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Sample records for active lmw-gs genes

  1. Comprehensive identification of LMW-GS genes and their protein products in a common wheat variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is well known that low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) affect bread and noodle processing quality, the function of specific LMW-GS proteins remains unclear. It is important to find the genes that correspond to individual LMW-GS proteins in order to understand the functions o...

  2. Molecular characterization of LMW-GS genes in Brachypodium distachyon L. reveals highly conserved Glu-3 loci in Triticum and related species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachypodium distachyon L. is a newly emerging model plant system for temperate cereal crop species. However, its grain protein compositions are still not clear. In the current study, we carried out a detailed proteomics and molecular genetics study on grain glutenin proteins in B. distachyon. Results SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC analysis of grain proteins showed that Brachypodium has few gliadins and high molecular weight glutenin subunits. In contrast the electrophoretic patterns for the albumin, globulin and low molecular weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) fractions of the grain protein were similar to those in wheat. In particular, the LMW-C type subunits in Brachypodium were more abundant than the equivalent proteins in common wheat. Southern blotting analysis confirmed that Brachypodium has 4–5 copies of LMW-GS genes. A total of 18 LMW-GS genes were cloned from Brachypodium by allele specific PCR. LMW-GS and 4 deduced amino acid sequences were further confirmed by using Western-blotting and MALDI-TOF-MS. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Brachypodium was closer to Ae. markgrafii and Ae. umbellulata than to T. aestivum. Conclusions Brachypodium possessed a highly conserved Glu-3 locus that is closely related to Triticum and related species. The presence of LMW-GS in B. distachyon grains indicates that B. distachyon may be used as a model system for studying wheat quality attributes. PMID:23171363

  3. Characterization of the low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit gene family members using a PCR-based marker approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) are a class of seed storage proteins that play a major role in the determination of the processing quality of wheat flour. The LMW-GS are encoded by multi-gene families located on the short arms of the homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, at the Glu-A3, G...

  4. Definition of the low molecular weight glutenin subunit gene family members in a set of standard bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) are a class of seed storage proteins that play a major role in the determination of the viscoelastic properties of wheat dough. Most of the LMW-GSs are encoded by a multi-gene family located on the short arms of the homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, at...

  5. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  6. Allelic variation of LMW-GS composition in Chinese wheat landraces of the Yangtze-River region detected by MALDI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanchun; Yu, Zitong; Islam, Shahidul; Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Xiaolong; Lei, Zhensheng; Yu, Kan; Sun, Dongfa; Ma, Wujun

    2016-01-01

    Low molecular weight glutenin subunits are important components of wheat storage proteins, which play an important role in determining end-use quality of common wheat. A newly established matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) procedure was used to analyze 478 landraces of bread wheat collected from the Yangtze-River region in China. Results indicated that 17 alleles at three loci: Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 were identified, resulting in 87 different allele combinations. Of the 17 alleles detected at all the Glu-3 loci, five belonged to Glu-A3, seven to Glu-B3 and five to Glu-D3 locus. MALDI-TOF-MS indicated Glu-A3a/c was present in 72.8%, Glu-A3b in 8.4%, Glu-A3d in 8.4%, Glu-A3f in 5.2% and Glu-A3e in 3.6% lines. Seven types of alleles were identified at the Glu-B3 locus: Glu-B3d/i (25.5%), Glu-B3b (21.3%), Glu-B3c (16.9%), Glu-B3h (13.8%), Glu-B3f (8.4%), Glu-B3a (8.2%), and Glu-B3g (5.2%). Five types of Glu-D3 alleles were detected: Glu-D3a (58.4%), Glu-D3c (22.6%), Glu-D3d (15.5%), Glu-D3b (3.3%) and Glu-D3f (0.2%). Four new alleles that showed abnormal MALDI-TOF spectrum patterns were identified at the Glu-A3 and Glu-B3 loci. A detailed study is needed to further characterize these alleles and their potential usage for wheat improvement. PMID:27795690

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of four novel LMW glutenin subunit genes from Aegilops longissima, Triticum dicoccoides and T. zhukovskyi.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengxi; Pei, Yuhe; Zhang, Yanzhen; Li, Xiaohui; Yao, Danian; Yan, Yueming; Ma, Wujun; Hsam, S L K; Zeller, F J

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports cloning and characterisation of four novel low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) genes (designated as TzLMW-m2, TzLMW-m1, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2) from the genomic DNA of Triticum dicoccoides, T. zhukovskyi and Aegilops longissima. The coding regions of TzLMW-m2, TzLMW-m1, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2 were 1056 bp, 903 bp, 1056 bp and 1050 bp in length, encoding 350, 300, 350 and 348 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences showed that the four novel genes were classified as LMW-m types and the comparison results indicated that the four genes had a more similar structure and a higher level of homology with the LMW-m genes than the LMW-s and -i types genes. However, the first cysteine residue's positions of TzLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2 were different from the others. Moreover, AlLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and TzLMW-m2 all possessed a longer repetitive domain, which was considered to be associated with good quality of wheat. The secondary structure prediction revealed that the content of beta-strand in AlLMW-m2 and TdLMW-m1 exceeded the positive control, suggesting that AlLMW-m2 and TdLMW-m1 should be considered as candidate genes that may have positive effect on dough quality. In order to investigate the evolutionary relationship of the novel genes with the other LMW-GSs, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The results lead to a speculation that AlLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and TzLMW-m2 may be the middle types during the evolution of LMW-m and LMW-s.

  8. Bone Regeneration Using Gene-Activated Matrices.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sheetal; Atluri, Keerthi; Geary, Sean M; Hong, Liu; Elangovan, Satheesh; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is a potential therapeutic strategy for directed, sustained, and regulated protein expression. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration include delivery of proteins, genes (viral and non-viral-mediated delivery), and/or cells to the bone defect site. In addition, biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds incorporating bone anabolic agents greatly enhance the bone repair process. Regional gene therapy has the potential of enhancing bone defect healing and bone regeneration by delivering osteogenic genes locally to the osseous lesions, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and the need for using supraphysiological dosages of therapeutic proteins. By implanting gene-activated matrices (GAMs), sustained gene expression and continuous osteogenic protein production in situ can be achieved in a way that stimulates osteogenesis and bone repair within osseous defects. Critical parameters substantially affecting the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy include the choice of osteogenic transgene(s), selection of non-viral or viral vectors, the wound environment, and the selection of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, such as GAMs. It is critical for gene therapy applications that clinically beneficial amounts of proteins are synthesized endogenously within and around the lesion in a sustained manner. It is therefore necessary that reliable and reproducible methods of gene delivery be developed and tested for their efficacy and safety before translating into clinical practice. Practical considerations such as the age, gender, and systemic health of patients and the nature of the disease process also need to be taken into account in order to personalize the treatments and progress towards developing a clinically applicable gene therapy for healing bone defects. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies to regenerate bone with specific focus on non-viral gene delivery systems.

  9. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  10. Gluten quality of bread wheat is associated with activity of RabD GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Adam M; Bhandari, Dhan G; Poole, Mervin; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D; Lu, Chungui; Lycett, Grantley W

    2015-01-01

    In the developing endosperm of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), seed storage proteins are produced on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to protein bodies, specialized vacuoles for the storage of protein. The functionally important gluten proteins of wheat are transported by two distinct routes to the protein bodies where they are stored: vesicles that bud directly off the ER and transport through the Golgi. However, little is known about the processing of glutenin and gliadin proteins during these steps or the possible impact on their properties. In plants, the RabD GTPases mediate ER-to-Golgi vesicle transport. Available sequence information for Rab GTPases in Arabidopsis, rice, Brachypodium and bread wheat was compiled and compared to identify wheat RabD orthologs. Partial genetic sequences were assembled using the first draft of the Chinese Spring wheat genome. A suitable candidate gene from the RabD clade (TaRabD2a) was chosen for down-regulation by RNA interference (RNAi), and an RNAi construct was used to transform wheat plants. All four available RabD genes were shown by qRT-PCR to be down-regulated in the transgenic developing endosperm. The transgenic grain was found to produce flour with significantly altered processing properties when measured by farinograph and extensograph. SE-HPLC found that a smaller proportion of HMW-GS and large proportion of LMW-GS are incorporated into the glutenin macropolymer in the transgenic dough. Lower protein content but a similar protein profile on SDS-PAGE was seen in the transgenic grain. PMID:25047236

  11. Gluten quality of bread wheat is associated with activity of RabD GTPases.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Adam M; Bhandari, Dhan G; Poole, Mervin; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D; Lu, Chungui; Lycett, Grantley W

    2015-02-01

    In the developing endosperm of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), seed storage proteins are produced on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to protein bodies, specialized vacuoles for the storage of protein. The functionally important gluten proteins of wheat are transported by two distinct routes to the protein bodies where they are stored: vesicles that bud directly off the ER and transport through the Golgi. However, little is known about the processing of glutenin and gliadin proteins during these steps or the possible impact on their properties. In plants, the RabD GTPases mediate ER-to-Golgi vesicle transport. Available sequence information for Rab GTPases in Arabidopsis, rice, Brachypodium and bread wheat was compiled and compared to identify wheat RabD orthologs. Partial genetic sequences were assembled using the first draft of the Chinese Spring wheat genome. A suitable candidate gene from the RabD clade (TaRabD2a) was chosen for down-regulation by RNA interference (RNAi), and an RNAi construct was used to transform wheat plants. All four available RabD genes were shown by qRT-PCR to be down-regulated in the transgenic developing endosperm. The transgenic grain was found to produce flour with significantly altered processing properties when measured by farinograph and extensograph. SE-HPLC found that a smaller proportion of HMW-GS and large proportion of LMW-GS are incorporated into the glutenin macropolymer in the transgenic dough. Lower protein content but a similar protein profile on SDS-PAGE was seen in the transgenic grain.

  12. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  13. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  14. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  15. Correspondence between resting state activity and brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T. Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M.; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance, and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady state brain gene expression and resting state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  16. Evolution of Brain Active Gene Promoters in Human Lineage Towards the Increased Plasticity of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gunbin, Konstantin V; Ponomarenko, Mikhail P; Suslov, Valentin V; Gusev, Fedor; Fedonin, Gennady G; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2017-02-24

    Adaptability to a variety of environmental conditions is a prominent feature of Homo sapiens. We hypothesize that this feature can be explained by evolutionary changes in gene promoters active in the brain prefrontal cortex leading to a more flexible gene regulation network. The genotype-dependent range of gene expression can be broader in humans than in other higher primates. Thus, we searched for specific signatures of evolutionary changes in promoter architectures of multiple hominid genes, including the genes active in human cortical neurons that may indicate an increase of variability of gene expression rather than just changes in the level of expression, such as downregulation or upregulation of the genes. We performed a whole-genome search for genetic-based alterations that may impact gene regulation "flexibility" in a process of hominids evolution, such as (i) CpG dinucleotide content, (ii) predicted nucleosome-DNA dissociation constant, and (iii) predicted affinities for TATA-binding protein (TBP) in gene promoters. We tested all putative promoter regions across the human genome and especially gene promoters in active chromatin state in neurons of prefrontal cortex, the brain region critical for abstract thinking and social and behavioral adaptation. Our data imply that the origin of modern man has been associated with an increase of flexibility of promoter-driven gene regulation in brain. In contrast, after splitting from the ancestral lineages of H. sapiens, the evolution of ape species is characterized by reduced flexibility of gene promoter functioning, underlying reduced variability of the gene expression.

  17. Orthogonal gene knock out and activation with a catalytically active Cas9 nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, James E.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Joung, Julia; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Zhang, Feng; Konermann, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a CRISPR-based method that uses catalytically active Cas9 and distinct sgRNA constructs to knock out and activate different genes in the same cell. These sgRNAs, with 14 15 bp target sequences and MS2 binding loops, can activate gene expression using an active Cas9 nuclease, without inducing DSBs. We use these ‘dead RNAs’ to perform orthogonal gene knockout and transcriptional activation in human cells. PMID:26436575

  18. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  19. Cloning and molecular characterization of three novel LMW-i glutenin subunit genes from cultivated einkorn (Triticum monococcum L.).

    PubMed

    An, X; Zhang, Q; Yan, Y; Li, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, A; Pei, Y; Tian, J; Wang, H; Hsam, S L K; Zeller, F J

    2006-08-01

    Three novel low molecular weight (LMW) glutenin subunits from cultivated einkorn (Triticum monococcum L., A(m)A(m), 2n = 2x = 14) were characterized by SDS-PAGE and molecular weights determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. Their coding genes were amplified and cloned with designed AS-PCR primers, revealing three complete gene sequences. All comprised upstream, open reading frame (ORF), downstream and no introns were present. The deduced amino acid sequences showed that all three genes, named as LMW-M1, LMW-M3 and LMW-M5, respectively, belonged to the LMW-i type subunits with the predicted molecular weight between 38.5206 and 38.7028 kDa. They showed high similarity with other LMW-i type genes from hexaploid bread wheats, but also displayed unique features. Particularly, LMW-M5 subunit contained an extra cysteine residue in the C-terminus except for eight conserved cysteines, which resulted from a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the T-C transition, namely arginine --> cysteine substitution at position 242 from the N-terminal end. This is the first report that the LMW-i subunit contained nine cysteines residues that could result in a more highly cross-linked and more elastic glutenin suggesting that LMW-M5 gene may associates with good quality properties. In addition, a total of 25 SNPs and one insertions/deletions (InDels) were detected among three LMW-i genes, which could result in significant functional changes in polymer formation of gluten. It is anticipated that these SNPs could be used as reliable genetic markers during wheat quality improvement. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that LMW-i type genes apparently differed from LMW-m and LMW-s type genes and diverged early from the primitive LMW-GS gene family, at about 12.92 million years ago (MYA) while the differentiation of A(m) and A genomes was estimated at 3.98 MYA.

  20. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  1. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  2. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  3. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  4. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  5. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  6. Molecular characterization of the celiac disease epitope domains in α-gliadin genes in Aegilops tauschii and hexaploid wheats (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenze; Wang, Congyan; Wang, Ke; Wang, Shunli; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhao; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yueming

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen novel full-ORF α-gliadin genes and 32 pseudogenes containing at least one stop codon were cloned and sequenced from three Aegilops tauschii accessions (T15, T43 and T26) and two bread wheat cultivars (Gaocheng 8901 and Zhongyou 9507). Analysis of three typical α-gliadin genes (Gli-At4, Gli-G1 and Gli-Z4) revealed some InDels and a considerable number of SNPs among them. Most of the pseudogenes were resulted from C to T change, leading to the generation of TAG or TAA in-frame stop codon. The putative proteins of both Gli-At3 and Gli-Z7 genes contained an extra cysteine residue in the unique domain II. Analysis of toxic epitodes among 19 deduced α-gliadins demonstrated that 14 of these contained 1-5 T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes while the other 5 did not contain any toxic epitopes. The glutamine residues in two specific ployglutamine domains ranged from 7 to 27, indicating a high variation in length. According to the numbers of 4 T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes and glutamine residues in the two ployglutamine domains among the 19 α-gliadin genes, 2 were assigned to chromosome 6A, 5 to chromosome 6B and 12 to chromosome 6D. These results were consistent with those from wheat cv. Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic and phylogenetic analysis. Secondary structure prediction showed that all α-gliadins had high content of β-strands and most of the α-helixes and β-strands were present in two unique domains. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that α-gliadin genes had a high homology with γ-gliadin, B-hordein, and LMW-GS genes and they diverged at approximate 39 MYA. Finally, the five α-gliadin genes were successfully expressed in E. coli, and their expression amount reached to the maximum after 4 h induced by IPTG, indicating that the α-gliadin genes can express in a high level under the control of T(7) promoter.

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  9. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  10. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Walker, Whitney J.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16/Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. The mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic, and we describe here the application of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identify 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that are expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis, and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observe that loss of Tbx16 function precociously activates posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene is sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  11. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  12. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  13. [Cascade of gene activation in Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Belayew, A

    2010-01-01

    Our laboratory studies the Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy or FSHD, a genetic disease which affects 7 in 100,000 individuals. The genetic defect is a deletion on chromosome 4 that decreases the copy number of a repeated DNA element, disturbs chromatin structure and activates the expression of neighbouring genes. The originality of our team has been to identify a gene within the repeated element itself and to show its activation in FSHD muscle cells. This gene expresses DUX4, a transcription factor that targets tens of genes, some of which express other transcription factors which target other genes, leading to a general deregulation. This DUX4-mediated cascade recapitulates by itself the major pathological features of FSHD: muscle atrophy, differentiation defect, oxidative stress... The homologous DUX4c gene located 42 kb from the repeat array expresses a protein that triggers myoblast proliferation. Its high expression level in severe cases of FSHD most probably contributes to the pathology by interfering with myoblast fusion with the muscle fibers at the last steps of muscle regeneration. We are performing global analyses of proteins and metabolites in healthy and FSHD myotubes (collaboration R Wattiez and JM Colet, UMONS) to identify abnormalities and their links with DUX4 or DUX4C.

  14. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  15. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  16. RNA activation of haploinsufficient Foxg1 gene in murine neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred distinct gene hemizygosities are specifically linked to epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia and neuro-degeneration. Radical repair of these gene deficits via genome engineering is hardly feasible. The same applies to therapeutic stimulation of the spared allele by artificial transactivators. Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) offer an alternative, appealing approach. As a proof-of-principle, here we tested this approach on the Rett syndrome-linked, haploinsufficient, Foxg1 brain patterning gene. We selected a set of artificial small activating RNAs (saRNAs) upregulating it in neocortical precursors and their derivatives. Expression of these effectors achieved a robust biological outcome. saRNA-driven activation (RNAa) was limited to neural cells which normally express Foxg1 and did not hide endogenous gene tuning. saRNAs recognized target chromatin through a ncRNA stemming from it. Gene upregulation required Ago1 and was associated to RNApolII enrichment throughout the Foxg1 locus. Finally, saRNA delivery to murine neonatal brain replicated Foxg1-RNAa in vivo. PMID:27995975

  17. Linear topology confers in vivo gene transfer activity to polyethylenimines.

    PubMed

    Brissault, B; Leborgne, C; Guis, C; Danos, O; Cheradame, H; Kichler, A

    2006-01-01

    Although polyethylenimines (PEIs) are frequently used transfection agents, it is still unclear which of their properties are required for efficient gene delivery. This is even more striking when working in vivo since some PEIs are able to generate significant gene expression, whereas others are not. To facilitate a rational development of compounds with improved transfection activities, studies aimed at identifying the properties involved in the transfection process seem indispensable. In the present work, we investigated how transfection with linear PEI of 22 kDa allows for high reporter gene expression in lungs after intravenous injection, whereas the branched PEI of 25 kDa does not. To this end, we synthesized L-PEI derivatives that are intermediates between linear and branched PEIs. Our results show that the topology plays a crucial role in obtaining in vivo reporter gene expression, whereas the content of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines is only of minor importance.

  18. Activity-Regulated Genes as Mediators of Neural Circuit Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jennifer H.; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Many electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms are common to the seemingly diverse types of activity-dependent functional adaptation that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. They fine-tune brain circuits by strengthening or weakening synaptic connections or by altering synapse numbers. Their effects are further modulated by posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, that control activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. PMID:21601615

  19. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  20. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus).

    PubMed

    Höckner, M; Dallinger, R; Stürzenbaum, S R

    2015-05-08

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs.

  1. "Active" cancer immunotherapy by anti-Met antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Pennacchietti, Selma; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2008-11-15

    Gene therapy provides a still poorly explored opportunity to treat cancer by "active" immunotherapy as it enables the transfer of genes encoding antibodies directed against specific oncogenic proteins. By a bidirectional lentiviral vector, we transferred the cDNA encoding the heavy and light chains of a monoclonal anti-Met antibody (DN-30) to epithelial cancer cells. In vitro, the transduced cells synthesized and secreted correctly assembled antibodies with the expected high affinity, inducing down-regulation of the Met receptor and strong inhibition of the invasive growth response. The inhibitory activity resulted (a) from the interference of the antibody with the Met receptor intracellular processing ("cell autonomous activity," in cis) and (b) from the antibody-induced cleavage of Met expressed at the cell surface ("bystander effect," in trans). The monoclonal antibody gene transferred into live animals by systemic administration or by local intratumor delivery resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth. These data provide proof of concept both for targeting the Met receptor and for a gene transfer-based immunotherapy strategy.

  2. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  3. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-03

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  4. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D.; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.—Chakravarthy, H., Ormsbee, B. D., Mallanna, S. K., Rizzino, A. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery. PMID:20876214

  5. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  6. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  7. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  8. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  9. Sensation-seeking genes and physical activity in youth.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A V; Gabriel, K P; Wang, J; Bondy, M L; Dong, Q; Wu, X; Shete, S; Spitz, M R

    2013-03-01

    Many studies examining genetic influences on physical activity (PA) have evaluated the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to the development of lifestyle-related chronic diseases, under the hypothesis that they would be associated with PA. However, PA is a multidetermined behavior and associated with a multitude of health consequences. Thus, examining a broader range of candidate genes associated with a broader range of PA correlates may provide new insights into the genetic underpinnings of PA. In this study, we focus on one such correlate - sensation-seeking behavior. Participants (N = 1130 Mexican origin youth) provided a saliva sample and data on PA and sensation-seeking tendencies in 2008-2009. Participants were genotyped for 630 functional and tagging variants in the dopamine, serotonin and cannabinoid pathways. Overall 30% of participants (males - 37.6% and females - 22.0%) reported ≥60 min of PA on 5 of 7 days. After adjusting for gender, age and population stratification, and applying the Bayesian False Discovery Probability approach for assessing noteworthiness, four gene variants were significantly associated with PA. In a multivariable model, being male, having higher sensation-seeking tendencies and at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene [ACE; rs8066276 odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; P = 0.012] and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2; rs11615016 OR = 1.73; P = 0.021) were associated with increased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Participants with at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene (SNAP25; rs363035 OR = 0.53; P = 0.005) and cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1; rs6454672 OR = 0.62; P = 0.022) have decreased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Our findings extend current knowledge of the complex relationship between PA and possible genetic underpinnings.

  10. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  11. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  12. Recovering glycoside hydrolase genes from active tundra cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Lee J; Dunford, Eric; Ronan, Patrick; Hausner, Martina; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria responsible for cellulose hydrolysis in situ are poorly understood, largely because of the relatively recent development of cultivation-independent methods for their detection and characterization. This study combined DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and metagenomics for identifying active bacterial communities that assimilated carbon from glucose and cellulose in Arctic tundra microcosms. Following DNA-SIP, bacterial fingerprint analysis of gradient fractions confirmed isotopic enrichment. Sequenced fingerprint bands and clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified active bacterial taxa associated with cellulose-associated labelled DNA, including Bacteroidetes (Sphingobacteriales), Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderiales), Alphaproteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae), and Chloroflexi (Anaerolineaceae). We also compared glycoside hydrolase metagenomic profiles from bulk soil and heavy DNA recovered from DNA-SIP incubations. Active populations consuming [(13)C]glucose and [(13)C]cellulose were distinct, based on ordinations of light and heavy DNA. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated a ∼3-fold increase in the relative abundance of glycoside hydrolases in DNA-SIP libraries over bulk-soil libraries. The data also indicate that multiple displacement amplification introduced bias into the resulting metagenomic analysis. This research identified DNA-SIP incubation conditions for glucose and cellulose that were suitable for Arctic tundra soil and confirmed that DNA-SIP enrichment can increase target gene frequencies in metagenomic libraries.

  13. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    He, Chongsheng; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively). The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:24312106

  14. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D; Mallanna, Sunil K; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.

  15. Inhibition of retinoic acid-induced activation of 3' human HOXB genes by antisense oligonucleotides affects sequential activation of genes located upstream in the four HOX clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Boncinelli, E

    1994-01-01

    Most homeobox genes belonging to the Hox family are sequentially activated in embryonal carcinoma cells upon treatment with retinoic acid. Genes located at the 3' end of each one of the four Hox clusters are activated first, whereas upstream Hox genes are activated progressively later. This activation has been extensively studied for human HOX genes in the NT2/D1 cell line and shown to take place at the transcriptional level. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sequential HOX gene activation in these cells, we tried to modulate the expression of 3' HOX genes through the use of antisense oligonucleotides added to the culture medium. We chose the HOXB locus. A 5- to 15-fold reduction of the expression of HOXB1 and HOXB3 was sufficient to produce a significant inhibition of the activation of the upstream HOXB genes, as well as of their paralogs in the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters. Conversely, no effect was detectable on downstream HOX genes. The extent of this inhibition increased for progressively more-5' genes. The stability of the corresponding mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, supporting the idea that the observed effect might be mediated at the transcriptional level. These data suggest a cascade model of progressive activation of Hox genes, with a 3'-to-5' polarity. Images PMID:7911240

  16. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  17. A Bayesian Framework for the Classification of Microbial Gene Activity States

    PubMed Central

    Disselkoen, Craig; Greco, Brian; Cook, Kaitlyn; Koch, Kristin; Lerebours, Reginald; Viss, Chase; Cape, Joshua; Held, Elizabeth; Ashenafi, Yonatan; Fischer, Karen; Acosta, Allyson; Cunningham, Mark; Best, Aaron A.; DeJongh, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods for classifying gene activity states based on gene expression data have been proposed for use in downstream applications, such as incorporating transcriptomics data into metabolic models in order to improve resulting flux predictions. These methods often attempt to classify gene activity for each gene in each experimental condition as belonging to one of two states: active (the gene product is part of an active cellular mechanism) or inactive (the cellular mechanism is not active). These existing methods of classifying gene activity states suffer from multiple limitations, including enforcing unrealistic constraints on the overall proportions of active and inactive genes, failing to leverage a priori knowledge of gene co-regulation, failing to account for differences between genes, and failing to provide statistically meaningful confidence estimates. We propose a flexible Bayesian approach to classifying gene activity states based on a Gaussian mixture model. The model integrates genome-wide transcriptomics data from multiple conditions and information about gene co-regulation to provide activity state confidence estimates for each gene in each condition. We compare the performance of our novel method to existing methods on both simulated data and real data from 907 E. coli gene expression arrays, as well as a comparison with experimentally measured flux values in 29 conditions, demonstrating that our method provides more consistent and accurate results than existing methods across a variety of metrics. PMID:27555837

  18. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  19. GeneSet2miRNA: finding the signature of cooperative miRNA activities in the gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexey V.; Dietmann, Sabine; Wong, Philip; Lutter, Dominik; Mewes, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    GeneSet2miRNA is the first web-based tool which is able to identify whether or not a gene list has a signature of miRNA-regulatory activity. As input, GeneSet2miRNA accepts a list of genes. As output, a list of miRNA-regulatory models is provided. A miRNA-regulatory model is a group of miRNAs (single, pair, triplet or quadruplet) that is predicted to regulate a significant subset of genes from the submitted list. GeneSet2miRNA provides a user friendly dialog-driven web page submission available for several model organisms. GeneSet2miRNA is freely available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/proj/gene2mir/. PMID:19420064

  20. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  1. Activation of tissue plasminogen activator gene transcription by Neovastat, a multifunctional antiangiogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Denis; Nyalendo, Carine; Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Annabi, Borhane; Béliveau, Richard

    2004-07-16

    We recently reported that Neovastat, an antiangiogenic drug that is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, may inhibit angiogenesis through an increase in tPA activity. Here, we show that Neovastat also stimulates tPA gene transcription in endothelial cells, in a TNFalpha-like manner. RT-PCR analysis and gene reporter assays using the human tPA promoter indicated that upregulation of the tPA gene transcription by both Neovastat and TNFalpha was correlated with the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and of IkappaB and that SP600125 and BAY11-7082, inhibitors of JNK and IkappaK, respectively, inhibit the increase of tPA gene transcription induced by Neovastat and TNFalpha. These results suggest that Neovastat induces tPA gene transcription through activation of the JNK and NFkappaB signaling pathways, leading to an increase of tPA secretion by endothelial cells. This may lead to the localized destruction of the fibrin provisional matrix that is necessary for neovessel formation and thus contribute to the reported antiangiogenic properties of this compound.

  2. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  3. MBD3 Localizes at Promoters, Gene Bodies and Enhancers of Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Takashi; Du, Ying; Grimm, Sara A.; Dhasarathy, Archana; Mav, Deepak; Shah, Ruchir R.; Shi, Huidong; Wade, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a multiprotein machine proposed to regulate chromatin structure by nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation activities. Recent reports describing localization of NuRD provide new insights that question previous models on NuRD action, but are not in complete agreement. Here, we provide location analysis of endogenous MBD3, a component of NuRD complex, in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) using two independent genomic techniques: DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) and ChIP-seq. We observed concordance of the resulting genomic localization, suggesting that these studies are converging on a robust map for NuRD in the cancer cell genome. MBD3 preferentially associated with CpG rich promoters marked by H3K4me3 and showed cell-type specific localization across gene bodies, peaking around the transcription start site. A subset of sites bound by MBD3 was enriched in H3K27ac and was in physical proximity to promoters in three-dimensional space, suggesting function as enhancers. MBD3 enrichment was also noted at promoters modified by H3K27me3. Functional analysis of chromatin indicated that MBD3 regulates nucleosome occupancy near promoters and in gene bodies. These data suggest that MBD3, and by extension the NuRD complex, may have multiple roles in fine tuning expression for both active and silent genes, representing an important step in defining regulatory mechanisms by which NuRD complex controls chromatin structure and modification status. PMID:24385926

  4. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter. PMID:8770873

  5. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  6. A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Haczek, Cornelia; Koch, Christian; Vogt, Stephan; Kullmer, Martin; Pautke, Christoph; Deppe, Herbert; Plank, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.

  7. Setting limits on homeotic gene function: restraint of Sex combs reduced activity by teashirt and other homeotic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, D J; Horner, M A; Petitt, M G; Smolik, S M; Scott, M P

    1994-01-01

    Each of the homeotic genes of the HOM or HOX complexes is expressed in a limited domain along the anterior-posterior axis. Each homeotic protein directs the formation of characteristic structures, such as wings or ribs. In flies, when a heat shock-inducible homeotic gene is used to produce a homeotic protein in all cells of the embryo, only some cells respond by altering their fates. We have identified genes that limit where the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) can affect cell fates in the Drosophila embryo. In the abdominal cuticle Scr is prevented from inducing prothoracic structures by the three bithorax complex (BX-C) homeotic genes. However, two of the BX-C homeotic genes, Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal-A (abd-A), have no effect on the ability of Scr to direct the formation of salivary glands. Instead, salivary gland induction by Scr is limited in the trunk by the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and in the last abdominal segment by the third BX-C gene, Abdominal-B (AbdB). Therefore, spatial restrictions on homeotic gene activity differ between tissues and result both from the regulation of homeotic gene transcription and from restraints on where homeotic proteins can function. Images PMID:7907545

  8. A viral gene that activates lytic cycle expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Yuan, Yan; Zhu, Fanxiu; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    Herpesviruses exist in two states, latency and a lytic productive cycle. Here we identify an immediate-early gene encoded by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus eight (HHV8) that activates lytic cycle gene expression from the latent viral genome. The gene is a homologue of Rta, a transcriptional activator encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). KSHV/Rta activated KSHV early lytic genes, including virus-encoded interleukin 6 and polyadenylated nuclear RNA, and a late gene, small viral capsid antigen. In cells dually infected with Epstein–Barr virus and KSHV, each Rta activated only autologous lytic cycle genes. Expression of viral cytokines under control of the KSHV/Rta gene is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:9724796

  9. Compact and highly active next-generation libraries for CRISPR-mediated gene repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Adamson, Britt; Pak, Ryan A; Chen, Yuwen; Fields, Alexander P; Park, Chong Yon; Corn, Jacob E; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that nucleosomes directly block access of CRISPR/Cas9 to DNA (Horlbeck et al., 2016). Here, we build on this observation with a comprehensive algorithm that incorporates chromatin, position, and sequence features to accurately predict highly effective single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeting nuclease-dead Cas9-mediated transcriptional repression (CRISPRi) and activation (CRISPRa). We use this algorithm to design next-generation genome-scale CRISPRi and CRISPRa libraries targeting human and mouse genomes. A CRISPRi screen for essential genes in K562 cells demonstrates that the large majority of sgRNAs are highly active. We also find CRISPRi does not exhibit any detectable non-specific toxicity recently observed with CRISPR nuclease approaches. Precision-recall analysis shows that we detect over 90% of essential genes with minimal false positives using a compact 5 sgRNA/gene library. Our results establish CRISPRi and CRISPRa as premier tools for loss- or gain-of-function studies and provide a general strategy for identifying Cas9 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19760.001 PMID:27661255

  10. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  11. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  12. Network activity-independent coordinated gene expression program for synapse assembly.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Charlesworth, Paul; Humphreys, Lawrence; Anderson, Chris N G; Grant, Seth G N

    2007-03-13

    Global biological datasets generated by genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide new approaches to understanding the relationship between the genome and the synapse. Combined transcriptome analysis and multielectrode recordings of neuronal network activity were used in mouse embryonic primary neuronal cultures to examine synapse formation and activity-dependent gene regulation. Evidence for a coordinated gene expression program for assembly of synapses was observed in the expression of 642 genes encoding postsynaptic and plasticity proteins. This synaptogenesis gene expression program preceded protein expression of synapse markers and onset of spiking activity. Continued expression was followed by maturation of morphology and electrical neuronal networks, which was then followed by the expression of activity-dependent genes. Thus, two distinct sequentially active gene expression programs underlie the genomic programs of synapse function.

  13. Xenoestrogenic gene expression: structural features of active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Sinks, Glendon D

    2002-04-01

    Estrogenicity was assessed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based Lac-Z reporter assay and was reported as the logarithm of the inverse of the 50% molar beta-galactosidase activity (log[EC50(-1)]). In an effort to quantify the relationship between molecular structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and estrogenic gene expression, a series of PAHs were evaluated. With noted exceptions, the results of these studies indicate that the initial two-dimensional structural warning for estrogenicity, the superpositioning of a hydroxylated aromatic system on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol, can be extended to the PAHs. This two-dimensional-alignment criterion correctly identified estrogenicity of 22 of the 29 PAHs evaluated. Moreover, the estrogenic potency of these compounds was directly related to the size of the hydrophobic backbone. The seven compounds classified incorrectly by this structural feature were either dihydroxylated naphthalenes or aromatic nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds; all such compounds were false positives. Results with dihydroxylated naphthalenes reveal derivatives that were nonestrogenic when superimposed on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol had the second hydroxyl group in the position of the C-ring or were catechol-like in structure. Structural alerts for nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds must take into account the position of the hydroxyl group and the in-ring nitrogen atom; compounds with the hydroxyl group and nitrogen atom involved with the same ring were observed to be nonactive.

  14. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  15. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  16. Providencia stuartii genes activated by cell-to-cell signaling and identification of a gene required for production or activity of an extracellular factor.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Ding, X; Baca-DeLancey, R R; Siddiqui, S

    1999-12-01

    By utilizing reporter transposons, five Providencia stuartii genes that are activated by the accumulation of self-produced extracellular signals have been identified. These genes have been designated cma for conditioned medium activated. The presence of conditioned medium from stationary-phase cultures grown in rich media resulted in the premature activation of each gene in cells at early log phase, with activation values ranging from 6- to 26-fold. Preparation of conditioned medium from an M9 salts medium and fractionation by gel filtration chromatography resulted in fractions within the included volume which activated three of the cma fusions. In addition, depending on the reporter fusion, peak activity was found in different fractions. The partially purified factors activated in a dose-dependent manner. Characterization of the factors activating the cma fusions indicated that they were stable to heat, alkali, and acid. Furthermore, for each cma fusion, factor activity was not reproduced by the addition of homoserine lactone, homocysteine thiolactone, pyruvate, Casamino Acids, or alpha-ketoglutarate. The identities of three cma genes have been determined and revealed physiological roles in amino acid biosynthesis and nutrient import. To begin to address the pathways for production of or response to the extracellular factors, we have identified a locus, aarA, that is required for the activation of four cma fusions. The AarA product was required for factor activity in extracellular supernatants, indicating a possible role in biosynthesis or export.

  17. The great escape: Active genes on inactive sex chromosomes and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms precisely regulate sex chromosome inactivation as well as genes that escape the silencing process. In male germ cells, DNA damage response factor RNF8 establishes active epigenetic modifications on the silent sex chromosomes during meiosis, and activates escape genes during a state of sex chromosome-wide silencing in postmeiotic spermatids. During the course of evolution, the gene content of escape genes in postmeiotic spermatids recently diverged on the sex chromosomes. This evolutionary feature mirrors the epigenetic processes of sex chromosomes in germ cells. In this article, we describe how epigenetic processes have helped to shape the evolution of sex chromosome-linked genes. Furthermore, we compare features of escape genes on sex chromosomes in male germ cells to escape genes located on the single X chromosome silenced during X-inactivation in females, clarifying the distinct evolutionary implications between male and female escape genes.

  18. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources. PMID:20482775

  19. Therapeutic antibody gene transfer: an active approach to passive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Joost M; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2004-09-01

    Advances in gene transfer approaches are enabling the possibility of applying therapeutic antibodies using DNA. In particular gene transfer in combination with electroporation is promising and can result in generating in vivo antibody concentrations in the low therapeutic range. However, several important problems need to be dealt with before antibody gene transfer can become a valuable supplement to the current therapies. As antibody production following gene transfer is difficult to control, the danger of inducing autoimmune conditions or uncontrollable side effects occurs in cases in which autologous antigens are targeted. It is suggested that the most promising area of application therefore appears to be infectious disease in which heterologous antigens are targeted and concerns for long-term antibody exposure are minimal. Finally, genes encoding fully human antibodies will enhance long-term expression and decrease problems linked to immunogenicity.

  20. Gene editing activity on extrachromosomal arrays in C. elegans transgenics.

    PubMed

    Falgowski, Kerry A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2011-04-15

    Gene editing by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides is a strategy aimed at inducing single base changes into the genome, generating a permanent genetic change. The work presented here explores gene editing capabilities in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Current approaches to gene mutagenesis in C. elegans have been plagued by non-specificity and thus the ability to induce precise, directed alterations within the genome of C. elegans would offer a platform upon which structure/function analyses can be carried out. As such, several in vivo assay systems were developed to evaluate gene editing capabilities in C. elegans. Fluorescence was chosen as the selectable endpoint as fluorescence can be easily detected through the transparent worm body even from minimal expression. Two tissue specific fluorescent expression vectors containing either a GFP or mCherry transgene were mutagenized to create a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of each respective fluorescent gene. These served as the target site to evaluate the frequency of gene editing on extrachromosomal array transgenic lines. Extrachromosomal arrays can carry hundreds of copies of the transgene, therefore low frequency events (like those in the gene editing reaction) may be detected. Delivery of the oligonucleotide was accomplished by microinjection into the gonads of young adult worms in an effort to induce repair of the mutated fluorescent gene in the F1 progeny. Despite many microinjections on the transgenic strains with varying concentrations of ODNs, no gene editing events were detected. This result is consistent with the previous research, demonstrating the difficulties encountered in targeting embryonic stem cells and the pronuclei of single-celled embryos.

  1. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  2. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  3. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation. PMID:23249736

  4. Somatic Activation of rasK Gene in a Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, L. A.; Bast, R. C.; Knapp, R. C.; Cooper, G. M.

