Science.gov

Sample records for active lupus nephritis

  1. Lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neerja; Chiang, Lo-Ku; Rifkin, Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the more serious manifestations of the systemic autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and is associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality. Treatment remains problematic, particularly in terms of controlling the underlying disease process while at the same time preventing unacceptable side effects of therapy. In recent years, clinical trials have started to define optimum regimens of the immunosuppressive agents presently in use. The etiology and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis still are understood incompletely. Nevertheless, insights gained from basic science research in both animals and human beings now are being translated into newer therapies that have the potential to be safer and more specific than those currently available.

  2. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  3. Pregnancy and Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2015-09-01

    The management of lupus nephritis in pregnancy presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for providers. Pregnancy creates a series of physiologic changes in the immune system and kidney that may result in an increased risk of disease flare and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm delivery. Conception should be delayed until disease is in remission to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes. Maternal disease activity and fetal well-being should be monitored closely by an interdisciplinary team, including obstetricians, rheumatologists, and nephrologists throughout pregnancy. Careful attention must be paid to the dosing and potential teratogenicity of medications.

  4. Pregnancy and Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2015-09-01

    The management of lupus nephritis in pregnancy presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for providers. Pregnancy creates a series of physiologic changes in the immune system and kidney that may result in an increased risk of disease flare and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm delivery. Conception should be delayed until disease is in remission to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes. Maternal disease activity and fetal well-being should be monitored closely by an interdisciplinary team, including obstetricians, rheumatologists, and nephrologists throughout pregnancy. Careful attention must be paid to the dosing and potential teratogenicity of medications. PMID:26573551

  5. Serum Renalase Levels Correlate with Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Shao, Xinghua; Chang, Xinbei; Fan, Zhuping; Cao, Qin; Mou, Shan; Wang, Qin; Yan, Yucheng; Desir, Gary; Ni, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is among the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which causes significant morbidity and mortality. Renalase is a novel, kidney-secreted cytokine-like protein that promotes cell survival. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase levels with LN and its role in the disease progression of LN. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 67 LN patients and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventeen active LN patients who received standard therapies were followed up for six months. Disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity–2000 (SLEDAI-2K) scoring system and serum renalase amounts were determined by ELISA. Predictive value of renalase for disease activity was assessed. Furthermore, the expression of renalase in the kidneys of patients and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Serum renalase amounts were significantly higher in LN patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, patients with proliferative LN had more elevated serum renalase levels than Class V LN patients. In proliferative LN patients, serum renalase levels were significantly higher in patients with active LN than those with inactive LN. Serum renalase levels were positively correlated with SLEDAI-2K, 24-h urine protein excretion, ds-DNA and ESR but inversely correlated with serum albumin and C3. Renalase amounts decreased significantly after six-months of standard therapy. The performance of renalase as a marker for diagnosis of active LN was 0.906 with a cutoff value of 66.67 μg/ml. We also observed that the amount of renalase was significantly higher in glomerular of proliferative LN along with the co-expression of macrophages. Conclusion Serum renalase levels were correlated with disease activity in LN. Serum renalase might serve as a potential indicator for disease activity in LN. The marked increase of glomerular renalase and its association with macrophages suggest

  6. Assessment of lupus nephritis activity using urinary retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sesso, R; Rettori, R; Nishida, S; Sato, E; Ajzen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the presence of proximal renal tubular dysfunction as measured by urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) in 70 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Renal disease activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index. This is a clinical-laboratory score based on the principle of the physician's intention to treat. Increased urinary RBP (> 400 micrograms/l) was detected in 17 of 22 (77%) patients with active nephritis, six of 18 (33%) patients with probably active nephritis, one of nine (12%) cases with stable renal disease, and one of 21 (5%) cases without apparent renal disease (P < 0.01). Compared to initial values, mean urinary RBP decreased significantly in six patients evaluated after improvement of the exacerbation of renal disease. There was a positive correlation between urinary RBP and 24-h proteinuria (r = 0.40, P < 0.01), and an inverse correlation between urinary RBP and creatinine clearance (r = -0.60, P < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis adjusting for duration of disease, blood pressure, 24-h proteinuria, and creatinine clearance, mean urinary RBP continued to be significantly and progressively greater for patients with no renal disease, stable renal disease, probably active and active nephritis. Proximal tubular dysfunction is frequent in patients with active lupus nephritis. This association cannot be completely explained by the effects of increased total proteinuria, reduced glomerular filtration rate, and systemic hypertension. Urinary RBP seems to be a marker of renal disease activity. This test may be clinically useful to differentiate patients with active lupus nephritis from those with stable or absent renal disease. PMID:8084448

  7. Serum Thiols as a Biomarker of Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Pritesh; de Souza, Giselle Katiane Bonfim Bacelar; de Lima, Domingos Savio Nunes; Passos, Luiz Fernando Souza; Boechat, Antonio Luiz; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2015-01-01

    Lupus Nephritis (LN) develops in more than half of the Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) patients. However, lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for LN hampers clinical management of patients and impedes development of new therapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with SLE is predictive of renal pathology. Serum biochemical and oxidative stress markers were measured in patients with inactive lupus, active lupus with and without nephritis and compared to healthy control group. To assess the predictive performance of biomarkers, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and cut-offs were used to identify SLE patients with nephritis. We observed an increased oxidative stress response in all SLE patients compared to healthy controls. Among the several biomarkers tested, serum thiols had a significant inverse association with SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Interestingly, thiols were able too aptly differentiate between SLE patients with and without renal pathology, and serum thiol levels were not affected by immunosuppressive drug therapy. The decreased thiols in SLE correlated significantly with serum creatinine and serum C3 levels. Further retrospective evaluation using serum creatinine or C3 levels in combination with thiol’s cutoff values from ROC analysis, we could positively predict chronicity of renal pathology in SLE patients. In summary, serum thiols emerge as an inexpensive and reliable indicator of LN, which may not only help in early identification of renal pathology but also aid in the therapeutic management of the disease, in developing countries with resource poor settings. PMID:25799079

  8. Assessment of detached podocytes in the Bowman's space as a marker of disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, F E; Soliman, N A; Bakr, A M A; El Shwaf, I M

    2014-02-01

    Podocyte damage is an important pathogenic component of glomerular disease progression. This study is a trial to clarify the value of counting and scoring the number of shed Bowman's space podocytes as an activity parameter of lupus nephritis, a trial that has not been conducted before. This study was performed on 42 female patients with the clinical diagnosis of lupus nephritis. Beside the routine stains tissue sections were stained by colloidal iron and anti podocalyxin for sialomucin. Podocytes in the Bowman's space were counted and scored. Thorough statistical work was carried out to correlate the podocyte scores with the morphological lesions of lupus nephritis. This study revealed significant association and correlation of shed Bowman's space podocytes with histopathological parameters of activity in different classes of lupus nephritis. We concluded that counting and scoring shed Bowman's space podocytes is statistically significant as a marker of disease activity in lupus nephritis. It can be one of the parameters of activity index but not of chronicity index.

  9. Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Dieker, Jürgen; Berden, Jo H.; Bakker, Marinka; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane; Voll, Reinhard; Sjöwall, Christopher; Herrmann, Martin; Hilbrands, Luuk B.; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of anti-chromatin/chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4pac), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bpac), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3pme), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4pac showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bpac exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3pme appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4pac and anti-H2Bpac reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bpac and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3pme and H2Bpac. In conclusion, reactivity with H4pac and H2Bpac is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bpac is in particular associated with lupus nephritis. PMID:27780265

  10. Treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of lupus nephritis, together with earlier renal biopsy and selective use of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy, have contributed to a favorable outcome in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nevertheless, we believe that a more effective and less toxic treatment is needed to attain an optimal control of the activity of lupus nephritis. Recent published papers and our experiences regarding treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors are reviewed. Although it has been reported that intermittent monthly pulses of intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) are effective for preserving renal function in adult patients, CPA is a potent immunosuppressive agent that induces severe toxicity, including myelo- and gonadal toxicity, and increases the risk of secondary malignancy. Thus, treatment for controlling lupus nephritis activity, especially in children and adolescents, remains challenging. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) are T-cell-specific calcineurin inhibitors that prevent the activation of helper T cells, thereby inhibiting the transcription of the early activation genes of interleukin (IL)-2 and suppressing T cell-induced activation of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Therefore, both drugs, which we believe may be less cytotoxic, are attractive therapeutic options for young patients with lupus nephritis. Recently, a multidrug regimen of prednisolone (PDN), Tac, and mycophenolate mofetile (MMF) has been found effective and relatively safe in adult lupus nephritis. Since the mechanisms of action of MMF and Tac are probably complementary, multidrug therapy for lupus nephritis may be useful. We propose as an alternative to IVCY, a multidrug therapy with mizoribine, which acts very similarly to MMF, and Tac, which has a different mode of action, combined with PDN for pediatric-onset lupus nephritis. We also believe that a multidrug therapy including CsA and

  11. Renal glycosphingolipid metabolism is dysfunctional in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nowling, Tamara K; Mather, Andrew R; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Powers, Thomas W; Jones, E Ellen; Snider, Ashley J; Oates, Jim C; Drake, Richard R; Siskind, Leah J

    2015-06-01

    Nearly one half of patients with lupus develop glomerulonephritis (GN), which often leads to renal failure. Although nephritis is diagnosed by the presence of proteinuria, the pathology of nephritis can fall into one of five classes defined by different forms of tissue injury, and the mechanisms involved in pathogenesis are not completely understood. Glycosphingolipids are abundant in the kidney, have roles in many cellular functions, and were shown to be involved in other renal diseases. Here, we show dysfunctional glycosphingolipid metabolism in patients with lupus nephritis and MRL/lpr lupus mice. Specifically, we found that glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) levels are significantly higher in the kidneys of nephritic MRL/lpr lupus mice than the kidneys of non-nephritic lupus mice or healthy controls. This elevation may be, in part, caused by altered transcriptional regulation and/or activity of LacCer synthase (GalT5) and neuraminidase 1, enzymes that mediate glycosphingolipid metabolism. We show increased neuraminidase 1 activity early during the progression of nephritis (before significant elevation of GlcCer and LacCer in the kidney). Elevated levels of urinary LacCer were detected before proteinuria in lupus mice. Notably, LacCer levels were higher in the urine and kidneys of patients with lupus and nephritis than patients with lupus without nephritis or healthy controls. Together, these results show early and significant dysfunction of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway in the kidneys of lupus mice and patients with lupus nephritis and suggest that molecules in this pathway may serve as early markers in lupus nephritis.

