a severe defect in MurJ biogenesis; by engineering an intragenic suppressor mutation that restores MurJ biogenesis, we found that this charge is also essential for MurJ function. Because of the low level of homology between MurJ and putative orthologs from Gram-positive bacteria, we explored the conservation of these 8 charged residues in YtgP, a homolog from Streptococcus pyogenes. We found that only 3 positive charges are similarly positioned and essential in YtgP; YtgP possesses additional charged residues within its predicted cavity that are essential for function and conserved among Gram-positive bacteria. From these data, we hypothesize that some charged residues in the cavity region of MurJ homologs are required for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport. PMID:25225268

  1. Microbial lipids and stable foam formation in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Goddard, A J; Forster, C F

    1991-01-01

    The presence of fats and oils in sewage has been related to the formation of stable foams in activated sludge treatment systems. Foam forming microbes can utilise and, in some cases, store lipid substrates. Since surface lipids would confer the hydrophobicity necessary for flotation on the sludge biomass, the extractable lipids in foaming and non-foaming biomass samples were examined. Both pure mono-cultures and sludge samples were used. The results showed that, whilst there were some differences in the lipid profiles of the mono-cultures, the different sludge types did not show any significant pattern or variation which could be used as a lipid-based explanation for foam formation. PMID:1907713

  2. [Effect of alkylresorcin on biological membranes during activation of lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Erin, A N; Davitashvili, N G; Prilipko, L L; Boldyrev, A A; Lushchak, V I

    1987-07-01

    The effect of alkyl resorcin isolated from the cells of Azotobacter chroococcum and of its structural analog devoid of the alkyl chain (resorcin) on liver microsomes and brain synaptosomes of the rat as well as on rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum fragments during activation of lipid peroxidation was studied. Alkyl resorcin was shown to produce a much more potent antioxidant effect as compared with resorcin, since it inhibited lipid peroxidation in all the three types of membranes under study at much lower concentrations. Both alkyl resorcin and resorcin which inhibit lipid peroxidation prevented lipid peroxidation-induced structural-functional damages of synaptosomal and sarcoplasmic reticulum fragment membranes. Unlike resorcin, alkyl resorcin exerted an additional effect on brain synaptosomal membranes which consisted in the stabilization of barrier functions of membranes during incomplete inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The cumulative data suggest that stabilization necessitates the presence of both resorcin radical and alkyl chain in the alkyl resorcin molecule. PMID:3663757

  3. NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation inhibit aromatase activity in human placental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Milczarek, Ryszard; Sokołowska, Ewa; Hallmann, Anna; Kaletha, Krystian; Klimek, Jerzy

    2008-06-01

    During pregnancy placenta is the most significant source of lipid hydroperoxides and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased production of lipid peroxides and other ROS is often linked to pre-eclampsia. It is already proved that placental endoplasmic reticulum may be an important place of lipid peroxides and superoxide radical production. In the present study we revealed that NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in human placental microsomes (HPM) inhibit placental aromatase--a key enzyme of estrogen biosynthesis in human placenta. We showed that significant inhibition of this enzyme is caused by small lipid peroxidation (TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances)<4nmol/mg microsomal protein (m.p.)). More intensive lipid peroxidation (TBARS>9nmol/mg microsomal protein) diminishes aromatase activity to value being less than 5% of initial value. NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation also causes disappearance of cytochrome P450 parallel to observed aromatase activity inhibition. EDTA, alpha-tocopherol, MgCl(2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevent aromatase activity inhibition and cytochrome P450(AROM) degradation. Mannitol and catalase have not effect on TBARS synthesis, aromatase activity and cytochrome P450 degradation. In view of the above we postulate that the inhibition of aromatase activity observed is mainly a consequence of cytochrome P450(AROM) degradation induced by lipid radicals. The role of hydroxyl radical in cytochrome P450 degradation is negligible in our experimental conditions. The results presented here also suggest that the inhibition of aromatase activity can also take place in placenta at in vivo conditions. PMID:18499441

  4. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  5. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Peiretti@medecine.univ-mrs.fr

    2006-12-10

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts.

  6. Effect of mycolic acid on surface activity of binary surfactant lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2008-12-15

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis lies in close physical proximity to alveolar surfactant. Cell walls of the mycobacteria contain loosely bound, detachable surface-active lipids. In this study, the effect of mycolic acid (MA), the most abundant mycobacterial cell wall lipid, on the surface activity of phospholipid mixtures from lung surfactant was investigated using Langmuir monolayers and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of mycolic acid, all the surfactant lipid mixtures attained high minimum surface tensions (between 20 and 40 mN/m) and decreased surface compressibility moduli <50 mN/m. AFM images showed that the smooth surface topography of surfactant lipid monolayers was altered with addition of MA. Aggregates with diverse heights of at least two layer thicknesses were found in the presence of mycolic acid. Mycolic acids could aggregate within surfactant lipid monolayers and result in disturbed monolayer surface activity. The extent of the effect of mycolic acid depended on the initial state of the monolayer, with fluid films of DPPC-POPC and DPPC-CHOL being least affected. The results imply inhibitory effects of mycolic acid toward lung surfactant lipids and could be a mechanism of lung surfactant dysfunction in pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:18848703

  7. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  8. Lipid Rafts Alter the Stability and Activity of the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Supriyo; Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) travels from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an AB holotoxin. ER-specific conditions then promote the dissociation of the catalytic CTA1 subunit from the rest of the toxin. CTA1 is held in a stable conformation by its assembly in the CT holotoxin, but the dissociated CTA1 subunit is an unstable protein that spontaneously assumes a disordered state at physiological temperature. This unfolding event triggers the ER-to-cytosol translocation of CTA1 through the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation. The translocated pool of CTA1 must regain a folded, active structure to modify its G protein target which is located in lipid rafts at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Here, we report that lipid rafts place disordered CTA1 in a functional conformation. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of CTA1 is essential for binding to the plasma membrane and lipid rafts. These interactions inhibit the temperature-induced unfolding of CTA1. Moreover, lipid rafts could promote a gain of structure in the disordered, 37 °C conformation of CTA1. This gain of structure corresponded to a gain of function: whereas CTA1 by itself exhibited minimal in vitro activity at 37 °C, exposure to lipid rafts resulted in substantial toxin activity at 37 °C. In vivo, the disruption of lipid rafts with filipin substantially reduced the activity of cytosolic CTA1. Lipid rafts thus exhibit a chaperone-like function that returns disordered CTA1 to an active state and is required for the optimal in vivo activity of CTA1. PMID:22787142

  9. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  10. Lipids Regulate Lck Protein Activity through Their Interactions with the Lck Src Homology 2 Domain.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ren; Jung, Da-Jung; Silkov, Antonina; Kim, Hyunjin; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Eui; Park, Mi-Jeong; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Smrt, Sean; Honig, Barry; Baek, Kwanghee; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-08-19

    Lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays an essential role in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell development, but its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To explore the possibility that plasma membrane (PM) lipids control TCR signaling activities of Lck, we measured the membrane binding properties of its regulatory Src homology 2 (SH2) and Src homology 3 domains. The Lck SH2 domain binds anionic PM lipids with high affinity but with low specificity. Electrostatic potential calculation, NMR analysis, and mutational studies identified the lipid-binding site of the Lck SH2 domain that includes surface-exposed basic, aromatic, and hydrophobic residues but not the phospho-Tyr binding pocket. Mutation of lipid binding residues greatly reduced the interaction of Lck with the ζ chain in the activated TCR signaling complex and its overall TCR signaling activities. These results suggest that PM lipids, including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, modulate interaction of Lck with its binding partners in the TCR signaling complex and its TCR signaling activities in a spatiotemporally specific manner via its SH2 domain. PMID:27334919

  11. Arsenic-lipid complex formatinon during the active transport of arsenate in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cerbón, J

    1969-02-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of (74)As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. (74)As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10(-9)m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10(-2)m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  12. Arsenic-Lipid Complex Formation During the Active Transport of Arsenate in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cerbón, Jorge

    1969-01-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of 74As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. 74As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10−9m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10−2m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  13. Brown Adipose Tissue Activation Is Linked to Distinct Systemic Effects on Lipid Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K; Annamalai, Palam; Yfanti, Christina; Chao, Tony; Wong, Daniel; Shinoda, Kosaku; Labbė, Sebastien M; Hurren, Nicholas M; Cesani, Fernardo; Kajimura, Shingo; Sidossis, Labros S

    2016-06-14

    Recent studies suggest that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a role in energy and glucose metabolism in humans. However, the physiological significance of human BAT in lipid metabolism remains unknown. We studied 16 overweight/obese men during prolonged, non-shivering cold and thermoneutral conditions using stable isotopic tracer methodologies in conjunction with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) biopsies. BAT volume was significantly associated with increased whole-body lipolysis, triglyceride-free fatty acid (FFA) cycling, FFA oxidation, and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. Functional analysis of BAT and WAT demonstrated the greater thermogenic capacity of BAT compared to WAT, while molecular analysis revealed a cold-induced upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism only in BAT. The accelerated mobilization and oxidation of lipids upon BAT activation supports a putative role for BAT in the regulation of lipid metabolism in humans. PMID:27238638

  14. Opportunistic activation of TRP receptors by endogenous lipids: Exploiting lipidomics to understand TRP receptor cellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Heather B.; Raboune, Siham; Hollis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) form a large family of ubiquitous non-selective cation channels that function as cellular sensors and in many cases regulate intracellular calcium. Identification of the endogenous ligands that activate these TRP receptors is still under intense investigation with the majority of these channels still remaining “orphans”. That these channels respond to a variety of external stimuli (e.g. plant-derived lipids, changes in temperature, and changes in pH) provides a framework for their abilities as cellular sensors, however, the mechanism of direct activation is still under much debate and research. In the cases where endogenous ligands (predominately lipids) have shown direct activation of a channel, multiple ligands have been shown to activate the same channel suggesting that these receptors are “promiscuous” in nature. Lipidomics of a growing class of endogenous lipids, N-acyl amides, the most famous of which is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (the endogenous cannabinoid, Anandamide) is providing a novel set of ligands that have been shown to activate some members of the TRP family and have the potential to deorphanize many more. Here it is argued that activation of TRPV receptors, a subset of the larger family of TRPs, by multiple endogenous lipids that are structurally analogous is a model system to drive our understanding that many TRP receptors are not promiscuous, but are more characteristically “opportunistic” in nature; exploiting the structural similarity and biosynthesis of a narrow range of analogous endogenous lipids. In addition, this manuscript will compare the activation properties of TRPC5 to the activity profile of an “orphan” lipid, N-palmitoyl glycine; further demonstrating that lipidomics aimed at expanding our knowledge of the family of N-acyl amides has the potential to provide novel avenues of research for TRP receptors. PMID:23178153

  15. Antioxidant and anti-lipid peroxidation activities of Tamarindus indica seed coat in human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Nakchat, Oranuch; Meksuriyen, Duangdeun; Pongsamart, Sunanta

    2014-02-01

    Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of tamarind seed coat extracts (TSCEs) were compared between the two extracts using boiling-water (TSCE-W) and 70% ethanol (TSCE-E) for extraction. TSCE-W, consisting of the highest phenolic content, possessed 2,2-diphenyl-1 -picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and anti-lipid peroxidation activities much higher than TSCE-E and Trolox. Additionally, both TSCEs also exhibited superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities higher than Trolox and BHA. Anti-lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity of TSCE-W were also studied in human foreskin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells. Cytotoxic effect was not observed when exposed to TSCE-W up to 1 mg/mL for 12-48 h. However, TSCE-W significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation in H202-damaged cells. HPLC analysis showed the presence of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and procyanidin B2 in TSCE-W, which could be responsible for antioxidant and anti-lipid peroxidation activities. The results suggest that an inexpensive and simple boiling-water extraction of TSCE-W may provide a valuable natural antioxidant source having anti-lipid peroxidation for health food additives, nutraceuticals as well as cosmeceuticals. PMID:24597144

  16. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Seki, Ekihiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi; Adachi, Masayuki; Ito, Hiroyasu; Shiratori, Yoshimune; Banno, Yoshiko; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Nagaki, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Brenner, David A.; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Because sphingolipids regulate AKT activation, we investigated the role of ASM in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. Initially, we overexpressed ASM in the livers of wild-type and diabetic db/db mice by adenovirus vector (Ad5ASM). In these mice, glucose tolerance was improved, and glycogen and lipid accumulation in the liver were increased. Using primary cultured hepatocytes, we confirmed that ASM increased glucose uptake, glycogen deposition, and lipid accumulation through activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In addition, ASM induced up-regulation of glucose transporter 2 accompanied by suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Loss of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) diminished ASM-mediated AKT phosphorylation, but exogenous S1P induced AKT activation in hepatocytes. In contrast, SphK1 deficiency did not affect AMPK activation. These results suggest that the SphK/S1P pathway is required for ASM-mediated AKT activation but not for AMPK inactivation. Finally, we found that treatment with high-dose glucose increased glycogen deposition and lipid accumulation in wild-type hepatocytes but not in ASM−/− cells. This result is consistent with glucose intolerance in ASM−/− mice. In conclusion, ASM modulates AKT activation and AMPK inactivation, thus regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver.—Osawa, Y., Seki, E., Kodama, Y., Suetsugu, A., Miura, K., Adachi, M., Ito, H., Shiratori, Y., Banno, Y., Olefsky, J. M., Nagaki, M., Moriwaki, H., Brenner, D. A., Seishima, M. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression. PMID:21163859

  17. Control of Inward Rectifier K Channel Activity by Lipid Tethering of Cytoplasmic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Enkvetchakul, Decha; Jeliazkova, Iana; Bhattacharyya, Jaya; Nichols, Colin G.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between nontransmembrane domains and the lipid membrane are proposed to modulate activity of many ion channels. In Kir channels, the so-called “slide-helix” is proposed to interact with the lipid headgroups and control channel gating. We examined this possibility directly in a cell-free system consisting of KirBac1.1 reconstituted into pure lipid vesicles. Cysteine substitution of positively charged slide-helix residues (R49C and K57C) leads to loss of channel activity that is rescued by in situ restoration of charge following modification by MTSET+ or MTSEA+, but not MTSES− or neutral MMTS. Strikingly, activity is also rescued by modification with long-chain alkyl-MTS reagents. Such reagents are expected to partition into, and hence tether the side chain to, the membrane. Systematic scanning reveals additional slide-helix residues that are activated or inhibited following alkyl-MTS modification. A pattern emerges whereby lipid tethering of the N terminus, or C terminus, of the slide-helix, respectively inhibits, or activates, channel activity. This study establishes a critical role of the slide-helix in Kir channel gating, and directly demonstrates that physical interaction of soluble domains with the membrane can control ion channel activity. PMID:17698595

  18. Extracellular cellobiose lipid from yeast and their analogues: structures and fungicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskaya, Tatyana; Shashkov, Alexander; Kulakovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Wladyslav; Zinin, Alexander; Tsvetkov, Yury; Grachev, Alexey; Nifantiev, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    Basidiomycetous yeasts Cryptococcus humicola and Pseudozyma fusiformata secrete cellobiose lipids into the culture broth. In the case of Cr. humicola, 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was defined as major product and 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydrohexadecanoic acid was defined as minor product, while Ps. fusiformata secreted mainly 16-[6-O-acetyl-2'-O-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. These compounds exhibit similar fungicidal activities against different yeasts including pathogenic Cryptococcus and Candida species. The cells of Filobasidiella neoformans causing systemic cryptococcosis completely died after 30-min incubation with 0.02 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids. The same effect on ascomycetous yeast, including pathogenic Candida species, is achieved at 0.1-0.3 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids depending on the test culture used. Cellobiose lipid of Ps. fusiformata inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phomopsis helianthi more efficiently than cellobiose lipids from Cr. humicola. Fully O-deacylated analogue, namely 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid, and totally synthetic compound, 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-hexadecanoic acid, do not inhibit the growth of F. neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid inhibits the growth of both test cultures but at higher concentrations than cellobiose lipids of Cr. humicola and Ps. fusiformata. The amide of 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid possessed no fungicide activity. Thus, the structures of both the carbohydrate part and fatty acid aglycon moiety are important for the fungicidal activity of cellobiose lipids. PMID:19202311

  19. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  20. Paraoxonase Activity and Lipid Profile in Paediatric Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anuradha B.; Patil, Vidya S.; Ingleshwar, Deepti G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyslipidaemia of Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) is known to be linked to oxidative reactions and atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase (PON1) has been implicated in the prevention of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) lipid peroxidation and also degrades biologically active oxidised lipids in lipoprotein. Aim The present study was taken up to assess PON1 levels in paediatric nephrotic syndrome and also to see if any correlation exists between lipid parameters and PON1. Materials and Methods This study consists of Group 1 with 40 cases of NS in the age group of 2-14 years and Group 2 with 40 age and sex matched healthy controls. Lipid profile and paraoxonase activity was measured in serum samples of both the groups. Results Statistical analysis by student’s t-test showed that the mean levels of Total Cholesterol, Trigylycerides, LDL, and VLDL were significantly increased in Group 1 when compared to Group 2 (p <0.001). The mean levels of HDL were similar in both groups. The levels of PON1 were significantly lowered in Group 1 when compared to Group 2. Correlation studies showed no significant correlation between lipid profile and PON1. Conclusion Cases have atherosclerotic dyslipidaemia and significantly decreased PON1 activity. Decreased PON1 may lead to increased oxidation of LDL accelerating the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:27134858

  1. Anti lipid peroxidation activity of Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Dinakaran, Sathis Kumar; Saraswathi, Narasimha Raju; Nalini, Venkata Rama Rao; Srisudharson; Bodanapu, Venkat Ram Reddy; Avasarala, Harani; Banji, David

    2011-07-01

    Attempt has been made to evaluate free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extract of Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. individually. In this study goat liver has been used as lipid source. This in vitro evaluation was done by measuring the malondialdehyde (MDA) of tissue homogenates. The results suggest that the ethanolic extract of the Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. has the ability to suppress the lipid peroxidation and it was also found that Piper trioicum Roxb. extract has more activity than Physalis minima L. extract. PMID:21715277

  2. Phenolic Lipids Affect the Activity and Conformation of Acetylcholinesterase from Electrophorus electricus (Electric eel)

    PubMed Central

    Stasiuk, Maria; Janiszewska, Alicja; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic lipids were isolated from rye grains, cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL) from Anacardium occidentale, and fruit bodies of Merrulius tremellosus, and their effects on the electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity and conformation were studied. The observed effect distinctly depended on the chemical structure of the phenolic lipids that were available for interaction with the enzyme. All of the tested compounds reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase. The degree of inhibition varied, showing a correlation with changes in the conformation of the enzyme tested by the intrinsic fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. PMID:24787269

  3. Improved tumor targeting and antitumor activity of camptothecin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by preinjection of blank solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Moon, Cheol; Oh, Euichaul

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to enhance the in vivo antitumor effects of camptothecin (CPT), a strong antitumor agent whose delivery is limited by poor aqueous solubility and instability of the active lactone form. CPT was loaded into sterically stabilized, solid lipid nanoparticles (CPT-SLNs) formulated for intravenous administration. The influence of preinjected blank SLNs on the tumor targeting, pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of CPT-SLNs was investigated. The CPT-SLNs composed of trilaurin-based lipid matrix containing poloxamer188 and pegylated phospholipid as stabilizers were prepared by hot homogenization method and evaluated for in vitro characteristics and in vivo performance. The CPT-SLNs showed an in vitro long-term sustained release pattern and effectively protected the CPT lactone form from hydrolysis under physiological conditions. Notable tumor targeting and tumor growth inhibition were observed after intravenous administration of CPT-SLNs to mice with subcutaneous transplants of CT26 carcinoma cells. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, CPT-SLNs markedly elevated plasma CPT level and prolonged blood circulation compared to free CPT. Nonetheless, high uptake of CPT-SLNs by reticuloendothelial system (RES)-rich tissues resulted in limited tumor targeting of CPT-SLNs and plasma CPT levels. Preinjection of blank SLNs before administration of CPT-SLNs to tumor-bearing mice substantially reduced the accumulation of CPT-SLNs in RES organs. This led to significantly enhanced tumor targeting, improved pharmacokinetic parameters and increased antitumor efficacy of CPT-SLNs. These results suggested that the in vivo antitumor effects of CPT-SLNs could be further enhanced by preinjection of blank SLNs. Therefore, CPT-SLNs with preinjected blank SLNs could be a potential approach for stable and effective CPT-based cancer therapy. PMID:27133053

  4. Effects of lipid composition on the membrane activity and lipid phase behaviour of Vibrio sp. DSM14379 cells grown at various NaCl concentrations.

    PubMed

    Danevcic, Tjasa; Rilfors, Leif; Strancar, Janez; Lindblom, Göran; Stopar, David

    2005-06-15

    The membrane lipid composition of living cells generally adjusts to the prevailing environmental and physiological conditions. In this study, membrane activity and lipid composition of the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio sp. DSM14379, grown aerobically in a peptone-yeast extract medium supplemented with 0.5, 1.76, 3, 5 or 10% (w/v) NaCl, was determined. The ability of the membrane to reduce a spin label was studied by EPR spectroscopy under different salt concentrations in cell suspensions labeled with TEMPON. For lipid composition studies, cells were harvested in a late exponential phase and lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol-water, 1:2:0.8 (v/v). The lipid polar head group and acyl chain compositions were determined by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographies. (31)P-NMR spectroscopy was used to study the phase behaviour of the cell lipid extracts with 20 wt.% water contents in a temperature range from -10 to 50 degrees C. The results indicate that the ability of the membrane to reduce the spin label was highest at optimal salt concentrations. The composition of both polar head groups and acyl chains changed markedly with increasing salinity. The fractions of 16:0, 16:1 and 18:0 acyl chains increased while the fraction of 18:1 acyl chains decreased with increasing salinity. The phosphatidylethanolamine fraction correlated inversely with the lysophosphatidylethanolamine fraction, with phosphatidylethanolamine exhibiting a minimum, and lysophosphatidylethanolamine a maximum, at the optimum growth rate. The fraction of lysophosphatidylethanolamine was surprisingly high in the lipid extracts. This lipid can form normal micellar and hexagonal phases and it was found that all lipid extracts form a mixture of lamellar and normal isotropic liquid crystalline phases. This is an anomalous behaviour since the nonlamellar phases formed by total lipid extracts are generally of the reversed type. PMID:15878424

  5. Activation of protein kinase C by the lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, P.D.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) was partially purified from the RAW264.7 macrophage-like cell and characterized by its activation by phosphatidylserine (PS) in the presence of calcium and its insensitivity to cyclic nucleotides or calmodulin. This PKC can also be activated by the acidic lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS lipids activate PKC in the absence of PS and, like PS, synergize with diacylglycerol (DAG). Intact RAW264.7 cells were prelabelled with /sup 32/Pi and treated with the well characterized PKC ligands, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or DAG. The phosphoproteins thereby induced were separated in 2-D gels and visualized by autoradiography. These phosphoproteins were used as standards to identify the PKC-associated phosphoproteins induced in these cells using other stimulators. The authors demonstrate that the LPS lipids as well as LPS itself induce the formation of phosphoproteins common to those induced by PMA or DAG. PMA, DAG, the LPS lipids, and LPS itself activate the RAW264.7 cell and stimulate the release of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ at the same concentration that stimulate new protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the activation of PKC is an early event in the activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage by LPS.

  6. Antibody-independent activation of the classical pathway of human serum complement by lipid A is restricted to re-chemotype lipopolysaccharide and purified lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Vukajlovich, S W

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of most bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with normal human sera at 37 degrees C activates the serum complement system, resulting in decreased levels of hemolytic complement. A panel of R-chemotype LPS preparations isolated from Salmonella minnesota rough mutant strains, as well as smooth wild-type LPS from S. minnesota, Escherichia coli O55-B5, Serratia marcescens, and Yersinia enterolitica, were used to examine the effect of LPS polysaccharide chain length on LPS lipid (lipid A)-dependent activation of the classical pathway of complement (CPC). To examine specific lipid A-dependent activation of the CPC, sera deficient in alternative pathway of complement activity were prepared by the removal of factor D. Absorption of normal human sera with formalinized rabbit erythrocytes was found to remove natural antibodies, factors capable of forming LPS complexes which activate the CPC, or both. By using such factor D-depleted formalinized rabbit erythrocyte-absorbed normal human sera, only isolated lipid A and Re-chemotype LPS (R595 LPS) were found to activate the CPC. Thus, the presence of the additional monosaccharide L-glycero-D-mannoheptose in the Rd2 LPS oligosaccharide chain compared with the L-glycero-D-mannoheptose-deficient Re-chemotype LPS structure is sufficient to block lipid A-dependent activation of the CPC by LPS. PMID:3744547

  7. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form.

  8. Catanionic lipid nanosystems improve pharmacokinetics and anti-lung cancer activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Li, Songlin; Fang, Chunshu; Zhang, Jingqing; Liu, Bilin; Wei, Zhuanqin; Fan, Xiaoqing; Sui, Zheng; Tan, Qunyou

    2016-08-01

    Novel catanionic lipid nanosystems (CLNs) incorporating curcumin (CCM) were developed, and improvements in pharmacokinetics and enhanced anti-lung cancer activity were observed. CCM was present in a lipid matrix surrounded by cationic, anionic and zwitterionic surfactants, forming the core-shell nanosystems. Compared with free CCM, the CCM-CLNs had much higher oral and intravenous bioavailabilities due to enhanced absorption and reduced clearance. The CCM-CLNs exhibited greater cytotoxicity in Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells, which might have been due to increased antiproliferative, proapoptotic and anti-invasive activities and induction of cell cycle arrest. The CCM-CLNs increased the antitumor efficacy of CCM and decreased the tumor growth rate in tumor-bearing mice. This is the first report of induction of apoptosis in LLC cells by CCM through the PI3K/Akt/FoxO1/Bim signaling pathway. Catanionic lipid nanocarriers show promise for the therapeutic delivery of insoluble anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26995093

  9. Lipid constituents of the edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus demonstrate anti-Candida activity.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; Lee, Guan-Serm; Macreadie, Ian G; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd; Pamela, David; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2013-12-01

    Different solvent extracts of Pleurotus giganteus fruiting bodies were tested for antifungal activities against Candida species responsible for human infections. The lipids extracted from the ethyl acetate fraction significantly inhibited the growth of all the Candida species tested. Analysis by GC/MS revealed lipid components such as fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, ergosterol, and ergosterol derivatives. The sample with high amounts of fatty acid methyl esters was the most effective antifungal agent. The samples were not cytotoxic to a mammalian cell line, mouse embryonic fibroblasts BALB/c 3T3 clone A31. To our knowledge, this is the first report of antifungal activity of the lipid components of Pleurotus giganteus against Candida species. PMID:24555294

  10. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery.

    PubMed

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-22

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form. PMID:24164775

  11. A novel cationic lipid with intrinsic antitumor activity to facilitate gene therapy of TRAIL DNA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Miao, Lei; Zhao, Yi; Musetti, Sara; Wang, Yuhua; Shi, Kai; Huang, Leaf

    2016-09-01

    Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has been found to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of cancer. Herein, a novel lipid (1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-biguanide-propane (DOBP)) was elaborately designed by utilizing biguanide as the cationic head group. This novel cationic lipid was intended to act as a gene carrier with intrinsic antitumor activity. When compared with 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), a commercially available cationic lipid with a similar structure, the blank liposomes consisting of DOBP showed much more potent antitumor effects than DOTAP in human lung tumor xenografts, following an antitumor mechanism similar to metformin. Given its cationic head group, biguanide, DOBP could encapsulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plasmids into Lipid-Protamine-DNA (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic gene delivery. DOBP-LPD-TRAIL NPs demonstrated distinct superiority in delaying tumor progression over DOTAP-LPD-TRAIL NPs, due to the intrinsic antitumor activity combined with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumor. These results indicate that DOBP could be used as a versatile and promising cationic lipid for improving the therapeutic index of gene therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27344367

  12. Bidirectional control of sphingomyelinase activity and surface topography in lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Fanani, María Laura; Härtel, Steffen; Oliveira, Rafael G; Maggio, Bruno

    2002-12-01

    Lipid lateral organization is increasingly found to modulate membrane-bound enzymes. We followed in real time the reaction course of sphingomyelin (SM) degradation by Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) of lipid monolayers by epifluorescence microscopy. There is evidence that formation of ceramide (Cer), a lipid second messenger, drives structural reorganization of membrane lipids. Our results provide visual evidence that SMase activity initially alters surface topography by inducing phase separation into condensed (Cer-enriched) and expanded (SM-enriched) domains. The Cer-enriched phase grows steadily as the reaction proceeds at a constant rate. The surface topography derived from the SMase-driven reaction was compared with, and found to differ from, that of premixed SM/Cer monolayers of the same lipid composition, indicating that substantial information content is stored depending on the manner in which the surface was generated. The long-range topographic changes feed back on the kinetics of Smase, and the onset of condensed-phase percolation is temporally correlated with a rapid drop of reaction rate. These observations reveal a bidirectional influence and communication between effects taking place at the local molecular level and the supramolecular organization. The results suggest a novel biocatalytic-topographic mechanism in which a surface enzymatic activity can influence the function of amphitropic proteins important for cell function. PMID:12496108

  13. V-ATPase and osmotic imbalances activate endolysosomal LC3 lipidation.

    PubMed

    Florey, Oliver; Gammoh, Noor; Kim, Sung Eun; Jiang, Xuejun; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recently a noncanonical activity of autophagy proteins has been discovered that targets lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) onto macroendocytic vacuoles, including macropinosomes, phagosomes, and entotic vacuoles. While this pathway is distinct from canonical autophagy, the mechanism of how these nonautophagic membranes are targeted for LC3 lipidation remains unclear. Here we present evidence that this pathway requires activity of the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) and is induced by osmotic imbalances within endolysosomal compartments. LC3 lipidation by this mechanism is induced by treatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine, and through exposure to the Heliobacter pylori pore-forming toxin VacA. These data add novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of noncanonical LC3 lipidation and its associated processes, including LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), and demonstrate that the widely and therapeutically used drug chloroquine, which is conventionally used to inhibit autophagy flux, is an inducer of LC3 lipidation. PMID:25484071

  14. Bidirectional control of sphingomyelinase activity and surface topography in lipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Fanani, María Laura; Härtel, Steffen; Oliveira, Rafael G; Maggio, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Lipid lateral organization is increasingly found to modulate membrane-bound enzymes. We followed in real time the reaction course of sphingomyelin (SM) degradation by Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) of lipid monolayers by epifluorescence microscopy. There is evidence that formation of ceramide (Cer), a lipid second messenger, drives structural reorganization of membrane lipids. Our results provide visual evidence that SMase activity initially alters surface topography by inducing phase separation into condensed (Cer-enriched) and expanded (SM-enriched) domains. The Cer-enriched phase grows steadily as the reaction proceeds at a constant rate. The surface topography derived from the SMase-driven reaction was compared with, and found to differ from, that of premixed SM/Cer monolayers of the same lipid composition, indicating that substantial information content is stored depending on the manner in which the surface was generated. The long-range topographic changes feed back on the kinetics of Smase, and the onset of condensed-phase percolation is temporally correlated with a rapid drop of reaction rate. These observations reveal a bidirectional influence and communication between effects taking place at the local molecular level and the supramolecular organization. The results suggest a novel biocatalytic-topographic mechanism in which a surface enzymatic activity can influence the function of amphitropic proteins important for cell function. PMID:12496108

  15. Stability and in vitro antiproliferative activity of bioactive "Vitamin E" fortified parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Kanthala, Shanthi; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Anderson, John F; Sylvester, Paul W; Nazzal, Sami

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to engineer physically stable "Vitamin E" rich intravenous lipid emulsions and to evaluate their in vitro antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 (human mammary adenocarcinoma) and SW-620 (human colon adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Emulsions loaded with 70% vitamin E by total weight of the oil phase were stabilized with secondary emulsifiers and tested for their hemolytic effect and their plasma and electrolyte stability. Emulsions stabilized with sodium oleate and sodium deoxycholate were sensitive to electrolytes and exhibited significant hemolytic effect. On the other hand, addition of 2.5% poloxamer was found to stabilize the emulsions against electrolytes and physical stress, which was attributed to the steric effect of their polyoxyethylene (POE) head group. When tested for their antiproliferative effects, poloxamer-stabilized tocotrienol lipid emulsions were found to exhibit significantly higher anticancer activity than lipid emulsions enriched with tocopherol alone. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of tocotrienols lipid emulsions against MCF-7 and SW-620 were 14 and 12 μM, respectively, whereas the IC(50s) of tocopherol lipid emulsions were approximately 69 and 78 μM against MCF-7 and SW-620 cells, respectively. PMID:23201715

  16. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase-gamma induces Xenopus oocyte maturation via lipid kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, S; Stoyanov, B; Oehrl, W; Schönherr, R; Wetzker, R; Heinemann, S H

    2001-01-01

    Type-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) were characterized as a group of intracellular signalling proteins expressing both protein and lipid kinase activities. Recent studies implicate PI3Ks as mediators of oocyte maturation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system as a model to investigate a possible contribution of the gamma-isoform of PI3K (PI3Kgamma) in the different pathways leading to cell-cycle progression by monitoring the time course of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). Expression of a constitutive active PI3Kgamma (PI3Kgamma-CAAX) induced GVBD and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, PI3Kgamma-CAAX accelerated progesterone-induced GVBD, but had no effect on GVBD induced by insulin. The effects of PI3Kgamma-CAAX could be suppressed by pre-incubation of the oocytes with LY294002, PD98059 or roscovitine, inhibitors of PI3K, MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) and cdc2/cyclin B kinase, respectively. Mutants of PI3Kgamma-CAAX, in which either lipid kinase or both lipid and protein kinase activities were altered or eliminated, did not induce significant GVBD. Our data demonstrate that expression of PI3Kgamma in Xenopus oocytes accelerates their progesterone-induced maturation and that lipid kinase activity is required to induce this effect. PMID:11736661

  17. [Effect of pantethine on post-heparin lipolytic activity and lipid peroxidation in the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Kumerova, A O; Silova, A A; Utno, L Ia

    1991-01-01

    In the present work the effect of the precursor of Co a D-bis (N- pantothenyl-beta-aminoethyl) disulfide--pantethine on post heparin lipolytic activity and the intensity of lipid peroxidation has been investigated. Pantethine in doses of 5 mg/kg enhanced post heparin lipolytic activity (60.6%) and lipoprotein lipase activity (39.9%) in plasma and reduced the amount of NEFA (35.1%) and content of MDA (57.4%) in the mitochondria. PMID:2054471

  18. Inhibitory effect of some natural and semisynthetic phenolic lipids upon acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Stasiuk, Maria; Bartosiewicz, Dominika; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2008-06-01

    The effect of phenolic lipids isolated from rye grains and cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) from Anacardium occidentale and their semisynthetic derivatives on erythrocyte ghost's acetylcholinesterase activity was studied. It has been shown that all tested compounds decreased the enzymatic activity of acetylcholinesterase. This effect depends on the type of studied compounds. Three of them completely inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity at the micromolar concentration. PMID:26065763

  19. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  20. Hydration in Lipid Monolayers: Correlation of Water Activity and Surface Pressure.

    PubMed

    Disalvo, E Anibal; Hollmann, Axel; Martini, M Florencia

    2015-01-01

    In order to give a physical meaning to each region of the membrane we define the interphase as the region in a lipid membrane corresponding to the polar head groups imbibed in water with net different properties than the hydrocarbon region and the water phase. The interphase region is analyzed under the scope of thermodynamics of surface and solutions based on the definition of Defay-Prigogine of an interphase and the derivation that it has in the understanding of membrane processeses in the context of biological response. In the view of this approach, the complete monolayer is considered as the lipid layer one molecule thick plus the bidimensional solution of the polar head groups inherent to it (the interphase region). Surface water activity appears as a common factor for the interaction of several aqueous soluble and surface active proteins with lipid membranes of different composition. Protein perturbation can be measured by changes in the surface pressure of lipid monolayers at different initial water surface activities. As predicted by solution chemistry, the increase of surface pressure is independent of the particle nature that dissolves. Therefore, membranes give a similar response in terms of the determined surface states given by water activity independent of the protein or peptide. PMID:26438267

  1. Acyl lipidation of a peptide: effects on activity and epidermal permeability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Daniel; Ross, James; Murray, Paul E; Caccetta, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain lipid conjugates can increase permeability of a small peptide across human epidermis; however, the emerging lipoaminoacid (LAA) conjugation technique is costly and can deliver mixed synthetic products of varied biological potential. LAA conjugation using a racemic mixture produces a mixture of D- and L-stereoisomers. Individual enantiomers can be produced at an extra cost. We investigated an affordable technique that produces only one synthetic product: short-chain (C7–C8) acyl lipidation. Acyl lipidation of Ala-Ala-Pro-Val, an inhibitor of human neutrophil elastase (HNE; believed to lead to abnormal tissue destruction and disease development), was investigated as an alternative to LAA conjugation. The current study aimed to assess the effects of acyl lipidation (either at the N-terminal or at the C-terminal) on neutrophil elastase activity in vitro and on transdermal delivery ex vivo. The inhibitory capacity of the acyl conjugates was compared to LAA conjugates (conjugated at the N-terminal) of the same peptide. The L-stereoisomer appears to rapidly degrade, but it represents a significantly (P<0.05) better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val). Although the D-stereoisomer appears to permeate human epidermal skin sections in a better fashion than the L-stereoisomer, it is not a significantly better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide. Acyl lipidation (with a C7 lipid chain) at either end of the peptide substantially enhances the permeability of the peptide across human skin epidermis as well as significantly (P<0.005) increases its elastase inhibitory potential. Therefore, our current study indicates that acyl lipidation of a peptide is a more economical and effective alternative to LAA conjugation. PMID:27468224

  2. Polydatin improves glucose and lipid metabolism in experimental diabetes through activating the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Chen, Cheng; Huang, Kaipeng; Huang, Junying; Li, Jie; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2014-12-15

    Recently, the effect of polydatin on lipid regulation has gained considerable attention. And previous study has demonstrated that polydatin has hypoglycemic effect on experimental diabetic rats. Repressed Akt pathway contributes to glucose and lipid disorders in diabetes. Thus, whether polydatin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in experimental diabetic models through the Akt pathway arouses interest. The purpose was to explore the regulatory mechanism of polydain on glucose and lipid through Akt pathway. We used a diabetic rat model induced by high-fat and -sugar diet with low-dose of streptozocin and an insulin resistant HepG2 cell model induced by palmitic acid to clarify the role of polydatin on glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we found that polydatin significantly attenuated fasting blood–glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, glycosylated serum protein, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in diabetic rats. Furthermore, polydatin significantly increased glucose uptake and consumption and decreased lipid accumulation in insulin resistant HepG2 cells. Polydatin markedly increased serum insulin levels in diabetic rats, and obviously activated the Akt signaling pathway in diabetic rat livers and insulin resistant HepG2 cells. Polydatin markedly increased phosphorylated GSK-3β, decreased the protein levels of G6Pase and SREBP-1c, and increased protein levels of GCK, LDLR, and phosphorylated IRS in livers and HepG2 cells. Overall, the results indicate that polydatin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in experimental diabetic models, the underlying mechanism is probably associated with regulating the Akt pathway. The effect of polydatin on increased Akt phosphorylation is independent of prompting insulin secretion, but dependent of increasing IRS phosphorylation. PMID:25310908

  3. Lipid composition and sensitivity of Prototheca wickerhamii to membrane-active antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Sud, I J; Feingold, D S

    1979-01-01

    The lipid composition of Prototheca wickerhamii ATCC 16529 is presented and discussed in relation to the unique susceptibility of the organism to drugs of three membrane-active antimicrobial classes: the polyenes, the polymyxins, and the imidazoles. The presence of ergosterol in the neutral lipid fraction of the membrane is likely responsible for the exquisite susceptibility to amphotericin B. The presence of a large quantity of free fatty acids in the membrane appears responsible for imidazole susceptibility. The membrane determinants of polymyxin B susceptibility are less well defined. PMID:518077

  4. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production. PMID:27038264

  5. Mass Spectrometric Collisional Activation and Product Ion Mobility of Human Serum Neutral Lipid Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Barkley, Robert M.; Zemski-Berry, Karin; Deng, Yiming; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for lipid analysis called CTS (collisional activation and traveling wave mass spectrometry) involving tandem mass spectrometry of all precursor ions with ion mobility determinations of all product ions was applied to a sample of human serum. The resulting four dimensional data set (precursor ion, product ion, ion mobility values, and intensity) was found to be useful for characterization of lipids as classes as well as identification of specific species. Utilization of ion mobility measurements of the product ions is a novel approach for lipid analysis. The trends and patterns of product mobility values when visually displayed yield information on lipid classes and specific species independent of mass determination. The collection of a comprehensive set of data that incorporates all precursor-product relationships combined with ion mobility measurements of all products enables data analysis where different molecular properties can be juxtaposed and analyzed to assist with class and species identification. Overall, CTS is powerful, specific, and comprehensive method for lipid analysis. PMID:27213895

  6. Structural elucidation of olive pomace fed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) polar lipids with cardioprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Smith, Terry; Detopoulou, Maria; Tsikrika, Constantina; Papaharisis, Leonidas; Barkas, Dimitris; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to structurally characterise the polar lipids of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), fed with an experimental diet containing olive pomace (OP), that exhibit cardioprotective activities. OP has been added to conventional fish oil (FO) feed at 4% and this was the OP diet, having been supplemented as finishing diet to fish. Sea bass was aquacultured using either FO or OP diet. At the end of the dietary experiment, lipids in both samples of fish muscle were quantified and HPLC fractionated. The in vitro cardioprotective properties of the polar lipid fractions, using washed rabbit's platelets, have been assessed and the two most biologically active fractions were further analysed by mass spectrometry. The gas-chromatrograpy-mass spectrometric data shows that these two fractions contain low levels of myristic (14:0), oleic (18:1 cis ω-9) and linoleic acids (18:2 ω-6), but high levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic acids (18:0) as well as eicosadienoic acid (20:2 ω-6). The first fraction (MS1) also contained significant levels of arachidonic acid (20:4 ω-6) and the omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (22:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6). Electrospray-mass spectrometry elucidated that the lipid composition of the two fractions contained various diacyl-glycerophospholipids species, where the majority of them have either 18:0 or 18:1 fatty acids in the sn-1 position and either 22:6 or 20:2 fatty acids in the sn-2 position for MS1 and MS2, respectively. Our research focuses on the structure/function relationship of fish muscle polar lipids and cardiovascular diseases and structural data are given for polar lipid HPLC fractions with strong cardioprotective properties. PMID:24128590

  7. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C.; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics. PMID:23823233

  8. Fatty acids of lipid fractions in extracellular polymeric substances of activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Arnaud; Suutari, Merja Kontro; Keinänen, Minna M; Cadoret, Aurore; Faure, Pierre; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Block, Jean-Claude

    2003-10-01

    Phospholipid (PL), glycolipid (GL), and neutral lipid (NL) FA, and the lipopolysaccharide 2- and 3-hydroxy (LPS 2-OH and 3-OH) FA of activated sludges and extracted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined on samples collected from two wastewater treatment plants. EPS extracted from sludges by means of sonication and cation exchange contained proteins (43.4%), humic-like substances (11.5%), nucleic acids (10.9%), carbohydrates (9.9%), and lipid-bound FA (1.8%). The lipids associated with EPS were composed of GL, PL, NL, and LPS acids in proportions of 61, 21, 16, and 2%, respectively. The profiles of lipid-bound FA in activated sludges and EPS were similar (around 85 separate FA were identified). The FA signatures observed can be attributed to the likely presence of yeasts, fungi, sulfate-reducing bacteria, gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and, in lesser quantities, mycobacteria. Comparison of data from the dates of sampling (January and September) showed that there were more unsaturated PLFA in the EPS extracted from the activated sludges sampled in January. This observation could be partly related to microorganism adaptation to temperature variations. The comparison between two wastewater treatment plants showed that the FA profiles were similar, although differences in microbial community structure were also seen. Most of the FA in sludges had an even number of carbons. PMID:14669975

  9. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities. PMID:23180608

  10. Time course of lipolytic activity and lipid peroxidation after whole-body gamma irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rejholcova, M.; Wilhelm, J.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fluorescing products of lipid peroxidation (LFP) and hormone-stimulated lipolytic activity were determined in rat epididymal adipose tissue during a 29-day interval after whole-body gamma irradiation. An increase in LFP was accompanied by a decrease in lipolytic activity. It is suggested that these effects are interrelated and that the decrease in lipolysis in irradiated, semi fasting rats is an additional deteriorating factor leading to death in some animals.

  11. Antifouling Activity of Lipidic Metabolites Derived from Padina tetrastromatica.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Murugan; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Anantharaman, Perumal

    2016-07-01

    An attempt has been made to identify the potential seaweed for antifouling property due to the growing need for environmentally safe antifouling systems. The antibacterial, antimicroalgal, and antimussel foot adherence potentials of methanol, dichloromethane, and hexane extracts of the chosen seaweeds such as Padina tetrastromatica, Caulerpa taxifolia, and Amphiroa fragilissima have been compared against copper sulfate. Among the extracts, the maximum antibacterial activities were exhibited by the methanol extract of P. tetrastromatica. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the methanolic extract of P. tetrastromatica was found to be 10 and 1 μg/ml against test biofilm bacteria and diatoms, respectively. The antimussel foot adherence assay indicated that the extract had inhibited the foot adherence of the green mussels Perna viridis with the effective concentration (EC50) of 25.51 ± 0.03 μg/ml, and lethal concentration for 50 % mortality (LC50) was recorded at 280.22 ± 0.12 μg/ml. Based on the prolific results, the crude methanolic extract of P. tetrastromatica was subjected to purification using silica gel column and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Then, the active compounds of the bioassay-guided fraction (F13) were identified using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and it was observed that fatty acids were the major components, which may be responsible for the antifouling properties. PMID:26956575

  12. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60 000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes. PMID:25267488

  13. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  14. Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qun; Zhang Jun; Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-06-24

    Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-{alpha} production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-{alpha}. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production was additive with that of methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling.