    1984-02-01

    A tumor isolate from a patient with serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary contained an activated rasK gene detected by transfection of NIH/3T3 cells. In contrast, DNA from normal cells of the same patient lacked transforming activity, indicating that activation of this transforming gene was the consequence of somatic mutation in the neoplastic cells. The transforming gene product displayed an electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels that differed from the mobilities of rasK transforming proteins in other tumors, indicating that a previously undescribed mutation was responsible for activation of rasK in this ovarian carcinoma.

  5. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  6. Activation of cryptic 3' splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Osipovich, Anna B; White-Grindley, Erica K; Hicks, Geoffrey G; Roshon, Michael J; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H; Ruley, H Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3'-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3' splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3' splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3' splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3' splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3' splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3' splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3' processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts.

  7. Activation of cryptic 3′ splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Osipovich, Anna B.; White-Grindley, Erica K.; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Roshon, Michael J.; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3′-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3′ splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3′ splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3′ splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3′ splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3′ splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3′ splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3′ processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts. PMID:15155860

  8. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  9. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  10. ihfA Gene of the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus and Its Role in Activation of Carotenoid Genes by Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Alberto J.; Fontes, Marta; Murillo, Francisco J.

    2001-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to blue light by producing carotenoids. Several regulatory genes are known that participate in the light action mechanism, which leads to the transcriptional activation of the carotenoid genes. We had already reported the isolation of a carotenoid-less, Tn5-induced strain (MR508), whose mutant site was unlinked to the indicated regulatory genes. Here, we show that ΩMR508::Tn5 affects all known light-inducible promoters in different ways. It blocks the activation of two of them by light but makes the activity of a third one light independent. The ΩMR508 locus has been cloned and sequenced. The mutation had occurred at the promoter of a gene we propose is the M. xanthus ortholog of ihfA. This encodes the α subunit of the histone-like integration host factor protein. An in-frame deletion within ihfA causes the same effects as the ΩMR508::Tn5 insertion. Like other IhfA proteins, the deduced amino acid sequence of M. xanthus IhfA shows much similarity to HU, another histone-like protein. Sequence comparison data, however, and the finding that the M. xanthus gene is preceded by gene pheT, as happens in other gram-negative bacteria, strongly argue for the proposed orthology relationship. The M. xanthus ihfA gene shows some unusual features, both from structural and physiological points of view. In particular, the protein is predicted to have a unique, long acidic extension at the carboxyl terminus, and it appears to be necessary for normal cell growth and even vital for a certain wild-type strain of M. xanthus. PMID:11133949

  11. Regulation of Gene33 expression by insulin requires MEK-ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Xu, Jie; Franklin, J Lee; Messina, Joseph L

    2004-09-17

    Gene33 and its human homologue, mitogen inducible gene-6/receptor-associated late transducer (mig-6, RALT), is a 53-kDa soluble protein that was identified as a hepatic gene regulated by glucocorticoids and insulin. Its mRNA is expressed in numerous tissues in addition to the liver. Mitogen inducibility of Gene33 mRNA has been described in several experimental systems. Recent reports have suggested a role for Gene33 in inhibition of proliferation induced by factors that bind to members of the ErbB family of receptors. In the present work, we examine the regulation of Gene33 protein by insulin in hepatoma cells of rat (H4IIE) and human (HepG2/Hep3B) origin. Inhibition of MEK1 significantly inhibited extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation and insulin-regulated Gene33 transcription and protein levels in H4IIE cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) activity alone did not significantly alter transcription of Gene33. In Hep3B and HepG2 cells, insulin did not significantly induce either ERK1/2 activation or Gene33 expression. This work suggests that the MEK-ERK, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), pathway plays a direct role in insulin regulation of Gene33 transcription and protein expression.

  12. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  14. Laughter up-regulates the genes related to NK cell activity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Tsujii, Satoru; Iburi, Tadao; Tamanaha, Tamiko; Yamagami, Keiko; Ishibashi, Rieko; Hori, Miyo; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Ishii, Hitoshi; Murakami, Kazuo

    2007-12-01

    To elucidate the sustainable effects of laughter on gene expression, we recruited type 2 diabetic patients who were in-patient for receiving self-management education and examined time-dependent regulation for gene expression by laughter. Two-day experiment was performed. On one day, the patients watched comic video and laughed together with hospital staffs. On the other day, they participated in an inpatient diabetes educational program. Blood samples were collected before and 1.5, 4 h after watching comic video or spending lecture time, and changes in gene expression were comprehensively analyzed by microarray technique. Of the 41,000 genes analyzed, the laughter relatively up-regulated 39 genes, among which, 27 genes were relatively increased in the expression for all the observation period after watching comic video. By functional classification of these genes, 14 genes were found to be related to natural killer cell activity. No genes were included that are directly involved in blood glucose regulation, though successive suppression of postprandial blood glucose levels was observed. These results suggest that the laughter influences the expression of many genes classified into immune responses, and may contribute to amelioration of postprandial blood glucose elevation through a modulation of NK cell activity caused by up-regulation of relating genes.

  15. Impact of physical activity and doping on epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2011-10-01

    To achieve success in sports, many athletes consume doping substances, such as anabolic androgenic steroids and growth hormones, and ignore the negative influence of these drugs on their health. Apart from the unethical aspect of doping in sports, it is essential to consider the tremendous risk it represents to their physical condition. The abuse of pharmaceuticals which improve athletic performance may alter the expression of specific genes involved in muscle and bone metabolism by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Moreover, excessive and relentless training to increase the muscle mass, may also have an influence on the health of the athletes. This stress releases neurotransmitters and growth factors, and may affect the expression of endogenous genes by DNA methylation, too. This paper focuses on the relationship between epigenetic mechanisms and sports, highlights the potential consequences of abuse of doping drugs on gene expression, and describes methods to molecularly detect epigenetic changes of gene markers reflecting the physiological or metabolic effects of doping agents.

  16. Activation and Characterization of a Cryptic Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Huang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Wang, Meng; Lu, Lu; Shao, Zengyi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic tetramate macrolactams (PTMs) are a widely distributed class of natural products with important biological activities. However, many of them have not been characterized. Here we apply a plug and play synthetic biology strategy to activate a cryptic PTM biosynthetic gene cluster SGR810-815 from Streptomyces griseus and discover three potential PTMs. This gene cluster is highly conserved in phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains and contains an unusual hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) which resembles iterative PKSs known in fungi. To further characterize this gene cluster, we use the same synthetic biology approach to create a series of gene deletion constructs and elucidate the biosynthetic steps for the formation of the polycyclic system. The strategy we employ bypasses the traditional laborious processes to elicit gene cluster expression and should be generally applicable to many other silent or cryptic gene clusters for discovery and characterization of new natural products. PMID:24305602

  17. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  18. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  19. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J; Taylor, Kent D; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S; Rodriguez, Annabelle

    2016-10-20

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  20. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  1. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

  2. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  3. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  4. Identification of two peanut germin-like genes and the potential superoxide dismutase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germin and germin-like protein (GLP) genes are members of large multigene families. These genes have been reported to play a role directly or indirectly in plant defense response. A number of GLPs have been demonstrated to have superoxidase dismutase (SOD) or oxalate oxidase (OxO) activity, leading ...

  5. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

  6. Influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs and tet genes in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Dongfang; Li, Kexun

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations of tetracycline-intermediate resistant, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria, and total heterotrophic bacteria were examined to assess the influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs by the R2A agar cultivation method in the tetracycline fortified activated sludge process and in the natural background. Results showed that the percentages of both tetracycline-intermediate resistant and tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in total heterotrophic bacteria were significantly increased, after tetracycline was fed to activated sludge for a 3 months period under four different operating conditions, as compared with the background. In order to investigate the mechanism of activated sludge resistance to tetracycline, polymerase chain reaction experiments were carried out to analyze the existence and evolution of tet genes in the presence of tetracycline. Results revealed that only tet A and tet B genes out of the 11 target tet genes were observed in tetracycline treated activated sludge while no tet gene was detected in background. This indicated that tet A gene could accumulate in activated sludge with slower and continuous influent, while the accumulation of tet B gene could be attributed to shorter hydraulic retention time. Therefore, it was proposed in this study that tetracycline-resistant genes created by efflux pumps spread earlier and quicker to encode resistance to tetracycline, which facilitated the increase in tetracycline-resistance.

  7. Gene expression profile of activated microglia under conditions associated with dopamine neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2006-03-01

    Microglia are the resident antigen-presenting cells within the central nervous system (CNS), and they serve immune-like functions in protecting the brain against injury and invading pathogens. By contrast, activated microglia can secrete numerous reactants that damage neurons. The pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases has been associated with microglial activation, but the signaling pathways that program a neuronally protective or destructive phenotype in microglia are not known. To increase the understanding of microglial activation, microarray analysis was used to profile the transcriptome of BV-2 microglial cells after activation. Microglia were activated by lipopolysaccharide, the HIV neurotoxic protein TAT, and dopamine quinone, each of which has been linked to dopamine neuronal damage. We identified 210 of 9882 genes whose expression was differentially regulated by all activators (116 increased and 94 decreased in expression). Gene ontology analysis assigned up-regulated genes to a number of specific biological processes and molecular functions, including immune response, inflammation, and cytokine/chemokine activity. Genes down-regulated in expression contribute to conditions that are permissive of microglial migration, lowered adhesion to matrix, lessened phagocytosis, and reduction in receptors that oppose chemotaxis and inflammation. These results elaborate a broad profile of microglial genes whose expression is altered by conditions associated with both neurodegenerative diseases and microglial activation.

  8. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Huckle, Linda L; Lu, Shunwen; Knauber, Donna C

    2014-03-15

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in lateral buds isolated from field-grown tubers. All five putative StCKX genes encoded proteins with in vitro CKX activity. All five enzymes were maximally active at neutral to slightly alkaline pH with 2,6-dichloro-indophenol as the electron acceptor. In silico analyses indicated that four proteins were likely secreted. Substrate dependence of two of the most active enzymes varied; one exhibiting greater activity with isopentenyl-type cytokinins while the other was maximally active with cis-zeatin as a substrate. [(3)H]-isopentenyl-adenosine was readily metabolized by excised tuber buds to adenine/adenosine demonstrating that CKX was active in planta. There was no change in apparent in planta CKX activity during either natural or chemically forced dormancy progression. Similarly although expression of individual StCKX genes varied modestly during tuber dormancy, there was no clear correlation between StCKX gene expression and tuber dormancy status. Thus although CKX gene expression and enzyme activity are present in potato tuber buds throughout dormancy, they do not appear to play a significant role in the regulation of cytokinin content during tuber dormancy progression.

  9. SUMO functions in constitutive transcription and during activation of inducible genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rosonina, Emanuel; Duncan, Sarah M; Manley, James L

    2010-06-15

    Transcription factors represent one of the largest groups of proteins regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, and their sumoylation is usually associated with transcriptional repression. To investigate whether sumoylation plays a general role in regulating transcription in yeast, we determined the occupancy of sumoylated proteins at a variety of genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody that recognizes the yeast SUMO peptide. Surprisingly, we detected sumoylated proteins at all constitutively transcribed genes tested but not at repressed genes. Ubc9, the SUMO conjugation enzyme, was not present on these genes, but its inactivation reduced SUMO at the constitutive promoters and modestly decreased RNA polymerase II levels. In contrast, activation of the inducible GAL1, STL1, and ARG1 genes caused not only a striking accumulation of SUMO at all three promoter regions, but also recruitment of Ubc9, indicating that gene activation involves sumoylation of promoter-bound factors. However, Ubc9 inactivation, while reducing sumoylation at the induced promoters, paradoxically resulted in increased transcription. Providing an explanation for this, the reduced sumoylation impaired the cell's ability to appropriately shut off transcription of the induced ARG1 gene, indicating that SUMO can facilitate transcriptional silencing. Our findings thus establish unexpected roles for sumoylation in both constitutive and activated transcription, and provide a novel mechanism for regulating gene expression.

  10. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  11. Targeting c-Myc-activated genes with a correlation method: Detection of global changes in large gene expression network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Remondini, D.; O'Connell, B.; Intrator, N.; Sedivy, J. M.; Neretti, N.; Castellani, G. C.; Cooper, L. N.

    2005-01-01

    This work studies the dynamics of a gene expression time series network. The network, which is obtained from the correlation of gene expressions, exhibits global dynamic properties that emerge after a cell state perturbation. The main features of this network appear to be more robust when compared with those obtained with a network obtained from a linear Markov model. In particular, the network properties strongly depend on the exact time sequence relationships between genes and are destroyed by random temporal data shuffling. We discuss in detail the problem of finding targets of the c-myc protooncogene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator whose inappropriate expression has been correlated with a wide array of malignancies. The data used for network construction are a time series of gene expression, collected by microarray analysis of a rat fibroblast cell line expressing a conditional Myc-estrogen receptor oncoprotein. We show that the correlation-based model can establish a clear relationship between network structure and the cascade of c-myc-activated genes. PMID:15867157

  12. Activity-dependent regulation of genes implicated in X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Boda, B; Mas, C; Muller, D

    2002-01-01

    X-linked forms of non-specific mental retardation are complex disorders, for which mutations in several genes have recently been identified. These include OPHN1, GDI1, PAK3, IL1RAPL, TM4SF2, FMR2 and RSK2. To investigate the mechanisms through which alterations of these gene products could result in cognitive impairment, we analyzed their expression using quantitative PCR technique in two in vitro models of activity-dependent gene regulation: kainate-induced seizures and long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). We found that the level of expression of four genes, PAK3, IL1RAPL, RSK2 and TM4SF2, was significantly up-regulated following kainate treatment. Furthermore we observed a significant increase in mRNA levels of PAK3 and IL1RAPL following LTP induction. These results suggest a possible role for these four genes in activity-dependent brain plasticity.

  13. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  14. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications.

  15. Intricate regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1996-08-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Therefore, the regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme number and intrinsic enzyme activity represents the central means for controlling the synthesis of these important biogenic amines. An intricate scheme has evolved whereby tyrosine hydroxylase activity is modulated by nearly every documented form of regulation. Beginning with the genomic DNA, evidence exists for the transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels, alternative RNA processing, and the regulation of RNA stability. There is also experimental support for the role of both translational control and enzyme stability in establishing steady-state levels of active tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Finally, mechanisms have been proposed for feedback inhibition of the enzyme by catecholamine products, allosteric modulation of enzyme activity, and phosphorylation-dependent activation of the enzyme by various different kinase systems. Given the growing literature suggesting that different tissues regulate tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels and activity in different ways, regulatory mechanisms provide not only redundancy but also diversity in the control of catecholamine biosynthesis.

  16. Screening for novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation with cell microarray.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linjie; Wang, Pingzhang; Guo, Jinhai; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Fu, Dongxu; Gao, Xia; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2007-07-01

    In this study, cell microarray technology is used to identify novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation. By reverse transfection, expression plasmids containing full-length cDNAs were cotransfected with the reporter plasmid pCRE-d2EGFP to monitor the activation of the CRE pathway via enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression. Of the 575 predominantly novel genes screened, 22 exhibited relatively higher EGFP fluorescence compared with a negative control. After a functional validation with a dual luciferase reporter system that included both cis- and trans-luciferase assays, 4 of the 22 genes (RNF41, C8orf32, C6orf208, and MEIS3P1) were confirmed as CRE-pathway activators. Western blot analysis revealed that RNF41 can promote CREB phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the successful combination of cell microarray technology with this reporting system and the potential of this tool to characterize functions of novel genes in a highly parallel format.

  17. The evolution of drug-activated nuclear receptors: one ancestral gene diverged into two xenosensor genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Handschin, Christoph; Blättler, Sharon; Roth, Adrian; Looser, Renate; Oscarson, Mikael; Kaufmann, Michel R; Podvinec, Michael; Gnerre, Carmela; Meyer, Urs A

    2004-01-01

    Background Drugs and other xenobiotics alter gene expression of cytochromes P450 (CYP) by activating the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in mammals. In non-mammalian species, only one xenosensor gene has been found. Using chicken as a model organism, the aim of our study was to elucidate whether non-mammalian species only have one or two xenosensors like mammals. Results To explore the evolutionary aspect of this divergence, we tried to identify additional xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptors in chicken using various experimental approaches. However, none of those revealed novel candidates. Ablation of chicken xenobiotic receptor (CXR) function by RNAi or dominant-negative alleles drastically reduced drug-induction in a chicken hepatoma cell line. Subsequently, we functionally and structurally characterized CXR and compared our results to PXR and CAR. Despite the high similarity in their amino acid sequence, PXR and CAR have very distinct modes of activation. Some aspects of CXR function, e.g. direct ligand activation and high promiscuity are very reminiscent of PXR. On the other hand, cellular localization studies revealed common characteristics of CXR and CAR in terms of cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution. Finally, CXR has unique properties regarding its regulation in comparison to PXR and CAR. Conclusion Our finding thus strongly suggest that CXR constitutes an ancestral gene which has evolved into PXR and CAR in mammals. Future studies should elucidate the reason for this divergence in mammalian versus non-mammalian species. PMID:15479477

  18. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  19. Active and inactive genes localize preferentially in the periphery of chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The intranuclear position of a set of genes was analyzed with respect to the territories occupied by the whole chromosomes in which these genes are localized. Genes and their respective chromosome territories were simultaneously visualized in three-dimensionally preserved nuclei applying dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Three coding (DMD, MYH7, and HBB) and two noncoding sequences (D1Z2 and an anonymous sequence) were analyzed in four different cell types, including cells where DMD and MYH7 are actively transcribed. Spatial analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the genes are preferentially located in the periphery of chromosome territories. This positioning was independent from the activity of the genes. In contrast, the non-expressed anonymous fragment was found randomly distributed or localized preferentially in the interior of the corresponding chromosome territory. Furthermore, the distribution of the analyzed genes within the territorial peripheries was found to be highly characteristic for each gene, and, again, independent from its expression. The impact of these findings with regard to the three- dimensional arrangement of the linear DNA string within chromosome territories, as well as with respect to a putative nuclear subcompartment confining gene expression, are discussed. PMID:8947544

  20. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  1. Modulation of activation-associated host cell gene expression by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Zeeshan; Weir, William; Pillai, Sreerekha; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Infection of bovine leucocytes by Theileria annulata results in establishment of transformed, infected cells. Infection of the host cell is known to promote constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory transcription factors that have the potential to be beneficial or detrimental. In this study we have compared the effect of LPS activation on uninfected bovine leucocytes (BL20 cells) and their Theileria-infected counterpart (TBL20). Gene expression profiles representing activated uninfected BL20 relative to TBL20 cells were also compared. The results show that while prolonged stimulation with LPS induces cell death and activation of NF-κB in BL20 cells, the viability of Theileria-infected cells was unaffected. Analysis of gene expression networks provided evidence that the parasite establishes tight control over pathways associated with cellular activation by modulating reception of extrinsic stimuli and by significantly altering the expression outcome of genes targeted by infection-activated transcription factors. Pathway analysis of the data set identified novel candidate genes involved in manipulation of cellular functions associated with the infected transformed cell. The data indicate that the T. annulata parasite can irreversibly reconfigure host cell gene expression networks associated with development of inflammatory disease and cancer to generate an outcome thatis beneficial to survival and propagation of the infected leucocyte. PMID:22533473

  2. Physical activity-associated gene expression signature in nonhuman primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Leak, Rehana K; Garbett, Krassimira; Zigmond, Michael J; Cameron, Judy L; Mirnics, Károly

    2012-03-01

    It has been established that weight gain and weight loss are heavily influenced by activity level. In this study, we hypothesized that the motor cortex exhibits a distinct physical activity-associated gene expression profile, which may underlie changes in weight associated with movement. Using DNA microarrays we profiled gene expression in the motor cortex of a group of 14 female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with a wide range of stable physical activity levels. We found that neuronal growth factor signaling and nutrient sensing transcripts in the brain were highly correlated with physical activity. A follow-up of AKT3 expression changes (a gene at the apex of neuronal survival and nutrient sensing) revealed increased protein levels of total AKT, phosphorylated AKT, and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), one of AKT's main downstream effectors. In addition, we successfully validated three other genes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (cereblon (CRBN), origin recognition complex subunit 4-like, and pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4)). We conclude that these genes are important in the physical activity-associated pathway in the motor cortex, and may be critical for physical activity-associated changes in body weight and neuroprotection.

  3. Evolution of the perlecan/HSPG2 gene and its activation in regenerating Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Curtis R; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene's conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan's expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing.

  4. ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-β and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Andreas; Salway, Fiona; Dressman, Holly K; Kröner-Lux, Gabriele; Hafner, Mathias; Day, Philip JR; Marchuk, Douglas A; Garland, John

    2006-01-01

    Background TGF-β1 is an important angiogenic factor involved in the different aspects of angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. TGF-β signalling is mediated by the TβRII/ALK5 receptor complex activating the Smad2/Smad3 pathway. In endothelial cells TGF-β utilizes a second type I receptor, ALK1, activating the Smad1/Smad5 pathway. Consequently, a perturbance of ALK1, ALK5 or TβRII activity leads to vascular defects. Mutations in ALK1 cause the vascular disorder hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methods The identification of ALK1 and not ALK5 regulated genes in endothelial cells, might help to better understand the development of HHT. Therefore, the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 was infected with a recombinant constitutively active ALK1 adenovirus, and gene expression was studied by using gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results After 24 hours, 34 genes were identified to be up-regulated by ALK1 signalling. Analysing ALK1 regulated gene expression after 4 hours revealed 13 genes to be up- and 2 to be down-regulated. Several of these genes, including IL-8, ET-1, ID1, HPTPη and TEAD4 are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. Evaluation of ALK1 regulated gene expression in different human endothelial cell types was not in complete agreement. Further on, disparity between constitutively active ALK1 and TGF-β1 induced gene expression in HMEC-1 cells and primary HUVECs was observed. Conclusion Gene array analysis identified 49 genes to be regulated by ALK1 signalling and at least 14 genes are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. There was substantial agreement between the gene array and quantitative real-time PCR data. The angiogenesis related genes might be potential HHT modifier genes. In addition, the results suggest endothelial cell type specific ALK1 and TGF-β signalling. PMID:16594992

  5. Influence of redox-active compounds and PXR-activators on human MRP1 and MRP2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Hans Martin; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Zöller, Heike; Benz, Anke; Vorderstemann, Birgit; Webster, Jeanette I; Schrenk, Dieter

    2002-02-28

    In the present study, we investigated the inducibility of the drug conjugate transporter genes MRP1 and MRP2 by redox-active compounds such as tertiary butylated hydroquinone (tBHQ) and quercetin and by chemicals known to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as rifampicin and clotrimazol and by the metalloid compound arsenite. The human MRP2 gene was found to be inducible in HepG2 cells by rifampicin, clotrimazol, arsenite and tBHQ. As MRP1 expression is extremely low in HepG2 cells, its inducibility was studied in MCF-7 cells. However, only tBHQ and quercetin acted as inducers, but not the other compounds investigated. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that proximal promoter regions of the genes contribute to the induction by tBHQ, quercetin (MRP1) and clotrimazol (MRP2). However, the deletion of binding sites supposed to mediate the induction process (a PXR-binding element-like sequence for the clotrimazol effect and an ARE (antioxidative response element) for the tBHQ/quercetin effect) did not result in a significant decrease in the induction factor indicating that other parts of the promoter are probably involved in the induction process. In summary, expression of both genes can be up-regulated by redox-active compounds, while the other compounds tested induced only MRP2 but not MRP1 expression.

  6. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  7. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  8. Nostoc commune UTEX 584 gene expressing indole phosphate hydrolase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, W Q; Whitton, B A; Simon, J W; Jäger, K; Reed, D; Potts, M

    1989-01-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing indole phosphate was isolated from a recombinant gene library of Nostoc commune UTEX 584 DNA in lambda gt10. The gene (designated iph) is located on a 2.9-kilobase EcoRI restriction fragment and is present in a single copy in the genome of N. commune UTEX 584. The iph gene was expressed when the purified 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment, free of any vector sequences, was added to a cell-free coupled transcription-translation system. A polypeptide with an Mr of 74,000 was synthesized when the iph gene or different iph-vector DNA templates were expressed in vitro. When carried by different multicopy plasmids and phagemids (pMP005, pBH6, pB8) the cyanobacterial iph gene conferred an Iph+ phenotype upon various strains of Escherichia coli, including a phoA mutant. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate was detected in recombinant E. coli strains grown in phosphate-rich medium, and the activity persisted in assay buffers that contained phosphate. In contrast, indole phosphate hydrolase activity only developed in cells of N. commune UTEX 584, when they were partially depleted of phosphorus, and the activity associated with these cells was suppressed partially by the addition of phosphate to assay buffers. Indole phosphate hydrolase activity was detected in periplasmic extracts from E. coli (Iph+) transformants. Images PMID:2536677

  9. Epigenomic Modifications Predict Active Promoters and Gene Structure in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kelly, Krystyna A; Ajioka, James W; Greally, John M; Kim, Kami

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of gene regulation are poorly understood in Apicomplexa, a phylum that encompasses deadly human pathogens like Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Initial studies suggest that epigenetic phenomena, including histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, have a profound effect upon gene expression and expression of virulence traits. Using the model organism Toxoplasma gondii, we characterized the epigenetic organization and transcription patterns of a contiguous 1% of the T. gondii genome using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. We show that methylation and acetylation of histones H3 and H4 are landmarks of active promoters in T. gondii that allow us to deduce the position and directionality of gene promoters with >95% accuracy. These histone methylation and acetylation “activation” marks are strongly associated with gene expression. We also demonstrate that the pattern of histone H3 arginine methylation distinguishes certain promoters, illustrating the complexity of the histone modification machinery in Toxoplasma. By integrating epigenetic data, gene prediction analysis, and gene expression data from the tachyzoite stage, we illustrate feasibility of creating an epigenomic map of T. gondii tachyzoite gene expression. Further, we illustrate the utility of the epigenomic map to empirically and biologically annotate the genome and show that this approach enables identification of previously unknown genes. Thus, our epigenomics approach provides novel insights into regulation of gene expression in the Apicomplexa. In addition, with its compact genome, genetic tractability, and discrete life cycle stages, T. gondii provides an important new model to study the evolutionarily conserved components of the histone code. PMID:17559302

  10. UBA 1: an essential yeast gene encoding ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J P; Jentsch, S; Varshavsky, A

    1991-01-01

    All known functions of ubiquitin are mediated through its covalent attachment to other proteins. The post-translational formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is preceded by an ATP-requiring step in which the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin is adenylated and subsequently joined, through a thiolester bond, to a cysteine residue in the ubiquitin-activating enzyme, also known as E1. We report the isolation and functional analysis of the gene (UBA1) for the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. UBA1 encodes a 114 kd protein whose amino acid sequence contains motifs characteristic of nucleotide-binding sites. Expression of catalytically active UBA1 protein in E. coli, which lacks the ubiquitin system, confirmed that the yeast UBA1 gene encodes a ubiquitin-activating enzyme. Deletion of the UBA1 gene is lethal, demonstrating that the formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is essential for cell viability. Images PMID:1989885

  11. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  12. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  13. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  14. Hypermethylation of Wnt antagonist gene promoters and activation of Wnt pathway in myelodysplastic marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Masala, Erico; Valencia, Ana; Buchi, Francesca; Nosi, Daniele; Spinelli, Elena; Gozzini, Antonella; Sassolini, Francesca; Sanna, Alessandro; Zecchi, Sandra; Bosi, Alberto; Santini, Valeria

    2012-10-01

    We observed aberrant gene methylation of Wnt antagonists: sFRP1, sFRP2, sFRP4, sFRP5 and DKK1 in marrow cells of 55 MDS cases. Methylation of Wnt antagonist genes was associated with activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, consistent with the up-regulation of the Wnt downstream genes TCF1 and LEF1. Azacitidine exposure induced demethylation of Wnt-antagonist gene promoters and reduction of the non-phosphorylated β-catenin (NPBC) which is prevalent during Wnt pathway inactivation. Presence of ≥5% of bone marrow blasts was associated with methylation of sFRP1 and DKK1 and with methylation of more than two of the five Wnt antagonist genes.

  15. The New State of the Art: Cas9 for Gene Activation and Repression

    PubMed Central

    La Russa, Marie F.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has rapidly changed the landscape for how biologists and bioengineers study and manipulate the genome. Derived from the bacterial adaptive immune system, CRISPR-Cas9 has been coopted and repurposed for a variety of new functions, including the activation or repression of gene expression (termed CRISPRa or CRISPRi, respectively). This represents an exciting alternative to previously used repression or activation technologies such as RNA interference (RNAi) or the use of gene overexpression vectors. We have only just begun exploring the possibilities that CRISPR technology offers for gene regulation and the control of cell identity and behavior. In this review, we describe the recent advances of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for gene regulation and outline advantages and disadvantages of CRISPRa and CRISPRi (CRISPRa/i) relative to alternative technologies. PMID:26370509

  16. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  17. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound-induced gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2005-11-01

    Cultured human cervical cancer (HeLa) and rat mammary carcinoma (R3230Ac) cells were transfected with vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of hsp70B promoter. Aliquots of 10-μl transfected cells (5×107 cells/ml) were placed in 0.2-ml thin-wall polymerase chain reaction tubes and exposed to 1.1-MHz high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at a peak negative pressure P-=2.68 MPa. By adjusting the duty cycle of the HIFU transducer, the cell suspensions were heated to a peak temperature from 50 to 70 °C in 1-10 s. Exposure dependent cell viability and gene activation were evaluated. For a 5-s HIFU exposure, cell viability dropped from 95% at 50 °C to 13% at 70 °C. Concomitantly, gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells increased from 4% at 50 °C to 41% at 70 °C. A similar trend was observed at 60 °C peak temperature as the exposure time increased from 1 to 5 s. Further increase of exposure duration to 10 s led to significantly reduced cell viability and lower overall gene activation in exposed cells. Altogether, maximum HIFU-induced gene activation was achieved at 60 °C in 5 s. Under these experimental conditions, HIFU-induced gene activation was found to be produced primarily by thermal rather than mechanical stresses.

  19. A trypanosome metacyclic VSG gene promoter with two functionally distinct, life cycle stage-specific activities.

    PubMed

    Graham, S V; Wymer, B; Barry, J D

    1998-04-15

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), continual switching of which allows evasion of the host immune response. Bloodstream VSG genes are transcribed from polycistronic bloodstream expression sites with promoters which are located 45-60 kb upstream. These promoters are not exclusively stage-regulated, being active in the insect midgut stage where VSG is not expressed. However, the metacyclic VSG (M-VSG) genes, a small subset activated when VSG synthesis begins in the metacyclic stage in the tsetse fly salivary glands, are transcriptionally activated specifically in that stage from promoters <3 kb upstream. Using deletion mapping and transient transfection, we show that the entire 1.22 M-VSG gene promoter region (171 bp) is required for full activity in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. However, a subsidiary, bloodstream stage-specific activity is present in its 5' half which directs transcription initiation very close to the initiation site used in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. Our results imply that the M-VSG gene promoter is longer and more complex than other VSG gene promoters.

  20. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  1. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  2. Screening of the Enterocin-Encoding Genes and Antimicrobial Activity in Enterococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Mayara Baptistucci; Rocha, Katia Real; Terra, MÁrcia Regina; Furlaneto, MÁrcia Cristina; Maia, Luciana Furlaneto

    2016-06-28

    In the current study, a total of 135 enterococci strains from different sources were screened for the presence of the enterocin-encoding genes entA, entP, entB, entL50A, and entL50B. The enterocin genes were present at different frequencies, with entA occurring the most frequently, followed by entP and entB; entL50A and L50B were not detected. The occurrence of single enterocin genes was higher than the occurrence of multiple enterocin gene combinations. The 80 isolates that harbor at least one enterocin-encoding gene (denoted "Gene(+) strains") were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 82.5% of the Gene(+) strains inhibited at least one of the indicator strains, and the isolates harboring multiple enterocin-encoding genes inhibited a larger number of indicator strains than isolates harboring a single gene. The indicator strains that exhibited growth inhibition included Listeria innocua strain CLIP 12612 (ATCC BAA-680), Listeria monocytogenes strain CDC 4555, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 6538, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella typhimurium strain UK-1 (ATCC 68169), and Escherichia coli BAC 49LT ETEC. Inhibition due to either bacteriophage lysis or cytolysin activity was excluded. The growth inhibition of antilisterial Gene+ strains was further tested under different culture conditions. Among the culture media formulations, the MRS agar medium supplemented with 2% (w/v) yeast extract was the best solidified medium for enterocin production. Our findings extend the current knowledge of enterocin-producing enterococci, which may have potential applications as biopreservatives in the food industry due to their capability of controlling food spoilage pathogens.

  3. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Anne-Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T.; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Demenais, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Methods Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay—Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. Results One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Conclusions Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits. PMID:27334786

  4. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Challis, Gregory L; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-11-17

    Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one-vemR-that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP-binding LuxR-like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co-expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin-producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases.

  5. Organization of human ACAT-2 gene and its cell-type-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Song, B L; Qi, W; Yang, X Y; Chang, C C; Zhu, J Q; Chang, T Y; Li, B L

    2001-03-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) plays important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Two ACAT genes exist in mammals. We report here the genomic organization of human ACAT-2 gene and analysis of its promoter activity in various cell lines. The human ACAT-2 gene spans over 18 kb and contains 15 exons. Three transcription start sites and one poly(A) site are identified by the 5'/3'-RACE. In addition, the human ACAT-2 gene is linked to the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) gene in a head-to-tail manner with a small intergenic region of about 1.2 kb. The 5'-flanking region of human ACAT-2 gene contains many potential cis-acting elements for multiple transcriptional regulatory factors but lacks TATA and CCAAT boxes. Using promoter-luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrate the transcriptional activity of ACAT-2 gene promoter is high in Caco-2 cells, especially after these cells become postconfluent and behave as intestinal enterocytes.

  6. Genome-wide distribution of Auts2 binding localizes with active neurodevelopmental genes.

    PubMed

    Oksenberg, N; Haliburton, G D E; Eckalbar, W L; Oren, I; Nishizaki, S; Murphy, K; Pollard, K S; Birnbaum, R Y; Ahituv, N

    2014-09-02

    The autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) has been associated with multiple neurological diseases including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Previous studies showed that AUTS2 has an important neurodevelopmental function and is a suspected master regulator of genes implicated in ASD-related pathways. However, the regulatory role and targets of Auts2 are not well known. Here, by using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing) and RNA-seq on mouse embryonic day 16.5 forebrains, we elucidated the gene regulatory networks of Auts2. We find that the majority of promoters bound by Auts2 belong to genes highly expressed in the developing forebrain, suggesting that Auts2 is involved in transcriptional activation. Auts2 non-promoter-bound regions significantly overlap developing brain-associated enhancer marks and are located near genes involved in neurodevelopment. Auts2-marked sequences are enriched for binding site motifs of neurodevelopmental transcription factors, including Pitx3 and TCF3. In addition, we characterized two functional brain enhancers marked by Auts2 near NRXN1 and ATP2B2, both ASD-implicated genes. Our results implicate Auts2 as an active regulator of important neurodevelopmental genes and pathways and identify novel genomic regions that could be associated with ASD and other neurodevelopmental diseases.

  7. Different chromatin structures along the spacers flanking active and inactive Xenopus rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, R; Sogo, J M

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin to psoralen was assayed to compare the chromatin structure of the rRNA coding and spacer regions of the two related frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. Isolated nuclei from tissue culture cells were photoreacted with psoralen, and the extent of cross-linking in the different rDNA regions was analyzed by using a gel retardation assay. In both species, restriction fragments from the coding regions showed two distinct extents of cross-linking, indicating the presence of two types of chromatin, one that contains nucleosomes and represents the inactive gene copies, and the other one which is more cross-linked and corresponds to the transcribed genes. A similar cross-linking pattern was obtained with restriction fragments from the enhancer region. Analysis of fragments including these sequences and the upstream portions of the genes suggests that active genes are preceded by nonnucleosomal enhancer regions. The spacer regions flanking the 3' end of the genes gave different results in the two frog species. In X. borealis, all these sequences are packaged in nucleosomes, whereas in X. laevis a distinct fraction, presumably those flanking the active genes, show a heterogeneous chromatin structure. This disturbed nucleosomal organization correlates with the presence of a weaker terminator at the 3' end of the X. laevis genes compared with those of X. borealis, which allows polymerases to transcribe into the downstream spacer. Images PMID:1406621

  8. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez‐Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Al‐Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one—vemR—that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP‐binding LuxR‐like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co‐expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin‐producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases. PMID:27605017

  9. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  10. ERK signaling pathway regulates sleep duration through activity-induced gene expression during wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Cyril; Vaucher, Angélique; Jimenez, Sonia; Tafti, Mehdi

    2017-01-24

    Wakefulness is accompanied by experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and an increase in activity-regulated gene transcription. Wake-induced genes are certainly markers of neuronal activity and may also directly regulate the duration of and need for sleep. We stimulated murine cortical cultures with the neuromodulatory signals that are known to control wakefulness in the brain and found that norepinephrine alone or a mixture of these neuromodulators induced activity-regulated gene transcription. Pharmacological inhibition of the various signaling pathways involved in the regulation of gene expression indicated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is the principal one mediating the effects of waking neuromodulators on gene expression. In mice, ERK phosphorylation in the cortex increased and decreased with wakefulness and sleep. Whole-body or cortical neuron-specific deletion of Erk1 or Erk2 significantly increased the duration of wakefulness in mice, and pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation decreased sleep duration and increased the duration of wakefulness bouts. Thus, this signaling pathway, which is highly conserved from Drosophila to mammals, is a key pathway that links waking experience-induced neuronal gene expression to sleep duration and quality.