  12. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1–2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  13. Concurrent Kimura disease and lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Fang, Fang; Sun, Ying; Wang, Songlan; Mao, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Kimura disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder with peripheral eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE and is also frequently complicated by nephropathy. Methods: We report a rare case of Kimura disease concomitant with lupus nephritis in a 72-year old male patient with recurrent unexplained lymphadenopathy, renal lesions, and immunologic abnormalities. Results: The patient was successfully managed with gamma immunoglobulin, intravenous pulse methylprednisolone therapy, hydroxychloroquine, and prednisone. Conclusion: This is the first report of a case of Kimura disease concomitant with lupus nephritis and highlights the importance of considering lupus nephritis as a possible concurrent disease in patients with Kimura disease that have immunologic abnormalities. PMID:27741124

  14. Lupus Nephritis: The Evolving Role of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rovin, Brad H.; Parikh, Samir V.

    2014-01-01

    Immune complex accumulation in the kidney is the hallmark of lupus nephritis and triggers a series of events that result in kidney inflammation and injury. Cytotoxic agents and corticosteroids are standard of care for lupus nephritis treatment, but are associated with considerable morbidity and suboptimal outcomes. Recently, there has been interest in using novel biologic agents and small molecules to treat lupus nephritis. These therapies can be broadly categorized as anti-inflammatory (laquinamod, anti–tumor necrosis factor–like weak inducer of apotosis, anti-C5, and retinoids), antiautoimmunity (anti-CD20, anti–interferon α, and costimulatory blockers), or both (anti–interleukin 6 and proteasome inhibitors). Recent lupus nephritis clinical trials applied biologics or small molecules of any category to induction treatment, seeking short-term end points of complete renal response. These trials in general have not succeeded. When lupus nephritis comes to clinical attention during the inflammatory stage of the disease, the autoimmune stage leading to kidney inflammation will have been active for some time. The optimal approach for using novel therapies may be to initially target kidney inflammation to preserve renal parenchyma, followed by suppression of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss novel lupus nephritis therapies and how they fit into a combinatorial treatment strategy based on the pathogenic stage. PMID:24411715

  15. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment.

  16. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment. PMID:27407281

  17. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  18. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  19. Antinucleosome antibodies as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hung, W T; Chen, Y M; Lan, J L; Chen, H H; Chen, Y H; Chen, D Y; Hsieh, C W; Wen, M C

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the correlation between antinucleosome antibodies and renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). We evaluated 36 patients with proliferative LN, 14 non-renal lupus patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Lupus activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 (BILAG 2004) index, serum anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) levels, serum complement levels and daily urinary protein levels. All 36 lupus nephritis patients received renal biopsy. Antinucleosome antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that levels of serum antinucleosome antibodies were significantly higher in LN patients (median 90.35 units/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 37.38-135.23) than in non-renal SLE patients (median 5.45 units/ml, IQR 2.6-28.93, p <0.05) and in healthy volunteers (median 3.35 units/ml, IQR 2.95-5.23, p <0.001). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with BILAG index (Spearman's r = 0.645, p <0.001) and serum anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r(s) = 0.644, p <0.01), while serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were negatively correlated with serum levels of C3 (r(s) = -0.400, p <0.01) and C4 (r(s) = -0.300, p <0.05). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with the histological activity index of LN (r(s) = 0.368, p <0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies and the histological chronicity index. In conclusion, the serum level of antinucleosome antibodies is a potential biomarker for early recognition of renal involvement and evaluation of disease activity in SLE. Our preliminary results suggested that serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies might be a potential biomarker in evaluating pathological activity of LN.

  20. Genetics of Lupus Nephritis: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Melissa E.; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease marked by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies, immune dysregulation, and chronic inflammation that may lead to increased morbidity and early mortality from end-organ damage. Over half of all SLE patients will develop lupus nephritis. Genetic association studies have identified more than fifty polymorphisms that contribute to lupus nephritis pathogenesis, including genetic variants associated with altered programmed cell death (PCD) and defective immune clearance of PCD debris. These variants may support the generation of autoantibody-containing immune complexes that contribute to lupus nephritis. Genetic variants associated with lupus nephritis also affect the initial phase of innate immunity and the amplifying, adaptive phase of the immune response. Finally, genetic variants associated with the kidney-specific effector response may influence end-organ damage and the progression to end-stage renal disease and death. This review discusses genetic insights of key pathogenic processes and pathways that may lead to lupus nephritis, as well as the clinical implications of these findings as they apply to recent advances in biologic therapies. PMID:26573543

  1. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  2. Complement in Lupus Nephritis: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Quigg, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder caused by loss of tolerance to self-antigens, the production of autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing immune complexes (ICs) in injured tissues. SLE is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and targeted organs, with lupus nephritis being one of the most serious complications. The complement system consists of three pathways and is tightly controlled by a set of regulatory proteins to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of SLE is well accepted; yet, its exact role is still not clear. Summary Complement plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. On the one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classical pathway components, such as C1q and C4, are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, IC-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathological features that are logical consequences of complement activation. Studies in genetically altered mice have shown that lack of complement inhibitors, such as complement factor H (CFH) or decay-accelerating factor (DAF) accelerates the development of experimental lupus nephritis, while treatment with recombinant protein inhibitors, such as Crry-Ig, CR2-Crry, CR2-DAF and CR2-CFH, ameliorates the disease development. Complement-targeted drugs, including soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10), C1 esterase inhibitor and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab), have been shown to inhibit complement safely, and are now being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Key Messages SLE is an autoimmune disorder which targets multiple systems. Complement is centrally involved and plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. Studies from experimental lupus models and clinical

  3. Molecular studies of lupus nephritis kidneys.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Anne; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Berthier, Celine; Sahu, Ranjit; Zhang, Weijia; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Lupus nephritis is a devastating complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for which current therapies are insufficiently effective. Histologic evaluation of renal biopsies is a poor predictor of therapeutic response or outcome. Integrated immunologic, genomic and proteomic approaches may yield new insights into disease pathogenesis and thereby improve therapeutic strategies for lupus nephritis. Given the lack of sequential biopsies from humans, it also remains essential to study informative animal models of disease. Cross-species analyses can identify cells or pathways that are relevant to human disease and can be further studied in mouse models. Using a systems biology approach in which we compare molecular data from kidneys of three different mouse models of lupus nephritis with data from human lupus biopsies, we have found that inflammatory events escalate rapidly around the time of proteinuria onset. This is followed by hypoxia and metabolic stress, and by tubular and endothelial dysfunction. The failure of complete reversal of these abnormalities may increase the sensitivity of the kidney to further insult. We further found that renal macrophages and dendritic cells are key players in lupus nephritis both in mouse models and humans and that macrophages display a hybrid molecular profile that reflects incomplete resolution of inflammation and excessive tissue remodeling. Finally, our studies have suggested several new biomarkers for disease stage that can now be tested longitudinally in human SLE patients.

  4. Serum Cytokines Th1, Th2, and Th17 Expression Profiling in Active Lupus Nephritis-IV: From a Southern Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Hu, Weiping; Wang, Ning; Sun, Qingyi; Liu, Qingyan; Liu, Xiaocong; Hou, Xianghua; Cheng, Ao

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by aberrant T cell immune response. Diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (LN-IV) is the most common, severe, and active form of lupus nephritis. In this study, we investigated the production of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines in prediction of active form of LN-IV. ProcartaPlex multiplex immunoassays panels were used for detection of serum Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines profiling. Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IL-18, IFN-γ, IL-12p70, IL-6, and IL-17A) were considerably expressed in the serum of lupus nephritis IV patients in comparison to the healthy control. However, only IL18 and IL6 were higher in class IV versus class III lupus nephritis. Importantly, the ratios of Th1/Th2 (IL-18/IL-4) and Th17/Th2 (IL-17A/IL-4) were significantly elevated in LN-IV when compared with LN-III, LN-V, and healthy controls. Consistently, the serum cytokines IL-18, IL-17A, and IFN-γ were markedly expressed in LN-IV patient glomeruli and interstitial tissue compared to other classes of LN by IHC. ROC further suggests that IL-18 was a potential marker for LN-IV. The data from our study suggests that the early detection and quantification of these cytokines may help in prediction of active form of LN-IV. PMID:27738386

  5. [Lupus nephritis: up-to-date].

    PubMed

    Karras, A

    2015-02-01

    Renal involvement is frequent during natural history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has a major prognostic value in this systemic disease. Screening for renal symptoms, such as proteinuria, micro-haematuria or renal failure must be performed at initial diagnosis and repeated during subsequent follow-ups. Any significant abnormality of these parameters may reveal active glomerulonephritis (GN) and should lead to a renal biopsy, which will significantly impact the therapeutic choices. Proliferative GN, defined as class III or IV by the actual histo-pathological classification, is the most severe form of SLE-associated nephropathy and can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in up to 60% of cases, according to ethnicity and follow-up duration. Standard induction treatment of active proliferative GN includes corticosteroids combined with an immunosuppressive drug, which can either be cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Even though, recent biotherapies have not yet proved their efficacy in the field of lupus nephritis, new protocols are expected, aiming higher remission rates and avoidance of high-dose corticosteroids regimens. When remission is achieved in proliferative GN, a maintenance therapy is required to decrease the risk of relapse, using either azathioprine or MMF. Immunosuppressive drugs are responsible for an increased risk of infectious or neoplastic complications but cardiovascular disease is actually one of the main causes of mortality among lupus patients, especially for patients with SLE-related kidney disease, well before reaching ESRD.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Monahan, Marianne; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-12-01

    Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.