  15. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H J; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Willems, Rob J L; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-07-29

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic constructs that display potent inhibition of bacterial growth, with activities approaching that of nisin itself. Most notable was the activity observed against clinically relevant bacterial strains including MRSA and VRE. Experiments with membrane models indicate that these constructs operate via a lipid II-mediated mode of action without causing pore formation. A lipid II-dependent mechanism of action is further supported by antagonization assays wherein the addition of lipid II was found to effectively block the antibacterial activity of the nisin-derived lipopeptides. PMID:26122963

  16. Non-esterified fatty acids activate the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway to regulate lipid metabolism in bovine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwei; Li, Xiaobing; Chen, Hui; Lei, Liancheng; Liu, Juxiong; Guan, Yuan; Liu, Zhaoxi; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Wentao; Zhao, Chenxu; Fu, Shixin; Li, Peng; Liu, Guowen; Wang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) act as signaling molecules involved in regulating genes expression to modulate lipid metabolism. However, the regulation mechanism of NEFAs on lipid metabolism in dairy cows is unclear. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. In vitro, bovine hepatocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of NEFAs and AMPKα inhibitors (BML-275). NEFAs increased AMPKα phosphorylation through up-regulating the protein levels of liver kinase B1. Activated AMPKα increased the expression and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). NEFAs also directly activate the PPARα independent of AMPKα. Activated PPARα increased the lipolytic genes expression to increase lipid oxidation. Furthermore, activated AMPKα inhibited the expression and transcriptional activity of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein, which reduced the expression of lipogenic genes, thereby decreasing lipid synthesis. Activated AMPKα phosphorylated and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity, which increased lipid oxidation. Consequently, the triglyceride content in the NEFAs-treated hepatocytes was significantly decreased. These results indicate that NEFAs activate the AMPKα signaling pathway to increase lipid oxidation and decrease lipid synthesis in hepatocytes, which in turn, generates more ATP to relieve the negative energy balance in transition dairy cows. PMID:23690240

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  18. Bacterial lipids activate, synergize, and inhibit a developmental switch in choanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Woznica, Arielle; Cantley, Alexandra M.; Beemelmanns, Christine; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Clardy, Jon; King, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In choanoflagellates, the closest living relatives of animals, multicellular rosette development is regulated by environmental bacteria. The simplicity of this evolutionarily relevant interaction provides an opportunity to identify the molecules and regulatory logic underpinning bacterial regulation of development. We find that the rosette-inducing bacterium Algoriphagus machipongonensis produces three structurally divergent classes of bioactive lipids that, together, activate, enhance, and inhibit rosette development in the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta. One class of molecules, the lysophosphatidylethanolamines (LPEs), elicits no response on its own but synergizes with activating sulfonolipid rosette-inducing factors (RIFs) to recapitulate the full bioactivity of live Algoriphagus. LPEs, although ubiquitous in bacteria and eukaryotes, have not previously been implicated in the regulation of a host–microbe interaction. This study reveals that multiple bacterially produced lipids converge to activate, enhance, and inhibit multicellular development in a choanoflagellate. PMID:27354530

  19. Neuronal Activation by GPI-Linked Neuroligin-1 Displayed in Synthetic Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Groves, Jay T.; Dean, Camin; Pautot, Sophie; DeMaria, Shannon; Isacoff, Ehud

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized, in vitro, interactions between hippocampal neuronal cells and silica microbeads coated with synthetic, fluid, lipid bilayer membranes containing the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked extracellular domain of the postsynaptic membrane protein neuroligin-1. These bilayer–neuroligin-1 beads activated neuronal cells to form presynaptic nerve terminals at the point of contact in a manner similar to that observed for live PC12 cells, ectopically expressing the full length neuroligin-1. The synthetic membranes exhibited biological activity at neuroligin-1 densities of ∼1 to 6 proteins/μm2. Polyolycarbonate beads with neuroligin-1 covalently attached to the surface failed to activate neurons despite the fact that neuroligin-1 binding activity is preserved. This implies that a lipid membrane environment is likely to be essential for neuroligin-1 activity. This technique allows the study of isolated proteins in an environment that has physical properties resembling those of a cell surface; proteins can diffuse freely within the membrane, retain their in vivo orientations, and are in a nondenatured state. In addition, the synthetic membrane environment affords control over both lipid and protein composition. This technology is easily implemented and can be applied to a wide variety of cellular studies. PMID:16262338

  20. Lipid-induced NOX2 activation inhibits autophagic flux by impairing lysosomal enzyme activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaishy, Bharat; Zhang, Quanjiang; Chung, Heaseung S.; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Jenkins, Stephen; Abel, Patrick; Cowart, L. Ashley; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Abel, E. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in maintaining energy and organelle homeostasis. The relationship between obesity and the regulation of autophagy is cell type specific. Despite adverse consequences of obesity on cardiac structure and function, the contribution of altered cardiac autophagy in response to fatty acid overload is incompletely understood. Here, we report the suppression of autophagosome clearance and the activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox)2 in both high fat-fed murine hearts and palmitate-treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes (CMs). Defective autophagosome clearance is secondary to superoxide-dependent impairment of lysosomal acidification and enzyme activity in palmitate-treated CMs. Inhibition of Nox2 prevented superoxide overproduction, restored lysosome acidification and enzyme activity, and reduced autophagosome accumulation in palmitate-treated CMs. Palmitate-induced Nox2 activation was dependent on the activation of classical protein kinase Cs (PKCs), specifically PKCβII. These findings reveal a novel mechanism linking lipotoxicity with a PKCβ-Nox2-mediated impairment in pH-dependent lysosomal enzyme activity that diminishes autophagic turnover in CMs. PMID:25529920

  1. Effective lipid-detergent system for study of membrane active peptides in fluid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sychev, Sergei V; Sukhanov, Stanislav V; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-02-01

    The structure of peptide antibiotic gramicidin A (gA) was studied in phosphatidylcholin liposomes modified by nonionic detergent Triton X-100. First, the detergent : lipid ratio at which the saturation of lipid membrane by Triton X-100 occurs (Re (sat)), was determined by light scattering. Measurements of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene at sublytic concentrations of detergent showed that after saturation of the membrane by Triton X-100 microviscosity of lipid bilayer is reduced by 20%. The equilibrium conformational state of gA in phosphatidylcholine liposomes at Re (sat) was studied by CD spectroscopy. It was found that the conformational state of this channel-forming peptide changed crucially when Triton X-100 induced transition to more fluid membranes. The gA single-channel measurements were made with Triton X-100 containing bilayers. Tentative assignment of the channel type and gA structures was made by correlation of CD data with conductance histograms. Lipid-detergent system with variable viscosity developed in this work can be used to study the structure and folding of other membrane-active peptides. PMID:26751806

  2. Enhanced Antimalarial Activity by a Novel Artemether-Lumefantrine Lipid Emulsion for Parenteral Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Lu, Tingli; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ting; Mei, Qibing

    2014-01-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (also known as benflumetol) are difficult to formulate for parenteral administration because of their low aqueous solubility. Cremophor EL as an emulsion excipient has been shown to cause serious side effects. This study reports a method of preparation and the therapeutic efficacies of novel lipid emulsion (LE) delivery systems with artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine, for parenteral administration. Their physical and chemical stabilities were also evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo antimalarial activities of the lipid emulsions developed were tested in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine was encapsulated in an oil phase, and the in vivo performance was assessed by comparison with artesunate for injection. It was found that the lumefantrine lipid emulsion (LUM-LE) and artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion (ARM-LUM-LE-3) (1:6) began to decrease the parasitemia levels after only 3 days, and the parasitemia inhibition was 90% at doses of 0.32 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively, with immediate antimalarial effects greater than those of the positive-control group and constant antimalarial effects over 30 days. LUM-LE and ARM-LUM-LE-3 demonstrated the best performance in terms of chemical and physical stabilities and antiplasmodial efficacy, with a mean particle size of 150 nm, and they have many favorable properties for parenteral administration, such as biocompatibility, physical stability, and ease of preparation. PMID:24982079

  3. Pharmacological screening of Hypericum androsaemum extracts for antioxidant, anti-lipid peroxidation, antiglycation and cytotoxicity activity.

    PubMed

    Saddiqe, Zeb; Maimoona, Alya; Abbas, Ghulam; Naeem, Ismat; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress and glycation processes have a combined effect on diabetes related complications. Crude plant extracts and plant derived compounds possessing both antiglycation and antioxidant activities have a high therapeutic potential for treating these complications. Antioxidant, antiglycation, anti-lipid per oxidation and cytotoxic activities of crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Hypericum androsaemum L. (Hypericaceae) were evaluated and correlated with total content of phenolics and flavonoids. Significant radical scavenging activity was observed for the methanol extract against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical used as a basis for antioxidant activity with IC50 value of 92.70±2.85 μg mL(-1) (96.20±2.34% inhibition at 500 μg mL(-1)). In case of anion scavenging activity the results were not very significant (33.20±1.22% inhibition at 500 μg mL(-1)). Anti-lipid per oxidation activity was highest for n-hexane fraction (67.83±1.33% inhibition at 500 μg mL(-1)) while the ethyl acetate fraction had the highest antiglycation activity (62.77±2.54% inhibition at 500 μg mL(-1)). Statistically significant correlation was determined for antioxidant and antiglycation activity and phenolic and flavonoid contents. In cytotoxicity assay all the extracts had IC50 values >30 μg mL(-1) as compared to the standard cycloheximide (IC50 value 0.084±0.1 μg mL(-1)). The polar extracts of H. androsaemum can be a good source of non-toxic compounds with antioxidant, anti-lipid per oxidation and antiglycation activities. PMID:27087068

  4. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of /sup 14/C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated.

  5. Effect of media milling on lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xia, Wenshui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of media milling on lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan was studied in rats fed high-fat diets. Results showed that media-milled chitosan was more effective than chitosan in reducing body weight gain and liver fat accumulation of rats. Compared with chitosan, the reducing effects of media-milled chitosan on serum triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were increased by 10.1, 7.5 and 10.2%, and liver TG and TC-reducing effects were increased by 16.2 and 14.6%, respectively. Rats fed media-milled chitosan showed decreased levels of free fatty acid (FFA) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The cholesterol and fat in feces of rats fed media-milled chitosan were higher than those of rats fed chitosan. These results suggested media milling enhanced the lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan, and the reason might be partly due to its effect on strengthening the ability of chitosan in promoting fecal lipid excretions. PMID:25450554

  6. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling. PMID:26772186

  7. Activity of key enzymes in microsomal and mitochondrial membranes depends on the redox reactions involving lipid radicals.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, L F

    2001-07-01

    The work reviews membrane processes, such as monooxygenase reaction and oxidative phosphorylation with special reference to hydroxylation of a xenobiotic benzo(a)pyrene and the effects of the radical scavenger propyl gallate and radical generator Fe2+ ions on the reaction kinetics. A possibility is discussed that tocopherol provides for the activity of the lipid-radical cycles involving cytochrome b5. The lipid-radical cycles protect membrane lipids from oxidation and control the kinetics of membrane processes. The NADPH oxidation energy is transformed into the energy of lipid pulsations and this energy is used for activation of membrane enzymes. To account for the role of lipid pulsations in membrane processes, a new parameter is introduced - the internal temperature. It is supposed that there should be the equilibrium between the pro- and antioxidant factors in the membranes, and the presence of exogenous antioxidants (propyl gallate etc.) should be considered as a negative factor. PMID:11699868

  8. The role of spontaneous lipid curvature in the interaction of interfacially active peptides with membranes.

    PubMed

    Koller, Daniel; Lohner, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Research on antimicrobial peptides is in part driven by urgent medical needs such as the steady increase in pathogens being resistant to antibiotics. Despite the wealth of information compelling structure-function relationships are still scarce and thus the interfacial activity model has been proposed to bridge this gap. This model also applies to other interfacially active (membrane active) peptides such as cytolytic, cell penetrating or antitumor peptides. One parameter that is strongly linked to interfacial activity is the spontaneous lipid curvature, which is experimentally directly accessible. We discuss different parameters such as H-bonding, electrostatic repulsion, changes in monolayer surface area and lateral pressure that affect induction of membrane curvature, but also vice versa how membrane curvature triggers peptide response. In addition, the impact of membrane lipid composition on the formation of curved membrane structures and its relevance for diverse mode of action of interfacially active peptides and in turn biological activity are described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. PMID:24853655

  9. Toxicity and immunomodulatory activity of liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids toward immune effector cells.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-23

    Liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids (cationic liposomes) and fusogenic dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have potential for modulating the immune system by delivering gene or antisense oligonucleotide inside immune cells. The toxicity and the immunoadjuvant activity of cationic liposomes containing nucleic acids toward immune effector cells has not been investigated in detail. In this report, we have evaluated the toxicity of liposomes formulated with various cationic lipids towards murine macrophages and T lymphocytes and the human monocyte-like U937 cell line. The effect of these cationic liposomes on the synthesis of two immunomodulators produced by activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), has also been determined. We have found that liposomes formulated from DOPE and cationic lipids based on diacyltrimethylammonium propane (dioleoyl-, dimyristoyl-, dipalmitoyl-, disteroyl-: DOTAP, DMTAP, DPTAP, DSTAP) or dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) are highly toxic in vitro toward phagocytic cells (macrophages and U937 cells), but not towards non-phagocytic T lymphocytes. The rank order of toxicity was DOPE/DDAB > DOPE/DOTAP > DOPE/DMTAP > DOPE/DPTAP > DOPE/DSTAP. The ED50's for macrophage toxicity were < 10 nmol/ml for DOPE/DDAB, 12 nmol/ml for DOPE/DOTAP, 50 nmol/ml for DOPE/DMTAP, 400 nmol/ml for DOPE/DPTAP and > 1000 nmol/ml for DOPE/DSTAP. The incorporation of DNA (antisense oligonucleotide or plasmid vector) into the cationic liposomes marginally reduced their toxicity towards macrophages. Although toxicity was observed with cationic lipids alone, it was clearly enhanced by the presence of DOPE. The replacement of DOPE by dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) significantly reduced liposome toxicity towards macrophages, and the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-PEG2000 (DPPE-PEG2000: 10 mol%) in the liposomes completely abolished this toxicity. Cationic liposomes, irrespective of

  10. GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Prione, Lilian P; Olchanheski, Luiz R; Tullio, Leandro D; Santo, Bruno C E; Reche, Péricles M; Martins, Paula F; Carvalho, Giselle; Demiate, Ivo M; Pileggi, Sônia A V; Dourado, Manuella N; Prestes, Rosilene A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Pileggi, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Callisto(®), containing the active ingredient mesotrione (2-[4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl]1,3-cyclohenanedione), is a selective herbicide that controls weeds in corn crops and is a potential environmental contaminant. The objective of this work was to evaluate enzymatic and structural changes in Pantoea ananatis, a strain isolated from water, in response to exposure to this herbicide. Despite degradation of mesotrione, probably due a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway in Pantoea ananatis, this herbicide induced oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production. Thiol fragments, eventually produced after mesotrione degradation, could be involved in increased GST activity. Nevertheless, there was no peroxidation damage related to this production, as malondialdehyde (MDA) synthesis, which is due to lipid peroxidation, was highest in the controls, followed by the mesotrione- and Callisto(®)-treated cultures at log growth phase. Therefore, P. ananatis can tolerate and grow in the presence of the herbicide, probably due an efficient control of oxidative stress by a polymorphic catalase system. MDA rates depend on lipid saturation due to a pattern change to a higher level of saturation. These changes are likely related to the formation of GST-mesotrione conjugates and mesotrione degradation-specific metabolites and to the presence of cytotoxic adjuvants. These features may shift lipid membrane saturation, possibly providing a protective effect to bacteria through an increase in membrane impermeability. This response system in P. ananatis provides a novel model for bacterial herbicide tolerance and adaptation in the environment. PMID:27620734

  11. Communication: Activation energy of tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-08-01

    Tension plays a vital role in pore formation in biomembranes, but the mechanism of pore formation remains unclear. We investigated the temperature dependence of the rate constant of constant tension (σ)-induced pore formation in giant unilamellar vesicles of lipid membranes using an experimental method we developed. By analyzing this result, we determined the activation energy (Ua) of tension-induced pore formation as a function of tension. A constant (U0) that does not depend on tension was found to contribute significantly to Ua. Analysis of the activation energy clearly indicated that the dependence of Ua on σ in the classical theory is correct, but that the classical theory of pore formation is not entirely correct due to the presence of U0. We can reasonably consider that U0 is a nucleation free energy to form a hydrophilic pre-pore from a hydrophobic pre-pore or a region with lower lateral lipid density. After obtaining U0, the evolution of a pre-pore follows a classical theory. Our data provide valuable information that help explain the mechanism of tension-induced pore formation in biomembranes and lipid membranes.

  12. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  13. In vivo effects of nickel and cadmium in rats on lipid peroxidation and ceruloplasmin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, J.; Huguet, J.; Arola, L.; Romeu, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Before Ni(II) and Cd(II), or any other metallic ion, can interact intracellulary, it must penetrate the cell membrane. The latter, therefore, is a primary target for toxic metals. Damage to cell membranes may allow a greater uptake of metal and thus injury may extend to more critical targets, although loss of plasmatic membrane functionality may be a crucial factor to explain the interactions of these metals with cellular components. In this sense the present study has been carried out. Factors that have been investigated in order to prove the membrane response of nickel and cadmium toxicity include lipid peroxidation, since divalent ions of transition metals can promote lipid peroxidation and this evidently contributes to the toxicity of certain metals and to metal interaction with ceruloplasmin, as its ferroxidase and scavenger of superoxide radicals activities are important protective mechanisms in vivo against peroxidative damage.

  14. Interplay of cytoskeletal activity and lipid phase stability in dynamic protein recruitment and clustering.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Buceta, Javier; Reigada, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that some membrane proteins aggregate to form clusters. This type of process has been proven to be dynamic and to be actively maintained by external kinetics. Additionally, this dynamic recruiting is cholesterol- and actin-dependent, suggesting that raft organization and cytoskeleton rearrangement play a crucial role. In the present study, we propose a simple model that provides a general framework to describe the dynamical behavior of lipid-protein assemblies. Our results suggest that lipid-mediated interactions and cytoskeleton-anchored proteins contribute to the modulation of such behavior. In particular, we find a resonant condition between the membrane protein and cytoskeleton dynamics that results in the invariance of the ratio of clustered proteins that is found in in vivo experimental observations. PMID:24018870

  15. Ion channel activity of the CSFV p7 viroporin in surrogates of the ER lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Largo, Eneko; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Aguilella, Vicente M; Nieva, José L; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Viroporins comprise a family of non-structural proteins that play significant and diverse roles during the replication cycle of many animal viruses. Consequently, they have become promising targets for inhibitory drug and vaccine development. Structure–function traits common to all members of the family are their small size (ca. 60–120 aa), high hydrophobicity, and the presence of helical domains that transverse the membrane and assemble into oligomeric-permeating structures therein. The possibility that viroporins show in particular conditions any kind of specificity in the transport of ions and small solutes remains a point of contention in the field. Here we have approached this issue using the Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) protein p7 viroporin as a model. We have previously reported that CSFV-p7 induces release of ANTS (MW: 427.33) from lipid vesicles that emulate the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) membrane, and that this process is dependent on pH, modulated by the lipid composition, and recreated by a C-terminal transmembrane helix. Here we have assayed CSFV-p7 for its capacity to form ion-conducting channels in ER-like planar lipid membranes, and established whether this activity is subject to regulation by the same factors. The analysis of electrophysiological recordings in ER membrane surrogates suggests that CSFV-p7 forms pores wide enough to allow ANTS release. Moreover, we were able to discriminate between two pore structures with slightly different sizes and opposite ion selectivities. The fact that the relative abundances of each pore type depend crucially on membrane composition strengthens the view that the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayers present in the cell endomembrane system modulate viroporin activity. PMID:26464198

  16. Immuno-Stimulatory Activity of Escherichia coli Mutants Producing Kdo2-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A or Kdo2-Pentaacyl-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biwen; Han, Yaning; Li, Ye; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is the active center of lipopolysaccharide which also known as endotoxin. Monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) has less toxicity but retains potent immunoadjuvant activity; therefore, it can be developed as adjuvant for improving the strength and duration of the immune response to antigens. However, MPLA cannot be chemically synthesized and can only be obtained by hydrolyzing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) purified from Gram-negative bacteria. Purifying LPS is difficult and time-consuming and can damage the structure of MPLA. In this study, Escherichia coli mutant strains HWB01 and HWB02 were constructed by deleting several genes and integrating Francisella novicida gene lpxE into the chromosome of E. coli wild type strain W3110. Compared with W3110, HWB01 and HWB02 synthesized very short LPS, Kdo2-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-MPLA) and Kdo2-pentaacyl-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA), respectively. Structural changes of LPS in the outer membranes of HWB01 and HWB02 increased their membrane permeability, surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation ability and sensitivity to some antibiotics, but the abilities of these strains to activate the TLR4/MD-2 receptor of HKE-Blue hTLR4 cells were deceased. Importantly, purified Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA differed from wild type LPS in their ability to stimulate the mammalian cell lines THP-1 and RAW264.7. The purification of Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA from HWB01 and HWB02, respectively, is much easier than the purification of LPS from W3110, and these lipid A derivatives could be important tools for developing future vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26710252

  17. Diazepam blocks striatal lipid peroxidation and improves stereotyped activity in a rat model of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Escobar-Briones, Carolina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Alvarez-Ruiz, Yarummy; Maldonado, Perla D; Santana, Ricardo A; Santamaría, Abel; Carrillo-Mora, Paul

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the effect of a single dose of diazepam was tested on different markers of oxidative damage in the striatum of rats in an acute model of immobilization (restraint) stress. In addition, the locomotor activity was measured at the end of the restraint period. Immobilization was induced to animals for 24 hr, and then, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase activity and content, and mitochondrial function were all estimated in striatal tissue samples. Corticosterone levels were measured in serum. Diazepam was given to rats as a pre-treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 20 min. before the initiation of stress. Our results indicate that acute stress produced enhanced striatal levels of lipid peroxidation (73% above the control), decreased superoxide dismutase activity (54% below the control), reduced levels of mitochondrial function (35% below the control) and increased corticosterone serum levels (86% above the control). Pre-treatment of stressed rats with diazepam decreased the striatal lipid peroxidation levels (68% below the stress group) and improved mitochondrial function (18% above the stress group), but only mild preservation of superoxide dismutase activity was detected (17% above the stress group). In regard to the motor assessment, only the stereotyped activity was increased in the stress group with respect to control (46% above the control), and this effect was prevented by diazepam administration (30% below the stress group). The preventive actions of diazepam in this acute model of stress suggest that drugs exhibiting anxiolytic and antioxidant properties might be useful for the design of therapies against early acute phases of physic stress. PMID:21645264

  18. Novel bio-active lipid nanocarriers for the stabilization and sustained release of sitosterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatusu, I.; Badea, N.; Stan, R.; Meghea, A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, new stable and efficiently bio-active lipid nanocarriers (NLCs) with antioxidant properties have been developed for the transport of active ingredients in food. The novel NLCs loaded with β-sitosterol/β-sitosterol and green tea extract (GTE) and prepared by a combination of natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and squalene) and biological lipids with food grade surfactants, were physico-chemically examined by DLS, TEM, electrokinetic potential, DSC and HPLC and found to have main diameters less than 200 nm, a spherical morphology, excellent physical stability, an imperfect crystalline lattice and high entrapment efficiency. The novel loaded-NLCs have demonstrated the potential to develop a high blocking action of chain reactions, trapping up to 92% of the free-oxygen radicals, as compared to the native β-sitosterol (AA%=36.5). Another advantage of this study is associated with the quality of bio-active NLCs based on grape seed oil and squalene to manifest a better sitosterol—sustained release behaviour as compared to their related nanoemulsions. By coupling both in vitro results, i.e. the enhanced antioxidant activity and superior release properties, this study emphasizes the sustainability of novel bio-active nanocarriers to gain specific bio-food features for development of functional foods with a high applicability spectrum.

  19. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:26610729

  20. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  1. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat.

    PubMed

    Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Seung Gyu; Baek, Ki Ho; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  2. Potent and Selective α-Ketoheterocycle-Based Inhibitors of the Anandamide and Oleamide Catabolizing Enzyme, Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F. Anthony; Du, Wu; Hwang, Inkyu; Rayl, Thomas J.; Kimball, F. Scott; Leung, Donmienne; Hoover, Heather S.; Apodaca, Richard L.; Breitenbucher, J. Guy; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of 2f (OL-135), a potent inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), is detailed targeting the 5-position of the oxazole. Examination of a series of substituted benzene derivatives (12–14) revealed that the optimal position for substitution was the meta-position with selected members approaching or exceeding the potency of 2f. Concurrent with these studies, the effect of substitution on the pyridine ring of 2f was also examined. A series of small, non-aromatic C5-substituents was also explored and revealed that the Ki follows a well-defined correlation with the Hammett σp constant (ρ = 3.01, R2 = 0.91) in which electron-withdrawing substituents enhance potency leading to inhibitors with Ki’s as low as 400 pM (20n). Proteomic-wide screening of the inhibitors revealed that most are exquisitely selective for FAAH over all other mammalian proteases reversing the 100-fold preference of 20a (C5 substituent = H) for the enzyme TGH. PMID:17279740

  3. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  4. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  5. Lipid peroxidation and cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitory activities of acidic aqueous extracts of some dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Raman, Priyadarshini; Dewitt, David L; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2008-02-01

    The botanical supplement market is growing at a fast pace with more and more people resorting to them for maintaining good health. Echinacea, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, Siberian ginseng, grape seed extract, kava kava, saw palmetto and St John's wort are some of the popular supplements used for a variety of health benefits. These supplements are associated with various product claims, which suggest that they possess cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme and lipid s inhibitory activities. COX enzymes are found to be at elevated levels in inflamed and cancerous cells. To test some of the product claims, selected supplements were analysed for their ability to inhibit COX-1 and -2 enzymes and lipid peroxidation in vitro. The supplements were extracted with acidified water (pH 2) at 37 degrees C to simulate the gastric environment. The supplements tested demonstrated varying degrees of COX enzyme inhibition (5-85% for COX-1 and 13-28% for COX-2). Interestingly, extracts of garlic (Meijer), ginkgo (Solaray), ginseng (Nature's Way), Siberian ginseng (GNC, Nutrilite, Solaray, Natrol), kava kava (GNC, Sundown, Solaray) and St John's wort (Nutrilite) selectively inhibited COX-2 enzyme. These supplements also inhibited lipid peroxidation in vitro (5-99%). The results indicated that the consumption of these botanical supplements studied possess health benefits. PMID:17726737

  6. Temporin L: antimicrobial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities, and effects on membrane permeabilization in lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Andrea C; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rufo, Anna; Luzi, Carla; Barra, Donatella; Zhao, Hongxia; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Bozzi, Argante; Di Giulio, Antonio; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    The temporins are a family of small, linear antibiotic peptides with intriguing biological properties. We investigated the antibacterial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of temporin L (FVQWFSKFLGRIL-NH2), isolated from the skin of the European red frog Rana temporaria. The peptide displayed the highest activity of temporins studied to date, against both human erythrocytes and bacterial and fungal strains. At variance with other known temporins, which are mainly active against Gram-positive bacteria, temporin L was also active against Gram-negative strains such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa A.T.C.C. 15692 and Escherichia coli D21 at concentrations comparable with those that are microbiocidal to Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, temporin L was cytotoxic to three different human tumour cell lines (Hut-78, K-562 and U-937), causing a necrosis-like cell death, although sensitivity to the peptide varied markedly with the specific cell line tested. A study of the interaction of temporin L with liposomes of different lipid compositions revealed that the peptide causes perturbation of bilayer integrity of both neutral and negatively charged membranes, as revealed by the release of a vesicle-encapsulated fluorescent marker, and that the action of the peptide is modulated to some extent by membrane lipid composition. In particular, the presence of negatively charged lipids in the model bilayer inhibits the lytic power of temporin L. We also show that the release of fluorescent markers caused by temporin L is size-dependent and that the peptide does not have a detergent-like effect on the membrane, suggesting that perturbation of bilayer organization takes place on a local scale, i.e. through the formation of pore-like openings. PMID:12133008

  7. Low temperature alters plasma membrane lipid composition and ATPase activity of pineapple fruit during blackheart development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) plays central role in triggering primary responses to chilling injury and sustaining cellular homeostasis. Characterising response of membrane lipids to low temperature can provide important information for identifying early causal factors contributing to chilling injury. To this end, PM lipid composition and ATPase activity were assessed in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) in relation to the effect of low temperature on the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury. Chilling temperature at 10 °C induced blackheart development in concurrence with increase in electrolyte leakage. PM ATPase activity was decreased after 1 week at low temperature, followed by a further decrease after 2 weeks. The enzyme activity was not changed during 25 °C storage. Loss of total PM phospholipids was found during postharvest senescence, but more reduction was shown from storage at 10 °C. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant PM phospholipid species. Low temperature increased the level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the level of phosphatidylinositol. Both phospholipid species were not changed during storage at 25 °C. Postharvest storage at both temperatures decreased the levels of C18:3 and C16:1, and increased level of C18:1. Low temperature decreased the level of C18:2 and increased the level of C14:0. Exogenous application of phosphatidic acid was found to inhibit the PM ATPase activity of pineapple fruit in vitro. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of plasma membrane at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in blackheart development of pineapple fruit. PMID:24390546

  8. Membrane lipid physical state and modulation of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B.

    PubMed Central

    Silvius, J R; McElhaney, R N

    1980-01-01

    Careful analysis of the Arrhenius plot of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase (ATP pyrophosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.8) activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B membranes of varying fatty acid composition has been combined with differential thermal analysis of the membrane lipid phase transitions to evaluate the effects of membrane lipid properties on the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the enzyme is active only in association with liquid-crystalline lipids, exhibiting a significant heat capacity of activation, delta Cp++, for the ATP hydrolytic reaction in this case. Quantitative analyses of Arrhenius plots for the enzyme activity in membranes whose lipids exhibit a gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition in the physiological temperature range suggest that the ATPase is inactivated when its boundary lipids undergo a phase transition that is driven by the bulk lipid phase transition but is less cooperative than the latter. Our results suggest that the familiar "biphasic linear" Arrhenius plots obtained for many membrane enzymes may in fact have a more complex shape, analysis of which can furnish useful information regarding the behavior of the enzyme molecule. Images PMID:6445554

  9. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active protein machines in solution and lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The cytoplasm and biomembranes in biological cells contain large numbers of proteins that cyclically change their shapes. They are molecular machines that can function as molecular motors or carry out various other tasks in the cell. Many enzymes also undergo conformational changes within their turnover cycles. We analyze the advection effects that nonthermal fluctuating hydrodynamic flows induced by active proteins have on other passive molecules in solution or membranes. We show that the diffusion constants of passive particles are enhanced substantially. Furthermore, when gradients of active proteins are present, a chemotaxis-like drift of passive particles takes place. In lipid bilayers, the effects are strongly nonlocal, so that active inclusions in the entire membrane contribute to local diffusion enhancement and the drift. All active proteins in a biological cell or in a membrane contribute to such effects and all passive particles, and the proteins themselves, will be subject to them. PMID:26124140

  10. Effects of soluble dietary fibers on lipid metabolism and activities of intestinal disaccharidases in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y S; Cho, S H; Kim, H J; Lee, H J

    1998-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of indigestible dextrin and polydextrose, soluble dietary fibers with low molecular weight, on lipid metabolism and disaccharidase activities of intestinal mucosa in rats fed a high sucrose diet. Their effects were compared with those of well-known soluble fibers, pectin, and guar gum, and also with an insoluble fiber, cellulose. Dietary fibers added to diets at the 5% (w/w) level were alpha-cellulose, pectin, guar gum, indigestible dextrin, and polydextrose. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to test diets for 6 weeks. Body weight gain was the lowest in rats fed guar gum, the highest in rats fed cellulose, and in-between in rats fed other diets. Although guar gum, pectin, and indigestible feeding dextrin had lower plasma lipid values than cellulose feeding did, the differences were statistically insignificant. Liver triglyceride of the guar gum-fed group was about a third that of the cellulose-fed group, but although those of rats fed polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, and pectin were lower than that of cellulose, the differences were insignificant. Liver cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations were similar among groups. Daily fecal excretion of total lipid, cholesterol, and bile acids were highest in rats fed guar gum, followed by pectin-fed and cellulose-fed rats, and the lowest in rats fed indigestible dextrin and polydextrose. Jejunal sucrase activity was low in the order of guar-gum, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, pectin, and cellulose. The results indicate that the hypolipidemic effect of soluble dietary fibers would be lessened with reduction in molecular weight, but that the lower sucrase activity by soluble fibers with low molecular weight might be beneficial for hypoglycemic effect. PMID:9919480

  11. Novel Biotinylated Lipid Prodrugs of Acyclovir for the Treatment of Herpetic Keratitis (HK): Transporter Recognition, Tissue Stability and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Earla, Ravinder; Sirimulla, Suman; Bailey, Jake Brain; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Biotinylated lipid prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) were designed to target the sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) on the cornea to facilitate enhanced cellular absorption of ACV. Methods All the prodrugs were screened for in vitro cellular uptake, interaction with SMVT, docking analysis, cytotoxicity, enzymatic stability and antiviral activity. Results Uptake of biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV (B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV) was significantly higher than biotinylated prodrug (B-ACV), lipid prodrugs (R-ACV and 12HS-ACV) and ACV in corneal cells. Transepithelial transport across rabbit corneas indicated the recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT. Average Vina scores obtained from docking studies further confirmed that biotinylated lipid prodrugs possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. All the prodrugs studied did not cause any cytotoxicity and were found to be safe and non-toxic. B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV were found to be relatively more stable in ocular tissue homogenates and exhibited excellent antiviral activity. Conclusions Biotinylated lipid prodrugs demonstrated synergistic improvement in cellular uptake due to recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT on the cornea and lipid mediated transcellular diffusion. These biotinylated lipid prodrugs appear to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of herpetic keratitis (HK) and may lower ACV resistance in patients with poor clinical response. PMID:23657675

  12. Antiviral activity of 1-docosanol, an inhibitor of lipid-enveloped viruses including herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, D H; Marcelletti, J F; Khalil, M H; Pope, L E; Katz, L R

    1991-01-01

    This article reports that 1-docosanol, a 22-carbon-long saturated alcohol, exerts a substantial inhibitory effect on replication of certain viruses (e.g., herpes simplex virus and respiratory syncytial virus) within primary target cells in vitro. To study the basis for its viral inhibitory activity, a suspension of 1-docosanol was formulated in an inert and nontoxic surfactant, Pluronic F-68; this suspension exerted potent inhibitory activity on the ability of susceptible viruses to infect cultured target cells. Susceptible viruses included wild-type herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 as well as acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus 2 and also respiratory syncytial virus--all of which are lipid-enveloped. In contrast, nonenveloped poliovirus was not susceptible to the inhibitory action of 1-docosanol. Although the precise mechanism has yet to be defined, current evidence suggests that 1-docosanol inhibits viral replication by interfering with the early intracellular events surrounding viral entry into target cells. It is possible that interaction between the highly lipophilic compound and components of target cell membranes renders such target cells less susceptible to viral fusion and/or entry. If this mechanism proves to be correct, 1-docosanol may provide a broad spectrum activity against many different viruses, especially those with lipid-containing envelopes. Images PMID:1660151

  13. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamali, F; Edwards, C; Wood, P; Wynne, H A; Kesteven, P

    2001-11-01

    There is no information available on temporal variability in plasma vitamin K concentrations and its relationship to coagulation processes. We investigated the possible existence of temporal changes in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and activity of clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X and relationships between these variables. Plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity were measured at four-hour intervals for 28 hours in a group of healthy volunteers. Temporal variations existed in plasma vitamin K concentrations, with a mean maximum at 22:00 hr and a mean minimum (32% of the maximum) at 10:00 hr. Plasma triglycerol concentrations mirrored the changes in vitamin K concentrations. Mean factor VII activity was positively correlated with mean total plasma cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.714; P < 0.0001) and with mean plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.461; P < 0.0001). No distinct correlations were found between plasma vitamin K concentrations and either high density lipoprotein (HDL) or LDL cholesterol concentrations, or between triglycerol, HDL, or LDL cholesterol concentrations and functional activity of factors II, IX, and X. Plasma vitamin K concentrations did not correlate with the functional activity of any of the clotting factors. The presence of a correlation between plasma cholesterol concentrations and factor VII activity for blood samples collected at four-hour intervals suggests that plasma cholesterol concentrations may have a more acute effect on factor VII activity. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K concentrations indicate that a single time point measurement may be an inappropriate method of establishing vitamin K status in an individual. PMID:11754396

  14. Silibinin modulates lipid homeostasis and inhibits nuclear factor kappa B activation in experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Federico; Galvano, Fabio; Cappello, Francesco; Mangiameli, Andrea; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased liver-related mortality. Disturbances in hepatic lipid homeostasis trigger oxidative stress and inflammation (ie, lipotoxicity), leading to the progression of NASH. This study aimed at identifying whether silibinin may influence the molecular events of lipotoxicity in a mouse model of NASH. Eight-week-old db/db mice were fed a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet for 4 weeks and treated daily with silibinin (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle. Liver expression and enzyme activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase, and expression of liver fatty acid-binding protein were assessed. Hepatic levels of reactive oxygen species, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) activities were also determined. Silibinin administration decreased serum alanine aminotransferase and improved liver steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning, and lobular inflammation in db/db mice fed an MCD diet. Gene expression and activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 were reduced in db/db mice fed an MCD diet compared with lean controls and were increased by silibinin; moreover, silibinin treatment induced the expression and activity of acyl-CoA oxidase and the expression of liver fatty acid-binding protein. Vehicle-treated animals displayed increased hepatic levels of reactive oxygen species and TBARS, 3-NT staining, and iNOS expression; silibinin treatment markedly decreased reactive oxygen species and TBARS and restored 3-NT and iNOS to the levels of control mice. db/db mice fed an MCD diet consistently had increased NFkB p65 and p50 binding activity; silibinin administration significantly decreased the activity of both subunits. Silibinin treatment counteracts the progression of liver injury by modulating lipid homeostasis and suppressing oxidative stress-mediated lipotoxicity and NFkB activation in experimental

  15. Caffeine attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hai Yan; Kim, Do Yeon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2013-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the effect of caffeine on lipid accumulation in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Significant decreases in the accumulation of hepatic lipids, such as triglyceride (TG), and cholesterol were observed when HepG2 cells were treated with caffeine as indicated. Caffeine decreased the mRNA level of lipogenesis-associated genes (SREBP1c, SREBP2, FAS, SCD1, HMGR and LDLR). In contrast, mRNA level of CD36, which is responsible for lipid uptake and catabolism, was increased. Next, the effect of caffeine on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway was examined. Phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were evidently increased when the cells were treated with caffeine as indicated for 24 h. These effects were all reversed in the presence of compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. In summary, these data indicate that caffeine effectively depleted TG and cholesterol levels by inhibition of lipogenesis and stimulation of lipolysis through modulating AMPK-SREBP signaling pathways. PMID:23615262

  16. Peroxisome induction potential and lipid-regulating activity in rats. Quantitative microscopy and chemical structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E. J.; Lucas, J. A.; Gray, R. H.; de la Iglesia, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    Structurally diverse lipid-regulating agents induce hepatomegaly, hepatic peroxisome proliferation, and hepatocarcinoma in rats by mechanisms not fully understood. Nevertheless the initial hepatic response is a prompt, florid proliferation of peroxisomes. In investigations reported here, changes in the rat hepatic peroxisome compartment were measured by quantitative microscopy to determine chemical structure requirements that relate to peroxisome proliferation and lipid regulation. Aryloxyalkanoic acids plus amide analogs, and thio, benzimidazole, phenylpiperazine, and oxazole derivatives induced peroxisome proliferation and generally decreased plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. These compounds contain an acidic function or are readily metabolized to a chemical with an acidic function. Substitution of the acidic function with an adamantyloxy eliminated peroxisome proliferation and induced contrasting effects on lipid profile, increasing triglycerides and decreasing total cholesterol. A previously unreported, direct correlation emerged between peroxisome proliferation and plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. These effects could not be elicited separately, negating identification of functional groups that could be associated with either activity. Chemical structure and resulting peroxisome proliferation with changes in plasma lipoproteins are therefore closely interrelated in rats. Images Figure 1 PMID:1853935

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism by ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Michung; Lee, Hyunghee; Jeong, Sunhyo; Kim, Jung-Jae; Nicol, Christopher J; Nam, Kung Woo; Kim, Moonza; Cho, Byung Goo; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2003-04-01

    1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates the expression of the key genes involved in lipid metabolism following activation of this receptor by various ligands. Ginseng, a highly valuable medicine in oriental societies, is also reported to modulate lipid metabolism, although the mechanism of its action remains unknown. In order to test our hypothesis that ginseng exerts its effects by altering PPARalpha-mediated pathways, the effects of Korean red ginseng on PPARalpha function and serum lipid profiles were investigated using in vivo and in vitro approaches. 2. In vivo administration of ginseng extract (GE) and ginsenosides (GS) not only inhibited mRNA levels of acyl-CoA oxidase, a rate-limiting enzyme for PPARalpha-mediated peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation, induced by the potent PPARalpha ligand Wy14,643 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but also inhibited the induction of PPARalpha target genes expected following treatment with Wy14,643. 3. Consistent with the in vivo data, both GE and GS caused dose-dependent decreases in the endogenous expression of a luciferase reporter gene containing the PPAR responsive element (PPRE), while GS significantly decreased the magnitude of reporter gene activation in the presence of Wy14,643. 4. Serological studies demonstrated that, compared with vehicle-treated mice, treatment with GS significantly increased serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Compared to groups treated with Wy14,643 alone, which significantly decreased serum triglyceride and HDL cholesterol levels versus controls, coadministration of either GE or GS with Wy14,643 modestly increased serum triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. 5. These results indicate that the effects of ginseng on serum lipid profiles may be mediated by changes in the expression of PPARalpha target genes, providing the first evidence that in vivo and in vitro treatments of ginseng

  18. Lung surfactant dysfunction in tuberculosis: effect of mycobacterial tubercular lipids on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine surface activity.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2005-11-10

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside in the alveoli and are in close proximity with the alveolar surfactant. Mycolic acid in its free form and as cord factor, constitute the major lipids of the mycobacterial cell wall. They can detach from the bacteria easily and are known to be moderately surface active. We hypothesize that these surface-active mycobacterial cell wall lipids could interact with the pulmonary surfactant and result in lung surfactant dysfunction. In this study, the major phospholipid of the lung surfactant, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and binary mixtures of DPPC:phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in 9:1 and 7:3 ratios were modelled as lung surfactant monolayers and the inhibitory potential of mycolic acid and cord factor on the surface activity of DPPC and DPPC:PG mixtures was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. The mycobacterial lipids caused common profile changes in all the isotherms: increase in minimum surface tension, compressibility and percentage area change required for change in surface tension from 30 to 10 mN/m. Higher minimum surface tension values were achieved in the presence of mycolic acid (18.2+/-0.7 mN/m) and cord factor (13.28+/-1.2 mN/m) as compared to 0 mN/m, achieved by pure DPPC film. Similarly higher values of compressibility (0.375+/-0.005 m/mN for mycolic acid:DPPC and 0.197+/-0.003 m/mN for cord factor:DPPC monolayers) were obtained in presence of mycolic acid and cord factor. Thus, mycolic acid and cord factor were said to be inhibitory towards lung surfactant phospholipids. Higher surface tension and compressibility values in presence of tubercular lipids are suggestive of an unstable and fluid surfactant film, which will fail to achieve low surface tensions and can contribute to alveolar collapse in patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. In conclusion a biophysical inhibition of lung surfactant may play a role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and may serve as a target for

  19. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Ragunath; Lyn, Rodney K.; Srinivasan, Prashanth; Delcorde, Julie; Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne; Pezacki, John P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1α and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1α, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1α/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

  20. PEA chloroplasts under clino-rotation: lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranenko, V. V.

    The lipid peroxidation (LP) intensity and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were studied in chloroplasts of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown for 7 and 14 days under clino-rotation. An increase in LP levels in chloroplasts during both terms of clinorotation in comparison with stationary controls was documented. SOD activity increased in chloroplasts of plants that were clino-rotated for seven days. SOD has a significant protective effect by diminishing the availability of O2-. However, under more prolonged clino-rotation (14 days), SOD activity decreased but was still higher than in the control samples. In accordance with Selye's oxidative stress theory (Selye, 1956; modified by Leshem et al., 1998), plants that were clino-rotated for seven days are presumed to be in a stage of resistance while 14-day plants reached a stage of exhaustion.