  11. Differential activation of virulence gene expression by PrfA, the Listeria monocytogenes virulence regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, B; Klarsfeld, A; Msadek, T; Cossart, P

    1995-01-01

    PrfA is a pleiotropic activator of virulence gene expression in the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Several lines of evidence have suggested that a hierarchy of virulence gene activation by PrfA exists. This hypothesis was investigated by assessing the ability of PrfA to activate the expression of virulence gene fusions to lacZ in Bacillus subtilis. Expression of PrfA in this heterologous host was sufficient for activation of transcription at the hly, plcA, mpl, and actA promoters. Activation was most efficient at the divergently transcribed hly and plcA promoters. The putative PrfA binding site shared by these promoters is perfectly symmetrical and appears to represent the optimum sequence for target gene activation by PrfA. The activation of actA and mpl expression was considerably weaker and occurred more slowly than that observed at the hly and plcA promoters, suggesting that greater quantities of PrfA are required for productive interaction at these promoters. Interestingly, expression of an inlA-lacZ transcriptional fusion was very poorly activated by PrfA in B. subtilis, suggesting that other Listeria factors, in addition to PrfA, are required for PrfA-mediated activation at this promoter. Further support for the involvement of such factors was obtained by constructing and analyzing a prfA deletion mutant of L. monocytogenes. We observed that, in contrast to that of the other genes of the PrfA regulon, expression of inlA is only partially dependent on PrfA. PMID:7592422

  12. Identification of the nik Gene Cluster of Brucella suis: Regulation and Contribution to Urease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Rodrigue, Agnès; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Layssac, Marion; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Köhler, Stephan; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of a Brucella suis 1330 gene fused to a gfp reporter, and identified as being induced in J774 murine macrophage-like cells, allowed the isolation of a gene homologous to nikA, the first gene of the Escherichia coli operon encoding the specific transport system for nickel. DNA sequence analysis of the corresponding B. suis nik locus showed that it was highly similar to that of E. coli except for localization of the nikR regulatory gene, which lies upstream from the structural nikABCDE genes and in the opposite orientation. Protein sequence comparisons suggested that the deduced nikABCDE gene products belong to a periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system. The nikA promoter-gfp fusion was activated in vitro by low oxygen tension and metal ion deficiency and was repressed by NiCl2 excess. Insertional inactivation of nikA strongly reduced the activity of the nickel metalloenzyme urease, which was restored by addition of a nickel excess. Moreover, the nikA mutant of B. suis was functionally complemented with the E. coli nik gene cluster, leading to the recovery of urease activity. Reciprocally, an E. coli strain harboring a deleted nik operon recovered hydrogenase activity by heterologous complementation with the B. suis nik locus. Taking into account these results, we propose that the nik locus of B. suis encodes a nickel transport system. The results further suggest that nickel could enter B. suis via other transport systems. Intracellular growth rates of the B. suis wild-type and nikA mutant strains in human monocytes were similar, indicating that nikA was not essential for this step of infection. We discuss a possible role of nickel transport in maintaining enzymatic activities which could be crucial for survival of the bacteria under the environmental conditions encountered within the host. PMID:11133934

  13. Gyrase activity and number of copies of the gyrase B subunit gene in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, E; Setlow, J K

    1985-01-01

    Gyrase activities in extracts of various strains of Haemophilus influenzae can differ by more than an order of magnitude (J. K. Setlow, E. Cabrera-Juárez, W. L. Albritton, D. Spikes, and A. Mutschler, J. Bacteriol. 164:525-534, 1985). Measurements of in vitro activity and copy number indicated that most of these differences arose from variations in the number of copies of the gene for the gyrase B subunit, with some strains containing multicopy plasmids coding for that subunit. The quantitative relationship between gyrase and copy number depended on the mutations in the plasmids and in the host. The gyrase and copy number were considerably lower in plasmid-bearing strains carrying the prophage HP1c1. Two mutations affecting gyrase that are apparently regulatory caused an increase in gyrase without a concomitant increase in copy number. The possibility that the in vivo gyrase activity did not reflect the in vitro data was explored by measurement of alkaline phosphatase and ATPase activity in the extracts. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with increasing gyrase activity measured in vitro, but ATPase activity did not. We conclude that extra supercoiling enhanced transcription of the alkaline phosphatase gene but not the ATPase gene and that it is unlikely that there is much discrepancy between gyrase activity assayed in vitro and the activity in the cell. PMID:2997116

  14. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  15. Inhibiting AP-1 activity alters cocaine induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Paletzki, Ronald F.; Myakishev, Max V.; Polesskaya, Oksana; Orosz, Andras; Hyman, Steven E.; Vinson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of AP-1 DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observe normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral responses to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 hours after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 hours following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 hours after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. 56 gene are down regulated while 28 genes are up regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including BDNF and Per1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared to human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  16. Child dopamine active transporter 1 genotype and parenting: evidence for evocative gene-environment correlations.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Hanna, Brigitte; Sheikh, Haroon I; Laptook, Rebecca S; Kim, Jiyon; Singh, Shiva M; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-02-01

    The dopamine active transporter 1 (DAT1) gene is implicated in psychopathology risk. Although the processes by which this gene exerts its effects on risk are poorly understood, a small body of research suggests that the DAT1 gene influences early emerging negative emotionality, a marker of children's psychopathology risk. As child negative emotionality evokes negative parenting practices, the DAT1 gene may also play a role in gene-environment correlations. To test this model, children (N = 365) were genotyped for the DAT1 gene and participated in standardized parent-child interaction tasks with their primary caregiver. The DAT1 gene 9-repeat variant was associated with child negative affect expressed toward the parent during parent-child interactions, and parents of children with a 9-repeat allele exhibited more hostility and lower guidance/engagement than parents of children without a 9-repeat allele. These gene-environment associations were partially mediated by child negative affect toward the parent. The findings implicate a specific polymorphism in eliciting negative parenting, suggesting that evocative associations play a role in elevating children's risk for emotional trajectories toward psychopathology risk.

  17. SWI/SNF enzymes promote SOX10- mediated activation of myelin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Himangi G; Mehta, Gaurav; Zhang, Xiaolu; Datar, Ila; Mehrotra, Aanchal; Yeung, Kam C; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-01-01

    SOX10 is a Sry-related high mobility (HMG)-box transcriptional regulator that promotes differentiation of neural crest precursors into Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, and melanocytes. Myelin, formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, is essential for propagation of nerve impulses. SWI/SNF complexes are ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that are critical for cellular differentiation. It was recently demonstrated that the BRG1 subunit of SWI/SNF complexes activates SOX10 expression and also interacts with SOX10 to activate expression of OCT6 and KROX20, two transcriptional regulators of Schwann cell differentiation. To determine the requirement for SWI/SNF enzymes in the regulation of genes that encode components of myelin, which are downstream of these transcriptional regulators, we introduced SOX10 into fibroblasts that inducibly express dominant negative versions of the SWI/SNF ATPases, BRM or BRG1. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 have mutations in the ATP binding site and inhibit gene activation events that require SWI/SNF function. Ectopic expression of SOX10 in cells derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to the activation of the endogenous Schwann cell specific gene, myelin protein zero (MPZ) and the gene that encodes myelin basic protein (MBP). Thus, SOX10 reprogrammed these cells into myelin gene expressing cells. Ectopic expression of KROX20 was not sufficient for activation of these myelin genes. However, KROX20 together with SOX10 synergistically activated MPZ and MBP expression. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 abrogated SOX10 mediated activation of MPZ and MBP and synergistic activation of these genes by SOX10 and KROX20. SOX10 was required to recruit BRG1 to the MPZ locus. Similarly, in immortalized Schwann cells, BRG1 recruitment to SOX10 binding sites at the MPZ locus was dependent on SOX10 and expression of dominant negative BRG1 inhibited expression of MPZ and MBP in these cells. Thus, SWI/SNF enzymes cooperate with SOX10 to

  18. Customized Regulation of Diverse Stress Response Genes by the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Activator MarA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Stress response networks frequently have a single upstream regulator that controls many downstream genes. However, the downstream targets are often diverse, therefore it remains unclear how their expression is specialized when under the command of a common regulator. To address this, we focused on a stress response network where the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA from Escherichia coli regulates diverse targets ranging from small RNAs to efflux pumps. Using single-cell experiments and computational modeling, we showed that each downstream gene studied has distinct activation, noise, and information transmission properties. Critically, our results demonstrate that understanding biological context is essential; we found examples where strong activation only occurs outside physiologically relevant ranges of MarA and others where noise is high at wild type MarA levels and decreases as MarA reaches its physiological limit. These results demonstrate how a single regulatory protein can maintain specificity while orchestrating the response of many downstream genes. PMID:28060821

  19. Customized Regulation of Diverse Stress Response Genes by the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Activator MarA.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicholas A; Dunlop, Mary J

    2017-01-01

    Stress response networks frequently have a single upstream regulator that controls many downstream genes. However, the downstream targets are often diverse, therefore it remains unclear how their expression is specialized when under the command of a common regulator. To address this, we focused on a stress response network where the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA from Escherichia coli regulates diverse targets ranging from small RNAs to efflux pumps. Using single-cell experiments and computational modeling, we showed that each downstream gene studied has distinct activation, noise, and information transmission properties. Critically, our results demonstrate that understanding biological context is essential; we found examples where strong activation only occurs outside physiologically relevant ranges of MarA and others where noise is high at wild type MarA levels and decreases as MarA reaches its physiological limit. These results demonstrate how a single regulatory protein can maintain specificity while orchestrating the response of many downstream genes.

  20. Gene deregulation and chronic activation in natural killer cells deficient in the transcription factor ETS1.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kevin; Chandler, Katherine J; Spaulding, Christina; Zandi, Sasan; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Graves, Barbara J; Kee, Barbara L

    2012-06-29

    Multiple transcription factors guide the development of mature functional natural killer (NK) cells, yet little is known about their function. We used global gene expression and genome-wide binding analyses combined with developmental and functional studies to unveil three roles for the ETS1 transcription factor in NK cells. ETS1 functions at the earliest stages of NK cell development to promote expression of critical transcriptional regulators including T-BET and ID2, NK cell receptors (NKRs) including NKp46, Ly49H, and Ly49D, and signaling molecules essential for NKR function. As a consequence, Ets1(-/-) NK cells fail to degranulate after stimulation through activating NKRs. Nonetheless, these cells are hyperresponsive to cytokines and have characteristics of chronic stimulation including increased expression of inhibitory NKRs and multiple activation-associated genes. Therefore, ETS1 regulates a broad gene expression program in NK cells that promotes target cell recognition while limiting cytokine-driven activation.

  1. Gene activation properties of a mouse DNA sequence isolated by expression selection.

    PubMed Central

    von Hoyningen-Huene, V; Norbury, C; Griffiths, M; Fried, M

    1986-01-01

    The MES-1 element was previously isolated from restricted total mouse cellular DNA by "expression selection"--the ability to reactivate expression of a test gene devoid of its 5' enhancer sequences. Mes-1 has been tested in long-term transformation and short-term CAT expression assays. In both assays MES-1 is active independent of orientation and at a distance when placed 5' to the test gene. The element is active with heterologous promoters and functions efficiently in both rat and mouse cells. MES-1 activates expression by increasing transcription from the test gene's own start (cap) site. Thus the expression selection technique can be used for the isolation of DNA sequences with enhancer-like properties from total cellular DNA. Images PMID:3016657

  2. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  3. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-12-26

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale.

  4. Changes in cathepsin gene expression and relative enzymatic activity during gilthead sea bream oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, O; Cionna, C; Tosti, L; Cerdà, J; Gioacchini, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence on the modulation of lysosomal enzymes in terms of both gene expression and enzymatic activity during follicle maturation. For this purpose three lysosomal enzymes, cathepsins B, D, and L, were studied in relation to yolk formation and degradation, during the main phases of ovarian follicle growth in the pelagophil species, the sea bream Sparus aurata. Specific attention was focused on the gene expression quantification method, on the assay of enzymatic activities, and on the relationship between the proteolytic cleavage of yolk proteins (YPs), cathepsin gene expression and cathepsin activities. For the gene expression study, the cathepsins B-like and L-like mRNAs were isolated and partially or fully characterized, respectively; the sequences were used as design specific primers for the quantification of cathepsin gene expression by real-time PCR, in follicles at different stages of maturation. The enzymatic assays for cathepsins B, D, and L were optimized in terms of specificity, sensitivity and reliability, using specific substrates and inhibitors. In ovulated eggs, the lipovitellin I (LV I) was degraded and the changes in electrophoretic pattern were preceded by an increase in the activity of a cysteine proteinase, cathepsin L, and its mRNA. Cathepsin B did not appear to be involved in YP changes during the final maturation stage.

  5. Characterization of human TCR Vbeta gene promoter. Role of the dodecamer motif in promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Sun, G R; Zheng, Q; Li, Y

    1998-09-11

    During T-lymphocyte development, the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) gene expression is controlled by its promoter and enhancer elements and regulated in tissue- and development stage-specific manner. To uncover the promoter function and to define positive and negative regulatory elements in TCR gene promoters, the promoter activities from 13 human TCR Vbeta genes were determined by the transient transfection system and luciferase reporter assay. Although most of the TCR Vbeta gene promoters that we tested are inactive by themselves, some promoters were found to be constitutively strong. Among them, Vbeta6.7 is the strongest. 5'-Deletion and fragmentation experiments have narrowed the full promoter activity of Vbeta6.7 to a fragment of 147 base pairs immediately 5' to the transcription initiation site. A decanucleotide motif with the consensus sequence AGTGAYRTCA has been found to be conserved in most TCR Vbeta gene promoters. There are three such decamer motifs in the promoter region of Vbeta6.7, and the contribution of each such motif to the promoter activity has been examined. Further site-directed mutagenesis analyses showed that: 1) when two Ts in the decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was totally abolished; 2) when two additional nucleotides 3' to the end of decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was decreased to two-thirds of the full level; and 3) when the element with the sequence AGTGATGTCACT was inserted into other promoters, the original weak promoters become very strong. Taken together, our data suggest that the positive regulatory element in Vbeta6.7 should be considered a dodecamer rather than a decamer and that it confers strong basal transcriptional activity on TCR Vbeta genes.

  6. Methylation of the mouse hprt gene differs on the active and inactive X chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, L F; Melton, D W; Caskey, C T; Martin, G R

    1986-01-01

    It has been proposed that DNA methylation is involved in the mechanism of X inactivation, the process by which equivalence of levels of X-linked gene products is achieved in female (XX) and male (XY) mammals. In this study, Southern blots of female and male DNA digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and hybridized to various portions of the cloned mouse hprt gene were compared, and sites within the mouse hprt gene were identified that are differentially methylated in female and male cells. The extent to which these sites are methylated when carried on the active and inactive X chromosomes was directly determined in a similar analysis of DNA from clonal cell lines established from a female embryo derived from a mating of two species of mouse, Mus musculus and Mus caroli. The results revealed two regions of differential methylation in the mouse hprt gene. One region, in the first intron of the gene, includes four sites that are completely unmethylated when carried on the active X and extensively methylated when carried on the inactive X. These same sites are extensively demethylated in hprt genes reactivated either spontaneously or after 5-azacytidine treatment. The second region includes several sites in the 3' 20kilobases of the gene extending from exon 3 to exon 9 that show the converse pattern; i.e., they are completely methylated when carried on the active X and completely unmethylated when carried on the inactive X. At least one of these sites does not become methylated after reactivation of the gene. The results of this study, together with the results of previous studies by others of the human hprt gene, indicate that these regions of differential methylation on the active and inactive X are conserved between mammalian species. Furthermore, the data described here are consistent with the idea that at least the sites in the 5' region of the gene play a role in the X inactivation phenomenon and regulation of expression of the mouse hprt

  7. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  8. Identification and characterization of genes related to cellulolytic activity in basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Volpini, A F N; Thomazine, T; Umeo, S H; Pereira, G A; Linde, G A; Valle, J S; Colauto, N B; Barcellos, F G; Souza, S G H

    2016-09-16

    Enzymes produced by basidiomycetes that are involved in the cellulose degradation process, and their respective codifying genes, must be identified to facilitate the development of novel biotechnological strategies and applications in the agro-industry. The objective of this study was to identify prospective cellulase-producing genes and characterize their cellulolytic activity, in order to elucidate the potential biotechnological applications (with respect to vegetal residues) of basidiomycetes. The basidiomycete strains Lentinula edodes U8-1, Lentinus crinitus U9-1, and Schizophyllum commune U6-7 were analyzed in this study. The cellulolytic activities of these fungi were evaluated based on the halo formation in carboxymethyl cellulose culture medium after dyeing with Congo red. The presence of cellulase-codifying genes (cel7A, cel6B, cel3A, and egl) in these fungal strains was also evaluated. L. edodes and S. commune presented the highest cellulolytic halo to mycelial growth radius ratio, followed by L. crinitus. Four genes were amplified in the L. edodes strain, whereas three and one genes were isolated from L. crinitus and S. commune, respectively. The cel6B gene (L. edodes) presented the conserved domain glyco_hydro_6 and characterized as cellobiohydrolase gene. The results of this study contribute to the existing knowledge on cellulases in basidiomycetes, and serve as a basis for future studies on the expression of these genes and the characterization of the catalytic activity of these enzymes. This allows for better utilization of these fungi in degrading vegetal fibers from agro-industrial residues and in other biotechnological applications.

  9. Heterogeneous activation of a slow myosin gene in proliferating myoblasts and differentiated single myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-hua; Wang, Qiao-jing; Wang, Chao; Reinholt, Brad; Grant, Alan L; Gerrard, David E; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Each skeletal muscle contains a fixed ratio of fast and slow myofibers that are distributed in a stereotyped pattern to achieve a specific motor function. How myofibers are specified during development and regeneration is poorly understood. Here we address this question using transgenic reporter mice that indelibly mark the myofiber lineages based on activation of fast or slow myosin. Lineage tracing indicates that during development all muscles have activated the fast myosin gene Myl1, but not the slow myosin gene Myh7, which is activated in all slow but a subset of fast myofibers. Similarly, most nascent myofibers do not activate Myh7 during fast muscle regeneration, but the ratio and pattern of fast and slow myofibers are restored at the completion of regeneration. At the single myofiber level, most mature fast myofibers are heterogeneous in nuclear composition, manifested by mosaic activation of Myh7. Strikingly, Myh7 is activated in a subpopulation of proliferating myoblasts that co-express the myogenic progenitor marker Pax7. When induced to differentiate, the Myh7-activated myoblasts differentiate more readily than the non-activated myoblasts, and have a higher tendency, but not restricted, to become slow myotubes. Together, our data reveal significant nuclear heterogeneity within a single myofiber, and challenge the conventional view that myosin genes are only expressed after myogenic differentiation. These results provide novel insights into the regulation of muscle fiber type specification. PMID:25794679

  10. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  11. Repression of telomere-associated genes by microglia activation in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Uhlemann, Ria; Schöner, Johanna; Wegner, Stephanie; Boujon, Valérie; Deigendesch, Nikolas; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen

    2016-11-28

    Microglia senescence may promote neuropsychiatric disease. This prompted us to examine the relationship between microglia activation states and telomere biology. A panel of candidate genes associated with telomere maintenance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and cell-cycle regulation were investigated in M1- and M2-polarized microglia in vitro as well as in MACS-purified CD11b+ microglia/brain macrophages from models of stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic stress. M1 polarization, ischemia, and Alzheimer pathology elicited a strikingly similar transcriptomic profile with, in particular, reduced expression of murine Tert. Our results link classical microglia activation with repression of telomere-associated genes, suggesting a new mechanism underlying microglia dysfunction.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  13. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  14. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed.

  15. Genetic Characterization of the Homeodomain-Independent Activity of the Drosophila Fushi Tarazu Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Hyduk, D.; Percival-Smith, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gene product of fushi tarazu (FTZ) has a homeodomain (HD)-independent activity. Ectopic expression of a FTZ protein that lacks half the HD in embryos results in the anti-ftz phenotype. We have characterized this FTZ HD-independent activity further. Ectopic expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity, in the absence of FTZ activity expressed from the endogenous ftz gene, was sufficient to result in the anti-ftz phenotype. Since the anti-ftz phenotype is a first instar larvae composed nearly entirely of FTZ-dependent cuticular structures derived from the even-numbered parasegments, this result suggests that expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity is sufficient to establish FTZ-dependent cuticle. Activation of FTZ-dependent Engrailed (EN) expression and activation of the ftz enhancer were HD-independent. The ftz enhancer element, AE-1, was activated by the HD-independent FTZ activity; however, the ftz enhancer element, AE-BS2CCC, which is the same as AE-1 except for the inactivation of two FTZ HD DNA-binding sites, was not. Activation of the ftz enhancer by ectopic expression of FTZ activity was effective only during gastrulation and germ band extension. In the discussion, we propose an explanation for these results. PMID:8852847

  16. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  17. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Truong D; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R

    2015-07-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels.

  18. Computer-aided design of modular protein devices: Boolean AND gene activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salis, H.; Kaznessis, Y. N.

    2006-12-01

    Many potentially useful synthetic gene networks require the expression of an engineered gene if and only if two different DNA-binding proteins exist in sufficient concentration. While some natural and engineered systems activate gene expression according to a logical AND-like behavior, they often utilize allosteric or cooperative protein-protein interactions, rendering their components unsuitable for a toolbox of modular parts for use in multiple applications. Here, we develop a quantitative model to demonstrate that a small system of interacting fusion proteins, called a protein device, can activate an engineered gene according to the Boolean AND behavior while using only modular protein domains and DNA sites. The fusion proteins are created from transactivating, DNA-binding, non-DNA binding, and protein-protein interaction domains along with the corresponding peptide ligands. Using a combined kinetic and thermodynamic model, we identify the characteristics of the molecular components and their rates of constitutive production that maximize the fidelity of AND behavior. These AND protein devices facilitate the creation of complex genetic programs and may be used to create gene therapies, biosensors and other biomedical and biotechnological applications that turn on gene expression only when multiple DNA-binding proteins are simultaneously present.

  19. Structural requirements for the functional activity of a U1 snRNA gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, C H; Fan, Q N; Stumph, W E

    1993-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of a chicken U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) gene contains a GC-box, an octamer motif, and an SPH motif that are recognized by the transcription factors Sp1, Oct-1, and SBF respectively. Previous work indicated that the octamer and the SPH motifs were both required for U1 gene enhancer activity in frog oocytes when the U1 gene was coinjected with a competing snRNA gene template. Here we show that neither two copies of the octamer motif, nor two copies of the SPH motif, can effectively substitute for the natural combination of octamer and SPH. Furthermore, neither the octamer nor the SPH motif (in the absence of the other) functioned efficiently in combination with a GC-box. Alteration of the spacing between the octamer and SPH motifs also reduced U1 template activity. Several potential cis-acting elements other than the SPH motif, with one possible exception among those tested, were unable to cooperate with the octamer motif to effectively enhance U1 gene expression. These results indicate that rather stringent structural requirements exist with respect to the essential cis-acting motifs present in the U1 enhancer, possibly reflecting the unique properties of the transcription complexes assembled on snRNA gene promoters. Images PMID:8441636

  20. Patterns of Gene-Specific and Total Transcriptional Activity during the Plasmodium falciparum Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jennifer S.; Militello, Kevin T.; Sims, Peter A.; Patel, Vishal P.; Kasper, Jacob M.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among gene regulatory mechanisms in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum throughout its asexual intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) remain poorly understood. To investigate the level and nature of transcriptional activity and its role in controlling gene expression during the IDC, we performed nuclear run-on on whole-transcriptome samples from time points throughout the IDC and found a peak in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcriptional activity related to both the number of nuclei per parasite and variable transcriptional activity per nucleus over time. These differential total transcriptional activity levels allowed the calculation of the absolute transcriptional activities of individual genes from gene-specific nuclear run-on hybridization data. For half of the genes analyzed, sense-strand transcriptional activity peaked at the same time point as total activity. The antisense strands of several genes were substantially transcribed. Comparison of the transcriptional activity of the sense strand of each gene to its steady-state RNA abundance across the time points assayed revealed both correlations and discrepancies, implying transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such comparisons can effectively indicate gene regulatory mechanisms in P. falciparum and suggest that genes with diverse transcriptional activity levels and patterns combine to produce total transcriptional activity levels tied to parasite development during the IDC. PMID:19151330

  1. Diversity of laccase-like multicopper oxidase genes in Morchellaceae: identification of genes potentially involved in extracellular activities related to plant litter decay.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Buscot, François

    2007-07-01

    Despite the important role played by soil-inhabiting ascomycetes in plant litter decay processes, studies on the diversity and function of their laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO) genes are scarce. In the present work, the LMCO gene diversity in 15 strains representing nine Morchellaceae and one Discinaceae species was evaluated by PCR. One to six different genes were found within the species, representing 26 different sequence types. Cluster analysis revealed LMCO genes belonging to four main gene families encoding different protein classes (Class I-IV). To identify the genes related to extracellular activities and potentially involved in litter decay processes, liquid cultures were induced by different aromatic compounds. Morchella conica and Verpa conica showed the strongest LMCO activity enhancement in the presence of the naturally occurring phenolic compound guaiacol, and their expressed LMCO genes were identified by sequencing. Only genes belonging to the gene families encoding the Class II and III proteins were expressed. Both genes (Class II and III) of the mycorrhizal-like strain M. conica were exclusively expressed in the presence of guaiacol. In contrast to the saprotrophic strain V. conica, the gene encoding the Class III protein was constitutively expressed as it was also found in control cultures without guaiacol.

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene polymorphism in patients with gastric ulcer complicated with bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Soo; Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Moon-Ho; Kim, Sun-Joo; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) may be involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers through suppression of fibrinolysis. This study was designed to investigate associations of t-PA and PAI-1 genes with clinical features of the patients with bleeding gastric ulcers. Eighty-four patients with peptic ulcers and 100 controls were studied between January 1998 and April 2000. We used polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion to genotype for 4G/5G polymorphism in the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene and the Alurepeat insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron h of the t-PA gene. Various clinical features, including lesion site, bleeding event, recurrence of ulcer, and rebleeding, were assessed using a multiple logistic regression model. The genotype distributions of both the t-PA and PAI-1 genes did not differ between the patient and control groups. The occurrence of the I/D or D/D genotype of t-PA was significantly higher in cases of duodenal ulcer (adjusted OR=4.39, 95% CI=1.12-17.21). When a dominant effect (i.e., 4G/4G or 4G/5G versus 5G/5G) of the 4G allele was assumed, the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype was independently associated with rebleeding after hemostasis (adjusted OR=5.07, 95% CI=1.03-24.87). Our data suggest that t-PA gene polymorphism is associated with duodenal ulcers, and that the PAI-1 gene may be a risk factor leading to recurrent bleeding after initial hemostasis. PMID:12589088

  3. Mapping of Brain Activity by Automated Volume Analysis of Immediate Early Genes.

    PubMed

    Renier, Nicolas; Adams, Eliza L; Kirst, Christoph; Wu, Zhuhao; Azevedo, Ricardo; Kohl, Johannes; Autry, Anita E; Kadiri, Lolahon; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Victoria X; Tang, Cheuk Y; Olsen, Olav; Dulac, Catherine; Osten, Pavel; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-06-16

    Understanding how neural information is processed in physiological and pathological states would benefit from precise detection, localization, and quantification of the activity of all neurons across the entire brain, which has not, to date, been achieved in the mammalian brain. We introduce a pipeline for high-speed acquisition of brain activity at cellular resolution through profiling immediate early gene expression using immunostaining and light-sheet fluorescence imaging, followed by automated mapping and analysis of activity by an open-source software program we term ClearMap. We validate the pipeline first by analysis of brain regions activated in response to haloperidol. Next, we report new cortical regions downstream of whisker-evoked sensory processing during active exploration. Last, we combine activity mapping with axon tracing to uncover new brain regions differentially activated during parenting behavior. This pipeline is widely applicable to different experimental paradigms, including animal species for which transgenic activity reporters are not readily available.

  4. Controlling Hox gene expression and activity to build the vertebrate axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Casaca, Ana; Santos, Ana Cristina; Mallo, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that Hox genes are central players in patterning the vertebrate axial skeleton. Extensive genetic studies in the mouse have revealed that the combinatorial activity of Hox genes along the anterior-posterior body axis specifies different vertebral identities. In addition, Hox genes were instrumental for the evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate body plan. In this review, we focus on fundamental questions regarding the intricate mechanisms controlling Hox gene activity. In particular, we discuss the functional relevance of the precise timing of Hox gene activation in the embryo. Moreover, we provide insight into the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are likely to control this process and are responsible for the maintenance of spatially restricted Hox expression domains throughout embryonic development. We also analyze how specific features of each Hox protein may contribute to the functional diversity of Hox family. Altogether, the work reviewed here further supports the notion that the Hox program is far more complex than initially assumed. Exciting new findings will surely emerge in the years ahead.

  5. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Evolution of high cellulolytic activity in symbiotic Streptomyces through selection of expanded gene content and coordinated gene expression

    DOE PAGES

    Book, Adam J.; Lewin, Gina R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; ...

    2016-06-08

    In this study, the evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil andmore » symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.« less

  7. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Book, Adam J; Lewin, Gina R; McDonald, Bradon R; Takasuka, Taichi E; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F; Fox, Brian G; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.

  8. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  9. Keeping the blood flowing-plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Tellgren-Roth, Asa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A; Liberles, David A

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  10. Keeping the blood flowing—plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E.; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A.; Liberles, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  11. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  12. Structure-activity investigation on the gene transfection properties of cardiolipin mimicking gemini lipid analogues.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Avinash; Paul, Bishwajit; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2008-06-01

    A structure-activity relationship has been explored on the gene transfection efficiencies of cardiolipin mimicking gemini lipid analogues upon variation of length and hydrophilicity of the spacer between the cationic ammonium headgroups and lipid hydrocarbon chain lengths. All the gemini lipids were found to be highly superior in gene transfer abilities as compared to their monomeric lipid and a related commercially available formulation. Pseudoglyceryl gemini lipids bearing an oxyethylene (-CH2-(CH2-O-CH2)m-CH2-) spacer were found to be superior gene transfecting agents as compared to those bearing polymethylene (-CH2)m-) spacers. The major characteristic feature of the present set of gemini lipids is their serum compatibility, which is most often the major hurdle in liposome-mediated gene delivery.

  13. Genetic Organization of Plasmid ColJs, Encoding Colicin Js Activity, Immunity, and Release Genes

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Weinstock, George M.

    2001-01-01

    The 5.2-kb ColJs plasmid of a colicinogenic strain of Shigella sonnei (colicin type 7) was isolated and sequenced. pColJs was partly homologous to pColE1 and to pesticin-encoding plasmid pPCP1, mainly in the rep, mob, and cer regions. A 1.2-kb unique region of pColJs showed significantly different G+C content (34%) compared to the rest of pColJs (53%). Within the unique region, seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. ORF94 was shown to code for colicin Js activity (cja), a 94-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 10.4 kDa); ORF129 (cji) was shown to code for the 129-amino-acid colicin Js immunity protein (molecular mass, 14.3 kDa); and ORF65 was shown to be involved in colicin Js release by producer bacteria (cjl) coding for a 65-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 7.5 kDa). In contrast to the gene order in other colicin operons, the cjl gene was found upstream from cja. Moreover, the promoter upstream from cjl was similar to promoters described upstream from several colicin activity genes. The cji gene was found to be located downstream from cja with a transcription polarity opposite to that of the cjl and cja genes. The cja, cji, and cjl genes were not similar to other known colicin genes. Colicin Js was purified as an inactive fusion protein with an N-terminal histidine tag. Activity of the purified fusion form of colicin Js was restored after cleavage of the amino acids fused to the colicin Js N terminus. PMID:11395458

  14. Gene expression profiling of pituitary melanotrope cells during their physiological activation.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, Miyuki; van Bakel, Nick H M; Ramekers, Dyan; de Gouw, Daan; Neijts, Roel; Roubos, Eric W; Scheenen, Wim J J M; Martens, Gerard J M; Jenks, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    The pituitary melanotrope cells of the amphibian Xenopus laevis are responsible for the production of the pigment-dispersing peptide α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, which allows the animal to adapt its skin color to its environment. During adaptation to a dark background the melanotrope cells undergo remarkable changes characterized by dramatic increases in cell size and secretory activity. In this study we performed microarray mRNA expression profiling to identify genes important to melanotrope activation and growth. We show a strong increase in the expression of the immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos and of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF). Furthermore, we demonstrate the involvement of another IEG in the adaptation process, Nur77, and conclude from in vitro experiments that the expression of both c-Fos and Nur77 are partially regulated by the adenylyl cyclase system and calcium ions. In addition, we found a steady up-regulation of Ras-like product during the adaptation process, possibly evoked by BDNF/TrkB signaling. Finally, the gene encoding the 105-kDa heat shock protein HSPh1 was transiently up-regulated in the course of black-background adaptation and a gene product homologous to ferritin (ferritin-like product) was >100-fold up-regulated in fully black-adapted animals. We suggest that these latter two genes are induced in response to cellular stress and that they may be involved in changing the mode of mRNA translation required to meet the increased demand for de novo protein synthesis. Together, our results show that microarray analysis is a valuable approach to identify the genes responsible for generating coordinated responses in physiologically activated cells.

  15. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  16. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Caetano, Carlos; Fish, Richard J.; Kruithof, Egbert K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT) is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE) -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb). In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE) near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter. PMID:27973546

  17. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  18. A long noncoding RNA induced by TLRs mediates both activation and repression of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan; Atianand, Maninjay; Aiello, Daniel; Ricci, Emiliano; Gandhi, Pallavi; Hall, Lisa L.; Byron, Meg; Monks, Brian; Henry-Bezy, Meabh; O’Neill, Luke A.J; Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Moore, Melissa J.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    An inducible program of inflammatory gene expression is central to anti-microbial defenses. Signal-dependent activation of transcription factors, transcriptional co-regulators and chromatin modifying factors collaborate to control this response. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA that acts as a key regulator of this inflammatory response. Germline-encoded receptors such as the Toll-like receptors induce the expression of numerous lncRNAs. One of these, lincRNA-Cox2 mediates both the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes. Transcriptional repression of target genes is dependent on interactions of lincRNA-Cox2 with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and A2/B1. Collectively, these studies unveil a central role of lincRNA-Cox2 as a broad acting regulatory component of the circuit that controls the inflammatory response. PMID:23907535

  19. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  20. Activation of Hh Signaling: A Critical Biological Consequence of ETS Gene Anomalies in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    consequence of ETS gene overexpression in prostate cells is increased expression and activity of Gli transcription factors that are normally induced by...Additionally, we identified Gli overexpression induces androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells and this action is mediated by...interaction between GLIs and androgen receptor (AR) which leads to activation of AR signaling under androgen-deprived conditions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  1. Intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 is a stress-inducible gene controlled by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Irina E; Garaeva, Alisa A; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-09-15

    Intermedin or adrenomedullin 2 is a set of calcitonin-related peptides with a putative tumor angiogenesis promoting activity that are formed by proteolytic processing of the ADM2 gene product. It has been proposed that the ADM2 gene is regulated by the estrogen response element (ERE) and hypoxia response elements (HRE) found within its promoter region. In the present study we reveal a functional mechanism by which ADM2 participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) and in responses to the mitochondrial respiration chain inhibition. We show that the ADM2 gene is controlled by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the principal regulator of the integrated stress response (ISR). The upregulation of ADM2 mRNA could be prevented by the pharmacological ISR inhibitor ISRIB and by the downregulation of ATF4 with specific shRNA, while ectopic expression of ATF4 cDNA resulted in a notable increase in ADM2 gene transcription. A potential ATF4-binding site was identified in the coding region of the ADM2 gene and the requirement of this site during the ATF4-mediated ADM2 gene promoter activation was validated by the luciferase reporter assay. Mutagenesis of the putative ATF4-response element prevented the induction of luciferase activity in response to ATF4 overproduction, as well as in response to mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibition by piericidin A and ER stress induction by tunicamycin and brefeldin A. Since ADM2 was shown to inhibit ATF4 expression during myocardial ER stress, a feedback mechanism could be proposed for the ADM2 regulation under ER stress conditions.

  2. Activation of Ftz-F1-Responsive Genes through Ftz/Ftz-F1 Dependent Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Field, Amanda; Xiang, Jie; Anderson, W. Ray; Graham, Patricia; Pick, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Ftz-F1 is expressed in all somatic nuclei in Drosophila embryos, but mutations result in a pair-rule phenotype. This was explained by the interaction of Ftz-F1 with the homeodomain protein Ftz that is expressed in stripes in the primordia of segments missing in either ftz-f1 or ftz mutants. Ftz-F1 and Ftz were shown to physically interact and coordinately activate the expression of ftz itself and engrailed by synergistic binding to composite Ftz-F1/Ftz binding sites. However, attempts to identify additional target genes on the basis of Ftz-F1/ Ftz binding alone has met with only limited success. To discern rules for Ftz-F1 target site selection in vivo and to identify additional target genes, a microarray analysis was performed comparing wildtype and ftz-f1 mutant embryos. Ftz-F1-responsive genes most highly regulated included engrailed and nine additional genes expressed in patterns dependent on both ftz and ftz-f1. Candidate enhancers for these genes were identified by combining BDTNP Ftz ChIP-chip data with a computational search for Ftz-F1 binding sites. Of eight enhancer reporter genes tested in transgenic embryos, six generated expression patterns similar to the corresponding endogenous gene and expression was lost in ftz mutants. These studies identified a new set of Ftz-F1 targets, all of which are co-regulated by Ftz. Comparative analysis of enhancers containing Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites that were or were not bona fide targets in vivo suggested that GAF negatively regulates enhancers that contain Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites but are not actually utilized. These targets include other regulatory factors as well as genes involved directly in morphogenesis, providing insight into how pair-rule genes establish the body pattern. PMID:27723822

  3. DNA sequences that activate isocitrate lyase gene expression during late embryogenesis and during postgerminative growth.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J Z; Santes, C M; Engel, M L; Gasser, C S; Harada, J J

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed DNA sequences that regulate the expression of an isocitrate lyase gene from Brassica napus L. during late embryogenesis and during postgerminative growth to determine whether glyoxysomal function is induced by a common mechanism at different developmental stages. beta-Glucuronidase constructs were used both in transient expression assays in B. napus and in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the segments of the isocitrate lyase 5' flanking region that influence promoter activity. DNA sequences that play the principal role in activating the promoter during post-germinative growth are located more than 1,200 bp upstream of the gene. Distinct DNA sequences that were sufficient for high-level expression during late embryogenesis but only low-level expression during postgerminative growth were also identified. Other parts of the 5' flanking region increased promoter activity both in developing seed and in seedlings. We conclude that a combination of elements is involved in regulating the isocitrate lyase gene and that distinct DNA sequences play primary roles in activating the gene in embryos and in seedlings. These findings suggest that different signals contribute to the induction of glyoxysomal function during these two developmental stages. We also showed that some of the constructs were expressed differently in transient expression assays and in transgenic plants. PMID:8934622

  4. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  5. Global gene regulation during activation of immunoglobulin class switching in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Fear, David J.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) to IgE is a tightly regulated process central to atopic disease. To profile the B-cell transcriptional responses underlying the activation of the germinal centre activities leading to the generation of IgE, naïve human B-cells were stimulated with IL-4 and anti-CD40. Gene expression and alternative splicing were profiled over 12 days using the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A total of 1,399 genes, forming 13 temporal profiles were differentially expressed. CCL22 and CCL17 were dramatically induced but followed a temporal trajectory distinct from classical mediators of isotype switching. AICDA, NFIL3, IRF4, XBP1 and BATF3 shared a profile with several genes involved in innate immunity, but with no recognised role in CSR. A transcription factor BHLHE40 was identified at the core of this profile. B-cell activation was also accompanied by variation in exon retention affecting >200 genes including CCL17. The data indicate a circadian component and central roles for the Th2 chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in the activation of CSR. PMID:27897229

  6. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  7. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  8. FLUCONAZOLE-INDUCED HEPATIC CYTOCHROME P450 GENE EXPRESSION AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES IN RATS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the triazole antifungal agent fluconazole on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyp) genes and the activities of Cyp enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats and male CD-1 mice. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) methods w...

  9. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  10. Gene-physical activity interactions in the etiology of obesity: behavioral considerations.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K

    2008-12-01

    Understanding how genes, environment, and personal motivation operate to influence physical activity will require (i) inclusion of properly validated measures of putative mediators (e.g., cultural values, efficacy and control beliefs, goals, intentions, enjoyment, and self-management skills) and moderators (e.g., age or maturation, personality, race/ethnicity, fitness, fatness, skill, and competing behaviors) of physical activity, (ii) a search for candidate genes involved with motivational systems of energy expenditure in addition to energy intake pathways, (iii) assessment of specific features physical activity exposure (i.e., type, intensity, timing, and context), (iv) manipulation of physical activity or prospective observation of change in physical activity at multiple times, rather than cross-sectional association and linkage studies, and (v) use of statistical procedures that permit multilevel modeling (i.e., personal and group-level variables) of direct, indirect (i.e., mediated), and moderated (i.e., interactions of mediators with external factors) relations with physical activity within theoretical gene-environment networks.