  7. Novel Autoantigens Associated with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Sachiko; Adnan, Endy; Ishizaki, Jun; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Suemori, Koichiro; Shudou, Masachika; Okura, Takafumi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by production of a variety of autoantibodies. Although anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN), they are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity. To obtain other autoantibodies associated with LN, we screened autoantigens reacting with the sera of LN patients by using an N-terminal biotinylated protein library created from a wheat cell-free protein production system. We screened 17 proteins that showed higher positive signals in the active phase than in the inactive phase of SLE, and higher positive signals in the serum of SLE patient with nephritis than in that of patient without nephritis. Of these, two LN-associated autoantigens, ribosomal RNA-processing protein 8 (RRP8) and spermatid nuclear transition protein 1 (TNP1) were identified by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of renal tissues. Circulating anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 autoantibodies were recognized and deposited as an immune complex (IC) in glomeruli. IC was deposited preferentially in glomeruli rather than in other organs in C57BL/6 mice injected with RRP8 or TNP1. ELISA analysis of sera from patients with various rheumatic diseases demonstrated reactivity for RRP8 and TNP1 in 20% and 14.7% of SLE patients, respectively, whereas there was little or no reactivity in patients with other rheumatic diseases. Among SLE patients, 63.6% and 45.5% of those with LN were positive for anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 antibodies, compared with 12.5% and 9.4% of SLE patients without nephritis, respectively. Both proteins are cationic, and their respective antibodies did not cross-react with dsDNA. These proteins released from apoptotic cells form ICs with each autoantibody, and their ICs may become trapped at anionic sites in the glomerular basement membrane, leading to deposition in glomeruli. These autoantibodies may be useful for prediction of LN in subsets of SLE patients who

  8. Exacerbation of lupus nephritis by high sodium chloride related to activation of SGK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Yao, Genhong; Chen, Weiwei; Tang, Xiaojun; Feng, Xuebing; Sun, Lingyun

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the effects of high salt diet (HSD) on the severity of lupus nephritis (LN) and its mechanism. MRL/lpr mice were randomly divided into two groups, which were fed with normal diet or sodium-rich chow and tap. C57BL/6 mice were selected as control. Spleen Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells were detected by flow cytometry. Serum TGF-β and IL-17 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CD4(+) T cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy donors were treated by NaCl with or without SGK1 inhibitor. Then, Th17 and Treg cells were detected. The HSD MRL/lpr mice had decreased survival rate and increased disease severity. The frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cells increased in HSD treatment group. The ratios of Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg in HSD treated MRL/lpr mice significantly increased. Serum TGF-β increased after HSD treatment. In vitro, high salt could up-regulate Th17 cells of CD4(+) T cells. The effects of high salt treatment on CD4(+) T cells were reversed by SGK1 inhibitor. Our findings demonstrated that excessive intake of salt in diet is an aggravating factor for LN. High salt diet may deteriorate LN through SGK1 pathway.

  9. The Complement System in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Daniel J; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is composed of a family of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that historically has been viewed as a key component of the innate immune system, with a primary role of providing a first-line defense against microorganisms. Although this role indeed is important, complement has many other physiological roles, including the following: (1) influencing appropriate immune responses, (2) disposing of waste in the circulation (immune complexes, cellular debris), and (3) contributing to damage of self-tissue through inflammatory pathways. These three roles are believed to be significant factors in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly its renal manifestation (lupus nephritis), contributing both protective and damaging effects. In this review, we provide an overview of the human complement system and its functions, and discuss its intricate and seemingly contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

  10. Association between the Presence of Autoantibodies Targeting Ficolin-3 and Active Nephritis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Clavarino, Giovanna; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Ouili, Saber; Paul, Stéphane; Gout, Evelyne; Sarrot-Reynauld, Françoise; Bardin, Nathalie; Boëlle, Pierre -Yves; Chiche, Laurent; Bouillet, Laurence; Thielens, Nicole M.; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of multiple autoantibodies. Antibodies against Ficolin-3 were previously identified in the sera of some SLE patients, but their prevalence and significance have not been yet investigated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies among SLE patients and to investigate their potential as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in SLE. In this retrospective study, sera from SLE patients (n = 165) were selected from a preexisting declared biological collection. Samples from healthy controls (n = 48) were matched with SLE sera. Disease activity was determined according to the SLEDAI score. Anti-ficolin-3, anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q antibodies levels were measured in sera by ELISA. First, a highly significant difference was found in the anti-ficolin-3 levels between SLE patients and healthy subjects. Anti-ficolin-3 antibodies were detected as positive in 56 of 165 (34%) SLE patients. The titer of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was correlated with the SLEDAI score (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). The presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was associated with anti-C1q and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Regarding associations with clinical manifestations, the presence of active lupus nephritis was significantly associated with the presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies (p≤0.001). This association with renal involvement was higher with anti-ficolin-3 or anti-C1q antibodies than with other auto-antibodies. Interestingly, the combination of anti-ficolin-3 and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated higher specificity than any other serological biomarker. These results suggest that anti-ficolin-3 antibodies could be useful for the diagnosis of active nephritis in SLE patients. PMID:27631981

  11. Association between the Presence of Autoantibodies Targeting Ficolin-3 and Active Nephritis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Plawecki, Maëlle; Lheritier, Elise; Clavarino, Giovanna; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Ouili, Saber; Paul, Stéphane; Gout, Evelyne; Sarrot-Reynauld, Françoise; Bardin, Nathalie; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Chiche, Laurent; Bouillet, Laurence; Thielens, Nicole M; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of multiple autoantibodies. Antibodies against Ficolin-3 were previously identified in the sera of some SLE patients, but their prevalence and significance have not been yet investigated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies among SLE patients and to investigate their potential as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in SLE. In this retrospective study, sera from SLE patients (n = 165) were selected from a preexisting declared biological collection. Samples from healthy controls (n = 48) were matched with SLE sera. Disease activity was determined according to the SLEDAI score. Anti-ficolin-3, anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q antibodies levels were measured in sera by ELISA. First, a highly significant difference was found in the anti-ficolin-3 levels between SLE patients and healthy subjects. Anti-ficolin-3 antibodies were detected as positive in 56 of 165 (34%) SLE patients. The titer of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was correlated with the SLEDAI score (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). The presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was associated with anti-C1q and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Regarding associations with clinical manifestations, the presence of active lupus nephritis was significantly associated with the presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies (p≤0.001). This association with renal involvement was higher with anti-ficolin-3 or anti-C1q antibodies than with other auto-antibodies. Interestingly, the combination of anti-ficolin-3 and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated higher specificity than any other serological biomarker. These results suggest that anti-ficolin-3 antibodies could be useful for the diagnosis of active nephritis in SLE patients. PMID:27631981

  12. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  13. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  14. Renal biopsy in the management of lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T K; Gelber, A C; Witter, F R; Petri, M; Fine, D M

    2015-02-01

    The differential diagnosis of proteinuria and hematuria in pregnancy is broad and includes active lupus nephritis. Identification of the correct diagnosis often has a profound therapeutic impact on not only the mother but also the fetus. To date, relatively few reports exist on the role of renal biopsy during pregnancy among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present a case series of 11 pregnant women with SLE who underwent a renal biopsy to evaluate a presumptive flare of lupus nephritis. The electronic medical record was retrospectively analyzed for pre-biopsy serum creatinine, proteinuria, hematuria, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA); histologic findings on renal biopsy; and the clinical course of each mother and fetus. From 2001 to 2012, 11 pregnant women with SLE flares during pregnancy underwent a renal biopsy at an academic tertiary medical center. At the time of biopsy, median gestational age was 16 weeks (range 9 to 27), median serum creatinine was 0.6 mg/dl (interquartile range 0.5 to 0.9), six (55%) had hematuria, and all had proteinuria >500 mg/24 hours. Proliferative lupus nephritis was found in 10 (91%) of 11 biopsies (five with ISN/RPS Class III; five with ISN/RPS Class IV). All but one individual underwent a change in management guided by information gleaned from renal biopsy. No apparent biopsy-related complications occurred to mother or fetus. Three women elected to terminate their pregnancy; although many factors were involved, the findings on renal biopsy informed the decision-making process. Among the remaining cases, there were three pre-term deliveries, one fetus with complete heart block, one in utero demise, and one maternal death. Renal biopsy is helpful at informing the management of patients with lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

  15. Urine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 and Lupus Nephritis Disease Activity: Preliminary Report of a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Alharazy, Sabah; Kong, Norella C. T.; Mohd, Marlyn; Shah, Shamsul A.; Ba'in, Arbaiyah; Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This longitudinal study aimed to determine the urine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (uMCP-1) levels in patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN) at various stages of renal disease activity and to compare them to current standard markers. Methods. Patients with LN—active or inactive—had their uMCP-1 levels and standard disease activity markers measured at baseline and 2 and 4 months. Urinary parameters, renal function test, serological markers, and renal SLE disease activity index-2K (renal SLEDAI-2K) were analyzed to determine their associations with uMCP-1. Results. A hundred patients completed the study. At each visit, uMCP-1 levels (pg/mg creatinine) were significantly higher in the active group especially with relapses and were significantly associated with proteinuria and renal SLEDAI-2K. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that uMCP-1 was a potential biomarker for LN. Whereas multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only proteinuria and serum albumin and not uMCP-1 were independent predictors of LN activity. Conclusion. uMCP-1 was increased in active LN. Although uMCP-1 was not an independent predictor for LN activity, it could serve as an adjunctive marker when the clinical diagnosis of LN especially early relapse remains uncertain. Larger and longer studies are indicated. PMID:26246906

  16. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 as a novel biomarker for disease activity and renal pathology changes in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Kharboutli, M; Saxena, R; Wu, T

    2016-04-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Invasive renal biopsy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and management of LN. The objective of this study is to validate serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) as a novel biomarker for clinical disease and renal pathology in LN. Eighty-five biopsy-proven lupus nephritis patients, 18 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and 20 healthy controls were recruited for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing of serum IGFBP-2 levels. Compared to CKD patients of origins other than lupus or healthy controls, serum IGFBP-2 levels were elevated significantly in LN patients. Serum IGFBP-2 was able to discriminate LN patients from the other two groups of patients [area under the curve (AUC) = 0·65, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0·52-0·78; P = 0·043 for LN versus CKD; 0·97, 95% CI = 0·93-1·00; P < 0·0001 for LN versus healthy controls]. Serum IGFBP-2 was a potential indicator of both global disease activity and renal disease activity in LN patients, correlated with serum creatinine levels (r = 0·658, P < 0·001, n = 85) and urine protein-to-creatinine levels (r = 0·397, P < 0·001, n = 85). More importantly, in 19 concurrent patient samples, serum IGFBP-2 correlated with the chronicity index of renal pathology (r = 0·576, P = 0·01, n = 19) but not renal pathological classification. In conclusion, serum IGFBP-2 is a promising biomarker for lupus nephritis, reflective of disease activity and chronicity changes in renal pathology.