  1. Spatial distribution and activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in lipid bilayer membranes with phase boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Brewer, Jonathan; Bagatolli, Luis A; Simonsen, Adam C; Ipsen, John H; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-06-01

    We have reconstituted functional Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of well-defined binary and ternary lipid composition including cholesterol. The activity of the membrane system can be turned on and off by ATP. The hydrolytic activity of NKA is found to depend on membrane phase, and the water relaxation in the membrane on the presence of NKA. By collapsing and fixating the GUVs onto a solid support and using high-resolution atomic-force microscopy (AFM) imaging we determine the protein orientation and spatial distribution at the single-molecule level and find that NKA is preferentially located at lo/ld interfaces in two-phase GUVs and homogeneously distributed in single-phase GUVs. When turned active, the membrane is found to unbind from the support suggesting that the protein function leads to softening of the membrane. PMID:26994932

  2. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  3. Lipolytic activity of ricin from Ricinus sanguineus and Ricinus communis on neutral lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, S; Helmy, M E; Piéroni, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study was carried out with a view of determining ricin lipolytic activity on neutral lipids in emulsion and in a membrane-like model. Using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol tributyrate (BAL-TC(4)) as substrate, the lipolytic activity of ricin was found to be proportional to ricin and substrate concentrations, with an apparent K(m) (K(m,app)) of 2.4 mM, a k(cat) of 200 min(-1) and a specific activity of 1.0 unit/mg of protein. This work was extended to p-nitrophenyl (pNP) fatty acid esters containing two to twelve carbon atoms. Maximum lipolytic activity was registered on pNP decanoate (pNPC(10)), with a K(m,app) of 3.5 mM, a k(cat) of 173 min(-1) and a specific activity of 3.5 units/mg of protein. Ricin lipolytic activity is pH and galactose dependent, with a maximum at pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.2 M galactose. Using the monolayer technique with dicaprin as substrate, ricin showed a lipolytic activity proportional to the ricin concentration at 20 mN/m, which is dependent on the surface pressure of the lipid monolayer and is detectable up to 30 mN/m, a surface pressure that is of the same order of magnitude as that of natural cell membranes. The methods based on pNPC(10) and BAL-TC(4) hydrolysis are simple and reproducible; thus they can be used for routine studies of ricin lipolytic activity. Ricin from Ricinus communis and R. sanguineus were treated with diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, an irreversible serine esterase inhibitor, and their lipolytic activities on BAL-TC(4) and pNPC(10), and cytotoxic activity, were concurrently recorded. A reduction in lipolytic activity was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxicity on Caco2 cells. These data support the idea that the lipolytic activity associated with ricin is relevant to a lipase whose activity is pH and galactose dependent, sensitive to diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, and that a lipolytic step may be involved in the process of cell poisoning by ricin. Both colorimetric tests used in this study are sensitive

  4. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  5. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Omura, Satoshi

    2004-01-20

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC(50) values of 0.78 and 0.41 microM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.5 microM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  6. [Effects of biologically-active dietary supplement from marine biology on cholinesterase activity and blood lipid peroxidation in humans].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, V A; Kovalev, N N; Enikeeva, N A; Epshteĭn, L M

    2000-01-01

    Influence of dietary supplement Tinrostim-C on cholinesterase (ChE) activity and serum lipids peroxidation (LP) in patients whose work connects with emotional stress was examined. Activity of ChE was measured by Ellman calorimetric method (with acetylthiocholin as substrate), LP--by fluorimetric method with malone dialdehyde. Tinrostim-C was given three times a day in 0.5 g. On the 10th day of taking the preparation an activity of serum ChE increased 23.5% higher and had been staying higher during the whole period of observation. In vitro experiments showed an activating effect of Tinrostim-C and piracetam for serum ChE. The level of LP being initially higher was decreasing to values close to normal and had been staying at decreased level during the whole period of observation. PMID:11247159

  7. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  8. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase2 is essential for steroidogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L.; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M.; Bell, John D.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, their activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serves as both a dehydrogenase and isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (Tm), from 42° C to 37° C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without affecting the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the N-terminal 20 amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  9. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in rats: Lipid analyses and lipase activities in liver and spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, M.; Yoshida, H.; Suzuki, M.; Fujiyama, J.; Igata, A. )

    1990-09-01

    We report the biological characterization of an animal model of a genetic lipid storage disease analogous to human Wolman's disease. Affected rats accumulated cholesteryl esters (13.3-fold), free cholesterol (2.8-fold), and triglycerides (5.4-fold) in the liver, as well as cholesteryl esters (2.5-fold) and free cholesterol (1.33-fold) in the spleen. Triglycerides did not accumulate, and the levels actually decreased in the spleen. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides showed high percentages of linoleic acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) in both organs, especially in the liver. No accumulation of phospholipids, neutral glycosphingolipids, or gangliosides was found in the affected rats. Acid lipase activity for (14C)triolein, (14C)cholesteryl oleate, and 4-methyl-umbelliferyl oleate was deficient in both the liver and spleen of affected rats. Lipase activity at neutral pH was normal in both liver and spleen. Heterozygous rats showed intermediate utilization of these substrates in both organs at levels between those for affected rats and those for normal controls, although they did not accumulate any lipids. These data suggest that these rats represent an animal counterpart of Wolman's disease in humans.

  10. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  11. A series of cationic sterol lipids with gene transfer and bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Randazzo, R. A. S.; Bucki, R.; Janmey, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    A family of cationic lipids was synthesized via direct amide coupling of spermine to the C-24 position of cholic acid analogs. Four monosubstituted spermines and a bis-substituted spermine were evaluated as plasmid transfection reagents, as bacteriostatic agents, and as bactericidal agents. The incorporation of a double bond in the sterol moiety enhanced transfection efficiency significantly and produced two compounds with little cytotoxicity and transfection potency comparable to Lipofectamine2000. Inclusion of the double bond had no effect on the general trend of increasing bactericidal activity with increasing sterol hydrophobicity. Co-formulation of the most hydrophilic of the compounds with its bis-substituted analogue led to enhancement in transfection activity. The bis-substituted compound, when tested alone, emerged as the most bacteriostatic compound in the family with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 4 μM against B. subtilis and 16 μM against E. coli and therapeutic indexes (minimum hemolytic concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration) of 61 and 15, respectively. Cationic lipids can be optimized for both gene delivery and antibacterial applications by similar modifications. PMID:19364656

  12. Lipid A biosynthesis in Rhizobium leguminosarum: Role of a 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonate-activated 4{prime} phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Price, N.P.J.; Jeyaretnam, B.; Carlson, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    Lipid A from several strains of the N{sub 2}-fixing bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum displays significant structural differences from Escherichia coli lipid A, one of which is the complete absence of phosphate groups. However, the first seven enzymes of E. coli lipid A biosynthesis, leading from UDP-GlcNAc to the phosphorylated intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonate (Kdo{sub 2})-lipid IV{sub A}, are present in R. leguminosarum. We now describe a membrane-bound phosphatase in R. leguminosarum extracts that removes the 4{prime} phosphate of Kdo{sub 2}-lipid IV{sub A}. The 4{prime} phosphatase is selective for substrates containing the Kdo domain. It is present in extracts of R. leguminosarum biovars phaseoli, viciae, and trifolii but is not detectable in E. coli and Rhizobium meliloti. A nodulation-defective strain (24AR) of R. leguminosarum bovar trifolii, known to contain a 4{prime} phosphate residue on its lipid A, also lacks measurable 4{prime} phosphatase activity. the Kdo-dependent 4{prime} phosphatase appears to be a key reaction in a pathway for generating phosphate-deficient lipid A.

  13. Heparin suppresses lipid raft-mediated signaling and ligand-independent EGF receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Tao; Song, Lifang; Templeton, Douglas M

    2007-04-01

    Heparin is well known to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, and attempts to exploit this therapeutically have led to recognition of multiple pathways for heparin's anti-mitogenic actions. At low concentrations (ca. 1 microg.ml(-1)), these suppressive effects may reflect physiological activities of endogenous heparan sulfates, and appear to be rapid responses to extracellular or cell surface-associated heparin. Because heparin has been shown to influence expression of caveolin proteins, and caveolae/lipid rafts are critical structures modulating cell signaling, we examined the effect of heparin on signaling involving cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. The VSMC line PAC-1 activates the MAP kinase Erk in response to the cholesterol-sequestering agents methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and nystatin. This follows a temporal sequence that involves Ras-GTP activation of MEK, and is independent of PKC, Src, and PI3 kinase. However, ligand-independent phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by removal of cholesterol precedes Ras activation, and the EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 blocks Erk phosphorylation, supporting occurrence of the signaling sequence EGFR-Ras-MEK-Erk. Phosphorylation of EGFR occurs predominantly in caveolin-rich microdomains as identified by Western blotting of fractions from density gradient centrifugation of membranes prepared under detergent-free conditions. In these situations, heparin inhibits phosphorylation of EGFR on the Src-dependent site Tyr(845), but not the autophosphorylation of Tyr(1173), and decreases Ras activation and Erk phosphorylation. We conclude that heparin can suppress Erk signaling in VSMC with effects on site-specific phosphorylation of EGFR localized in caveolin-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:17226785

  14. Development of highly potent protease-activated receptor 2 agonists via synthetic lipid tethering

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Hoffman, Justin; Tillu, Dipti V.; Sherwood, Cara L.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Patek, Renata; Asiedu, Marina N. K.; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) associated with a variety of pathologies. However, the therapeutic potential of PAR2 is limited by a lack of potent and specific ligands. Following proteolytic cleavage, PAR2 is activated through a tethered ligand. Hence, we reasoned that lipidation of peptidomimetic ligands could promote membrane targeting and thus significantly improve potency and constructed a series of synthetic tethered ligands (STLs). STLs contained a peptidomimetic PAR2 agonist (2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2) bound to a palmitoyl group (Pam) via polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers. In a high-throughput physiological assay, these STL agonists displayed EC50 values as low as 1.47 nM, representing a ∼200 fold improvement over the untethered parent ligand. Similarly, these STL agonists were potent activators of signaling pathways associated with PAR2: EC50 for Ca2+ response as low as 3.95 nM; EC50 for MAPK response as low as 9.49 nM. Moreover, STLs demonstrated significant improvement in potency in vivo, evoking mechanical allodynia with an EC50 of 14.4 pmol. STLs failed to elicit responses in PAR2−/− cells at agonist concentrations of >300-fold their EC50 values. Our results demonstrate that the STL approach is a powerful tool for increasing ligand potency at PAR2 and represent opportunities for drug development at other protease activated receptors and across GPCRs.—Flynn, A. N., Hoffman, J., Tillu, D. V., Sherwood, C. L., Zhang, Z., Patek, R., Asiedu, M. N. K., Vagner, J., Price, T. J., Boitano, S. Development of highly potent protease-activated receptor 2 agonists via synthetic lipid tethering. PMID:23292071

  15. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  16. Analysis of constant tension-induced rupture of lipid membranes using activation energy.

    PubMed

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Levadnyy, Victor; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-05-11

    The stretching of biomembranes and lipid membranes plays important roles in various physiological and physicochemical phenomena. Here we analyzed the rate constant kp of constant tension-induced rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a function of tension σ using their activation energy Ua. To determine the values of kp, we applied constant tension to a GUV membrane using the micropipette aspiration method and observed the rupture of GUVs, and then analyzed these data statistically. First, we investigated the temperature dependence of kp for GUVs of charged lipid membranes composed of negatively charged dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and electrically neutral dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). By analyzing this result, the values of Ua of tension-induced rupture of DOPG/DOPC-GUVs were obtained. Ua decreased with an increase in σ, supporting the classical theory of tension-induced pore formation. The analysis of the relationship between Ua and σ using the theory on the electrostatic interaction effects on the tension-induced rupture of GUVs provided the equation of Ua including electrostatic interaction effects, which well fits the experimental data of the tension dependence of Ua. A constant which does not depend on tension, U0, was also found to contribute significantly to Ua. The Arrhenius equations for kp using the equation of Ua and the parameters determined by the above analysis fit well to the experimental data of the tension dependence of kp for DOPG/DOPC-GUVs as well as for DOPC-GUVs. On the basis of these results, we discussed the possible elementary processes underlying the tension-induced rupture of GUVs of lipid membranes. These results indicate that the Arrhenius equation using the experimentally determined Ua is useful in the analysis of tension-induced rupture of GUVs. PMID:27125194

  17. Helicobacter pylori Resists the Antimicrobial Activity of Calprotectin via Lipid A Modification and Associated Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Radin, Jana N.; Cullen, Thomas W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Skaar, Eric P.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori is one of several pathogens that persist within the host despite a robust immune response. H. pylori elicits a proinflammatory response from host epithelia, resulting in the recruitment of immune cells which manifests as gastritis. Relatively little is known about how H. pylori survives antimicrobials, including calprotectin (CP), which is present during the inflammatory response. The data presented here suggest that one way H. pylori survives the nutrient sequestration by CP is through alteration of its outer membrane. CP-treated H. pylori demonstrates increased bacterial fitness in response to further coculture with CP. Moreover, CP-treated H. pylori cultures form biofilms and demonstrate decreased cell surface hydrophobicity. In response to CP, the H. pylori Lpx lipid A biosynthetic enzymes are not fully functional. The lipid A molecules observed in H. pylori cultures treated with CP indicate that the LpxF, LpxL, and LpxR enzyme functions are perturbed. Transcriptional analysis of lpxF, lpxL, and lpxR indicates that metal restriction by CP does not control this pathway through transcriptional regulation. Analyses of H. pylori lpx mutants reveal that loss of LpxF and LpxL results in increased fitness, similar to what is observed in the presence of CP; moreover, these mutants have significantly increased biofilm formation and reduced cell surface hydrophobicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism of H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobial activity of CP via lipid A modification strategies and resulting biofilm formation. PMID:26646009

  18. [Regulation of superoxide dismutase activity during deep hypothermia by simultaneous administration of water and lipid soluble antioxidants].

    PubMed

    Shkesters, A P; Utno, L Ia; Girgensone, M Ia

    1991-06-01

    Alongside anti-hypoxia activity, the method of deep hypothermia causes discoordination of metabolism in the heart. This is due to increased secretion of catecholamines in the process of cooling, to activation in free radical generation and lipid peroxidation. Pantethine and alpha-tocopherol were used. Pantethine reduced lipid peroxidation, preserved reaction activity of catalyzing resyntheses and transport of high energetic compounds in the heart, while alpha-tocopherol prevented lipid peroxidation activation and decrease in SOD. Simultaneous use of pantethine and alpha-tocopherol caused increase in SOD and normalization of heart metabolism. Thus, for protection of the heart against excessive free radical generation under deep hypothermia simultaneous use of antioxidants like pantethine and alpha-tocopherol is necessary. PMID:1893178

  19. AMPK activation promotes lipid droplet dispersion on detyrosinated microtubules to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Herms, Albert; Bosch, Marta; Reddy, Babu J.N.; Schieber, Nicole L.; Fajardo, Alba; Rupérez, Celia; Fernández-Vidal, Andrea; Ferguson, Charles; Rentero, Carles; Tebar, Francesc; Enrich, Carlos; Parton, Robert G.; Gross, Steven P.; Pol, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular organelles that provide fatty acids (FAs) to cellular processes including synthesis of membranes and production of metabolic energy. While known to move bidirectionally along microtubules (MTs), the role of LD motion and whether it facilitates interaction with other organelles are unclear. Here we show that during nutrient starvation, LDs and mitochondria relocate on detyrosinated MT from the cell centre to adopt a dispersed distribution. In the cell periphery, LD–mitochondria interactions increase and LDs efficiently supply FAs for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. This cellular adaptation requires the activation of the energy sensor AMPK, which in response to starvation simultaneously increases LD motion, reorganizes the network of detyrosinated MTs and activates mitochondria. In conclusion, we describe the existence of a specialized cellular network connecting the cellular energetic status and MT dynamics to coordinate the functioning of LDs and mitochondria during nutrient scarcity. PMID:26013497

  20. Stearoyl CoA desaturase is required to produce active, lipid-modified Wnt proteins.

    PubMed

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Resh, Marilyn D

    2013-09-26

    Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD) generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation. PMID:24055053

  1. Stearoyl CoA desaturase is required to produce active, lipid-modified Wnt proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Wnt proteins contain an unusual lipid modification, palmitoleic acid. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD) generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate which is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a, and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation. PMID:24055053

  2. Reduction Sensitive Lipid Conjugates of Tenofovir: Synthesis, Stability, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Giesler, Kyle E; Marengo, Jose; Liotta, Dennis C

    2016-08-11

    The therapeutic value of numerous small molecules hinges on their ability to permeate the plasma membrane. This is particularly true for tenofovir (TFV), adefovir, and other antiviral nucleosides that demonstrate potent antiviral activity but poor bioavailability. Using TFV as a model substrate, we hybridized two disparate prodrug strategies to afford novel reduction-sensitive lipid conjugates of TFV that exhibit subnanomolar activity toward HIV-1 and are stable in human plasma for more than 24 h with a therapeutic index approaching 30000. These compounds significantly rival the clinically approved formulation of TFV and revitalize the potential of disulfide-bearing prodrugs which have seen limited in vitro and in vivo success since their debut over 20 years ago. We further demonstrate the utility of these conjugates as a tool to indirectly probe the enzymatic hydrolysis of phosphonomonoesters that may further advance the development of other prodrug strategies for nucleosides, peptides, and beyond. PMID:27405794

  3. Evaluation of lipid peroxidation activity at intravenous administration of gold nanorods in rats with simulated diabetes and transplanted liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Dikht, Natalia I.; Afanasyeva, Galina A.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Zaraeva, Nadezhda V.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.

    2014-01-01

    In the experiment the white outbred rats with transplanted liver cancer (cholangiocarcinoma line PC-1) and simulated alloxan diabetes were treated by single intravenous injection of gold nanorods. State of lipid peroxidation was evaluated by the following parameters: the malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxide, the average weght molecules in the serum of animals by conventional spectrophotometric methods study using a spectrofluorometer RF-5301 PC (Shimadzu, Japan). In both experimental groups of animals the significant increasing of levels of lipid peroxidation products was noted compared with control group. After intravenous administration of nanoparticles in the group of animals with alloxan diabetes the activation of a free radical oxidation was not observed, in group with transplanted liver cancer the increasing of levels of lipid hydroperoxide, malondialdehyde was established.

  4. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering. PMID:25805842

  5. Lipid peroxidation, erythrocyte superoxide-dismutase activity and trace metals in young male footballers.

    PubMed

    Metin, Gokhan; Atukeren, Pinar; Alturfan, A Ata; Gulyasar, Tevfik; Kaya, Mehmet; Gumustas, M Koray

    2003-12-30

    Physical training is known to induce oxidative stress in individuals subjected to intense exercise. In this study, we investigated plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of 25 young male footballers and a control group of similar age. Red blood cell (RBC) count, haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Hct) values, and copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels were also examined. The maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) of all subjects was determined in order to establish their functional capacity. The main finding of the present study was that plasma MDA levels, one of the most commonly used markers of lipid peroxidation, of this group of footballers aged under 21 decreased slightly when compared with those of the control group (p < 0.001). In contrast, erythrocyte SOD activity was higher in the footballer group than in the controls (p < 0.001). Footballers who are under regular training showed an improved antioxidant activity in comparison to sedentary controls. Plasma copper concentration, RBC count and Hb concentration of the footballer group were all significantly lower than those of the control group, (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). Investigating the footballers' data with Spearman's correlation analyses, the correlation coefficients (r) between Zn/Cu ratio and SOD was positive (r=0.44; p < 0.05); and between VO2max and SOD (r=0.42; p < 0.05) were both positive. On the basis of statistical analysis, we suggest that regular exercise may be beneficial in cases of oxidative damage by reducing the amount of lipid peroxidation and increasing the activity of the antioxidant enzyme SOD. PMID:14703604

  6. Oriented Circular Dichroism: A Method to Characterize Membrane-Active Peptides in Oriented Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-02-16

    The structures of membrane-bound polypeptides are intimately related to their functions and may change dramatically with the lipid environment. Circular dichroism (CD) is a rapid analytical method that requires relatively low amounts of material and no labeling. Conventional CD is routinely used to monitor the secondary structure of peptides and proteins in solution, for example, in the presence of ligands and other binding partners. In the case of membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins, these measurements can be applied to, and remain limited to, samples containing detergent micelles or small sonicated lipid vesicles. Such traditional CD analysis reveals only secondary structures. With the help of an oriented circular dichroism (OCD) setup, however, based on the preparation of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers, it is possible to address the membrane alignment of a peptide in addition to its conformation. This approach has been mostly used for α-helical peptides so far, but other structural elements are conceivable as well. OCD analysis relies on Moffitt's theory, which predicts that the electronic transition dipole moments of the backbone amide bonds in helical polypeptides are polarized either parallel or perpendicular to the helix axis. The interaction of the electric field vector of the circularly polarized light with these transitions results in an OCD spectrum of a membrane-bound α-helical peptide, which exhibits a characteristic line shape and reflects the angle between the helix axis and the bilayer normal. For parallel alignment of a peptide helix with respect to the membrane surface (S-state), the corresponding "fingerprint" CD band around 208 nm will exhibit maximum negative amplitude. If the helix changes its alignment via an obliquely tilted (T-state) to a fully inserted transmembrane orientation (I-state), the ellipticity at 208 nm decreases and the value approaches zero due to the decreased interactions between the field and the

  7. Micron dimensioned cavity array supported lipid bilayers for the electrochemical investigation of ionophore activity.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean; Basit, Hajra; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-12-01

    Microcavity supported lipid bilayers, MSLBs, were applied to an electrochemical investigation of ionophore mediated ion transport. The arrays comprise of a 1cm(2) gold electrode imprinted with an ordered array of uniform spherical-cap pores of 2.8μm diameter prepared by gold electrodeposition through polystyrene templating spheres. The pores were pre-filled with aqueous buffer prior to Langmuir-Blodgett assembly of a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy enabled by the micron dimensions of the pores permitted study of lipid diffusion across single apertures, yielding a diffusion coefficient of 12.58±1.28μm(2)s(-1) and anomalous exponent of 1.03±0.02, consistent with Brownian motion. From FLCS, the MSLBs were stable over 3days and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the membrane with and without ionic gradient over experimental windows of 6h showed excellent stability. Two ionophores were studied at the MSLBs; Valinomycin, a K(+) uniporter and Nigericin, a K(+)/H(+) antiporter. Ionophore reconstituted into the DOPC bilayer resulted in a decrease and increase in membrane resistance and capacitance respectively. Significant increases in Valinomycin and Nigericin activity were observed, reflected in large decreases in membrane resistance when K(+) was present in the contacting buffer and in the presence of H(+) ionic gradient across the membrane respectively. PMID:27420132

  8. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    PubMed

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72 mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466 kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and orally (8 mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30 min incubation at 80 °C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8 mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein. PMID:26783638

  9. Functional UQCRC1 polymorphisms affect promoter activity and body lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kunej, Tanja; Wang, Zeping; Michal, Jennifer J; Daniels, Tyler F; Magnuson, Nancy S; Jiang, Zhihua

    2007-12-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes constitute leading public health problems worldwide. Studies have shown that insulin resistance affiliated with these conditions is associated with skeletal muscle lipid accumulation, while the latter is associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions. However, the initiation and regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis rely heavily on approximately 1000 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulatory proteins. In this study, we targeted the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein I gene, a nuclear-encoded component of mitochondrial complex III, for its association with subcutaneous fat depth (SFD) and skeletal muscle lipid accumulation (SMLA) using cattle as a model. Four promoter polymorphisms were identified and genotyped on approximately 250 Wagyu x Limousin F2 progeny. Statistical analysis revealed that two completely linked polymorphic sites, g.13487C>T and g.13709G>C (r2 = 1), were significantly associated with both SFD (p < 0.01) and SMLA (p < 0.0001). The difference between TTCC and CCGG haplotypes was 0.178 cm for SFD and 0.624 scores for SMLA. Interestingly, the former haplotype produced higher promoter activities than the latter by 43% to 49% in three cell lines (p < 0.05). In addition to Rett syndrome and breast/ovarian cancer observed in other studies, we report evidence for the first time, to our knowledge, that overexpression of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein I might affect mitochondrial morphology and/or physiology and lead to development of obesity and related conditions. PMID:18198295

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Trypanocidal Activity of H2bdtc-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Zumira A.; da S. Maia, Pedro I.; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Lopes, Carla D.; Pereira, Tatiana A.; Milanezi, Cristiane M.; da Silva, Marcelo A. Pereira.; Lopez, Renata F. V.; Silva, João S.; Deflon, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which remains a serious public health concern and continues to victimize thousands of people, primarily in the poorest regions of Latin America. In the search for new therapeutic drugs against T. cruzi, here we have evaluated both the in vitro and the in vivo activity of 5-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-phenyl-pyrazoline-1-(S-benzyl dithiocarbazate) (H2bdtc) as a free compound or encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN); we compared the results with those achieved by using the currently employed drug, benznidazole. H2bdtc encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (a) effectively reduced parasitemia in mice at concentrations 100 times lower than that normally employed for benznidazole (clinically applied at a concentration of 400 µmol kg−1 day−1); (b) diminished inflammation and lesions of the liver and heart; and (c) resulted in 100% survival of mice infected with T. cruzi. Therefore, H2bdtc is a potent trypanocidal agent. PMID:24810753

  11. Characterization, biorecognitive activity and stability of WGA grafted lipid nanostructures for the controlled delivery of Rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Tunki, Lakshmi; Kulhari, Hitesh; Reddy, Bharathi B; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-12-01

    Targeted nanomedicines improve the delivery of drugs by increasing the drug concentration at target site, protecting the premature degradation and releasing the encapsulated drug in controlled manner. To make rifampicin (RFN) delivery more effective, we designed and characterized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated, RFN loaded solid-lipid nanoparticles (WRSN). Nanoparticles were prepared by solvent emulsification/evaporation and conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled WGA. Important characteristics, such as particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, conjugation efficiency and in vitro drug release behavior, were investigated. WGA conjugation to the nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis. Conjugation efficiency was determined by fluorescent spectroscopy and Bradford assay. RFN was released from nanoparticles via the diffusion-controlled, non-fickian and supercase II mechanism. A haemaglutination test confirmed that WGA retained its bio-recognition activity and sugar-binding specificity after it was coupled with the nanoparticles. In vitro experiments demonstrated that WRSN interacted more than non-conjugated nanoparticles with porcine mucin. WRSN were stable in the presence of electrolytes up to 1M concentration. Therefore, WGA-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles could be a promising tool for the controlled delivery of RFN or other anti-tubercular drugs. PMID:26409629

  12. Diffusional dynamics of an active rhodamine-labeled 1,4-dihydropyridine in sarcolemmal lipid multibilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, R P; Chester, D W

    1989-01-01

    A "membrane bilayer pathway" model, involving ligand partition into the bilayer, lateral diffusion, and receptor binding has been invoked to describe the 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel antagonist receptor binding mechanism. In an earlier study (Chester et al. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:1021-1030), the diffusional component of this model was examined using an active fluorescence labeled DHP calcium channel antagonist, nisoldipine-lissamine rhodamine B (Ns-R), in purified cardiac sarcolemmal (CSL) lipid multibilayers. Diffusion coefficient measurements on membrane-bound drug and phospholipid at maximum bilayer hydration yielded similar values (3.8 x 10(-8) cm2/s). However, decreases in bilayer hydration resulted in dramatically reduced diffusion coefficient values for both probes with substantially greater impact on Ns-R diffusion. These data suggested that hydration dependent diffusional differences could be a function of relative probe location along the bilayer normal. In this communication, we have addressed the relative effect of the rhodamine substituent on Ns-R diffusion complex by examining the diffusional dynamics of free rhodamine B under the same conditions used to evaluate Ns-R complex and phospholipid diffusion. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to determine the Ns-R location in the membrane and model the CSL lipid bilayer profile structure to give a rationale for the differences in probe diffusional dynamics as a function of interbilayer water space. PMID:2611332

  13. In vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of H2bdtc-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Zumira A; Maia, Pedro I da S; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Lopes, Carla D; Pereira, Tatiana A; Milanezi, Cristiane M; da Silva, Marcelo A Pereira; Lopez, Renata F V; Silva, João S; Deflon, Victor M

    2014-05-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which remains a serious public health concern and continues to victimize thousands of people, primarily in the poorest regions of Latin America. In the search for new therapeutic drugs against T. cruzi, here we have evaluated both the in vitro and the in vivo activity of 5-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-phenyl-pyrazoline-1-(S-benzyl dithiocarbazate) (H2bdtc) as a free compound or encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN); we compared the results with those achieved by using the currently employed drug, benznidazole. H2bdtc encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (a) effectively reduced parasitemia in mice at concentrations 100 times lower than that normally employed for benznidazole (clinically applied at a concentration of 400 µmol kg(-1) day(-1)); (b) diminished inflammation and lesions of the liver and heart; and (c) resulted in 100% survival of mice infected with T. cruzi. Therefore, H2bdtc is a potent trypanocidal agent. PMID:24810753

  14. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III Inhibit Lipoprotein Lipase Activity by Displacement of the Enzyme from Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  15. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III inhibit lipoprotein lipase activity by displacement of the enzyme from lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-11-22

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  16. Diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities are associated with an altered lipid pattern: protective effects of LXR activation[S

    PubMed Central

    Cermenati, Gaia; Abbiati, Federico; Cermenati, Solei; Brioschi, Elisabetta; Volonterio, Alessandro; Cavaletti, Guido; Saez, Enrique; De Fabiani, Emma; Crestani, Maurizio; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Melcangi, Roberto C.; Caruso, Donatella; Mitro, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is characterized by myelin abnormalities; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying such deficits remain obscure. To uncover the effects of diabetes on myelin alterations, we have analyzed myelin composition. In a streptozotocin-treated rat model of diabetic neuropathy, analysis of sciatic nerve myelin lipids revealed that diabetes alters myelin's phospholipid, FA, and cholesterol content in a pattern that can modify membrane fluidity. Reduced expression of relevant genes in the FA biosynthetic pathway and decreased levels of the transcriptionally active form of the lipogenic factor sterol-regulatory element binding factor-1c (SREBF-1c) were found in diabetic sciatic nerve. Expression of myelin's major protein, myelin protein zero (P0), was also suppressed by diabetes. In addition, we confirmed that diabetes induces sciatic nerve myelin abnormalities, primarily infoldings that have previously been associated with altered membrane fluidity. In a diabetic setting, synthetic activator of the nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) increased SREBF-1c function and restored myelin lipid species and P0 expression levels to normal. These LXR-modulated improvements were associated with restored myelin structure in sciatic nerve and enhanced performance in functional tests such as thermal nociceptive threshold and nerve conduction velocity. These findings demonstrate an important role for the LXR-SREBF-1c axis in protection from diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities. PMID:22158827

  17. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qin; Gou, Xiao-jun; Meng, Sheng-xi; Huang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-quan; Tang, Ya-jun; Wang, Wen-jing; Xu, Lin; Peng, Jing-hua; Hu, Yi-yang

    2013-01-01

    Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD), a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA) in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23573117

  18. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  19. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  20. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 860-871, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26419316

  1. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in Plasmodium vivax malaria patients evolving with cholestatic jaundice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax infection has been considered a benign and self-limiting disease, however, recent studies highlight the association between vivax malaria and life-threatening manifestations. Increase in reactive oxygen species has already been described in vivax malaria, as a result of the increased metabolic rate triggered by the multiplying parasite, and large quantities of toxic redox-active byproducts generated. The present study aimed to study the oxidative stress responses in patients infected with P. vivax, who developed jaundice (hyperbilirubinaemia) in the course of the disease, a common clinical complication related to this species. Methods An evaluation of the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes profile was performed in 28 healthy individuals and compared with P. vivax infected patients with jaundice, i.e., bilirubin < 51.3 μmol/L (8 patients) or without jaundice (34 patients), on day 1 (D1) and day 14 (D14) after anti-malarial therapy. Results Hyperbilirubinaemia was more frequent among women and patients experiencing their first malarial infection, and lower haemoglobin and higher lactate dehydrogenase levels were observed in this group. Malondialdehyde levels and activity of celuroplasmin and glutathione reductase were increased in the plasma from patients with P. vivax with jaundice compared to the control group on D1. However, the activity of thioredoxin reductase was decreased. The enzymes glutathione reductase, thioredoxin reductase, thiols and malondialdehyde also differed between jaundiced versus non-jaundiced patients. On D14 jaundice and parasitaemia had resolved and oxidative stress biomarkers were very similar to the control group. Conclusion Cholestatic hyperbilirubinaemia in vivax malaria cannot be totally disassociated from malaria-related haemolysis. However, significant increase of lipid peroxidation markers and changes in antioxidant enzymes in patients with P. vivax-related jaundice was observed. These results

  2. Biological Activity of Japanese Quince Extract and Its Interactions with Lipids, Erythrocyte Membrane, and Human Albumin.

    PubMed

    Strugała, Paulina; Cyboran-Mikołajczyk, Sylwia; Dudra, Anna; Mizgier, Paulina; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Olejniczak, Teresa; Gabrielska, Janina

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine in vitro biological activity of fruit ethanol extract from Chaenomeles speciosa (Sweet) Nakai (Japanese quince, JQ) and its important constituents (-)-epicatechin (EC) and chlorogenic acid (CA). The study also investigated the structural changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, and erythrocyte membranes (RBC) induced by the extract. It was found that the extract effectively inhibits oxidation of RBC, induced by 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), and PC liposomes, induced by UVB radiation and AAPH. Furthermore, JQ extract to a significant degree inhibited the activity of the enzymes COX-1 and COX-2, involved in inflammatory reactions. The extract has more than 2 times greater activity in relation to COX-2 than COX-1 (selectivity ratio 0.48). JQ extract stimulated growth of the beneficial intestinal bacteria Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum. In the fluorimetric method by means of the probes Laurdan, DPH and TMA-DPH, and (1)H-NMR, we examined the structural changes induced by JQ and its EC and CA components. The results show that JQ and its components induce a considerable increase of the packing order of the polar heads of lipids with a slight decrease in mobility of the acyl chains. Lipid membrane rigidification could hinder the diffusion of free radicals, resulting in inhibition of oxidative damage induced by physicochemical agents. JQ extract has the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of human serum albumin through static quenching. This report thus could be of huge significance in the food industry, pharmacology, and clinical medicine. PMID:26861057

  3. Neuroprotective properties of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and its lipid ligands.

    PubMed

    Fidaleo, Marco; Fanelli, Francesca; Ceru, Maria Paola; Moreno, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Signalling lipids are known to control a wide array of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and energy metabolism. Fatty acids and their derivatives, eicosanoids, phosphoinositides, sphingolipids, some cannabinoid-like molecules bind and activate nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). This subfamily of transcription factors comprises three isotypes - PPARα (NR1C1), PPAR β/δ (NR1C2), PPARγ (NR1C3) - which bind to specific DNA response elements, as heterodimers with retinoid X receptors. PPAR activity is modulated by post-translational modifications and cofactors, towards which they show differential affinity. The three PPARs mutually interact, being integrated in a complex system, leading to the concept of a "PPAR triad". Nevertheless, the isotypes also show distinct actions on cellular physiology and partially different tissue, ligand and target gene specificities. In the brain, while the functions of PPARγ and its ligands are being thoroughly investigated, the actual and potential roles of PPARα and β/δ are far from being clarified. PPARα appears especially intriguing, since it is selectively expressed in certain brain areas and neuronal/glial populations, and modulates antioxidant responses, neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, neurogenesis, and glial cell proliferation/differentiation. This receptor and its endogenous ligands, including oleoylethanoloamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), are involved in physiological and pathological responses, such as satiety, memory consolidation, and modulation of pain perception. The protective role of PPARα agonists in neurodegenerative diseases and in neuropsychiatric disorders makes manipulation of this pathway highly attractive as therapeutic strategy for neuropathological conditions. In this review, we focus on the pleiotropic functions of PPARα and its lipid ligands in the nervous tissue, devoting special attention to

  4. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Karlisch, Patricia; Solerssi, Rosa Lopez

    1991-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins E2 and F2(alpha) which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Mechnical stimulation significantly increases the breakdown rate of (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free (3)H-arachidonic acid, and the rate-limiting precursor of prostaglandin synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also significantly increases (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are activated by stretch. The lipase inhibitors bromophenacylbromide and RHC80267 together reduce stretch-induced prostaglandin production by 73-83 percent. The stretch-induced increases in prostaglandin production, (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids are dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and prostaglandins through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  5. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; Karlisch, P.; Solerssi, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins (PG) E2 and F2 alpha which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. These stretch-induced PG increases are reduced in low extracellular calcium medium and by specific phospholipase inhibitors. Mechanical stimulation increases the breakdown rate of 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free 3H-arachidonic acid, the rate-limiting precursor of PG synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also increases 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are all activated by stretch. The stretch-induced increases in PG production, 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids is dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and PG through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  6. Sodium pump molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in two disparate ectotherms, and comparison with endotherms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Hulbert, A J; Else, Paul L

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the lower sodium pump molecular activity observed in tissues of ectotherms compared to endotherms, is largely related to the lower levels of polyunsaturates and higher levels of monounsaturates found in the cell membranes of ectotherms. Marine-based ectotherms, however, have very polyunsaturated membranes, and in the current study, we measured molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in tissues of two disparate ectothermic species, the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps), to determine whether the high level of membrane polyunsaturation generally observed in marine-based ectotherms is associated with an increased sodium pump molecular activity relative to other ectotherms. Phospholipids from all tissues of the octopus were highly polyunsaturated and contained high concentrations of the omega-3 polyunsaturate, docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 (n-3)). In contrast, phospholipids from bearded dragon tissues contained higher proportions of monounsaturates and lower proportions of polyunsaturates. Sodium pump molecular activity was only moderately elevated in tissues of the octopus compared to the bearded dragon, despite the much greater level of polyunsaturation in octopus membranes. When the current data were combined with data for the ectothermic cane toad, a significant (P = 0.003) correlation was observed between sodium pump molecular activity and the content of 22:6 (n-3) in the surrounding membrane. These results are discussed in relation to recent work which shows a similar relationship in endotherms. PMID:15726386

  7. [Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and lipid parameters in Tunisian smokers].

    PubMed

    Haj Mouhamed, Dhouha; Ezzaher, Asma; Araoud, Manel; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at examine the effect of cigarettes smoking on paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and lipid profile. Our study included 102 smokers aged 35.5 +/- 16.0 years and 98 non-smokers aged 38.5 +/- 21.9 years. Total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerols (TG), HDL cholesterol (CHDL) and LDL-cholesterol (cLDL) were determined by enzymatic colorimetric methods. ApoA1 and ApoB and Lp(a) were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry on Konélab 30, PON1 activity was measured by a kinetic method. Plasma CT, TG, cLDL, Lp(a) and ApoB/ApoA1 ratio appeared significantly higher in the smokers when compared to nonsmokers, since cHDL levels were lower. In addition, TG values were significantly higher in subjects smoking more than 30 cigarettes/day as compared to those smoking 5-10 cigarettes/day. We noted a significant decrease of PON1 activity in smokers compared to non smokers (94 +/- 104 vs 158 +/- 133 IU/L), with regression of PON1 activity according number of cigarettes/day. In conclusion, hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of cHDL, high levels of ApoB/ApoA1 and significant decrease of PON1 activity confirm the high risk of cardiovascular diseases in smokers. PMID:20348046

  8. Enzyme activities and membrane lipids in artemia cysts after a long duration space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubin, Y.; Prévost, M. C.; Cariven, C.; Pianezzi, B.; Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    In the Free Flyer Biostack Experiment (L.D.E.F. mission) investigations have shown that biological objects in a resting state can survive more than 5.5 years of exposure to the space factors in particular microgravity and cosmic rays. We have measured enzyme activities involved in metabolic pathways of sugar and lipid degradation and determined phospholipid composition. Pyruvate kinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in space-exposed cysts were higher than in earth controls after 1 hour incubation. In controls, total phospholipids remained unchanged, on the contrary they increased significantly in space-exposed cysts. The rate of metabolism of various phospholipid components was unchanged in controls allowing the development while the level of most of them decreased in space-exposed cysts except for phosphatidylcholine. Enzyme activities (acetylhydrolase, phospholipase A_2 and lyso phospholipase) involved in phospholipid degradation increased ; however, activities were much higher in space-exposed cysts. In conclusion, the long duration space flight resulted in an increase of the metabolic activity correlated with a faster development within the first 20 hours of post flight incubation.

  9. Expression of constitutively activated Akt in the mammary gland leads to excess lipid synthesis during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Schwertfeger, Kathryn L; McManaman, James L; Palmer, Carol A; Neville, Margaret C; Anderson, Steven M

    2003-06-01

    Expression of constitutively activated Akt in the mammary glands of transgenic mice results in a delay in post-lactational involution. We now report precocious lipid accumulation in the alveolar epithelium of mouse mammary tumor virus-myr-Akt transgenic mice accompanied by a lactation defect that results in a 50% decrease in litter weight over the first 9 days of lactation. Although ductal structures and alveolar units develop normally during pregnancy, cytoplasmic lipid droplets appeared precociously in mammary epithelial cells in early pregnancy and were accompanied by increased expression of adipophilin, which is associated with lipid droplets. By late pregnancy the lipid droplets had become significantly larger than in nontransgenic mice, and they persisted into lactation. The fat content of milk from lactating myr-Akt transgenic mice was 65-70% by volume compared to 25-30% in wild-type mice. The diminished growth of pups nursed by transgenic mothers could result from the high viscosity of the milk and the inability of the pups to remove sufficient quantities of milk by suckling. Transduction of the CIT3 mammary epithelial cell line with a recombinant human adenovirus encoding myr-Akt resulted in an increase in glucose transport and lipid biosynthesis, suggesting that Akt plays an important role in regulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:12700340

  10. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  11. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  12. Activation of lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of plant cell rearrangements under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranenko, V. V.

    Activation of the lipid peroxidation (LP) is a universal process perturbating cell membranes under different unfavourable conditions. It is suggested that the LP can be one of the important mechanisms of plant cell rearrangements under altered gravity as well. The purpose of this investigation is to study the LP intensity in pea leaves and chloroplasts under 7- and 14-day clinorotation. The intensification of the LP under both terms of clinorotation particularly under more prolonged, is detected. The adaptive increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content under 7-day clinorotation and their minor decrease under 14-day clinorotation are revealed. The lowering of electron transport rate in both photosystems, particularly in PSI, is established. The results confirm that the LPmay be one of the mechanisms of plant cell rearrangements under microgravity.

  13. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  14. A lipid-mediated conformational switch modulates the thermosensing activity of DesK.

    PubMed

    Inda, María Eugenia; Vandenbranden, Michel; Fernández, Ariel; de Mendoza, Diego; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía

    2014-03-01

    The thermosensor DesK is a multipass transmembrane histidine-kinase that allows the bacterium Bacillus subtilis to adjust the levels of unsaturated fatty acids required to optimize membrane lipid fluidity. The cytoplasmic catalytic domain of DesK behaves like a kinase at low temperature and like a phosphatase at high temperature. Temperature sensing involves a built-in instability caused by a group of hydrophilic residues located near the N terminus of the first transmembrane (TM) segment. These residues are buried in the lipid phase at low temperature and partially "buoy" to the aqueous phase at higher temperature with the thinning of the membrane, promoting the required conformational change. Nevertheless, the core question remains poorly understood: How is the information sensed by the transmembrane region converted into a rearrangement in the cytoplasmic catalytic domain to control DesK activity? Here, we identify a "linker region" (KSRKERERLEEK) that connects the TM sensor domain with the cytoplasmic catalytic domain involved in signal transmission. The linker adopts two conformational states in response to temperature-dependent membrane thickness changes: (i) random coiled and bound to the phospholipid head groups at the water-membrane interface, promoting the phosphatase state or (ii) unbound and forming a continuous helix spanning a region from the membrane to the cytoplasm, promoting the kinase state. Our results uphold the view that the linker is endowed with a helix/random coil conformational duality that enables it to behave like a transmission switch, with helix disruption decreasing the kinase/phosphatase activity ratio, as required to modulate the DesK output response. PMID:24522108

  15. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 is essential for steroidogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M; Bell, John D; Bose, Himangshu S

    2011-12-27

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, the activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serve as both a dehydrogenase and an isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (T(m)) from 42 to 37 °C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without an effect on the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the 20 N-terminal amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  16. A unique antioxidant activity of phosphatidylserine on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Dacaranhe, C D; Terao, J

    2001-10-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant effect of acidic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS), on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers and their abilities to bind iron ion was examined in egg yolk phosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles (EYPC LUV). The effect of each acidic phospholipid added to the vesicles at 10 mol% was assessed by measuring phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PC-OOH) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The addition of dipalmitoyl PS (DPPS) showed a significant inhibitory effect, although the other two acidic phospholipids, dipalmitoyl PA (DPPA) and dipalmitoyl PG (DPPG), did not exert the inhibition. Neither dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) nor dipalmitoyl phophatidylethanolamine (DPPE) showed any remarkable inhibition on this system. None of the tested phospholipids affected the lipid peroxidation rate remarkably when the vesicles were exposed to a water-soluble radical generator. The iron-binding ability of each phospholipid was estimated on the basis of the amounts of iron recovered in the chloroform/methanol phase after separation of the vesicle solution to water/methanol and chloroform/methanol phases. EYPC LUV containing DPPS, DPPA, and DPPG had higher amounts of bound iron than those containing DPPC and DPPE, indicating that these three acidic phospholipids possess an iron-binding ability at a similar level. Nevertheless, only DPPS suppressed iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH significantly. Therefore, it is likely that these three acidic phospholipids possess a significant iron-binding ability, although this ability per se does not warrant them antioxidative activities. The ability to suppress the iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH may explain the unique antioxidant activity of PS. PMID:11768154

  17. Modulation of ileal bile acid transporter (ASBT) activity by depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol: association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Kumar, Pradeep; Saksena, Seema; Turner, Jerrold R.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.