  11. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases.

  12. Shaping synaptic plasticity: the role of activity-mediated epigenetic regulation on gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Mendoza, Javier; Díaz de León-Guerrero, Sol; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2013-10-01

    Learning and memory are basic functions of the brain that allowed human evolution. It is well accepted that during learning and memory formation the dynamic establishment of new active synaptic connections is crucial. Persistent synaptic activation leads to molecular events that include increased release of neurotransmitters, increased expression of receptors on the postsynaptic neuron, thus creating a positive feedback that results in the activation of distinct signaling pathways that temporally and permanently alter specific patterns of gene expression. However, the epigenetic changes that allow the establishment of long term genetic programs that control learning and memory are not completely understood. Even less is known regarding the signaling events triggered by synaptic activity that regulate these epigenetic marks. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling activity-dependent gene transcription leading synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We describe how Ca(2+) entry through N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate neurotransmitter receptors result in the activation of specific signaling pathways leading to changes in gene expression, giving special emphasis to the recent data pointing out different epigenetic mechanisms (histone acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation as well as DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation) underlying learning and memory.

  13. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  14. A high-resolution map of the regulator of the complement activation gene cluster on 1q32 that integrates new genes and markers.

    PubMed

    Heine-Suñer, D; Díaz-Guillén, M A; de Villena, F P; Robledo, M; Benítez, J; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1997-01-01

    Sixteen microsatellite markers, including two described here, were used to construct a high-resolution map of the 1q32 region encompassing the regulator of the complement activation (RCA) gene cluster. The RCA genes are a group of related genes coding for plasma and membrane associated proteins that collectively control activation of the complement component C3. We provide here the location of two new genes within the RCA gene cluster. These genes are PFKFB2 that maps 15 kilobases (kb) upstream of the C4BPB gene, and a gene located 4 kb downstream of C4BPA, which seems to code for the 72 000 Mr component of the signal recognition particle (SRP72). Neither of these two genes is related structurally or functionally to the RCA genes. In addition, our map shows the centromere-telomere orientation of the C4BPB/MCP linkage group, which is: centromere-PFKFB2-C4BPB-C4BPA-SRP72-C4BPAL1++ +-C4BPAL2-telomere, and outlines an interval with a significant female-male recombination difference which suggests the presence of a female-specific hotspot(s) of recombination.

  15. Mosquito larvicidal activity of Escherichia coli with combinations of genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, E; Boussiba, S; Zaritsky, A

    1995-01-01

    The genes cryIVA and cryIVD, encoding 134- and 72-kDa proteins, respectively, and the gene for a regulatory 20-kDa polypeptide of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (serovar H14) were cloned in all seven possible combinations by the Escherichia coli expression vectors pT7 and pUHE. The four combinations containing cryIVA (cryIVA alone, with cryIVD, with the 20-kDa-protein gene, and with both) displayed high levels of mosquito larvicidal activity in pUHE. The toxicity of the combination of cryIVA and cryIVD, with or without the 20-kDa-protein gene, was higher than has ever been achieved with delta-endotoxin genes in recombinant E. coli. Fifty percent lethal concentrations against third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae for these clones decreased (i.e., toxicity increased) continuously to about 3 x 10(5) cells ml-1 after 4 h of induction. Larvicidal activities, obtained after 30 min of induction, were lower for clones in pT7 and decreased for an additional 3.5 h. Induction of either cryIVD or the 20-kDa-protein gene alone resulted in no larvicidal activity in either pT7 or pUHE20. Cloned together, these genes were slightly toxic in pT7 but not in pUHE20. Five minutes of induction of this combination (cryIVD with the 20-kDa-protein gene) in pT7 yielded a maximal mortality of about 40%, which decreased rapidly and disappeared completely after 50 min. CryIVD is thus apparently degraded in E. coli and partially stabilized by the 20-kDa regulatory protein. Larvicidal activity of the combination of cryIVA and cryIVD was sevenfold higher than that of cryIVA alone, probably because of the cross-stabilization of the polypeptides or the synergism between their activities. PMID:7751296

  16. A physiological increase in insulin suppresses gluconeogenic gene activation in fetal sheep with sustained hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Sekar, Satya M; Lavezzi, Jinny R; O'Meara, Meghan C; Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2012-10-15

    Reduced maternal glucose supply to the fetus and resulting fetal hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia activate fetal glucose production as a means to maintain cellular glucose uptake. However, this early activation of fetal glucose production may be accompanied by hepatic insulin resistance. We tested the capacity of a physiological increase in insulin to suppress fetal hepatic gluconeogenic gene activation following sustained hypoglycemia to determine whether hepatic insulin sensitivity is maintained. Control fetuses (CON), hypoglycemic fetuses induced by maternal insulin infusion for 8 wk (HG), and 8 wk HG fetuses that received an isoglycemic insulin infusion for the final 7 days (HG+INS) were studied. Glucose and insulin concentrations were 60% lower in HG compared with CON fetuses. Insulin was 50% higher in HG+INS compared with CON and four-fold higher compared with HG fetuses. Expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, PCK1, G6PC, FBP1, GLUT2, and PGC1A was increased in the HG and reduced in the HG+INS liver. Expression of the insulin-regulated glycolytic and lipogenic genes, PFKL and FAS, was increased in the HG+INS liver. Total FOXO1 protein expression, a gluconeogenic activator, was 60% higher in the HG liver. Despite low glucose, insulin, and IGF1 concentrations, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was higher in the HG liver. Thus, a physiological increase in fetal insulin is sufficient for suppression of gluconeogenic genes and activation of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in the HG fetal liver. These results demonstrate that fetuses exposed to sustained hypoglycemia have maintained hepatic insulin action in contrast to fetuses exposed to placental insufficiency.

  17. Integrating Circadian Activity and Gene Expression Profiles to Predict Chronotoxicity of Drosophila suzukii Response to Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zalom, Frank G.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Native to Southeast Asia, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is a recent invader that infests intact ripe and ripening fruit, leading to significant crop losses in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Since current D. suzukii management strategies rely heavily on insecticide usage and insecticide detoxification gene expression is under circadian regulation in the closely related Drosophila melanogaster, we set out to determine if integrative analysis of daily activity patterns and detoxification gene expression can predict chronotoxicity of D. suzukii to insecticides. Locomotor assays were performed under conditions that approximate a typical summer or winter day in Watsonville, California, where D. suzukii was first detected in North America. As expected, daily activity patterns of D. suzukii appeared quite different between ‘summer’ and ‘winter’ conditions due to differences in photoperiod and temperature. In the ‘summer’, D. suzukii assumed a more bimodal activity pattern, with maximum activity occurring at dawn and dusk. In the ‘winter’, activity was unimodal and restricted to the warmest part of the circadian cycle. Expression analysis of six detoxification genes and acute contact bioassays were performed at multiple circadian times, but only in conditions approximating Watsonville summer, the cropping season, when most insecticide applications occur. Five of the genes tested exhibited rhythmic expression, with the majority showing peak expression at dawn (ZT0, 6am). We observed significant differences in the chronotoxicity of D. suzukii towards malathion, with highest susceptibility at ZT0 (6am), corresponding to peak expression of cytochrome P450s that may be involved in bioactivation of malathion. High activity levels were not found to correlate with high insecticide susceptibility as initially hypothesized. Chronobiology and chronotoxicity of D. suzukii provide valuable insights for monitoring and control efforts, because insect activity as well as

  18. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  19. Comprehensive developmental profiles of gene activity in regions and subregions of the Arabidopsis seed

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Mark F.; Kirkbride, Ryan C.; Stone, Sandra L.; Pelletier, Julie M.; Bui, Anhthu Q.; Yeung, Edward C.; Hashimoto, Meryl; Fei, Jiong; Harada, Corey M.; Munoz, Matthew D.; Le, Brandon H.; Drews, Gary N.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Goldberg, Robert B.; Harada, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are complex structures that consist of the embryo, endosperm, and seed-coat regions that are of different ontogenetic origins, and each region can be further divided into morphologically distinct subregions. Despite the importance of seeds for food, fiber, and fuel globally, little is known of the cellular processes that characterize each subregion or how these processes are integrated to permit the coordinated development of the seed. We profiled gene activity genome-wide in every organ, tissue, and cell type of Arabidopsis seeds from fertilization through maturity. The resulting mRNA datasets offer the most comprehensive description of gene activity in seeds with high spatial and temporal resolution, providing unique insights into the function of understudied seed regions. Global comparisons of mRNA populations reveal unexpected overlaps in the functional identities of seed subregions. Analyses of coexpressed gene sets suggest that processes that regulate seed size and filling are coordinated across several subregions. Predictions of gene regulatory networks based on the association of transcription factors with enriched DNA sequence motifs upstream of coexpressed genes identify regulators of seed development. These studies emphasize the utility of these datasets as an essential resource for the study of seed biology. PMID:23319655

  20. Gene activation-associated long noncoding RNAs function in mouse preimplantation development

    PubMed Central

    Hamazaki, Nobuhiko; Uesaka, Masahiro; Nakashima, Kinichi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Imamura, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In mice, zygotic activation occurs for a wide variety of genes, mainly at the 2-cell stage. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly being recognized as modulators of gene expression. In this study, directional RNA-seq of MII oocytes and 2-cell embryos identified more than 1000 divergently transcribed lncRNA/mRNA gene pairs. Expression of these bidirectional promoter-associated noncoding RNAs (pancRNAs) was strongly associated with the upregulation of their cognate genes. Conversely, knockdown of three abundant pancRNAs led to reduced mRNA expression, accompanied by sustained DNA methylation even in the presence of enzymes responsible for DNA demethylation. In particular, microinjection of siRNA against the abundant pancRNA partner of interleukin 17d (Il17d) mRNA at the 1-cell stage caused embryonic lethality, which was rescued by supplying IL17D protein in vitro at the 4-cell stage. Thus, this novel class of lncRNAs can modulate the transcription machinery in cis to activate zygotic genes and is important for preimplantation development. PMID:25633350

  1. Quorum activation at a distance: spatiotemporal patterns of gene regulation from diffusion of an autoinducer signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanji, Gabriel; Langebrake, Jessica; Deleenheer, Patrick; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria in colonies coordinate gene regulation through the exchange of diffusible signal molecules known as autoinducers (AI). This ``quorum signaling'' often occurs in physically heterogeneous and spatially extended environments such as biofilms. Under these conditions the space and time scales for diffusion of the signal limit the range and timing of effective gene regulation. We expect that spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression will reflect physical environmental constraints as well as nonlinear transcriptional activation and feedback within the gene regulatory system. We have combined experiments and modeling to investigate how these spatiotemporal patterns develop. We embed engineered plasmid/GFP quorum sensor strains or wild type strains in a long narrow agar lane, and then introduce AI signal at one terminus of the lane. Diffusion of the AI initiates reporter expression along the length of the lane, extending to macroscopic distances of mm-cm. Resulting patterns are captured quantitatively by a mathematical model that incorporates logistic growth of the population, diffusion of AI, and nonlinear transcriptional activation. Our results show that a diffusing quorum signal can coordinate gene expression over distances of order 1cm on time scales of order 10 hrs.

  2. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  3. Age-associated activation of epigenetically repressed genes in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Baker, Pamela E; Wilkowski, Jodi; Burke, David T

    2003-01-01

    Epigenetic control of gene expression is a consistent feature of differentiated mammalian cell types. Epigenetic expression patterns are mitotically heritable and are stably maintained in adult cells. However, unlike somatic DNA mutation, little is known about the occurrence of epigenetic change, or epimutation, during normal adult life. We have monitored the age-associated maintenance of two epigenetic systems--X inactivation and genomic imprinting--using the genes Atp7a and Igf2, respectively. Quantitative measurements of RNA transcripts from the inactive and active alleles were performed in mice from 2 to 24 months of age. For both genes, older animal cohorts showed reproducible increases in transcripts expressed from the silenced alleles. Loss of X chromosome silencing showed cohort mean increases of up to 2.2%, while imprinted-gene activation increased up to 6.7%. The results support the hypothesis that epigenetic loss of gene repression occurs in normal tissues and may be a contributing factor in progressive physiological dysfunction seen during mammalian aging. Quantitatively, the loss of epigenetic control may be one to two orders of magnitude greater than previously determined somatic DNA mutation. PMID:14704185

  4. Gene expression profiling of HGF/Met activation in neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Stefano; Leo, Christian; Gallo, Simona; Sala, Valentina; Bucci, Enrico; Natale, Massimo; Cantarella, Daniela; Medico, Enzo; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) controls growth and differentiation in different cell types, including cardiac cells. However, its downstream effectors are poorly understood. To investigate the transcriptional targets of HGF, we analyzed the hearts of neonatal mice with cardiomyocyte-specific HGF overexpression with whole genome DNA microarrays. When comparing HGF expressing versus control hearts, we found a total of 249 transcripts with significant gene expression changes (210 upregulated and 39 downregulated). Gene Ontology (GO) annotation analysis revealed that the transcripts modulated by HGF were enriched for metabolic functions including: protein translation, vesicle-mediated transport, regulation of transcription, regulation of muscle development. Using an automated literature meta-analysis approach, we obtained a co-occurrence network oriented to the positive regulatory role of Myc and Notch1 in controlling some of the genes which are downstream to HGF. GO analysis of this network returned genes involved in the regulation of heart development. HGF positively controls MyocD, an activator of cardiac gene expression, and Hdac5, an inhibitor of cardiac growth. These results may unveil a new role of HGF in the modulation of signaling pathways implicated in the activation or repression of cardiomyogenesis.

  5. Dynamics of potentiation and activation: GAGA factor and its role in heat shock gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, R C; Lis, J T

    1997-01-01

    GAGA factor (GAF) binds to specific DNA sequences and participates in a complex spectrum of chromosomal activities.Products of the Trithorax-like locus (Trl), which encodes multiple GAF isoforms, are required for homeotic gene expression and are essential for Drosophila development. While homozygous null mutations in Trl are lethal, heterozygotes display enhanced position effect variegation (PEV) indicative of the broad role of GAF in chromatin architecture and its positive role in gene expression.The distribution of GAF on chromosomes is complex, as it is associated with hundreds of chromosomal loci in euchromatin of salivary gland polytene chromosomes, however, it also displays a strong association with pericentric heterochromatin in diploid cells, where it appears to have roles in chromosome condensation and segregation. At higher resolution GAF binding sites have been identified in the regulatory regions of many genes. In some cases, the positive role of GAF in gene expression has been examined in detail using a variety of genetic, biochemical, and cytological approaches. Here we review what is currently known of GAF and, in the context of the heat shock genes of Drosophila, we examine the effects of GAF on multiple steps in gene expression. PMID:9321643

  6. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A.; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells. PMID:26646448

  7. Differential activity of Drosophila Hox genes induces myosin expression and can maintain compartment boundaries.

    PubMed

    Curt, Jesús R; de Navas, Luis F; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Compartments are units of cell lineage that subdivide territories with different developmental potential. In Drosophila, the wing and haltere discs are subdivided into anterior and posterior (A/P) compartments, which require the activity of Hedgehog, and into dorsal and ventral (D/V) compartments, needing Notch signaling. There is enrichment in actomyosin proteins at the compartment boundaries, suggesting a role for these proteins in their maintenance. Compartments also develop in the mouse hindbrain rhombomeres, which are characterized by the expression of different Hox genes, a group of genes specifying different structures along their main axis of bilaterians. We show here that the Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax can maintain the A/P and D/V compartment boundaries when Hedgehog or Notch signaling is compromised, and that the interaction of cells with and without Ultrabithorax expression induces high levels of non-muscle myosin II. In the absence of Ultrabithorax there is occasional mixing of cells from different segments. We also show a similar role in cell segregation for the Abdominal-B Hox gene. Our results suggest that the juxtaposition of cells with different Hox gene expression leads to their sorting out, probably through the accumulation of non-muscle myosin II at the boundary of the different cell territories. The increase in myosin expression seems to be a general mechanism used by Hox genes or signaling pathways to maintain the segregation of different groups of cells.

  8. Duplicative activation mechanisms of two trypanosome telomeric VSG genes with structurally simple 5' flanks.

    PubMed

    Matthews, K R; Shiels, P G; Graham, S V; Cowan, C; Barry, J D

    1990-12-25

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes from a family of long and complex telomeric expression sites. VSG switching generally occurs by the duplication of different VSG genes into these sites by gene conversion involving a series of 70 base pair (70bp) repeats in the 5' flank. In contrast, when VSG is first synthesised by trypanosomes in the tsetse fly at the metacyclic stage, a separate set of telomeric expression sites is activated. These latter telomeres appear not to act as recipients in gene conversion. We have found that the structure of two such expression sites is simple, with very short 70bp repeat regions and very little other sequence in common with bloodstream expression sites. However, the two telomeres readily act as donors in VSG gene conversion in the bloodstream and we show for one a consistent association of the conversion 5' end point with the short 70bp repeat region. These findings help explain why a very predictable set of VSGs is expressed in the tsetse fly and have implications for VSG gene conversion mechanisms.

  9. Replication-dependent histone genes are actively transcribed in differentiating and aging retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Baumgartner, Marybeth; Al Seesi, Sahar; Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Venkatesh, Aditya; Congdon, Sean; Lemoine, Christopher; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Mandoiu, Ion; Punzo, Claudio; Kanadia, Rahul N

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian genome, each histone family contains multiple replication-dependent paralogs, which are found in clusters where their transcription is thought to be coupled to the cell cycle. Here, we wanted to interrogate the transcriptional regulation of these paralogs during retinal development and aging. We employed deep sequencing, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and microarray analysis, which revealed that replication-dependent histone genes were not only transcribed in progenitor cells but also in differentiating neurons. Specifically, by ISH analysis we found that different histone genes were actively transcribed in a subset of neurons between postnatal day 7 and 14. Interestingly, within a histone family, not all paralogs were transcribed at the same level during retinal development. For example, expression of Hist1h1b was higher embryonically, while that of Hist1h1c was higher postnatally. Finally, expression of replication-dependent histone genes was also observed in the aging retina. Moreover, transcription of replication-dependent histones was independent of rapamycin-mediated mTOR pathway inactivation. Overall, our data suggest the existence of variant nucleosomes produced by the differential expression of the replication-dependent histone genes across retinal development. Also, the expression of a subset of replication-dependent histone isotypes in senescent neurons warrants re-examining these genes as "replication-dependent." Thus, our findings underscore the importance of understanding the transcriptional regulation of replication-dependent histone genes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons.

  10. SNORD116 and SNORD115 change expression of multiple genes and modify each other's activity.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Surface, Justin; Shen, Manli; de la Grange, Pierre; Stamm, Stefan

    2015-11-10

    The loss of two gene clusters encoding small nucleolar RNAs, SNORD115 and SNORD116 contribute to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), the most common syndromic form of obesity in humans. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are considered to be orphan C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs) as they do not target rRNAs or snRNAs. SNORD115 exhibits sequence complementarity towards the serotonin receptor 2C, but SNORD116 shows no extended complementarities to known RNAs. To identify molecular targets, we performed genome-wide array analysis after overexpressing SNORD115 and SNORD116 in HEK 293T cells, either alone or together. We found that SNORD116 changes the expression of over 200 genes. SNORD116 mainly changed mRNA expression levels. Surprisingly, we found that SNORD115 changes SNORD116's influence on gene expression. In similar experiments, we compared gene expression in post-mortem hypothalamus between individuals with PWS and aged-matched controls. The synopsis of these experiments resulted in 23 genes whose expression levels were influenced by SNORD116. Together our results indicate that SNORD115 and SNORD116 influence expression levels of multiple genes and modify each other activity.

  11. [Phytase activity in some groups of bacteria. Search for and cloning of genes for bacterial phytases].

    PubMed

    Shedova, E N; Berezina, O V; Khmel', I A; Lipasova, V A; Borriss, R; Velikodvorskaia, G A

    2004-01-01

    A search for phytase genes in 9 Bacillus strains from the collection of IMGAN was implemented. The growth optimum of strains IX-22, IX-12B, K17-2, K18, IMG I, IMG II, M4 and M8 was 50-60 degrees C; the optimal growth temperature for Bacillus sp. 790 was 45-47 degrees C. According to the sequence data of 16S RNA genes, Bacillus sp. 790 belongs to the B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens group. The other 8 strains were identified as B. licheniformis. Selection of Bacillus strains, potentially containing the phytase genes, was performed via PCR with primers designed on the basis of the conserved sequence regions of the phyA gene from B. amyloliquefaciens FZB45 with chromosomal DNA being used as the template. The nucleotide sequences of all PCR fragments showed a high level of homology to the known Bacillus phytase genes. The gene libraries of B. licheniformis M8 and B. amyloliquefaciens 790 in E. coli were constructed and phytase-containing clones were selected from them. Twenty-four Pseudomonas strains of different species, 5 Xanthomonas maltophilia strains and 1 Xanthomonas malvacearum (all from the mentioned collection) were tested for phytase activity. Such activity was found in 13 Pseudomonas strains and in 6 Xanthomonas strains. The accumulation of phytase in Pseudomonas was shown to take place at later (over 2 days') growth stages. The optimum pH for phytase from 3 Pseudomonas strains were established. The enzymes were found to be most active at pH 5.5.

  12. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  13. LWD-TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-10-13

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock.

  14. A Kinase-Independent Activity of Cdk9 Modulates Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Gene Induction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A gene induction competition assay has recently uncovered new inhibitory activities of two transcriptional cofactors, NELF-A and NELF-B, in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation. NELF-A and -B are also components of the NELF complex, which participates in RNA polymerase II pausing shortly after the initiation of gene transcription. We therefore asked if cofactors (Cdk9 and ELL) best known to affect paused polymerase could reverse the effects of NELF-A and -B. Unexpectedly, Cdk9 and ELL augmented, rather than prevented, the effects of NELF-A and -B. Furthermore, Cdk9 actions are not blocked either by Ckd9 inhibitors (DRB or flavopiridol) or by two Cdk9 mutants defective in kinase activity. The mode and site of action of NELF-A and -B mutants with an altered NELF domain are similarly affected by wild-type and kinase-dead Cdk9. We conclude that Cdk9 is a new modulator of GR action, that Ckd9 and ELL have novel activities in GR-regulated gene expression, that NELF-A and -B can act separately from the NELF complex, and that Cdk9 possesses activities that are independent of Cdk9 kinase activity. Finally, the competition assay has succeeded in ordering the site of action of several cofactors of GR transactivation. Extension of this methodology should be helpful in determining the site and mode of action of numerous additional cofactors and in reducing unwanted side effects. PMID:24559102

  15. LWD–TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock. PMID:27734958

  16. Fruit preferential activity of the tomato RIP1 gene promoter in transgenic tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Priyanka; Kumar, Rahul; Pareek, Amit; Sharma, Arun K

    2017-02-01

    Isolation and functional characterization of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is beneficial for genetic improvement of economically important crops. Here, we have characterized a putative promoter of a ripening-induced gene RIP1 (Ripening induced protein 1) in tomato. Quantification of the transcript level of RIP1 showed that its expression is fruit preferential, with maximum accumulation in red ripe fruits. To test the promoter activity, we made a reporter construct by cloning 1450 bp putative RIP1 promoter driving the GUS (ß-glucuronidase) gene expression and generated stable transgenic lines in tomato and Arabidopsis. Histochemical and fluorometric assays validated the fruit-specific expression of RIP1 as the highest GUS activity was found in red ripe tomatoes. Similarly, we detected high levels of GUS activity in the siliques of Arabidopsis. On the contrary, weak GUS activity was found in the flower buds in both tomato and Arabidopsis. To characterize the specific regions of the RIP1 promoter that might be essential for its maximum activity and specificity in fruits, we made stable transgenic lines of tomato and Arabidopsis with 5'-deletion constructs. Characterization of these transgenic plants showed that the full length promoter is essential for its function. Overall, we report the identification and characterization of a ripening-induced promoter of tomato, which would be useful for the controlled manipulation of the ripening-related agronomic traits in genetic manipulation studies in future.

  17. Repression and catabolite gene activation in the araBAD operon.

    PubMed

    Lichenstein, H S; Hamilton, E P; Lee, N

    1987-02-01

    Catabolite gene activation of the araBAD operon was examined by using catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) site deletion mutants. A high-affinity CAP-binding site between the divergently orientated araBAD and araC operons has been previously identified by DNase I footprinting techniques. Subsequent experiments disagreed as to whether this site is directly involved in stimulating araBAD expression. In this paper, we present data showing that deletions generated by in vitro mutagenesis of the CAP site led to a five- to sixfold reduction in single-copy araBAD promoter activity in vivo. We concluded that catabolite gene activation of araBAD involves this CAP site. The hypothesis that CAP stimulates the araBAD promoter primarily by relieving repression was then tested. The upstream operator araO2 was required for repression, but we observed that the magnitude of CAP stimulation was unaffected by the presence or absence of araO2. We concluded that CAP plays no role in relieving repression. Other experiments showed that when CAP binds it induces a bend in the ara DNA; similar bending has been reported upon CAP binding to lac DNA. This conformational change in the DNA may be essential to the mechanism of CAP activation.

  18. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Insulin treatment also consistently prevented changes in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1. The oral administration of an antioxidant, probucol, to these diabetic rats partially prevented the elevation of the activity of both NF-kappaB and AP-1, and normalized the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 without producing any change in the plasma glucose concentration. These results suggest that elevated oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  19. APG: an Active Protein-Gene network model to quantify regulatory signals in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiguang; Sun, Yidan; Zheng, Si; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Zhou, Huarong; Chen, Luonan

    2013-01-01

    Synergistic interactions among transcription factors (TFs) and their cofactors collectively determine gene expression in complex biological systems. In this work, we develop a novel graphical model, called Active Protein-Gene (APG) network model, to quantify regulatory signals of transcription in complex biomolecular networks through integrating both TF upstream-regulation and downstream-regulation high-throughput data. Firstly, we theoretically and computationally demonstrate the effectiveness of APG by comparing with the traditional strategy based only on TF downstream-regulation information. We then apply this model to study spontaneous type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and Wistar control rats. Our biological experiments validate the theoretical results. In particular, SP1 is found to be a hidden TF with changed regulatory activity, and the loss of SP1 activity contributes to the increased glucose production during diabetes development. APG model provides theoretical basis to quantitatively elucidate transcriptional regulation by modelling TF combinatorial interactions and exploiting multilevel high-throughput information.

  20. Translating DPYD genotype into DPD phenotype: using the DPYD gene activity score.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Lunenburg, Carin A T C; Meulendijks, Didier; Gelderblom, Hans; Cats, Annemieke; Swen, Jesse J; Schellens, Jan H M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme (DPD, encoded by the gene DPYD) plays a key role in the metabolism of fluoropyrimidines. DPD deficiency occurs in 4-5% of the population and is associated with severe fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. Several SNPs in DPYD have been described that lead to absent or reduced enzyme activity, including DPYD*2A, DPYD*13, c.2846A>T and c.1236G>A/haplotype B3. Since these SNPs differ in their effect on DPD enzyme activity, a differentiated dose adaption is recommended. We propose the gene activity score for translating DPYD genotype into phenotype, accounting for differences in functionality of SNPs. This method can be used to standardize individualized fluoropyrimidine dose adjustments, resulting in optimal safety and effectiveness.

  1. Tissue-specific activity of the pro-opiomelanocortin gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeannotte, L.; Trifiro, M.A.; Plante, R.K.; Chamberland, M.; Drouin, J.

    1987-11-01

    The pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene is specifically expressed in corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary. To define the POMC promoter sequences responsible for tissue-specific expression, we assessed POMC promoter activity by gene transfer into POMC-expressing pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20) and fibroblast L cells. The rat POMC promoter was only efficiently utilized and correctly transcribed in AtT-20 cells. 5'-End deletion analysis revealed two promoter regions for activity in AtT-20 cells. When tested by fusion to a heterologuous promoter, DNA fragments corresponding to both regions exhibited tissue-specific activity, suggesting the presence of at least two tissue-specific DNA sequence elements within the promoter. In summary, POMC promoter sequences from -480 to -34 base pairs appear sufficient to mimic the specificity of anterior pituitary expression.

  2. Reciprocal activation of Xenobiotic response genes by nuclear receptors SXR/PXR and CAR

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Barwick, Joyce L.; Simon, Cynthia M.; Pierce, Alexis M.; Safe, Stephen; Blumberg, Bruce; Guzelian, Philip S.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2000-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene products such as CYP3A and CYP2B are essential for the metabolism of steroid hormones and xenochemicals including prescription drugs. Nuclear receptor SXR/PXR (steroid and xenobiotic receptor/pregnenolone X receptor) has been shown both biochemically and genetically to activate CYP3A genes, while similar studies have established constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) as a CYP2B regulator. The response elements in these genes are also distinct, furthering the concept of independent regulation. Unexpectedly, we found that SXR can regulate CYP2B, both in cultured cells and in transgenic mice via adaptive recognition of the phenobarbital response element (PBRE). In a type of functional symmetry, orphan receptor CAR was also found to activate CYP3A through previously defined SXR/PXR response elements. These observations not only provide a rational explanation for the activation of multiple CYP gene classes by certain xenobiotics, but also reveal the existence of a metabolic safety net that confers a second layer of protection to the harmful effects of toxic compounds and at the same time increases the propensity for drug–drug interactions. PMID:11114890

  3. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  4. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  5. Effect of base modifications on structure, thermodynamic stability, and gene silencing activity of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sipa, Katarzyna; Sochacka, Elzbieta; Kazmierczak-Baranska, Julia; Maszewska, Maria; Janicka, Magdalena; Nowak, Genowefa; Nawrot, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    A series of nucleobase-modified siRNA duplexes containing “rare” nucleosides, 2-thiouridine (s2U), pseudouridine (Ψ), and dihydrouridine (D), were evaluated for their thermodynamic stability and gene silencing activity. The duplexes with modified units at terminal positions exhibited similar stability as the nonmodified reference. Introduction of the s2U or Ψ units into the central part of the antisense strand resulted in duplexes with higher melting temperatures (Tm). In contrary, D unit similarly like wobble base pair led to the less stable duplexes (ΔTm 3.9 and 6.6°C, respectively). Gene-silencing activity of siRNA duplexes directed toward enhanced green fluorescent protein or beta-site APP cleaving enzyme was tested in a dual fluorescence assay. The duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 3′-ends and with a D unit at their 5′-ends (with respect to the guide strands) were the most potent gene expression inhibitors. Duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 5′-ends were by 50% less active than the nonmodified counterpart. Those containing a D unit or wobble base pair in the central domain had the lowest Tm, disturbed the A-type helical structure, and had more than three times lower activity than their nonmodified congener. Activity of siRNA containing the wobble base pair could be rescued by placing the thio-nucleoside at the position 3′-adjacent to the mutation site. Thermally stable siRNA molecules containing several s2U units in the antisense strand were biologically as potent as their native counterparts. The present results provide a new chemical tool for modulation of siRNA gene-silencing activity. PMID:17585051

  6. Coordinative modulation of human zinc transporter 2 gene expression through active and suppressive regulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ju; Liu, Ya-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Zinc transporter 2 (ZnT2) is one of the cellular factors responsible for Zn homeostasis. Upon Zn overload, ZnT2 reduces cellular Zn by transporting it into excretory vesicles. We investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates human ZnT2 (hZnT2) gene expression. Zn induces hZnT2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Overexpression of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) increases hZnT2 transcription, whereas depletion of MTF-1 reduces hZnT2 expression. There are five putative metal response elements (MREs) within 1kb upstream of the hZnT2 gene. A serial deletion of the hZnT2 promoter region (from 5' to 3') shows that the two MREs proximal to the gene are essential for Zn-induced promoter activity. Further mutation analysis concludes that the penultimate MRE (MREb) supports the metal-induced promoter activity. The hZnT2 promoter has also a zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB) binding element. Mutation or deletion of this ZEB binding element elevates the basal and Zn-induced hZnT2 promoter activities. Knockdown of ZEB1 mRNA enhances the hZnT2 transcript level in HEK-293 cells. In MCF-7 (ZEB-deficient) cells, expression of ZEB proteins attenuates the Zn-induced hZnT2 expression. However, expressions of MTF-1 target genes such as human ZnT1 and metallothionein IIA were not affected. Our study shows the expression of the hZnT2 gene is coordinately regulated via active and suppressive modulators.

  7. Transrepression activity of T-box1 in a gene regulation network in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen K L; Yagi, Hisato; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Nakanishi, Toshio; Furukawa, Toru

    2012-12-01

    T-box1 (TBX1) has been identified as a candidate disease-causing gene in DiGeorge syndrome/conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (DGS/CAFS). Tbx1 can function as a transcriptional transactivator as well as a transrepressor. Although the transactivating role of Tbx1 has been the focus of a number of published studies, its transrepression activity has been largely unexplored. Thus, this study centers on the identification of potential transrepressed targets of Tbx1. By subtractive hybridization, we compared the expression profiles of control mouse P19 cells and P19 cells depleted of Tbx1 via RNA interference. We identified 127 genes that were potentially transrepressed by Tbx1. Of the transrepressed genes, we focused on Ywhae and C1qbp and carried out promoter assays. The results showed that Tbx1 potentially transrepresses the promoter activities of these genes via palindromic sequences, including 5'-CCACAG-3' and 5'-(C/G)TGTG(C/G)-3', harbored within the promoters. Electromobility shift assays also showed that Tbx1 specifically interacts with certain portions of these promoter sequences. Moreover, the construction of Tbx1 mutants containing known human TBX1 mutations showed that these mutations result in the loss of Tbx1 transrepression activity. These results indicate that Tbx1 functions as a transrepressor in a gene regulation network, wherein Ywhae and C1qbp are 2 of the targets transrepressed by Tbx1 via T-box binding elements. Hence, the loss of TBX1 transrepression activity could be associated with the disease phenotypes of patients with DGS/CAFS.

  8. Effect of interleukin-1beta gene functional polymorphism on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Papiol, Sergi; Molina, Vicente; Rosa, Araceli; Sanz, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2007-12-05

    Hypoactivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during cognitive tasks is among the most consistent findings in schizophrenia. The biological factors contributing to this hypofrontality are only partially known. Previous reports have shown the influence of genes mapped to IL-1 cluster (i) in the risk to develop schizophrenia and (ii) on brain morphological abnormalities in these patients. Moreover, Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), encoded by IL-1B gene (IL-1 cluster, chromosome 2q13) has a key role in dopaminergic differentiation and dendrite growth in developing cortical neurons. The authors explored the role of a genetic functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene in relation to DLPFC activity. DLPFC (left and right) metabolic activity was measured in a sample of 19 DSM-IV diagnosed schizophrenic patients of Spanish origin using a procedure based on MRI/PET image fusion. During PET studies, subjects performed a contingent Continuous Performance Test aiming to activate DLPFC. Functional promoter polymorphism -511 C/T (rs16944) of IL-1B gene was genotyped in these patients. Those patients who were allele 2 (-511 T) carriers showed a lower metabolic activity in the left DLPFC with respect to patients homozygous for allele 1 (-511 C) (U = 16, z = -2.32, P = 0.02). Our results suggest that hypofrontality reported in some schizophrenic patients might be explained, at least in part, by this functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene. Genetic variants with influence on brain functionality may account for the neurocognitive heterogeneity observed in schizophrenic patients.

  9. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  10. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Husson, A; Chédeville, A; Lavoinne, A

    2000-09-22

    The effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Activation of AMPK by AICAR counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the PEPCK gene expression, both at the mRNA and the transcriptional levels. It is proposed that a target for AMPK is involved in the inhibitory effect of glucose on PEPCK gene transcription.

  12. Oscillation of p38 activity controls efficient pro-inflammatory gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Saito, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway controls inflammatory responses and is an important target of anti-inflammatory drugs. Although pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appear to induce only transient activation of p38 (over ∼60 min), longer cytokine exposure is necessary to induce p38-dependent effector genes. Here we study the dynamics of p38 activation in individual cells using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based p38 activity reporter. We find that, after an initial burst of activity, p38 MAPK activity subsequently oscillates for more than 8 h under continuous IL-1β stimulation. However, as this oscillation is asynchronous, the measured p38 activity population average is only slightly higher than basal level. Mathematical modelling, which we have experimentally verified, indicates that the asynchronous oscillation of p38 is generated through a negative feedback loop involving the dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. We find that the oscillatory p38 activity is necessary for efficient expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2. PMID:26399197

  13. Regulation of neuronal gene expression and survival by basal NMDA receptor activity: a role for histone deacetylase 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yelin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Modrusan, Zora; Sheng, Morgan; Kaminker, Joshua S

    2014-11-12

    Neuronal gene expression is modulated by activity via calcium-permeable receptors such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs). While gene expression changes downstream of evoked NMDAR activity have been well studied, much less is known about gene expression changes that occur under conditions of basal neuronal activity. In mouse dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that a broad NMDAR antagonist, AP5, induced robust gene expression changes under basal activity, but subtype-specific antagonists did not. While some of the gene expression changes are also known to be downstream of stimulated NMDAR activity, others appear specific to basal NMDAR activity. The genes altered by AP5 treatment of basal cultures were enriched for pathways related to class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), apoptosis, and synapse-related signaling. Specifically, AP5 altered the expression of all three class IIa HDACs that are highly expressed in the brain, HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9, and also induced nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. HDAC4 knockdown abolished a subset of the gene expression changes induced by AP5, and led to neuronal death under long-term tetrodotoxin or AP5 treatment in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. These data suggest that basal, but not evoked, NMDAR activity regulates gene expression in part through HDAC4, and, that HDAC4 has neuroprotective functions under conditions of low NMDAR activity.

  14. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  15. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  16. Chromatin structure implicated in activation of HIV-1 gene expression by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M. )

    1990-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of different DNA-damaging agents on HIV-1 gene expression. We find that agents that produce bulky DNA lesions, similar to those induced by ultraviolet light (UV), all dramatically increase HIV-1 gene expression, whereas agents that produce primarily base damage and DNA breakage, such as ionizing radiation, have little or no effect. We show that these effects are independent of DNA synthesis per se and do not require DNA nucleotide excision repair. The drug novobiocin effectively prevents the UV activation process, consistent with the idea that a change in DNA chromatin structure may be required. We suggest that a transient decondensation of chromatin structure, an early step in DNA nucleotide excision repair but not in base excision repair, may be the triggering mechanism. The decondensation may allow the transcriptional machinery better access to the HIV-1 promoter region, thereby increasing gene expression.

  17. Gene activation and cell fate control in plants: a chromatin perspective.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Julia; Blanvillain, Robert; Carles, Cristel C

    2014-08-01

    In plants, environment-adaptable organogenesis extends throughout the lifespan, and iterative development requires repetitive rounds of activation and repression of several sets of genes. Eukaryotic genome compaction into chromatin forms a physical barrier for transcription; therefore, induction of gene expression requires alteration in chromatin structure. One of the present great challenges in molecular and developmental biology is to understand how chromatin is brought from a repressive to permissive state on specific loci and in a very specific cluster of cells, as well as how this state is further maintained and propagated through time and cell division in a cell lineage. In this review, we report recent discoveries implementing our knowledge on chromatin dynamics that modulate developmental gene expression. We also discuss how new data sets highlight plant specificities, likely reflecting requirement for a highly dynamic chromatin.