  18. Mycophenolate Mofetil versus Cyclophosphamide for Induction Treatment of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Gerald B.; Contreras, Gabriel; Dooley, Mary Anne; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Isenberg, David; Jayne, David; Li, Lei-Shi; Mysler, Eduardo; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Solomons, Neil; Wofsy, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) may offer advantages over intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVC) for the treatment of lupus nephritis, but these therapies have not been compared in an international randomized, controlled trial. Here, we report the comparison of MMF and IVC as induction treatment for active lupus nephritis in a multinational, two-phase (induction and maintenance) study. We randomly assigned 370 patients with classes III through V lupus nephritis to open-label MMF (target dosage 3 g/d) or IVC (0.5 to 1.0 g/m2 in monthly pulses) in a 24-wk induction study. Both groups received prednisone, tapered from a maximum starting dosage of 60 mg/d. The primary end point was a prespecified decrease in urine protein/creatinine ratio and stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine. Secondary end points included complete renal remission, systemic disease activity and damage, and safety. Overall, we did not detect a significantly different response rate between the two groups: 104 (56.2%) of 185 patients responded to MMF compared with 98 (53.0%) of 185 to IVC. Secondary end points were also similar between treatment groups. There were nine deaths in the MMF group and five in the IVC group. We did not detect significant differences between the MMF and IVC groups with regard to rates of adverse events, serious adverse events, or infections. Although most patients in both treatment groups experienced clinical improvement, the study did not meet its primary objective of showing that MMF was superior to IVC as induction treatment for lupus nephritis. PMID:19369404

  19. Lupus nephritis reoccurs following transplantation in the lupus prone mouse.

    PubMed

    Hamar, P; Wang, M; Godo, M; Kokeny, G; Rosivall, L; Ouyang, N; Heemann, U

    2010-02-01

    The incidence and pathomechanism of recurrent lupus nephritis (RLN) after transplantation is not clearly understood. Burning out of the autoimmune process or local immunoregulatory mechanisms in the kidney may be responsible for the low incidence of recurrence. These mechanisms cannot be investigated in human subjects, due to post-transplant immunosuppression. To investigate the pathomechanisms of RLN, male and female kidneys were transplanted from FAS deficient lupus prone (LPR) or control (FAS intact) MRL mice into either LPR or MRL recipients. Urinary protein and blood urea were assessed. Double negative (DN) lymphocyte proliferation was determined by flow cytometry. Two months after transplantation inflammatory infiltration of the glomerular, vascular and interstitial compartments were determined. Renal function as demonstrated by blood urea levels was normal in MRL recipients, but elevated in LPR recipients, independent of the donor strain. Paralleling functional results, inflammatory infiltration was mild or absent in MRL recipients of MRL grafts, and mild to moderate in MRL recipients of LPR grafts, suggesting that kidney removal from the autoimmune (LPR) environment significantly reduced inflammation. Graft infiltration was most severe in LPR recipients: grafts were similarly inflamed independent of the donor. All LPR recipients had significantly less CD4+ Th cells versus MRL mice. Transplantation of LPR grafts into MRL recipients reduced CD4+ Th cell percentage, accompanied by a slight induction of lupus autoantibody production. Our results demonstrate that lupus nephritis is not kidney specific in the LPR model with recurrence after transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression.

  20. Mapping similarities in mTOR pathway perturbations in mouse lupus nephritis models and human lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Padmalatha S; Legault, Holly M; Sypek, Joseph P; Collins, Mark J; Goad, Elizabeth; Goldman, Samuel J; Liu, Wei; Murray, Stuart; Dorner, Andrew J; O'Toole, Margot

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Treatment with sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, has been shown to be efficacious in the MRL/lpr and NZB × NZW F1 mouse models of lupus nephritis, indicating a critical role for the mTOR pathway in both models. This type of demonstration of efficacy in animal models is usually a pre-requisite for advancement into clinical development. However, efficacy in an animal model often has not translated to the desired activity in the clinic. Therefore, a more profound understanding of the mechanistic similarities and differences between various animal models and human diseases is highly desirable. Methods Transcriptional profiling was performed on kidneys from mice with lupus nephritis; from mice who had efficacious drug treatment; and from mice before they developed nephritis. Analysis of variance with false discovery rate adjusted to p < 0.05 and an average fold change of two or more was used to identify transcripts significantly associated with disease and response to therapy. Pathway analyses (using various bioinformatics tools) were carried out to understand the basis for drug efficacy in the mouse model. The relevance in human lupus of the pathways identified in the mouse model was explored using information from several databases derived from the published literature. Results We identified a set of nephritis-associated genes in mouse kidney. Expression of the majority of these returned to asymptomatic levels on sirolimus treatment, confirming the correlation between expression levels and symptoms of nephritis. Network analysis showed that many of these nephritis genes are known to interact with the mTOR pathway. This led us to ask what human diseases are linked to the mTOR pathway. We constructed the mTOR pathway interactome consisting of proteins that interact with members of the mTOR pathway and identified a strong association between mTOR pathway genes and genes reported in the literature as being involved in human lupus

  1. Lupus nephritis: a nucleosome waste disposal defect?

    PubMed

    Berden, Jo H M; Grootscholten, Cecile; Jürgen, W C Dieker; van der Vlag, Johan

    2002-01-01

    Formation of anti-nuclear autoantibodies is a cardinal characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In recent years the nucleosome has been identified as the major autoantigen, since nucleosome specific T cells have been identified, which also drive the formation of anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies. Nucleosome specific autoantibodies are present in a large majority of SLE patients and lupus mice. Nucleosomes are formed during apoptosis by organized cleavage of chromatin. These nucleosomes together with other lupus autoantigens cluster in apoptotic bodies at the surface of apoptotic cells. Systemic release of these autoantigens is normally prevented by swift removal of apoptotic cels. However, if the rate of apoptosis overflows the removal capacity and/or the cleaning machinery is reduced, nucleosomes are released. Furthermore, during apoptosis autoantigens can be modified, which makes them more immunogenic. Nucleosomes also play a pivotal role in the evolution of tissue lesions, especially glomerulonephritis. In lupus nephritis nucleosomes, anti-nucleosome autoantibodies and nucleosome/Ig complexes have been identified in the glomerular immune deposits. Via their cationic histone part nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate, a strong anionic constituent of the glomerular basement membrane.

  2. Bay11-7082 attenuates murine lupus nephritis via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jijun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Hongyue; Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Chunmei; Liang, Yingjie; Yang, Niansheng

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in inflammation and autoimmunity. In vitro data have shown that Bay11-7082 selectively inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activity independent of NF-κB activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of Bay11-7082 on murine lupus nephritis (LN) in vivo. Twelve-week-old MRL/lpr mice were treated with either Bay11-7082 (5mg/kg) or vehicle (DMSO/PBS buffer) by intraperitoneal injection thrice per week for 8 weeks. NLRP3 inflammasome formation and NF-κB activation were measured. Histopathology, immune complex deposits, proteinuria, renal function and production of anti-dsDNA antibody as well as inflammatory markers were evaluated. Bay11-7082 treatment inhibited renal NLRP3 inflammasome formation and NF-κB activation in vivo. Bay11-7082 decreased proteinuria, blood urea nitrogen, resulting in dramatically attenuated renal damage. Bay11-7082-treated mice had decreased serum anti-dsDNA level and less renal immune complex deposition. The IL-1β, TNF-α and chemokine (C-C Motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) levels and infiltration of macrophages as well as the mortality were significantly reduced by Bay11-7082 treatment. This study suggests that dual inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation using Bay11-7082 or its analogues may be a promising therapeutic strategy for preventing the progression of LN.

  3. Bay11-7082 attenuates murine lupus nephritis via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jijun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Hongyue; Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Chunmei; Liang, Yingjie; Yang, Niansheng

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in inflammation and autoimmunity. In vitro data have shown that Bay11-7082 selectively inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activity independent of NF-κB activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of Bay11-7082 on murine lupus nephritis (LN) in vivo. Twelve-week-old MRL/lpr mice were treated with either Bay11-7082 (5mg/kg) or vehicle (DMSO/PBS buffer) by intraperitoneal injection thrice per week for 8 weeks. NLRP3 inflammasome formation and NF-κB activation were measured. Histopathology, immune complex deposits, proteinuria, renal function and production of anti-dsDNA antibody as well as inflammatory markers were evaluated. Bay11-7082 treatment inhibited renal NLRP3 inflammasome formation and NF-κB activation in vivo. Bay11-7082 decreased proteinuria, blood urea nitrogen, resulting in dramatically attenuated renal damage. Bay11-7082-treated mice had decreased serum anti-dsDNA level and less renal immune complex deposition. The IL-1β, TNF-α and chemokine (C-C Motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) levels and infiltration of macrophages as well as the mortality were significantly reduced by Bay11-7082 treatment. This study suggests that dual inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation using Bay11-7082 or its analogues may be a promising therapeutic strategy for preventing the progression of LN. PMID:23770281