    2016-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) represents a highly efficient conservation mechanism of bile acids via mediation of their active transport across the luminal membrane of terminal ileum. To gain insight into the cellular regulation of ASBT, we investigated the association of ASBT with cholesterol and sphingolipid-enriched specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and examined the role of membrane cholesterol in maintaining ASBT function. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably transfected with human ASBT, human ileal brush-border membrane vesicles, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were utilized for these studies. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of ASBT protein with lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts by depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly reduced the association of ASBT with lipid rafts, which was paralleled by a decrease in ASBT activity in Caco-2 and HEK-293 cells treated with MβCD. The inhibition in ASBT activity by MβCD was blocked in the cells treated with MβCD-cholesterol complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that MβCD treatment decreased the Vmax of the transporter, which was not associated with alteration in the plasma membrane expression of ASBT. Our study illustrates that cholesterol content of lipid rafts is essential for the optimal activity of ASBT and support the association of ASBT with lipid rafts. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which ASBT activity may be rapidly modulated by alterations in cholesterol content of plasma membrane and thus have important implications in processes related to maintenance of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:18063707

  18. Bactericidal activities of cathelicidin LL-37 and select cationic lipids against the hypervirulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain LESB58.

    PubMed

    Wnorowska, Urszula; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Myint, Melissa; Diamond, Scott L; Wróblewska, Marta; Savage, Paul B; Janmey, Paul A; Bucki, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are associated with transmissibility and increased patient morbidity. This study was designed to assess the in vitro activities of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide (LL-37) and select cationic lipids against Pseudomonas aeruginosa LESB58 in CF sputum and in a setting mimicking the CF airway. We found that LL-37 naturally present in airway surface fluid and some nonpeptide cationic lipid molecules such as CSA-13, CSA-90, CSA-131, and D2S have significant, but broadly differing, bactericidal activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58. We observed strong inhibition of LL-37 bactericidal activity in the presence of purified bacteriophage Pf1, which is highly expressed by P. aeruginosa LES, but the activities of the cationic lipids CSA-13 and CSA-131 were not affected by this polyanionic virus. Additionally, CSA-13 and CSA-131 effectively prevent LESB58 biofilm formation, which is stimulated by Pf1 bacteriophage, DNA, or F-actin. CSA-13 and CSA-131 display strong antibacterial activities against different clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, and their activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58 and Xen5 strains were maintained in CF sputum. These data indicate that synthetic cationic lipids (mimics of natural antimicrobial peptides) are suitable for developing an effective treatment against CF lung P. aeruginosa infections, including those caused by LES strains. PMID:25870055

  19. Principles of lysosomal membrane digestion: stimulation of sphingolipid degradation by sphingolipid activator proteins and anionic lysosomal lipids.

    PubMed

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids and glycosphingolipids are membrane components of eukaryotic cell surfaces. Their constitutive degradation takes place on the surface of intra-endosomal and intra-lysosomal membrane structures. During endocytosis, these intra-lysosomal membranes are formed and prepared for digestion by a lipid-sorting process during which their cholesterol content decreases and the concentration of the negatively charged bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)--erroneously also called lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)--increases. Glycosphingolipid degradation requires the presence of water-soluble acid exohydrolases, sphingolipid activator proteins, and anionic phospholipids like BMP. The lysosomal degradation of sphingolipids with short hydrophilic head groups requires the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). These are the saposins (Saps) and the GM2 activator protein. Sphingolipid activator proteins are membrane-perturbing and lipid-binding proteins with different specificities for the bound lipid and the activated enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their inherited deficiency leads to sphingolipid- and membrane-storage diseases. Sphingolipid activator proteins not only facilitate glycolipid digestion but also act as glycolipid transfer proteins facilitating the association of lipid antigens with immunoreceptors of the CD1 family. PMID:16212488

  20. Bactericidal Activities of Cathelicidin LL-37 and Select Cationic Lipids against the Hypervirulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain LESB58

    PubMed Central

    Wnorowska, Urszula; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Myint, Melissa; Diamond, Scott L.; Wróblewska, Marta; Savage, Paul B.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are associated with transmissibility and increased patient morbidity. This study was designed to assess the in vitro activities of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide (LL-37) and select cationic lipids against Pseudomonas aeruginosa LESB58 in CF sputum and in a setting mimicking the CF airway. We found that LL-37 naturally present in airway surface fluid and some nonpeptide cationic lipid molecules such as CSA-13, CSA-90, CSA-131, and D2S have significant, but broadly differing, bactericidal activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58. We observed strong inhibition of LL-37 bactericidal activity in the presence of purified bacteriophage Pf1, which is highly expressed by P. aeruginosa LES, but the activities of the cationic lipids CSA-13 and CSA-131 were not affected by this polyanionic virus. Additionally, CSA-13 and CSA-131 effectively prevent LESB58 biofilm formation, which is stimulated by Pf1 bacteriophage, DNA, or F-actin. CSA-13 and CSA-131 display strong antibacterial activities against different clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, and their activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58 and Xen5 strains were maintained in CF sputum. These data indicate that synthetic cationic lipids (mimics of natural antimicrobial peptides) are suitable for developing an effective treatment against CF lung P. aeruginosa infections, including those caused by LES strains. PMID:25870055

  1. Glutamate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria: do lipid modifications and transient metabolon formation influence enzyme activity?

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in brain, is complex and of paramount importance to overall brain function. Thus, understanding the regulation of enzymes involved in formation and disposal of glutamate and related metabolites is crucial to understanding glutamate metabolism. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a pivotal enzyme that links amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle activity in brain and other tissues. The allosteric regulation of GDH has been extensively studied and characterized. Less is known about the influence of lipid modifications on GDH activity, and the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes (metabolons) that can greatly influence metabolism by altering kinetic parameters and lead to channeling of metabolites. This review summarizes evidence for palmitoylation and acylation of GDH, information on protein binding, and information regarding the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes. Recent studies suggest that a number of other proteins can bind to GDH altering activity and overall metabolism. It is likely that these modifications and interactions contribute additional levels of regulation of GDH activity and glutamate metabolism. PMID:21771624

  2. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  3. Structure-Activity Relationship of Amino Acid Tunable Lipidated Norspermidine Conjugates: Disrupting Biofilms with Potent Activity against Bacterial Persisters.

    PubMed

    Konai, Mohini M; Adhikary, Utsarga; Samaddar, Sandip; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-12-16

    The emergence of bacterial resistance and biofilm associated infections has created a challenging situation in global health. In this present state of affairs where conventional antibiotics are falling short of being able to provide a solution to these problems, development of novel antibacterial compounds possessing the twin prowess of antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy is imperative. Herein, we report a library of amino acid tunable lipidated norspermidine conjugates that were prepared by conjugating both amino acids and fatty acids with the amine functionalities of norspermidine through amide bond formation. These lipidated conjugates displayed potent antibacterial activity against various planktonic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including drug-resistant superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. This class of nontoxic and fast-acting antibacterial molecules (capable of killing bacteria within 15 min) did not allow bacteria to develop resistance against them after several passages. Most importantly, an optimized compound in the series was also capable of killing metabolically inactive persisters and stationary phase bacteria. Additionally, this compound was capable of disrupting the preformed biofilms of S. aureus and E. coli. Therefore, this class of antibacterial conjugates have potential in tackling the challenging situation posed by both bacterial resistance as well as drug tolerance due to biofilm formation. PMID:26452096

  4. Structure-activity correlation in transfection promoted by pyridinium cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Parvizi-Bahktar, P; Mendez-Campos, J; Raju, L; Khalique, N A; Jubeli, E; Larsen, H; Nicholson, D; Pungente, M D; Fyles, T M

    2016-03-21

    The efficiency of the transfection of a plasmid DNA encoding a galactosidase promoted by a series of pyridinium lipids in mixtures with other cationic lipids and neutral lipids was assessed in CHO-K1 cells. We identify key molecular parameters of the lipids in the mixture - clog P, lipid length, partial molar volume - to predict the morphology of the lipid-DNA lipoplex and then correlate these same parameters with transfection efficiency in an in vitro assay. We define a Transfection Index that provides a linear correlation with normalized transfection efficiency over a series of 90 different lipoplex compositions. We also explore the influence of the same set of molecular parameters on the cytotoxicity of the formulations. PMID:26891970

  5. Inhibition of SREBP transcriptional activity by a boron-containing compound improves lipid homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoping; Xiaoli; Zong, Haihong; Abdulla, Arian; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Qun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Das, Bhaskar C; Yang, Fajun

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is intimately associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master regulators of lipid biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that the conserved transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex is critically required for the SREBP transcriptional activity, and recruitment of the Mediator complex to the SREBP transactivation domains (TADs) is through the MED15-KIX domain. Recently, we have synthesized several boron-containing small molecules. Among these novel compounds, BF175 can specifically block the binding of MED15-KIX to SREBP1a-TAD in vitro, resulting in an inhibition of the SREBP transcriptional activity and a decrease of SREBP target gene expression in cultured hepatocytes. Furthermore, BF175 can improve lipid homeostasis in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Compared with the control, BF175 treatment decreased the expression of SREBP target genes in mouse livers and decreased hepatic and blood levels of lipids. These results suggest that blocking the interaction between SREBP-TADs and the Mediator complex by small molecules may represent a novel approach for treating diseases with aberrant lipid homeostasis. PMID:24608444

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel cationic lipids with anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Myint, Melissa; Bucki, Robert; Janmey, Paul A; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-07-15

    Certain membrane-active cationic steroids are known to also possess both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. This combined functionality is particularly relevant for potential therapies of infections associated with elevated tissue damage, for example, cystic fibrosis airway disease, a condition characterized by chronic bacterial infections and ongoing inflammation. In this study, six novel cationic glucocorticoids were synthesized using beclomethasone, budesonide, and flumethasone. Products were either monosubstituted or disubstituted, containing one or two steroidal groups, respectively. In vitro evaluation of biological activities demonstrated dual anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties with limited cytotoxicity for all synthesized compounds. Budesonide-derived compounds showed the highest degree of both glucocorticoid and antimicrobial properties within their respective mono- and disubstituted categories. Structure-activity analyses revealed that activity was generally related to the potency of the parent glucocorticoid. Taken together, these data indicate that these types of dual acting cationic lipids can be synthesized with the appropriate starting steroid to tailor activities as desired. PMID:26004577

  7. QCM-D and ToF-SIMS Investigation to Deconvolute the Relationship between Lipid Adsorption and Orientation on Lipase Activity.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Kempson, Ivan; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-09-22

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to provide insights into the relationship between lipid adsorption kinetics and molecular behavior in porous silica particles of varying hydrophobicities on lipase activity. Lipase (an interfacial enzyme that cleaves ester bonds to break down lipids to fatty acids and monoglycerides) activity was controlled by loading triglycerides at different surface coverages in hydrophilic and hydrophobic porous silica particles. The rate of lipid adsorption increased 2-fold for the hydrophobic surface compared to the hydrophilic surface. However, for submonolayer lipid coverage, the hydrophilic surface enhanced lipase activity 4-fold, whereas the hydrophobic surface inhibited lipase activity 16-fold, compared to lipid droplets in water. A difference in lipid orientation for low surface coverage, evidenced by ToF-SIMS, indicated that lipid adsorbs to hydrophilic silica in a conformation promoting hydrolysis. Multilayer coverage on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces was indistinguishable with ToF-SIMS analysis. Increased lipid adsorption for both substrates facilitated digestion kinetics comparable to a conventional emulsion. Improved understanding of the interfacial adsorption and orientation of lipid and its digestibility in porous silica has implications in improving the uptake of pharmaceuticals and nutrients from lipid-based delivery systems. PMID:26340506

  8. Activation of fibroblast and papilla cells by glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Suzuki, Michiko; Sogabe, Atsushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), the extracellular glycolipids produced from feedstock by yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma, are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics, the cell activating property of MELs was investigated using cultured fibroblast and papilla cells, and a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The di-acetylated MEL (MEL-A) produced from soybean oil significantly increased the viability of the fibroblast cells over 150% compared with that of control cells. On the other hand, no cell activation was observed by the treatment with MEL-A produced from olive oil. The mono-acetylated MEL (MEL-B) hardly increased the cell viability. The viability of the fibroblast cells decreased with the addition of more than 1 microg/L of MELs, whereas the cultured human skin cells showed high viability with 5 microg/L of MELs. Interestingly, the papilla cells were dramatically activated with 0.001 microg/L of MEL-A produced from soybean oil: the cell viability reached at 150% compared with that of control cells. Consequently, the present MEL-A produced from soybean oil should have a potential as a new hair growth agent stimulating the papilla cells. PMID:20625237

  9. Structure-activity relationship of lipid core peptide-based Group A Streptococcus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy; Hussein, Waleed M; Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; Marasini, Nirmal; Mostafa, Ahmed; Eskandari, Sharareh; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-07-15

    Infection with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can result in a range of different illnesses, some of which are fatal. Currently, our efforts to develop a vaccine against GAS focuses on the lipid core peptide (LCP) system, a subunit vaccine containing a lipoamino acid (LAA) moiety which allows the stimulation of systemic antibody activity. In the present study, a peptide (J14) representing the B-cell epitope from the GAS M protein was incorporated alongside a universal T-helper epitope (P25) in four LCP constructs of different spatial orientation or LAA lengths. Through structure-activity studies, it was discovered that while the alteration of the LCP orientation had a weaker effect on immunostimulation, increasing the LAA side chain length within the construct increased antibody responses in murine models. Furthermore, the mice immunised with the lead LCP construct were also able to maintain antibody activity throughout the course of five months. These findings highlight the importance of LAA moieties in the development of intranasal peptide vaccines and confirmed that its side chain length has an effect on the immunogenicity of the structure. PMID:27246859

  10. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai; He, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Kejian; Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong; Guo, Xiaomei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  11. Lipid-lowering Activity of Natural and Semi-Synthetic Sterols and Stanols.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of plant sterols/ stanols has long been demonstrated to reduce plasma cholesterol levels. The objective of this review is to demonstrate the lipid-lowering activity and anti-atherogenic effects of natural and semi-synthetic plant sterols/ stanols based on evidence from cell-culture studies, animal studies and clinical trials. Additionally, this review highlights certain molecular mechanisms by which plant sterols/ stanols lower plasma cholesterol levels with a special emphasis on factors that affect the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols. The crystalline nature and the poor oil solubility of these natural products could be important factors that limit their cholesterol-lowering efficiency. Several attempts have been made to improve the cholesterol-lowering activity by enhancing the bioavailability of crystalline sterols and stanols. Approaches involved reduction of the crystal size and/or esterification with fatty acids from vegetable or fish oils. However, the most promising approach in this context is the chemical modification of plant sterols /stanols into water soluble disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphates analogue by esterification with ascorbic acid. This novel semi-synthetic stanol derivative has improved efficacy over natural plant sterols/ stanols and can provide additional benefits by combining the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant stanols with the antioxidant potential of ascorbic acid. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626241

  12. Activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes in workers exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Ostalowska, Alina; Dziwisz, Maria; Birkner, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes in healthy male employees of zinc and lead steelworks who were occupationally exposed to lead over a long period of time (about 15 yr). Workers were divided into two subgroups: the first included employees with low exposure to lead (LL) (n=75) with blood lead level PbB=25-40 microg/dL and the second with high exposure to lead (HL) (n=62) with PbB over 40 microg/dL. Administration workers (n=35) with normal levels of PbB and zinc protoporphyrin in blood (ZPP) in blood were the control group. The activity of GPx significantly increased in LL when compared to the control group (p<0.001) and decreased when compared to the HL group (p=0.036). There were no significant changes in activity of GR in the study population. MDA erythrocyte concentration significantly increased in the HL group compared to the control (p=0.014) and to the LL group (p=0.024). For the people with low exposure to lead (PbB=25-40 microg/dL), the increase of activity of GPx by about 79% in erythrocytes prevented lipid peroxidation and it appears to be the adaptive mechanism against the toxic effect of lead. People with high exposure to lead (with PbB over 40 microg/dL) have shown an increase in MDA concentration in erythrocytes by about 91%, which seems to have resulted from reduced activity of GPx and the lack of increase in activity of GR in blood red cells. PMID:15621928

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Deficient in Lipidation of Prelipoproteins Is Attenuated in Growth and Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Hartmut; Dengjel, Jörn; Nerz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    A lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) deletion mutant of Staphylococcus aureus SA113 was constructed. The lipoprotein and prelipoprotein expression, the growth behavior, and the ability of the mutant to elicit an immune response in various host cells were studied. In the wild type, the majority of [14C]palmitate-labeled lipoproteins were located in the membrane fraction, although some lipoproteins were also present on the cell surface and in the culture supernatant. The lgt mutant completely lacked palmitate-labeled lipoproteins and released high amounts of some unmodified prelipoproteins, e.g., the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA, the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PrsA, and the staphylococcal iron transporter SitC, into the culture supernatant. The growth of the lgt mutant was hardly affected in rich medium but was retarded under nutrient limitation. The lgt mutant and its crude lysate induced much fewer proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human monocytic (MonoMac6), epithelial (pulmonary A549), and endothelial (human umbilical vein endothelial) cells than the wild type. However, in whole blood samples, the culture supernatant of the lgt mutant was equal or even superior to the wild-type supernatant in tumor necrosis factor alpha induction. Lipoprotein fractionation experiments provided evidence that a small proportion of the mature lipoproteins are released by the S. aureus wild type despite the lipid anchor and are trapped in part by the cell wall, thereby exposing the immune-activating lipid structure on the cell surface. Bacterial lipoproteins appear to be essential for a complete immune stimulation by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:15784587

  14. Improved In Vitro Antileukemic Activity of All-Trans Retinoic Acid Loaded in Cholesteryl Butyrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Lima, Flávia Alves; Carneiro, Guilherme; Ramos Jonas Periera; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2016-02-01

    All-trans retinoic acid, a hydrophobic drug, has become one of the most successful examples of differentiation agents used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. On the other hand, histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as cholesteryl butyrate, present differentiating activity and.can potentiate action of drugs such as all-trans retinoic acid. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent a promising alternative for administration of hydrophobic drugs such as ATRA. This study aimed to develop, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of all-trans retinoic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for leukemia treatment. The influence of in situ formation of an ion pairing between all-trans retinoic acid and lipophilic amines on the characteristics of the particles (size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency) was evaluated. Cholesteryl butyrate, a butyric acid donor, was used as a component of the lipid matrix. In vitro activity on cell viability and distribution of cell cycle phases were evaluated for HL-60, Jurkat, and THP-1 cell lines. The encapsulation efficiency of all-trans retinoic acid in cholesteryl butyrate-solid lipid nanoparticles was significantly increased by the presence of the amine. Inhibition of cell viability by all-trans retinoic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was more pronounced than the free drug. Analysis of the distribution of cell cycle phases also showed increased activity for all-trans retinoic acid-loaded cholesteryl butyrate-solid lipid nanoparticles, with a clear increase in subdiploid DNA content. The ion pair formation in SLN containing cholesteryl butyrate can be explored as a simple and inexpensive strategy to improve the efficacy and bioavail-ability of ATRA in the treatment of the cancer and metabolic diseases in which this retinoid plays an important role. PMID:27433579

  15. The synthetic cationic lipid diC14 activates a sector of the Arabidopsis defence network requiring endogenous signalling components.

    PubMed

    Cambiagno, Damián Alejandro; Lonez, Caroline; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Alvarez, María Elena

    2015-12-01

    Natural and synthetic elicitors have contributed significantly to the study of plant immunity. Pathogen-derived proteins and carbohydrates that bind to immune receptors, allow the fine dissection of certain defence pathways. Lipids of a different nature that act as defence elicitors, have also been studied, but their specific effects have been less well characterized, and their receptors have not been identified. In animal cells, nanoliposomes of the synthetic cationic lipid 3-tetradecylamino-tert-butyl-N-tetradecylpropionamidine (diC14) activate the TLR4-dependent immune cascade. Here, we have investigated whether this lipid induces Arabidopsis defence responses. At the local level, diC14 activated early and late defence gene markers (FRK1, WRKY29, ICS1 and PR1), acting in a dose-dependent manner. This lipid induced the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent, but not jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent, pathway and protected plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), but not Botrytis cinerea. diC14 was not toxic to plant or pathogen, and potentiated pathogen-induced callose deposition. At the systemic level, diC14 induced PR1 expression and conferred resistance against Pst. diC14-induced defence responses required the signalling protein EDS1, but not NDR1. Curiously, the lipid-induced defence gene expression was lower in the fls2/efr/cerk1 triple mutant, but still unchanged in the single mutants. The amidine headgroup and chain length were important for its activity. Given the robustness of the responses triggered by diC14, its specific action on a defence pathway and the requirement for well-known defence components, this synthetic lipid is emerging as a useful tool to investigate the initial events involved in plant innate immunity. PMID:25727690

  16. Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids using a Novel Cold-Active Lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structured lipids (SL) were synthesized by the acidolysis of borage oil with caprylic acid using lipases. Six commercial lipases from different sources and a novel lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723 were screened for their acidolysis activities and Lipozyme RM IM and NRRL Y-7723 lipase were s...

  17. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-d...

  18. Impact of lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes and ascorbic acid on the antioxidant activity of model melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Kitrytė, Vaida; Adams, An; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2012-12-01

    As the heat-induced formation of antioxidants throughout the Maillard reaction is known, this study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes and ascorbic acid in Maillard model systems on the resulting antioxidant activity. For this purpose, various fractions of melanoidin-like polycondensation products were obtained from mixtures of amino acids (glycine, lysine, arginine) and lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes (hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal), in the presence or absence of glucose or ascorbic acid. All fractions showed a significant radical scavenging capacity (DPPH assay) and ferric reducing power (FRAP assay). The activity varied according to the composition of the model system tested, although some similar trends were discovered in both assays applied. The presence of lipid oxidation products in the browning products augmented the antioxidant activity in specific cases. For instance, the combined presence of arginine, hexanal and glucose in heated model systems resulted in a significantly higher antioxidant capacity. With an exception of ascorbic acid-containing model systems, melanoidin-like polycondensation products possessed significantly stronger antioxidant activities than the corresponding unheated initial reactant mixtures. Water-soluble high molecular weight (>12kDa) and nonsoluble fractions comprised the major part of the antioxidants derived from amino acid/lipid oxidation product model systems, with or without glucose or ascorbic acid. PMID:22953854

  19. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, B.A.; Wasowicz, W.; Sklodowska, M.; Gromadzinska, J.

    1987-07-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  20. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. PMID:26776045

  1. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2) followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week). Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max) and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp) was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001) and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose) improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01) as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15). Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity and cardiac function

  2. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase Isoforms Exhibit Acyl Chain Selectivity for Both Substrate and Lipid Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Anderson, Richard A.; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is mostly produced in the cell by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5K) and has a crucial role in numerous signaling events. Here we demonstrate that in vitro all three isoforms of PIP5K, α, β, and γ, discriminate among substrates with different acyl chains for both the substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) although to different extents, with isoform γ being the most selective. Fully saturated dipalmitoyl-PtdIns4P was a poor substrate for all three isoforms, but both the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl and the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl forms of PtdIns4P were good substrates. Vmax was greater for the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl form compared with the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl form, although for PIP5Kβ the difference was small. For the α and γ isoforms, Km was much lower for 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl PtdIns4P, making this lipid the better substrate of the two under most conditions. Activation of PIP5K by phosphatidic acid is also acyl chain-dependent. Species of phosphatidic acid with two unsaturated acyl chains are much better activators of PIP5K than those containing one saturated and one unsaturated acyl chain. PtdIns is a poor substrate for PIP5K, but it also shows acyl chain selectivity. Curiously, there is no acyl chain discrimination among species of phosphatidic acid in the activation of the phosphorylation of PtdIns. Together, our findings indicate that PIP5K isoforms α, β, and γ act selectively on substrates and activators with different acyl chains. This could be a tightly regulated mechanism of producing physiologically active unsaturated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate species in the cell. PMID:22942276

  3. Role of lipid packing in the activity of phospholipase C-delta1 as determined by hydrostatic pressure measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Rebecchi, M; Bonhomme, M; Scarlata, S

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies with phospholipid monolayers revealed a large decrease in the activity of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta(1) (PLC-delta(1)) which catalyses the hydrolysis of PtdIns(4, 5)P(2) as lateral pressure is applied to the membrane. If stress on the membrane is the sole inhibitor of PLC-delta(1) activity, the enzyme must penetrate the membrane surface to engage its substrate. To test the effect on PLC-delta(1) activity of lipid packing in the absence of a directional stress, we examined the effects of increasing hydrostatic pressure on enzymic activity. We find that, in contrast with monolayer studies, increasing lipid packing by hydrostatic pressure does not affect membrane binding and increases enzymic activity by 90% in going from atmospheric pressure to 10(8) Pa (approx. 1000 atm). The increase in activity could be accounted for mainly by electrostriction of water around the multiply-charged product. Our results show that when there is no net stress on the monolayer, lipid packing does not alter PLC-delta(1) activity, possibly because penetration of the enzyme into the membrane surface is shallow. We suggest that, in biological membranes, the activity of this and possibly other interfacial proteins is independent of headgroup packing. PMID:10417319

  4. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation.

  5. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation. PMID:25698336

  6. Effects of Differences in Lipid A Structure on TLR4 Pro-Inflammatory Signaling and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Paula M.; Embry, Chelsea A.; Mitchell, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate immune system exists in equilibrium with the microbial world. The innate immune system recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns via a family of Toll-like receptors (TLR) that activate cells upon detection of potential pathogens. Because some microbes benefit their hosts, mobilizing the appropriate response, and then controlling that response is critical in the maintenance of health. TLR4 recognizes the various forms of lipid A produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Depending on the structural form of the eliciting lipid A molecule, TLR4 responses range from a highly inflammatory endotoxic response involving inflammasome and other pro-inflammatory mediators, to an inhibitory, protective response. Mounting the correct response against an offending microbe is key to maintaining health when exposed to various bacterial species. Further study of lipid A variants may pave the way to understanding how TLR4 responses are generally able to avoid chronic inflammatory damage. PMID:22707952

  7. High-throughput, cell-free, liposome-based approach for assessing in vitro activity of lipid kinases.

    PubMed

    Demian, Douglas J; Clugston, Susan L; Foster, Meta M; Rameh, Lucia; Sarkes, Deborah; Townson, Sharon A; Yang, Lily; Zhang, Melvin; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-08-01

    Lipid kinases are central players in lipid signaling pathways involved in inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metabolic syndrome. A number of these kinase targets have proven difficult to investigate in higher throughput cell-free assay systems. This challenge is partially due to specific substrate interaction requirements for several of the lipid kinase family members and the resulting incompatibility of these substrates with most established, homogeneous assay formats. Traditional, cell-free in vitro investigational methods for members of the lipid kinase family typically involve substrate incorporation of [gamma-32P] and resolution of signal by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and autoradiograph densitometry. This approach, although highly sensitive, does not lend itself to high-throughput testing of large numbers of small molecules (100 s to 1 MM+). The authors present the development and implementation of a fully synthetic, liposome-based assay for assessing in vitro activity of phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate-4-kinase isoforms (PIP4KIIbeta and alpha) in 2 commonly used homogeneous technologies. They have validated these assays through compound testing in both traditional TLC and radioactive filterplate approaches as well as binding validation using isothermic calorimetry. A directed library representing known kinase pharmacophores was screened against type IIbeta phosphatidylinositol-phosphate kinase (PIPK) to identify small-molecule inhibitors. This assay system can be applied to other types and isoforms of PIPKs as well as a variety of other lipid kinase targets. PMID:19641220

  8. The Arabidopsis ABHD11 Mutant Accumulates Polar Lipids in Leaves as a Consequence of Absent Acylhydrolase Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Anitha; Vijayaraj, Panneerselvam; Vijayakumar, Arun Kumar; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Alpha/beta hydrolase domain (ABHD)-containing proteins are structurally related with diverse catalytic activities. In various species, some ABHD proteins have been characterized and shown to play roles in lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about ABHD proteins in plants. Here, we characterized AT4G10030 (AtABHD11), an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of a human ABHD11 gene. In silico analyses of AtABHD11 revealed homology with other plant species with a conserved GXSXG lipid motif. Interestingly, Arabidopsis abhd11 mutant plants exhibited an enhanced growth rate compared with wild-type plants. Quantitative analyses of the total lipids showed that the mutant abhd11 has a high amount of phospholipid and galactolipid in Arabidopsis leaves. The overexpression of AtABHD11 in Escherichia coli led to a reduction in phospholipid levels. The bacterially expressed recombinant AtABHD11 hydrolyzed lyso(phospho)lipid and monoacylglycerol. Furthermore, using whole-genome microarray and real-time PCR analyses of abhd11 and wild-type plants, we noted the up-regulation of MGD1, -2, and -3 and DGD1. Together, these findings suggested that AtABHD11 is a lyso(phospho)lipase. The disruption of AtABHD11 caused the accumulation of the polar lipids in leaves, which in turn promoted a higher growth rate compared with wild-type plants. PMID:26589672

  9. Production of hybrid lipid-based particles loaded with inorganic nanoparticles and active compounds for prolonged topical release.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Sampaio da Sousa, A R; Argemí, A; López Periago, A; Saurina, J; Duarte, C M M; Domingo, C

    2009-12-01

    The production of particulate hybrid carriers containing a glyceryl monostearate (Lumulse GMS-K), a waxy triglyceride (Cutina HR), silanized TiO(2) and caffeine were investigated with the aim of producing sunscreens with UV-radiation protection properties. Particles were obtained using the supercritical PGSS (Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions) technique. This method takes advantages of the lower melting temperatures of the lipids obtained from the dissolution of CO(2) in the bulk mixture. Experiments were performed at 13 MPa and 345 K, according to previous melting point measurements. Blends containing Lumulse GMS-K and Cutina HR lipids (50 wt%) were loaded with silanized TiO(2) and caffeine in percentile proportions of 6 and 4 wt%, respectively. The particles produced were characterized using several analytical techniques as follows: system crystallinity was checked by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis, and morphology by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Further, the UV-shielding ability of TiO(2) after its dispersion in the lipidic matrix was assessed by solid UV-vis spectroscopy. Preliminary results indicated that caffeine-loaded solid lipid particles presented a two-step dissolution profile, with an initial burst of 60 wt% of the loaded active agent. Lipid blends loaded with TiO(2) and caffeine encompassed the UV-filter behavior of TiO(2) and the photoaging prevention properties of caffeine. PMID:19720123

  10. Lipid droplets in activated mast cells - a significant source of triglyceride-derived arachidonic acid for eicosanoid production.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Kovanen, Petri T; Schneider, Wolfgang J

    2016-08-15

    Mast cells are potent effectors of immune reactions and key players in various inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cellular defense response of mast cells represents a unique and powerful system, where external signals can trigger cell activation resulting in a stimulus-specific and highly coordinated release of a plethora of bioactive mediators. The arsenal of mediators encompasses preformed molecules stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules, as well as newly synthesized proteinaceous and lipid mediators. The release of mediators occurs in strict chronological order and requires proper coordination between the endomembrane system and various enzymatic machineries. For the generation of lipid mediators, cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been shown to function as a major intracellular pool of arachidonic acid, the precursor for eicosanoid biosynthesis. Recent studies have revealed that not only phospholipids in mast cell membranes, but also triglycerides in mast cell lipid droplets are a substrate source for eicosanoid formation. The present review summarizes current knowledge about mast cell lipid droplet biology, and discusses expansions and challenges of traditional mechanistic models for eicosanoid production. PMID:26164793

  11. Anionic Lipid Content Presents a Barrier to the Activity of ROMP-Based Synthetic Mimics of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDMs).

    PubMed

    Lis, Michael; Dorner, Franziska; Tew, Gregory N; Lienkamp, Karen

    2016-06-14

    Many biophysical studies of protein transduction domains (PTDs) and their synthetic mimics (PTDMs) focus on the interaction between the polycationic PTD(M) and anionic phospholipid surfaces. Most, but not all, of these studies suggest that these cation-anion interactions are vital for membrane activity. In this study, the effect of anionic lipid content on PTDM performance was examined for three ring-opening metathesis (ROMP)-based PTDMs with varying hydrophobicity. Using a series of dye-loaded vesicles with gradually increasing anionic lipid content, we saw that increased anionic lipid content inhibited dye release caused by these PTDMs. This result is the opposite of what was found in studies with poly- and oligo-arginine. While the effect is reduced for more hydrophobic PTDMs, it is observable even with the most hydrophobic PTDMs of our test panel. Additional experiments included dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements to measure size as a function of vesicle surface charge in the presence of increasing PTDM concentration and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy to quantify binding between PTDMs and surface-bound lipid layers with varying anion content. The results from these measurements suggested that PTDM hydrophobicity, not cation-anion interactions, is the main driving force of the interaction between our PTDMs and the model membranes investigated. This suggests a model of interaction where surface association and membrane insertion are driven by PTDM hydrophobicity, while anionic lipid content serves primarily to "pin" the PTDM to the membrane surface and limit insertion. PMID:27182683

  12. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  13. Lipid activation of the signal recognition particle receptor provides spatial coordination of protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vinh Q.; Akopian, David; Rome, Michael; Henningsen, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that activate the bacterial SRP receptor FtsY and the SRP–FtsY complex. This leads to accelerated SRP–FtsY complex assembly, and allows the SRP–FtsY complex to more efficiently unload cargo proteins. Likewise, formation of an active SRP–FtsY GTPase complex exposes FtsY’s lipid-binding helix and enables stable membrane association of the targeting complex. Thus, membrane binding, complex assembly with SRP, and cargo unloading are inextricably linked to each other via conformational changes in FtsY. These allosteric communications allow the membrane delivery of cargo proteins to be efficiently coupled to their subsequent unloading and translocation, thus providing spatial coordination during protein targeting. PMID:20733058

  14. Empagliflozin Protects against Diet-Induced NLRP-3 Inflammasome Activation and Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Elisa; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Vitarelli, Giovanna; Cutrin, Juan Carlos; Nigro, Debora; Chiazza, Fausto; Mayoux, Eric; Collino, Massimo; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with empagliflozin, a potent and selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, in a murine model of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, focusing on drug effects on body weight reduction and nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome activation, which have never been investigated to date. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed control or a high fat-high sugar (HFHS) diet for 4 months. Over the last 2 months, subsets of animals were treated with empagliflozin (1-10 mg/kg) added to the diet. Empagliflozin evoked body weight reduction (P < 0.001 for the highest dose) and positive effects on fasting glycemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. In addition, the drug was able to reduce renal tubular damage and liver triglycerides level in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, empagliflozin also decreased cardiac lipid accumulation. Moreover, diet-induced activation of NLRP-3 in kidney and liver (not observed in the heart) was dose-dependently attenuated by empagliflozin. Our results clearly demonstrate the ability of empagliflozin to counteract the deleterious effects evoked by chronic exposure to HFHS diet. Most notably, empagliflozin treatment was associated with NLRP-3 inflammasome signaling modulation, suggesting that this inhibition may contribute to the drug therapeutic effects. PMID:27440421

  15. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J. P.; Costa, Tamara G. F.; Silva, Lilian N. D.; Renó, Cristiane O.; Oliveira, Eneida S.; Tilelli, Cristiane Q.; Santos, Luciana L.; Cortes, Vanessa F.; Santos, Herica L.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels. PMID:26197432

  16. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  17. Influence of Gender, Obesity, and Muscle Lipase Activity on Intramyocellular Lipids in Sedentary Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Cedric; Galgani, Jose E.; Luu, LanChi; Pasarica, Magdalena; Mairal, Aline; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Schmitz, Gerd; Langin, Dominique; Liebisch, Gerhard; Smith, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with elevated intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) and insulin resistance. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle lipases activity could influence IMCL content (including diacylglycerol and ceramides). Design and Patients: The present study included 48 subjects with a wide range of age (19–68 yr) and body mass index (20–45 kg/m2) who underwent skeletal muscle biopsy, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Main Outcome Measures: Insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic clamp, and intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG), diacylglycerol (DAG), and ceramides content, and triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol hydrolase activities were measured in biopsies of vastus lateralis. IMCL was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subgroup of 25 subjects. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the main predictors of IMCL. Results: Body fat was the main predictor of IMTG independently of the method and the type of muscle; IMTG concentration was higher in females vs. males and obese vs. nonobese subjects. Muscle DAG and ceramides concentrations were elevated in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects and were not related to body fat and fasting free fatty acids, whereas a direct association with the ratio of diacylglycerol hydrolase to triacylglycerol hydrolase activity (an index of incomplete triacylglycerol hydrolysis) was observed, which explained 54 and 38% of the variance in DAG and ceramides (P < 0.001), respectively. DAG content was the main determinant of insulin resistance. Conclusions: These data suggest that intramyocellular DAG is an independent predictor of insulin resistance in humans and that its levels correlate with lipolytic enzymes activity in skeletal muscle but not with markers of adiposity. PMID:19531593

  18. Caspase-8 and c-FLIPL Associate in Lipid Rafts with NF-κB Adaptors during T Cell Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ravi S.; Russell, Jennifer Q.; Koenig, Andreas; Hinshaw-Makepeace, Jennifer A.; Wen, Renren; Wang, Demin; Huo, Hairong; Littman, Dan R.; Ferch, Uta; Ruland, Jurgen; Thome, Margot; Budd, Ralph C.

    2015-01-01

    Humans and mice lacking functional caspase-8 in T cells manifest a profound immunodeficiency syndrome due to defective T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-induced NF-κB signaling and proliferation. It is unknown how caspase-8 is activated following T cell stimulation, and what is the caspase-8 substrate(s) that is necessary to initiate T cell cycling. We observe that following TCR ligation, a small portion of total cellular caspase-8 and c-FLIPL rapidly migrate to lipid rafts where they associate in an active caspase complex. Activation of caspase-8 in lipid rafts is followed by rapid cleavage of c-FLIPL at a known caspase-8 cleavage site. The active caspase·c-FLIP complex forms in the absence of Fas (CD95/APO1) and associates with the NF-κB signaling molecules RIP1, TRAF2, and TRAF6, as well as upstream NF-κB regulators PKCθ, CARMA1, Bcl-10, and MALT1, which connect to the TCR. The lack of caspase-8 results in the absence of MALT1 and Bcl-10 in the active caspase complex. Consistent with this observation, inhibition of caspase activity attenuates NF-κB activation. The current findings define a link among TCR, caspases, and the NF-κB pathway that occurs in a sequestered lipid raft environment in T cells. PMID:17462996

  19. Myelin-Derived Lipids Modulate Macrophage Activity by Liver X Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  20. Myelin-derived lipids modulate macrophage activity by liver X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Timmermans, Silke; Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J M; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  1. Effect of biologically active substances derived from hydrobionts of the Pacific Ocean on parameters of lipid metabolism during experimental hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, T A; Kryzhanovskii, S P; Bogdanovich, L N; Besednova, N N

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effect of biologically active substances derived from hydrobionts, namely maristim (natural product from sea urchin roe) and fucolam (polysaccharides of fucoidan and calcium alginate from brown algae) on blood biochemistry in the mouse model of nutritional hypercholesterolemia. Maristim and fucolam are found to be capable to normalize the levels of the major indicators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and aminotransferase enzyme activity in terms of atherogenic load. Correction action of biologically active substances is more expressed in combined application. Identified experimentally normalizing effects of maristim and on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism allow us to recommend the further study in clinical trials of these biologically active substances and based on them additives. PMID:25430644

  2. The Lipid Portion of Activated Platelet-Rich Plasma Significantly Contributes to Its Wound Healing Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hoeferlin, Lauren Alexis; Huynh, Quoc K.; Mietla, Jennifer A.; Sell, Scott A.; Tucker, Jason; Chalfant, Charles Edward; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a popular choice for the treatment of chronic wounds. Current dogma attributes these healing properties to the peptide growth factors of PRP. However, PRP is also rich in bioactive lipids whose contribution to healing has not been characterized and warrants investigation due to the protease-rich environment of chronic wounds. Approach: The lipid fraction of PRP was tested with respect to proliferation and migration of primary adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa)±exposure to chronic wound fluid (CWF). This fraction was also characterized via LC-MS/MS for bioactive lipids. A synthetic formulation of the bioactive lipid composition was developed and tested for the ability to overcome proliferative growth arrest induced by CWF. Results: The data demonstrate the ability of the lipid fraction of PRP to significantly enhance the migration and proliferation of HDFa, and to overcome the proliferative growth arrest induced by CWF. Furthermore, the synthetic lipid formulation generated following characterization of the PRP lipidome demonstrated a similar ability to overcome proliferative arrest of HDFa in the presence of CWF. Innovation: For the first time, we demonstrate the relevance of the lipid fraction of PRP toward the biology of wound healing. These studies open the possibility of altering the lipid profile of PRP via diet or exogenous pathway manipulation to obtain a better healing outcome. Conclusion: The lipid fraction of PRP is under investigated and yet relevant component in wound healing. The current study demonstrates the relevance of this fraction in wound healing by PRP. PMID:25713752

  3. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  4. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  5. Highly selective water channel activity measured by voltage clamp: Analysis of planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with purified AqpZ

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Peter; Saparov, Sapar M.; Borgnia, Mario J.; Agre, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels selectively permeated by water or water plus glycerol. Conflicting reports have described ion conductance associated with some water channels, raising the question of whether ion conductance is a general property of the aquaporin family. To clarify this question, a defined system was developed to simultaneously measure water permeability and ion conductance. The Escherichia coli water channel aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) was studied, because it is a highly stable tetramer. Planar lipid bilayers were formed from unilamellar vesicles containing purified AqpZ. The hydraulic conductivity of bilayers made from the total extract of E. coli lipids increased 3-fold if reconstituted with AqpZ, but electric conductance was unchanged. No channel activity was detected under voltage-clamp conditions, indicating that less than one in 109 transport events is electrogenic. Microelectrode measurements were simultaneously undertaken adjacent to the membrane. Changes in sodium concentration profiles accompanying transmembrane water flow permitted calculation of the activation energies: 14 kcal/mol for protein-free lipid bilayers and 4 kcal/mol for lipid bilayers containing AqpZ. Neither the water permeability nor the electric conductivity exhibited voltage dependence. This sensitive system demonstrated that AqpZ is permeated by water but not charged ions and should permit direct analyses of putative electrogenic properties of other aquaporins. PMID:11493683

  6. Development of Dual-Activity Vectors by Co-Envelopment of Adenovirus and SiRNA in Artificial Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yilmazer, Açelya; Tian, Bowen; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been extensively explored for the treatment of diseases resistant to traditional therapies. Intravenous administration leads to rapid clearance from blood circulation and high liver accumulation, which restrict the use of Ad-based vectors in clinical gene therapy protocols that involve systemic administration. We have previously proposed that such limitations can be improved by engineering artificial lipid envelopes around Ad and designed a variety of artificial lipid bilayer envelopes around the viral capsid. In this study, we sought to explore further opportunities that the artificially enveloped virus constructs could offer, by designing a previously unreported gene therapy vector by simultaneous envelopment of Ad and siRNA within the same lipid bilayer. Such a dual-activity vector can offer efficacious therapy for different genetic disorders where both turning on and switching off genes would be needed. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize these vectors. Agarose gel electrophoresis, Ribo green and dot blot assays showed that siRNA and Ad virions can be enveloped together within lipid bilayers at high envelopment efficiency. Cellular uptake and in vitro transfection experiments were carried out to show the feasibility of combining siRNA-mediated gene silencing with viral gene transfer using these newly designed dual-activity vectors. PMID:25501573

  7. Scube/You activity mediates release of dually lipid-modified Hedgehog signal in soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Creanga, Adrian; Glenn, Thomas D.; Mann, Randall K.; Saunders, Adam M.; Talbot, William S.; Beachy, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their covalent modification by cholesterol and palmitate, Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins are localized predominantly to the plasma membrane of expressing cells. Yet Hh proteins are also capable of mobilizing to and eliciting direct responses from distant cells. The zebrafish you gene, identified genetically >15 years ago, was more recently shown to encode a secreted glycoprotein that acts cell-nonautonomously in the Hh signaling pathway by an unknown mechanism. We investigated the function of the protein encoded by murine Scube2, an ortholog of you, and found that it mediates release in soluble form of the mature, cholesterol- and palmitate-modified Sonic hedgehog protein signal (ShhNp) when added to cultured cells or purified detergent-resistant membrane microdomains containing ShhNp. The efficiency of Scube2-mediated release of ShhNp is enhanced by the palmitate adduct of ShhNp and by coexpression in ShhNp-producing cells of mDispatchedA (mDispA), a transporter-like protein with a previously defined role in the release of lipid-modified Hh signals. The structural determinants of Scube2 required for its activity in cultured cell assays match those required for rescue of you mutant zebrafish embryos, and we thus conclude that the role of Scube/You proteins in Hh signaling in vivo is to facilitate the release and mobilization of Hh proteins for distant action. PMID:22677548

  8. Brain-Targeted Delivery of Trans-Activating Transcriptor-Conjugated Magnetic PLGA/Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  9. α-Tocopherol succinate improves encapsulation and anticancer activity of doxorubicin loaded in solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mariana S; Mussi, Samuel V; Gomes, Dawidson A; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Frezard, Frederic; Carregal, Virgínia M; Ferreira, Lucas A M

    2016-04-01

    This work aimed to develop solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) co-loaded with doxorubicin and α-tocopheryl succinate (TS), a succinic acid ester of α-tocopherol that exhibits anticancer actions, evaluating the influence of TS on drug encapsulation efficiency. The SLN were characterized for size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency (EE), and drug release. Studies of in vitro anticancer activity were also conducted. The EE was significantly improved from 30 ± 1% to 96 ± 2% for SLN without and with TS at 0.4%, respectively. In contrast, a reduction in particle size from 298 ± 1 to 79 ± 1 nm was observed for SLN without and with TS respectively. The doxorubicin release data show that SLN provide a controlled drug release. The in vitro studies showed higher cytotoxicity for doxorubicin-TS-loaded SLN than for free doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that TS-doxorubicin-loaded SLN is a promising alternative for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26764108