  18. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  19. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  20. Viral microRNAs Target a Gene Network, Inhibit STAT Activation, and Suppress Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs during latency that are processed to yield ~25 mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We were interested in identifying cellular networks that were targeted by KSHV-miRNAs and employed network building strategies using validated KSHV miRNA targets. Here, we report the identification of a gene network centering on the transcription factor- signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that is targeted by KSHV miRNAs. KSHV miRNAs suppressed STAT3 and STAT5 activation and inhibited STAT3-dependent reporter activation upon IL6-treatment. KSHV miRNAs also repressed the induction of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes upon IFNα- treatment. Finally, we observed increased lytic reactivation of KSHV from latently infected cells upon STAT3 repression with siRNAs or a small molecule inhibitor. Our data suggest that treatment of infected cells with a STAT3 inhibitor and a viral replication inhibitor, ganciclovir, represents a possible strategy to eliminate latently infected cells without increasing virion production. Together, we show that KSHV miRNAs suppress a network of targets associated with STAT3, deregulate cytokine-mediated gene activation, suppress an interferon response, and influence the transition into the lytic phase of viral replication. PMID:28102325

  1. Regulation of Drug Disposition Gene Expression in Pregnant Mice with Car Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Amanda S.; Herrera-Garcia, Guadalupe; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; You, Dahea; Guo, Grace L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    More than half of pregnant women use prescription medications in order to maintain both maternal and fetal health. The constitutive androstane receptor (Car) critically affects the disposition of chemicals by regulating the transcription of genes encoding metabolic enzymes and transporters. However, the effects of Car activation on chemical disposition during pregnancy are unclear. This study aims to determine the degree to which pregnancy alters the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in response to the pharmacological activation of Car. To test this, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were administered IP doses of vehicle, or a potent Car agonist, TCPOBOP, on gestation days 14, 15 and 16. Hepatic mRNA and protein expression of Car target genes (phase I, II and transporters) were quantified on gestation day 17. Pregnancy-related changes, such as induction of Cyp2b10, Ugt1a1 and Sult1a1 and repression of Ugt1a6, Gsta1, Gsta2 and Mrp6, were observed. Interestingly, the induction of Cyp2b10, Gsta1, Gsta2 and Mrp2-4 mRNAs by TCPOBOP was attenuated in maternal livers suggesting that Car activation is impeded by the biochemical and/or physiological changes that occur during gestation. Taken together, these findings suggest that pregnancy and pharmacological activation of Car can differentially regulate the expression of drug metabolism and transport genes. PMID:27818994

  2. Evidence for evolutionary divergence of activity-dependent gene expression in developing neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jing; McQueen, Jamie; Bilican, Bilada; Dando, Owen; Magnani, Dario; Punovuori, Karolina; Selvaraj, Bhuvaneish T; Livesey, Matthew; Haghi, Ghazal; Heron, Samuel; Burr, Karen; Patani, Rickie; Rajan, Rinku; Sheppard, Olivia; Kind, Peter C; Simpson, T Ian; Tybulewicz, Victor LJ; Wyllie, David JA; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Lowell, Sally; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary differences in gene regulation between humans and lower mammalian experimental systems are incompletely understood, a potential translational obstacle that is challenging to surmount in neurons, where primary tissue availability is poor. Rodent-based studies show that activity-dependent transcriptional programs mediate myriad functions in neuronal development, but the extent of their conservation in human neurons is unknown. We compared activity-dependent transcriptional responses in developing human stem cell-derived cortical neurons with those induced in developing primary- or stem cell-derived mouse cortical neurons. While activity-dependent gene-responsiveness showed little dependence on developmental stage or origin (primary tissue vs. stem cell), notable species-dependent differences were observed. Moreover, differential species-specific gene ortholog regulation was recapitulated in aneuploid mouse neurons carrying human chromosome-21, implicating promoter/enhancer sequence divergence as a factor, including human-specific activity-responsive AP-1 sites. These findings support the use of human neuronal systems for probing transcriptional responses to physiological stimuli or indeed pharmaceutical agents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20337.001 PMID:27692071

  3. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor R; Jones, Gavin C; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1Hz for 48h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  4. Involvement of SOX proteins in lens-specific activation of crystallin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kamachi, Y; Sockanathan, S; Liu, Q; Breitman, M; Lovell-Badge, R; Kondoh, H

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of delta 1-crystallin gene activation, which occurs early in lens cell differentiation, and have previously shown that an essential element of the delta 1-crystallin enhancer is bound by a group of nuclear factors, delta EF2, among which delta EF2a is highly enriched in lens cells. In this report we show that the cDNA of delta EF2a codes for the chicken SOX-2 protein (cSOX-2), which is structurally related to the sex-determining factor SRY. Sox-2 is expressed at high levels in the early developing lens in both chicken and mouse embryos. Overexpression of delta EF2a/cSOX-2 increased delta 1-crystallin enhancer activity to a plateau in lens cells, but not in fibroblasts, consistent with the previously drawn conclusion that delta EF2a activates transcription only in concert with another factor present in the lens. This result supports the model that SOX proteins act as architectural components in the activating complex formed on an enhancer, as indicated for another HMG domain protein, lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF-1). We also show that SOX protein binding is essential for lens-specific promoter activity of the mouse gamma F-crystallin gene. This work is the first to show delta- and gamma-crystallin genes as examples of direct regulatory targets of SOX proteins and provides evidence that diversified crystallin genes are regulated, at least partly, by a common mechanism. Images PMID:7628452

  5. PcaU, a Transcriptional Activator of Genes for Protocatechuate Utilization in Acinetobacter†

    PubMed Central

    Gerischer, Ulrike; Segura, Ana; Ornston, L. Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    The Acinetobacter pcaIJFBDKCHG operon encodes the six enzymes that convert protocatechuate to citric acid cycle intermediates. Directly downstream from the operon are qui and pob genes encoding sets of enzymes that convert quinate and p-hydroxybenzoate, respectively, to protocatechuate. Prior to this investigation, the only known regulatory gene in the pca-qui-pob cluster was pobR, which encodes a transcriptional activator that responds to p-hydroxybenzoate and activates transcription of pobA. The pca and qui genes were known to be expressed in response to protocatechuate, but a protein that mediated this induction had not been identified. This study was initiated by characterization of a spontaneous mutation that mapped upstream from pcaI and prevented expression of the pca genes. Sequencing of wild-type DNA extending from the translational start of pcaI through and beyond the location of the mutation revealed a 282-bp intergenic region and a divergently transcribed open reading frame, designated pcaU. Downstream from pcaU are two open reading frames encoding proteins similar in amino acid sequence to those associated with the oxidation of acyl thioesters. Inactivation of pcaU reduced the induced expression of pca structural genes by about 90% and impeded but did not completely prevent growth of the mutant cells with protocatechuate. PcaU was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to bind to a portion of the pcaI-pcaU intergenic region containing a sequence identical in 16 of 19 nucleotide residues to a segment of the pob operator. Further similarity of the two regulatory systems is indicated by 54% amino acid sequence identity in the aligned primary structures of PobR and PcaU. The pob and pca systems were shown to differ, however, in the relative orientations of transcriptional starts with respect to the site where the activator binds to DNA, the size of the intergenic region, and the tightness of transcriptional control. The spontaneous mutation blocking pca

  6. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  7. The X protein of hepatitis B virus activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing melanoma inhibitory activity 2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yilin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yanyan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated that HBV represses MIA2 gene expression both invitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X protein of HBV plays a major role in such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activates cell growth and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates cell proliferation, over-expression of MIA2 impaired such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing MIA2 expression. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths globally. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection accounts for over 75% of all HCC cases; however, the molecular pathogenesis of HCC is not well understood. In this study, we found that the expression of the newly identified gene melanoma inhibitory activity 2 (MIA2) was reduced by HBV infection invitro and invivo, and that HBV X protein (HBx) plays a major role in this regulation. Recent studies have revealed that MIA2 is a potential tumor suppressor, and that, in most HCCs, MIA2 expression is down-regulated or lost. We found that the knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activated cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that MIA2 inhibits HCC cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the over-expression of HBx alone induced cell proliferation, whereas MIA2 over-expression impaired the HBx-mediated induction of proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that HBx activates hepatoma cell growth and proliferation through repression of the potential tumor suppressor MIA2.

  8. Synergistic and Antagonistic Interplay between Myostatin Gene Expression and Physical Activity Levels on Gene Expression Patterns in Triceps Brachii Muscles of C57/BL6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Mishra, Sanjibita; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of myostatin expression and physical activity have both been associated with transcriptome dysregulation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The transcriptome of triceps brachii muscles from male C57/BL6 mice corresponding to two genotypes (wild-type and myostatin-reduced) under two conditions (high and low physical activity) was characterized using RNA-Seq. Synergistic and antagonistic interaction and ortholog modes of action of myostatin genotype and activity level on genes and gene pathways in this skeletal muscle were uncovered; 1,836, 238, and 399 genes exhibited significant (FDR-adjusted P-value < 0.005) activity-by-genotype interaction, genotype and activity effects, respectively. The most common differentially expressed profiles were (i) inactive myostatin-reduced relative to active and inactive wild-type, (ii) inactive myostatin-reduced and active wild-type, and (iii) inactive myostatin-reduced and inactive wild-type. Several remarkable genes and gene pathways were identified. The expression profile of nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (Naca) supports a synergistic interaction between activity level and myostatin genotype, while Gremlin 2 (Grem2) displayed an antagonistic interaction. Comparison between activity levels revealed expression changes in genes encoding for structural proteins important for muscle function (including troponin, tropomyosin and myoglobin) and for fatty acid metabolism (some linked to diabetes and obesity, DNA-repair, stem cell renewal, and various forms of cancer). Conversely, comparison between genotype groups revealed changes in genes associated with G1-to-S-phase transition of the cell cycle of myoblasts and the expression of Grem2 proteins that modulate the cleavage of the myostatin propeptide. A number of myostatin-feedback regulated gene products that are primarily regulatory were uncovered, including microRNA impacting central functions and Piezo proteins that make cationic current

  9. Activation of the Arabidopsis B class homeotic genes by APETALA1.

    PubMed

    Ng, M; Yanofsky, M F

    2001-04-01

    Proper development of petals and stamens in Arabidopsis flowers requires the activities of APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI), whose transcripts can be detected in the petal and stamen primordia. Localized expression of AP3 and PI requires the activities of at least three genes: APETALA1 (AP1), LEAFY (LFY), and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO). It has been proposed that UFO provides spatial cues and that LFY specifies competence for AP3 and PI expression in the developing flower. To understand the epistatic relationship among AP1, LFY, and UFO in regulating AP3 and PI expression, we generated two versions of AP1 that have strong transcriptional activation potential. Genetic and molecular analyses of transgenic plants expressing these activated AP1 proteins show that the endogenous AP1 protein acts largely as a transcriptional activator in vivo and that AP1 specifies petals by regulating the spatial domains of AP3 and PI expression through UFO.

  10. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    PubMed

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  11. Meta-analysis of primary target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Uski, J Oskari; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. Results In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. Conclusion An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection. PMID:17650321

  12. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  13. Transcriptome Sequencing of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis to Analyze the Genes Related to Optically Active Phycoerythrin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyun; Zang, Xiaonan; Wu, Fei; Jin, Yuming; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Chang; Ding, Yating; He, Bangxiang; Xiao, Dongfang; Song, Xinwei; Liu, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (aka Gracilaria lemaneiformis) is a red macroalga rich in phycoerythrin, which can capture light efficiently and transfer it to photosystemⅡ. However, little is known about the synthesis of optically active phycoerythrinin in G. lemaneiformis at the molecular level. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technology, analysis of genetic information for G. lemaneiformis by transcriptome sequencing is an effective means to get a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism of phycoerythrin synthesis. Illumina technology was employed to sequence the transcriptome of two strains of G. lemaneiformis- the wild type and a green-pigmented mutant. We obtained a total of 86915 assembled unigenes as a reference gene set, and 42884 unigenes were annotated in at least one public database. Taking the above transcriptome sequencing as a reference gene set, 4041 differentially expressed genes were screened to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles of the wild type and green mutant. By GO and KEGG pathway analysis, we concluded that three factors, including a reduction in the expression level of apo-phycoerythrin, an increase of chlorophyll light-harvesting complex synthesis, and reduction of phycoerythrobilin by competitive inhibition, caused the reduction of optically active phycoerythrin in the green-pigmented mutant. PMID:28135287

  14. Diet quality determines lipase gene expression and lipase/esterase activity in Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Wacker, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the short- (12 h) and long-term (144 h) response of Daphnia pulex lipases to quality shifts in diets consisting of different mixtures of the green alga Scenedesmus with the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, two species with contrasting lipid compositions. The lipase/esterase activity in both the gut and the body tissues had fast responses to the diet shift and increased with higher dietary contributions of Synechococcus. When screening the Daphnia genome for TAG lipases, we discovered a large gene-family expansion of these enzymes. We used a subset of eight genes for mRNA expression analyses and distinguished between influences of time and diet on the observed gene expression patterns. We identified five diet-responsive lipases of which three showed a sophisticated short- and long-term pattern of expression in response to small changes in food-quality. Furthermore, the gene expression of one of the lipases was strongly correlated to lipase/esterase activity in the gut suggesting its potentially major role in digestion. These findings demonstrate that the lipid-related enzymatic machinery of D. pulex is finely tuned to diet and might constitute an important mechanism of physiological adaptation in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:28069588

  15. ZNF395 Is an Activator of a Subset of IFN-Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Linda; Herwartz, Christine; Jordanovski, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the interferon (IFN) pathway in response to infection with pathogens results in the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) including proinflammatory cytokines, which mount the proper antiviral immune response. However, aberrant expression of these genes is pathogenic to the host. In addition to IFN-induced transcription factors non-IFN-regulated factors contribute to the transcriptional control of ISGs. Here, we show by genome wide expression analysis, siRNA-mediated suppression and Doxycycline-induced overexpression that the cellular transcription factor ZNF395 activates a subset of ISGs including the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in keratinocytes. We found that ZNF395 acts independently of IFN but enhances the IFN-induced expression of CXCL10 and CXCL11. Luciferase reporter assays revealed a requirement of intact NFκB-binding sites for ZNF395 to stimulate the CXCL10 promoter. The transcriptional activation of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by ZNF395 was abolished after inhibition of IKK by BMS-345541, which increased the stability of ZNF395. ZNF395 encodes at least two motifs that mediate the enhanced degradation of ZNF395 in response to IKK activation. Thus, IKK is required for ZNF395-mediated activation of transcription and enhances its turn-over to keep the activity of ZNF395 low. Our results support a previously unrecognized role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response and inflammation. PMID:28316371

  16. Genistein mediated histone acetylation and demethylation activates tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Urakami, Shinji; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Majid, Shahana; Igawa, Mikio; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen that has been reported to suppress the AKT signaling pathway in several malignancies. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein action is not known. We tested the hypothesis that genistein activates expression of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) that have unmethylated promoters such as PTEN, CYLD, p53 and FOXO3a. We report here that genistein activates TSGs through remodeling of the heterochromatic domains at promoters in prostate cancer cells by modulating histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation and deacetylation. Genistein activation involved demethylation and acetylation of H3-K9 at the PTEN and the CYLD promoter, while acetylation of H3-K9 at the p53 and the FOXO3a promoter occurred through reduction of endogenous SIRT1 activity. There was a decrease of SIRT1 expression and accumulation of SIRT1 in the cytoplasm from the nucleus. Increased expression of these TSGs was also reciprocally related to attenuation of phosphorylated-AKT and NF-kappaB binding activity in prostate cancer cells. This is the first report describing a novel epigenetic pathway that activates TSGs by modulating either histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation or deacetylation at gene promoters leading to inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings strengthen the understanding of how genistein may be chemoprotective in prostate cancer.

  17. Detection of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Some Chemicals in Food Using a Reporter Gene Assay

    PubMed Central

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Nakamura, Masafumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko; Watanabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a simple bioassay used for the detection of dioxins (DXNs) could be applied to detect trace amounts of harmful DXN-like substances in food products. To identify substances with possible DXN-like activity, we assessed the ability of various compounds in the environment to bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that binds specifically to DXNs. The compounds tested included 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 20 PAH derivatives (nitrated, halogenated, and aminated derivatives), 23 pesticides, six amino acids, and eight amino acid metabolites. The AhR binding activities (AhR activity) of these compounds were measured using the chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) reporter gene assay system. The majority of the PAHs exhibited marked AhR activity that increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a positive link between AhR activity and the number of aromatic rings in the PAH derivatives. Conversely, there appeared to be a negative correlation between AhR activity and the number of chlorine residues present on halogenated PAH derivatives. However, there was no correlation between AhR activity and the number and position of substituents among nitrated and aminated derivatives. Among the pesticides tested, the indole-type compounds carbendazim and thiabendazole showed high levels of activity. Similarly, the indole compound tryptamine was the only amino acid metabolite to induce AhR activity. The results are useful in understanding the identification and characterization of AhR ligands in the CALUX assay. PMID:28231110

  18. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  19. Enhancement of gene transactivation activity of androgen receptor by hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yanyan; Chen Wenling; Ma, W.-L. Maverick; Chang Chawnshang; Ou, J.-H. James . E-mail: jamesou@hsc.usc.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is a regulatory protein that is required for efficient replication of HBV in its natural host. In this report, we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that HBx can physically bind to the androgen receptor (AR), which is a nuclear hormone receptor that is expressed in many different tissues including the liver. This observation is further supported by confocal microscopy, which reveals that HBx can alter the subcellular localization of the AR both in the presence and in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Further studies indicate that HBx can enhance the gene transactivation activity of AR by enhancing its DNA binding activity in a DHT-dependent manner. However, HBx does not remain associated with AR on the DNA. As AR can regulate the expression of a number of cellular genes, our results raise the possibility that HBV pathogenesis may be mediated in part via the interaction between HBx and AR.

  20. The multiple sulfatase deficiency gene encodes an essential and limiting factor for the activity of sulfatases.

    PubMed

    Cosma, Maria Pia; Pepe, Stefano; Annunziata, Ida; Newbold, Robert F; Grompe, Markus; Parenti, Giancarlo; Ballabio, Andrea

    2003-05-16

    In multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a human inherited disorder, the activities of all sulfatases are impaired due to a defect in posttranslational modification. Here we report the identification, by functional complementation using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, of a gene that is mutated in MSD and is able to rescue the enzymatic deficiency in patients' cell lines. Functional conservation of this gene was observed among distantly related species, suggesting a critical biological role. Coexpression of SUMF1 with sulfatases results in a strikingly synergistic increase of enzymatic activity, indicating that SUMF1 is both an essential and a limiting factor for sulfatases. These data have profound implications on the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy for eight distinct inborn errors of metabolism.

  1. The coat protein gene of tobamovirus P 0 pathotype is a determinant for activation of temperature-insensitive L 1a-gene-mediated resistance in Capsicum plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Katsutoshi; Sawada, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Kouhei; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Eri; Ito, Takao; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Tsuda, Shinya; Suzuki, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Kappei; Kiba, Akinori; Okuno, Tetsuro; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2008-01-01

    Tobamovirus resistance in Capsicum plants, which is mediated by L genes (L(1), L(2), L(3) or L(4)), is known to be temperature sensitive. However, the L(1a ) gene, a newly identified tobamovirus resistance gene that is mapped to the L locus, confers temperature-insensitive resistance against the tobamovirus P(0) pathotype. To identify the viral elicitor that activates the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance, several chimeric viral genomes were constructed between tobacco mosaic virus-L (P(0) pathotype), paprika mild mottle virus-J (P(1 )pathotype) and pepper mild mottle virus-J (P(1,2) pathotype). Infection patterns of these chimeric viruses in L(1a )-harboring plants revealed that the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance was activated by the CP of a particular pathotype of tobamovirus, like other L-gene-mediated resistances, but the L(1a )-gene-mediated resistance differs from those conferred by other L genes in terms of temperature sensitivity.

  2. Optimal reference genes for qPCR in resting and activated human NK cells--Flow cytometric data correspond to qPCR gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaszubowska, Lucyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr Mieczysław; Karsznia, Sylwia; Damska, Marta; Ślebioda, Tomasz Jerzy; Foerster, Jerzy; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2015-07-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are cytotoxic lymphocytes critical to the innate immune system engaged in rapid response against tumor or virus infected cells. After activation NK cells acquire enhanced cytotoxicity and are capable of producing cytokines to stimulate other immune cells. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a method of choice for gene expression analysis but the usage of reliable reference genes for the normalization process is critical. Commonly used reference genes may vary in expression level between different experimental conditions providing wrong quantitative results of the studied genes' expression levels. Fourteen potential endogenous control genes were analyzed by qPCR method in NK-92 cell line that shows characteristics of human natural killer cells and is often used in studies on biology of NK lymphocytes. NK-92 cells were stimulated with IL-2 or TNF for 2, 24 or 72 h. Results were analyzed with RefFinder, a program which enables evaluation and screening of reference genes and integrates the currently available major computational programs (Genorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper and Delta Ct). The most stable gene in activated and non-activated NK cells was B2M, followed by IPO-8 and GAPDH and the least stable were HPRT1, PPIA and RPL32. The normalization process was performed on SOD2 gene and the results of qPCR experiments were confirmed by flow cytometry. The flow cytometric data corresponded to the results of qPCR gene expression analysis performed for the reference genes qualified by RefFinder as the most stable.

  3. S100A8/A9 activate key genes and pathways in colon tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mie; Williams, Roy; Wang, Ling; Vogl, Thomas; Srikrishna, Geetha

    2011-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in modulating tumor progression. Earlier, we showed that S100A8/A9 proteins secreted by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) present within tumors and metastatic sites promote an autocrine pathway for accumulation of MDSC. In a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, we also showed that S100A8/A9-positive cells accumulate in all regions of dysplasia and adenoma. Here we present evidence that S100A8/A9 interact with RAGE and carboxylated glycans on colon tumor cells and promote activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Comparison of gene expression profiles of S100A8/A9-activated colon tumor cells versus unactivated cells led us to identify a small cohort of genes upregulated in activated cells, including Cxcl1, Ccl5 and Ccl7, Slc39a10, Lcn2, Zc3h12a, Enpp2, and other genes, whose products promote leukocyte recruitment, angiogenesis, tumor migration, wound healing, and formation of premetastatic niches in distal metastatic organs. Consistent with this observation, in murine colon tumor models we found that chemokines were upregulated in tumors, and elevated in sera of tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Mice lacking S100A9 showed significantly reduced tumor incidence, growth and metastasis, reduced chemokine levels, and reduced infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells within tumors and premetastatic organs. Studies using bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that S100A8/A9 expression on myeloid cells is essential for development of colon tumors. Our results thus reveal a novel role for myeloid-derived S100A8/A9 in activating specific downstream genes associated with tumorigenesis and in promoting tumor growth and metastasis.

  4. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  5. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  7. Wnt6 activates endoderm in the sea urchin gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Jenifer; Range, Ryan; Wu, Shu-Yu; Miranda, Esther; Lhomond, Guy; Peng, Jeff Chieh-fu; Lepage, Thierry; McClay, David R.

    2011-01-01

    In the sea urchin, entry of β-catenin into the nuclei of the vegetal cells at 4th and 5th cleavages is necessary for activation of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network. Beyond that, little is known about how the embryo uses maternal information to initiate specification. Here, experiments establish that of the three maternal Wnts in the egg, Wnt6 is necessary for activation of endodermal genes in the endomesoderm GRN. A small region of the vegetal cortex is shown to be necessary for activation of the endomesoderm GRN. If that cortical region of the egg is removed, addition of Wnt6 rescues endoderm. At a molecular level, the vegetal cortex region contains a localized concentration of Dishevelled (Dsh) protein, a transducer of the canonical Wnt pathway; however, Wnt6 mRNA is not similarly localized. Ectopic activation of the Wnt pathway, through the expression of an activated form of β-catenin, of a dominant-negative variant of GSK-3β or of Dsh itself, rescues endomesoderm specification in eggs depleted of the vegetal cortex. Knockdown experiments in whole embryos show that absence of Wnt6 produces embryos that lack endoderm, but those embryos continue to express a number of mesoderm markers. Thus, maternal Wnt6 plus a localized vegetal cortical molecule, possibly Dsh, is necessary for endoderm specification; this has been verified in two species of sea urchin. The data also show that Wnt6 is only one of what are likely to be multiple components that are necessary for activation of the entire endomesoderm gene regulatory network. PMID:21750039

  8. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  9. Partially phosphorylated Pho4 activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael; Wykoff, Dennis D; Miller, Nicole; O'Shea, Erin K

    2003-11-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin-CDK complex Pho80-Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80-Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80-Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs.

  10. Partially Phosphorylated Pho4 Activates Transcription of a Subset of Phosphate-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin–CDK complex Pho80–Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80–Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80–Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs. PMID:14624238

  11. World's First Clinical Case of Gene-Activated Bone Substitute Application

    PubMed Central

    Deev, R. V.; Drobyshev, A. Y.; Isaev, A. A.; Eremin, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with large bone defects is a complex clinical problem. We have initiated the first clinical study of a gene-activated bone substitute composed of the collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and plasmid DNA encoding vascular endothelial growth factor. The first patient with two nonunions of previously reconstructed mandible was enrolled into the study. Scar tissues were excised; bone defects (5–14 mm) between the mandibular fragments and nonvascularized rib-bone autograft were filled in with the gene-activated bone substitute. No adverse events were observed during 12 months of follow-up. In 3 months, the average density of newly formed tissues within the implantation zone was 402.21 ± 84.40 and 447.68 ± 106.75 HU in the frontal and distal regions, respectively, which correlated with the density of spongy bone. Complete distal bone defect repair with vestibular and lingual cortical plates formation was observed in 6 and 12 months after surgery; thereby the posterior nonunion was successfully eliminated. However, there was partial resorption of the proximal edge of the autograft entailed to relapse of the anterior nonunion. Thus, the first clinical data on the safety and efficacy of the gene-activated bone substitute were obtained. Given a high complexity of the clinical situation the treatment, results might be considered as promising. NCT02293031. PMID:27891264

  12. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  13. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  14. The human PRD-like homeobox gene LEUTX has a central role in embryo genome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Madissoon, Elo; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petropoulos, Sophie; Månsson, Robert; Linnarsson, Sten; Bürglin, Thomas; Lanner, Fredrik; Hovatta, Outi; Katayama, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    Leucine twenty homeobox (LEUTX) is a paired (PRD)-like homeobox gene that is expressed almost exclusively in human embryos during preimplantation development. We previously identified a novel transcription start site for the predicted human LEUTX gene based on the transcriptional analysis of human preimplantation embryos. The novel variant encodes a protein with a complete homeodomain. Here, we provide a detailed description of the molecular cloning of the complete homeodomain-containing LEUTX. Using a human embryonic stem cell overexpression model we show that the complete homeodomain isoform is functional and sufficient to activate the transcription of a large proportion of the genes that are upregulated in human embryo genome activation (EGA), whereas the previously predicted partial homeodomain isoform is largely inactive. Another PRD-like transcription factor, DPRX, is then upregulated as a powerful repressor of transcription. We propose a two-stage model of human EGA in which LEUTX acts as a transcriptional activator at the 4-cell stage, and DPRX as a balancing repressor at the 8-cell stage. We conclude that LEUTX is a candidate regulator of human EGA. PMID:27578796

  15. Pyrophosphate Stimulates Differentiation, Matrix Gene Expression and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Lu, Xi; Lind, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Engstrand, Thomas; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Pyrophosphate is a potent mitogen, capable of stimulating proliferation in multiple cell types, and a critical participant in bone mineralization. Pyrophosphate can also affect the resorption rate and bioactivity of orthopedic ceramics. The present study investigated whether calcium pyrophosphate affected proliferation, differentiation and gene expression in early (MC3T3 pre-osteoblast) and late stage (SAOS-2 osteosarcoma) osteoblasts. Pyrophosphate stimulated peak alkaline phosphatase activity by 50% and 150% at 100μM and 0.1μM in MC3T3, and by 40% in SAOS-2. The expression of differentiation markers collagen 1 (COL1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN) were increased by an average of 1.5, 2, 2 and 3 fold, by high concentrations of sodium pyrophosphate (100μM) after 7 days of exposure in MC3T3. COX-2 and ANK expression did not differ significantly from controls in either treatment group. Though both high and low concentrations of pyrophosphate stimulate ALP activity, only high concentrations (100μM) stimulated osteogenic gene expression. Pyrophosphate did not affect proliferation in either cell type. The results of this study confirm that chronic exposure to pyrophosphate exerts a physiological effect upon osteoblast differentiation and ALP activity, specifically by stimulating osteoblast differentiation markers and extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:27701417

  16. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-11-23

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown.

  17. Gene-set activity toolbox (GAT): A platform for microarray-based cancer diagnosis using an integrative gene-set analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Engchuan, Worrawat; Meechai, Asawin; Tongsima, Sissades; Doungpan, Narumol; Chan, Jonathan H

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that cannot be diagnosed reliably using only single gene expression analysis. Using gene-set analysis on high throughput gene expression profiling controlled by various environmental factors is a commonly adopted technique used by the cancer research community. This work develops a comprehensive gene expression analysis tool (gene-set activity toolbox: (GAT)) that is implemented with data retriever, traditional data pre-processing, several gene-set analysis methods, network visualization and data mining tools. The gene-set analysis methods are used to identify subsets of phenotype-relevant genes that will be used to build a classification model. To evaluate GAT performance, we performed a cross-dataset validation study on three common cancers namely colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The results show that GAT can be used to build a reasonable disease diagnostic model and the predicted markers have biological relevance. GAT can be accessed from http://gat.sit.kmutt.ac.th where GAT's java library for gene-set analysis, simple classification and a database with three cancer benchmark datasets can be downloaded.

  18. Continuous activity and no cycling of clock genes in the Antarctic midge during the polar summer.

    PubMed

    Kobelkova, Alena; Goto, Shin G; Peyton, Justin T; Ikeno, Tomoko; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extreme seasonal shifts of day length in polar regions, ranging from constant light in the summer to constant darkness in the winter, pose an intriguing environment for probing activity rhythms and the functioning of circadian clocks. Here, we monitor locomotor activity during the summer on the Antarctic Peninsula and under laboratory conditions, as well as the accompanying patterns of clock gene expression in the Antarctic midge, the only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae and adults are most active during the warmest portion of the day, but at a constant temperature they remain continuously active regardless of the photoregime, and activity also persists in constant darkness. The canonical clock genes period, timeless, Clock, and vrille are expressed in the head but we detected no cycling of expression in either the field or under diverse photoregimes in the laboratory. The timekeeping function of the clock has possibly been lost, enabling the midge to opportunistically exploit the unpredictable availability of permissive thermal conditions for growth, development, and reproduction during the short summer in Antarctica.

  19. PKA/CREB regulates the constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianjun; Zhou, Xiaoou; Gong, Zhen; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    The human ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22) plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle processes and its overexpression has been linked to tumor progression. However, the mechanisms leading to USP22 transcriptional activation in human cancer cells are still unclear. Previously, we characterized the 5'-flanking sequence of the human USP22 gene and found a potential CREB/ATF binding site within the basic promoter region. The present study found that this site was required for constitutive USP22 transcriptional activity in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that CREB interacted with this site. siRNA knockdown of CREB decreased USP22 transcriptional activation and endogenous expression, whereas CREB overexpression did not affect transcriptional levels. Furthermore, USP22 promoter activity and expression were decreased by inhibiting PKA with H-89, but were not responsive to forskolin induction. All of these results demonstrate that PKA/CREB is involved in the regulation of constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

  20. Expression of an activated rasD gene changes cell fate decisions during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Louis, S A; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1997-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the expression of an activated rasD gene in wild-type Dictyostelium cells results in formation of aggregates with multitips, instead of the normal single tips, and a block in further development. In an attempt to better understand the role of activated RasD development, we examined cell-type-specific gene expression in a strain stably expressing high levels of RasD[G12T]. We found that the expression of prestalk cell-specific genes ecmA and tagB was markedly enhanced, whereas the expression of the prespore cell-specific gene cotC was reduced to very low levels. When the fate of cells in the multitipped aggregate was monitored with an ecmA/lacZ fusion, it appeared that most of the cells eventually adopted prestalk gene expression characteristics. When mixtures of the [G12T]rasD cells and Ax3 cells were induced to differentiate, chimeric pseudoplasmodia were not formed. Thus, although the [G12T]rasD transformant had a marked propensity to form prestalk cells, it could not supply the prestalk cell population when mixed with wild-type cells. Both stalk and spore cell formation occurred in low cell density monolayers of the [G12T]rasD strain, suggesting that at least part of the inhibition of stalk and spore formation during multicellular development involved inhibitory cell interactions within the cell mass. Models for the possible role of rasD in development are discussed.

  1. Retrovolution: HIV-driven evolution of cellular genes and improvement of anticancer drug activation.

    PubMed

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-08-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research.

  2. Retrovolution: HIV–Driven Evolution of Cellular Genes and Improvement of Anticancer Drug Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research. PMID:22927829

  3. Passenger mutations and aberrant gene expression in congenic tissue plasminogen activator-deficient mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, R.; Samson, A. L.; Lawrence, D. A.; Medcalf, R. L.; Bugge, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The ability to generate defined null mutations in mice revolutionized the analysis of gene function in mammals. However, gene-deficient mice generated by using 129-derived embryonic stem cells may carry large segments of 129 DNA, even when extensively backcrossed to reference strains, such as C57BL/6J, and this may confound interpretation of experiments performed in these mice. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), encoded by the PLAT gene, is a fibrinolytic serine protease that is widely expressed in the brain. A number of neurological abnormalities have been reported in tPA-deficient mice. Objectives To study genetic contamination of tPA-deficient mice. Materials and methods Whole genome expression array analysis, RNAseq expression profiling, low- and high-density SNP analysis, bioinformatics, and genome editing was used to analyze gene expression in tPA-deficient mouse brains. Results and conclusions Genes differentially expressed in the brain of Plat−/− mice from two independent colonies highly backcrossed onto the C57BL/6J strain clustered near Plat on chromosome 8. SNP analysis attributed this anomaly to about 20 Mbp of DNA flanking Plat being of 129 origin in both strains. Bioinformatic analysis of these 129-derived chromosomal segments identified a significant number of mutations in genes co-segregating with the targeted Plat allele, including several potential null mutations. Using zinc finger nuclease technology, we generated novel “passenger mutation”-free isogenic C57BL/6J-Plat−/− and FVB/NJ-Plat−/− mouse strains by introducing an 11 bp deletion in the exon encoding the signal peptide. These novel mouse strains will be a useful community resource for further exploration of tPA function in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:27079292

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-dependent activation of inflammatory genes in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hua; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Takahashi, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Takanari; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies have suggested that infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentiate atherosclerosis and human coronary heart disease. Furthermore, infection with invasive, but not noninvasive P. gingivalis has been demonstrated to accelerate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and to accelerate local inflammatory responses in aortic tissue. In the present study, using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, we have defined the gene expression profile of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) after infection with invasive and noninvasive P. gingivalis. After infection of HAEC with invasive P. gingivalis strain 381, we observed the upregulation of 68 genes. Genes coding for the cytokines Gro2 and Gro3; the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and ELAM-1 (E-selectin); the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8); and the proinflammatory molecules IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 were among the most highly upregulated genes in P. gingivalis 381-infected HAEC compared to uninfected HAEC control. Increased mRNA levels for signaling molecules, transcriptional regulators, and cell surface receptors were also observed. Of note, only 4 of these 68 genes were also upregulated in HAEC infected with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant. Reverse transcription-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-/P-selectins, IL-6, and IL-8 in HAEC infected with invasive P. gingivalis. We also demonstrated that increased expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in aortic tissue of ApoE(-/-) mice orally challenged with invasive P. gingivalis but not with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant by immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that P. gingivalis fimbria-mediated invasion upregulates inflammatory gene expression in HAEC and in aortic

  5. Promoter Methylation Pattern Controls Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Gene Activity in Human Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xin; Bowman, Maria; Scott, Rodney J.; Fitter, John; Smith, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Placental CRH production increases with advancing pregnancy in women and its course predicts gestational length. We hypothesized that CRH gene expression in the placenta is epigenetically controlled setting gestational trajectories characteristic of normal and pathological pregnancies. Here we determined histone modification and DNA methylation levels and DNA methylation patterns at the CRH promoter in primary trophoblast cultures by chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with clonal bisulfite sequencing and identified the transcriptionally active epialleles that associate with particular histone modifications and transcription factors during syncytialisation and cAMP-stimulation. CRH gene expression increased during syncytial differentiation and cAMP stimulation, which was associated with increased activating and decreased repressive histone modification levels at the promoter. DNA methylation levels remained unchanged. The nine CpGs of the CRH proximal promoter were partially and allele-independently methylated displaying many (>100) epialleles. RNA-polymerase-II (Pol-II) bound only to three particular epialleles in cAMP-stimulated cells, while phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) bound to only one epiallele, which was different from those selected by Pol-II. Binding of TATA-binding protein increased during syncytial differentiation preferentially at epialleles compatible with Pol-II and pCREB binding. Histone-3 acetylation was detected only at epialleles targeted by Pol-II and pCREB, while gene activating histone-4 acetylation and histone-3-lysine-4 trimethylation occurred at CRH epialleles not associated with Pol-II or pCREB. The suppressive histone-3-lysine-27 trimethyl and–lysine-9 trimethyl modifications showed little or no epiallele preference. The epiallele selectivity of activating histone modifications and transcription factor binding demonstrates the epigenetic and functional diversity of the CRH gene in trophoblasts, which is

  6. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  7. GBF-dependent family genes morphologically suppress the partially active Dictyostelium STATa strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Kanno-Tanabe, Naoko; Minemura, Kakeru; Kawata, Takefumi

    2008-02-01

    Transcription factor Dd-STATa, a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins, is necessary for culmination during development. We have isolated more than 18 putative multicopy suppressors of Dd-STATa using genetic screening. One was hssA gene, whose expression is known to be G-box-binding-factor-dependent and which was specific to prestalk A (pstA) cells, where Dd-STATa is activated. Also, hssA mRNA was expressed in pstA cells in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. At least 40 hssA-related genes are present in the genome and constitute a multigene family. The tagged HssA protein was translated; hssA encodes an unusually high-glycine-serine-rich small protein (8.37 kDa), which has strong homology to previously reported cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate-inducible 2C and 7E proteins. Overexpression of hssA mRNA as well as frame-shifted versions of hssA RNA suppressed the phenotype of the partially active Dd-STATa strain, suggesting that translation is not necessary for suppression. Although overexpression of prespore-specific genes among the family did not suppress the parental phenotype, prestalk-specific family members did. Although overexpression of the hssA did not revert the expression of Dd-STATa target genes, and although its suppression mechanism remains unknown, morphological reversion implies functional relationships between Dd-STATa and hssA.