  4. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Management of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.; Thacker, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis is complex, involving innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses. Autoantibodies in particular have been shown to be critical in the initiation and progression of renal injury, via interactions with both Fc-receptors and complement. One approach in the management of patients with lupus nephritis has been the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. This therapy has shown benefit in the setting of many forms of autoantibody-mediated injury; however, the mechanisms of efficacy are not fully understood. In this paper, the data supporting the use of immunoglobulin therapy in lupus nephritis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action will be discussed with respect to the known involvement of complement and Fc-receptors in the kidney parenchyma. Results are provocative and warrant additional clinical trials. PMID:23056926

  5. Pathogenetic role of glomerular CXCL13 expression in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Worthmann, K; Gueler, F; von Vietinghoff, S; Davalos-Mißlitz, A; Wiehler, F; Davidson, A; Witte, T; Haller, H; Schiffer, M; Falk, C S; Schiffer, L

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes maintain the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, podocytes have recently been implicated in the innate immune response, and their function as non-haematopoietic antigen-presenting cells was highlighted. We have shown previously that excessive expression of the chemokine CXCL13 is a distinctive early event for nephritis in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Furthermore, we found that CXCL13 is elevated significantly in the serum of patients with SLE-nephritis. In this study, we were able to show for the first time that (i) CXCL13 is expressed locally in glomeruli in a model for SLE-nephritis in mice and that (ii) incubation of human podocytes with CXCL13 induces receptor stimulation of CXCR5 with activation of signalling pathways, resulting in (iii) secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in culture supernatant. This cytokine/chemokine cocktail can lead to (iv) a neutrophil respiratory burst in isolated human granulocytes. Taken together, our results provide further evidence that CXCL13 is involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis and that podocytes can play an active role in local proinflammatory immune responses. Thus, CXCL13 could be a direct target for the therapy of glomerulonephritis in general and for SLE-nephritis in particular. PMID:24827905

  6. Mechanisms of Kidney Injury in Lupus Nephritis – the Role of Anti-dsDNA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance, production of auto-antibodies and immune-mediated injury, resulting in damage accrual in multiple organs. Kidney involvement, termed lupus nephritis, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that affects over half of the SLE population during the course of disease. The etiology of lupus nephritis is multifactorial and remains to be fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to forming immune complexes and triggering complement activation, anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis through binding, either directly or indirectly, to cross-reactive antigens or chromatin materials, respectively, to resident renal cells and/or extracellular matrix components, thereby triggering downstream cellular activation and proliferation as well as inflammatory and fibrotic processes. Several cross-reactive antigens that mediate anti-dsDNA antibody binding have been identified, such as annexin II and alpha-actinin. This review discusses the mechanisms through which anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to immunopathogenesis in lupus nephritis. Corticosteroids combined with either mycophenolic acid (MPA) or cyclophosphamide is the current standard of care immunosuppressive therapy for severe lupus nephritis. This review also discusses recent data showing distinct effects of MPA and cyclophosphamide on inflammatory and fibrotic processes in resident renal cells. PMID:26441980

  7. Anti-dsDNA negative and anti-Ro positive lupus nephritis: a report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Aggarwal, H K; Kaverappa, V; Dhayia, S; Jain, P; Yadav, S

    2014-03-17

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, characterized by an autoantibody response to various nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens. Renal disease in SLE occurs in 40-75% of patients, most often within five years of onset of disease, and is one of the strongest predictors of a poor outcome. A hallmark of glomerular involvement in lupus nephritis is the presence of autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Its level usually correlates with disease activity. Our patient presented with a rash resembling malar rash and features of nephrotic syndrome. On investigating, patient was found to have pancytopenia, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate and depressed serum C3 levels with positivity of antinuclear antibodies and anti- Ro antibodies. However, most of the markers of lupus nephritis including anti dsDNA antibody were negative. Renal biopsy showed features of lupus nephritis (class-IV). Differential item functioning studies showed a full house immunoflourescence staining pattern characteristic of lupus nephritis. Association of Anti-Ro antibody alone with lupus nephritis is less known in literature. Negativity of anti-dsDNA antibody, which is usually considered to be diagnostic of lupus nephritis, poses a diagnostic dilemma short of renal biopsy. Till date only very few cases of non-drug induced lupus nephritis with negative dsDNA antibodies have been reported. In this report we wish to highlight a case of lupus nephritis which was negative for its specific anti dsDNA antibodies and with possible role of anti-Ro antibodies in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis although the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood.

  8. Renal haemodynamic characteristics in patients with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, M.; Ueno, M.; Hasegawa, H.; Watanabe, T.; Kuroda, T.; Ito, S.; Arakawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To clarify the characteristics of renal haemodynamics in patients with lupus nephritis (LN).
METHODS—The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) of 37 patients with active LN were studied longitudinally over an interval of 8 to 144 weeks during treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic drugs, or both. All patients had clinical renal disorders and underwent renal biopsies.
RESULTS—Analysis of renal biopsy specimens showed that 31 patients had class IV LN. Class II, III, and V LN were present in two patients each. The average GFR increased significantly from 65.4 (SD 33.0) in the pretreatment stage to 86.6 (31.6) ml/min in the post-treatment stage, accompanied by an improvement in urinary or immunological abnormalities, or both. On the other hand, RPF decreased significantly from 625.2 (243.0) to 519.8 (179.0) ml/min. Therefore, the filtration fraction (FF) increased significantly from 10.7 (4.3)% to 16.8 (3.7)%. Low FF was recognised predominantly in patients with class IV LN, but was also observed in patients with other classes. The FF returned towards normal irrespective of the degree of GFR recovery. No significant changes were observed in the levels of blood pressure.
CONCLUSION—A reduction in GFR out of proportion to the reduction in RPF as demonstrated by the low FF values was related to the severity of LN or disease activity, or both. Therefore, relative evaluation of GFR and RPF, namely the determination of FF, may be a useful clinical parameter to determine the status of LN.

 Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus; lupus nephritis; renal haemodynamics; filtration fraction PMID:9709179

  9. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans.

  10. Parasites alter the pathological phenotype of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Katsuhisa; Adachi, Keishi; Watanabe, Maho; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Ogahara, Satoru; Abe, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kenji; Dan Justin, Yombo K.; Saito, Takao

    2014-01-01

    lpr Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus and manifests with considerable phenotypic and histological heterogeneity. In particular, diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) and membranous lupus nephritis (MLN) represent morphologic forms that are polar opposites. DPLN is associated with autoimmune responses dominated by Th1 immune response associated with high levels of interferon (IFN)-γ. In contrast, a Th2 cytokine response is associated with the pathogenesis of MLN. MRL/lpr mice develop human LN-like immune complex-associated nephritis and provide a suitable histological model for human DPLN. Infection with Schistosoma mansoni skewed a Th2-type immune response induction and IL-10 in MRL/lpr mice, drastically changing the pathophysiology of glomerulonephritis from DPLN to MLN accompanied by increased IgG1 and IgE in the sera. T cells in 32-week-old MRL/lpr mice infected with S. mansoni expressed significantly more IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells of uninfected mice; T cells with IFN-γ were comparable between infected and uninfected MR/lpr mice. Thus, the helminthic infection modified the cytokine microenvironment and altered the pathological phenotype of autoimmune nephritis. PMID:24957876

  11. The Level of IgA Antibodies to Endothelial Cells Correlates with Histological Evidence of Disease Activity in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ayako; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Kato, Akihiro; Hirano, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Shigehisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Midori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Shunji; Miura, Keiji; Yuzawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) are frequently detected in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their pathological role remains unclear. We recently developed a solubilized cell surface protein capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CSP-ELISA) to detect antibodies against membrane proteins involved in autoimmune reactions. In this study, sera from 51 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN), 25 with SLE without renal involvement (non-LN SLE), 42 disease control (DC) subjects, and 80 healthy control (HC) subjects were tested for IgG- and IgA-AECA for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human glomerular EC (HGEC) by using CSP-ELISA. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers were significantly higher in LN and non-LN SLE patients than in the DC or HC (P < 0.001) groups. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers for HUVEC corresponded well with those for HGEC. The IgA-AECA level correlated with the SLE disease activity index and with histological evidence of active lesions (cellular proliferations, hyaline thrombi and wire loops, leukocytic infiltration, and fibrinoid necrosis) in LN patients (P < 0.001). The sensitivity of IgA-AECA as a diagnostic test for histological evidence of active lesions in LN patients was 0.92, with a specificity of 0.70. The significant correlation of IgA-AECA with glomerular hypercellularity indicates that IgA-AECA are associated with endothelial damage in LN. PMID:27788140

  12. 75 FR 35492 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... Federal Register of March 29, 2005 (70 FR 15868), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  13. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... a notice published in the Federal Register of June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35492), FDA announced the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food...

  14. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Lütfi; Önem, Soner; Özgen, Metin; Sayarlıoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by several immunological abnormalities. We wish to communicate the case of a patient with SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) who developed pseudothrombocytopenia. Pseudothrombocytopenia can occur in patients with SLE and LN and should be considered when diagnosing patients with thrombocytopenia without bleeding.

  15. Outcome of the acute glomerular injury in proliferative lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Chagnac, A.; Kiberd, B.A.; Farinas, M.C.; Strober, S.; Sibley, R.K.; Hoppe, R.; Myers, B.D. )

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and corticosteroids markedly reduced activity of systemic lupus erythematosis in 10 patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) complicated by a nephrotic syndrome. Physiologic and morphometric techniques were used serially before, and 12 and 36 mo post-TLI to characterize the course of glomerular injury. Judged by a progressive reduction in the density of glomerular cells and immune deposits, glomerular inflammation subsided. A sustained reduction in the fractional clearance of albumin, IgG and uncharged dextrans of radius greater than 50 A, pointed to a parallel improvement in glomerular barrier size-selectivity. Corresponding changes in GFR were modest, however. A trend towards higher GFR at 12 mo was associated with a marked increase in the fraction of glomerular tuft area occupied by patent capillary loops as inflammatory changes receded. A late trend toward declining GFR beyond 12 mo was associated with progressive glomerulosclerosis, which affected 57% of all glomeruli globally by 36 mo post-TLI. Judged by a parallel increase in volume by 59%, remaining, patent glomeruli had undergone a process of adaptive enlargement. We propose that an increasing fraction of glomeruli continues to undergo progressive sclerosis after DPLN has become quiescent, and that the prevailing GFR depends on the extent to which hypertrophied remnant glomeruli can compensate for the ensuing loss of filtration surface area.