  10. Activity of isoflavones and berberine on vasomotor symptoms and lipid profile in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Antonio; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Colacurci, Nicola; Matarazzo, Maria Grazia; De Leo, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a food supplement combination based on isoflavones and berberine (ISB) in the treatment of menopausal symptoms and dyslipidaemia. Isoflavones are extracted from soy and absorbed in the body after being activated by lactobacillus. Berberine, extracted from the plant Berberis aristata, lowers plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) by increasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors and reducing hepatic synthesis of TG. One hundred twenty women with a mean age of 54.8 ± 0.6 years were enrolled and randomized to treatment with ISB (estromineral lipid [EL] = 60 cases) or calcium and vitamin D(3) (CaD = 60 cases). Menopausal symptoms, plasma cholesterol, and TG were evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 12 weeks. EL treatment significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol (-13.5% ± 0.7 vs -0.2% ± 0.5), LDL cholesterol (-12.4% ± 1.5 vs + 0.8 % ± 0.7) and TG (-18.9% ± 2.5 vs -1.3% ± 1.2) and improved menopausal symptoms compared with CaD treatment. Safety parameters were unchanged during the study. The combination of berberine and isoflavones was effective in lowering cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in menopausal women with moderate dyslipidaemia and in improving their quality of life. PMID:22313171

  11. Cationic Lipid Content in Liposome-Encapsulated Nisin Improves Sustainable Bactericidal Activity against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yamakami, Kazuo; Tsumori, Hideaki; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yutaka; Nagatoshi, Kohei; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An oral infectious disease, dental caries, is caused by the cariogenic streptococci Streptococcus mutans. The expected preventive efficiency for prophylactics against dental caries is not yet completely observed. Nisin, a bacteriocin, has been demonstrated to be microbicidal against S. mutans, and liposome-encapsulated nisin improves preventive features that may be exploited for human oral health. Here we examined the bactericidal effect of charged lipids on nisin-loaded liposomes against S. mutans and inhibitory efficiency for insoluble glucan synthesis by the streptococci for prevention of dental caries. Cationic liposome, nisin-loaded dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/phytosphingosine, exhibited higher bactericidal activities than those of electroneutral liposome and anionic liposome. Bactericidal efficiency of the cationic liposome revealed that the vesicles exhibited sustained inhibition of glucan synthesis and the lowest rate of release of nisin from the vesicles. The optimizing ability of cationic liposome-encapsulated nisin that exploit the sustained preventive features of an anti-streptococcal strategy may improve prevention of dental caries. PMID:27583045

  12. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R.; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E.; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B.; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI−/− and KtyII−/−K8 mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  13. Cationic Lipid Content in Liposome-Encapsulated Nisin Improves Sustainable Bactericidal Activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Kazuo; Tsumori, Hideaki; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yutaka; Nagatoshi, Kohei; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An oral infectious disease, dental caries, is caused by the cariogenic streptococci Streptococcus mutans. The expected preventive efficiency for prophylactics against dental caries is not yet completely observed. Nisin, a bacteriocin, has been demonstrated to be microbicidal against S. mutans, and liposome-encapsulated nisin improves preventive features that may be exploited for human oral health. Here we examined the bactericidal effect of charged lipids on nisin-loaded liposomes against S. mutans and inhibitory efficiency for insoluble glucan synthesis by the streptococci for prevention of dental caries. Cationic liposome, nisin-loaded dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/phytosphingosine, exhibited higher bactericidal activities than those of electroneutral liposome and anionic liposome. Bactericidal efficiency of the cationic liposome revealed that the vesicles exhibited sustained inhibition of glucan synthesis and the lowest rate of release of nisin from the vesicles. The optimizing ability of cationic liposome-encapsulated nisin that exploit the sustained preventive features of an anti-streptococcal strategy may improve prevention of dental caries. PMID:27583045

  14. Preparation, characterisation and antibacterial activity of a florfenicol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Xiaojin; Lu, Mengmeng; Li, Xihe; Zhou, WenZhong

    2015-12-01

    A florfenicol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle (FFC-SLN) suspension was prepared by hot homogenisation and ultrasonic technique. The suspension was characterised for its release profile, stability, toxicity, and the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles. Antibacterial activity of the suspension was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the mean diameter, polydispersity index and zeta potential of the nanoparticles were 253 ± 3 nm, 0.409 ± 0.022 and 47.5 ± 0.21 mV, respectively. In vitro release profile showed the FFC-SLN suspension had sustained release effect. The minimum inhibition concentration values of the FFC-SLN suspension were 6 and 3 µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli respectively, compared with 3.5 and 2 µg/mL of native florfenicol. The suspension was relatively stable at 4°C and less stable at room temperature during 9 months storage. Although the nanoparticle carriers exhibited cytotoxicity in cell cultures, the LD50 of the lyophilised dry power of the suspension was higher than 5 g/kg body weight. Mortality protection against E. coli lethal infection in mice showed that the nanoparticle suspension had much better efficacy (6/10) than native drug (1/10). These results indicate that FFC-SLN suspension could be a promising formulation in veterinary medicine. PMID:26647811

  15. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis. PMID:26770990

  16. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI(-/-) and KtyII(-/-)(K8) mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  17. The Fungicidal Activity of Thymol against Fusarium graminearum via Inducing Lipid Peroxidation and Disrupting Ergosterol Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Liangbin; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Thymol is a natural plant-derived compound that has been widely used in pharmaceutical and food preservation applications. However, the antifungal mechanism for thymol against phytopathogens remains unclear. In this study, we identified the antifungal action of thymol against Fusarium graminearum, an economically important phytopathogen showing severe resistance to traditional chemical fungicides. The sensitivity of thymol on different F. graminearum isolates was screened. The hyphal growth, as well as conidial production and germination, were quantified under thymol treatment. Histochemical, microscopic, and biochemical approaches were applied to investigate thymol-induced cell membrane damage. The average EC50 value of thymol for 59 F. graminearum isolates was 26.3 μg·mL(-1). Thymol strongly inhibited conidial production and hyphal growth. Thymol-induced cell membrane damage was indicated by propidium iodide (PI) staining, morphological observation, relative conductivity, and glycerol measurement. Thymol induced a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and a remarkable decrease in ergosterol content. Taken together, thymol showed potential antifungal activity against F. graminearum due to the cell membrane damage originating from lipid peroxidation and the disturbance of ergosterol biosynthesis. These results not only shed new light on the antifungal mechanism of thymol, but also imply a promising alternative for the control of Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease caused by F. graminearum. PMID:27322238

  18. A novel lipid-based nanomicelle of docetaxel: evaluation of antitumor activity and biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mingshu; Hao, Yanli; Liu, Nan; Yin, Zhe; Wang, Lan; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A lipid-based, nanomicelle-loaded docetaxel (M-DOC) was designed and characterized. Optical imaging was employed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy of docetaxel in vivo. Materials and methods The M-DOC was prepared using the emulsion-diffusion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to assess the morphology and particle size of the M-DOC. Critical micelle concentrations, their stability under physiological conditions, and their encapsulation efficiency – as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography – were assessed. Pharmacological features were evaluated in two different animal models by comparing M-DOC treatments with docetaxel injections (I-DOC). Bioluminescence imaging was used to assess antitumor activity and docetaxel distribution in vivo, using nude mice injected with luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor cells. In addition, animals injected with B16 melanoma cells were used to measure survival time and docetaxel distribution. Results The M-DOC was prepared as round, uniform spheres with an effective diameter of 20.8 nm. The critical micelle concentration of the original emulsion was 0.06%. Satisfactory encapsulation efficiency (87.6% ± 3.0%) and 12-hour stability were achieved. Xenograft results demonstrated that the M-DOC was more effective in inhibiting tumor growth, without significantly changing body weight. Survival was prolonged by 12.6% in the M-DOC group. Tumor growth inhibitory rates in the M-DOC and I-DOC groups were 91.2% and 57.8% in volume and 71.8% and 44.9% in weight, respectively. Optical bioluminescence imaging of tumor growths yielded similar results. Area under the curve(0–6 hour) levels of docetaxel in blood and tumors were significantly higher in the M-DOC group (15.9 ± 3.2 μg/mL−1, 601.1 ± 194.5 μg/g−1) than in the I-DOC group (7.2 ± 1.7 μg/mL−1, 357.8 ± 86.2 μg/g−1). The fluorescent dye 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3

  19. ß1 Integrin Binding Phosphorylates Ezrin at T567 to Activate a Lipid Raft Signalsome Driving Invadopodia Activity and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Antelmi, Ester; Cardone, Rosa A.; Greco, Maria R.; Rubino, Rosa; Di Sole, Francesca; Martino, Nicola A.; Casavola, Valeria; Carcangiu, MariaLuisa; Moro, Loredana; Reshkin, Stephan J.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a critical process in tumor cell invasion and requires matrix degrading protrusions called invadopodia. The Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) has recently been shown to be fundamental in the regulation of invadopodia actin cytoskeleton dynamics and activity. However, the structural link between the invadopodia cytoskeleton and NHE1 is still unknown. A candidate could be ezrin, a linker between the NHE1 and the actin cytoskeleton known to play a pivotal role in invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanistic basis for its role remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ezrin phosphorylated at T567 is highly overexpressed in the membrane of human breast tumors and positively associated with invasive growth and HER2 overexpression. Further, in the metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231, p-ezrin was almost exclusively expressed in invadopodia lipid rafts where it co-localized in a functional complex with NHE1, EGFR, ß1-integrin and phosphorylated-NHERF1. Manipulation by mutation of ezrins T567 phosphorylation state and/or PIP2 binding capacity or of NHE1s binding to ezrin or PIP2 demonstrated that p-ezrin expression and binding to PIP2 are required for invadopodia-mediated ECM degradation and invasion and identified NHE1 as the membrane protein that p-ezrin regulates to induce invadopodia formation and activity. PMID:24086451

  20. Changes in lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities by triiodothyronine (T3) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Varghese, S; Lakshmy, P S; Oommen, O V

    2001-11-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in the control of metabolism of vertebrates. This investigation was carried out to examine the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on lipid peroxidation in rat liver. Male Wistar strain of rats treated with 6-propylthiouracil (6-PTU) showed no significant change in lipid peroxidation as evident from the generation of malondialdehyde and conjugated dienes. However, in PUFA fed animals as well as 6-PTU + PUFA + T3 treated groups, increased peroxidation products were found. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was low in 6-PTU, 6-PTU + PUFA, PUFA, 6-PTU + PUFA + T3 treated animals while glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was high in these groups. Catalase activity was low in all treated groups except PUFA alone fed animals. Glutathione reductase (GR) activity was decreased by 6-PTU treatment and increased in PTU + PUFA fed rats. Cellular glutathione level was high in PUFA and low in PTU-treated groups. From these results it can be concluded that both T3 and PUFA have profound influence on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities in rat liver. PMID:11794465

  1. Nanostructured lipid system as a strategy to improve the anti-Candida albicans activity of Astronium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; Ramos, Matheus Aparecido dos Santos; da Silva, Patrícia Bento; Negri, Kamila Maria Silveira; de Oliveira Lopes, Érica; de Souza, Leonardo Perez; Vilegas, Wagner; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2015-01-01

    The genus Astronium (Anacardiaceae) includes species, such as Astronium fraxinifolium, Astronium graveolens, and Astronium urundeuva, which possess anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcerogenic, healing, and antimicrobial properties. Nanostructured lipid systems are able to potentiate the action of plant extracts, reducing the required dose and side effects and improving antimicrobial activity. This work aims to evaluate a nanostructured lipid system that was developed as a strategy to improve the anti-Candida albicans activity of hydroethanolic extracts of stems and leaves from Astronium sp. The antifungal activity against C. albicans (ATCC 18804) was evaluated in vitro by a microdilution technique. In addition to the in vitro assays, the Astronium sp. that showed the best antifungal activity and selectivity index was submitted to an in vivo assay using a model of vulvovaginal candidiasis infection. In these assays, the extracts were either used alone or were incorporated into the nanostructured lipid system (comprising 10% oil phase, 10% surfactant, and 80% aqueous phase). The results indicated a minimal inhibitory concentration of 125.00 µg/mL before incorporation into the nanostructured system; this activity was even more enhanced when this extract presented a minimal inhibitory concentration of 15.62 µg/mL after its incorporation. In vivo assay dates showed that the nanostructure-incorporated extract of A. urundeuva leaves was more effective than both the unincorporated extract and the antifungal positive control (amphotericin B). These results suggest that this nanostructured lipid system can be used in a strategy to improve the in vitro and in vivo anti-C. albicans activity of hydroethanolic extracts of Astronium sp. PMID:26300640

  2. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies. PMID:27138068

  3. Lipid modulatory activities of Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet are mediated by multiple components within hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Jun-Lin; Hassan, Waseem; Wang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Fang-Rong; Shang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    To investigate a possible methodology of exploiting herbal medicine and design polytherapy for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), we have made use of Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet (CG), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been proven to be effective in treating hepatic diseases. Here, we report that the extract of CG effectively reduced lipid accumulation under conditions of lipid overloading in vivo and in vitro (in a rat high-fat diet model and a hepG2 cell model of free fatty acid treatment). CG extract also protected hepatocytes from injury and inflammation to aid its lipid-lowering properties (in a rat high-fat diet model and a L02 cell model of acetaminophen treatment). Serum chemistry analysis accompanied by in vitro drug screening confirmed that CG-4, CG-10 and CG-14 are the lipo-effective components of CG. Western blotting analysis revealed that these components can regulate key lipid targets at the molecular level, including CD36, FATP5 and PPAR-α, thus the lipid oxidation and lipid absorption pathways. Finally, we adopted the experimental design and statistical method to calculate the best combination proportion (CG-4: CG-10: CG-14 = 2.065: 1.782: 2.153) to optimize its therapeutic effect. PMID:24797163

  4. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  5. Effects of chilled storage and cryopreservation on sperm characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in Pacific cod Gadus microcephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueying; Shi, Xuehui; Liu, Yifan; Yu, Daode; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of chilled storage and cryopreservation on sperm motion characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in the Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus. Sperm motility and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (Gr), and lipid peroxidation (measured via malondialdehyde (MDA) content) were determined after the milt was stored at 4°C for 12 h, cryopreserved without cryoprotectant in 12% propylene glycol (PG), cryopreserved in 12% PG+0.1 mol/L trehalose, or cryopreserved in 12% PG spermatozoa but centrifuged to decant the supernatant prior to cryopreservation (only sperm cells were cryopreserved). After chilled storage or cryopreservation, the SOD, CAT and GPx activities were reduced in sperm cells and increased in seminal plasma in almost all treatments; sperm motility parameters were also decreased. However, the addition of trehalose into the cryoprotectant could significantly improve the postthaw sperm quality as revealed by the sperm average path velocity. This improvement might be attributed to the function of trehalose in scavenging reactive oxygen species. Chilled storage and cryopreservation had significant effects on sperm motion characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in the Pacific cod.

  6. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with tributyrin as an alternative to improve anticancer activity of all-trans retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; Caetano, Priscila Albuquerque; Costa, Daniel Ferreira; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is one of the most successful examples of differentiation agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as tributyrin (TB), are known for their antitumor activity and potentiating action of drugs such as ATRA. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) represent a promising alternative to the encapsulation of lipophilic drugs such as ATRA. This study aimed to develop, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of ATRA-TB-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) for cancer treatment. Methods The influence of in situ formation of an ion pairing between ATRA and a lipophilic amine (benethamine; BNT) on the characteristics of NLC (size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency) was evaluated. Tributyrin (TB), a butyric acid donor, was used as a component of the lipid matrix. In vitro activity on cell viability and distribution of cell cycle phases were evaluated for MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HL-60, and Jurkat cell lines. Results The presence of the amine significantly increased the encapsulation efficiency of ATRA in NLC. Inhibition of cell viability by TB-ATRA-loaded NLC was more pronounced than the free drug. Analysis of the distribution of cell cycle phases also showed increased activity for TB-ATRA-loaded NLC, with the clear effect of cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase transition. The presence of TB played an important role in the activity of the formulation. Conclusion Taken together, these findings suggest that TB-ATRA-loaded NLC represent a promising alternative to intravenous administration of ATRA in cancer treatment. PMID:25611812

  7. Effects of chilled storage and cryopreservation on sperm characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in Pacific cod Gadus microcephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueying; Shi, Xuehui; Liu, Yifan; Yu, Daode; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of chilled storage and cryopreservation on sperm motion characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in the Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus. Sperm motility and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (Gr), and lipid peroxidation (measured via malondialdehyde (MDA) content) were determined after the milt was stored at 4°C for 12 h, cryopreserved without cryoprotectant in 12% propylene glycol (PG), cryopreserved in 12% PG+0.1 mol/L trehalose, or cryopreserved in 12% PG spermatozoa but centrifuged to decant the supernatant prior to cryopreservation (only sperm cells were cryopreserved). After chilled storage or cryopreservation, the SOD, CAT and GPx activities were reduced in sperm cells and increased in seminal plasma in almost all treatments; sperm motility parameters were also decreased. However, the addition of trehalose into the cryoprotectant could significantly improve the postthaw sperm quality as revealed by the sperm average path velocity. This improvement might be attributed to the function of trehalose in scavenging reactive oxygen species. Chilled storage and cryopreservation had significant effects on sperm motion characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation in the Pacific cod.

  8. Lipid Exchange by Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipid species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization of the protein in the presence of a target lipid of interest. PMID:26695050

  9. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (<1% of live sperm) in fresh semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  10. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2•−, and intracellular Ca2+ were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170–225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca2+ influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  11. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2(•-), and intracellular Ca(2+) were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170-225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca(2+) influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  12. Preparation, Physicochemical Properties, and Transfection Activities of Tartaric Acid-Based Cationic Lipids as Effective Nonviral Gene Delivery Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ning; Jia, Yi-Yang; Hou, Yi-Lin; Ma, Xi-Xi; He, Yong-Sheng; Li, Chen; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Bang-Le

    2016-07-01

    In this work two novel cationic lipids using natural tartaric acid as linking backbone were synthesized. These cationic lipids were simply constructed by tartaric acid backbone using head group 6-aminocaproic acid and saturated hydrocarbon chains dodecanol (T-C12-AH) or hexadecanol (T-C16-AH). The physicochemical properties, gel electrophoresis, transfection activities, and cytotoxicity of cationic liposomes were tested. The optimum formulation for T-C12-AH and T-C16-AH was at cationic lipid/dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) molar ratio of 1 : 0.5 and 1 : 2, respectively, and N/P charge molar ratio of 1 : 1 and 1 : 1, respectively. Under optimized conditions, T-C12-AH and T-C16-AH showed effective gene transfection capabilities, superior or comparable to that of commercially available transfecting reagent 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethyl)carbamoyl]cholesterol (DC-Chol) and N-[2,3-dioleoyloxypropyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTAP). The results demonstrated that the two novel tartaric acid-based cationic lipids exhibited low toxicity and efficient transfection performance, offering an excellent prospect as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:27118165

  13. Age-Related Alterations of Plasma Lipid Peroxidation and Erythrocyte Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Different Ethnic Groups of Gorgan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghari, Gholam Reza; Rabiee, Mohammad Reza

    Free radicals have been proposed as important causative agents of ageing. The free radical theory of ageing postulates that ageing is caused by free radical reactions. These highly reactive species can cause oxidative damage in the cell. The purposive of this study was to investigate the alteration in plasma lipid peroxidation and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity in 2 different ethnic groups of Fars and Turkmen healthy people. We measured plasma lipid peroxidation levels (lipid peroxidation expressed as malondialdehyde) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity. Study include 350 (175 Fars and 175 Turkmen male) apparently healthy individuals. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activities were determined in 2 different ethnic groups of Fars and Turkmen consisting of healthy individuals between 26-60 years of age {26-30 (n = 30), 3-35 (n = 30), 36-40 (n = 30), 41-45 (n = 30), 46-50 (n = 25), 51-55 (n = 15) and 56-60 (n = 15)}, respectively. The data was analyzed by Student` t-test. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and plasma lipid peroxidation levels in Fars and Turkmen people with 41-45 ages (group 4) and 36-40 ages (group 3) were significantly lower and higher than in the other age groups (Fars groups 1, 2 and 3, Turkmen groups 1, 2), respectively (p< 0.05). There were no significant relation between the age group 4 (Fars people) and the age groups 5, 6 and 7 (p>0.05). There were no significant relation between the age groups 3 (Turkmen people) and the age groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 (p>0.05). We found age-related differences in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity and plasma lipid peroxidation levels. The results indicate that the balance between antioxidant and prooxidant factors in free radical metabolism shifts towards increased lipid peroxidation with advancing age in 2 ethnic groups. This situation maybe begin in Turkmen people earlier than Fars people. The ethnic origin, diet, heavy working and life style factors of the two populations may explain

  14. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat. PMID:26954148

  15. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat. PMID:26954148

  16. Lipid bilayer nanodisc platform for investigating polyprenol-dependent enzyme interactions and activities

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Meredith D.; Schneggenburger, Philipp E.; Imperiali, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-bound polyprenol-dependent pathways are important for the assembly of essential glycoconjugates in all domains of life. However, despite their prevalence, the functional significance of the extended linear polyprenyl groups in the interactions of the glycan substrates, the biosynthetic enzymes that act upon them, and the membrane bilayer in which they are embedded remains a mystery. These interactions are investigated simultaneously and uniquely through application of the nanodisc membrane technology. The Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycosylation pathway has been chosen as a model pathway in which all of the enzymes and substrates are biochemically accessible. We present the functional reconstitution of two enzymes responsible for the early membrane-committed steps in glycan assembly. Protein stoichiometry analysis, fluorescence-based approaches, and biochemical activity assays are used to demonstrate the colocalization of the two enzymes in nanodiscs. Isotopic labeling of the substrates reveals that undecaprenyl-phosphate is coincorporated into discs with the two enzymes, and furthermore, that both enzymes are functionally reconstituted and can sequentially convert the coembedded undecaprenyl-phosphate into undecaprenyl-diphosphate-linked disaccharide. These studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstrating that the nanodisc model membrane system represents a promising experimental platform for analyzing the multifaceted interactions among the enzymes involved in polyprenol-dependent glycan assembly pathways, the membrane-associated substrates, and the lipid bilayer. The stage is now set for exploration of the roles of the conserved polyprenols in promoting protein–protein interactions among pathway enzymes and processing of substrates through sequential steps in membrane-associated glycan assembly. PMID:24302767

  17. Physical Activity and Lipid Profile in the ELSA-Brasil Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Raquel Caroline; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Alvim, Sheila; Vidigal, Pedro Guatimosim; Fedeli, Ligia Maria Giongo; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity (PA) induces desirable changes in plasma levels of high- and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively) and triglycerides (TG), important risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases. However, doubts whether intensity and duration have equivalent benefits remain. Objective To assess the association of PA intensity and duration with HDL, LDL and TG levels. Methods Cross-sectional study with 12,688 participants from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) baseline, who were not on lipid-lowering medication. After adjustment for important covariates, multiple linear regression was used to assess the association of PA intensity and duration with HDL, LDL and TG (natural logarithm) levels. Results Both moderate and vigorous PA and PA practice ≥ 150 min/week were significantly associated with higher HDL and lower TG levels. Vigorous PA was associated with lower LDL only on univariate analysis. After adjustments, moderate and vigorous PA increased mean HDL level by 0.89 mg/dL and 1.71 mg/dL, respectively, and reduced TG geometric mean by 0.98 mg/dL and 0.93 mg/dL, respectively. PA practice ≥ 150 min/week increased mean HDL level by 1.05 mg/dL, and decreased TG geometric mean by 0.98 mg/dL. Conclusion Our findings reinforce the benefits of both PA parameters studied on HDL and TG levels, with a slight advantage for vigorous PA as compared to the recommendation based only on PA duration. PMID:27355470

  18. DHEA Administration Activates Transcription of Muscular Lipid Metabolic Enzymes via PPARα and PPARδ in Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Horii, N; Sato, K; Mesaki, N; Iemitsu, M

    2016-03-01

    Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a precursor of sex steroid hormones, reduces total and visceral fat mass and elevates adipocytic adiponectin gene expression. The aim of this study is to investigate whether levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in muscle and transcription of PPAR target genes are affected by long-term DHEA administration or exercise training, and whether altered PPAR levels are associated with circulating adiponectin level in obese rats. After 14 weeks on a high-sucrose diet, obese male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of 3 groups: control, DHEA administration (1 mg/kg body weight), or exercise training (treadmill running for 1 h, 25 m/min, 5 days/week) for 6 weeks (n=7 for each group). Plasma DHEA and total adiponectin levels in the DHEA-treated and exercise-training groups were significantly higher than those in the obese control group. Additionally, DHEA administration and exercise training significantly increased muscular PPARα and PPARδ protein levels, with a concomitant increase in mRNA expression of 3β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase IV, which are target genes of PPARα and PPARδ respectively. Moreover, DHEA administration increased these protein and mRNA levels to the same degree as exercise training. Circulating adiponectin level was positively correlated with plasma DHEA and with muscle levels of PPARα and PPARδ. These results suggest that in obese rats, secretion of adiponectin due to chronic DHEA administration and exercise training may contribute to an increase in the transcription of genes encoding lipid metabolic enzymes, mediated via elevated expression of PPARα and PPARδ in muscle. PMID:26406917

  19. Perturbed rhythmic activation of signaling pathways in mice deficient for Sterol Carrier Protein 2-dependent diurnal lipid transport and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jouffe, Céline; Gobet, Cédric; Martin, Eva; Métairon, Sylviane; Morin-Rivron, Delphine; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gachon, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Through evolution, most of the living species have acquired a time keeping system to anticipate daily changes caused by the rotation of the Earth. In all of the systems this pacemaker is based on a molecular transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop able to generate rhythmic gene expression with a period close to 24 hours. Recent evidences suggest that post-transcriptional regulations activated mostly by systemic cues play a fundamental role in the process, fine tuning the time keeping system and linking it to animal physiology. Among these signals, we consider the role of lipid transport and metabolism regulated by SCP2. Mice harboring a deletion of the Scp2 locus present a modulated diurnal accumulation of lipids in the liver and a perturbed activation of several signaling pathways including PPARα, SREBP, LRH-1, TORC1 and its upstream regulators. This defect in signaling pathways activation feedbacks upon the clock by lengthening the circadian period of animals through post-translational regulation of core clock regulators, showing that rhythmic lipid transport is a major player in the establishment of rhythmic mRNA and protein expression landscape. PMID:27097688

  20. Perturbed rhythmic activation of signaling pathways in mice deficient for Sterol Carrier Protein 2-dependent diurnal lipid transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jouffe, Céline; Gobet, Cédric; Martin, Eva; Métairon, Sylviane; Morin-Rivron, Delphine; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gachon, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Through evolution, most of the living species have acquired a time keeping system to anticipate daily changes caused by the rotation of the Earth. In all of the systems this pacemaker is based on a molecular transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop able to generate rhythmic gene expression with a period close to 24 hours. Recent evidences suggest that post-transcriptional regulations activated mostly by systemic cues play a fundamental role in the process, fine tuning the time keeping system and linking it to animal physiology. Among these signals, we consider the role of lipid transport and metabolism regulated by SCP2. Mice harboring a deletion of the Scp2 locus present a modulated diurnal accumulation of lipids in the liver and a perturbed activation of several signaling pathways including PPARα, SREBP, LRH-1, TORC1 and its upstream regulators. This defect in signaling pathways activation feedbacks upon the clock by lengthening the circadian period of animals through post-translational regulation of core clock regulators, showing that rhythmic lipid transport is a major player in the establishment of rhythmic mRNA and protein expression landscape. PMID:27097688

  1. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  2. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M.; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P.; de Mello Coelho, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN+ LLC. Some cortical NeuN+ neurons, GFAP+ glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1+ microglia and S100β+ ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  3. DNA and its cationic lipid complexes induce CpG motif-dependent activation of murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kei; Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2007-01-01

    Unmethylated CpG motifs in bacterial DNA, but not in vertebrate DNA, are known to trigger an inflammatory response of antigen-presenting cells (APC). In this study, we investigated the cytokine release from murine dendritic cells (DC) by the addition of various types of DNA in the free or complexed form with cationic lipids. Naked plasmid DNA and Escherichia coli DNA with immunostimulatory unmethylated CpG motifs induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-cultured bone marrow-derived DC and the DC cell-line, DC2.4 cells, though vertebrate calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) with less CpG motifs did not. These characteristics differed from mouse peritoneal resident macrophages that do not respond to any naked DNA. The amount of cytokines released from the DC was significantly increased by complex formation with cationic lipids when CpG-motif positive DNAs were used. Unlike murine macrophages or Flt-3 L cultured DC, GM-CSF DC did not release inflammatory cytokines in response to the addition of CT DNA/cationic lipid complex, suggesting that the activation is completely dependent on CpG motifs. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that murine DC produce pro-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with CpG-containing DNAs and the responses are enhanced by cationic lipids. These results also suggest that DC are the major cells that respond to naked CpG DNA in vivo, although both DC and macrophages will release inflammatory cytokines after the administration of a DNA/cationic lipid complex. PMID:17199803

  4. Screening for lipid yielding microalgae: activities for 1983. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W. H.; Tornabene, T. G.; Weissman, J.

    1984-04-01

    The SERI/DOE Aquatic Species Program is conducting a screening project, to select microalgae species and strains that are acceptable for liquid fuel production in outdoor culture. The emphases are on finding species that grow rapidly at high biomass density, in outdoor culture and produce large quantities of lipids. During 1983 over 100 species were isolated from saline waters at the California and Nevada deserts. Some of these species were characterized for growth response to various nutrients, temperatures, and salinities. Selected species were analyzed for lipid composition. Lipids were characterized into fractions, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, triglyceride, glycolipids, and phospholipids. The most promising species were tested for growth and monoculture sustainability in outdoor culture. Each section (microalgae selection, chemical profiles of microalgae, mass culture of macroalgae) was abstracted separately. 51 references, 8 figures, 14 tables.

  5. Non-genomic inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on activated peripheral blood basophils through suppression of lipid raft formation.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, S; Tomita, K; Sano, H; Itoh, Y; Fukai, Y; Okimoto, N; Watatani, N; Inbe, S; Miyajima, H; Tsukamoto, K; Santoh, H; Ichihashi, H; Sano, A; Sato, R; Tohda, Y

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the non-genomic effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on inhibition of plasma membrane lipid raft formation in activated human basophils. Human basophils obtained from house dust mite (HDM)-sensitive volunteers were pretreated with hydrocortisone (CORT) or dexamethasone (Dex) for 30 min and then primed with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 10 ng/ml) or HDM (10 µg/ml). The expression of CD63, a basophil activation marker, was assessed by flow cytometry. Membrane-bound GC receptors (mGCRs) were analysed by flow cytometry and confocal laser microscopy. Lipid rafts were assessed using a GM1 ganglioside probe and visualization by confocal laser microscopy. Pretreatment of basophils with CORT (10(-4) M and 10(-5) M) and Dex (10(-7) M) significantly inhibited CD63 expression 20 min after addition of PMA or HDM. The inhibitory effects of GCs were not altered by the nuclear GC receptor (GCR) antagonist RU486 (10(-5) M) or the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (10(-4) M) (P < 0·05). CORT coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA-CORT) mimicked the rapid inhibitory effects of CORT, suggesting the involvement of mGCRs. mGCRs were detectable on the plasma membrane of resting basophils and formed nanoclusters following treatment with PMA or HDM. Pretreatment of cells with BSA-CORT inhibited the expression of mGCRs and nanoclustering of ganglioside GM1 in lipid rafts. The study provides evidence that non-genomic mechanisms are involved in the rapid inhibitory effect of GCs on the formation of lipid raft nanoclusters, through binding to mGCRs on the plasma membrane of activated basophils. PMID:22943204

  6. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Extract, Aucubin, and Geniposide Enhance Lysosomal Activity to Regulate ER Stress and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Mi-Rin; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Nan-young; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE) on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia. PMID:24349058

  7. Antibacterial/antifungal activity and synergistic interactions between polyprenols and other lipids isolated from Ginkgo biloba L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ran; Wang, Cheng-Zhang; Kong, Zhen-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Polyprenols separated from lipids are promising new components from Ginkgo biloba L. leaves (GBL). In this paper, ginkgo lipids were isolated by extraction with petroleum ether, saponification, and molecular distillation. Eight known compounds: isophytol (1), nerolidol (2), linalool (3), β-sitosterol acetate (4), β-sitosterol (5), stigmasterol (6), ergosterol (7), β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8) and Ginkgo biloba polyprenols (GBP) were separated from GBL by chromatography and identified mainly by NMR. The separated and identified compounds 1, 2 and 3 are reported here for the first time in GBL. The 3D-DAD-HPLC-chromatogram (190-232 nm) of GBP was recorded. This study provides new evidence as there are no previous reports on antibacterial/antifungal activities and synergistic interactions between GBP and the compounds separated from GBL lipids against Salmonella enterica, Staphylocococus aureus and Aspergillus niger. Nerolidol (2) showed the highest activity among all the tested samples and of all mixture groups tested the GBP with isophytol (1) mixture had the strongest synergistic effect against Salmonella enterica among the three tested strains. A proportion of isophytol and GBP of 38.19%:61.81% (wt/wt) was determined by mixture design as the optimal proportion for the synergistic effect of GBP with isophytol against Salmonella enterica. PMID:23434869

  8. Mechanism of a Prototypical Synthetic Membrane-Active Antimicrobial: Efficient Hole-Punching Via Interaction With Negative Intrinsic Curvature Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Gordon, V.D.; Trinkle, D.R.; Schmidt, N.W.; Davis, M.A.; DeVries, C.; Som, A.; Cronan, J.E., Jr.; Tew, G.N.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-05-28

    Phenylene ethynylenes comprise a prototypical class of synthetic antimicrobial compounds that mimic antimicrobial peptides produced by eukaryotes and have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. We show unambiguously that bacterial membrane permeation by these antimicrobials depends on the presence of negative intrinsic curvature lipids, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids, found in high concentrations within bacterial membranes. Plate-killing assays indicate that a PE-knockout mutant strain of Escherichia coli drastically out-survives the wild type against the membrane-active phenylene ethynylene antimicrobials, whereas the opposite is true when challenged with traditional metabolic antibiotics. That the PE deletion is a lethal mutation in normative environments suggests that resistant bacterial strains do not evolve because a lethal mutation is required to gain immunity. PE lipids allow efficient generation of negative curvature required for the circumferential barrel of an induced membrane pore; an inverted hexagonal HII phase, which consists of arrays of water channels, is induced by a small number of antimicrobial molecules. The estimated antimicrobial occupation in these water channels is nonlinear and jumps from {approx}1 to 3 per 4 nm of induced water channel length as the global antimicrobial concentration is increased. By comparing to exactly solvable 1D spin models for magnetic systems, we quantify the cooperativity of these antimicrobials.

  9. Influence of Sorghum Kafirin on Serum Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Activity in Hyperlipidemic Rats (In Vitro and In Vivo Studies)

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz Cruz, Raquel A.; Cárdenas López, José L.; González Aguilar, Gustavo A.; Astiazarán García, Humberto; Gorinstein, Shela; Canett Romero, Rafael; Robles Sánchez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the antioxidant potential of sorghum kafirin and sorghum flour and their influence on lipids and antioxidant capacity in rats. The antioxidant activity in sorghum kafirin extract measured by the DPPH and TEAC methods was increased 30 and 65 times, respectively, compared to that of its counterpart, sorghum flour. According to electrophoresis assay, the kafirins tert-butanol extract showed a high proportion of α-kafirin monomers, and its amino acid composition revealed higher hydrophobic amino acid content such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine than sorghum flour extract. Diets supplemented with sorghum kafirin extract have improved lipid metabolism and increased the serum antioxidant potential (67%) especially in rats fed with added cholesterol. The bioactive peptides generated from kafirin in vivo hydrolysis appear to be associated with the positive effect on serum lipids and antioxidant activity. According to these results, sorghum kafirin extract at the levels used in this study apparently could be used for prevention of atherosclerosis and other chronic diseases. PMID:26634202

  10. Human hippocampal energy metabolism is impaired during cognitive activity in a lipid infusion model of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Yaso; Cochlin, Lowri E; Tyler, Damian J; de Jager, Celeste A; David Smith, A; Clarke, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal glucose uptake was thought to be independent of insulin, being facilitated by glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3, which do not require insulin signaling. However, it is now known that components of the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway, including neuronal insulin synthesis and the insulin-dependent glucose transporter GLUT4, are present in brain tissue, particularly in the hippocampus. There is considerable recent evidence that insulin signaling is crucial to optimal hippocampal function. The physiological basis, however, is not clear. We propose that while noninsulin-dependent GLUT1 and GLUT3 transport is adequate for resting needs, the surge in energy use during sustained cognitive activity requires the additional induction of insulin-signaled GLUT4 transport. We studied hippocampal high-energy phosphate metabolism in eight healthy volunteers, using a lipid infusion protocol to inhibit insulin signaling. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it is now known that free fatty acids do cross the blood–brain barrier in significant amounts. Energy metabolism within the hippocampus was assessed during standardized cognitive activity. 31Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the phosphocreatine (PCr)-to-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. This ratio reflects cellular energy production in relation to concurrent cellular energy expenditure. With lipid infusion, the ratio was significantly reduced during cognitive activity (PCr/ATP 1.0 ± 0.4 compared with 1.4 ± 0.4 before infusion, P = 0.01). Without lipid infusion, there was no reduction in the ratio during cognitive activity (PCr/ATP 1.5 ± 0.3 compared with 1.4 ± 0.4, P = 0.57). This provides supporting evidence for a physiological role for insulin signaling in facilitating increased neuronal glucose uptake during sustained cognitive activity. Loss of this response, as may occur in type 2 diabetes, would lead to insufficient neuronal energy availability during cognitive activity

  11. Interaction between a Cationic Surfactant-like Peptide and Lipid Vesicles and Its Relationship to Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the properties of an antimicrobial surfactant-like peptide (Ala)6(Arg), A6R, containing a cationic headgroup. The interaction of this peptide with zwitterionic (DPPC) lipid vesicles is investigated using a range of microscopic, X-ray scattering, spectroscopic, and calorimetric methods. The β-sheet structure adopted by A6R is disrupted in the presence of DPPC. A strong effect on the small-angle X-ray scattering profile is observed: the Bragg peaks from the DPPC bilayers in the vesicle walls are eliminated in the presence of A6R and only bilayer form factor peaks are observed. All of these observations point to the interaction of A6R with DPPC bilayers. These studies provide insight into interactions between a model cationic peptide and vesicles, relevant to understanding the action of antimicrobial peptides on lipid membranes. Notably, peptide A6R exhibits antimicrobial activity without membrane lysis. PMID:24156610

  12. Antimicrobial Activities and Water Vapor Barrier of Starch-Lipid Based Edible Coatings on Fresh Produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The uses of edible antimicrobial films or coatings have been proven to be a novel way of suppressing pathogen contaminations of fresh foods where physical barriers alone aren’t enough. In the present study, we embedded essential oils into a proprietary starch-lipids composite, called Fantesk, to in...