  8. Evaluation of estrogenic activities of pesticides using an in vitro reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Mihoko; Fukunaga, Kenji; Sasaki, Mari; Nakamura, Masafumi; Tsuji, Motohiro; Nishiyama, Toshimasa

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of 32 pesticides in agricultural products were evaluated using the E-CALUX assay system developed by Xenobiotic Detection Systems Inc (North Carolina, USA). This system utilizes human ovarian carcinoma cells (BG1) stably transfected with an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter gene plasmid. It was found that tolclofos-methyl, prothiofos, diazinon, Thiabenclazole (TBZ) and pyriproxyfen had estrogenic activity. Several pesticides are often present in agricultural products. Therefore the estrogenicity of the mixtures of two kinds of pesticides was evaluated. The activity of diazinon/tolclofos-methyl, pyriproxyfen/prothiofos and TBZ/o-phenylphenol (OPP) was increased up to 1.2-5.3 fold. On the other hand, chlorfluazuron, imazalil and chlorfenapyr had anti-estrogenic activity. Further, to evaluate the change in the estrogenic activity of pesticide metabolites, an experimental system was established using a rat S9 mixture. Metabolites of permethrin and OPP had no estrogenic activity, but they had weak activity after the metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolites of TBZ exhibited less estrogenic activity than the original compounds.

  9. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-12-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  10. CRISPR-ERA: a comprehensive design tool for CRISPR-mediated gene editing, repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglei; Wei, Zheng; Dominguez, Antonia; Li, Yanda; Wang, Xiaowo; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The CRISPR/Cas9 system was recently developed as a powerful and flexible technology for targeted genome engineering, including genome editing (altering the genetic sequence) and gene regulation (without altering the genetic sequence). These applications require the design of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that are efficient and specific. However, this remains challenging, as it requires the consideration of many criteria. Several sgRNA design tools have been developed for gene editing, but currently there is no tool for the design of sgRNAs for gene regulation. With accumulating experimental data on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing and regulation, we implement a comprehensive computational tool based on a set of sgRNA design rules summarized from these published reports. We report a genome-wide sgRNA design tool and provide an online website for predicting sgRNAs that are efficient and specific. We name the tool CRISPR-ERA, for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-mediated editing, repression, and activation (ERA). Availability and implementation: http://CRISPR-ERA.stanford.edu. Contact: stanley.qi@stanford.edu or xwwang@tsinghua.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26209430

  11. Sensory experience and sensory activity regulate chemosensory receptor gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Peckol, Erin L.; Troemel, Emily R.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the environment cause both short-term and long-term changes in an animal's behavior. Here we show that specific sensory experiences cause changes in chemosensory receptor gene expression that may alter sensory perception in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Three predicted chemosensory receptor genes expressed in the ASI chemosensory neurons, srd-1, str-2, and str-3, are repressed by exposure to the dauer pheromone, a signal of crowding. Repression occurs at pheromone concentrations below those that induce formation of the alternative dauer larva stage, suggesting that exposure to pheromones can alter the chemosensory behaviors of non-dauer animals. In addition, ASI expression of srd-1, but not str-2 and str-3, is induced by sensory activity of the ASI neurons. Expression of two receptor genes is regulated by developmental entry into the dauer larva stage. srd-1 expression in ASI neurons is repressed in dauer larvae. str-2 expression in dauer animals is induced in the ASI neurons, but repressed in the AWC neurons. The ASI and AWC neurons remodel in the dauer stage, and these results suggest that their sensory specificity changes as well. We suggest that experience-dependent changes in chemosensory receptor gene expression may modify olfactory behaviors. PMID:11572964

  12. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activate C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.

  13. A single nucleotide polymorphism of porcine MX2 gene provides antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Tungtrakoolsub, Pullop; Morozumi, Takeya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MX2 gene affect its antiviral potential. MX proteins are known to suppress the multiplication of several viruses, including influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In domestic animals possessing highly polymorphic genome, our previous research indicated that a specific SNP in chicken Mx gene was responsible for its antiviral function. However, there still has been no information about SNPs in porcine MX2 gene. In this study, we first conducted polymorphism analysis in 17 pigs of MX2 gene derived from seven breeds. Consequently, a total of 30 SNPs, of which 11 were deduced to cause amino acid variations, were detected, suggesting that the porcine MX2 is very polymorphic. Next, we classified MX2 into eight alleles (A1-A8) and subsequently carried out infectious experiments with recombinant VSVΔG*-G to each allele. In A1-A5 and A8, position 514 amino acid (514 aa) of MX2 was glycine (Gly), which did not inhibit VSV multiplication, whereas in A6 and A7, 514 aa was arginine (Arg), which exhibited the antiviral ability against VSV. These results demonstrate that a SNP at 514 aa (Gly-Arg) of porcine MX2 plays a pivotal role in the antiviral activity as well as that at 631 aa of chicken Mx.

  14. Identification, nomenclature, and evolutionary relationships of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S; Reese, R Neil; Benson, Benjamin V

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution.

  15. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  16. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  17. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells. PMID:27977694

  18. Potentially novel copper resistance genes in copper-enriched activated sludge revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Guan; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we utilized the Illumina high-throughput metagenomic approach to investigate diversity and abundance of both microbial community and copper resistance genes (CuRGs) in activated sludge (AS) which was enriched under copper selective stress up to 800 mg/L. The raw datasets (~3.5 Gb for each sample, i.e., the copper-enriched AS and the control AS) were merged and normalized for the BLAST analyses against the SILVA SSU rRNA gene database and self-constructed copper resistance protein database (CuRD). Also, the raw metagenomic sequences were assembled into contigs and analyzed based on Open Reading Frames (ORFs) to identify potentially novel copper resistance genes. Among the different resistance systems for copper detoxification under the high copper stress condition, the Cus system was the most enriched system. The results also indicated that genes encoding multi-copper oxidase played a more important role than those encoding efflux proteins. More significantly, several potentially novel copper resistance ORFs were identified by Pfam search and phylogenic analysis. This study demonstrated a new understanding of microbial-mediated copper resistance under high copper stress using high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

  19. Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-12-05

    In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate toward neuronal precursor cells. Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5 µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate the expression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis, and nervous system development were significantly modulated. From our results, we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-16, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  1. Infection of Ustilaginoidea virens intercepts rice seed formation but activates grain-filling-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Li, Liang; Huang, Fu; Sun, Wen-Xian; Li, Yan; Huang, Yan-Yan; Xu, Yong-Ju; Shi, Jun; Lei, Yang; Zheng, Ai-Ping; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Rice false smut has become an increasingly serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The typical feature of this disease is that the fungal pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens (Uv) specifically infects rice flower and forms false smut ball, the ustiloxin-containing ball-like fungal colony, of which the size is usually several times larger than that of a mature rice seed. However, the underlying mechanisms of Uv-rice interaction are poorly understood. Here, we applied time-course microscopic and transcriptional approaches to investigate rice responses to Uv infection. The results demonstrated that the flower-opening process and expression of associated transcription factors, including ARF6 and ARF8, were inhibited in Uv-infected spikelets. The ovaries in infected spikelets were interrupted in fertilization and thus were unable to set seeds. However, a number of grain-filling-related genes, including seed storage protein genes, starch anabolism genes and endosperm-specific transcription factors (RISBZ1 and RPBF), were highly transcribed as if the ovaries were fertilized. In addition, critical defense-related genes like NPR1 and PR1 were downregulated by Uv infection. Our data imply that Uv may hijack host nutrient reservoir by activation of the grain-filling network because of growth and formation of false smut balls.

  2. cis and trans activation of globin gene transcription in transient assays.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Green, M R; Maniatis, T

    1983-12-01

    We examined the effects of the simian virus 40 enhancer sequence on transcription of cloned human alpha- and beta-globin genes shortly after their introduction into cultured mammalian cells. We find that (i) detectable transcription of the beta-globin gene but not the alpha-globin gene requires linkage to the enhancer; (ii) the enhancer increases the amount of beta-globin RNA at least 100-fold but results in only a 5- to 10-fold increase in the amount of alpha-globin RNA; (iii) plasmid replication does not increase the level of beta-globin RNA, regardless of linkage to the enhancer, but does result in an approximately equal to 50-fold increase in the level of alpha-globin RNA; (iv) the enhancer is not required for and does not increase transcription of either gene in 293 cells, an adenovirus 5-transformed human kidney cell line. We also show that an enhancer sequence is not required for activity of the normally enhancer-dependent simian virus 40 early promoter in 293 cells, indicating that these cells contain a trans-acting factor(s) that circumvents the requirement for the enhancer sequence.

  3. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Jennifer; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  4. TBP/TFIID-dependent activation of MyoD target genes in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Malecova, Barbora; Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Madaro, Luca; Gatto, Sole; Coutinho Toto, Paula; Albini, Sonia; Ryan, Tammy; Tora, Làszlò; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Change in the identity of the components of the transcription pre-initiation complex is proposed to control cell type-specific gene expression. Replacement of the canonical TFIID-TBP complex with TRF3/TBP2 was reported to be required for activation of muscle-gene expression. The lack of a developmental phenotype in TBP2 null mice prompted further analysis to determine whether TBP2 deficiency can compromise adult myogenesis. We show here that TBP2 null mice have an intact regeneration potential upon injury and that TBP2 is not expressed in established C2C12 muscle cell or in primary mouse MuSCs. While TFIID subunits and TBP are downregulated during myoblast differentiation, reduced amounts of these proteins form a complex that is detectable on promoters of muscle genes and is essential for their expression. This evidence demonstrates that TBP2 does not replace TBP during muscle differentiation, as previously proposed, with limiting amounts of TFIID-TBP being required to promote muscle-specific gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12534.001 PMID:26880551

  5. Hydrogen peroxide activates cell death and defense gene expression in birch.

    PubMed

    Pellinen, Riikka I; Korhonen, Minna-Sisko; Tauriainen, Airi A; Palva, E Tapio; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2002-10-01

    The function of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a signal molecule regulating gene expression and cell death induced by external stresses was studied in birch (Betula pendula). Ozone (O(3)), Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae (Pss), and wounding all induced cell death of various extents in birch leaves. This was temporally preceded and closely accompanied by H(2)O(2) accumulation at, and especially surrounding, the lesion sites. O(3) and Pss, along with an artificial H(2)O(2) producing system glucose (Glc)/Glc oxidase, elicited elevated mRNA levels corresponding to genes encoding reactive oxygen species detoxifying enzymes, Pal, Ypr10, and mitochondrial phosphate translocator 1. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, Glc/Glc oxidase also induced endogenous H(2)O(2) production in birch leaves, accompanied by cell death that resembled O(3) and Pss damage. Wound-induced gene expression differed from that induced by O(3) and Pss. Thus, it appears that at least two separate defense pathways can be activated in birch leaves by stress factors, even though the early H(2)O(2) accumulation response is common among them all.

  6. Isolation and structural characterization of the human 4F2 heavy-chain gene, an inducible gene involved in T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesdiener, K M; Karpinski, B A; Lindsten, T; Strominger, J L; Jones, N H; Thompson, C B; Leiden, J M

    1988-01-01

    The human 4F2 cell surface antigen is a 120-kilodalton (kDa) disulfide-linked heterodimer which is composed of an 80- to 90-kDa glycosylated heavy chain (4F2HC) and a 35- to 40-kDa nonglycosylated light chain (4F2LC). 4F2 belongs to a family of inducible cell surface molecules which are involved in T-lymphocyte activation and growth. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) that controls 4F2HC gene expression in both resting and activated T cells, a 4F2HC human genomic clone was isolated and structurally characterized. The 4F2HC gene spans 8 kilobases of chromosome 11 and is composed of nine exons. The 5' upstream region of the gene displays several properties which are characteristic of housekeeping genes. It is G+C rich and hypomethylated in peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA and contains multiple binding sites for the Sp1 transcription factor while lacking TATA or CCAAT sequences. This region of the gene also displays sequence homologies with several other inducible T-cell genes, including the interleukin-2, interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain, dihydrofolate reductase, thymidine kinase, and transferrin receptor genes. A 255-base-pair fragment of the 4F2HC gene which contains 154 base pairs of the 5' flanking sequence was able to efficiently promote expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in human Jurkat T cells, indicating that it contains promoter or enhancer (or both) sequences. Analyses of chromatin structure in resting and lectin-activated T cells revealed the presence of stable DNase I-hypersensitive sites within both the 5' flanking and intron 1 regions of the 4F2HC gene. Although the 4F2HC gene displayed many of the structural features characteristic of a constitutively expressed gene, lectin-mediated activation of resting peripheral blood T lymphocytes resulted in a dramatic increase in steady-state levels of 4F2HC mRNA. Images PMID:3265470

  7. Interaction Effects of BDNF and COMT Genes on Resting-State Brain Activity and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Chunhui; Xia, Mingrui; Wu, Karen; Chen, Chuansheng; He, Qinghua; Xue, Gui; Wang, Wenjing; He, Yong; Dong, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes have been found to interactively influence working memory (WM) as well as brain activation during WM tasks. However, whether the two genes have interactive effects on resting-state activities of the brain and whether these spontaneous activations correlate with WM are still unknown. This study included behavioral data from WM tasks and genetic data (COMT rs4680 and BDNF Val66Met) from 417 healthy Chinese adults and resting-state fMRI data from 298 of them. Significant interactive effects of BDNF and COMT were found for WM performance as well as for resting-state regional homogeneity (ReHo) in WM-related brain areas, including the left medial frontal gyrus (lMeFG), left superior frontal gyrus (lSFG), right superior and medial frontal gyrus (rSMFG), right medial orbitofrontal gyrus (rMOFG), right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG), precuneus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, left superior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule. Simple effects analyses showed that compared to other genotypes, subjects with COMT-VV/BDNF-VV had higher WM and lower ReHo in all five frontal brain areas. The results supported the hypothesis that COMT and BDNF polymorphisms influence WM performance and spontaneous brain activity (i.e., ReHo). PMID:27853425

  8. Enterococcus faecalis reconfigures its gene regulatory network activation under copper exposure

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Mauricio; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Murray, Barbara E.; Maass, Alejandro; González, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    A gene regulatory network was generated in the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis in order to understand how this organism can activate its expression under different copper concentrations. The topological evaluation of the network showed common patterns described in other organisms. Integrating microarray experiments allowed the identification of sub-networks activated under low (0.05 mM CuSO4) and high (0.5 mM CuSO4) copper concentrations. The analysis indicates the presence of specific functionally activated modules induced by copper, highlighting the regulons LysR, ArgR as global regulators and CopY, Fur and LexA as local regulators. Taking advantage of the fact that E. faecalis presented a homeostatic module isolated, we produced an in vivo intervention removing this system from the cell without affecting the connectivity of the global transcriptional network. This strategy led us to find that this bacterium can reconfigure its gene expression to maintain cellular homeostasis, activating new modules principally related to glucose metabolism and transcriptional processes. Finally, these results position E. faecalis as the organism having the most complete and controllable systemic model of copper homeostasis available to date. PMID:24382465

  9. Different Gene Expression and Activity Pattern of Antioxidant Enzymes in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonowski, Zbigniew; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Konecki, Tomasz; Fendler, Wojciech; Sosnowski, Marek; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role in and contribution of antioxidant enzymes to bladder cancer (BC) etiology and recurrence after transurethral resection (TUR). We enrolled 40 patients with BC who underwent TUR and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The analysis was performed at diagnosis and recurrence, taking into account the time of recurrence. Gene expression of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was determined in peripheral blood leukocytes. The activity of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3) was examined in plasma, and GPX1 and copper-zinc containing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in erythrocytes. SOD2 and GPX1 expression and GPX1 and SOD1 activity were significantly higher in patients at diagnosis of BC in comparison to controls. In patients who had recurrence earlier than 1 year from TUR, CAT and SOD2 expression was lower (at diagnosis p=0.024 and p=0.434, at recurrence p=0.022 and p=0.010), while the GPX1 and GPX3 activity was higher (at diagnosis p=0.242 and p=0.394, at recurrence p=0.019 and p=0.025) compared to patients with recurrence after 1 year from TUR. This study revealed that the gene expression and activity of the antioxidant enzymes are elevated in blood of patients with BC, although a low expression of CAT might contribute to the recurrence of BC, in early prognosis.

  10. Epigenetic activation of Sox2 gene in the developing vertebrate neural plate.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Santiago O; Marini, Melisa S; Torres Zelada, Eliana; Buzzi, Ailín L; Morales Vicente, David A; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H

    2016-06-15

    One of the earliest manifestations of neural induction is onset of expression of the neural marker Sox2, mediated by the activation of the enhancers N1 and N2. By using loss and gain of function, we find that Sox2 expression requires the activity of JmjD2A and the Msk1 kinase, which can respectively demethylate the repressive H3K9me3 mark and phosphorylate the activating H3S10 (H3S10ph) mark. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation reveals that the adaptor protein 14-3-3, known to bind to H3S10ph, interacts with JMJD2A and may be involved in its recruitment to regulatory regions of the Sox2 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals dynamic binding of JMJD2A to the Sox2 promoter and N-1 enhancer at the time of neural plate induction. Finally, we show a clear temporal antagonism on the occupancy of H3K9me3 and H3S10ph modifications at the promoter of the Sox2 locus before and after the neural plate induction. Taken together, our results propose a series of epigenetic events necessary for the early activation of the Sox2 gene in neural progenitor cells.

  11. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Disrupted Ultradian Activity Rhythms and Differential Expression of Several Clock Genes in Interleukin-6-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monje, Francisco J.; Cicvaric, Ana; Acevedo Aguilar, Juan Pablo; Elbau, Immanuel; Horvath, Orsolya; Diao, Weifei; Glat, Micaela; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of the cycles of activity and rest stand out among the most intensively investigated aspects of circadian rhythmicity in humans and experimental animals. Alterations in the circadian patterns of activity and rest are strongly linked to cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in severe mental illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and major depression (MDD). The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has been prominently associated with the pathogenesis of AD and MDD. However, the potential involvement of IL-6 in the modulation of the diurnal rhythms of activity and rest has not been investigated. Here, we set out to study the role of IL-6 in circadian rhythmicity through the characterization of patterns of behavioral locomotor activity in IL-6 knockout (IL-6 KO) mice and wild-type littermate controls. Deletion of IL-6 did not alter the length of the circadian period or the amount of locomotor activity under either light-entrained or free-running conditions. IL-6 KO mice also presented a normal phase shift in response to light exposure at night. However, the temporal architecture of the behavioral rhythmicity throughout the day, as characterized by the quantity of ultradian activity bouts, was significantly impaired under light-entrained and free-running conditions in IL-6 KO. Moreover, the assessment of clock gene expression in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in AD and depression, revealed altered levels of cry1, dec2, and rev-erb-beta in IL-6 KO mice. These data propose that IL-6 participates in the regulation of ultradian activity/rest rhythmicity and clock gene expression in the mammalian brain. Furthermore, we propose IL-6-dependent circadian misalignment as a common pathogenetic principle in some neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28382017

  13. Temperature and water loss affect ADH activity and gene expression in grape berry during postharvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Marco; Bellincontro, Andrea; De Santis, Diana; Botondi, Rinaldo; Colao, Maria Chiara; Muleo, Rosario; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2012-05-01

    Clusters of Aleatico wine grape were picked at 18°Brix and placed at 10, 20, or 30°C, 45% relative humidity (RH) and 1.5m/s of air flow to dehydrate the berries up to 40% of loss of initial fresh weight. Sampling was done at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% weight loss (wl). ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene expression, enzyme activity, and related metabolites were analysed. At 10°C, acetaldehyde increased rapidly and then declined, while ethanol continued to rise. At 20°C, acetaldehyde and ethanol increased significantly with the same pattern and declined at 40%wl. At 30°C, acetaldehyde did not increase but ethanol increased rapidly already at 10%wl. At the latter temperature, a significant increase in acetic acid and ethyl acetate occurred, while at 10°C their values were low. At 30°C, the ADH activity (ethanol to acetaldehyde direction), increased rapidly but acetaldehyde did not rise because of its oxidation to acetic acid, which increased together with ethyl acetate. At 10°C, the ADH activity increased at 20%wl and continued to rise even at 40%wl, meaning that ethanol oxidation was delayed. At 20°C, the behaviour was intermediate to the other temperatures. The relative expression of the VvAdh2 gene was the highest at 10°C already at 10%wl in a synchrony with the ADH activity, indicating a rapid response likely due to low temperature. The expression subsequently declined. At 20 and 30°C, the expression was lower and increased slightly during dehydration in combination with the ADH activity. This imbalance between gene expression and ADH activity at 10°C, as well as the unexpected expression of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) gene, opens the discussion on the stress sensitivity and transcription event during postharvest dehydration, and the importance of carefully monitoring temperature during dehydration.

  14. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    PubMed Central

    Yilbas, Ayse E.; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl R.; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification. PMID:24790981

  15. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  16. Expression and Enzyme Activity Detection of a Sepiapterin Reductase Gene from Musca domestica Larva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Pei, Zhihua; Liu, Lei; Wang, Dongfang; Kong, Lingcong; Liu, Shuming; Jiang, Xiuyun; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2017-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthase. Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the final steps of BH4 biosynthesis. Studies on SPR from several insects and other organisms have been reported. However, thus far, enzyme activity of SPR in Musca domestica is kept unknown. In this study, 186 differentially expressed genes including SPR gene from Musca domestica (MDSPR) were screened in subtractive cDNA library. The MDSPR gene was cloned, and the recombinant MDSPI16 protein was expressed as a 51-kDa protein in soluble form. The MDSPR exhibited strong activity to the substrate sepiapterin (SP). The values of Vmax and Km of the MDSPR for SP were 6.83 μM/min and 23.48 μM, and the optimum temperature and pH of MDSPR were 50 °C and 4.0, respectively. This study provides new hypotheses and methods for the production of BH4 using insect-derived SPR.

  17. Optoporation of impermeable molecules and genes for visualization and activation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Kamal; Batbyal, Subrata; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-03-01

    Visualization, activation, and detection of the cell(s) and their electrical activity require delivery of exogenous impermeable molecules and targeted expression of genes encoding labeling proteins, ion-channels and voltage indicators. While genes can be delivered by viral vector to cells, delivery of other impermeable molecules into the cytoplasm of targeted cells requires microinjection by mechanical needle or microelectrodes, which pose significant challenge to the viability of the cells. Further, it will be useful to localize the expression of the targeted molecules not only in specific cell types, but to specific cells in restricted spatial regions. Here, we report use of focused near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser beam to transiently perforate targeted cell membrane to insert genes encoding blue light activatable channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and red-shifted opsin (ReachR). Optoporation of nanomolar concentrations of rhodamine phalloidin (an impermeable dye molecule for staining filamentous actin) into targeted living mammalian cells (both HEK and primary cortical neurons) is also achieved allowing imaging of dynamics and intact morphology of cellular structures without requiring fixation.

  18. Aly/ REF, a factor for mRNA transport, activates RH gene promoter function.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Hiroshi; Kumada, Maki; Omi, Toshinori; Gotoh, Takaya; Lkhagvasuren, Munkhtulga; Okuda, Hiroshi; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kajii, Eiji; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2005-06-01

    The rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are of considerable importance in transfusion medicine as well as in newborn or autoimmune hemolytic diseases due to their high antigenicity. We identified a major DNaseI hypersensitive site at the 5' flanking regions of both RHD and RHCE exon 1. A 34 bp fragment located at -191 to -158 from a translation start position, and containing the TCCCCTCCC sequence, was involved in enhancing promoter activity, which was assessed by luciferase reporter gene assay. A biotin-labelled 34 bp probe isolated an mRNA transporter protein, Aly/REF. The specific binding of Aly/REF to RH promoter in erythroid was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The silencing of Aly/REF by siRNA reduced not only the RH promoter activity of the reporter gene but also transcription from the native genome. These facts provide second proof of Aly/REF as a transcription coactivator, initially identified as a coactivator for the TCRalpha enhancer function. Aly/REF might be a novel transcription cofactor for erythroid-specific genes.

  19. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  20. Chromatin structure and gene expression changes associated with loss of MOP1 activity in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Madzima, Thelma F; Huang, Ji; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-07-01

    Though the mechanisms governing nuclear organization are not well understood, it is apparent that epigenetic modifications coordinately modulate chromatin organization as well as transcription. In maize, MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1) is required for 24 nt siRNA-mediated epigenetic regulation and transcriptional gene silencing via a putative Pol IV- RdDM pathway. To elucidate the mechanisms of nuclear chromatin organization, we investigated the relationship between chromatin structure and transcription in response to loss of MOP1 function. We used a microarray based micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay to identify genome-wide changes in chromatin structure in mop1-1 immature ears and observed an increase in chromatin accessibility at chromosome arms associated with loss of MOP1 function. Within the many genes misregulated in mop1 mutants, we identified one subset likely to be direct targets of epigenetic transcriptional silencing via Pol-IV RdDM. We found that target specificity for MOP1-mediated RdDM activity is governed by multiple signals that include accumulation of 24 nt siRNAs and the presence of specific classes of gene-proximal transposons, but neither of these attributes alone is sufficient to predict transcriptional misregulation in mop1-1 homozygous mutants. Our results suggest a role for MOP1 in regulation of higher-order chromatin organization where loss of MOP1 activity at a subset of loci triggers a broader cascade of transcriptional consequences and genome-wide changes in chromatin structure.

  1. Zebra fish myc family and max genes: differential expression and oncogenic activity throughout vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber-Agus, N; Horner, J; Torres, R; Chiu, F C; DePinho, R A

    1993-01-01

    To gain insight into the role of Myc family oncoproteins and their associated protein Max in vertebrate growth and development, we sought to identify homologs in the zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio). A combination of a polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy and low-stringency hybridization screening allowed for the isolation of zebra fish c-, N-, and L-myc and max genes; subsequent structural characterization showed a high degree of conservation in regions that encode motifs of known functional significance. On the functional level, zebra fish Max, like its mammalian counterpart, served to suppress the transformation activity of mouse c-Myc in rat embryo fibroblasts. In addition, the zebra fish c-myc gene proved capable of cooperating with an activated H-ras to effect the malignant transformation of mammalian cells, albeit with diminished potency compared with mouse c-myc. With respect to their roles in normal developing tissues, the differential temporal and spatial patterns of steady-state mRNA expression observed for each zebra fish myc family member suggest unique functions for L-myc in early embryogenesis, for N-myc in establishment and growth of early organ systems, and for c-myc in increasingly differentiated tissues. Furthermore, significant alterations in the steady-state expression of zebra fish myc family genes concomitant with relatively constant max expression support the emerging model of regulation of Myc function in cellular growth and differentiation. Images PMID:8474440

  2. Targeting Activation of Specific NF-κB Subunits Prevents Stress-Dependent Atherothrombotic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Zdenka; Kashif, Muhammed; Fleming, Thomas; Muhammad, Sajjad; Piel, David; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Bea, Florian; Herzig, Stephan; Zeier, Martin; Pizzi, Marina; Isermann, Berend; Hecker, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been shown to be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated entirely, it has been shown previously that the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an important component of stress-activated signaling pathway. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms of stress-induced NF-κB-mediated gene expression, using an in vitro and in vivo model of psychosocial stress. Induction of stress led to NF-κB-dependent expression of proinflammatory (tissue factor, intracellular adhesive molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) and protective genes (manganese superoxide dismutase [MnSOD]) via p50, p65 or cRel. Selective inhibition of the different subunits and the respective kinases showed that inhibition of cRel leads to the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein−/− (ApoE−/−) mice via suppression of proinflammatory gene expression. This observation may therefore provide a possible explanation for ineffectiveness of antioxidant therapies and suggests that selective targeting of cRel activation may provide a novel approach for the treatment of stress-related inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23114885

  3. Conserved Overlapping Gene Arrangement, Restricted Expression, and Biochemical Activities of DNA Polymerase ν (POLN)*

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Junya; Reh, Shelley; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Takata, Minoru; Hukriede, Neil A.; Wood, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase ν (POLN) is one of 16 DNA polymerases encoded in vertebrate genomes. It is important to determine its gene expression patterns, biological roles, and biochemical activities. By quantitative analysis of mRNA expression, we found that POLN from the zebrafish Danio rerio is expressed predominantly in testis. POLN is not detectably expressed in zebrafish embryos or in mouse embryonic stem cells. Consistent with this, injection of POLN-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotides did not interfere with zebrafish embryonic development. Analysis of transcripts revealed that vertebrate POLN has an unusual gene expression arrangement, sharing a first exon with HAUS3, the gene encoding augmin-like complex subunit 3. HAUS3 is broadly expressed in embryonic and adult tissues, in contrast to POLN. Differential expression of POLN and HAUS3 appears to arise by alternate splicing of transcripts in mammalian cells and zebrafish. When POLN was ectopically overexpressed in human cells, it specifically coimmunoprecipitated with the homologous recombination factors BRCA1 and FANCJ, but not with previously suggested interaction partners (HELQ and members of the Fanconi anemia core complex). Purified zebrafish POLN protein is capable of thymine glycol bypass and strand displacement, with activity dependent on a basic amino acid residue known to stabilize the primer-template. These properties are conserved with the human enzyme. Although the physiological function of pol ν remains to be clarified, this study uncovers distinctive aspects of its expression control and evolutionarily conserved properties of this DNA polymerase. PMID:26269593

  4. Genome-wide identification of neuronal activity-regulated genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Rahman, Reazur; Guo, Fang; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Activity-regulated genes (ARGs) are important for neuronal functions like long-term memory and are well-characterized in mammals but poorly studied in other model organisms like Drosophila. Here we stimulated fly neurons with different paradigms and identified ARGs using high-throughput sequencing from brains as well as from sorted neurons: they included a narrow set of circadian neurons as well as dopaminergic neurons. Surprisingly, many ARGs are specific to the stimulation paradigm and very specific to neuron type. In addition and unlike mammalian immediate early genes (IEGs), fly ARGs do not have short gene lengths and are less enriched for transcription factor function. Chromatin assays using ATAC-sequencing show that the transcription start sites (TSS) of ARGs do not change with neural firing but are already accessible prior to stimulation. Lastly based on binding site enrichment in ARGs, we identified transcription factor mediators of firing and created neuronal activity reporters. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19942.001 PMID:27936378

  5. Increased AICD generation does not result in increased nuclear translocation or activation of target gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Elaine; Isbert, Simone; Kern, Andreas; Jaeger, Sebastian; Martin, Anne M.; Hebert, Sebastien S.; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; De Strooper, Bart; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2008-08-01

    A sequence of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavages culminates in the sequential release of the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) and/or p3 fragment. One of the environmental factors favouring the accumulation of AICD appears to be a rise in intracellular pH. Here we further identified the metabolism and subcellular localization of artificially expressed constructs under such conditions. We also co-examined the mechanistic lead up to the AICD accumulation and explored possible significances for its increased expression. We found that most of the AICD generated under pH neutralized conditions is likely cleaved from C83. While the AICD surplus was unable to further activate transcription of a luciferase reporter via a Gal4-DNA-binding domain, it failed entirely via the endogenous promoter regions of proposed target genes, APP and KAI1. The lack of a specific transactivation potential was also demonstrated by the unchanged levels of target gene mRNA. However, rather than translocating to the nucleus, the AICD surplus remains membrane tethered or free in the cytosol where it interacts with Fe65. Therefore we provide strong evidence that an increase in AICD generation does not directly promote gene activation of previously proposed target 0011gen.

  6. Tet1 is critical for neuronal activity-regulated gene expression and memory extinction.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Andrii; Dawlaty, Meelad M; Seo, Jinsoo; Cheng, Albert W; Meng, Jia; Le, Thuc; Faull, Kym F; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2013-09-18

    The ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of methylcytosine dioxygenases catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and promote DNA demethylation. Despite the abundance of 5hmC and Tet proteins in the brain, little is known about the functions of the neuronal Tet enzymes. Here, we analyzed Tet1 knockout mice (Tet1KO) and found downregulation of multiple neuronal activity-regulated genes, including Npas4, c-Fos, and Arc. Furthermore, Tet1KO animals exhibited abnormal hippocampal long-term depression and impaired memory extinction. Analysis of the key regulatory gene, Npas4, indicated that its promoter region, containing multiple CpG dinucleotides, is hypermethylated in both naive Tet1KO mice and after extinction training. Such hypermethylation may account for the diminished expression of Npas4 itself and its downstream targets, impairing transcriptional programs underlying cognitive processes. In summary, we show that neuronal Tet1 regulates normal DNA methylation levels, expression of activity-regulated genes, synaptic plasticity, and memory extinction.

  7. The herbicide flumioxazin stimulates pathogenesis-related gene expression and enzyme activities in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio Jesús; Saladin, Gäelle; Bézier, Annie; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the capacity of the soil-applied herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) to trigger defence mechanisms was assessed using 6-week-old in vitro grown Vitis vinifera L. plantlets. Time-course studies demonstrated that the herbicide induced the expression of basic beta-1,3-glucanase (Vvglu), basic chitinase (Vvchit1b) and PR10 (VvPR10.3) genes encoding three pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins involved in grapevine defence against pathogens. Thus, all transcripts accumulated in grapevine tissues to reach maximum values after 24-72 h of herbicide exposure, except for VvPR10.3 gene expression, which was induced in roots and stems but not in leaves. Induction of PR genes was observed to a greater extent in roots and leaves, and its intensity diminished in the stems although still remained noteworthy. The activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase enzymes significantly increased in the whole plant after herbicide exposure and were still stimulated 21 days after the beginning of treatments. Similarly, the most remarkable effect occurred in roots. However, all enzyme activities tested were stimulated in the upper aerial tissues as well, indicating that fmx or a derived product acts systemically, likely via root uptake.

  8. Effects of Skilled Training on Sleep Slow Wave Activity and Cortical Gene Expression in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Erin C.; Faraguna, Ugo; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: The best characterized marker of sleep homeostasis is the amount of slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5–4 Hz) during NREM sleep. SWA increases as a function of previous waking time and declines during sleep, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have suggested that SWA homeostasis is linked to synaptic potentiation associated with learning during wakefulness. Indeed, studies in rodents and humans found that SWA increases after manipulations that presumably enhance synaptic strength, but the evidence remains indirect. Here we trained rats in skilled reaching, a task known to elicit long-term potentiation in the trained motor cortex, and immediately after learning measured SWA and cortical protein levels of c-fos and Arc, 2 activity-dependent genes involved in motor learning. Design: Intracortical local field potential recordings and training on reaching task. Setting: Basic sleep research laboratory. Patients or Participants: Long Evans adult male rats. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: SWA increased post-training in the trained cortex (the frontal cortex contralateral to the limb used to learn the task), with smaller or no increase in other cortical areas. This increase was reversible within 1 hour, specific to NREM sleep, and positively correlated with changes in performance during the prior training session, suggesting that it reflects plasticity and not just motor activity. Fos and Arc levels were higher in the trained relative to untrained motor cortex immediately after training, but this asymmetry was no longer present after 1 hour of sleep. Conclusion: Learning to reach specifically affects gene expression in the trained motor cortex and, in the same area, increases sleep need as measured by a local change in SWA. Citation: Hanlon EC; Faraguna U; Vyazovskiy VV; Tononi G; Cirelli C. Effects of skilled training on sleep slow wave activity and cortical gene expression in the rat. SLEEP 2009;32(6):719-729. PMID:19544747

  9. Changes in gene expression and catalase activity in Oryza sativa L. under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Vighi, I L; Benitez, L C; do Amaral, M N; Auler, P A; Moraes, G P; Rodrigues, G S; da Maia, L C; Pinto, L S; Braga, E J B

    2016-11-03

    Different rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes were subjected to high salinity and low temperature (150 mM NaCl and 13°C, respectively) for 0, 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. We evaluated the simultaneous expression of the genes OsCATA, OsCATB, and OsCATC, correlated gene expression with enzyme activity, and verified the regulation of these genes through identification of cis-elements in the promoter region. The hydrogen peroxide content increased in a tolerant genotype and decreased in a sensitive genotype under both stress conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the tolerant genotype when exposed to cold, and in the sensitive genotype when exposed to high salinity. Catalase activity significantly increased in both genotypes when subjected to 13°C. In the tolerant genotype, OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to high salinity and cold, while in the sensitive genotype, OsCATA and OsCATC responded positively to saline stress, as did OsCATA and OsCATB to low temperature. Cis-element analysis identified different regulatory sequences in the catalase promoter region of each genotype. The sensitive genotype maintained a better balance between hydrogen oxyacid levels, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation under low temperature than the resistant genotype. OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive in the salt-tolerant genotype to cold, OsCATA and OsCATC were the most responsive to saline stress, and OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to chilling stress in the sensitive genotype. There were positive correlations between catalase activity and OsCATB expression in the tolerant genotype under saline stress and in the sensitive genotype under cold stress.

  10. Polymorphisms in oxidative stress genes, physical activity, and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Millikan, Robert C.; North, Kari E.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Eng, Sybil M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Steck, Susan E.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The mechanisms driving the physical activity–breast cancer association are unclear. Exercise both increases reactive oxygen species production, which may transform normal epithelium to a malignant phenotype, and enhances antioxidant capacity, which could protect against subsequent oxidative insult. Given the paradoxical effects of physical activity, the oxidative stress pathway is of interest. Genetic variation in CAT or antioxidant-related polymorphisms may mediate the physical activity–breast cancer association. Methods We investigated the main and joint effects of three previously unreported polymorphisms in CAT on breast cancer risk. We also estimated interactions between recreational physical activity (RPA) and 13 polymorphisms in oxidative stress-related genes. Data were from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project, with interview and biomarker data available on 1,053 cases and 1,102 controls. Results Women with ≥1 variant allele in CAT rs4756146 had a 23 % reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer compared with women with the common TT genotype (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.59–0.99). We observed two statistical interactions between RPA and genes in the anti-oxidant pathway (p = 0.043 and 0.006 for CAT and GSTP1, respectively). Highly active women harboring variant alleles in CAT rs1001179 were at increased risk of breast cancer compared with women with the common CC genotype (OR = 1.61; 95 % CI, 1.06–2.45). Risk reductions were observed among moderately active women carrying variant alleles in GSTP1 compared with women homozygous for the major allele (OR = 0.56; 95 % CI, 0.38–0.84). Conclusions Breast cancer risk may be jointly influenced by RPA and genes involved in the antioxidant pathway, but our findings require confirmation. PMID:23053794

  11. The hoxZ gene of the Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase operon is required for activation of hydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, L A; Arp, D J

    1992-01-01

    The roles of the product of the hoxZ gene immediately downstream of the hydrogenase gene (hoxKG) in Azotobacter vinelandii were investigated by constructing and characterizing a mutant with the center of the hoxZ gene deleted. The strain lacking the functional hoxZ gene product exhibited a low rate of H2 oxidation with O2 as the electron acceptor relative to that of the wild-type strain. Nevertheless, when the enzyme was exogenously activated and methylene blue was used as the electron acceptor from hydrogenase, rates of H2 oxidation comparable to those in the wild-type strain were observed. These results suggest that the gene product of hoxZ plays a role in activating and maintaining hydrogenase in a reduced active state. The product of hoxZ could also be the linkage necessary for transfer of electrons from H2 to the electron transport chain. Images PMID:1644756

  12. Oxytocin receptor gene and racial ingroup bias in empathy-related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siyang; Li, Bingfeng; Ma, Yina; Zhang, Wenxia; Rao, Yi; Han, Shihui

    2015-04-15

    The human brain responds more strongly to racial ingroup than outgroup individuals' pain. This racial ingroup bias varies across individuals and has been attributed to social experiences. What remains unknown is whether the racial ingroup bias in brain activity is associated with a genetic polymorphism. We investigated genetic associations of racial ingroup bias in the brain activity to racial ingroup and outgroup faces that received painful or non-painful stimulations by scanning A/A and G/G homozygous of the oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (OXTR rs53576) using functional MRI. We found that G/G compared to A/A individuals showed stronger activity in the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor area (ACC/SMA) in response to racial ingroup members' pain, whereas A/A relative to G/G individuals exhibited greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in response to racial outgroup members' pain. Moreover, the racial ingroup bias in ACC/SMA activity positively predicted participants' racial ingroup bias in implicit attitudes and NAcc activity to racial outgroup individuals' pain negatively predicted participants' motivations to reduce racial outgroup members' pain. Our results suggest that the two variants of OXTR rs53576 are associated with racial ingroup bias in brain activities that are linked to implicit attitude and altruistic motivation, respectively.