  16. Lupus nephritis: clinicopathological study of 162 cases in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Parichatikanond, P; Francis, N D; Malasit, P; Laohapand, T; Nimmannit, S; Singchoovong, L; Nilwarangkur, S; Chrirawong, P; Vanichakarn, S

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and sixty two cases of lupus nephritis biopsied over three years in Thailand were studied. A pattern of clinical and histological renal disease very similar to that seen in the United States or Europe emerged. The predominant histological type was World Health Organisation class IV (diffuse proliferative; 58.6%). Patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine greater than or equal to 2 mg/100 ml) or hypertension at the time of biopsy had a considerably worse three year survival. Certain features such as sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, and an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate were significantly associated with a worse outcome (0.05 greater than p greater than 0.01), and patients who died with poor renal function had significantly higher chronicity scores than those in other groups (p less than 0.05). These findings emphasise the importance of chronic renal damage in the morbidity and mortality of patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:3485117

  17. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  18. Outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G; Lenz, O; Pardo, V; Borja, E; Cely, C; Iqbal, K; Nahar, N; de La Cuesta, C; Hurtado, A; Fornoni, A; Beltran-Garcia, L; Asif, A; Young, L; Diego, J; Zachariah, M; Smith-Norwood, B

    2006-05-01

    Poor outcomes have been reported in African Americans and Hispanics compared to Caucasians with lupus nephritis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to identify independent predictors of outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis. In total, 93 African Americans, 100 Hispanics, and 20 Caucasians with a mean age of 28 +/- 13 years and an annual household income of 32.9 +/- 17.3 (in 1000 US dollars) were studied. World Health Organization (WHO) lupus nephritis classes II, III, IV, and V were seen in 9, 13, 52, and 26%, respectively. Important baseline differences were higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in African Americans compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (107 +/- 19, 102 +/- 15, and 99 +/- 13 mmHg, P < 0.05), and higher serum creatinine (1.66 +/- 1.3, 1.25 +/- 1.0, and 1.31 +/- 1.0 mg/dl, P < 0.025). African Americans had lower hematocrit compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (29 +/- 5, and 31 +/- 6, and 32 +/- 7%, P < 0.05), and lower annual household income (30.8 +/- 14.9, 33.1 +/- 15.9, and 42.2 +/- 29.3 in 1000 US dollars; P < 0.05). Lower prevalence of WHO class IV was seen in Caucasians (30%) compared to Hispanics (57%, P = 0.03) and African Americans (51%, P = 0.09). Development of doubling creatinine or end-stage renal disease was higher in African Americans and Hispanics than in Caucasians (31, 18, and 10%; P < 0.05), as was the development of renal events or death (34, 20, and 10%; P < 0.025). Our results suggest that both biological factors indicating an aggressive disease and low household income are common in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis, and outcomes in these groups are worse than in Caucasians.

  19. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  20. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS). Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, standard CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging) have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation. PMID:26309728

  1. Epidermal injury promotes nephritis flare in lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kaitlyn L; Reed, Tamra J; Wolf, Sonya J; Lowe, Lori; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Kahlenberg, J Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is clinically characterized by episodes of flare and remission. In patients, cutaneous exposure to ultraviolet light has been proposed as a flare trigger. However, induction of flare secondary to cutaneous exposure has been difficult to emulate in many murine lupus models. Here, we describe a system in which epidermal injury is able to trigger the development of a lupus nephritis flare in New Zealand Mixed (NZM) 2328 mice. 20-week old NZM2328 female mice underwent removal of the stratum corneum via duct tape, which resulted in rapid onset of proteinuria and death when compared to sham-stripped littermate control NZM2328 mice. This was coupled with a drop in serum C3 concentrations and dsDNA antibody levels and enhanced immune complex deposition in the glomeruli. Recruitment of CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages and CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(low) dendritic cells was noted prior to the onset of proteinuria in injured mice. Transcriptional changes within the kidney suggest a burst of type I IFN-mediated and inflammatory signaling which is followed by upregulation of CXCL13 following epidermal injury. Thus, we propose that tape stripping of lupus-prone NZM2328 mice is a novel model of lupus flare induction that will allow for the study of the role of cutaneous inflammation in lupus development and how crosstalk between dermal and systemic immune systems can lead to lupus flare.

  2. Treatment of lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation. Observations during a 12-79-month followup

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Farinas, M.C.; Field, E.H.; Solovera, J.J.; Kiberd, B.A.; Myers, B.D.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1988-07-01

    Seventeen patients with intractable lupus nephritis and nephrotic syndrome were treated with total lymphoid irradiation. Statistically significant improvement in mean renal disease and serologic activity parameters occurred within 3 months and persisted for at least 3 years. Although there was a marked reduction of T helper cell numbers and function after total lymphoid irradiation, recovery of these parameters was not associated with a return of disease activity. Risks of sterility, severe infections, and hematologic malignancy appeared to be lower than with alkylating agents.

  3. IL-17-producing T cells in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, S A; Crispín, J C; Tsokos, G C

    2011-02-01

    Significant evidence implicates interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), particularly in the development of tissue damage. IL-17 production and IL-17-producing CD4+ and CD3 + CD4-CD8- cells are increased in patients with SLE. IL-17-producing cells are present in the inflamed kidney tissues from patients with lupus nephritis. In lupus-prone mice, IL-17 production appears to be involved in the expression of disease pathology and pharmacologic or genetic manipulation of its production results in suppression of the disease. It becomes obvious that the use of biologics including humanized anti-IL-17 antibodies or decoy IL-17 receptors deserve clinical consideration. Similarly, the development of drugs that suppress the production of IL-17 is in order.

  4. Unmet medical needs in lupus nephritis: solutions through evidence-based, personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Weidenbusch, Marc; Rovin, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) remains a kidney disease with significant unmet medical needs despite extensive clinical and translational research over the past decade. These include the need to (i) predict the individual risk for LN in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, (ii) identify the best therapeutic option for an individual patient, (iii) distinguish chronic kidney damage from active immunologic kidney injury, (iv) develop efficient treatments with acceptable or no side effects and improve the design of randomized clinical trials so that effective drugs demonstrate efficacy. This review discusses the underlying reasons for these unmet medical needs and options of how to overcome them in the future. PMID:26413272

  5. Tubular up-regulation of clusterin mRNA in murine lupus-like nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, S.; Menoud, P. A.; French, L.; Sappino, A. P.; Pastore, Y.; Schifferli, J. A.; Izui, S.

    1998-01-01

    Clusterin, a widely distributed glycoprotein, is detected in most tissues and in numerous physiological fluids. In the kidney, this protein is constitutively expressed in tubular epithelial cells, and its expression is enhanced following tubular injuries. In addition, clusterin has been detected in glomerular immune deposits of glomerulonephritis. The present study was designed to define the sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation in murine lupus-like nephritis in comparison with murine tubulopathies. In lupus-like nephritis, a significant increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was demonstrated. This up-regulation was localized exclusively in tubular epithelial cells exhibiting tubulointerstitial alterations, whereas no clusterin mRNA was detectable in diseased glomeruli, excluding an active synthesis of clusterin by glomerular cells. A similar tubular increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was observed in myeloma-like cast nephropathy induced by IgG3 monoclonal cryoglobulins and even in the absence of any detectable histological alterations in a model of septic shock induced by the injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Our results suggest that tubular epithelial cells are the only sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation during the course of lupus-like nephritis and that the tubular up-regulation of clusterin gene expression may reflect the cellular response to various types of tubular injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:9546356

  6. Tubular up-regulation of clusterin mRNA in murine lupus-like nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moll, S; Menoud, P A; French, L; Sappino, A P; Pastore, Y; Schifferli, J A; Izui, S

    1998-04-01

    Clusterin, a widely distributed glycoprotein, is detected in most tissues and in numerous physiological fluids. In the kidney, this protein is constitutively expressed in tubular epithelial cells, and its expression is enhanced following tubular injuries. In addition, clusterin has been detected in glomerular immune deposits of glomerulonephritis. The present study was designed to define the sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation in murine lupus-like nephritis in comparison with murine tubulopathies. In lupus-like nephritis, a significant increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was demonstrated. This up-regulation was localized exclusively in tubular epithelial cells exhibiting tubulointerstitial alterations, whereas no clusterin mRNA was detectable in diseased glomeruli, excluding an active synthesis of clusterin by glomerular cells. A similar tubular increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was observed in myeloma-like cast nephropathy induced by IgG3 monoclonal cryoglobulins and even in the absence of any detectable histological alterations in a model of septic shock induced by the injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Our results suggest that tubular epithelial cells are the only sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation during the course of lupus-like nephritis and that the tubular up-regulation of clusterin gene expression may reflect the cellular response to various types of tubular injuries.

  7. Minimal change disease: a variant of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Neto, Miguel; Costa, Roberto S; Rodrigues, Fernanda F; Vieira Neto, Osvaldo M; Reis, Marlene A; Louzada Júnior, Paulo; Romão, Elen A; Dantas, Márcio

    2011-02-01

    Some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) present with nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease (MCD). Histopathological diagnosis of patients with SLE and nephrotic-range proteinuria has shown that these patients present with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis and membranous glomerulonephritis, World Health Organization (WHO) classes IV and V, respectively, more frequently than the other classes. In the present study, we reported a case of nephrotic syndrome and renal biopsy-proven MCD associated with SLE. A complete remission occurred after steroid treatment, which was followed by a relapse 15 months later with a concomitant reactivation of SLE. A second biopsy showed WHO class IIb lupus nephritis. Prednisone treatment was restarted, and the patient went into complete remission again. The association of MCD and SLE may not be a coincidence, and MCD should be considered as an associated SLE nephropathy.