  13. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  14. Copper and zinc induction of lipid peroxidation and effects on antioxidant enzyme activities in the microalga Pavlova viridis (Prymnesiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Hu, Changwei; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Li; Kong, Zhiming; Liu, Zhili

    2006-01-01

    The metal-induced lipid peroxidation and response of antioxidative enzymes have been investigated in the marine microalga Pavlova viridis to understand the mechanisms of metal resistance in algal cells. We have analyzed superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and glutathione (GSH) contents in microalgal cells grown at different concentrations of copper and zinc. In response to each metal, lipid peroxidation was enhanced with the increase of concentrations, as an indication of the oxidative damage caused by metal concentration assayed in the microalgae cells. Exposure of P. viridis to the two metals caused changes in enzyme activities in a different manner, depending on the metal assayed: after copper treatments, total SOD activity was enhanced, while it was reduced after zinc exposure. Copper and zinc stimulated the activities of CAT and GSH whereas GPX showed a remarkable increase in activity in response to copper treatments and decrease after zinc treatments. These results suggest that an activation of some antioxidant enzymes was enhanced to counteract the oxidative stress induced by the two metals. PMID:16085277

  15. Insulin sensitizes FGF21 in glucose and lipid metabolisms via activating common AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Ye, Xianlong; Wu, Qiang; Li, Shujie; Yang, Yongbi; He, Jinjiao; Liu, Yunye; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Qingyan; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies reveal that fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) sensitizes insulin to achieve a synergy in regulating glucose metabolism. Here, we report that insulin sensitizes FGF21 in regulating both glucose and lipid metabolisms. db/db diabetic mice were subcutaneously administrated once a day for 6 weeks. Effective dose of insulin (1 U) could control blood glucose level of the db/db mice for maximum of 2 h, increased the body weight of the db/db mice and did not improve serum lipid parameters. In contrast, effective dose of FGF21 (0.5 mg/kg) could maintain blood glucose of the db/db mice at normal level for at least 24 h, repressed the weight gain of the mice and significantly improved lipid parameters. Ineffective doses of FGF21 (0.125 mg/kg) and insulin had no effect on blood glucose level of the db/db mice after 24 h administration, body weight or lipid parameters. However, combination of the two ineffective doses could maintain blood glucose level of the db/db mice for at least 24 h, suppressed weight gain and significantly improved lipid parameters. These results suggest that insulin sensitizes FGF21 in regulating both glucose and lipid metabolism. The results aimed to study the molecular basis of FGF21 sensitization indicates that combination of the two ineffective doses increased the mRNA expression of glut1, glut4, β-Klotho, sirt1, pgc-1α, ucp-1 and AKT phosphorylation, decreased fasn. The results demonstrate that insulin sensitizes FGF21 through elevating the phosphorylation of common gene Akt and amplifying FGF21 downstream signaling, including increasing expression of glut1 sirt1, pgc-1α, ucp-1, and decreasing fasn expression. In summary, we reports herein for the first time that insulin sensitizes FGF21 to achieve a synergy in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Along with previous studies, we conclude that the synergistic effect between FGF21 and insulin is realized through mutual sensitization. PMID:26607153

  16. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-01-01

    All fibrates are peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs)-alpha agonists with ability to decrease triglyceride and increase high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C). However, bezafibrate has a unique characteristic profile of action since it activates all three PPAR subtypes (alpha, gamma and delta) at comparable doses. Therefore, bezafibrate operates as a pan-agonist for all three PPAR isoforms. Selective PPAR gamma agonists (thiazolidinediones) are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). They improve insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adipogenesis, decreasing free fatty acid levels, and reversing insulin resistance. However, selective PPAR gamma agonists also cause water retention, weight gain, peripheral edema, and congestive heart failure. The expression of PPAR beta/ delta in essentially all cell types and tissues (ubiquitous presence) suggests its potential fundamental role in cellular biology. PPAR beta/ delta effects correlated with enhancement of fatty acid oxidation, energy consumption and adaptive thermogenesis. Together, these data implicate PPAR beta/delta in fuel combustion and suggest that pan-PPAR agonists that include a component of PPAR beta/delta activation might offset some of the weight gain issues seen with selective PPAR gamma agonists, as was demonstrated by bezafibrate studies. Suggestively, on the whole body level all PPARs acting as one orchestra and balanced pan-PPAR activation seems as an especially attractive pharmacological goal. Conceptually, combined PPAR gamma and alpha action can target simultaneously insulin resistance and atherogenic dyslipidemia, whereas PPAR beta/delta properties may prevent the development of overweight. Bezafibrate, as all fibrates, significantly reduced plasma triglycerides and increased HDL-C level (but considerably stronger than other major fibrates). Bezafibrate significantly decreased prevalence of small, dense low density lipoproteins particles, remnants, induced

  17. Lipid derivatives activate GPR119 and trigger GLP-1 secretion in primary murine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Pais, Ramona; Lenaghan, Carol; Smith, David M.; Wedin, Marianne; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone derived from proglucagon, which is released from intestinal L-cells and increases insulin secretion in a glucose dependent manner. GPR119 is a lipid derivative receptor present in L-cells, believed to play a role in the detection of dietary fat. This study aimed to characterize the responses of primary murine L-cells to GPR119 agonism and assess the importance of GPR119 for the detection of ingested lipid. Methods GLP-1 secretion was measured from murine primary cell cultures stimulated with a panel of GPR119 ligands. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured in mice lacking GPR119 in proglucagon-expressing cells and controls after lipid gavage. Intracellular cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists were measured in single primary L-cells using transgenic mice expressing a cAMP FRET sensor driven by the proglucagon promoter. Results L-cell specific knockout of GPR119 dramatically decreased plasma GLP-1 levels after a lipid gavage. GPR119 ligands triggered GLP-1 secretion in a GPR119 dependent manner in primary epithelial cultures from the colon, but were less effective in the upper small intestine. GPR119 agonists elevated cAMP in ∼70% of colonic L-cells and 50% of small intestinal L-cells. Conclusions/interpretation GPR119 ligands strongly enhanced GLP-1 release from colonic cultures, reflecting the high proportion of colonic L-cells that exhibited cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists. Less GPR119-dependence could be demonstrated in the upper small intestine. In vivo, GPR119 in L-cells plays a key role in oral lipid-triggered GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26144594

  18. Piperidine alkaloids from Piper retrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-07-22

    The fruits of Piper retrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPARδ protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300mg/kg/day for 8weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also protected against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver by decreasing hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Consistent with the in vitro results, PRPA activated AMPK signaling and altered the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in liver and skeletal muscle. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPARδ, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. PMID:21741367

  19. Activation of Nlrp3 Inflammasomes Enhances Macrophage Lipid-Deposition and Migration: Implication of a Novel Role of Inflammasome in Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Min; Gulbins, Erich; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Although Nlrp3 inflammasome activation in macrophages has been shown to be critical for the development of atherosclerosis upon atherogenic stimuli, it remains unknown whether activated Nlrp3 inflammasomes by other non-atherogenic stimuli induce alterations in macrophages that may contribute in the concert with other factors to atherogenesis. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes by ATP, which is a classical non-lipid danger stimulus, enhances the migration of macrophage and increases lipids deposition in macrophages accelerating foam cell formation. We first demonstrated that extracellular ATP (2.5 mM) markedly increased the formation and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) from wild type (Asc+/+) mice resulting in activation of caspase-1 and IL-1β production. In these Asc+/+ macrophages, such stimulation of inflammasomes by non-lipid ATP was similar to those induced by atherogenic stimuli such as cholesterol crystals or 7-ketocholesterol. Both non-lipid and lipid forms of stimuli induced formation and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes, which were prevented by Asc gene deletion. Interestingly, Asc+/+ BMMs had dramatic lipids accumulation after stimulation with ATP. Further, we demonstrated that large amount of cholesterol was accumulated in lysosomes of Asc+/+ BMMs when inflammasomes were activated by ATP. Such intracellular and lysosomal lipids deposition was not observed in Asc−/− BMMs and also prevented by caspase-1 inhibitor WEHD. In addition, in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that migration of Asc+/+ BMMs increased due to stimulation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes, which was markedly attenuated in Asc−/− BMMs. Together, these results suggest that activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes remarkably increases the susceptibility of macrophages to lipid deposition and their migration ability. Such novel action of inflammasomes may facilitate entry or retention of macrophages into the

  20. Glycosylation-Dependent IFN-γR Partitioning in Lipid and Actin Nanodomains Is Critical for JAK Activation.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Cédric M; Hamon, Yannick; Gonnord, Pauline; Boularan, Cédric; Kagan, Jérémy; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Ruez, Richard; Mailfert, Sébastien; Bertaux, Nicolas; Loew, Damarys; Wunder, Christian; Johannes, Ludger; Vogt, Guillaume; Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Marguet, Didier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Galès, Céline; He, Hai-Tao; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-08-11

    Understanding how membrane nanoscale organization controls transmembrane receptors signaling activity remains a challenge. We studied interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR) signaling in fibroblasts from homozygous patients with a T168N mutation in IFNGR2. By adding a neo-N-glycan on IFN-γR2 subunit, this mutation blocks IFN-γ activity by unknown mechanisms. We show that the lateral diffusion of IFN-γR2 is confined by sphingolipid/cholesterol nanodomains. In contrast, the IFN-γR2 T168N mutant diffusion is confined by distinct actin nanodomains where conformational changes required for Janus-activated tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) activation by IFN-γ could not occur. Removing IFN-γR2 T168N-bound galectins restored lateral diffusion in lipid nanodomains and JAK/STAT signaling in patient cells, whereas adding galectins impaired these processes in control cells. These experiments prove the critical role of dynamic receptor interactions with actin and lipid nanodomains and reveal a new function for receptor glycosylation and galectins. Our study establishes the physiological relevance of membrane nanodomains in the control of transmembrane receptor signaling in vivo. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27499022

  1. Efficacious gene silencing in serum and significant apoptotic activity induction by survivin downregulation mediated by new cationic gemini tocopheryl lipids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishan; Maiti, Bappa; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2015-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery offers cationic liposomes as promising instruments for the delivery of double-stranded RNA (ds RNA) molecules for successful sequence-specific gene silencing (RNA interference). The efficient delivery of siRNA (small interfering RNA) to cells while avoiding unexpected side effects is an important prerequisite for the exploitation of the power of this excellent tool. We present here six new tocopherol based cationic gemini lipids, which induce substantial gene knockdown without any obvious cytotoxicity. All the efficient coliposomal formulations derived from each of these geminis and a helper lipid, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), were well characterized using physical methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Zeta potential measurements were conducted to estimate the surface charge of these formulations. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the optimized coliposomal formulations could transfect anti-GFP siRNA efficiently in three different GFP expressing cell lines, viz., HEK 293T, HeLa, and Caco-2, significantly better than a potent commercial standard Lipofectamine 2000 (L2K) both in the absence and in the presence of serum (FBS). Notably, the knockdown activity of coliposomes of gemini lipids was not affected even in the presence of serum (10% and 50% FBS) while it dropped down for L2K significantly. Observations under a fluorescence microscope, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis substantiated the flow cytometry results. The efficient cellular entry of labeled siRNA in GFP expressing cells as evidenced from confocal microscopy put forward these gemini lipids among the potent lipidic carriers for siRNA. The efficient transfection capabilities were also profiled in a more relevant fashion while performing siRNA transfections against survivin (an anti-apoptotic protein) which induced substantial apoptosis. Furthermore, the survivin downregulation improved the therapeutic efficacy levels of an

  2. The Role of Storage Lipids in the Relation between Fecundity, Locomotor Activity, and Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster Longevity-Selected and Control Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri Moghadam, Neda; Holmstrup, Martin; Manenti, Tommaso; Brandt Mouridsen, Marie; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of insect fat body to multiple processes, such as development, metamorphosis, activity, and reproduction results in trade-offs between life history traits. In the present study, age-induced modulation of storage lipid composition in Drosophila melanogaster longevity-selected (L) and non-selected control (C) lines was studied and the correlation between total body fat mass and lifespan assessed. The trade-offs between fecundity, locomotor activity, and lifespan were re-evaluated from a lipid-related metabolic perspective. Fewer storage lipids in the L lines compared to the C lines supports the impact of body fat mass on extended lifespan. The higher rate of fecundity and locomotor activity in the L lines may increase the lipid metabolism and enhance the lipolysis of storage lipids, reducing fat reserves. The correlation between neutral lipid fatty acids and fecundity, as well as locomotor activity, varied across age groups and between the L and C lines. The fatty acids that correlated with egg production were different from the fatty acids that correlated with locomotor activity. The present study suggests that fecundity and locomotor activity may positively affect the lifespan of D. melanogaster through the inhibition of fat accumulation. PMID:26115349

  3. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  4. Comparison of Biochemical Activities between High and Low Lipid-Producing Strains of Mucor circinelloides: An Explanation for the High Oleaginicity of Strain WJ11

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q.; Chen, Wei; Garre, Victoriano; Song, Yuanda; Ratledge, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The oleaginous fungus, Mucor circinelloides, is one of few fungi that produce high amounts of γ-linolenic acid (GLA); however, it usually only produces <25% lipid. Nevertheless, a new strain (WJ11) isolated in this laboratory can produce lipid up to 36% (w/w) cell dry weight (CDW). We have investigated the potential mechanism of high lipid accumulation in M. circinelloides WJ11 by comparative biochemical analysis with a low lipid-producing strain, M. circinelloides CBS 277.49, which accumulates less than 15% (w/w) lipid. M. circinelloides WJ11 produced more cell mass than that of strain CBS 277.49, although with slower glucose consumption. In the lipid accumulation phase, activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in strain WJ11 were greater than in CBS 277.49 by 46% and 17%, respectively, and therefore may provide more NADPH for fatty acid biosynthesis. The activities of NAD+:isocitrate dehydrogenase and NADP+:isocitrate dehydrogenase, however, were 43% and 54%, respectively, lower in WJ11 than in CBS 277.49 and may retard the tricarboxylic acid cycle and thereby provide more substrate for ATP:citrate lyase (ACL) to produce acetyl-CoA. Also, the activities of ACL and fatty acid synthase in the high lipid-producing strain, WJ11, were 25% and 56%, respectively, greater than in strain CBS 277.49. These enzymes may therefore cooperatively regulate the fatty acid biosynthesis in these two strains. PMID:26046932

  5. The Functional Activity of the Human Serotonin 5-HT1A Receptor Is Controlled by Lipid Bilayer Composition.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, M Gertrude; Mansfield, Kylee S; Malmstadt, Noah

    2016-06-01

    Although the properties of the cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer are broadly understood to affect integral membrane proteins, details of these interactions are poorly understood. This is particularly the case for the large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we examine the lipid dependence of the human serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, a GPCR that is central to neuronal function. We incorporate the protein in synthetic bilayers of controlled composition together with a fluorescent reporting system that detects GPCR-catalyzed activation of G protein to measure receptor-catalyzed oligonucleotide exchange. Our results show that increased membrane order induced by sterols and sphingomyelin increases receptor-catalyzed oligonucleotide exchange. Increasing membrane elastic curvature stress also increases this exchange. These results reveal the broad dependence that the 5-HT1A receptor has on plasma membrane properties, demonstrating that membrane lipid composition is a biochemical control parameter and highlighting the possibility that compositional changes related to aging, diet, or disease could impact cell signaling functions. PMID:27276266

  6. Alterations in superoxide dismutase activities, lipid peroxidation and glutathione levels in thinner inhaled rat lungs: relationship between histopathological properties.

    PubMed

    Ulakoğlu, E Z; Saygi, A; Gümüştaş, M K; Zor, E; Oztek, I; Kökoğlu, E

    1998-09-01

    Paint thinner has widespread use in industry. The use of thinner among children as a narcotic agent has become a social and health problem. There is some evidence that organic solvents may express their toxicity by the way of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell damage. ROS has been shown to induce lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. This study examined peroxidative and histopathological changes in the rat lung, during 5 weeks of thinner inhalation. Significant increases were found in lipid peroxidation (MDA+4-DHA) levels related to the duration of inhalation. As opposed to increases in the lipid peroxidation levels, significant decreases in superoxide dismutase activities and glutathione levels were observed from the third inhalation week to the end of the fifth week. At the beginning of the inhalation slight inflammatory changes, intraalveolar and interstitial extravasation and oedema in lung parenchyma were noted. As the inhalation period extended, chronic inflammatory changes, alveolar epithelial proliferation, collapse, emphysematous changes and interstitial fibrosis in lung were detected. PMID:9782071

  7. Phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 promotes lipid clearance in hepatic cells through interacting with STAT3 and activating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Qi, Zhilin; Zhu, Yanyan; Song, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Chunxia; Ben, Peiling; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the major liver disease worldwide. Recently, several studies have identified that the activation of autophagy attenuates hepatic steatosis. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is involved in autophagy in response to various stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphorylated Hsp27 stimulates autophagy and lipid droplet clearance and interacts with STAT3. In vivo study showed that high fat diet (HFD) feeding increased Hsp25 (mouse orthology of Hsp27) phosphorylation and autophagy in mouse livers. Inhibition of Hsp25 phosphorylation exacerbated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In vitro study showed that palmitate-induced lipid overload in hepatic cells was enhanced by Hsp27 knockdown, KRIBB3 treatment and Hsp27-3A (non-phosphorylatable) overexpression but was prevented by Hsp27-WT (wild type) and Hsp27-3D (phosphomimetic) overexpression. Mechanism analysis demonstrated that palmitate could induce Hsp27 phosphorylation which promoted palmitate-induced autophagy. Phosphorylated Hsp27 interacted with STAT3 in response to palmitate treatment, and disrupted the STAT3/PKR complexes, facilitated PKR-dependent eIF2α phosphorylation, and thus stimulated autophagy. To conclude, our study provides a novel mechanism by which the phosphorylated Hsp27 promotes hepatic lipid clearance and suggests a new insight for therapy of steatotic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PMID:27185187

  8. AMP-Activated Kinase Regulates Lipid Droplet Localization and Stability of Adipose Triglyceride Lipase in C. elegans Dauer Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meng; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Animals have developed diverse mechanisms to adapt to their changing environment. Like many organisms the free-living nematode C. elegans can alternate between a reproductive mode or a diapause-like "dauer" stage during larval development to circumvent harsh environmental conditions. The master metabolic regulator AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for survival during the dauer stage, where it phosphorylates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL-1) at multiple sites to block lipid hydrolysis and ultimately protect the cellular triglyceride-based energy depot from rapid depletion. However, how the AMPK-mediated phosphorylation affects the function of ATGL-1 has not been characterised at the molecular level. Here we show that AMPK phosphorylation leads to the generation of 14-3-3 binding sites on ATGL-1, which are recognized by the C. elegans 14-3-3 protein orthologue PAR-5. Physical interaction of ATGL-1 with PAR-5 results in sequestration of ATGL-1 away from the lipid droplets and eventual proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, we also show that the major AMPK phosphorylation site on ATGL-1, Ser 303, is required for both modification of its lipid droplet localization and its degradation. Our data provide mechanistic insight as to how AMPK functions to enhance survival through its ability to protect the accumulated triglyceride deposits from rapid hydrolysis to preserve the energy stores during periods of extended environmental duress. PMID:26098762

  9. The arbuscular mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis activates storage lipid biosynthesis to cope with the benzo[a]pyrene oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Calonne, Maryline; Fontaine, Joël; Debiane, Djouher; Laruelle, Frédéric; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2014-01-01

    The phytoremediation assisted by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could constitute an ecological and economic method to restore polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) polluted soils. Unfortunately, little is known about the PAH impact on the beneficial symbiotic AMF. Using radiolabelling experiments, our work aims to understand how benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a representative of high molecular weight PAH, acts on the AMF lipid metabolism. Our results showed decreases in the sterol precursors as well as in total phospholipid quantities, in link with the [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation decreases in these lipids. Interestingly, a concomitant increase of [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation by 29.5% into phosphatidylcholine with its content decrease in Rhizophagus irregularis extraradical mycelium was observed, suggesting a membrane regeneration. A second concomitant increase (estimated to 69%) of [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation into triacylglycerols (TAG) with the content decrease was also observed. This suggests a fungal TAG biosynthesis activation probably to offset the decrease in storage lipid content when the fungus was grown under B[a]P pollution. In addition, our findings showed that lipase activity was induced by more than 3 fold in the presence of B[a]P in comparison to the control indicating that the drop in TAG content could be a consequence of their active degradation. Taken together, our data suggest the involvement of the fungal TAG metabolism to cope B[a]P toxicity through two means: (i) by providing carbon skeletons and energy necessary for membrane regeneration and/or for B[a]P translocation and degradation as well as (ii) by activating the phosphatidic acid and hexose metabolisms which may be involved in cellular stress defence. PMID:24246754

  10. Effects of Whole Grain, Fish and Bilberries on Serum Metabolic Profile and Lipid Transfer Protein Activities: A Randomized Trial (Sysdimet)

    PubMed Central

    Lankinen, Maria; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Paananen, Jussi; Joukamo, Laura; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu; Gylling, Helena; Orešič, Matej; Jauhiainen, Matti; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Objective We studied the combined effects of wholegrain, fish and bilberries on serum metabolic profile and lipid transfer protein activities in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Methods Altogether 131 subjects (40–70 y, BMI 26–39 kg/m2) with impaired glucose metabolism and features of the metabolic syndrome were randomized into three groups with 12-week periods according to a parallel study design. They consumed either: a) wholegrain and low postprandial insulin response grain products, fatty fish 3 times a week, and bilberries 3 portions per day (HealthyDiet), b) wholegrain and low postprandial insulin response grain products (WGED), or c) refined wheat breads as cereal products (Control). Altogether 106 subjects completed the study. Serum metabolic profile was studied using an NMR-based platform providing information on lipoprotein subclasses and lipids as well as low-molecular-weight metabolites. Results There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the groups at baseline or at the end of the intervention. Mixed model analyses revealed significant changes in lipid metabolites in the HealthyDiet group during the intervention compared to the Control group. All changes reflected increased polyunsaturation in plasma fatty acids, especially in n-3 PUFAs, while n-6 and n-7 fatty acids decreased. According to tertiles of changes in fish intake, a greater increase of fish intake was associated with increased concentration of large HDL particles, larger average diameter of HDL particles, and increased concentrations of large HDL lipid components, even though total levels of HDL cholesterol remained stable. Conclusions The results suggest that consumption of diet rich in whole grain, bilberries and especially fatty fish causes changes in HDL particles shifting their subclass distribution toward larger particles. These changes may be related to known protective functions of HDL such as reverse cholesterol transport and could partly

  11. Spermidine feeding decreases age-related locomotor activity loss and induces changes in lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Minois, Nadège; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Smith, Terry K; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac

    2014-01-01

    Spermidine is a natural polyamine involved in many important cellular functions, whose supplementation in food or water increases life span and stress resistance in several model organisms. In this work, we expand spermidine's range of age-related beneficial effects by demonstrating that it is also able to improve locomotor performance in aged flies. Spermidine's mechanism of action on aging has been primarily related to general protein hypoacetylation that subsequently induces autophagy. Here, we suggest that the molecular targets of spermidine also include lipid metabolism: Spermidine-fed flies contain more triglycerides and show altered fatty acid and phospholipid profiles. We further determine that most of these metabolic changes are regulated through autophagy. Collectively, our data suggests an additional and novel lipid-mediated mechanism of action for spermidine-induced autophagy. PMID:25010732

  12. Inhibition of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity by VPC32183 suppresses the ability of diacylglycerol pyrophosphate to activate ERK(1/2) MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Violet, Pierre-Christian; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Robin, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    The lipidic metabolite, diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DGPP), in its dioctanoyl form (DGPP 8:0), has been described as an antagonist for mammalian lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors LPA1 and LPA3. In this study we show that DGPP 8:0 does not antagonize LPA dependent activation of ERK(1/2) MAP kinases but strongly stimulated them in various mammalian cell lines. LPA and DGPP 8:0 stimulation of ERK(1/2) occurred through different pathways. The DGPP 8:0 effect appeared to be dependent on PKC, Raf and MEK but was insensitive to pertussis toxin and did not involve G protein activation. Finally we showed that DGPP 8:0 effect on ERK(1/2) was dependent on its dephosphorylation by a phosphatase activity sharing lipid phosphate phosphatase properties. The inhibition of this phosphatase activity by VPC32183, a previously characterized LPA receptor antagonist, blocked the DGPP 8:0 effect on ERK(1/2) activation. Moreover, down-regulation of lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1) expression by RNA interference technique also reduced DGPP 8:0-induced ERK(1/2) activation. Consistently, over expression of LPP1 in HEK293 cells increases DGPP 8:0 hydrolysis and this increased activity was inhibited by VPC32183. In conclusion, DGPP 8:0 does not exert its effect by acting on a G protein coupled receptor, but through its dephosphorylation by LPP1, generating dioctanoyl phosphatidic acid which in turn activates PKC. These results suggest that LPP1 could have a positive regulatory function on cellular signaling processes such as ERK(1/2) activation. PMID:22820196

  13. The significance of lipid composition for membrane activity: new concepts and ways of assessing function.

    PubMed

    Vigh, Làszló; Escribá, Pablo V; Sonnleitner, Alois; Sonnleitner, Max; Piotto, Stefano; Maresca, Bruno; Horváth, Ibolya; Harwood, John L

    2005-09-01

    In the last decade or so, it has been realised that membranes do not just have a lipid-bilayer structure in which proteins are embedded or with which they associate. Structures are dynamic and contain areas of heterogeneity which are vital for their formation. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which these dynamic and heterogeneous structures have implications during stress and in relation to certain human diseases. A particular stress is that of temperature which may instigate adaptation in poikilotherms or appropriate defensive responses during fever in mammals. Recent data emphasise the role of membranes in sensing temperature changes and in controlling a regulatory loop with chaperone proteins. This loop seems to need the existence of specific membrane microdomains and also includes association of chaperone (heat stress) proteins with the membrane. The role of microdomains is then discussed further in relation to various human pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The concept of modifying membrane lipids (lipid therapy) as a means for treating such pathologies is then introduced. Examples are given when such methods have been shown to have benefit. In order to study membrane microheterogeneity in detail and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms that account for alteration in membrane function, new methods are needed. In the second part of the review, we discuss ultra-sensitive and ultra-resolution imaging techniques. These include atomic force microscopy, single particle tracking, single particle tracing and various modern fluorescence methods. Finally, we deal with computing simulation of membrane systems. Such methods include coarse-grain techniques and Monte Carlo which offer further advances into molecular dynamics. As computational methods advance they will have more application by revealing the very subtle interactions that take place between the lipid and protein components of membranes - and

  14. Physical inactivity amplifies the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the lipid-induced downregulation of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Zderic, Theodore W; Hamilton, Marc T

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for lipoprotein disorders and the metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity has a powerful effect on suppressing lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in skeletal muscle, the rate-limiting enzyme for hydrolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins. We tested the ability of several compounds to prevent the decrease in LPL. The present study minimized standing and ordinary light nonexercise movements in rats to compare the effects of inactivity and nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) on LPL activity. The key new insight was that the typically quick decrease in LPL activity of oxidative muscle caused by physical inactivity was prevented by nicotinic acid (NA), whereas inhibitors of TNF-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and NF-kappaB had no such effect. NA was administered at a dose known to acutely impede the appearance of plasma TG from the liver and free fatty acids from adipose tissue, and it was effective at intentionally lowering plasma lipid concentrations to the same level in active and inactive groups. As measured from heparin-releasable LPL activity, LPL in the microvasculature of the most oxidative muscles was approximately 90% lower in the inactive group compared with controls, and this suppression was completely blocked by NA. In contrast to inactivity, NA did not raise muscle LPL in ambulatory controls, whereas a large exogenous fat delivery did decrease LPL activity. In vitro control studies revealed that NA did not have a direct effect on skeletal muscle LPL activity. In conclusion, physical inactivity amplifies the ability of plasma lipids to suppress muscle LPL activity. The light ambulatory contractions responsible for NEAT are sufficient for mitigating these deleterious effects. PMID:16195388

  15. A fluorescent lipid analogue can be used to monitor secretory activity and for isolation of mammalian secretion mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistakis, N T; Kao, C Y; Wang, R H; Roth, M G

    1995-01-01

    The use of reporter proteins to study the regulation of secretion has often been complicated by posttranslational processing events that influence the secretion of certain proteins, but are not part of the cellular mechanisms that specifically regulate secretion. This has been a particular limitation for the isolation of mammalian secretion mutants, which has typically been a slow process. To provide a reporter of secretory activity independent of protein processing events, cells were labeled with the fluorescent lipid analogue C5-DMB-ceramide (ceramide coupled to the fluorophore boron dipyrromethene difluoride) and its secretion was followed by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Brefeldin A, which severely inhibits secretion in Chinese hamster ovary cells, blocked secretion of C5-DMB-ceramide. At high temperature, export of C5-DMB-ceramide was inhibited in HRP-1 cells, which have a conditional defect in secretion. Using C5-DMB-ceramide as a reporter of secretory activity, several different pulse-chase protocols were designed that selected mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells that were resistant to the drug brefeldin A and others that were defective in the transport of glycoproteins to the cell surface. Mutant cells of either type were identified in a mutagenized population at a frequency of 10(-6). Thus, the fluorescent lipid C5-DMB-ceramide can be used as a specific marker of secretory activity, providing an efficient, general approach for isolating mammalian cells with defects in the secretory pathway. Images PMID:7787242

  16. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Alves, Eliane S. F.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Mandal, Santi M.; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Andrade, Cesar A. S.; Nascimento, Jessica M.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Porto, William F.; Correa, Jose R.; Hancock, Robert. E. W.; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L.; Liao, Luciano M.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  17. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Osmar N; Alves, Eliane S F; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Mandal, Santi M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Andrade, Cesar A S; Nascimento, Jessica M; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Porto, William F; Correa, Jose R; Hancock, Robert E W; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L; Liao, Luciano M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  18. Antioxidant activity of tetrandrine and its inhibition of quartz-induced lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Mao, Y; Saffiotti, U; Wang, L; Rojanasakul, Y; Leonard, S S; Vallyathan, V

    1995-10-01

    Tetrandrine is a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid that has been used in China as an antifibrotic drug to treat the lesions of silicosis. Its mechanism in the treatment of silicosis is unclear. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping was employed to investigate the antioxidant properties of tetrandrine. The spin trap used was 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). Tetrandine efficiently reacted with hydroxyl (.OH) radicals with a reaction rate of approximately 1.4 x 10(10) M-1 s-1. The .OH radicals were generated by the Fenton reaction [Fe(II) + H2O2) as well as by reaction of chromium(V) with H2O2. Similar results were obtained using .OH radicals generated by reaction of freshly fractured quartz particles with aqueous medium. Tetrandrine also scavenged superoxide (O2-) radicals produced from xanthine/xanthine oxidase. The effect of tetrandrine on lipid peroxidation induced by freshly fractured quartz particles was evaluated using linoleic acid as a model lipid. The results showed that tetrandrine caused a significant inhibition on freshly fractured quartz-induced lipid peroxidation. PMID:7563220

  19. Archaebacterial activity in the Orca Basin determined by the isolation of characteristic isopranyl ether-linked lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickins, Holli D.; Van Vleet, Edward S.

    1992-04-01

    Phytanyl glycerol ether lipids characteristic of archaebacterial inputs have been quantified in 30 water samples taken in the Orca Basin, an anoxic hypersaline basin located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Because of the Basin's anoxic hypersaline character, it seems likely that archaebacteria may play a significant role in the microbial ecology of the brine. Physical data, including temperature, salinity, per cent transmission, oxygen and nutrient concentrations, also were collected from six depths at five sampling sites in the Basin. Four of the five sites were characterized by a 200 m thick, anoxic brine (salinity ≈ 250 ppt) at an approximate water depth of 2240 m. A stepwise increase in salinity was associated with the brine-seawater interface, increasing from 38 to 150 ppt within the upper portion of the 10 m interface and to >250 ppt within the brine. Three distinct layers of particulate material were observed within the 10 m interface. Corresponding with the salinity gradient was a decrease in dissolved oxygen from 5.0 ml l -1 at 2040 m to 0 ml l -1 within the brine. Ammonia and phosphate concentrations increased from 0 and 2.5 μM above the brine to 519 and 63.5 μM within the brine. At the same time, nitrate concentrations decreased from 22 μM above the brine to negligible within the brine. Depletion of oxygen, with concomitant increases in ammonia and phosphate, decreased nitrate, and the production of methane suggest microbially mediated processes may be occurring at the brine-seawater interface. Highest concentrations of phytanyl ether lipids were observed within the interface, ranging from 29.7 to 84.1 ng l -1. Concentrations were negligible below the interface. Elevated phytanyl ether lipid concentrations in conjunction with microbial activity studies carried out by other investigators suggest that archaebacterial activity is occurring within the brine particulate layers. A decline in ether lipid concentration and microbial activity below this

  20. Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, are isolated as the anti-obesity constituents. {yields} PRPA administration significantly reduces body weight gain without altering food intake and fat pad mass. {yields} PRPA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPAR{delta}, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. -- Abstract: The fruits of Piperretrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPAR{delta} protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also

  1. Enzyme activities support the use of liver lipid-derived ketone bodies as aerobic fuels in muscle tissues of active sharks.

    PubMed

    Watson, R R; Dickson, K A

    2001-01-01

    Few data exist to test the hypothesis that elasmobranchs utilize ketone bodies rather than fatty acids for aerobic metabolism in muscle, especially in continuously swimming, pelagic sharks, which are expected to be more reliant on lipid fuel stores during periods between feeding bouts and due to their high aerobic metabolic rates. Therefore, to provide support for this hypothesis, biochemical indices of lipid metabolism were measured in the slow-twitch, oxidative (red) myotomal muscle, heart, and liver of several active shark species, including the endothermic shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus. Tissues were assayed spectrophotometrically for indicator enzymes of fatty acid oxidation (3-hydroxy-o-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase), ketone-body catabolism (3-oxoacid-CoA transferase), and ketogenesis (hydroxy-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase). Red muscle and heart had high capacities for ketone utilization, low capacities for fatty acid oxidation, and undetectable levels of ketogenic enzymes. Liver demonstrated undetectable activities of ketone catabolic enzymes but high capacities for fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Serum concentrations of the ketone beta-hydroxybutyrate varied interspecifically (means of 0.128-0.978 micromol mL(-1)) but were higher than levels previously reported for teleosts. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that aerobic metabolism in muscle tissue of active sharks utilizes ketone bodies, and not fatty acids, derived from liver lipid stores. PMID:11247746

  2. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity1

    PubMed Central

    Delles, Rebecca M.; Xiong, Youling L.; True, Alma D.; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity. PMID:24879706

  3. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  4. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Delles, Rebecca M; Xiong, Youling L; True, Alma D; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A

    2014-06-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity. PMID:24879706

  5. Physical activity, body composition and lipids changes in adolescents: analysis from the MyHeART Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Amiri, Mohammadreza; Mohd Azmi, Nahar; Su, Tin Tin; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Al-Sadat, Nabilla

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient physical activity and growing obesity levels among Malaysian adolescents are becoming a public health concern. Our study is to identify the trends of self-reported physical activity (PA) levels, blood lipid profiles, and body composition (BC) indices from a cohort of 820 adolescents. The self-reported PA was assessed using a validated Malay version of the PA Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C). Fasting blood samples were collected to investigate their lipid profiles. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences as well as body fat percentage were measured. The baseline and the first follow-up were conducted in 2012 and 2014, respectively. A downward trend in the PA level was seen in all categories with a significant reduction among all rural adolescents (P = 0.013) and more specifically, PA among girls residing in rural areas dropped significantly (P = 0.006). Either a significant reduction in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or a significant increment in BC indices (i.e., body mass index [BMI], waist circumference [WC], hip circumference, and body fat percentage [BF %]) were seen in this group. Female adolescents experienced more body fat increment with the reduction of physical activity. If not intervened early, adolescents from rural areas may increase their risk of developing cardiovascular diseases earlier. PMID:27465116

  6. Src kinase activity and SH2 domain regulate the dynamics of Src association with lipid and protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsman, Dmitry E.; Donaldson, John C.; Diaz, Begoña; Gutman, Orit; Martin, G. Steven; Henis, Yoav I.

    2007-01-01

    Src functions depend on its association with the plasma membrane and with specific membrane-associated assemblies. Many aspects of these interactions are unclear. We investigated the functions of kinase, SH2, and SH3 domains in Src membrane interactions. We used FRAP beam-size analysis in live cells expressing a series of c-Src–GFP proteins with targeted mutations in specific domains together with biochemical experiments to determine whether the mutants can generate and bind to phosphotyrosyl proteins. Wild-type Src displays lipid-like membrane association, whereas constitutively active Src-Y527F interacts transiently with slower-diffusing membrane-associated proteins. These interactions require Src kinase activity and SH2 binding, but not SH3 binding. Furthermore, overexpression of paxillin, an Src substrate with a high cytoplasmic population, competes with membrane phosphotyrosyl protein targets for binding to activated Src. Our observations indicate that the interactions of Src with lipid and protein targets are dynamic and that the kinase and SH2 domain cooperate in the membrane targeting of Src. PMID:17698610

  7. GPR40 agonist ameliorates liver X receptor-induced lipid accumulation in liver by activating AMPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Meng, Xiangyu; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Hongxia; Li, Guoping; Wang, Shu; Man, Yong; Tang, Weiqing; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. GPR40 is a G protein-coupled receptor mediating free fatty acid-induced insulin secretion and thus plays a beneficial role in the improvement of diabetes. However, the impact of GPR40 agonist on hepatic steatosis still remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we found that activation of GPR40 by its agonist GW9508 attenuated Liver X receptor (LXR)-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of LXR in the livers of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-cholesterol diet and in HepG2 cells stimulated by chemical agonist caused increased expression of its target lipogenic genes and subsequent lipid accumulation. All these effects of LXR were dramatically downregulated after GW9508 supplementation. Moreover, GPR40 activation was accompanied by upregulation of AMPK pathway, whereas the inhibitive effect of GPR40 on the lipogenic gene expression was largely abrogated by AMPK knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GW9508 exerts a beneficial effect to ameliorate LXR-induced hepatic steatosis through regulation of AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:27121981

  8. GPR40 agonist ameliorates liver X receptor-induced lipid accumulation in liver by activating AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Meng, Xiangyu; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Hongxia; Li, Guoping; Wang, Shu; Man, Yong; Tang, Weiqing; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. GPR40 is a G protein-coupled receptor mediating free fatty acid-induced insulin secretion and thus plays a beneficial role in the improvement of diabetes. However, the impact of GPR40 agonist on hepatic steatosis still remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we found that activation of GPR40 by its agonist GW9508 attenuated Liver X receptor (LXR)-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of LXR in the livers of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-cholesterol diet and in HepG2 cells stimulated by chemical agonist caused increased expression of its target lipogenic genes and subsequent lipid accumulation. All these effects of LXR were dramatically downregulated after GW9508 supplementation. Moreover, GPR40 activation was accompanied by upregulation of AMPK pathway, whereas the inhibitive effect of GPR40 on the lipogenic gene expression was largely abrogated by AMPK knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GW9508 exerts a beneficial effect to ameliorate LXR-induced hepatic steatosis through regulation of AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:27121981

  9. Curcumin Blocks Naproxen-Induced Gastric Antral Ulcerations through Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation and Activation of Enzymatic Scavengers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jin, Soojung; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-08-28

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, which is used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine the protective effect of curcumin against naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations in rats. Different doses (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg) of curcumin or vehicle (curcumin, 0 mg/kg) were pretreated for 3 days by oral gavage, and then gastric mucosal lesions were caused by 80 mg/kg naproxen applied for 3 days. Curcumin significantly inhibited the naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcer area and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin markedly increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, 100 mg/kg curcumin completely protected the gastric mucosa against the loss in the enzyme, resulting in a drastic increase of activities of radical scavenging enzymes up to more than the level of untreated normal rats. Histological examination obviously showed that curcumin prevents naproxen-induced gastric antral ulceration as a result of direct protection of the gastric mucosa. These results suggest that curcumin blocks naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of radical scavenging enzymes, and it may offer a potential remedy of gastric antral ulcerations. PMID:27197667

  10. Physical activity, body composition and lipids changes in adolescents: analysis from the MyHeART Study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Amiri, Mohammadreza; Mohd Azmi, Nahar; Su, Tin Tin; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Al-Sadat, Nabilla

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient physical activity and growing obesity levels among Malaysian adolescents are becoming a public health concern. Our study is to identify the trends of self-reported physical activity (PA) levels, blood lipid profiles, and body composition (BC) indices from a cohort of 820 adolescents. The self-reported PA was assessed using a validated Malay version of the PA Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C). Fasting blood samples were collected to investigate their lipid profiles. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences as well as body fat percentage were measured. The baseline and the first follow-up were conducted in 2012 and 2014, respectively. A downward trend in the PA level was seen in all categories with a significant reduction among all rural adolescents (P = 0.013) and more specifically, PA among girls residing in rural areas dropped significantly (P = 0.006). Either a significant reduction in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or a significant increment in BC indices (i.e., body mass index [BMI], waist circumference [WC], hip circumference, and body fat percentage [BF %]) were seen in this group. Female adolescents experienced more body fat increment with the reduction of physical activity. If not intervened early, adolescents from rural areas may increase their risk of developing cardiovascular diseases earlier. PMID:27465116

  11. [Anti-radical activity of products of processing of holothurian Cucumaria japonica and their practical application for lipid stabilization].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Kalenik, T K; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Products of technological and biotechnological modification (acid and enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts) of the holothurian Cucumariajaponica from the Far East region are the complex multicomponent systems containing biologically active agents of a sea origin that has to provide them biological activity. The research objective consisted in quantitative studying of anti-radical properties of acid, enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from soft fabrics of a holothurian from the Far East region (Cucumaria japonica) and their influence on oxidation of lipids in fat emulsion products. The reaction with stable free 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical was used as a model system. Radical relating activity of hydrolyzates and extracts from Cucumaria japonica varied over a wide range from 48 to 78%. The maximum radical binding activity was noted for acid hydrolyzates. The activity of the hydrolyzate from a nimbus and feelers of Cucumaria japonica was comparable with activity of ionol. It has been defined that levels of manifestation of anti-radical activity depended on a way of technological and biotechnological processing of raw materials. Studying of fractional composition of melanoidins of hydrolyzates and extracts from Cucumaria japonica established that they can be divided into fractions--with molecular masses about 10,000 and 1000 Da. The maximum content of melanoidins has been defined in fraction weighing about 1000 Da. Introduction of acid, enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from Cucumaria japonica in the composition of oil-fat emulsion systems allowed to slow down processes of lipid oxidation and triglyceride hydrolysis in mayonnaise. Introduction of hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from Cucumaria japonica in an oil-fat emulsion product allowed to reduce peroxide value by 22-45%, acid value by 12-35% on the 90th days of storage. Acid hydrolysates of Cucumaria Japonica most significantly reduce the rate of

  12. Salinity stress increases lipid, secondary metabolites and enzyme activity in Amphora subtropica and Dunaliella sp. for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    BenMoussa-Dahmen, Ines; Chtourou, Haifa; Rezgui, Fatma; Sayadi, Sami; Dhouib, Abdelhafidh

    2016-10-01

    Amphora subtropica and Dunaliella sp. isolated from Tunisian biotopes were retained for their high lipid contents. Respective optimized parameters for rapid growth were: pH 9 and 10, light period 21 and 24h and temperature 31 and 34°C, respectively. After optimization, Amphora subtropica growth rate increased from 0.2 to 0.5day(-1) and Dunaliella sp. growth rate increased from 0.38 to 0.7day(-1). Amphora subtropica biomass production, productivity and lipid content increased from 0.3 to 0.7gL(-1)(dw), 69-100mgL(-1)d(-1)(dw) and 150-190gkg(-1)(dw), respectively, and Dunaliella sp. from 0.5 to 1.4gL(-1)(dw), 124-200mgL(-1)d(-1) (dw) and 190-280gkg(-1)(dw), respectively. Often to overcome trade-off between microalgae rapid growth and high lipid content which are often conflicting and very difficult to obtain at the same time, separation in a growth stage and a lipid accumulation stage is obvious. Salinity stress in a single stage of culture was studied. Compared to the optimal concentration of growth, excess or deficiency of NaCl engendered the same cellular responses by implication of oxidative stress systems and reactivation of defense and storage systems. Indeed, increasing salinity from 1M to 2M for Amphora subtropica or decreasing salinity from 3M to 2M for Dunaliella sp. have both increased lipids content from (220 and 280) to (350 and 430)gkg(-1), carotenoids from (1.8 and 2.4) to (2.3 and 3.7)pgcell(-1), TBARS amount from (10.4 and 5.3) to (12.1 and 10.7)nmolmg(-1) proteins and SOD activity from of (46.6 and 61.8) to (71.6 and 79.4)Umg(-1) proteins, respectively. With further improved fatty acids profile, the microalgae strains could be potent candidates for biofuel production. PMID:27428298

  13. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  14. Anti-glioma activity and the mechanism of cellular uptake of asiatic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garanti, Tanem; Stasik, Aneta; Burrow, Andrea Julie; Alhnan, Mohamed A; Wan, Ka-Wai

    2016-03-16

    Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene found in Centella Asiatica, has shown neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity against glioma. However, owing to its poor aqueous solubility, effective delivery and absorption across biological barriers, in particular the blood brain barrier (BBB), are challenging. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have shown a promising potential as a drug delivery system to carry lipophilic drugs across the BBB, a major obstacle in brain cancer therapy. Nevertheless, limited information is available about the cytotoxic mechanisms of nano-lipidic carriers with AA on normal and glioma cells. This study assessed the anti-cancer efficacy of AA-loaded SLNs against glioblastoma and their cellular uptake mechanism in comparison with SVG P12 (human foetal glial) cells. SLNs were systematically investigated for three different solid lipids; glyceryl monostearate (MS), glyceryl distearate (DS) and glyceryl tristearate (TS). The non-drug containing MS-SLNs (E-MS-SLNs) did not show any apparent toxicity towards normal SVG P12 cells, whilst the AA-loaded MS-SLNs (AA-MS-SLNs) displayed a more favourable drug release profile and higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells. Therefore, MS-SLNs were chosen for further in vitro studies. Cytotoxicity studies of SLNs (± AA) were performed using MTT assay where AA-SLNs showed significantly higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells than SVG P12 normal cells, as confirmed by flow cell cytometry. Cellular uptake of SLNs also appeared to be preferentially facilitated by energy-dependent endocytosis as evidenced by fluorescence imaging and flow cell cytometry. Using the Annexin V-PI double staining technique, it was found that these AA-MS-SLNs displayed concentration-dependent apoptotic activity on glioma cells, which further confirms the potential of exploiting these AA-loaded MS-SLNs for brain cancer therapy. PMID:26775062

  15. Beta-carotene suppression of benzophenone-sensitized lipid peroxidation in hexane through additional chain-breaking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Dragan; Marković, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the antioxidant activity of β-carotene in the presence of two different mixtures of phospholipids in hexane solution, under continuous UV-irradiation from three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C). β-Carotene is employed to control lipid peroxidation process generated by UV-irradiation, in the presence and in the absence of selected photosensitizer, benzophenone, by scavenging the involved, created free radicals. The results show that β-carotene undergoes to a substantial, probably structural dependent destruction (bleaching), highly dependent on UV-photons energy input, more expressed in the presence than in the absence of benzophenone. The additional bleaching is synchronized with the further increase in β-carotene antioxidant activity in the presence of benzophenone, implying the same cause: increase in (phospholipids peroxidation) chain-breaking activities.

  16. Alterations in some lipid components and Ca2+ ATPase activity in brain of rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Oner, P; Bekpinar, S; Oz, B

    1991-06-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed an atherogenic diet for four months to investigate possible diet-induced lipid alterations and brain Ca2+ ATPase activity. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were found to be increased significantly in both serum and brain while the phospholipid level was decreased in both. The distribution of serum cholesterol between high-density and low-density lipoproteins was altered when compared to control rats with a decrement in HDL-cholesterol and a pronounced increment in LDL-cholesterol. The atherogenic diet resulted in about 50% depression in brain Ca2+ ATPase activity. It is concluded that alterations in ion transport and neurotransmitter release may be expected due to pronounced inhibition of brain Ca2+ ATPase activity in rats fed an atherogenic diet. PMID:1835114

  17. Local salt substitutes “Obu-otoyo” activate acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase and induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that ingestion of heavy metals can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to investigate the neurotoxic potential of salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo); salt A (made by burning palm kernel shaft then soaked in water overnight and the extract from the resulting residue is used as the salt substitute) and salt B (an unrefined salt mined from a local site at Ilobu town, Osun-State, Nigeria) by assessing their effect on some key enzymes linked with neurodegenerative disease [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities] as well as on malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the rat brain. Salt substitutes were fed to normal rats as dietary inclusion at doses of 0.5 and 1.0% for 30 days. Thereafter, the effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities as well as on MDA level in the rat brain was determined. The results revealed that the salt substitutes caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in both AChE and BChE activity and also induced lipid peroxidation in the brain of rats in vivo as well as under in vitro condition in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities could be attributed to the presence of some toxic heavy metals. Therefore, the ability of the salt substitutes to induce lipid peroxidation and activate AChE and BChE activities could provide some possible mechanism for their neurotoxic effect. PMID:27486373

  18. Multistep Compositional Remodeling of Supported Lipid Membranes by Interfacially Active Phosphatidylinositol Kinases.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Guo, Feng; Rutaganira, Florentine U; Vafaei, Setareh; Choong, Ingrid; Shokat, Kevan M; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-05-17

    The multienzyme catalytic phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) in a supported lipid membrane platform is demonstrated for the first time. One-step treatment with PI 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4Kβ) yielded PI 4-phosphate (PI4P), while a multistep enzymatic cascade of PI4Kβ followed by PIP 5-kinase produced PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2). By employing quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, we were able to track membrane association of kinase enzymes for the first time as well as detect PI4P and PI(4,5)P2 generation based on subsequent antibody binding to the supported lipid bilayers. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI4Kβ by a small molecule inhibitor was also quantitatively assessed, yielding an EC50 value that agrees well with conventional biochemical readout. Taken together, the development of a PI-containing supported membrane platform coupled with surface-sensitive measurement techniques for kinase studies opens the door to exploring the rich biochemistry and pharmacological targeting of membrane-associated phosphoinositides. PMID:27118725

  19. Saturated lipids decrease mitofusin 2 leading to endoplasmic reticulum stress activation and insulin resistance in hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Brenda; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Tovar, Armando; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Camacho, Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria dysfunction contribute to insulin resistance generation during obesity and diabetes. ER and mitochondria interact through Mitofusin 2 (MTF2), which anchors in the outer mitochondrial and ER membranes regulating energy metabolism. Ablation of MTF2 leads to ER stress activation and insulin resistance. Here we determine whether lipotoxic insult induced by saturated lipids decreases MTF2 expression leading to ER stress response in hypothalamus and its effects on insulin sensitivity using in vitro and in vivo models. We found that lipotoxic stimulation induced by palmitic acid, but not the monounsaturated palmitoleic acid, decreases MTF2 protein levels in hypothalamic mHypoA-CLU192 cells. Also, palmitic acid incubation activates ER stress response evidenced by increase in the protein levels of GRP78/BIP marker at later stage than MTF2 downregulation. Additionally, we found that MTF2 alterations induced by palmitic, but not palmitoleic, stimulation exacerbate insulin resistance in hypothalamic cells. Insulin resistance induced by palmitic acid is prevented by pre-incubation of the anti-inflammatory and the ER stress release reagents, sodium salicylate and 4 phenylbutirate, respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that lipotoxic insult induced by high fat feeding to mice decreases MTF2 proteins levels in arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. Our data indicate that saturated lipids modulate MTF2 expression in hypothalamus coordinating the ER stress response and the susceptibility to insulin resistance. PMID:26410780

  20. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    McGlashon, Jacob M.; Gorecki, Michelle C.; Kozlowski, Amanda E.; Thirnbeck, Caitlin K.; Markan, Kathleen R.; Leslie, Kirstie L.; Kotas, Maya E.; Potthoff, Matthew J.; Richerson, George B.; Gillum, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the central nervous system are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human diphtheria toxin receptor was selectively expressed in central 5-HT neurons. Treatment with diphtheria toxin eliminated 5-HT neurons and caused loss of thermoregulation, brown adipose tissue (BAT) steatosis, and a >50% decrease in uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression in BAT and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1bf/f/p mice, in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, in part through recruitment and metabolic activation of brown and beige adipocytes. PMID:25955206

  1. The role of lipid-activated nuclear receptors in shaping macrophage and dendritic cell function: From physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Mate; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors linking lipid signaling to the expression of the genome. There is increasing appreciation of the involvement of this receptor network in the metabolic programming of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), essential members of the innate immune system. In this review we focus on the role of retinoid X receptor, retinoic acid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor γ, liver X receptor, and vitamin D receptor in shaping the immune and metabolic functions of macrophages and DCs. We also provide an overview of the contribution of macrophage- and DC-expressed nuclear receptors to various immunopathologic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, asthma, and some others. We suggest that systematic analyses of the roles of these receptors and their activating lipid ligands in immunopathologies combined with complementary and focused translational and clinical research will be crucial for the development of new therapies using the many molecules available to target nuclear receptors. PMID:23905916

  2. Miconazole-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: formulation and evaluation of a novel formula with high bioavailability and antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Aljaeid, Bader Mubarak; Hosny, Khaled Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Miconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that has poor aqueous solubility (<1 µg/mL); as a result, a reduction in its therapeutic efficacy has been reported. The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate miconazole-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (MN-SLNs) for oral administration to find an innovative way to alleviate the disadvantages associated with commercially available capsules. Methods MN-SLNs were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. The solubility of miconazole in different solid lipids was measured. The effect of process variables, such as surfactant types, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and the charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release, antifungal activity against Candida albicans, and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results The MN-SLN, consisting of 1.5% miconazole, 2% Precirol ATO5, 2.5% Cremophor RH40, 0.5% Lecinol, and 0.1% Dicetylphosphate, had an average diameter of 23 nm with a 90.2% entrapment efficiency. Furthermore, the formulation of MN-SLNs enhanced the antifungal activity compared with miconazole capsules. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed that the bioavailability was enhanced by >2.5-fold. Conclusion MN-SLN was more efficient in the treatment of candidiasis with enhanced oral bioavailability and could be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of miconazole. PMID:26869787

  3. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid has long been recognized as an important dietary component. Dietary lipid (fat) is a critical source of metabolic energy and a substrate for the synthesis of metabolically active compounds (essential fatty acids), and serves as a carrier for other nutrients such as the fat-soluble vitamins A, ...