  13. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  14. Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Muhammad; Aslam, Zubair; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones selected from 16S rRNA libraries of FS and VC on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fell into the major lineages of the domain bacteria Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Among culture isolates, Actinobacteria dominated in VC, while almost equal numbers of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were present in FS. Analysis of chitinolytic isolates and chitinase gene diversity revealed that chitinolytic bacterial communities were enriched in VC. Populations of bacteria that inhibited plant fungal pathogens were higher in VC than in FS and particularly chitinolytic isolates were most active against the target fungi.

  15. Ethylene could influence ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H+-ATPase gene expression by affecting FER (or FER-like) gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Carlos; Waters, Brian M; Romera, F Javier; García, María José; Morales, María; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    In previous works, it has been shown, by using ethylene inhibitors and precursors, that ethylene could participate in the regulation of the enhanced ferric reductase activity of Fe-deficient Strategy I plants. However, it was not known whether ethylene regulates the ferric reductase gene expression or other aspects related to this activity. This paper is a study of the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the genes encoding the ferric reductases and iron transporters of Arabidopsis thaliana (FRO2 and IRT1) and Lycopersicon esculentum (=Solanum lycopersicum) (FRO1 and IRT1) plants. The effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the activity of the iron reductase and the iron transporter have been examined in parallel. Also studied were the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the H(+)-ATPase genes of cucumber (CsHA1 and CsHA2) and the transcription factor genes of tomato (LeFER) and Arabidopsis (AtFRU or AtFIT1, an LeFER homologue) that regulate ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPse activity. The results obtained suggest that ethylene participates in the regulation of ferric reductase, the iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPase gene expression by affecting the FER (or FER-like) levels.

  16. Reporter gene assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed

    Fairey, E R; Edmunds, J S; Deamer-Melia, N J; Glasgow, H; Johnson, F M; Moeller, P R; Burkholder, J M; Ramsdell, J S

    1999-09-01

    Collaborative studies were performed to develop a functional assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida. Eight cell lines were used to screen organic fractions and residual water fraction by using a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-(2-4)]-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity assay. Diethyl ether and a residual water fraction were cytotoxic to several cell lines including rat pituitary (GH(4)C(1)) cells. Residual water as well as preextracted culture water containing P. piscicida cells induced c-fos-luciferase expressed in GH(4)C(1) cells with a rapid time course of induction and sensitive detection. The reporter gene assay detected activity in toxic isolates of P. piscicida from several North Carolina estuaries in 1997 and 1998 and may also be suitable for detecting toxic activity in human and animal serum.

  17. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  18. Reporter gene assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed Central

    Fairey, E R; Edmunds, J S; Deamer-Melia, N J; Glasgow, H; Johnson, F M; Moeller, P R; Burkholder, J M; Ramsdell, J S

    1999-01-01

    Collaborative studies were performed to develop a functional assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida. Eight cell lines were used to screen organic fractions and residual water fraction by using a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-(2-4)]-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity assay. Diethyl ether and a residual water fraction were cytotoxic to several cell lines including rat pituitary (GH(4)C(1)) cells. Residual water as well as preextracted culture water containing P. piscicida cells induced c-fos-luciferase expressed in GH(4)C(1) cells with a rapid time course of induction and sensitive detection. The reporter gene assay detected activity in toxic isolates of P. piscicida from several North Carolina estuaries in 1997 and 1998 and may also be suitable for detecting toxic activity in human and animal serum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10464070

  19. Riproximin's activity depends on gene expression and sensitizes PDAC cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Hassan; Murtaja, Ahmed; Kadhim Al-Taee, Khamael; Pervaiz, Asim; Hielscher, Thomas; Berger, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Riproximin (Rpx) is a type II ribosome inactivating protein, which was investigated for its activity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in a panel of 17 human and rat PDAC cell lines and in rat pancreatic cancer liver metastasis. Cytotoxicity in response to Rpx was determined by MTT assay, apoptosis by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR for apoptosis related genes, and the modulation of the transcriptome was monitored by micro array analysis. The combination effect of Rpx and TRAIL was assessed by MTT assay. Rpx showed high but varying cytotoxicity in PDAC cells. Based on overall gene expression, the sensitivity of these cells was linked to genes involved in apoptosis. Furthermore, based on the affinity of Rpx for CEA, the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) genes was significantly related to Rpx's cytotoxicity in cells with CEACAM gene expression. Exposure of Suit2-007 cells to Rpx induced the mRNA expression of members of signaling pathways initiating from most death receptors, and down modulation of TRAIL. Apoptosis was increased as shown by FACS analysis. Combination of Rpx with TRAIL resulted in a synergistic cytotoxic effect in human Suit2-007 and rat ASML cells, as evidenced by a 6-fold lower tumor cell survival than expected from an additive combination effect. Treatment of BDX rats bearing intra-portally implanted Suit2-007 cells showed a highly significant anticancer effect and indicated an application of Rpx against pancreatic cancer metastasis to the liver. These data favor further evaluation of Rpx as anticancer agent in PDAC.

  20. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ∼50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ∼130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori.

  1. Functional/activity network (FAN) analysis of gene-phenotype connectivity liaised by grape polyphenol resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tze-chen; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Bennett, Dylan John; Doonan, Barbara B.; Wu, Erxi; Wu, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that has witnessed an unprecedented yearly growth in PubMed citations since the late 1990s. Based on the diversity of cellular processes and diseases resveratrol reportedly affects and benefits, it is likely that the interest in resveratrol will continue, although uncertainty regarding its mechanism in different biological systems remains. We hypothesize that insights on disease-modulatory activities of resveratrol might be gleaned by systematically dissecting the publicly available published data on chemicals and drugs. In this study, we tested our hypothesis by querying DTome (Drug-Target Interactome), a web-based tool containing data compiled from open-source databases including DrugBank, PharmGSK, and Protein Interaction Network Analysis (PINA). Four direct protein targets (DPT) and 219 DPT-associated genes were identified for resveratrol. The DPT-associated genes were scrutinized by WebGestalt (WEB-based Gene SeT Analysis Toolkit). This enrichment analysis resulted in 10 identified KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways. Refined analysis of KEGG pathways showed that 2 — one linked to p53 and a second to prostate cancer — have functional connectivity to resveratrol and its four direct protein targets. These results suggest that a functional activity network (FAN) approach may be considered as a new paradigm for guiding future studies of resveratrol. FAN analysis resembles a BioGPS, with capability for mapping a Web-based scientific track that can productively and cost effectively connect resveratrol to its primary and secondary target proteins and to its biological functions. PMID:27232943

  2. Haplotypes of the porcine peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene are associated with backfat thickness

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-inducible transcription factors. It is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene (PPARD) has been assigned to a region on porcine chromosome 7, which harbours a quantitative trait locus for backfat. Thus, PPARD is considered a functional and positional candidate gene for backfat thickness. The purpose of this study was to test this candidate gene hypothesis in a cross of breeds that were highly divergent in lipid deposition characteristics. Results Screening for genetic variation in porcine PPARD revealed only silent mutations. Nevertheless, significant associations between PPARD haplotypes and backfat thickness were observed in the F2 generation of the Mangalitsa × Piétrain cross as well as a commercial German Landrace population. Haplotype 5 is associated with increased backfat in F2 Mangalitsa × Piétrain pigs, whereas haplotype 4 is associated with lower backfat thickness in the German Landrace population. Haplotype 4 and 5 carry the same alleles at all but one SNP. Interestingly, the opposite effects of PPARD haplotypes 4 and 5 on backfat thickness are reflected by opposite effects of these two haplotypes on PPAR-δ mRNA levels. Haplotype 4 significantly increases PPAR-δ mRNA levels, whereas haplotype 5 decreases mRNA levels of PPAR-δ. Conclusion This study provides evidence for an association between PPARD and backfat thickness. The association is substantiated by mRNA quantification. Further studies are required to clarify, whether the observed associations are caused by PPARD or are the result of linkage disequilibrium with a causal variant in a neighbouring gene. PMID:19943979

  3. Patterns of global gene expression in rat skeletal muscle during unloading and low-intensity ambulatory activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Lionel; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Hamilton, Marc T.

    2003-01-01

    Physical inactivity and unloading lead to diverse skeletal muscle alterations. Our goal was to identify the genes in skeletal muscle whose expression is most sensitive to periods of unloading/reduced physical activity and that may be involved in triggering initial responses before phenotypic changes are evident. The ability of short periods of physical activity/loading as an effective countermeasure against changes in gene expression mediated by inactivity was also tested. Affymetrix microarrays were used to compare mRNA levels in the soleus muscle under three experimental treatments (n = 20-29 rats each): 12-h hindlimb unloading (HU), 12-h HU followed by 4 h of intermittent low-intensity ambulatory and postural activity (4-h reloading), and control (with ambulatory and postural activity). Using a combination of criteria, we identified a small set of genes (approximately 1% of 8,738 genes on the array or 4% of significant expressed genes) with the most reproducible and largest responses to altered activity. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation of transcription for a large number of key signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in protein synthesis/degradation and energy metabolism. Most (21 of 25) of the gene expression changes that were downregulated during HU returned at least to control levels during the reloading. In surprising contrast, 27 of 38 of the genes upregulated during HU remained significantly above control, but most showed trends toward reversal. This introduces a new concept that, in general, genes that are upregulated during unloading/inactivity will be more resistant to periodic reloading than those genes that are downregulated. This study reveals genes that are the most sensitive to loading/activity in rat skeletal muscle and indicates new targets that may initiate muscle alterations during inactivity.

  4. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  5. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  6. Proteomics of Durum Wheat Grain during Transition to Conservation Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Galieni, Angelica; Stagnari, Fabio; Bonas, Urbana; Speca, Stefano; Faccini, Andrea; Pisante, Michele; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen management in combination with sustainable agronomic techniques can have a great impact on the wheat grain proteome influencing its technological quality. In this study, proteomic analyses were used to document changes in the proportion of prolamins in mature grains of the newly released Italian durum wheat cv Achille. Such an approach was applied to wheat fertilized with urea (UREA) and calcium nitrate (NITRATE), during the transition to no-till Conservation Agriculture (CA) practice in a Mediterranean environment. Results obtained in a two-years field experiment study suggest low molecular weight glutenins (LMW-GS) as the fraction particularly inducible regardless of the N-form. Quantitative analyses of LMW-GS by 2D-GE followed by protein identification by LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that the stable increase was principally due to C-type LMW-GS. The highest accumulation resulted from a physiologically healthier state of plants treated with UREA and NITRATE. Proteomic analysis on the total protein fraction during the active phase of grain filling was also performed. For both N treatments, but at different extent, an up-regulation of different classes of proteins was observed: i) enzymes involved in glycolysis and citric acid cycles which contribute to an enhanced source of energy and carbohydrates, ii) stress proteins like heat shock proteins (HSPs) and antioxidant enzymes, such as peroxidases and superoxide dismutase which protect the grain from abiotic stress during starch and storage protein synthesis. In conclusion N inputs, which combined rate with N form gave high yield and improved quality traits in the selected durum wheat cultivar. The specific up-regulation of some HSPs, antioxidant enzymes and defense proteins in the early stages of grain development and physiological indicators related to fitness traits, could be useful bio-indicators, for wheat genotype screening under more sustainable agronomic conditions, like transition phase to no-till CA in

  7. Proteomics of Durum Wheat Grain during Transition to Conservation Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Visioli, Giovanna; Galieni, Angelica; Stagnari, Fabio; Bonas, Urbana; Speca, Stefano; Faccini, Andrea; Pisante, Michele; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen management in combination with sustainable agronomic techniques can have a great impact on the wheat grain proteome influencing its technological quality. In this study, proteomic analyses were used to document changes in the proportion of prolamins in mature grains of the newly released Italian durum wheat cv Achille. Such an approach was applied to wheat fertilized with urea (UREA) and calcium nitrate (NITRATE), during the transition to no-till Conservation Agriculture (CA) practice in a Mediterranean environment. Results obtained in a two-years field experiment study suggest low molecular weight glutenins (LMW-GS) as the fraction particularly inducible regardless of the N-form. Quantitative analyses of LMW-GS by 2D-GE followed by protein identification by LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that the stable increase was principally due to C-type LMW-GS. The highest accumulation resulted from a physiologically healthier state of plants treated with UREA and NITRATE. Proteomic analysis on the total protein fraction during the active phase of grain filling was also performed. For both N treatments, but at different extent, an up-regulation of different classes of proteins was observed: i) enzymes involved in glycolysis and citric acid cycles which contribute to an enhanced source of energy and carbohydrates, ii) stress proteins like heat shock proteins (HSPs) and antioxidant enzymes, such as peroxidases and superoxide dismutase which protect the grain from abiotic stress during starch and storage protein synthesis. In conclusion N inputs, which combined rate with N form gave high yield and improved quality traits in the selected durum wheat cultivar. The specific up-regulation of some HSPs, antioxidant enzymes and defense proteins in the early stages of grain development and physiological indicators related to fitness traits, could be useful bio-indicators, for wheat genotype screening under more sustainable agronomic conditions, like transition phase to no-till CA in

  8. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  9. Role of oxidants in NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription induced by hypoxia and endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chandel, N S; Trzyna, W C; McClintock, D S; Schumacker, P T

    2000-07-15

    The transcription factor NF-kappa B stimulates the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha. LPS (endotoxin) and hypoxia both induce NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription. Furthermore, hypoxia augments LPS induction of TNF-alpha mRNA. Previous reports have indicated that antioxidants abolish NF-kappa B activation in response to LPS or hypoxia, which suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in NF-kappa B activation. This study tested whether mitochondrial ROS are required for both NF-kappaB activation and the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA levels during hypoxia and LPS. Our results indicate that hypoxia (1.5% O2) stimulates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription and increases ROS generation as measured by the oxidant sensitive dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate in murine macrophage J774.1 cells. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid abolished the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B, TNF-alpha gene transcription, and increases in ROS levels. Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, abolished the increase in ROS signal, the activation of NF-kappa B, and TNF-alpha gene transcription during hypoxia. LPS stimulated NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription but not ROS generation in J774.1 cells. Rotenone, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid, and N-acetylcysteine had no effect on the LPS stimulation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, indicating that LPS activates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription through a ROS-independent mechanism. These results indicate that mitochondrial ROS are required for the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but not for the LPS activation of NF-kappa B.

  10. Chitotriosidase Activity and Gene Polymorphism in Iranian Patients with Gaucher Disease and Sibling Carriers

    PubMed Central

    MOZAFARI, Hadi; TAGHIKHANI, Mohammad; KHATAMI, Shohreh; ALAEI, Mohammad Reza; VAISI-RAYGANI, Asad; RAHIMI, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chitotriosidase (CT) activity is a useful biomarker for diagnosis and monitoring of Gaucher disease (GD). Its application is limited by some variants in the CT gene. Two main polymorphisms are 24 bp duplication and G102S led to reduce CT activity. The aim of this study was to determine these variants influencing on plasma CT activity. Materials & Methods Blood samples were collected from 33 patients with GD, 15 sibling carriers and 105 healthy individuals serving as controls. CT activity was measured using 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N,N′,N″triacetylchitotrioside substrate in plasma samples. The CT genotypes of 24 bp duplication and G102S variants were determined using PCR and PCR-RFLP. Results Untreated GD patients had a significantly higher CT activity compared to treated patients (P = 0.021). In addition, chitotriosidase activity in carriers was higher rather than controls. Allele frequencies of 24 bp duplication in GD patients, sibling carriers and controls were 0.21, 0.266 and 0.29 and for G102S were 0.318, 0.366 and 0.219, respectively. Different G102S genotypes had not significant effect on CT activity. Chitotriosidase activity has a positive correlation with age in normal group, carriers, and negative correlation with hemoglobin in GD patients. Using cut-off level of 80.75 nmol/ml/h, sensitivity and specificity of CT activity were 93.9% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Chitotriosidase activity is a suitable biomarker for diagnosis and monitoring of GD. Determination of 24 bp duplication is helpful for more accurate monitoring the GD patient’s therapy. However, it seems that, specifying of the G102S polymorphism is not required for Iranian GD patients. PMID:27843468

  11. The cancer gene WWOX behaves as an inhibitor of SMAD3 transcriptional activity via direct binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WW domain containing protein WWOX has been postulated to behave as a tumor suppressor in breast and other cancers. Expression of this protein is lost in over 70% of ER negative tumors. This prompted us to investigate the phenotypic and gene expression effects of loss of WWOX expression in breast cells. Methods Gene expression microarrays and standard in vitro assays were performed on stably silenced WWOX (shRNA) normal breast cells. Bioinformatic analyses were used to identify gene networks and transcriptional regulators affected by WWOX silencing. Co-immunoprecipitations and GST-pulldowns were used to demonstrate a direct interaction between WWOX and SMAD3. Reporter assays, ChIP, confocal microscopy and in silico analyses were employed to determine the effect of WWOX silencing on TGFβ-signaling. Results WWOX silencing affected cell proliferation, motility, attachment and deregulated expression of genes involved in cell cycle, motility and DNA damage. Interestingly, we detected an enrichment of targets activated by the SMAD3 transcription factor, including significant upregulation of ANGPTL4, FST, PTHLH and SERPINE1 transcripts. Importantly, we demonstrate that the WWOX protein physically interacts with SMAD3 via WW domain 1. Furthermore, WWOX expression dramatically decreases SMAD3 occupancy at the ANGPTL4 and SERPINE1 promoters and significantly quenches activation of a TGFβ responsive reporter. Additionally, WWOX expression leads to redistribution of SMAD3 from the nuclear to the cytoplasmic compartment. Since the TGFβ target ANGPTL4 plays a key role in lung metastasis development, we performed a meta-analysis of ANGPTL4 expression relative to WWOX in microarray datasets from breast carcinomas. We observed a significant inverse correlation between WWOX and ANGPTL4. Furthermore, the WWOX lo /ANGPTL4 hi cluster of breast tumors is enriched in triple-negative and basal-like sub-types. Tumors with this gene expression signature could represent

  12. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A.; Matsunaga, James

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity

  13. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  14. Chromatin Remodeling Mediated by Drosophila GAGA Factor and ISWI Activates fushi tarazu Gene Transcription In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Hirose, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    GAGA factor is known to remodel the chromatin structure in concert with nucleosome-remodeling factor NURF in a Drosophila embryonic S150 extract. The promoter region of the Drosophila fushi tarazu (ftz) gene carries several binding sites for GAGA factor. Both the GAGA factor-binding sites and GAGA factor per se are necessary for the proper expression of ftz in vivo. We observed transcriptional activation of the ftz gene when a preassembled chromatin template was incubated with GAGA factor and the S150 extract. The chromatin structure within the ftz promoter was specifically disrupted by incubation of the preassembled chromatin with GAGA factor and the S150 extract. Both transcriptional activation and chromatin disruption were blocked by an antiserum raised against ISWI or by base substitutions in the GAGA factor-binding sites in the ftz promoter region. These results demonstrate that GAGA factor- and ISWI-mediated disruption of the chromatin structure within the promoter region of ftz activates transcription on the chromatin template. PMID:9566866

  15. Gene Replacement for the Generation of Designed Novel Avermectin Derivatives with Enhanced Acaricidal and Nematicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Chen, An-Liang; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Zhen; Li, Mei-Hong; Li, Na; Lin, Jia-Tan; Bai, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Avermectin (AVM) and ivermectin (IVM) are potent pesticides and acaricides which have been widely used during the past 30 years. As insect resistance to AVM and IVM is greatly increasing, alternatives are urgently needed. Here, we report two novel AVM derivatives, tenvermectin A (TVM A) and TVM B, which are considered a potential new generation of agricultural and veterinary drugs. The molecules of the TVMs were designed based on structure and pharmacological property comparisons among AVM, IVM, and milbemycin (MBM). To produce TVMs, a genetically engineered strain, MHJ1011, was constructed from Streptomyces avermitilis G8-17, an AVM industrial strain. In MHJ1011, the native aveA1 gene was seamlessly replaced with milA1 from Streptomyces hygroscopicus. The total titer of the two TVMs produced by MHJ1011 reached 3,400 mg/liter. Insecticidal tests proved that TVM had enhanced activities against Tetranychus cinnabarinus and Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, as desired. This study provides a typical example of exploration for novel active compounds through a new method of polyketide synthase (PKS) reassembly for gene replacement. The results of the insecticidal tests may be of use in elucidating the structure-activity relationship of AVMs and MBMs. PMID:26025902

  16. The product of the adenovirus intermediate gene IX is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, P; Rosa-Calatrava, M; Kedinger, C

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the functional properties of the product of the adenovirus type 5 gene IX. This gene, which is expressed at intermediate times postinfection, encodes a small polypeptide (pIX) of 140 residues that has previously been shown to be incorporated into the viral capsid. Here, we show that pIX, in addition to its structural contribution, exhibits transcriptional properties. In transient transfection experiments, expression of pIX stimulated adenovirus major late promoter activity. The effect was independent of other viral proteins, but the level of promoter activation appeared strongly pIX dose dependent; similar levels of induction were observed with other cellular or viral TATA-containing (but not with TATA-less) promoters. This promoter specificity could be reproduced in a cell-free transcription system by the addition of purified recombinant pIX, further stressing the transcriptional nature of the phenomenon. A preliminary structural analysis of pIX indicated that the integrity of a putative leucine zipper at the carboxy-terminal end of the molecule, as well as elements within the amino-terminal half, was critical for pIX transcriptional activity. The relevance of these findings in adenovirus infection is discussed. PMID:9188576

  17. Protease Gene Duplication and Proteolytic Activity in Drosophila Female Reproductive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Pennington, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted proteases play integral roles in sexual reproduction in a broad range of taxa. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, these molecules are thought to process peptides and activate enzymes inside female reproductive tracts, mediating critical postmating responses. A recent study of female reproductive tract proteins in the cactophilic fruit fly Drosophila arizonae, identified pervasive, lineage-specific gene duplication amongst secreted proteases. Here, we compare the evolutionary dynamics, biochemical nature, and physiological significance of secreted female reproductive serine endoproteases between D. arizonae and its congener D. melanogaster. We show that D. arizonae lower female reproductive tract (LFRT) proteins are significantly enriched for recently duplicated secreted proteases, particularly serine endoproteases, relative to D. melanogaster. Isolated lumen from D. arizonae LFRTs, furthermore, exhibits significant trypsin-like and elastase-like serine endoprotease acitivity, whereas no such activity is seen in D. melanogaster. Finally, trypsin- and elastase-like activity in D. arizonae female reproductive tracts is negatively regulated by mating. We propose that the intense proteolytic environment of the D. arizonae female reproductive tract relates to the extraordinary reproductive physiology of this species and that ongoing gene duplication amongst these proteases is an evolutionary consequence of sexual conflict. PMID:19546158

  18. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  19. Gene Replacement for the Generation of Designed Novel Avermectin Derivatives with Enhanced Acaricidal and Nematicidal Activities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Chen, An-Liang; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Zhen; Li, Mei-Hong; Li, Na; Lin, Jia-Tan; Bai, Hua; Wang, Ji-Dong; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-08-15

    Avermectin (AVM) and ivermectin (IVM) are potent pesticides and acaricides which have been widely used during the past 30 years. As insect resistance to AVM and IVM is greatly increasing, alternatives are urgently needed. Here, we report two novel AVM derivatives, tenvermectin A (TVM A) and TVM B, which are considered a potential new generation of agricultural and veterinary drugs. The molecules of the TVMs were designed based on structure and pharmacological property comparisons among AVM, IVM, and milbemycin (MBM). To produce TVMs, a genetically engineered strain, MHJ1011, was constructed from Streptomyces avermitilis G8-17, an AVM industrial strain. In MHJ1011, the native aveA1 gene was seamlessly replaced with milA1 from Streptomyces hygroscopicus. The total titer of the two TVMs produced by MHJ1011 reached 3,400 mg/liter. Insecticidal tests proved that TVM had enhanced activities against Tetranychus cinnabarinus and Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, as desired. This study provides a typical example of exploration for novel active compounds through a new method of polyketide synthase (PKS) reassembly for gene replacement. The results of the insecticidal tests may be of use in elucidating the structure-activity relationship of AVMs and MBMs.

  20. Autogenous transcriptional activation of a thiostrepton-induced gene in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, D J; Caso, J L; Thompson, C J

    1993-01-01

    Although the antibiotic thiostrepton is best known as an inhibitor of protein synthesis, it also, at extremely low concentrations (< 10(-9) M), induces the expression of a regulon of unknown function in certain Streptomyces species. Here, we report the purification of a Streptomyces lividans thiostrepton-induced transcriptional activator protein, TipAL, whose N-terminus is similar to a family of eubacterial regulatory proteins represented by MerR. TipAL was first purified from induced cultures of S.lividans as a factor which bound to and activated transcription from its own promoter. The tipAL gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and TipAL protein purified in a single step using a thiostrepton affinity column. Thiostrepton enhanced binding of TipAL to the promoter and catalysed specific transcription in vitro. TipAS, a second gene product of the same open reading frame consisting of the C-terminal domain of TipAL, is apparently translated using its own in-frame initiation site. Since it is produced in large molar excess relative to TipAL after induction and also binds thiostrepton, it may competitively modulate transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7688297

  1. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  2. Overproduction of Ristomycin A by Activation of a Silent Gene Cluster in Amycolatopsis japonicum MG417-CF17

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Marius; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas; Jochim, Angelika; Wolf, Felix; Muenzer, Patrick; Borst, Oliver; Gross, Harald; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria within the last decades is one reason for the urgent need for new antibacterial agents. A strategy to discover new anti-infective compounds is the evaluation of the genetic capacity of secondary metabolite producers and the activation of cryptic gene clusters (genome mining). One genus known for its potential to synthesize medically important products is Amycolatopsis. However, Amycolatopsis japonicum does not produce an antibiotic under standard laboratory conditions. In contrast to most Amycolatopsis strains, A. japonicum is genetically tractable with different methods. In order to activate a possible silent glycopeptide cluster, we introduced a gene encoding the transcriptional activator of balhimycin biosynthesis, the bbr gene from Amycolatopsis balhimycina (bbrAba), into A. japonicum. This resulted in the production of an antibiotically active compound. Following whole-genome sequencing of A. japonicum, 29 cryptic gene clusters were identified by genome mining. One of these gene clusters is a putative glycopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster. Using bioinformatic tools, ristomycin (syn. ristocetin), a type III glycopeptide, which has antibacterial activity and which is used for the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome, was deduced as a possible product of the gene cluster. Chemical analyses by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed the in silico prediction that the recombinant A. japonicum/pRM4-bbrAba synthesizes ristomycin A. PMID:25114137

  3. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae.

  4. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Recreational Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Lauren E.; Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Millikan, Robert C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; North, Kari E.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Eng, Sybil M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D.; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p<0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and XPF (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and MLH1 (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. PMID:23852586

  5. Activation of transcription factor genes in striatum by cocaine: role of both serotonin and dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R V; Baraban, J M

    1993-10-01

    Acute administration of cocaine increases expression of the transcription factor genes c-fos and zif268 in the striatum. This response is thought to be mediated via D1 dopamine (DA) receptors, as it is blocked by the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. However, the directly acting D1 receptor agonists, apomorphine and SKF 38393, do not mimic cocaine's activation of these genes raising the possibility that D1 receptor activation is necessary, but not sufficient, to trigger transcription factor expression. Because cocaine blocks uptake of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT), as well as DA, we examined whether cocaine's ability to inhibit NE and 5-HT uptake may contribute to its induction of c-fos and zif268 expression in striatum. In examining the effects of selective monoamine uptake inhibitors, we observed that fluoxetine or citalopram, selective inhibitors of 5-HT uptake, potentiated the ability of mazindol, a DA and NE uptake inhibitor, to induce zif268 and c-fos expression, even though these 5-HT uptake inhibitors had no effect when administered alone. In contrast, the selective NE uptake inhibitor, desipramine, administered alone, or in combination with fluoxetine, did not increase expression of zif268 or c-fos. Furthermore, selective denervation of 5-HT projections by p-chloroamphetamine treatment attenuated the increase in zif268 and c-fos expression induced by cocaine in the striatum. In contrast, selective lesions of NE projections with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride failed to block cocaine's activation of these genes in the striatum. Taken together, these findings indicate that cocaine's ability to induce striatal expression of c-fos and zif268 is mediated by its effects on both the 5-HT and DA systems.

  6. Matrix immobilization enhances the tissue repair activity of growth factor gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Doukas, J; Chandler, L A; Gonzalez, A M; Gu, D; Hoganson, D K; Ma, C; Nguyen, T; Printz, M A; Nesbit, M; Herlyn, M; Crombleholme, T M; Aukerman, S L; Sosnowski, B A; Pierce, G F

    2001-05-01

    Although growth factor proteins display potent tissue repair activities, difficulty in sustaining localized therapeutic concentrations limits their therapeutic activity. We reasoned that enhanced histogenesis might be achieved by combining growth factor genes with biocompatible matrices capable of immobilizing vectors at delivery sites. When delivered to subcutaneously implanted sponges, a platelet-derived growth factor B-encoding adenovirus (AdPDGF-B) formulated in a collagen matrix enhanced granulation tissue deposition 3- to 4-fold (p < or = 0.0002), whereas vectors encoding fibroblast growth factor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor promoted primarily angiogenic responses. By day 8 posttreatment of ischemic excisional wounds, collagen-formulated AdPDGF-B enhanced granulation tissue and epithelial areas up to 13- and 6-fold (p < 0.009), respectively, and wound closure up to 2-fold (p < 0.05). At longer times, complete healing without excessive scar formation was achieved. Collagen matrices were shown to retain both vector and transgene products within delivery sites, enabling the transduction and stimulation of infiltrating repair cells. Quantitative PCR and RT-PCR demonstrated both vector DNA and transgene mRNA within wound beds as late as 28 days posttreatment. By contrast, aqueous formulations allowed vector seepage from application sites, leading to PDGF-induced hyperplasia in surrounding tissues but not wound beds. Finally, repeated applications of PDGF-BB protein were required for neotissue induction approaching equivalence to a single application of collagen-immobilized AdPDGF-B, confirming the utility of this gene transfer approach. Overall, these studies demonstrate that immobilizing matrices enable the controlled delivery and activity of tissue promoting genes for the effective regeneration of injured tissues.

  7. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Bode, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  8. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  9. A common transcriptional activator is located in the coding region of two replication-dependent mouse histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, M M; Bowman, T L; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    There is a region in the mouse histone H3 gene protein-encoding sequence required for high expression. The 110-nucleotide coding region activating sequence (CRAS) from codons 58 to 93 of the H3.2 gene restored expression when placed 520 nucleotides 5' of the start of transcription in the correct orientation. Since identical mRNA molecules are produced by transcription of the original deletion gene and the deletion gene with the CRAS at -520, effects of the deletions on mRNA stability or other posttranscriptional events are completely ruled out. Inversion of the CRAS sequence in its proper position in the H3 gene resulted in only a threefold increase in expression, and placing the CRAS sequence 5' of the deleted gene in the wrong orientation had no effect on expression. In-frame deletions in the coding region of an H2a.2 gene led to identification of a 105-nucleotide sequence in the coding region between amino acids 50 and 85 necessary for high expression of the gene. Additionally, insertion of the H3 CRAS into the deleted region of the H2a.2 gene restored expression of the H2a gene. Thus, the CRAS element has an orientation-dependent, position-independent effect. Gel mobility shift competition studies indicate that the same proteins interact with both the H3 and H2a CRAS elements, suggesting that a common factor is involved in expression of histone genes. Images PMID:2038312

  10. Involvement of the Sinorhizobium meliloti leuA gene in activation of nodulation genes by NodD1 and luteolin.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán-Pinilla, Julio M; Muñoz, Socorro; Nogales, Joaquina; Olivares, José; Sanjuán, Juan

    2002-07-01

    The role of leucine biosynthesis by Sinorhizobium meliloti in the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with alfalfa ( Medicago sativa) was investigated. The leuA gene from S. meliloti, encoding alpha-isopropylmalate synthase, which catalyses the first specific step in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, was characterized. S. melilotiLeuA(-) mutants were Leu auxotrophs and lacked alpha-isopropylmalate synthase activity. In addition, leuA auxotrophs were unable to nodulate alfalfa. Alfalfa roots did not seem to secrete enough leucine to support growth of leucine auxotrophs in the rhizosphere. Thus, this growth limitation probably imposes the inability to initiate symbiosis. However, in addition to the leucine auxotrophy, leuA strains were impaired in activation of nodulation genes by the transcriptional activator NodD1 in response to the plant flavone luteolin. By contrast, nod gene activation by NodD3, which does not involve plant-derived inducers, was unaffected. Our results suggest that a leucine-related metabolic intermediate may be involved in activation of nodulation genes by NodD1 and luteolin. This kind of control could be of relevance as a way to link bacterial physiological status to the response to plant signals and initiation of symbiosis.

  11. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  12. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation. PMID:28151996

  13. Assessment of Transcriptional Activity of Borrelia burgdorferi and Host Cytokine Genes During Early and Late Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sunlian; Barthold, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Differential gene expression by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes during mammalian infection facilitates their dissemination as well as immune evasion. Modulation of gene transcription in response to host immunity has been documented with the outer surface protein C, but the influence of transcription of other genes is largely unknown. A low-density array (LDA) was developed to study transcriptional activity of 43 B. burgdorferi genes and 19 host genes that may be involved in various host–agent interactions. Gene transcription in heart, joint, and muscle tissue was compared in immunocompetent C3H and immunodeficient C3H-scid mice during early (3 weeks) and late (2 months) B. burgdorferi infection. Among all tissue types, levels of relative transcription of over 80% of B. burgdorferi genes tested were one- to nine-fold less in C3H mice compared to C3H-scid mice. At the later time point, all genes were transcribed in C3H-scid mice, whereas transcription of 16 genes out of 43 tested was not detected in analyzed tissues of C3H mice. Our data suggest that during infection of immunocompetent mice, a majority of B. burgdorferi genes tested are downregulated in response to acquired host immunity. LDA revealed variable patterns of host gene expression in different tissues and at different intervals in infected mice. Higher levels of relative expression for IL-10 during both early and late infection were detected in heart base, and it was unchanged in the tibiotarsal joint. Comparative analysis of B. burgdorferi and host genes transcriptional activity revealed that increased flaB mRNA during early infection was followed by increases of CCL7, CCL8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in all assessed tissue types. LDA represents a valuable approach for sensitive and quantitative gene transcription profiling and for understanding Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23930938

  14. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  15. Recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2) in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianlei; Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Peng

    2014-12-01

    During the development of B and T lymphocytes, Ig and TCR variable region genes are assembled from germline V, D, and J gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The process of somatic V(D)J recombination, mediated by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) products, is the most significant characteristic of adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) RAG1 and RAG2 were isolated by Genome Walker and RT-PCR, and their expression patterns were analysed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization on sections. RAG1 spans over 7.0 kb, containing 4 exons and 3 introns, and the full-length ORF is 3207 bp, encoding a peptide of 1068 amino acids. The first exon lies in the 5'-UTR, which is an alternative exon. RAG2 full-length ORF is 1062 bp, encodes a peptide of 533 amino acids, and lacks introns in the coding region. In 6-month old flounders, the expression of RAG1 and RAG2 was essentially restricted to the pronephros (head kidney) and mesonephros (truck kidney). Additionally, both of them were mainly expressed in the thymus. These results revealed that the thymus and kidney most likely serve as the primary lymphoid tissues in the flounder.

  16. Efficient gene delivery with osmotically active and hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s.

    PubMed

    Arote, Rohidas B; Lee, Eun-Sun; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, You-Kyoung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Myung-Haing; Cho, Chong-Su

    2009-12-01

    Degradable and hyperbranched poly (ester amine)s (PEAs) were successfully synthesized by Michael addition reaction between hydrophilic glycerol triacrylate (GTA) and low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) and evaluated as nonviral gene carriers. PEAs effectively condensed DNA with particle sizes below 200 nm and suitable surface charges (15-45 mV), suitable for intracellular delivery. PEAs degraded in a controlled fashion showing half-lives of more than 12 days and were essentially nontoxic in three different cell lines. Elevated transfection levels by luciferase assay revealed the superiority of PEAs over PEI 25K and Lipofectamine. PEAs synthesized using 1:4 mol ratio of GTA to PEI [GTA/PEI-1.2(1:4)] showed highest transfection efficiency in HepG2 cells. PEAs showed significant gene expression in vitro as well as in vivo through aerosol administration. Reduction in packed cell volume (PCV) of cells when treated with polyplexes supported the hyperosmotic effect of PEAs. Effect of bafilomycin A1 on transfection efficiency of PEAs on 293T cells indicated its endosomal buffering capacity. High transfection efficiency was attributed to the synergism from hyperosmotic glycerol backbone in the PEAs and endosomal buffering capacity of PEI amine groups. Therefore, this convergence of osmotically active biodegradable PEAs suggests their potential as a safe and efficient gene delivery vector.

  17. EGR1 regulates hepatic clock gene amplitude by activating Per1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Chen; Xu, Ying; Xue, Bin; Du, Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian clock system is composed of a master clock and peripheral clocks. At the molecular level, the rhythm-generating mechanism is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops. However, the underlying mechanisms for molecular clock regulation that affect circadian clock function remain unclear. Here, we show that Egr1 (early growth response 1), an early growth response gene, is expressed in mouse liver in a circadian manner. Consistently, Egr1 is transactivated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer through a conserved E-box response element. In hepatocytes, EGR1 regulates the transcription of several core clock genes, including Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ, and the rhythm amplitude of their expression is dependent on EGR1’s transcriptional function. Further mechanistic studies indicated that EGR1 binds to the proximal region of the Per1 promoter to activate its transcription directly. When the peripheral clock is altered by light or feeding behavior transposition in Egr1-deficient mice, the expression phase of hepatic clock genes shifts normally, but the amplitude is also altered. Our data reveal a critical role for EGR1 in the regulation of hepatic clock circuitry, which may contribute to the rhythm stability of peripheral clock oscillators. PMID:26471974

  18. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip R.; Cohen, Jonathan E.; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life. PMID:28256583

  19. Cystatin B-deficient mice have increased expression of apoptosis and glial activation genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieuallen, Kimberly; Pennacchio, Len A.; Park, Morgan; Myers, Richard M.; Lennon, Gregory G.