  8. Pentraxin 3 Is Closely Associated With Tubulointerstitial Injury in Lupus Nephritis: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yun; Tan, Ying; Li, Yongzhe; Zhang, Jianchun; Guo, Yongbing; Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Chengying; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis always elicits immune inflammatory tissue damages in kidney. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), mainly produced at inflammatory sites, is known to be involved in the regulation of the innate immunity system. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum and urine levels of PTX3, and the expression of PTX3 in renal tissues in lupus nephritis patients from a large Chinese cohort.The study used cross-sectional survey and 288 active lupus nephritis patients, including discovery cohort and validation cohort, 115 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without clinical renal involvement and 46 healthy controls were enrolled. Serum and urine PTX3 were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The renal deposition of PTX3 was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence.The average level of serum PTX3 in the discovery cohort of lupus nephritis was significantly higher than that in nonrenal involvement SLE group and normal controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively), which was confirmed by the validation cohort. Serum PTX3 levels of 15 lupus nephritis patients in remission decreased significantly compared with that in active phase. Serum PTX3 levels were significantly higher in patients with hematuria (P = 0.014), leucocyturia (P = 0.002), acute renal failure (P = 0.001), and nephrotic syndrome (P = 0.036). There were significant correlations between serum PTX3 levels and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores, serum creatinine value, renal pathological activity indices, and serum complement 3 (C3) in active lupus nephritis patients. The urinary PTX3 levels were significantly higher in active lupus nephritis patients compared with patients in remission and normal controls (P = 0.011, P = 0.008, respectively). There were significant associations between urinary PTX3 levels and multiple indices of tubulointerstitial lesions, including urinary KIM-1 (r = 0.368, P = 0

  9. Treatment of intractable lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kotzin, B.L.; Shemesh, O.; Engleman, E.; Ross, J.C.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-04-01

    Ten patients with lupus nephritis and marked proteinuria (3.9 g or more/d) that did not respond adequately to treatment with prednisone alone or prednisone in combination with azathioprine were treated with total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled feasibility study. Within 6 weeks after the start of total lymphoid irradiation, the serum albumin level rose in all patients in association with a reduction in the serum level of anti-DNA antibodies, an increase in the serum complement level, or both. Improvement in these variables persisted in eight patients followed for more than 1 year, with the stabilization or reduction of the serum creatinine level. Urinary leakage of albumin was substantially reduced in all patients. Side effects associated with radiotherapy included transient constitutional complaints in ten patients, transient blood element depressions in three, localized viral and bacterial infections in four, and ovarian failure in one. The results suggest that total lymphoid irradiation may provide an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of lupus nephritis.

  10. Insights into the epidemiology and management of lupus nephritis from the US rheumatologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Paul J; Costenbader, Karen H

    2016-09-01

    Lupus nephritis is a common and severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus that disproportionately affects nonwhites and those in lower socioeconomic groups. This review discusses recent data on the incidence, prevalence, and outcomes of patients with lupus nephritis with a focus on low-income US Medicaid patients. We also review recent guidelines on diagnosis, treatment, and screening for new onset and relapses of lupus nephritis. Finally, we discuss the management of lupus nephritis from a rheumatologist's perspective, including vigilance for the common adverse events related to disease and treatment, and we review prevention and new treatment strategies. PMID:27344205

  11. Anti-DNA autoantibodies initiate experimental lupus nephritis by binding directly to the glomerular basement membrane in mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Meera R; Wang, Congmiao; Marion, Tony N

    2012-07-01

    The strongest serological correlate for lupus nephritis is antibody to double-stranded DNA, although the mechanism by which anti-DNA antibodies initiate lupus nephritis is unresolved. Most recent reports indicate that anti-DNA must bind chromatin in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix to form glomerular deposits. Here we determined whether direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to glomerular basement membrane is critical to initiate glomerular binding of anti-DNA in experimental lupus nephritis. Mice were co-injected with IgG monoclonal antibodies or hybridomas with similar specificity for DNA and chromatin but different IgG subclass and different relative affinity for basement membrane. Only anti-DNA antibodies that bound basement membrane bound to glomeruli, activated complement, and induced proteinuria whether injected alone or co-injected with a non-basement-membrane-binding anti-DNA antibody. Basement membrane-binding anti-DNA antibodies co-localized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan in glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix but not with chromatin. Thus, direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to antigens in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix may be critical to initiate glomerular inflammation. This may accelerate and exacerbate glomerular immune complex formation in human and murine lupus nephritis.

  12. [Lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with special focus on lipoprotein(a) in lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Emese; Fazekas, Brigitta; Tarr, Tünde; Muszbek, László; Zeher, Margit; Szegedi, Gyula

    2004-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial polysystemic autoimmune disorder. Although life expectance in SLE has been improved by adequate immune suppressive therapy, the importance of chronic renal failure has not been reduced. Among late complications of the disease accelerated atherosclerosis attempts increasing attention. Dyslipoproteinemia and increased concentration of lipoproteins are important risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular complication in SLE. Serum lipid parameters of 50 patients with lupus were examined in the present work. Thirty patients had histologically proven lupus nephritis (LN+), while the other group did not have renal involvement (LN-). Serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations were significantly higher in the lupus nephritis (LN+) group. On the other hand, HDL-C and apoAI levels were also elevated in patients with LN. As a consequence of that, LDL-C/HDL-C and the apoB/apoAI ratios did not differ between patients with or without kidney involvement. This concluded the authors to measure the concentration of lipoprotein (a) in SLE patients, as Lp(a) is known to be an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. Results indicated a significantly increased Lp(a) concentration in patients with lupus nephritis as compared to the LN- group. All but 2 patients without kidney involvement had lower than 100 mg/L Lp(a) concentration, while 27% of patients with lupus nephritis has an Lp(a) level between 100-300 mg/L. Further more, Lp(a) concentration was higher than 300 mg/L in 13% of the LN+ group. In a good correlation of these observations patients with nephritis suffered more frequently from deep venous thrombosis and ischaemic heart disease. The frequencies of hypertension and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus were slightly elevated in patients with nephritis. Present results suggest the importance of elevated lipoprotein (a) concentration in patients with lupus nephritis

  13. Overexpression of Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 protein (EBI3) in MRL/lpr mice suppresses their lupus nephritis by activating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Shinsuke, Nishimura; Hiroshi, Inoue

    2013-11-01

    To identify the effect of an imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines on the development of autoimmune glomerulonephritis (lupus nephritis), we studied the modification of pathological changes in diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) and membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) in MRL/lpr mice, which are animal models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Transgenic MRL/lpr mice (Tg) that overexpressed Epstein--Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) showed almost normal renal function, which was demonstrated by healing of glomerulonephritis upon renal histology, as compared to the wild-type MRL/lpr (Wt) mice. The levels of anti-dsDNA antibodies and IgE decreased in the Tg mice compared to Wt mice. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated an increase in the mRNA levels of FoxP3, and a decrease in that of IFNγ in the splenocytes of Tg mice as compared to Wt mice. In addition, flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)-T cells in the former, as compared to the latter. Our findings suggest that EBI3-overexpression in MRL/lpr mice induces generation of regulatory T cells, which causes suppression of autoimmune and inflammatory reactions by affecting the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. PMID:23845089

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 as a Marker of Chronic Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Ye, Yujin; Singh, Sandeep; Zhou, Jinchun; Li, Yajuan; Ding, Huihua; Li, Quan-zhen; Zhou, Xin; Putterman, Chaim; Saxena, Ramesh; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy remains the mainstay of Lupus Nephritis (LN) diagnosis and prognostication. The objective of this study is to identify non-invasive biomarkers that closely parallel renal pathology in LN. Previous reports have demonstrated that serum Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4) was increased in diabetic nephropathy in both animal models and patients. We proceeded to assess if IGFBP4 could be associated with LN. We performed ELISA using the serum of 86 patients with LN. Normal healthy adults (N = 23) and patients with other glomerular diseases (N = 20) served as controls. Compared to the healthy controls or other glomerular disease controls, serum IGFBP-4 levels were significantly higher in the patients with LN. Serum IGFBP-4 did not correlate well with systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI), renal SLEDAI or proteinuria, but it did correlate with estimated glomerular filtration rate (R = 0.609, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, in 18 patients with proliferative LN whose blood samples were obtained at the time of renal biopsy, serum IGFBP-4 levels correlated strongly with the chronicity index of renal pathology (R = 0.713, P < 0.001). IGFBP-4 emerges a potential marker of lupus nephritis, reflective of renal pathology chronicity changes. PMID:27019456

  15. Murine and Human Lupus Nephritis: Pathogenic Mechanisms and Theoretical Strategies for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Horvei, Kjersti Daae; Thiyagarajan, Dhivya; Seredkina, Natalya; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2015-09-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus, and represents one of the criteria implemented to classify systemic lupus erythematosus. Although studied for decades, no consensus has been reached related to the basic cellular, molecular, and immunologic mechanism(s) responsible for lupus nephritis. No causal treatments have been developed; therapy is approached mainly with nonspecific immunosuppressive medications. More detailed insight into disease mechanisms therefore is indispensable to develop new therapeutic strategies. In this review, contemporary knowledge on the pathogenic mechanisms of lupus nephritis is discussed based on recent data in murine and human lupus nephritis. Specific focus is given to the effect of anti-double-stranded DNA/antinucleosome antibodies in the kidneys and whether they bind exposed chromatin fragments in glomeruli or whether they bind inherent glomerular structures by cross-recognition. Overall, the data presented here favor the exposed chromatin model because we did not find any indication to substantiate the anti-double-stranded DNA antibody cross-reacting model. At the end of this review we present data on why chromatin fragments are expressed in the glomeruli of patients with lupus nephritis, and discuss how this knowledge can be used to direct the development of future therapies.