  4. Rhodobacter capsulatus OlsA is a bifunctional enzyme active in both ornithine lipid and phosphatidic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Bilaloglu, Rahmi; Goldfine, Howard; Daldal, Fevzi

    2007-12-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus genome contains three genes (olsA [plsC138], plsC316, and plsC3498) that are annotated as lysophosphatidic acid (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate) acyltransferase (AGPAT). Of these genes, olsA was previously shown to be an O-acyltransferase in the second step of ornithine lipid biosynthesis, which is important for optimal steady-state levels of c-type cytochromes (S. Aygun-Sunar, S. Mandaci, H.-G. Koch, I. V. J. Murray, H. Goldfine, and F. Daldal. Mol. Microbiol. 61:418-435, 2006). The roles of the remaining plsC316 and plsC3498 genes remained unknown. In this work, these genes were cloned, and chromosomal insertion-deletion mutations inactivating them were obtained to define their function. Characterization of these mutants indicated that, unlike the Escherichia coli plsC, neither plsC316 nor plsC3498 was essential in R. capsulatus. In contrast, no plsC316 olsA double mutant could be isolated, indicating that an intact copy of either olsA or plsC316 was required for R. capsulatus growth under the conditions tested. Compared to OlsA null mutants, PlsC316 null mutants contained ornithine lipid and had no c-type cytochrome-related phenotype. However, they exhibited slight growth impairment and highly altered total fatty acid and phospholipid profiles. Heterologous expression in an E. coli plsC(Ts) mutant of either R. capsulatus plsC316 or olsA gene products supported growth at a nonpermissive temperature, exhibited AGPAT activity in vitro, and restored phosphatidic acid biosynthesis. The more vigorous AGPAT activity displayed by PlsC316 suggested that plsC316 encodes the main AGPAT required for glycerophospholipid synthesis in R. capsulatus, while olsA acts as an alternative AGPAT that is specific for ornithine lipid synthesis. This study therefore revealed for the first time that some OlsA enzymes, like the enzyme of R. capsulatus, are bifunctional and involved in both membrane ornithine lipid and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. PMID

  5. Rhodobacter capsulatus OlsA Is a Bifunctional Enyzme Active in both Ornithine Lipid and Phosphatidic Acid Biosynthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Bilaloglu, Rahmi; Goldfine, Howard; Daldal, Fevzi

    2007-01-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus genome contains three genes (olsA [plsC138], plsC316, and plsC3498) that are annotated as lysophosphatidic acid (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate) acyltransferase (AGPAT). Of these genes, olsA was previously shown to be an O-acyltransferase in the second step of ornithine lipid biosynthesis, which is important for optimal steady-state levels of c-type cytochromes (S. Aygun-Sunar, S. Mandaci, H.-G. Koch, I. V. J. Murray, H. Goldfine, and F. Daldal. Mol. Microbiol. 61:418-435, 2006). The roles of the remaining plsC316 and plsC3498 genes remained unknown. In this work, these genes were cloned, and chromosomal insertion-deletion mutations inactivating them were obtained to define their function. Characterization of these mutants indicated that, unlike the Escherichia coli plsC, neither plsC316 nor plsC3498 was essential in R. capsulatus. In contrast, no plsC316 olsA double mutant could be isolated, indicating that an intact copy of either olsA or plsC316 was required for R. capsulatus growth under the conditions tested. Compared to OlsA null mutants, PlsC316 null mutants contained ornithine lipid and had no c-type cytochrome-related phenotype. However, they exhibited slight growth impairment and highly altered total fatty acid and phospholipid profiles. Heterologous expression in an E. coli plsC(Ts) mutant of either R. capsulatus plsC316 or olsA gene products supported growth at a nonpermissive temperature, exhibited AGPAT activity in vitro, and restored phosphatidic acid biosynthesis. The more vigorous AGPAT activity displayed by PlsC316 suggested that plsC316 encodes the main AGPAT required for glycerophospholipid synthesis in R. capsulatus, while olsA acts as an alternative AGPAT that is specific for ornithine lipid synthesis. This study therefore revealed for the first time that some OlsA enzymes, like the enzyme of R. capsulatus, are bifunctional and involved in both membrane ornithine lipid and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. PMID

  6. A shared mechanism for lipid- and β-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    The low-dielectric plasma membrane provides an energy barrier hindering transmembrane movement of charged particles. The positively charged, voltage-sensing fourth transmembrane domain (S4) of voltage-gated ion channels must surmount this energy barrier to initiate channel activation, typically necessitating both membrane depolarization and interaction with membrane lipid phospho-head groups (MLPHGs). In contrast, and despite containing S4, the KCNQ1 K+ channel α subunit exhibits predominantly constitutive activation when in complexes with transmembrane β subunits, MinK-related peptide (MiRP) 1 (KCNE2) or MiRP2 (KCNE3). Here, using a 2-electrode voltage clamp and scanning mutagenesis of channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we discovered that 2 of the 8 MiRP2 extracellular domain acidic residues (D54 and D55) are important for KCNQ1-MiRP2 constitutive activation. Double-mutant thermodynamic cycle analysis revealed energetic coupling of D54 and D55 to R237 in KCNQ1 S4 but not to 10 other native or introduced polar residues in KCNQ1 S4 and surrounding linkers. MiRP2-D54 and KCNQ1-R237 also similarly dictated susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of MLPHG hydrolysis, whereas other closely situated polar residues did not. Thus, by providing negative charge near the plasma membrane extracellular face, MiRP2 uses a lipomimetic mechanism to constitutively stabilize the activated KCNQ1 voltage sensor.—Choi, E., Abbott, G. W. A shared mechanism for lipid- and β-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor. PMID:20040519

  7. Lipid Requirements for the Enzymatic Activity of MraY Translocases and in Vitro Reconstitution of the Lipid II Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Ma, Yi; Engels, Ina; Münch, Daniela; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Henrichfreise, Beate; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-01-29

    Screening of new compounds directed against key protein targets must continually keep pace with emerging antibiotic resistances. Although periplasmic enzymes of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis have been among the first drug targets, compounds directed against the membrane-integrated catalysts are hardly available. A promising future target is the integral membrane protein MraY catalyzing the first membrane associated step within the cytoplasmic pathway of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. However, the expression of most MraY homologues in cellular expression systems is challenging and limits biochemical analysis. We report the efficient production of MraY homologues from various human pathogens by synthetic cell-free expression approaches and their subsequent characterization. MraY homologues originating from Bordetella pertussis, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Escherichia coli as well as Bacillus subtilis were co-translationally solubilized using either detergent micelles or preformed nanodiscs assembled with defined membranes. All MraY enzymes originating from Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to detergents and required nanodiscs containing negatively charged lipids for obtaining a stable and functionally folded conformation. In contrast, the Gram-positive B. subtilis MraY not only tolerates detergent but is also less specific for its lipid environment. The MraY·nanodisc complexes were able to reconstitute a complete in vitro lipid I and lipid II forming pipeline in combination with the cell-free expressed soluble enzymes MurA-F and with the membrane-associated protein MurG. As a proof of principle for future screening platforms, we demonstrate the inhibition of the in vitro lipid II biosynthesis with the specific inhibitors fosfomycin, feglymycin, and tunicamycin. PMID:26620564

  8. Odorous chemical perturbations of (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase activities. Effects on native and lipid-substituted preparations from individual turbinals from dog olfactory tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Dreesen, T D; Koch, R B

    1982-01-01

    Individual turbinals from the right and left sides of dog olfactory tissue were removed and nerve-ending-particle preparations were prepared. (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase activities of the individual preparations, and the effect of several odorous compounds [including (+)- and (-)-carvone] on the (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase activities, were determined. The maximally stimulatory odorant concentration in the reaction mixture for the majority of odorants was found to be 1.0 mM. Matched pairs of left/right turbinals showed a lack of bilateral symmetry of response. (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase activities of various dog brain nerve-ending particle preparations responded only slightly to 1.0 mM odorants. The role of phospholipids in the (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase activity was found to be critical. Partial replacement of endogenous lipid with either synthetic phospholipids or extracted lipids resulted in changes in stimulation obtained with endogenous lipids alone. PMID:6285897

  9. Effect of hypoxia on the calcium and magnesium content, lipid peroxidation level, and Ca²⁺-ATPase activity of syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes from placental explants.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Delia I; Marín, Reinaldo; Proverbio, Fulgencio; Benzo, Zully; Piñero, Sandy; Botana, Desirée; Abad, Cilia

    2014-01-01

    In the current study the possible relationship between the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio of human syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes and their lipid peroxidation and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was determined. Syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes of placental explants cultured under hypoxia increased their lipid peroxidation and Ca(2+) content, diminished their Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, and kept their Mg(2+) content unchanged. Membranes preincubated with different concentrations of Ca(2+) increased their Ca(2+) content without changes in their Mg(2+) content. There is a direct relationship between Ca(2+) content and lipid peroxidation of the membranes, as well as an inverse relationship between their Ca(2+) content and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. On the contrary, preincubation of membranes with different concentrations of Mg(2+) showed a higher Mg(2+) content without changing their lipid peroxidation and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. Explants cultured under hypoxia in the presence of 4 mM MgSO4 showed similar values of lipid peroxidation and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of their membranes compared to those of explants cultured under normoxia. Increased Ca(2+) content of the membranes by interacting with negatively charged phospholipids could result in destabilizing effects of the membrane structure, exposing hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to the action of free radicals. Mg(2+) might exert a stabilizing effect of the membranes, avoiding their exposure to free radicals. PMID:25180187

  10. Effect of Hypoxia on the Calcium and Magnesium Content, Lipid Peroxidation Level, and Ca2+-ATPase Activity of Syncytiotrophoblast Plasma Membranes from Placental Explants

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Delia I.; Benzo, Zully; Piñero, Sandy; Botana, Desirée; Abad, Cilia

    2014-01-01

    In the current study the possible relationship between the Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio of human syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes and their lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase activity was determined. Syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes of placental explants cultured under hypoxia increased their lipid peroxidation and Ca2+ content, diminished their Ca2+-ATPase activity, and kept their Mg2+ content unchanged. Membranes preincubated with different concentrations of Ca2+ increased their Ca2+ content without changes in their Mg2+ content. There is a direct relationship between Ca2+ content and lipid peroxidation of the membranes, as well as an inverse relationship between their Ca2+ content and Ca2+-ATPase activity. On the contrary, preincubation of membranes with different concentrations of Mg2+ showed a higher Mg2+ content without changing their lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase activity. Explants cultured under hypoxia in the presence of 4 mM MgSO4 showed similar values of lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase activity of their membranes compared to those of explants cultured under normoxia. Increased Ca2+ content of the membranes by interacting with negatively charged phospholipids could result in destabilizing effects of the membrane structure, exposing hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to the action of free radicals. Mg2+ might exert a stabilizing effect of the membranes, avoiding their exposure to free radicals. PMID:25180187

  11. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LpxT reveals dual positional lipid A kinase activity and coordinated control of outer membrane modification

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Emily M.; O’Brien, John P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Gram-negative bacteria have evolved modification machinery to promote a dynamic outer membrane in response to a continually fluctuating environment. The kinase LpxT, for example, adds a phosphate group to the lipid A moiety of some Gram-negatives including Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. LpxT activity is inhibited under conditions that compromise membrane integrity, resulting instead in the addition of positively charged groups to lipid A that increase membrane stability and provide resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. We have now identified a functional lpxT ortholog in P. aeruginosa. LpxTPa has unique enzymatic characteristics, as it is able to phosphorylate P. aeruginosa lipid A at two sites of the molecule. Surprisingly, a previously uncharacterized lipid A 4′-dephospho-1-triphosphate species was detected. LpxTPa activity is inhibited by magnesium independently of lpxTPa transcription. Modulation of LpxTPa activity is influenced by transcription of the lipid A aminoarabinose transferase ArnT, known to be activated in response to limiting magnesium. These results demonstrate a divergent activity of LpxTPa, and suggest the existence of a coordinated regulatory mechanism that permits adaptation to a changing environment. PMID:25223756

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Regulates Genes Involved in Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor Signaling and Lipid Metabolism during Adipogenesis through Functionally Distinct Enhancer Classes*

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Frédérik; Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Gheeraert, Céline; Avner, Stéphane; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Salbert, Gilles; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a transcription factor whose expression is induced during adipogenesis and that is required for the acquisition and control of mature adipocyte functions. Indeed, PPARγ induces the expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and storage through enhancers activated during adipocyte differentiation. Here, we show that PPARγ also binds to enhancers already active in preadipocytes as evidenced by an active chromatin state including lower DNA methylation levels despite higher CpG content. These constitutive enhancers are linked to genes involved in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway that are transcriptionally induced during adipogenesis but to a lower extent than lipid metabolism genes, because of stronger basal expression levels in preadipocytes. This is consistent with the sequential involvement of hormonal sensitivity and lipid handling during adipocyte maturation and correlates with the chromatin structure dynamics at constitutive and activated enhancers. Interestingly, constitutive enhancers are evolutionary conserved and can be activated in other tissues, in contrast to enhancers controlling lipid handling genes whose activation is more restricted to adipocytes. Thus, PPARγ utilizes both broadly active and cell type-specific enhancers to modulate the dynamic range of activation of genes involved in the adipogenic process. PMID:24288131

  13. Salinity influences glutathione S-transferase activity and lipid peroxidation responses in the Crassostrea gigas oyster exposed to diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Juliano; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; da Silva, Angela Zaccaron; Guzenski, João; Ferreira, Jaime Fernando; Di Mascio, Paolo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2011-04-15

    Biochemical responses in bivalve mollusks are commonly employed in environmental studies as biomarkers of aquatic contamination. The present study evaluated the possible influence of salinity (35, 25, 15 and 9ppt) in the biomarker responses of Crassostrea gigas oysters exposed to diesel at different nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1mL.L(-1)) using a semi-static exposure system. Salinity alone did not resulted in major changes in the gill's catalase activity (CAT), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST) and lipid peroxidation levels (measured as malondialdehyde, MDA), but influenced diesel related responses. At 25ppt salinity, but not at the other salinity levels, oysters exposed to diesel showed a strikingly positive concentration-dependent GST response. At 25ppt and 1mL.L(-1) diesel, the GST activity in the gills remained elevated, even after one week of depuration in clean water. The increased MDA levels in the oysters exposed to diesel comparing to control groups at 9, 15 and 35ppt salinities suggest the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in those salinities, but not at 25ppt salinity. The MDA quickly returned to basal levels after 24h of depuration. CAT activity was unaltered by the treatments employed. High toxicity for 1mL.L(-1) diesel was observed only at 35ppt salinity, but not in the other salinities. Results from this study strongly suggest that salinity influences the diesel related biomarker responses and toxicity in C. gigas, and that some of those responses remain altered even after depuration. PMID:21349572

  14. In Vitro Activity of Neisseria meningitidis PglL O-Oligosaccharyltransferase with Diverse Synthetic Lipid Donors and a UDP-activated Sugar*

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Matias A.; Hug, Isabelle; Scott, Nichollas E.; Ielmini, M. Veronica; Foster, Leonard J.; Wang, Peng G.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2013-01-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferases (OTases) are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid carrier to an acceptor molecule, commonly a protein. OTases are classified as N-OTases and O-OTases, depending on the nature of the glycosylation reaction. The N-OTases catalyze the glycan transfer to amide groups in asparagines in a reaction named N-linked glycosylation. The O-OTases are responsible for protein O-linked glycosylation, which involves the attachment of glycans to hydroxyl groups of serine or threonine residues. These enzymes exhibit a relaxed specificity and are able to transfer a variety of glycan structures to different protein acceptors. This property confers OTases with great biotechnological potential as these enzymes can produce glycoconjugates relevant to the pharmaceutical industry. Furthermore, OTases are thought to be involved in pathogenesis mechanisms. Several aspects of the functionality of OTases are not fully understood. In this work, we developed a novel approach to perform kinetic studies on PglL, the O-OTase from Neisseria meningitidis. We investigated the importance of the acyl moiety of the lipid glycan donor substrate on the functionality of PglL by testing the efficiency of glycosylation reactions using synthetic substrates carrying the same glycan structure but different acyl moieties. We found that PglL can function with many lipids as glycan donors, although the length and the conformation of the lipid moiety significantly influenced the catalytic efficiency. Interestingly, PglL was also able to transfer a monosaccharide employing its nucleotide-activated form, acting as a Leloir glycosyltransferase. These results provide new insights on the function and the evolution of oligosaccharyltransferases. PMID:23460642

  15. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  16. [The specific features of lipid metabolism and changes in the plasma activity of transaminases in patients with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, L N; Iakovleva, I I; Molchanova, L V

    2004-01-01

    A parallel study of changes in the activity of transaminases and the parameters of lipid metabolism was conducted in patients with sepsis or septic shock, receiving renal replacement therapy. The multiple baseline increase in the activity of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase was observed in about 50% of the patients and the elevated level of triglycerides and very low density-lipoprotein cholesterol in all the examinees. In case of the baseline multiple increased activity of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase as compared with the normal physiological values, the probability of a good clinical outcome was some 67%, in the survivors, the activity of the enzyme significantly increasing during therapy. In the absence of the baseline multiple increased activity of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, there was a good clinical outcome provided that there were positive changes in triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol during therapy and its probability was about 33%. It is concluded that the activity of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and the concentration of triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol may be used to evaluate the efficiency of treatment and as predictors of the outcome of treatment in patients with sepsis and septic shock. PMID:15717510

  17. Membrane Morphology Is Actively Transformed by Covalent Binding of the Protein Atg8 to PE-Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Roland L.; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Baumgart, Tobias; Dimova, Rumiana

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway involving the shape transformation of lipid bilayers. During the onset of autophagy, the water-soluble protein Atg8 binds covalently to phosphatdylethanolamines (PEs) in the membrane in an ubiquitin-like reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We reconstituted the Atg8 conjugation system in giant and nm-sized vesicles with a minimal set of enzymes and observed that formation of Atg8-PE on giant vesicles can cause substantial tubulation of membranes even in the absence of Atg12-Atg5-Atg16. Our findings show that ubiquitin-like processes can actively change properties of lipid membranes and that membrane crowding by proteins can be dynamically regulated in cells. Furthermore we provide evidence for curvature sorting of Atg8-PE. Curvature generation and sorting are directly linked to organelle shapes and, thus, to biological function. Our results suggest that a positive feedback exists between the ubiquitin-like reaction and the membrane curvature, which is important for dynamic shape changes of cell membranes, such as those involved in the formation of autophagosomes. PMID:25522362

  18. Relation of fatty acid composition in lead-exposed mallards to fat mobilization, lipid peroxidation and alkaline phosphatase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mateo, R.; Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The increase of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in animal tissues has been proposed as a mechanism of Pb poisoning through lipid peroxidation or altered eicosanoids metabolism. We have studied fatty acid (FA) composition in liver and brain of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding for three weeks on diets containing combinations of low or high levels of vitamin E (20 or 200 UI/kg) and Pb (0 or 2 g/kg). Saturated FA, n-6 PUFA and total concentrations of FA were higher in livers of Pb-exposed mallards, but not in their brains. The percentage of n-6 PUFA in liver and brain was slightly higher in Pb-exposed mallards. The increase of n-6 PUFA in liver was associated with increased triglycerides and cholesterol in plasma, thus could be in part attributed to feed refusal and fat mobilization. The hepatic ratios between adrenic acid (22:4 n-6) and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) or between adrenic acid and linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) were higher in Pb exposed birds, supporting the existing hypothesis of increased fatty acid elongation by Pb. Among the possible consequences of increased n-6 PUFA concentration in tissues, we found increased lipid peroxidation in liver without important histopathological changes, and decreased plasma alkaline phosphatase activity that may reflect altered bone metabolism in birds.

  19. Effect of lipid composition and liposome size on toxicity and in vitro fungicidal activity of liposome-intercalated amphotericin B.

    PubMed Central

    Szoka, F C; Milholland, D; Barza, M

    1987-01-01

    Intercalation of amphotericin B into liposomes at a 10 mol% drug/lipid ratio decreased its cytotoxicity by 3- to 90-fold in cultured murine cells and reduced its lethality by 2- to 8-fold in a median lethal dose (LD50) test in mice when compared with the commercial deoxycholate-solubilized drug (LD50 = 2.3 mg/kg). The cytotoxicity and lethality of the liposomal preparations were a function of their lipid composition and diameter. There was no correlation between the reduction of toxicity in the tissue culture assay and the reduction of lethality in the LD50 test. The rank order of reduction of lethality was sterol-containing liposomes greater than solid liposomes greater than fluid liposomes. In general, small sterol-containing vesicles were less lethal than large vesicles of the same composition. Intercalation of amphotericin B in sterol or solid liposomes increased not only the LD50 but also the time to death. The organ distribution of amphotericin B 24 h after intravenous administration was similar whether the drug was given as the commercial deoxycholate preparation or in liposomes. Finally, there were no differences among any of the formulations in their fungicidal activity against Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in vitro. The lesser and slower lethality of the liposomal and detergent-solubilized drug suggests that the mechanism by which liposomes reduce the lethality of amphotericin B is by slowing its rate of transfer to a sensitive cellular target. PMID:3579259

  20. Antimicrobial activities of novel mannosyl lipids isolated from the biocontrol fungus Simplicillium lamellicola BCP against phytopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Le Dang, Quang; Shin, Teak Soo; Park, Myung Soo; Choi, Yong Ho; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Kim, In Seon; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-04-16

    The antagonistic fungus Simplicillium lamellicola BCP has been developed as a microbial biopesticide that effectively controls the development of various plant diseases caused by both pathogenic bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Antibacterial bioassay-directed fractionation was used to isolate mannosyl lipids from S. lamellicola BCP, and the structures of these compounds were elucidated using spectral analysis and chemical degradation. Three novel mannosyl lipids were characterized and identified as halymecins F and G and (3R,5R)-3-O-β-D-mannosyl-3,5-dihydrodecanoic acid. Massoia lactone and (3R, 5R)-3-hydroxydecan-5-olide were also isolated from S. lamellicola BCP. The three novel compounds inhibited the growth of the majority of phytopathogenic bacteria that were tested, and halymecin F displayed the strongest antibacterial activity. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was the most sensitive to the three novel compounds, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 1.58 to 24.8 μg/mL. The ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth from the antagonistic fungus effectively reduced the bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum on tomato seedlings. These results indicate that S. lamellicola BCP suppresses the development of plant bacterial diseases through the production of antibacterial metabolites. PMID:24660753

  1. Functional nanoemulsion-hybrid lipid nanocarriers enhance the bioavailability and anti-cancer activity of lipophilic diferuloylmethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lili; Wan, Kun; Hu, Xueyuan; Zhang, Yonghong; Yan, Zijun; Feng, Jiao; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the enhanced physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release behavior, anti-lung cancer activity, gastrointestinal absorption, in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence of functional nanoemulsion-hybrid lipid nanocarriers containing diferuloylmethane (DNHLNs). The DNHLNs were first fabricated by loading water-in-oil nanoemulsions into hybrid lipid nanosystems using nanoemulsion-thin film-sonication dispersion technologies. The in situ absorption and in vitro and in vivo kinetic features of DNHLNs were measured using an in situ unidirectional perfusion method, a dynamic dialysis method and a plasma concentration-time profile-based method, respectively. The cytotoxic effects of DNHLNs in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined using MTT colorimetric analysis. The absorptive constants and permeabilities of DNHLNs in four gastrointestinal sections increased by 1.43-3.23 times and by 3.10-7.76 times that of diferuloylmethane (DIF), respectively. The relative bioavailability of DNHLNs to free DIF was 855.02%. DNHLNs inhibited cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNHLNs markedly improved the absorption and bioavailability of DIF after oral administration. DNHLNs had stronger inhibitory effects on the viability of A549 cells than that of free DIF. DNHLNs might be potentially promising nanocarriers for DIF delivery via the oral route to address unmet clinical needs.

  2. Longitudinal impact of physical activity on lipid profiles in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study[S

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Keri L.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; North, Kari E.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence exists that increased levels of physical activity decrease the population burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although risk factors for CVD, including plasma lipids and lipoproteins, have been associated with physical activity, studies including a sizeable number of minority participants are lacking. Our purpose was to interrogate the longitudinal effect of physical activity on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in the African American and white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Nine years of follow-up data on 8,764 individuals aged 45–64 years at baseline were used in linear mixed-effects models to estimate the association between increases in baseline physical activity on mean change in HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Increases in the level of activity were associated with increases in HDL in all strata and decreases in triglycerides among white participants. Physical activity was associated with LDL in all women, while the association with total cholesterol was limited to African American women. This study is one of the few to investigate the effect of physical activity on lipids and lipoproteins in a race- and sex-specific manner. Overall our results highlight the importance of physical activity on plasma lipid profiles and provide evidence for novel differential associations. PMID:19346332

  3. Keratinocyte lipid fluidity under the influence of cholesterols, hydrocortisones, "active lipid", tocopherol and retinoic acid--a fluorescence polarization study with regard to physiological and pathophysiological epidermopoiesis and its therapeutic accessibility.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Daefler, S; Krueger, G R; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    Lipid fluidity of freshly isolated human (H) and guinea pig (GP) keratinocytes (K) was determined as the reciprocal of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) fluorescence polarization (P-value), the temperature being kept at 25 degrees C and cell density standardized to 550,000 per ml (level of statistical significance a less than 0.05). An experimental model involving short-term incubations (2.5 hours, 37 degrees C) of GPK in 1% ethanolic lipid solutions (15 mg lipid agent per ml ethanol) was set up to investigate accumulation a) of cholesterol due to terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and b) of cholesteryl sulfate due to the lack of steroid sulfatase activity in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI). In comparison to the control including 1% ethanol (P = 0.291 +/- 0.004), significant rigidifying effects were demonstrated for cholesteryl hemisuccinate (0.331 +/- 0.005) and cholesteryl sulfate (0.310 +/- 0.002). Correspondingly, a significant increase of the P-value was also induced by cholesteryl hemisuccinate in HK. Rigidification of GPK by a preincubation with cholesteryl sulfate (P = 0.306 +/- 0.002) could be antagonized by a subsequent short-term incubation with "active lipid (mixture 721)" (0.285 +/- 0.003, a less than 0.05) which may be relevant for future therapeutic strategies in RXLI. Other steran molecules such as hydrocortisone-21-hemisuccinate or hydrocortisone acetate did not affect lipid fluidity. With regard to the therapeutic potency of retinoids in epidermopoietic disorders, incubations of HK with all-trans-retinoic-acid were compared to those with also lipophilic vitamin E, i.e. d-alpha-tocopherol, for 2.5 hours at 37 degrees C using 1% DMSO as a solvent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1893078

  4. Houttuynia cordata attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Koppula, Sushruta

    2014-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata) from the family Saururaceae is a perennial herb native to Southeast Asia. It possesses a range of medicinal properties to treat several disease symptoms including allergic inflammation and anaphylaxis. In the present investigation, we provided the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of H. cordata extract (HCE) in the prevention of high glucose-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were pre-treated with various concentrations of HCE (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL) and treated with serum-free medium with normal glucose (5 mM) for 1 h, followed by exposure to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) for 24 h. HCE significantly and dose-dependently attenuated lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 at 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL concentrations, respectively). Further, HCE attenuated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs). The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated by HCE treatment when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) in human HepG2 hepatocytes. This study suggests the hypolipidemic effects of HCE by the inhibition of lipid biosynthesis mediated through AMPK signaling, which may play an active role and can be developed as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:24871657

  5. Lipid A and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ribi, E; Cantrell, J L; Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Peterson, J; Ribi, H O

    1984-01-01

    Endotoxin isolated from Re mutants of Salmonella typhimurium or Salmonella minnesota and consisting only of 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid (KDO) and lipid A synergistically enhances the ability of mycobacterial cell wall skeleton (CWS) to regress transplantable, line-10 tumor (hepatocellular carcinoma) in syngeneic guinea pigs. Tumor regression is rapid, and systemic tumor immunity concomitantly develops when as little as 50 micrograms of each of these two components is combined and injected intralesionally. Selective removal of KDO from endotoxin yields diphosphoryl lipid A, which retains its toxic properties. Subsequent selective removal of the phosphate moiety at the reducing end of the diphosphoryl lipid A molecule yields nontoxic, monophosphoryl lipid A (determined by lethality for chick embryos). Like the parent endotoxin or toxic diphosphoryl lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A retains the ability to synergistically enhance the antitumor activity of mycobacterial CWS adjuvant. Both di- and monophosphoryl lipid A contain mixtures of a series of structural analogs. They can be separated chromatographically into single components that differ in number, type, and position of ester-linked fatty acids. Comparison of chromatographic fractions reveals that components of toxic and nontoxic lipid A can be paired according to structure. Each component of the pair has the same molecular structure, with the exception of an additional phosphate group in the toxic component. The toxicity of "lipid A's" liberated from endotoxin by acid hydrolysis appears to be determined by the proportion of di- and monophosphoryl lipid A in the hydrolysis mixture. Structural analogs of monophosphoryl lipid A, which differ in degree of O-acylation and type and distribution of fatty acids, have comparable antitumor activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6382555

  6. Lipid nanoparticles for cyclosporine A administration: development, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of their immunosuppression activity.

    PubMed

    Guada, Melissa; Sebastián, Victor; Irusta, Silvia; Feijoó, Esperanza; Dios-Viéitez, María del Carmen; Blanco-Prieto, María José

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used in transplantation for prevention of organ rejection as well as in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Although commercial formulations are available, they have some stability, bioavailability, and toxicity related problems. Some of these issues are associated with the drug or excipients and others with the dosage forms. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, lipid nanoparticles (LN) have been proposed as an alternative, since excipients are biocompatible and also a large amount of surfactants and organic solvents can be avoided. CsA was successfully incorporated into LN using the method of hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication. Three different formulations were optimized for CsA oral administration, using different surfactants: Tween(®) 80, phosphatidylcholine, taurocholate and Pluronic(®) F127 (either alone or mixtures). Freshly prepared Precirol nanoparticles showed mean sizes with a narrow size distribution ranging from 121 to 202 nm, and after freeze-drying were between 163 and 270 nm, depending on the stabilizer used. Surface charge was negative in all LN developed. High CsA entrapment efficiency of approximately 100% was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the optimized LN. Also, the crystallinity of the nanoparticles was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of the drug in LN surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CsA LN developed preserved their physicochemical properties for 3 months when stored at 4°C. Moreover, when the stabilizer system was composed of two surfactants, the LN formulations were also stable at room temperature. Finally, the new CsA formulations showed in vitro dose-dependent immuno-suppressive effects caused by the inhibition of IL-2 levels secreted from stimulated Jurkat cells. The findings obtained in this paper suggest that new lipid

  7. Lipid nanoparticles for cyclosporine A administration: development, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of their immunosuppression activity

    PubMed Central

    Guada, Melissa; Sebastián, Victor; Irusta, Silvia; Feijoó, Esperanza; Dios-Viéitez, María del Carmen; Blanco-Prieto, María José

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used in transplantation for prevention of organ rejection as well as in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Although commercial formulations are available, they have some stability, bioavailability, and toxicity related problems. Some of these issues are associated with the drug or excipients and others with the dosage forms. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, lipid nanoparticles (LN) have been proposed as an alternative, since excipients are biocompatible and also a large amount of surfactants and organic solvents can be avoided. CsA was successfully incorporated into LN using the method of hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication. Three different formulations were optimized for CsA oral administration, using different surfactants: Tween® 80, phosphatidylcholine, taurocholate and Pluronic® F127 (either alone or mixtures). Freshly prepared Precirol nanoparticles showed mean sizes with a narrow size distribution ranging from 121 to 202 nm, and after freeze-drying were between 163 and 270 nm, depending on the stabilizer used. Surface charge was negative in all LN developed. High CsA entrapment efficiency of approximately 100% was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the optimized LN. Also, the crystallinity of the nanoparticles was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of the drug in LN surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CsA LN developed preserved their physicochemical properties for 3 months when stored at 4°C. Moreover, when the stabilizer system was composed of two surfactants, the LN formulations were also stable at room temperature. Finally, the new CsA formulations showed in vitro dose-dependent immuno-suppressive effects caused by the inhibition of IL-2 levels secreted from stimulated Jurkat cells. The findings obtained in this paper suggest that new lipid

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Newton, Roger S

    2012-12-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Newton, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES ON LIPID PEROXIDATION AND ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY IN RATS AFTER SWIMMING STRESS].

    PubMed

    Solin, A V; Lyashev, Yu D

    2015-08-01

    It was established in experiments on rats, that injection of opioid peptides DAGO (a selective igonist of opioid mu-receptors), DSLET (a selective agonist of opioid delta-receptors) or dynorpiin A (1-13) (a selective agonist of opioid kappa-receptors) decreased the stress-induced activatin of lipid peroxidation in liver tissue and plasma. A selective agonist of opioid mu-receptors) AGO manifested the most expressed activity. The using of investigating peptides caused the increase of superoxiddismutase activity in liver tissue. The reinforcement of catalase activity was )bserved in DSLET or dynorphin A (1-13). DAGO decreased its activity. The peptide effects of lifferent directions oncatalase activity in plasma were established. These effects can be explained y the stress-limiting action of peptides in entire organism, the peculiarities of opioid receptors spreading in liver tissue and by the influence of preceded load with non-complete oxidized sub stances after intensive swimming on the opioid receptor affinity. PMID:26591588

  11. Activation of lipid catabolism by the water-soluble fraction of petroleum in the crustacean Macrobrachium borellii.

    PubMed

    Lavarías, S; Pollero, R J; Heras, H

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of the water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolism in invertebrates. The effect of the WSF on the triacylglycerol (TAG) mobilization, fatty acid activation and degradation was evaluated in the decapod Macrobrachium borellii, exposing adult and eggs at different stages of development for 7 days to a sublethal concentration of WSF. Using radioactive tracers, mitochondrial palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), triacylglycerol lipase (TAG-lipase) and fatty acid beta-oxidation system activities were assayed. Before studying the effect of WSF, the kinetic parameters of ACS were determined in purified mitochondria. Its optimal temperature and pH were 32 degrees C and 8.0, respectively, the apparent K(m) 2.48 micromol l(-1), and its V(max) of 1.93 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1). These kinetic parameters differed significantly from this shrimp's microsomal isoform. After 7 days exposure to a sublethal concentration of WSF (0.6 mg/l), changes were observed in the enzymatic activity of all enzymes or enzymatic system assayed in adult midgut gland as well as in stage 5 eggs, a period of active organogenesis. An increase in the mobilization of energy stores was detected as early as stage 4, where TAG-lipase activity increased by 27% in exposed eggs. The increase was even more marked in exposed eggs at stage 5 where a three-fold rise (154%) was determined. Exposed adult shrimp also showed an augmented lipase activity by 38%. Fatty acid beta-oxidation increased by 51.0 and 35.5% in midgut gland and eggs at stage 5, respectively, but no changes were observed at less-developed stages. Mitochondrial fatty acid activation by ACS also increased in adults and stage 5 eggs by 7.4 and 52.0%, respectively. A similar response of the lipid catabolic pathways to WSF contamination in both adult and eggs, suggests that the exposure to this pollutant causes an increase in the energy needs of this shrimp. When validated by field studies, these catabolic

  12. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  13. Characterization and Inducing Melanoma Cell Apoptosis Activity of Mannosylerythritol Lipids-A Produced from Pseudozyma aphidis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Linlin; Li, Hongji; Niu, Yongwu; Chen, Qihe

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are natural glycolipid biosurfactants which have potential applications in the fields of food, cosmetic and medicine. In this study, MELs were produced from vegetable oil by Pseudozyma aphidis. Their structural data through LC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis revealed that MEL-A with two acetyls was the major compound and the identified homologs of MEL-A contained a length of C8 to C14 fatty acid chains. This glycolipid exhibited a surface tension of 27.69 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC), self-assembling into particles in the water solution. It was observed to induce cell growth-inhibition and apoptosis of B16 melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Further quantitative RT-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed an increasing tendency of both mRNA and protein expressions of Caspase-12, CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-3, and a down-regulation of protein Bcl-2. Combined with the up regulation of signaling IRE1 and ATF6, it can be speculated that MEL-A-induced B16 melanoma cell apoptosis was associated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). PMID:26828792

  14. Characterization and Inducing Melanoma Cell Apoptosis Activity of Mannosylerythritol Lipids-A Produced from Pseudozyma aphidis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Linlin; Li, Hongji; Niu, Yongwu; Chen, Qihe

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are natural glycolipid biosurfactants which have potential applications in the fields of food, cosmetic and medicine. In this study, MELs were produced from vegetable oil by Pseudozyma aphidis. Their structural data through LC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis revealed that MEL-A with two acetyls was the major compound and the identified homologs of MEL-A contained a length of C8 to C14 fatty acid chains. This glycolipid exhibited a surface tension of 27.69 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC), self-assembling into particles in the water solution. It was observed to induce cell growth-inhibition and apoptosis of B16 melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Further quantitative RT-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed an increasing tendency of both mRNA and protein expressions of Caspase-12, CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-3, and a down-regulation of protein Bcl-2. Combined with the up regulation of signaling IRE1 and ATF6, it can be speculated that MEL-A-induced B16 melanoma cell apoptosis was associated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). PMID:26828792

  15. Evaluation of antiradical activity of different cocoa and chocolate products: relation with lipid and protein composition.

    PubMed

    Vertuani, Silvia; Scalambra, Emanuela; Vittorio, Trotta; Bino, Alessia; Malisardi, Gemma; Baldisserotto, Anna; Manfredini, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Chocolate antioxidant properties are often claimed; however, they are frequently different from the parent natural sources due to the industry or artisan transformation. In particular, antioxidant property of chocolate and cocoa are not adequately taken into consideration by consumers who normally make use of this food just for its flavor and taste properties. In this study, we have investigated the antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of cocoa nibs, cocoa masses, and corresponding chocolate bars with different percentages of cocoa from different origins. The antioxidant capacity of the different samples was measured by two different assays [1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant of potency (FRAP) tests]. The Folin-Ciocalteu reagent was used to assess the total phenolic content. The masses showed a higher antioxidant power than the nibs, and this has been attributed to the fact that in the nibs is still present the lipid part, which will form the cocoa butter. The influence of milk, whey, and soy proteins was also investigated. Our results showed that the extra dark cocoa bar, 100% cocoa chocolate, is the best in terms of total polyphenol content and in terms of antioxidant capacity according to the DPPH and FRAP tests. In addition, the bars of organic dark chocolate 80%, dark Tanzania 80%, and Trinidad 80% products are well performing in all respects. As highlighted by us, the antiradical properties of cocoa products are higher than many antioxidant supplements in tablets. PMID:24433077

  16. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. PMID:27433576

  17. Evaluation of Antiradical Activity of Different Cocoa and Chocolate Products: Relation with Lipid and Protein Composition

    PubMed Central

    Vertuani, Silvia; Scalambra, Emanuela; Vittorio, Trotta; Bino, Alessia; Malisardi, Gemma; Baldisserotto, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chocolate antioxidant properties are often claimed; however, they are frequently different from the parent natural sources due to the industry or artisan transformation. In particular, antioxidant property of chocolate and cocoa are not adequately taken into consideration by consumers who normally make use of this food just for its flavor and taste properties. In this study, we have investigated the antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of cocoa nibs, cocoa masses, and corresponding chocolate bars with different percentages of cocoa from different origins. The antioxidant capacity of the different samples was measured by two different assays [1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant of potency (FRAP) tests]. The Folin–Ciocalteu reagent was used to assess the total phenolic content. The masses showed a higher antioxidant power than the nibs, and this has been attributed to the fact that in the nibs is still present the lipid part, which will form the cocoa butter. The influence of milk, whey, and soy proteins was also investigated. Our results showed that the extra dark cocoa bar, 100% cocoa chocolate, is the best in terms of total polyphenol content and in terms of antioxidant capacity according to the DPPH and FRAP tests. In addition, the bars of organic dark chocolate 80%, dark Tanzania 80%, and Trinidad 80% products are well performing in all respects. As highlighted by us, the antiradical properties of cocoa products are higher than many antioxidant supplements in tablets. PMID:24433077

  18. Coating Solid Lipid Nanoparticles with Hyaluronic Acid Enhances Antitumor Activity against Melanoma Stem-like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongxin; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Successful anticancer chemotherapy requires targeting tumors efficiently and further potential to eliminate cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations. Since CD44 is present on many types of CSCs, and it binds specially to hyaluronic acid (HA), we tested whether coating solid lipid nanoparticles with hyaluronan (HA-SLNs)would allow targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to CD44-overexpressing B16F10 melanoma cells. First, we developed a model system based on melanoma stem-like cells for experiments in vitro and in mouse xenografts, and we showed that cells expressing high levels of CD44 (CD44+) displayed a strong CSC phenotype while cells expressing low levels of CD44 (CD44-) did not. This phenotype included sphere and colony formation, higher proportion of side population cells, expression of CSC-related markers (ALDH, CD133, Oct-4) and tumorigenicity in vivo. Next we showed that administering PTX-loaded HA-SLNs led to efficient intracellular delivery of PTX and induced substantial apoptosis in CD44+ cells in vitro. In the B16F10-CD44+ lung metastasis model, PTX-loaded HA-SLNs targeted the tumor-bearing lung tissues well and subsequently exhibited significant antitumor effects with a relative low dose of PTX, which provided significant survival benefit without evidence of adverse events. These findings suggest that the HA-SLNs targeting system shows promise for enhancing cancer therapy. PMID:25897340

  19. Structural Variations of the Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II and Their Influence on Binding and Activity of the Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Oritavancin

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Daniela; Engels, Ina; Müller, Anna; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Grein, Fabian; Bendas, Gerd; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Oritavancin is a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and enterococci. Compared to vancomycin, oritavancin is characterized by the presence of two additional residues, a hydrophobic 4′-chlorobiphenyl methyl moiety and a 4-epi-vancosamine substituent, which is also present in chloroeremomycin. Here, we show that oritavancin and its des-N-methylleucyl variant (des-oritavancin) effectively inhibit lipid I- and lipid II-consuming peptidoglycan biosynthesis reactions in vitro. In contrast to that for vancomycin, the binding affinity of oritavancin to the cell wall precursor lipid II appears to involve, in addition to the d-Ala-d-Ala terminus, other species-specific binding sites of the lipid II molecule, i.e., the crossbridge and d-isoglutamine in position 2 of the lipid II stem peptide, both characteristic for a number of Gram-positive pathogens, including staphylococci and enterococci. Using purified lipid II and modified lipid II variants, we studied the impact of these modifications on the binding of oritavancin and compared it to those of vancomycin, chloroeremomycin, and des-oritavancin. Analysis of the binding parameters revealed that additional intramolecular interactions of oritavancin with the peptidoglycan precursor appear to compensate for the loss of a crucial hydrogen bond in vancomycin-resistant strains, resulting in enhanced binding affinity. Augmenting previous findings, we show that amidation of the lipid II stem peptide predominantly accounts for the increased binding of oritavancin to the modified intermediates ending in d-Ala-d-Lac. Corroborating our conclusions, we further provide biochemical evidence for the phenomenon of the antagonistic effects of mecA and vanA resistance determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, thus partially explaining the low frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) acquiring high

  20. Antifungal activity upon Saccharomyces cerevisiae of iturin A, mycosubtilin, bacillomycin L and of their derivatives; inhibition of this antifungal activity by lipid antagonists.