    2001-07-05

    Loss-of-function mutations in the cystatin B (Cstb) gene cause a neurological disorder known as Unverricht Lundborg disease (EPM1) in human patients. Mice that lack Cstb provide a mammalian model for EPM1 by displaying progressive ataxia and myoclonic seizures. We analyzed RNAs from brains of Cstb-deficient mice by using modified differential display, oligonucleotide microarray hybridization and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to examine the molecular consequences of the lack of Cstb. We identified seven genes that have consistently increased transcript levels in neurological tissues from the knockout mice. These genes are cathepsin S, C1q B-chain of complement (C1qB), beta-2-microglobulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), apolipoprotein D, fibronectin 1 and metallothionein II, which are expected to be involved in increased proteolysis, apoptosis and glial activation. The molecular changes in Cstb-deficient mice are consistent with the pathology found in the mouse model and may provide clues towards the identification of therapeutic points of intervention for EPM1 patients.

  20. Post-transcription initiation function of the ubiquitous SAGA complex in tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Weake, Vikki M.; Dyer, Jamie O.; Seidel, Christopher; Box, Andrew; Swanson, Selene K.; Peak, Allison; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex was discovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been well characterized as an important transcriptional coactivator that interacts both with sequence-specific transcription factors and the TATA-binding protein TBP. SAGA contains a histone acetyltransferase and a ubiquitin protease. In metazoans, SAGA is essential for development, yet little is known about the function of SAGA in differentiating tissue. We analyzed the composition, interacting proteins, and genomic distribution of SAGA in muscle and neuronal tissue of late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The subunit composition of SAGA was the same in each tissue; however, SAGA was associated with considerably more transcription factors in muscle compared with neurons. Consistent with this finding, SAGA was found to occupy more genes specifically in muscle than in neurons. Strikingly, SAGA occupancy was not limited to enhancers and promoters but primarily colocalized with RNA polymerase II within transcribed sequences. SAGA binding peaks at the site of RNA polymerase pausing at the 5′ end of transcribed sequences. In addition, many tissue-specific SAGA-bound genes required its ubiquitin protease activity for full expression. These data indicate that in metazoans SAGA plays a prominent post-transcription initiation role in tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21764853

  1. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip R; Cohen, Jonathan E; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R Douglas

    2017-03-03

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life.

  2. A long non-coding RNA promotes full activation of adult gene expression in the chicken α-globin domain.

    PubMed

    Arriaga-Canon, Cristian; Fonseca-Guzmán, Yael; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Guerrero, Georgina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were recently shown to regulate chromatin remodelling activities. Their function in regulating gene expression switching during specific developmental stages is poorly understood. Here we describe a nuclear, non-coding transcript responsive for the stage-specific activation of the chicken adult α(D) globin gene. This non-coding transcript, named α-globin transcript long non-coding RNA (lncRNA-αGT) is transcriptionally upregulated in late stages of chicken development, when active chromatin marks the adult α(D) gene promoter. Accordingly, the lncRNA-αGT promoter drives erythroid-specific transcription. Furthermore, loss of function experiments showed that lncRNA-αGT is required for full activation of the α(D) adult gene and maintenance of transcriptionally active chromatin. These findings uncovered lncRNA-αGT as an important part of the switching from embryonic to adult α-globin gene expression, and suggest a function of lncRNA-αGT in contributing to the maintenance of adult α-globin gene expression by promoting an active chromatin structure.

  3. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasR gene, a transcriptional activator of elastase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gambello, M J; Iglewski, B H

    1991-01-01

    We report the discovery of the lasR gene, which positively regulates elastase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The lasR gene was cloned by its ability to restore a positive elastase phenotype in strain PA103, a strain which possesses the elastase structural gene (lasB) but fails to synthesize the enzyme. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 716 nucleotides encoding a protein of approximately 27 kDa. A labeled LasR protein of 27 kDa was detected in Escherichia coli by using a T7 RNA polymerase expression system. A chromosomal deletion mutant of the lasR gene was constructed in PAO1 by gene replacement. This mutant (PAO-R1) is devoid of elastolytic activity and elastase antigen. The deduced amino acid sequence of LasR is 27% homologous to the positive activator LuxR of Vibrio fischeri and the suspected activator 28K-UvrC of E. coli. Northern (RNA) analysis of total cellular RNA from PAO1, PAO-R1, and PAO-R1 containing the lasR gene on a multicopy plasmid (pMG1.7) revealed that a functional lasR gene is required for transcription of the elastase structural gene (lasB). Images PMID:1902216

  5. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA.

  6. Antitumor activity of mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Long-Ying; Wang, Jian-Ping; Gui, Zhi-Fu; Shen, Li-Zong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) mutant D314A and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) for treatment of colon cancer in a mouse model. METHODS: Recombinant lentivirus vectors that contained wild-type bCD gene (bCDwt), and bCD mutant D314A gene (bCD-D314A) with green fluorescence protein gene were constructed and used to infect human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, to generate stable transfected cells, LoVo/null, LoVo/bCDwt or LoVo/bCD-D314A. These were injected subcutaneously into Balb/c nude mice to establish xenograft models. Two weeks post-LoVo cell inoculation, PBS or 5-FC (500 mg/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once daily for 14 d. On the day after LoVo cell injection, mice were monitored daily for tumor volume and survival. RESULTS: Sequence analyses confirmed the construction of recombinant lentiviral plasmids that contained bCDwt or bCD-D314A. The lentiviral vector had high efficacy for gene delivery, and RT-PCR showed that bCDwt or bCD-D314A gene was transferred to LoVo cells. Among these treatment groups, gene delivery or 5-FC administration alone had no effect on tumor growth. However, bCDwt/5-FC or bCD-D314A/5-FC treatment inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice significantly (P < 0.05). Importantly, the tumor volume in the bCD-D314A/5-FC-treated group was lower than that in the bCDwt/5-FC group (P < 0.05), and bCD-D314A plus 5-FC significantly prolonged survival of mice in comparison with bCDwt plus 5-FC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The bCD mutant D314A enhanced significantly antitumor activity in human colon cancer xenograft models, which provides a promising approach for human colon carcinoma therapy. PMID:21734808

  7. Transcriptional control of muscle plasticity: differential regulation of troponin I genes by electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Calvo, S; Stauffer, J; Nakayama, M; Buonanno, A

    1996-01-01

    Plasticity of the skeletal muscle phenotype can result from the selective repression and activation of gene expression in response to innervation patterns. Motoneurons, eliciting different patterns of depolarization, regulate the contractile properties of the myofibers they innervate by selectively activating expression of genes encoding fiber-type-specific (fast vs. slow) contractile proteins. We have analyzed the regulation of the troponin I slow (TnIs) and fast (TnIf) genes as a model to study the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber-type plasticity. We found that expression of the two TnI isoforms is downregulated by denervation. Moreover, TnI expression is upregulated by specific patterns of electrical activity [10 Hz vs. 100 Hz] used to depolarize muscle. We previously isolated the rat TnIs gene and demonstrated that regulatory sequences reside in its upstream region and second intron [Banerjee-Basu S, Buonanno A (1993), Mol Cell Biol 12:5024-5032]. Using transgenic mice, we show that the upstream region of the TnIs gene extending from -949 to +50 is sufficient to confer transcription specifically in slowtwitch muscles. Serial deletions of the TnIs upstream and intronic regions were generated in a CAT reporter vector to delineate transcriptional regulatory elements in transiently transfected Sol8 myotubes. Sequences necessary to confer the highest levels of TnIs transcription mapped to the upstream region between -0.95 and -0.72 kb, and to a 56 bp sequence located in the second intron. Comparison of the at sequence between -0.95 and -0.72 to the human TnIs gene identified a highly homologous region of 128 bp that we named the TnI SURE (slow upstream regulatory element). Alignment of these two SURE sequences with the quail TnI fast intronic regulatory element identified common motifs, namely, two A/T-rich sequences (A/T1 and A/T2) with homology to homeotic protein and MEF2 binding sites, a CACC box, an E box, and a novel motif (GCAGGCA) that we denoted the

  8. Fasting activates the gene expression of UCP3 independent of genes necessary for lipid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Rebecca J; Mehan, Kate A; Hargreaves, Mark; Spriet, Lawrence L; Cameron-Smith, David

    2002-06-07

    Fasting triggers a complex array of adaptive metabolic and hormonal responses including an augmentation in the capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) oxidation in skeletal muscle. This study hypothesized that this adaptive response is mediated by increased mRNA of key genes central to the regulation of fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle. Fasting dramatically increased UCP3 gene expression, by 5-fold at 15 h and 10-fold at 40 h. However the expression of key genes responsible for the uptake, transport, oxidation, and re-esterification of FA remained unchanged following 15 and 40 h of fasting. Likewise there was no change in the mRNA abundance of transcription factors. This suggests a unique role for UCP3 in the regulation of FA homeostasis during fasting as adaptation to 40 h of fasting does not require alterations in the expression of other genes necessary for lipid metabolism.

  9. A 15-base-pair element activates the SPS4 gene midway through sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, S R; Ebisuzaki, L K; Segall, J

    1995-01-01

    Sporulation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents a simple developmental process in which the events of meiosis and spore wall formation are accompanied by the sequential activation of temporally distinct classes of genes. In this study, we have examined expression of the SPS4 gene, which belongs to a group of genes that is activated midway through sporulation. We mapped the upstream boundary of the regulatory region of SPS4 by monitoring the effect of sequential deletions of 5'-flanking sequence on expression of plasmid-borne versions of SPS4 introduced into a MATa/MAT alpha delta sps4/delta sps4 strain. This analysis indicated that the 5' boundary of the regulatory region was within 50 bp of the putative TATA box of the gene. By testing various oligonucleotides that spanned this boundary and the downstream sequence for their ability to activate expression of a heterologous promoter, we found that a 15-bp sequence sufficed to act as a sporulation-specific upstream activation sequence. This 15-bp fragment, designated UASSPS4, activated expression of a CYC1-lacZ reporter gene midway through sporulation and was equally active in both orientations. Extending the UAS fragment to include the adjacent 14-bp enhanced its activity 10-fold. We show that expression of SPS4 is regulated in a manner distinct from that of early meiotic genes: mutation of UME6 did not lead to vegetative expression of SPS4, and sporulation-specific expression was delayed by mutation of IME2. In vivo and in vitro assays suggested that a factor present in vegetative cells bind to the UASSPS4 element. We speculate that during sporulation this factor is modified to serve as an activator of the SPS4 gene or, alternatively, that it recruits an activator to the promoter. PMID:7791799

  10. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  11. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  12. Dopamine quinones activate microglia and induce a neurotoxic gene expression profile: relationship to methamphetamine-induced nerve ending damage.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Thomas, David M

    2006-08-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) intoxication leads to persistent damage of dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. Recently, we and others have suggested that the neurotoxicity associated with METH is mediated by extensive microglial activation. DA itself has been shown to play an obligatory role in METH neurotoxicity, possibly through the formation of quinone species. We show presently that DA-quinones (DAQ) cause a time-dependent activation of cultured microglial cells. Microarray analysis of the effects of DAQ on microglial gene expression revealed that 101 genes were significantly changed in expression, with 73 genes increasing and 28 genes decreasing in expression. Among those genes differentially regulated by DAQ were those often associated with neurotoxic conditions including inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, and prostaglandins. In addition, microglial genes associated with a neuronally protective phenotype were among those that were downregulated by DAQ. These results implicate DAQ as one species that could cause early activation of microglial cells in METH intoxication, manifested as an alteration in the expression of a broad biomarker panel of genes. These results also link oxidative stress, chemical alterations in DA to its quinone, and microglial activation as part of a cascade of glial-neuronal crosstalk that can amplify METH-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. Jasmonic acid-dependent and -independent signaling pathways control wound-induced gene activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Titarenko, E; Rojo, E; León, J; Sánchez-Serrano, J J

    1997-01-01

    Plant response to mechanical injury includes gene activation both at the wound site and systemically in nondamaged tissues. The model developed for the wound-induced activation of the proteinase inhibitor II (Pin2) gene in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) establishes the involvement of the plant hormones abscisic acid and jasmonic acid (JA) as key components of the wound signal transduction pathway. To assess in Arabidopsis thaliana the role of these plant hormones in regulating wound-induced gene expression, we isolated wound- and JA-inducible genes by the differential mRNA display technique. Their patterns of expression upon mechanical wounding and hormonal treatments revealed differences in the spatial distribution of the transcripts and in the responsiveness of the analyzed genes to abscisic acid and JA. A correlation can be established between sensitivity to JA and the accumulation of the transcripts in systemic tissues upon wounding. A comparative study of the wound response in wild-type and JA-insensitive coi1 mutant plants indicated that in A. thaliana wound signals are transmitted via at least two different pathways. One of them does not involve JA as a mediator and is preferentially responsible for gene activation in the vicinity of the wound site, whereas the other requires JA perception and activates gene expression throughout the aerial part of the plant. PMID:9342878

  14. Distribution of the trehalase activation response and the regulatory trehalase gene among yeast species.

    PubMed

    Soto, T; Fernández, J; Cansado, J; Vicente, J; Gacto, M

    1997-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts the activity of regulatory trehalases increases in response to the addition of glucose and to thermal changes in the extracellular medium. We have performed an screening on the extent of this response among different representative yeast species and the results show that this ability is displayed only by a few members of the Saccharomycetaceae family. However, all yeasts examined contain a gene related to that coding for regulatory trehalase in S. cerevisiae. This finding reveals that the operational distinction between regulatory and nonregulatory trehalase in yeasts is not a property of the enzyme by itself but relays on the expression of accompanying mechanisms able to modulate trehalase activity.

  15. Activity-Dependent Plasticity and Gene Expression Modifications in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Daniela; Foscarin, Simona; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Information processing, memory formation, or functional recovery after nervous system damage depend on the ability of neurons to modify their functional properties or their connections. At the cellular/molecular level, structural modifications of neural circuits are finely regulated by intrinsic neuronal properties and growth-regulatory cues in the extracellular milieu. Recently, it has become clear that stimuli coming from the external world, which comprise sensory inflow, motor activity, cognitive elaboration, or social interaction, not only provide the involved neurons with instructive information needed to shape connection patterns to sustain adaptive function, but also exert a powerful influence on intrinsic and extrinsic growth-related mechanisms, so to create permissive conditions for neuritic remodeling. Here, we present an overview of recent findings concerning the effects of experience on molecular mechanisms underlying CNS structural plasticity, both in physiological conditions and after damage, with particular focus on activity-dependent modulation of growth-regulatory genes and epigenetic modifications. PMID:22144945

  16. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  17. [Resistance to therapy in primary nephrotic syndrome: effect of MDR1 gene activity].

    PubMed

    Stachowski, J; Zanker, C B; Runowski, D; Zaniew, M; Peszko, A; Medyńska, A; Zwolińska, D; Rogowska-Kalisz, A; Hyla-Klekot, L; Szprygner, K; Weglarska, J; Sieniawska, M; Musiał, W; Maciejewski, J; Baldamus, C A

    2000-04-01

    MDR1 gene encodes for a transmembranous glycoprotein, gp-170, which acts as a drug export pump and is also a cyclosporine(CsA)-binding protein. This study aimed at evaluating MDR1 expression in NS sensitive(S) and resistant(R) to therapy (steroids/S/, cyclophosphamide/C/, CsA) patients. Twenty six boys, 13 girls aged 3-8 years were included to the study. MDR1 was analysed using: 1) evaluation of gp-170 activity according to DiC2/3/ [3,3-Diethyloxa-carbocyanine Iodide] by means of flow cytometry and as 2) mRNA expression of MDR1 determined by RT-PCR. The analysis was performed in the lymphocyte subset CD4/CD45RA presenting suppressor-inducer activity. Negative control, Jurkat-T-cell line, not expressing the MDR1 phenotype, was transfected with viral expression vector containing a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene. We found that: in SR-NS the high expression of MDR1 was associated mainly with the suppressor-inducer T-cells (CD45RA+CD4+) and was subsequently enhanced during an ineffective treatment with C and/or CsA. C-R-NS and CsA-R-NS were partially reversible by S- and R-Verapamil; this was in vitro confirmed by inhibition of export pump activity, gp-170. SS-NS, C-S-NS and CsA-S-NS presented the low expression and activity of MDR1 comparing to R-children (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (p < 0.00001). Resistance to therapy in NS patients seems to be resulted from the enhanced expression of MDR1 gene and subsequent high activity of export pump P-gp-170. Calcium channel blockers may reverse the MRD1-related resistance in the therapy of NS. Analysis of MDR1 may help to detect of suspected therapy resistance in NS.

  18. Aym1, a mouse meiotic gene identified by virtue of its ability to activate early meiotic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Malcov, Mira; Cesarkas, Karen; Stelzer, Gil; Shalom, Sarah; Dicken, Yosef; Naor, Yaniv; Goldstein, Ronald S; Sagee, Shira; Kassir, Yona; Don, Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that operate during differentiation of mitotically dividing spermatogonia cells into spermatocytes lags way behind what is known about other differentiating systems. Given the evolutionary conservation of the meiotic process, we screened for mouse proteins that could specifically activate early meiotic promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells, when fused to the Gal4 activation domain (Gal4AD). Our screen yielded the Aym1 gene that encodes a short peptide of 45 amino acids. We show that a Gal4AD-AYM1 fusion protein activates expression of reporter genes through the promoters of the early meiosis-specific genes IME2 and HOP1, and that this activation is dependent on the DNA-binding protein Ume6. Aym1 is transcribed predominantly in mouse primary spermatocytes and in gonads of female embryos undergoing the corresponding meiotic divisions. Aym1 immunolocalized to nuclei of primary spermatocytes and oocytes and to specific type A spermatogonia cells, suggesting it might play a role in the processes leading to meiotic competence. The potential functional relationship between AYM1 and yeast proteins that regulate expression of early meiotic genes is discussed.

  19. RNA-seq pinpoints a Xanthomonas TAL-effector activated resistance gene in a large-crop genome.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Tina; van Poecke, Remco M P; Strauss, Annett; Römer, Patrick; Minsavage, Gerald V; Singh, Sylvia; Wolf, Christina; Strauss, Axel; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Yeom, Seon-In; Parniske, Martin; Stall, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey B; Choi, Doil; Prins, Marcel; Lahaye, Thomas

    2012-11-20

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins of the plant pathogenic bacterial genus Xanthomonas bind to and transcriptionally activate host susceptibility genes, promoting disease. Plant immune systems have taken advantage of this mechanism by evolving TALE binding sites upstream of resistance (R) genes. For example, the pepper Bs3 and rice Xa27 genes are hypersensitive reaction plant R genes that are transcriptionally activated by corresponding TALEs. Both R genes have a hallmark expression pattern in which their transcripts are detectable only in the presence and not the absence of the corresponding TALE. By transcriptome profiling using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq), we tested whether we could avoid laborious positional cloning for the isolation of TALE-induced R genes. In a proof-of-principle experiment, RNA-seq was used to identify a candidate for Bs4C, an R gene from pepper that mediates recognition of the Xanthomonas TALE protein AvrBs4. We identified one major Bs4C candidate transcript by RNA-seq that was expressed exclusively in the presence of AvrBs4. Complementation studies confirmed that the candidate corresponds to the Bs4C gene and that an AvrBs4 binding site in the Bs4C promoter directs its transcriptional activation. Comparison of Bs4C with a nonfunctional allele that is unable to recognize AvrBs4 revealed a 2-bp polymorphism within the TALE binding site of the Bs4C promoter. Bs4C encodes a structurally unique R protein and Bs4C-like genes that are present in many solanaceous genomes seem to be as tightly regulated as pepper Bs4C. These findings demonstrate that TALE-specific R genes can be cloned from large-genome crops with a highly efficient RNA-seq approach.

  20. Effect of textile dyes on activity and differential regulation of laccase genes from Pleurotus ostreatus grown in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Bazán, Verónica; Téllez-Téllez, Maura; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Díaz-Godínez, Gerardo; Nava-Galicia, Soley; Villalobos-López, Miguel Ángel; Arroyo-Becerra, Analilia; Bibbins-Martínez, Martha

    2016-12-01

    This research was conducted to extend the knowledge on the differential regulation of laccase genes in response to dyes. In order to accomplish this, we analyzed both, the expression of five laccase genes by real time RT-qPCR, and also the laccase activity and isoforms patterns during the time-course of a Pleurotus ostreatus submerged fermentation supplemented with either acetyl yellow G (AYG) or remazol brilliant blue R (RBBR) dyes. For the purpose of obtaining a stable reference gene for optimal normalization of RT-quantitative PCR gene expression assays, we tested four candidate reference genes. As a result of this analysis, gpd was selected as reference index for data normalization. The addition of dyes had an induction effect on the enzymatic activity and also modified the zymogram profile. Fermentation with RBBR showed the highest laccase activity and number of isoforms along the course of the fermentation. Laccase gene expression profiles displayed up/down regulation along the fermentation time in four laccase genes (pox4, pox3, poxa1b and pox2), while pox1 was not expressed in either of the fermentation conditions. AYG addition caused the highest induction and repression levels for genes pox3 and poxa1b respectively. The expression level for all genes in the presence of RBBR were lower than in AYG, being in both conditions this response growth time dependent. These results show the influence of the nature of dyes on the induction level of laccase activity and on the differential regulation of the laccase genes expression in P. ostreatus.

  1. Visualizing changes in circuit activity resulting from denervation and reinnervation using immediate early gene expression.

    PubMed

    Temple, Meredith D; Worley, Paul F; Steward, Oswald

    2003-04-01

    We describe a novel strategy to evaluate circuit function after brain injury that takes advantage of experience-dependent immediate early gene (IEG) expression. When normal rats undergo training or are exposed to a novel environment, there is a strong induction of IEG expression in forebrain regions, including the hippocampus. This gene induction identifies the neurons that are engaged during the experience. Here, we demonstrate that experience-dependent IEG induction is diminished after brain injury in young adult rats (120-200 gm), specifically after unilateral lesions of the entorhinal cortex (EC), and then recovers with a time course consistent with reinnervation. In situ hybridization techniques were used to assess the expression of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein Arc at various times after the lesion (4, 8, 12, 16, or 30 d). One group of rats was allowed to explore a complex novel environment for 1 hr; control operated animals remained in their home cage. In unoperated animals, exposure to the novel environment induced Arc mRNA levels in most pyramidal neurons in CA1, in many pyramidal neurons in CA3, and in a small number of dentate granule cells. This characteristic pattern of induction was absent at early time points after unilateral EC lesions (4 and 8 d) but recovered progressively at later time points. The recovery of Arc expression occurred with approximately the same time course as the reinnervation of the dentate gyrus as a result of postlesion sprouting. These results document a novel approach for quantitatively assessing activity-regulated gene expression in polysynaptic circuits after trauma.

  2. Chromatin modifications that support acetylcholine receptor gene activation are established during muscle cell determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Carter A; Snell, Jeff; Fromm, Larry

    2011-02-01

    Localization of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) to the postsynaptic region of muscle is mediated in part by transcriptional mechanisms. An important way of regulating transcription is through targeting histone modifications on chromatin to distinct gene loci. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we examined the developmental regulation of certain histone modifications at the AChR epsilon subunit locus, including methylations at lysine residues K4 and K27 and acetylations at K9 and K14. We modeled various stages of muscle development in cell culture, including pre-determined cells, committed but undifferentiated myoblasts, and differentiated myotubes, and modeled synaptic myotube nuclei by stimulating myotubes with neuregulin (NRG) 1. We found that a pattern of histone modifications associated with transcriptional activation is targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus in myotubes prior to stimulation with NRG1 and does not change upon addition of NRG1. Instead, we found that during muscle cell determination and differentiation, specific histone modifications are targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus. Within the gene, at K4, dimethylation is induced during muscle cell determination, while trimethylation is induced during differentiation. At K27, loss of trimethylation and appearance of monomethylation occurs during determination and differentiation. In addition, in a region upstream of the gene, K4 di- and trimethylation, and K9/14 acetylation are induced in a distinct developmental pattern, which may reflect a functional regulatory element. These results suggest synaptic signaling does not directly target histone modifications but rather the histone modification pattern necessary for transcriptional activation is previously established in a series of steps during muscle development.

  3. Rapid and efficient assembly of transcription activator-like effector genes by USER cloning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Li, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Hu, Baoyang

    2014-06-20

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that were related to bacteria immune system have lately been employed in a promising approach of precise gene targeting. Because of the repetitive characteristics of TALEs, existing TALE assembly methods are either very complicated, time-consuming, or too tricky to be handled in common labs. Here, we reported a rapid, efficient and easy method for TALE assembly. This method takes advantage of uracil-specific excision reagent (USER), an enzyme that can cleave DNA constructs and create long, unique single-strand DNA overhangs. Upon USER treatment, the overhangs on each individual TALE repeat unit can be rejoined hierarchically to form pentamers in a ligation-independent manner. Eventually, three pentamers are assembled into a full TALE construct by Golden Gate cloning. TALE nucleases (TALENs) generated with this method exhibit high genome-editing activity in human cells such as HEK293FT cells. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized three TALEN pairs targeting endogenous Tet1 locus, and proved that all can specifically target Tet1 gene, though in various degree. Comparing to other methods of TALEN assembly, this one is much less labor intensive and fairly faster, and positive clones can be obtained at high efficiency within only two days. We thus contribute to an easier approach for effective TALENs synthesis, which may highly facilitate the wide application of TALEN technology in genome editing, especially for human cells that require precise targeting.

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III Overexpression By Gene Therapy Exerts Antitumoral Activity In Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    González, Raúl; De la Rosa, Ángel J; Romero-Brufau, Santiago; Barrera-Pulido, Lydia; Gallardo-Chamizo, Francisco; Pereira, Sheila; Marín, Luís M; Álamo, José M; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ángeles; Padillo, Francisco J; Muntané, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic liver. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase type III (NOS-3) overexpression induces cell death in hepatoma cells. The study developed gene therapy designed to specifically overexpress NOS-3 in cultured hepatoma cells, and in tumors derived from orthotopically implanted tumor cells in fibrotic livers. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 administration in mice. Hepa 1-6 cells were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. The first generation adenovirus was designed to overexpress NOS-3 (or GFP) and luciferase cDNA under the regulation of murine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV) promoters, respectively. Both adenoviruses were administered through the tail vein two weeks after orthotopic tumor cell implantation. AFP-NOS-3/RSV-Luciferase increased oxidative-related DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and caspase-8 activity in cultured Hepa 1-6 cells. The increased expression of CD95/CD95L and caspase-8 activity was abolished by l-NAME or p53 siRNA. The tail vein infusion of AFP-NOS- 3/RSV-Luciferase adenovirus increased cell death markers, and reduced cell proliferation of established tumors in fibrotic livers. The increase of oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by NOS-3 overexpression induced DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The effectiveness of the gene therapy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Discovery of genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzyme by metagenomic analysis of lignocellulosic biomasses

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Salvatore; Ventorino, Valeria; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was applied to discover novel biocatalysts for lignocellulose hydrolysis from three dedicated energy crops, Arundo donax, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Populus nigra, after natural biodegradation. The microbiomes of the three lignocellulosic biomasses were dominated by bacterial species (approximately 90%) with the highest representation by the Streptomyces genus both in the total microbial community composition and in the microbial diversity related to GH families of predicted ORFs. Moreover, the functional clustering of the predicted ORFs showed a prevalence of poorly characterized genes, suggesting these lignocellulosic biomasses are potential sources of as yet unknown genes. 1.2%, 0.6% and 3.4% of the total ORFs detected in A. donax, E. camaldulensis and P. nigra, respectively, were putative Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes). Interestingly, the glycoside hydrolases abundance in P. nigra (1.8%) was higher than that detected in the other biomasses investigated in this study. Moreover, a high percentage of (hemi)cellulases with different activities and accessory enzymes (mannanases, polygalacturonases and feruloyl esterases) was detected, confirming that the three analyzed samples were a reservoir of diversified biocatalysts required for an effective lignocellulose saccharification. PMID:28198423

  6. Enhancing VSV oncolytic activity with an improved cytosine deaminase suicide gene strategy.

    PubMed

    Leveille, S; Samuel, S; Goulet, M-L; Hiscott, J

    2011-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, with recent studies emphasizing the combined use of chemotherapeutic compounds and prodrug suicide gene strategies to improve OV efficacy. In the present study, the synergistic activity of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-MΔ51 virus expressing the cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT) suicide gene and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) prodrug was investigated in triggering tumor cell oncolysis. In a panel of VSV-sensitive and -resistant cells-prostate PC3, breast MCF7 and TSA, B-lymphoma Karpas and melanoma B16-F10-the combination treatment increased killing of non-infected bystander cells in vitro via the release of 5FC toxic derivatives. In addition, we showed a synergistic effect on cancer cell killing with VSV-MΔ51 and the active form of the drug 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, by monitoring VSV replication at the tumor site and maximizing 5FC bioavailability, we optimized the treatment regimen and improved survival of animals bearing TSA mammary adenocarcinoma. Altogether, this study emphasizes the potency of the VSV-CD::UPRT and 5FC combination, and demonstrates the necessity of optimizing each step of a multicomponent therapy to design efficient treatment.

  7. CCL2 enhances pluripotency of human induced pluripotent stem cells by activating hypoxia related genes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yuki; Tang, Dave; Takahashi, Naoko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2014-06-24

    Standard culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) to maintain the pluripotent state, whereas hiPSC more closely resemble epiblast stem cells than true naïve state ES which requires LIF to maintain pluripotency. Here we show that chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) enhances the expression of pluripotent marker genes through the phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein. Moreover, comparison of transcriptomes between hiPSCs cultured with CCL2 versus with bFGF, we found that CCL2 activates hypoxia related genes, suggesting that CCL2 enhanced pluripotency by inducing a hypoxic-like response.Further, we show that hiPSCs cultured with CCL2 can differentiate at a higher efficiency than culturing withjust bFGF and we show CCL2 can be used in feeder-free conditions [corrected]. Taken together, our finding indicates the novel functions of CCL2 in enhancing its pluripotency in hiPSCs.

  8. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA.

  9. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  11. Palmitate increases musclin gene expression through activation of PERK signaling pathway in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Guo, Qian; Mao, Ke; Hu, Hailong; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; He, Hongjuan; Oh, Yuri; Liu, Chuanpeng; Wu, Qiong

    2015-11-20

    Musclin is a type of muscle-secreted cytokine and its increased gene expression induces insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying increased musclin gene expression is currently unclear. Excessive saturated fatty acids (SFA) can activate the secretion of several muscle-secreted cytokines as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, thereby contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the effect of palmitate, the most abundant SFA in the plasma, on the gene expression of musclin in C2C12 myotubes. Treatment of C2C12 myotubes with palmitate or tunicamycin significantly increased the expression of musclin as well as ER stress-related genes, but treatment with oleate did not. Pre-treatment of C2C12 myotubes with 4-phenyl butyrate suppressed the expression of ER stress-related genes, simultaneously, resulting in decreased expression of the musclin gene induced by palmitate or tunicamycin. These results indicate that ER stress is related to palmitate-induced musclin gene expression. Moreover, palmitate-induced musclin gene expression was significantly inhibited in C2C12 myotubes when PERK pathway signaling was suppressed by knockdown of the PERK gene or treatment with GSK2656157, a PERK autophosphorylation inhibitor. However, there was no difference in the palmitate-induced musclin gene expression when IRE1 and ATF6 signaling pathways were suppressed by knockdown of the IRE1 and ATF6 genes. These findings suggest that palmitate increases musclin gene expression via the activation of the PERK signaling pathway in C2C12 myotubes.

  12. Affinity and dose of TCR engagement yield proportional enhancer and gene activity in CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Karmel A; Sajti, Eniko; Collier, Jana G; Gosselin, David; Troutman, Ty Dale; Stone, Erica L; Hedrick, Stephen M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Affinity and dose of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with antigens govern the magnitude of CD4+ T cell responses, but questions remain regarding the quantitative translation of TCR engagement into downstream signals. We find that while the response of mouse CD4+ T cells to antigenic stimulation is bimodal, activated cells exhibit analog responses proportional to signal strength. Gene expression output reflects TCR signal strength, providing a signature of T cell activation. Expression changes rely on a pre-established enhancer landscape and quantitative acetylation at AP-1 binding sites. Finally, we show that graded expression of activation genes depends on ERK pathway activation, suggesting that an ERK-AP-1 axis plays an important role in translating TCR signal strength into proportional activation of enhancers and genes essential for T cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10134.001 PMID:27376549

  13. Virus infection and interferon can activate gene expression through a single synthetic element, but endogenous genes show distinct regulation.

    PubMed

    Raj, N B; Engelhardt, J; Au, W C; Levy, D E; Pitha, P M

    1989-10-05

    Virus inducible elements (IE) in promoters of mouse alpha-interferon and human beta 1-interferon genes contain multiple copies of the hexanucleotide sequence AGT-GAA or its variants which are also found in the interferon-stimulated response element of genes transcriptionally induced by interferon. We have examined the similarities between virus and interferon induction of gene expression and the role of AGTGAA and AAT-GAA hexamers in these responses. Hybrid plasmids were constructed by inserting the IE region, the alpha 4 promoter, or the multiple copies of AGTGAA or AAT-GAA 5' to the inactive-45 human immunodeficiency-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase hybrid gene, and their inducible expression was studied in a transient expression assay. In L-cells, multiple hexamers were efficiently induced both by infection with Newcastle disease virus and by interferon treatment; while the alpha 4 promoter and the IE inducible region were induced predominantly by virus rather than by interferon. In order to dissociate the effect of virus and endogenous interferon on the induction process, we examined the gene expression in Vero cells, which have undergone homozygous deletion of type 1 interferon genes, and in VNPT-159 cells, which were derived from Vero cells by insertion of an inducible human interferon beta 1 gene. The results show that while the alpha 4 promoter was efficiently induced only by virus in both cell types, the constructs containing shorter segments of the IE were induced by both virus and interferon in Vero cells. However, the inducibility by interferon was not detected in VNPT-159 cells, suggesting that the presence of endogenous interferon suppresses interferon-induced expression of hexanucleotide repeats and the short inducible region. In contrast, virus inducibility of endogenous interferon-stimulated genes, ISG-15 and ISG-54, was about 100-fold more efficient in VNPT-159 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting that this induction is largely mediated through

  14. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chi H J; Bishop, Karen S; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M; Marlow, Gareth J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis.

  15. The histone modification pattern of active genes revealed through genome-wide chromatin analysis of a higher eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Schübeler, Dirk; MacAlpine, David M.; Scalzo, David; Wirbelauer, Christiane; Kooperberg, Charles; van Leeuwen, Fred; Gottschling, Daniel E.; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bell, Stephen P.; Groudine, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The covalent modification of nucleosomal histones has emerged as a major determinant of chromatin structure and gene activity. To understand the interplay between various histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, we performed a genome-wide chromatin structure analysis in a higher eukaryote. We found a binary pattern of histone modifications among euchromatic genes, with active genes being hyperacetylated for H3 and H4 and hypermethylated at Lys 4 and Lys 79 of H3, and inactive genes being hypomethylated and deacetylated at the same residues. Furthermore, the degree of modification correlates with the level of transcription, and modifications are largely restricted to transcribed regions, suggesting that their regulation is tightly linked to polymerase activity. PMID:15175259

  16. Angelica Sinensis Polysaccharides Stimulated UDP-Sugar Synthase Genes through Promoting Gene Expression of IGF-1 and IGF1R in Chondrocytes: Promoting Anti-Osteoarthritic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yinxian; Li, Jing; Tan, Yang; Qin, Jun; Xie, Xianfei; Wang, Linlong; Mei, Qibing; Wang, Hui; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joints disease characterized by progressive degeneration of articular cartilage due to the loss of cartilage matrix. Previously, we found, for the first time, that an acidic glycan from Angelica Sinensis Polysaccharides (APSs), namely the APS-3c, could protect rat cartilage from OA due to promoting glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis in chondrocytes. In the present work, we tried to further the understanding of ASP-3c’s anti-OA activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Human primary chondrocytes were treated with APS-3c or/and recombinant human interleukin 1β (IL-1β). It turned out that APS-3c promoted synthesis of UDP-xylose and GAG, as well as the gene expression of UDP-sugar synthases (USSs), insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and attenuated the degenerative phenotypes, suppressed biosynthesis of UDP-sugars and GAG, and inhibited the gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R induced by IL-1β. Then, we induced a rat OA model with papain, and found that APS-3c also stimulated GAG synthesis and gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R in vivo. Additionally, recombinant human IGF1 and IGF1R inhibitor NP-AEW541 were applied to figure out the correlation between stimulated gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R induced by APS-3c. It tuned out that the promoted GAG synthesis and USSs gene expression induced by APS-3c was mediated by the stimulated IGF1 and IGF1R gene expression, but not through directly activation of IGF1R signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significances We demonstrated for the first time that APS-3c presented anti-OA activity through stimulating IGF-1 and IGF1R gene expression, but not directly activating the IGF1R signaling pathway, which consequently promoted UDP-sugars and GAG synthesis due to up-regulating gene expression of USSs. Our findings presented a better understanding of APS-3c’s anti-OA activity and suggested that APS-3c could potentially be a novel therapeutic agent

  17. Potentiation of Methoxymorpholinyl Doxorubicin Anti-Tumor Activity by P450 3A4 Gene Transfer#

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Chen, Chong-Sheng; Waxman, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Preclinical and clinical studies of CYP gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy have focused on anticancer prodrugs activated by CYP2B enzymes, which have low endogenous expression in human liver; however, the gene therapeutic potential of CYP3A enzymes, which are highly expressed in human liver, remains unknown. This study investigated methoxymorpholinyl-doxorubicin (MMDX), a novel CYP3A-activated anticancer prodrug. Retroviral transfer of CYP3A4 increased 9L gliosarcoma cell chemosensitivity to MMDX 120-fold (IC50=0.2nM). In CHO cells, overexpression of P450 reductase in combination with CYP3A4 enhanced chemosensitivity to MMDX, and to ifosfamide, another CYP3A4 prodrug, 11–23-fold compared to CYP3A4 expression alone. CYP3A4 expression and MMDX chemosensitivity were increased in human lung (A549) and brain (U251) tumor cells infected with replication-defective adenovirus encoding CYP3A4. Co-infection with Onyx-017, a replication-conditional adenovirus that co-amplifies and co-replicates the Adeno-3A4 virus, led to large increases in CYP3A4 RNA but only modest increases in CYP3A4 protein and activity. MMDX induced remarkable growth delay of 9L/3A4 tumors, but not 9L tumors, in immunodeficient mice administered low-dose MMDX either i.v. or by direct intratumoral injection (60µg/kg, every 7-days ×3), with the intratumoral route being substantially less toxic to the mouse host. No antitumor activity was observed with i.p. MMDX treatment, suggesting a substantial hepatic first pass effect, and with activated MMDX metabolites formed in the liver having poor access to the tumor site. These studies demonstrate that human CYP3A4 has strong potential for MMDX prodrug activation therapy, and suggest that endogenous tumor cell expression of CYP3A4, and not hepatic CYP3A4 activity, is a key determinant of responsiveness to MMDX therapy in cancer patients in vivo. PMID:19011599

  18. Epigenetic Activation of μ-Opioid Receptor Gene via Increased Expression and Function of Mitogen- and Stress-Activated Protein Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wagley, Yadav; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) gene two decades ago, various regulatory factors have been shown to interact with the MOR promoter and modulate transcript levels. However, the majority of early transcriptional studies on MOR gene have not addressed how intracellular signaling pathways mediate extracellular modulators. In this study, we demonstrate that MOR epigenetic regulation requires multiple coordinated signals