    PubMed

    Besson, F; Peypoux, F; Michel, G; Delcambe, L

    1979-08-01

    The antifungal activity of three antibiotics of the iturin group: iturin A, mycosubtilin, bacillomycin L and of eleven methylated and acetylated derivatives of these antibiotics was tested upon Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The lowest MIC values were found for natural antibiotics. The substitution of polar groups diminished the antifungal activity. Various lipids, sterols, fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters and phospholipids were tested as inhibitors of the antifungal activity of iturin A, mycosubtilin and bacillomycin L. Cholesterol was the strongest inhibitor upon the three antibiotics; ergosterol, oleic acid and cis-vaccenic acid were less potent inhibitors. Among phospholipids, phosphatidyl choline inhibited bacillomycin L and iturin A while diphosphatidyl glycerol inhibited bacillomycin L and mycosubtilin. The inhibitory effect appeared to be dependent on the nature of both the hydrophilic group and the fatty acid part of phospholipids. PMID:387691

  1. Antioxidant Activity of Allium hookeri Root Extract and Its Effect on Lipid Stability of Sulfur-fed Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the antioxidant activity of Allium hookeri root extract (AHE) on lipid oxidation of raw sulfur-fed pork patties for 14 d of refrigerated storage. Different concentration of ethanol (0-100%) and time (1-12 h) were applied to determine the extraction condition. Water (0% ethanol) extraction for 1 h was selected as an optimal extraction condition of AHE for the following study showing the highest total phenolic content and total flavonoid content, as well as the strongest antioxidant activity. The 1% AHE (SP1), 3% AHE (SP2), and 0.05% ascorbic acid (SP3) were added into sulfur-fed pork patties against controls; SP0 (sulfur-fed pork patties with no AHE) and P0 (normal pork patties with no AHE). The pH values of P0 and SP0 significantly increased (p<0.05) than others on 14 d and redness of P0 showed the largest decrement during storage. P0 and SP0 showed higher production of conjugated dienes on d 7 than others (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values were decreased in proportion to the increased level of AHE on 14 d (p<0.05) resulting in higher TBARS values on P0 and SP0 (p<0.05) and the negative correlation between AHE level and TBARS were also demonstrated (r=-0.910, p=0.001). Therefore, the results suggest that AHE effectively retarded the lipid oxidation rate of sulfur-fed pork patties indicating the potential usage of AHE as a natural preservative. PMID:26761799

  2. The Compound of Mangiferin-Berberine Salt Has Potent Activities in Modulating Lipid and Glucose Metabolisms in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Can; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Wu, Wei; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    The mangiferin-berberine (MB) salt was synthesized by ionic bonding of mangiferin (M) and berberine (B) at an equal molecular ratio. This study aimed to investigate the activities of MB salt in modulating lipid and glucose metabolisms in HepG2 cells. After 24 h treatment of the studying compounds, cellular AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) protein levels and carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) 1 activities, intracellular lipid contents, mRNA expression levels of target genes, glucose consumption, and glucose production amounts were determined. Compound C (CC) was used in the blocking experiments. Our results showed that MB salt increased p-AMPKα (Thr172)/p-ACC (Ser79) levels and CPT1 activity and suppressed oleic acid- (OA-) induced lipid accumulation and upregulation of lipogenic genes potently in HepG2 cells. The above activities of MB salt were AMPK dependent and were superior to those of M or B when administered at an equal molar concentration. MB salt enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and suppressed gluconeogenesis more potently than M or B alone. The inhibiting activity of MB salt on cellular gluconeogenesis was AMPK dependent. Our results may support MB salt as a new kind of agent for the development of novel lipid or glucose-lowering drugs in the future. PMID:27123455

  3. Seven-Year Changes of Leisure-Time and Occupational Physical Activity among Iranian Adults (Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study)

    PubMed Central

    AFGHAN, Marjan; GHASEMI, Asghar; AZIZI, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the lack of data available on changes of physical activity over time in Iran, this study was designed to evaluate changes in physical activity levels among Iranian adults over a median 6.5 yr period. Methods: In this population-based cohort study, 3515 participants, aged ≥ 20 yr (2100 females and 1415 males) were followed from phase II (2002–2005) to phase IV (2008–2011) of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Information on physical activity, both leisure time (LTPA) and occupational (OCPA), was collected using the Modifiable Activity Questionnaire. Scores ≤600 METs-min/wk were considered as having low physical activity. Wilcoxon test was performed for comparing MET values between the two phases. McNemar test was used to evaluate differences between paired qualitative data. Results: In both phases, 59.8% of adults were women, with mean±SD age 44.3±14.6 and 50.9±14.6 yr, in phases II and IV respectively. The prevalence of low physical activity decreased significantly in the follow up period (from 45.9% in phase II to 42.6% in phase IV, P=0.004). In both genders, a non-significant decrease in OCPA was observed, However, there was a significant decrease in LTPA among women (P=0.031), but not in men. Conclusion: Despite the high levels of physical activity in Tehranian adults, a decreasing trend was observed. Significant decrease in LTPA among women indicates the urgent need to target women for prevention and implementation of public educational programs to promote physical activity levels and LTPA in particular, to compensate the reduction in OCPA. PMID:27057520

  4. Membrane texture induced by specific protein binding and receptor clustering: active roles for lipids in cellular function.

    PubMed

    Watkins, E B; Miller, C E; Majewski, J; Kuhl, T L

    2011-04-26

    Biological membranes are complex, self-organized structures that define boundaries and compartmentalize space in living matter. Composed of a wide variety of lipid and protein molecules, these responsive surfaces mediate transmembrane signaling and material transport within the cell and with its environment. It is well known that lipid membrane properties change as a function of composition and phase state, and that protein-lipid interactions can induce changes in the membrane's properties and biochemical response. Here, molecular level changes in lipid organization induced by multivalent toxin binding were investigated using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Structural changes to lipid monolayers at the air-water interface and bilayers at the solid-water interface were studied before and after specific binding of cholera toxin to membrane embedded receptors. At biologically relevant surface pressures, protein binding perturbed lipid packing within monolayers and bilayers resulting in topological defects and the emergence of a new orientationally textured lipid phase. In bilayers this altered lipid order was transmitted from the receptor laden exterior membrane leaflet to the inner leaflet, representing a potential mechanism for lipid mediated outside-in signaling by multivalent protein binding. It is further hypothesized that cell-surface micro-domains exhibiting this type of lipid order may serve as nucleation sites for vesicle formation in clathrin independent endocytosis of cholera toxin. PMID:21474780

  5. Lipid and Carbohydrate Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Differently Influence Mouse and Human Type I Natural Killer T Cell Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Alysia; Nemčovič, Marek; Yu, Esther Dawen; Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Khurana, Archana; Pauwels, Nora; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Franck, Richard W.; Tsuji, Moriya; Howell, Amy; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of different glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to activate type I natural killer T cells (NKT cells) has been known for 2 decades. The possible therapeutic use of these GSLs has been studied in many ways; however, studies are needed in which the efficacy of promising GSLs is compared under identical conditions. Here, we compare five unique GSLs structurally derived from α-galactosylceramide. We employed biophysical and biological assays, as well as x-ray crystallography to study the impact of the chemical modifications of the antigen on type I NKT cell activation. Although all glycolipids are bound by the T cell receptor of type I NKT cells in real time binding assays with high affinity, only a few activate type I NKT cells in in vivo or in vitro experiments. The differences in biological responses are likely a result of different pharmacokinetic properties of each lipid, which carry modifications at different parts of the molecule. Our results indicate a need to perform a variety of assays to ascertain the therapeutic potential of type I NKT cell GSL activators. PMID:26018083

  6. Lipid and Carbohydrate Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Differently Influence Mouse and Human Type I Natural Killer T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia; Nemčovič, Marek; Yu, Esther Dawen; Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Khurana, Archana; Pauwels, Nora; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Franck, Richard W; Tsuji, Moriya; Howell, Amy; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2015-07-10

    The ability of different glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to activate type I natural killer T cells (NKT cells) has been known for 2 decades. The possible therapeutic use of these GSLs has been studied in many ways; however, studies are needed in which the efficacy of promising GSLs is compared under identical conditions. Here, we compare five unique GSLs structurally derived from α-galactosylceramide. We employed biophysical and biological assays, as well as x-ray crystallography to study the impact of the chemical modifications of the antigen on type I NKT cell activation. Although all glycolipids are bound by the T cell receptor of type I NKT cells in real time binding assays with high affinity, only a few activate type I NKT cells in in vivo or in vitro experiments. The differences in biological responses are likely a result of different pharmacokinetic properties of each lipid, which carry modifications at different parts of the molecule. Our results indicate a need to perform a variety of assays to ascertain the therapeutic potential of type I NKT cell GSL activators. PMID:26018083

  7. A shared mechanism for lipid- and beta-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2010-05-01

    The low-dielectric plasma membrane provides an energy barrier hindering transmembrane movement of charged particles. The positively charged, voltage-sensing fourth transmembrane domain (S4) of voltage-gated ion channels must surmount this energy barrier to initiate channel activation, typically necessitating both membrane depolarization and interaction with membrane lipid phospho-head groups (MLPHGs). In contrast, and despite containing S4, the KCNQ1 K(+) channel alpha subunit exhibits predominantly constitutive activation when in complexes with transmembrane beta subunits, MinK-related peptide (MiRP) 1 (KCNE2) or MiRP2 (KCNE3). Here, using a 2-electrode voltage clamp and scanning mutagenesis of channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we discovered that 2 of the 8 MiRP2 extracellular domain acidic residues (D54 and D55) are important for KCNQ1-MiRP2 constitutive activation. Double-mutant thermodynamic cycle analysis revealed energetic coupling of D54 and D55 to R237 in KCNQ1 S4 but not to 10 other native or introduced polar residues in KCNQ1 S4 and surrounding linkers. MiRP2-D54 and KCNQ1-R237 also similarly dictated susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of MLPHG hydrolysis, whereas other closely situated polar residues did not. Thus, by providing negative charge near the plasma membrane extracellular face, MiRP2 uses a lipomimetic mechanism to constitutively stabilize the activated KCNQ1 voltage sensor. PMID:20040519

  8. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  9. Correlation of serum triglyceride and its reduction by omega-3 fatty acids with lipid transfer activity and the neutral lipid compositions of high-density and low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Pownall, H J; Brauchi, D; Kilinç, C; Osmundsen, K; Pao, Q; Payton-Ross, C; Gotto, A M; Ballantyne, C M

    1999-04-01

    Serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations are inversely correlated and mechanistically linked by means of lipid transfer activities. Phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) moves phospholipids among serum lipoproteins; cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA), which exchanges cholesteryl esters (CE) and TG among lipoproteins, is stimulated by nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The aims of this study were (a) to develop a quantitative model that correlates the neutral lipid (NL = CE + TG) compositions of HDL and LDL with serum TG concentration; (b) identify the serum lipid determinants of CETA and PLTA, and; (c) identify the effects of serum TG reductions on the neutral lipid compositions of HDL and LDL, serum NEFA concentrations, and on PLTA and CETA. These aims were addressed in 40 hypertriglyceridemic subjects before and after treatment with an 85% concentrate of omega-3 fatty acids (Omacor) and in 16 untreated normolipidemic subjects. In vivo, the NL compositions of LDL and HDL were described by a mathematical model having the form of adsorption isotherms: HDL - (TG/NL) = (0.90 +/- 0.07) serum TG/(7.0 +/- 1.2 mmol/l + serum TG) and LDL - (TG/NL) = (0.65 +/- 0.08) serum TG/(4.9 +/- 1.5 mmol/l + serum TG). Reduction of serum TG was associated with reductions in HDL - (TG/NL), serum NEFA concentration, and serum CETA but not PLTA. These data suggest that both hypertriglyceridemia and the attendant elevated serum CETA but not PLTA are determinants of HDL and LDL composition and structure and that serum TG concentrations are good predictors of the NL compositions of HDL and LDL. PMID:10217357

  10. Comparison among Different Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Farming Systems: Activity of Intestinal and Hepatic Enzymes and 13C-NMR Analysis of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Laura Del; Papadia, Paride; Pascali, Sandra A. De; Bressani, Giorgia; Storelli, Carlo; Zonno, Vincenzo; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate differences in general health and nutritional values of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), the effects of semi-intensive, land-based tanks and sea-cages intensive rearing systems were investigated, and results compared with captured wild fish. The physiological state was determined by measuring the activity of three different intestinal digestive enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and maltase; and the activity of the hepatic ALP. Also, the hepatic content in protein, cholesterol, and lipid were assessed. 13C-NMR analysis for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the lipid fraction extracted from fish muscles for semi-intensive and land based tanks intensive systems was performed. The lipid fraction composition showed small but significant differences in the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio, with the semi-intensive characterized by higher monounsaturated and lower saturated fatty acid content with respect to land based tanks intensive rearing system. PMID:22253985

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) decreases butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity and changes its relationship with lipids

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Larissa O.; de Andrade, Fabiana A.; Bono, Gleyse F.; Setoguchi, Thaís E.; Brandão, Mariana B.; Chautard-Freire-Maia, Eleidi A.; dos Santos, Izabella C.R.; Picheth, Geraldo; Faria, Ana Cristina R. de A.; Réa, Rosângela R.; Souza, Ricardo L.R.; Furtado-Alle, Lupe

    2014-01-01

    Many conditions interfere with butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity, e.g., pregnancy or presence of the BCHE gene variant −116A can decrease activity whereas obesity and types I and II diabetes mellitus can increase activity. In this study, we examined BChE activity, −116A and 1615A BCHE gene variants, and anthropometric and biochemical variables associated with diabetes in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and in healthy pregnant women. BChE activity was measured spectrophotometrically using propionylthiocholine as substrate and genotyping of the −116 and 1615 sites of the BCHE gene was done with a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Three groups were studied: 150 patients with GDM, 295 healthy pregnant women and 156 non-pregnant healthy women. Mean BChE activity was significantly lower in healthy pregnant women than in women from the general population and was further reduced in GDM patients. BChE activity was significantly reduced in carriers of −116A in GDM patients and healthy pregnant women. Although GDM patients had a significantly higher mean body mass index (BMI) and triglycerides than healthy pregnant women, they had lower mean BChE activity, suggesting that the lowering effect of GDM on BChE activity was stronger than the characteristic enhancing effect of increased BMI and triglycerides. PMID:24688284

  12. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  13. The inhibition of the GTPase activating protein-Ha-ras interaction by acidic lipids is due to physical association of the C-terminal domain of the GTPase activating protein with micellar structures.

    PubMed Central

    Serth, J; Lautwein, A; Frech, M; Wittinghofer, A; Pingoud, A

    1991-01-01

    The effects of fatty acids and phospholipids on the interaction of the full-length GTPase activating protein (GAP) as well as its isolated C-terminal domain and the Ha-ras proto-oncogene product p21 were studied by various methods, viz. GTPase activity measurements, fluorescence titrations and gel permeation chromatography. It is shown that all fatty acids and acidic phospholipids tested, provided the critical micellar concentration and the critical micellar temperature are reached, inhibit the GAP stimulated p21 GTPase activity. This is interpreted to mean that it is not the molecular structure of acidic lipid molecules per se but rather their physical state of aggregation which is responsible for the inhibitory effect of lipids on the GTPase activity. The relative inhibitory potency of various lipids was measured under defined conditions with mixed Triton X-100 micelles to follow the order: unsaturated fatty acids greater than saturated acids approximately phosphatidic acids greater than or equal to phosphatidylinositol phosphates much greater than phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine. GTPase experiments with varying concentrations of p21 and constant concentrations of GAP and lipids indicate that the binding of GAP by the lipid micelles is responsible for the inhibition, a finding which was confirmed by fluorescence titrations and gel filtrations which show that the C-terminal domain of GAP is bound by lipid micelles. PMID:2026138

  14. Exposure to phenanthrene and depuration: Changes on gene transcription, enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation in gill of scallops Nodipecten nodosus.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rômi S; Trevisan, Rafael; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Wendt, Nestor; Mattos, Jacó J; Lima, Daína; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Mello, Álvaro C P; Zacchi, Flávia L; Serrano, Miguel A S; Gomes, Carlos H A M; Bícego, Márcia C; Almeida, Eduardo A de; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the mechanism of phenanthrene (PHE) biotransformation and related cellular responses in bivalves can be an important tool to elucidate the risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms. In the present study it was analyzed the transcriptional levels of 13 biotransformation genes related to cytochrome P450 (CYP), glutathione S-transferase (GST), sulfotransferase (SULT), flavin-containing monooxygenase and fatty acid-binding proteins by qPCR in gill of scallops Nodipecten nodosus exposed for 24 or 96h to 50 or 200μgL(-1) PHE (equivalent to 0.28 and 1.12μM, respectively), followed by depuration in clean water for 96h (DEP). Likewise, it was quantified the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GST and levels of lipid peroxidation. Increased transcriptional levels of CYP2UI-like, CYP2D20-like, CYP3A11-like, GSTomega-like, SULT1B1-like genes were detected in organisms exposed to PHE for 24 or 96h. In parallel, GR and GPX activities increased after 96h exposure to 200μgL(-1) PHE and G6PDH activity increased after 24h exposure to 50μgL(-1) PHE. This enhancement of antioxidant and phase I and II biotransformation systems may be related to the 2.7 and 12.5 fold increases in PHE bioaccumulation after 96h exposure to 50 and 200μgL(-1) PHE, respectively. Interestingly, DEP caused reestablishment of GPX and GR activity, as well as to the transcript levels of all upregulated biotransformation genes (except for SULT1B1-like). Bioaccumulated PHE levels decreased 2.5-2.9 fold after depuration, although some biochemical and molecular modifications were still present. Lipid peroxidation levels remained lower in animals exposed to 200μgL(-1) PHE for 24h and DEP. These data indicate that N. nodosus is able to induce an antioxidant and biotransformation-related response to PHE exposure, counteracting its toxicity, and DEP can

  15. Miltefosine Increases Lipid and Protein Dynamics in Leishmania amazonensis Membranes at Concentrations Similar to Those Needed for Cytotoxicity Activity

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Rodrigo Alves; Mendanha, Sebastião Antonio; Fernandes, Kelly Souza; Matos, Grazzielle Guimaraes; Alonso, Lais; Dorta, Miriam Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Miltefosine (MT) is a membrane-active alkylphospholipid licensed for the topical treatment of breast cancer skin metastases and the oral treatment of leishmaniasis, although its mechanism of action remains unclear. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and a thiol-specific spin label in the plasma membrane of Leishmania promastigotes showed that MT causes dramatic increases in membrane dynamics. Although these alterations can be detected using a spin-labeled lipid, our experimental results indicated that MT interacts predominantly with the protein component of the membrane. Cell lysis was also detected by analyzing the supernatants of centrifuged samples for the presence of spin-labeled membrane fragments and cytoplasmic proteins. Using a method for the rapid incorporation of MT into the membrane, these effects were measured immediately after treatment under the same range of MT concentrations that cause cell growth inhibition. Cytotoxicity, estimated via microscopic counting of living and dead cells, indicated ∼70% cell death at the concentration of MT at which EPR spectroscopy detected a significant change in membrane dynamics. After this initial impact on the number of viable parasites, the processes of cell death and growth continued during the first 4 h of incubation. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled membrane-bound proteins were consistent with more expanded and solvent-exposed protein conformations, suggesting a detergent-like action. Thus, MT may form micelle-like structures around polypeptide chains, and proteins with a higher hydrophobicity may induce the penetration of hydrophilic groups of MT into the membrane, causing its rupture. PMID:24614380

  16. Cyanogenic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Selmar, Dirk; Grocholewski, Sabine; Seigler, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  17. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  18. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  19. Cadmium-induced membrane lipid peroxidation and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and peroxidase isoforms in Jerusalem artichoke seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-Ming; Chen, Yan-Zhen; Liang, Yang-Lin; Xu, Mei-Yan; Xu, Xiang-Ming

    2007-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) seedlings cultured in sandy media were treated with Hoagland nutrition solution with different concentrations of Cd(NO(3))(2) from 0 to 400 micromol/L. After 50 days' treatment, Cd accumulation, activities of peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) were measured and electrophoretograms of POD isoenzymes were analyzed. The accumulation of Cd in seedlings increased from Cd 50-100 micromol/L, after which further increases in Cd concentration resulted in only small increases in accumulation of Cd in seedlings. MDA content was markedly higher than control values indicating the enhanced membrane lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves. POD activities in leaf and root extracts increased with an increase of Cd concentration from 0 to 50 and 100 micromol/L and then decreased with further increases to 200 and 400 micromol/L. Under moderate Cd level of 50-200 micromol/L, SOD activities in leaf and root extracts increased whereas with a higher Cd level of 400 micromol/L marked inhibitions in enzyme activities were observed. With increase in Cd concentration marked elevations in CAT activities in leaves and roots were observed. Results of electrophoresis show that the alteration of POD isoenzyme was noticeable to Cd and an additional POD isoenzyme LP10 appeared. It is suggested that POD isoenzyme of Jerusalem artichoke seedlings could be used as bioindicator for soil contamination by Cd. PMID:17675753

  20. Design, synthesis and biological activity of a novel Rutin analogue with improved lipid soluble properties.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Vertuani, Silvia; Bino, Alessia; De Lucia, Daniela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Milani, Roberta; Gambari, Roberto; Manfredini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Recent interest in flavonoids has increased greatly due to their biological and pharmacological activities. Flavonoids, consist of a large group of low molecular weight polyphenolic substances, naturally occurring in fruits, vegetables, tea, and wine, and are an integral part of the human diet. Rutin is a common dietary flavonoid that is widely consumed worldwide from plant-derived beverages and foods as traditional and folk medicine remedy as well. Rutin exhibit important pharmacological activities, including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic, anti-adipogenic, neuroprotective and hormone therapy. Here, we present the synthesis, antimicrobial, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effect on human leukemic K562 cells of compound R2, a new semi-synthetic derivative of Rutin as compared to Rutin itself. The new derivative was also included in finished topical formulations to evaluate a potential application to the dermatology field in view of the antioxidant/antimicrobial/antiinflammatory properties. Stability studies were performed by HPLC; PCL assay and ORAC tests were used to determine the antioxidant activity. R2 presented an antioxidant activity very close to that of the parent Rutin while bearing much better lipophilic character. Regarding antiproliferative effects on the human K562 cell line, R2 was found to be more effective than parent Rutin. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that R2 inhibits NF-kB activity and promotes cellular apoptosis. PMID:25496805

  1. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Congyan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhou, Lei; Qu, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC) on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC), and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1) were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 μg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 μg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content after treatment with CT-NLC and T-NLC was significantly higher than that of high-dose tripterine. Moreover, CT-NLC showed the expected advantage of inducing necrosis and apoptosis in prostate tumor cells. Conclusion CT-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and showed dramatically improved cytotoxicity in normal cells

  2. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-08-15

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1-20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  3. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1–20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  4. Alcohol and Race/Ethnicity Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Míguez-Burbano, Maria J.; Lewis, John E.; Malow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the impact of alcohol consumption (88 hazardous and 76 nonhazardous drinkers) and race/ethnicity on lipid profiles in individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). At baseline, Whites and Hispanics had the most adverse lipid profiles, whereas Blacks had the least atherogenic. Whites and Hispanics showed higher increases in cholesterol (W = 11%; H = 6%), triglycerides (W = 40%; H = 24%), and low-density lipoprotein (10%) than Blacks (cholesterol = 4%; triglycerides = 9%; low-density lipoprotein = 4%). Hazardous alcohol consumption was correlated with increased lipids in each group. Hispanics had a clear trait risk for hypertriglyceridemia with HAART (1.9-fold) and with hazardous drinking (3.2-fold; p = .04). The highest risk for hypertriglyceridemia was found in heavy drinkers (3.75-fold; p = .05). Results underscore the importance of an alcohol/race interactive effect on HAART-associated dyslipidemia and the need for assessment and treatment of alcohol disorders. PMID:19427595

  5. Solid lipid nanoparticles co-loaded with simazine and atrazine: preparation, characterization, and evaluation of herbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jhones Luiz; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Gonçalves da Silva, Camila Morais; Pasquoto, Tatiane; Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-21

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) containing the herbicides atrazine and simazine were prepared and characterized, and in vitro evaluation was made of the release kinetics, herbicidal activity, and cytotoxicity. The stability of the nanoparticles was investigated over a period of 120 days, via analyses of particle size, ζ potential, polydispersion, pH, and encapsulation efficiency. SLN showed good physicochemical stability and high encapsulation efficiencies. Release kinetics tests showed that use of SLN modified the release profiles of the herbicides in water. Herbicidal activity assays performed with pre- and postemergence treatment of the target species Raphanus raphanistrum showed the effectiveness of the formulations of nanoparticles containing herbicides. Assays with nontarget organisms (Zea mays) showed that the formulations did not affect plant growth. The results of cytotoxicity assays indicated that the presence of SLN acted to reduce the toxicity of the herbicides. The new nanoparticle formulations enable the use of smaller quantities of herbicide and therefore offer a more environmentally friendly method of controlling weeds in agriculture. PMID:25537071

  6. Development of intravenous lipid emulsion of tanshinone IIA and evaluation of its anti-hepatoma activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ting; Zhang, Qing; Li, Hui; Ma, Wei-cong; Zhang, Na; Jin, Hui; Mao, Sheng-jun

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a lipid emulsion of tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA-LE) for intravenous administration and to investigate its feasibility for future clinical practice. The formulation was optimized using central composite design-response surface methodology (CCD-RSM), and the homogenization process was investigated systematically. The Tan IIA-LE was evaluated in terms of stability, safety and in vitro anti-hepatoma activity. The formulation of Tan IIA-LE is composed of 0.05% (w/v) Tan IIA, 20% (w/v) soybean oil-MCT mixture (1:1, w/w), 1.2% (w/v) soybean lecithin, 0.3% (w/v) F68 and 2.2% (w/v) glycerol, a high pressure homogenization at 100 MPa for 3 cycles was selected as the optimal homogenization process. The Tan IIA-LE was light-sensitive but stable for at least 12 months at room temperature in dark. The safety study demonstrated that the Tan IIA-LE did not cause venous irritation or obvious acute toxicity. Furthermore, the Tan IIA-LE displayed significant anti-tumor activity against human hepatoma cell lines in vitro. Overall, the Tan IIA-LE developed in this study was suggested to be a suitable and safe dosage form of Tan IIA for intravenous administration and has potential in liver cancer therapy in future. PMID:22226873

  7. A Newly Identified CG301269 Improves Lipid and Glucose Metabolism Without Body Weight Gain Through Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor α and γ

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Woo; Lee, Joo-Won; Kim, Woo Sik; Choe, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Ho Seon; Shin, Hyun Jung; Lee, Gha Young; Shin, Dongkyu; Lee, Hanjae; Lee, Jun Hee; Choi, Eun Bok; Lee, Hyeon Kyu; Chung, Heekyoung; Park, Seung Bum; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Ro, Seonggu; Kim, Jae Bum

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-α/γ dual agonists have been developed to alleviate metabolic disorders. However, several PPARα/γ dual agonists are accompanied with unwanted side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. This study investigated the effects of a novel PPARα/γ dual agonist, CG301269, on metabolic disorders both in vitro and in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Function of CG301269 as a PPARα/γ dual agonist was assessed in vitro by luciferase reporter assay, mammalian one-hybrid assay, and analyses of PPAR target genes. In vitro profiles on fatty acid oxidation and inflammatory responses were acquired by fatty acid oxidation assay and quantitative (q)RT-PCR of proinflammatory genes. In vivo effect of CG301269 was examined in db/db mice. Total body weight and various tissue weights were measured, and hepatic lipid profiles were analyzed. Systemic glucose and insulin tolerance were measured, and the in vivo effect of CG301269 on metabolic genes and proinflammatory genes was examined by qRT-PCR. RESULTS CG301269 selectively stimulated the transcriptional activities of PPARα and PPARγ. CG301269 enhanced fatty acid oxidation in vitro and ameliorated insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia in vivo. In db/db mice, CG301269 reduced inflammatory responses and fatty liver, without body weight gain. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate that CG301269 exhibits beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism by simultaneous activation of both PPARα and PPARγ. Our data suggest that CG301269 would be a potential lead compound against obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:21270261

  8. Effects of the PPARα agonist WY-14,643 on plasma lipids, enzymatic activities and mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes in a marine flatfish, Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Urbatzka, R; Galante-Oliveira, S; Rocha, E; Lobo-da-Cunha, A; Castro, L F C; Cunha, I

    2015-07-01

    Fibrates and other lipid regulator drugs are widespread in the aquatic environment including estuaries and coastal zones, but little is known on their chronic effects on non-target organisms as marine fish. In the present study, turbot juveniles were exposed to the PPARα model agonist WY-14,643 for 21 days by repeated injections at the concentrations of 5mg/kg (lo-WY) and 50mg/kg (hi-WY), and samples taken after 7 and 21 days. Enzyme activity and mRNA expression of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase and catalase in the liver were analyzed as first response, which validated the experiment by demonstrating interactions with the peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and oxidative stress pathways in the hi-WY treatment. In order to get mechanistic insights, alterations of plasma lipids (free cholesterol, FC; HDL associated cholesterol, C-HDL; triglycerides, TG; non-esterified fatty acids, NEFA) and hepatic mRNA expression of 17 genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism were studied. The exposure to hi-WY reduced the quantity of plasma FC, C-HDL, and NEFA. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein E mRNA expression were higher in hi-WY, and indicated an increased formation of VLDL particles and energy mobilization from liver. It is speculated that energy depletion by PPARα agonists may contribute to a higher susceptibility to environmental stressors. PMID:25974001

  9. Effect of Drought Stress on Total Phenolic, Lipid Peroxidation, and Antioxidant Activity of Achillea Species.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Shima; Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed; Saeidi, Ghodratollah; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-02-01

    The changes in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, and antioxidant activity were assessed based on three model systems in three Achillea species (Achillea millefolium, A. nobilis, and A. filipendulina) growing under four irrigation regimes, including 100% FC (field capacity as normal irrigation) 75% FC (low stress), 50% FC (moderate stress), and 25% FC (severe stress) conditions. The highest TPC (47.13 mg tannic acid/g DW) and TFC (20.86 mg quercetin/g W) were obtained in A. filipendulina under moderate and severe stress conditions. In 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, the highest and the lowest antioxidant activity was obtained for A. millefolium (70.28%) and A. filipendulina (53.21%), respectively, while in the FTC model system A. nobilis revealed the highest antioxidant activity (1.934) in severe drought condition. In the linoleic model system, the highest antioxidant activity was observed under low drought stress condition in A. nobilis. MDA and H2O2 content were increased due to both low (75% FC) and moderate (50% FC) drought stress, but they were decreased under severe stress condition (25% FC). Furthermore, A. millefolium revealed the lowest H2O2 (4.96 nm/g FW) and MDA content (176.32 μmol/g). Investigation of the relationship among different metabolites showed a strong positive correlation with TPC and TFC. Finally, the moderate drought stress treatment (50% FC) was introduced as the optimum condition to obtain appreciable TPC and TFC,, while the highest antioxidant activity was obtained in severe stress condition (25%FC). PMID:26541161

  10. Quercetin and Allopurinol Ameliorate Kidney Injury in STZ-Treated Rats with Regulation of Renal NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Wang, Fu-Meng; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia and inflammation are associated with diabetic nephropathy. The NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammation is recently recognized in the development of kidney injury. Urate and lipid are considered as danger signals in the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Although dietary flavonoid quercetin and allopurinol alleviate hyperuricemia, dyslipidmia and inflammation, their nephroprotective effects are currently unknown. In this study, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy model with hyperuricemia and dyslipidemia in rats, and found over-expression of renal inflammasome components NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein and Caspase-1, resulting in elevation of IL-1β and IL-18, with subsequently deteriorated renal injury. These findings demonstrated the possible association between renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation and lipid accumulation to superimpose causes of nephrotoxicity in STZ-treated rats. The treatment of quercetin and allopurinol regulated renal urate transport-related proteins to reduce hyperuricemia, and lipid metabolism-related genes to alleviate kidney lipid accumulation in STZ-treated rats. Furthermore, quercetin and allopurinol were found to suppress renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation, at least partly, via their anti-hyperuricemic and anti-dyslipidemic effects, resulting in the amelioration of STZ-induced the superimposed nephrotoxicity in rats. These results may provide a basis for the prevention of diabetes-associated nephrotoxicity with urate-lowering agents such as quercetin and allopurinol. PMID:22701621

  11. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  12. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Andrea N; McNeely, Patrick M; Katsaras, John; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2016-08-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. The studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein's purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner. PMID:27241126

  13. The impact of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles on human neutrophil activation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Han; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-06-25

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) are extensively employed as the nanocarriers for drug/gene targeting to tumors and the brain. Investigation into the possible immune response of cSLNs is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cSLNs upon the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs). The cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory mediators, Ca(2+) mobilization, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as the indicators of PMN stimulation were examined in this work. The cSLNs presented a diameter of 195 nm with a zeta potential of 44 mV. The cSLNs could interact with the cell membrane to produce a direct membrane lysis and the subsequent cytotoxicity according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. The interaction of cSLNs with the membrane also triggered a Ca(2+) influx, followed by the induction of oxidative stress and degranulation. The cationic nanoparticles elevated the levels of superoxide anion and elastase by 24- and 9-fold, respectively. The PMN activation by cSLNs promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The imaging of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence demonstrated the production of NETs by cSLNs. This phenomenon was not significant for the neutral SLNs (nSLNs), although histones in NETs also increased after treatment of nSLNs. Our results suggest an important role of cSLNs in governing the activation of human neutrophils. PMID:25920576

  14. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  15. Dietary freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract suppresses accumulation of hepatic lipids and increases in serum cholesterol and aminotransferase activities induced by dietary chloretone in rats.

    PubMed

    Chijimatsu, Takeshi; Umeki, Miki; Kobayashi, Satoru; Kataoka, Yutaro; Yamada, Koji; Oda, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ameliorative effect of freshwater clam extract (FCE) on fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. Furthermore, we examined the effects of major FCE components (fat and protein fractions) to determine the active components in FCE. Chloretone increased serum aminotransferase activities and led to hepatic lipid accumulation. Serum aminotransferase activities and hepatic lipid content were lower in rats fed total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE. Expression of fatty acid synthase and fatty acid desaturase genes was upregulated by chloretone. Total FCE and fat/protein fractions of FCE suppressed the increase in gene expression involved in fatty acid synthesis. Serum cholesterol levels increased twofold upon chloretone exposure. Total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE showed hypocholesterolemic effects in rats with hypercholesterolemia induced by chloretone. These suggest that FCE contains at least two active components against fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. PMID:25704646

  16. Enzymatic release of antitumor ether lipids by specific phospholipase A2 activation of liposome-forming prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Thomas L; Davidsen, Jesper; Begtrup, Mikael; Mouritsen, Ole G; Jørgensen, Kent

    2004-03-25

    An enzymatically activated liposome-based drug-delivery concept involving masked antitumor ether lipids (AELs) has been investigated. This concept takes advantage of the cytotoxic properties of AEL drugs as well as the membrane permeability enhancing properties of these molecules, which can lead to enhanced drug diffusion into cells. Three prodrugs of AELs (proAELs) have been synthesized and four liposome systems, consisting of these proAELs, were investigated for enzymatic degradation by secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), resulting in the release of AELs. The three synthesized proAELs were (R)-1-O-hexadecyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (1-O-DPPC), (R)-1-O-hexadecyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol)(350) (1-O-DPPE-PEG(350)), and 1-O-DPPE-PEG(2000) of which 1-O-DPPC was the main liposome component. All three phospholipids were synthesized from the versatile starting material (R)-O-benzyl glycidol. A phosphorylation method, employing methyl dichlorophosphate, was developed and applied in the synthesis of two analogues of (R)-1-O-hexadecyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol). Differential scanning calorimetry has been used to investigate the phase behavior of the lipid bilayers. A release study, employing calcein encapsulated in non-hydrolyzable 1,2-bis-O-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (D-O-SPC) liposomes, showed that proAELs, activated by sPLA(2), perturb membranes because of the detergent-like properties of the released hydrolysis products. A hemolysis investigation was conducted on human red blood cells, and the results demonstrate that proAEL liposomes display a very low hemotoxicity, which has been a major obstacle for using AELs in cancer therapy. The results suggest a possible way of combining a drug-delivery and prodrug concept in a single liposome system. Our investigation of the permeability-enhancing properties of the AEL molecules imply that by encapsulating conventional

  17. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  18. Estrogen receptor activation reduces lipid synthesis in pancreatic islets and prevents β cell failure in rodent models of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tiano, Joseph P.; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Le May, Cedric; Liu, Suhuan; Kaw, Meenakshi K.; Khuder, Saja S.; Latour, Martin G.; Bhatt, Surabhi A.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Najjar, Sonia M.; Prentki, Marc; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2011-01-01

    The failure of pancreatic β cells to adapt to an increasing demand for insulin is the major mechanism by which patients progress from insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is thought to be related to dysfunctional lipid homeostasis within those cells. In multiple animal models of diabetes, females demonstrate relative protection from β cell failure. We previously found that the hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) in part mediates this benefit. Here, we show that treating male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats with E2 suppressed synthesis and accumulation of fatty acids and glycerolipids in islets and protected against β cell failure. The antilipogenic actions of E2 were recapitulated by pharmacological activation of estrogen receptor α (ERα) or ERβ in a rat β cell line and in cultured ZDF rat, mouse, and human islets. Pancreas-specific null deletion of ERα in mice (PERα–/–) prevented reduction of lipid synthesis by E2 via a direct action in islets, and PERα–/– mice were predisposed to islet lipid accumulation and β cell dysfunction in response to feeding with a high-fat diet. ER activation inhibited β cell lipid synthesis by suppressing the expression (and activity) of fatty acid synthase via a nonclassical pathway dependent on activated Stat3. Accordingly, pancreas-specific deletion of Stat3 in mice curtailed ER-mediated suppression of lipid synthesis. These data suggest that extranuclear ERs may be promising therapeutic targets to prevent β cell failure in T2D. PMID:21747171

  19. Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and lipid metabolism parameters changes in different production cycle periods of Holstein-Friesian, Polish Red and Norwegian breeds.

    PubMed

    Kulka, M; Kołodziejska-Lesisz, J; Kluciński, W

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the measurement of paraoxonase 1 (PON1), as a potential marker of redox state changes in dairy cows, its involvement in lipid metabolism and compared it with superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity changes. We also evaluated lipid metabolism parameters associated with dairy production. PON1 paraoxonase and arylesterase acitvities, SOD activity, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), uric acid (UA), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were measured in Holstein-Friesian, Polish Red and Norwegian breeds serum in two production cycles. Our data showed a significant postpartum depletion in PON1 activity and lipoprotein and lipid products concentrations, with elevated BHB values. However, there were no significant changes in SOD activity and uric acid concentrations in Holstein-Friesian and Polish Red breeds after calving. At lactation peak there was a significant SOD activity decrease correlated with standardized PON1 activity depletion in all examined breeds. The results suggest that PON1 might be a better parameter for minimal redox state changes in serum, shortly after labour in the examined breeds. PMID:27096801

  20. Wedelolactone Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Improves Hepatic Steatosis Partly by AMPK Activation and Up-Regulation of Expression of PPARα/LPL and LDLR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-chao; Xu, Xu-dong; Li, Wei-jie; Luo, Xiu-mei; Jin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is considered one of the greatest risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the anti-hyperlipidemic effect and the underlying mechanism of wedelolactone, a plant-derived coumestan, in HepG2 cells and high-fat diet (HFD)−induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. We showed that in cultured HepG2 cells, wedelolactone up-regulated protein levels of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) as well as the gene expression of AMPK, PPARα, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Meanwhile, administration of wedelolactone for 4 weeks decreased the lipid profiles of plasma and liver in HFD−induced hyperlipidemic hamsters, including total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). The activation of AMPK and up-regulation of PPARα was also observed with wedelolactone treatment. Furthermore, wedelolactone also increased the activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and decreased the level of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver, therefore decreasing the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT). In conclusion, we provide novel experimental evidence that wedelolactone possesses lipid-lowering and steatosis-improving effects, and the underlying mechanism is, at least in part, mediated by the activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of PPARα/LPL and LDLR. PMID:26168156

  1. Dual modulation of both lipid oxidation and synthesis by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and -1β in cultured myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Daniel O.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Crunkhorn, Sarah; Gami, Hiral; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family is a key regulator of mitochondrial function, and reduced mRNA expression may contribute to muscle lipid accumulation in obesity and type 2 diabetes. To characterize the effects of PGC-1 on lipid metabolism, we overexpressed PGC-1α and PGC-1β in C2C12 myotubes using adenoviral vectors. Both PGC-1α and -1β increased palmitate oxidation [31% (P<0.01) and 26% (P<0.05), respectively] despite reductions in cellular uptake [by 6% (P<0.05) and 21% (P<0.001)]. Moreover, PGC-1α and -1β increased mRNA expression of genes regulating both lipid oxidation (e.g., CPT1b and ACADL/M) and synthesis (FAS, CS, ACC1/2, and DGAT1). To determine the net effect, we assessed lipid composition in PGC-1-expressing cells. Total lipid content decreased by 42% in palmitate-loaded serum-starved cells overexpressing PGC-1α (P<0.05). In contrast, in serum-replete cells, total lipid content was not significantly altered, but fatty acids C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, and C18:1 were increased 2- to 4-fold for PGC-1α/β (P<0.05). Stable isotope-based dynamic metabolic profiling in serum-replete cells labeled with 13C substrates revealed both increased de novo fatty acid synthesis from glucose and increased fatty acid synthesis by chain elongation with either PGC-1α or -1β expression. These results indicate that PGC-1 can promote both lipid oxidation and synthesis, with net balance determined by the nutrient/hormonal environment.—Espinoza, D. O., Boros, L. G., Crunkhorn, S., Gami, H., Patti, M.-E. Dual Modulation of both lipid oxidation and synthesis by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and -1β in cultured myotubes. PMID:19906680

  2. Effects of thermal stress on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus cucumeris (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Hao; Liu, Huai; Wang, Jin-Jun; Wang, Zi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Changes in temperature are known to cause a variety of physiological stress responses in insects and mites. Thermal stress responses are usually associated with the increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage. In this study, we examined the time-related effect (durations for 1, 2, 3, and 5 h) of thermal stress conditions-i.e., relatively low (0, 5, 10, and 15 °C) or high (35, 38, 41, and 44 °C) temperatures-on the activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) of the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris. Also the lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels of the predatory mite were measured under thermal stress conditions. The results confirmed that thermal stress results in a condition of so-called oxidative stress and the four antioxidant enzymes play an important role in combating the accumulation of ROS in N. cucumeris. CAT and POX activity changed significantly when the mites were exposed to cold and heat shock, respectively. The elevated levels of SOD and GSTs activity, expressed in a time-dependent manner, may have an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. However, the levels of LPO in N. cucumeris were high, serving as an important signal that these antioxidant enzyme-based defense mechanisms were not always adequate to counteract the surplus ROS. Thus, we hypothesize that thermal stress, especially extreme temperatures, may contribute much to the generation of ROS in N. cucumeris, and eventually to its death. PMID:24687176

  3. Effects of heterocyclic-based head group modifications on the structure-activity relationship of tocopherol-based lipids for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Gosangi, Mallikarjun; Mujahid, Thasneem Yoosuf; Gopal, Vijaya; Patri, Srilakshmi V

    2016-07-12

    Gene therapy, a promising strategy for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids, is greatly dependent on the development of efficient vectors. In this study, we designed and synthesized several tocopherol-based lipids varying in the head group region. Here, we present the structure-activity relationship of stable aqueous suspensions of lipids that were synthetically prepared and formulated with 1,2-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE) as the co-lipid. The physicochemical properties such as the hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, stability and morphology of these formulations were investigated. Interaction with plasmid DNA was clearly demonstrated through gel binding and EtBr displacement assays. Further, the transfection potential was examined in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a, hepatocarcinoma HepG2, human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines, all of different origins. Cell-uptake assays with N-methylpiperidinium, N-methylmorpholinium, N-methylimidazolium and N,N-dimethylaminopyridinium head group containing formulations evidently depicted efficient cell uptake as observed by particulate cytoplasmic fluorescence. Trafficking of lipoplexes using an endocytic marker and rhodamine-labeled phospholipid DHPE indicated that the lipoplexes were not sequestered in the lysosomes. Importantly, lipoplexes were non-toxic and mediated good transfection efficiency as analyzed by β-Gal and GFP reporter gene expression assays which established the superior activity of lipids whose structures correlate strongly with the transfection efficiency. PMID:27348545

  4. Lipid composition in a strain of Bacillus subtilis, a producer of iturin A lipopeptides that are active against uropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Przemysław; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Siewiera, Paulina; Moryl, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna; Chojniak, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections are a common disease in humans. Therefore, new methods are needed to destroy biofilms that are formed by uropathogens. Iturin A lipopeptides (LPs) C14 and C15 are potent biosurfactants synthetized by the Bacillus subtilis I'1a strain. The biological activity of extracted LPs was confirmed by examining extracts from I'1a cultures against uropathogenic bacteria that had been isolated from biofilms on urinary catheters. Compared with cultures of DSM 3257, which produce surfactin at a relatively low level, the extract obtained from strain I'1a exhibited a greater inhibitory effect against both planktonic and sessile forms of Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii and Enterococcus faecalis. Moreover, cyclic LP biosurfactants may disturb the integrity of cytoplasmic membranes; therefore, we investigated the effects of synthetized LPs on fatty acids and phospholipids of B. subtilis. LPs and lipids were analyzed using GC-MS, LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF techniques. Compared with B. subtilis DSM 3257, membranes of the I'1a strain were characterized by an increased amount of anteiso fatty acids and a ten-fold higher ratio of phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-to-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Interestingly, in cultures of B. subtilis DSM 3257 supplemented with LP extracts of the I'1a strain, the PG-to-PE ratio was fourfold higher, and the amount of anteiso fatty acids was also increased. PMID:27550437

  5. Active and water-soluble fo