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance therapy for proliferative lupus nephritis: a long-term observational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction While the role of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the management of lupus nephritis has been increasingly recognized, limited information is available regarding its efficacy and safety as a long-term maintenance treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of MMF as maintenance therapy for proliferative lupus nephritis. Methods Thirty-three consecutive patients with proliferative lupus nephritis received induction therapy with five to seven monthly intravenous (iv) pulses of cyclophosphamide (CYC) plus iv steroids followed by oral MMF 2 g/day as maintenance therapy for a median time of 29 months (range 9 to 71 months). Primary end points were the achievement of renal remission, complete renal remission, disease remission - renal and extrarenal -, the occurrence of renal relapse, chronic renal failure and death. Secondary end points were the extrarenal disease activity and drug adverse events. The clinical and laboratory parameters were compared during follow-up by means of nonparametric statistical tests. Time to event analysis was performed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A significant improvement of all renal parameters was observed at the end of the induction treatment and at the latest follow-up compared to baseline. The rate of patients achieving renal remission until the end of follow-up was 73%, whereas that of complete renal remission was 58%. The median survival times in the Kaplan-Meier analyses were 7 and 16 months, respectively. Remission was maintained in all but four (12%) patients who relapsed within 19 to 39 months after initial response. At the end of follow-up, 51% of the patients had reached disease remission. The median survival time of disease remission was 18 months. Extrarenal manifestations were well controlled in most of the patients. In one patient receiving MMF, extrarenal activity led to treatment discontinuation. Non life-threatening drug adverse events developed in 18

  17. Efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody belimumab in the treatment of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Frieri, Marianne; Heuser, William; Bliss, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced into the market, belimumab (Benlysta) is a monoclonal antibody that has potential clinically efficacious applications for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Lupus nephritis is a major complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that can lead to significant illness or even death without proper intervention and treatment. With vast implications through a novel mechanism, belimumab offers a new standard of treatment for physicians in the complications associated with SLE, specifically lupus nephritis. By targeting B cell signaling and maturation, belimumab is able to mitigate the underlying pathological complications surrounding SLE. Phase 3 clinical trials with belimumab have depicted clinically efficacious applications, suggesting belimumab as a revolutionary breakthrough in the treatment armamentarium for practicing clinicians. This article explains the precise mechanism of action of belimumab on the soluble protein BlyS that plays a major role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. In addition, the extensive pharmacokinetics and clinical implications are exemplified in this review with belimumab's comparison with standard therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25969652

  18. An Unusual Initial Presentation of Lupus Nephritis as a Renal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a frequent manifestation of systemic lupus erythematous. Lupus nephritis usually presents with abnormal urinalysis, proteinuria, and/or renal insufficiency. We report a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent partial nephrectomy for a fortuitously discovered solid enhancing left kidney mass. No neoplastic cells were found in the biopsy specimen; however, the pathology findings were compatible with immune complex glomerulonephritis with a predominantly membranous distribution, a pattern suggestive of lupus nephritis. The mass effect was apparently due to a dense interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate resulting in a pseudotumor. Further investigation revealed microscopic hematuria with a normal kidney function and no significant proteinuria. Antinuclear antibodies were negative, although anti-DNA and anti-SSA/Rho antibodies were positive. A diagnosis of probable silent lupus nephritis was made and the patient was followed up without immunosuppressive treatment. After two years of follow-up, she did not progress to overt disease. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of lupus nephritis with an initial presentation as a renal mass. PMID:25649369

  19. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus. PMID:27418084

  20. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus.

  1. Clinicopathologic correlations of renal microthrombosis and inflammatory markers in proliferative lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Microthrombosis is often observed in lupus nephritis (LN) lesions, but its clinical significance is unknown. We evaluated the clinicopathologic correlations of renal microthrombosis and inflammatory markers in LN. Methods Kidney biopsies from 58 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) proliferative nephritis were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for intravascular platelet aggregates (CD61), macrophagic infiltration (CD68), and activated complement deposition (C4d). Clinical data at the time of kidney biopsy and follow-up were analyzed with regard to pathologic IHC data. Results Microthrombosis was present in 52% of the tissues. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) (62% versus 42%). The presence of microthrombosis significantly correlated with higher macrophagic infiltration. Macrophagic infiltration but not microthrombosis was significantly correlated with C4d deposition. Only macrophagic infiltration showed a correlation with SLE and renal activity (proteinuria and active sediment), whereas neither the presence of CD61+ microthrombi nor the extent of C4d deposition correlated with LN severity or outcome. Conclusions Microthrombosis is associated with higher macrophagic infiltration in LN but does not seem to increase independently the severity of renal damage. Macrophagic infiltration was the best marker of SLE and renal activity in this LN series. PMID:22640796

  2. HMGB1: a smoking gun in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a prototypic alarmin that is released from activated and dying cells. Because of its proinflammatory activities, HMGB1 could mediate key events in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, a possibility supported by elevations of HMGB1 in patient blood and increased expression in renal biopsies. The biology of HMGB1 is complicated, however, and its activity is dependent on redox state as well as binding to other molecules such as cytokines. Defining more precisely the role of HMGB1 in lupus will require treatment studies to block the activity of this alarmin in animal models and ultimately patients. PMID:22423653

  3. A potential trigger of nephritogenic anti-DNA antibodies in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Y; Oka, Y; Tada, M; Takahashi, R; Ishii, T

    2007-06-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play an essential role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Mammalian DNA alone, however, is poorly immunogenic. We speculated that the antigenic trigger for the production of human nephritogenic anti-DNA antibodies is a non-DNA substance. The cDNA library from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of a patient with active lupus nephritis was screened using the single-chain Fv of a human monoclonal nephritogenic O-81 anti-DNA antibody in a two-hybrid system. A clone containing the gene of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible protein, Herp, was obtained: The O-81 antibody bound to recombinant Herp protein synthesized by Escherichia coli. Immunization with Herp elicited both anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) and anti-single-stranded (anti-ssDNA) antibodies in BALB/c mice and formed deposits of IgG in renal glomeruli. Anti-DNA antibodies purified from SLE sera bound to Herp. Moreover, anti-Herp antibodies showed specific binding to DNA. Herp was spontaneously expressed in PBLs of patients with active SLE, but not in PBLs of healthy subjects. These results imply that an inducible intracellular self-protein represents a candidate trigger for human nephritogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Any cell stress causing ER stress, such as viral infection, ultraviolet radiation, and chemicals, might be responsible for anti-DNA antibody production via Herp.

  4. A controlled trial of pulse cyclophosphamide versus pulse methylprednisolone in severe lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sesso, R; Monteiro, M; Sato, E; Kirsztajn, G; Silva, L; Ajzen, H

    1994-04-01

    We carried out a prospective randomized trial comparing pulse cyclophosphamide and pulse methylprednisolone in 29 patients with severe lupus nephritis in activity. Patients were assigned to one of two regimens: monthly pulse cyclophosphamide (0.5-1.0 g/m2 body surface area) for 4 months, followed by bimonthly doses for 4 months and quarterly doses for 6 months (14 patients) or pulse methylprednisolone (10-20 mg/kg weight) initially for 3 consecutive days and thereafter in the same intervals as the alternative regimen (15 patients). The mean follow-up was 15 months. Two patients in the cyclophosphamide group and three in the methylprednisolone group died. Renal failure (doubling of serum creatinine) developed in four patients in the cyclophosphamide group compared with five patients in the methylprednisolone group. Cumulative probability of not doubling serum creatinine was similar for cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone groups (0.66 vs 0.69, respectively, P > 0.20, after 18 months). Cumulative probability of survival without renal failure was also not significantly different (0.61 and 0.63, respectively, P > 0.20, after 18 months). These results suggest that pulse cyclophosphamide is as effective as pulse methylprednisolone in preserving renal function in patients with severe lupus nephritis. PMID:7920609

  5. Value of repeat biopsy in lupus nephritis flares

    PubMed Central

    Greloni, G; Scolnik, M; Marin, J; Lancioni, E; Quiroz, C; Zacariaz, J; De la Iglesia Niveyro, P; Christiansen, S; Pierangelo, M A; Varela, C F; Rosa-Diez, G J; Catoggio, L J; Soriano, E R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Renal flares are common in lupus nephritis (LN), and class switch is thought to be characteristic. There is no agreement on indications for performing a repeat renal biopsy. Our objective was to retrospectively review patients who had more than one renal biopsy performed on clinical indications, and analyse clinical, pathological and treatment changes after successive biopsies. Methods Forty-five patients with LN and one or more repeat renal biopsies were included, with a total of 116 biopsies. Results Of the 71 repeat biopsies, pathological transition occurred in 39 (54.9%). When having a previous biopsy with a proliferative lesion, class switch occurred in 55.6%, with 24.4% evolving into non-proliferative classes. When previous biopsy was class V, transition to other classes occurred in 58.3% and changes were all into proliferative classes. Conversion from one pure proliferative form to another (class III to class IV or vice versa) happened in 11.3% of the rebiopsies, with 62 rebiopsies (87.3%) leading to a change in the treatment regimen. Conclusions Histological transformations were common, and they occurred when the previous biopsy had non-proliferative lesions as well as when lesions were proliferative. Treatments were modified after repeat renal biopsy in the majority of patients. In this experience, kidney repeat biopsies were useful in guiding treatment of LN flares. PMID:25396056

  6. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis defines shared inflammatory responses in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Celine C; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Nair, Viji; Ramanujam, Meera; Zhang, Weijia; Bottinger, Erwin P; Segerer, Stephan; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D; Davidson, Anne; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Therapeutic studies in mouse LN models do not always predict outcomes of human therapeutic trials, raising concerns about the human relevance of these preclinical models. In this study, we used an unbiased transcriptional network approach to define, in molecular terms, similarities and differences among three lupus models and human LN. Genome-wide gene-expression networks were generated using natural language processing and automated promoter analysis and compared across species via suboptimal graph matching. The three murine models and human LN share both common and unique features. The 20 commonly shared network nodes reflect the key pathologic processes of immune cell infiltration/activation, endothelial cell activation/injury, and tissue remodeling/fibrosis, with macrophage/dendritic cell activation as a dominant cross-species shared transcriptional pathway. The unique nodes reflect differences in numbers and types of infiltrating cells and degree of remodeling among the three mouse strains. To define mononuclear phagocyte-derived pathways in human LN, gene sets activated in isolated NZB/W renal mononuclear cells were compared with human LN kidney profiles. A tissue compartment-specific macrophage-activation pattern was seen, with NF-κB1 and PPARγ as major regulatory nodes in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular networks, respectively. Our study defines which pathologic processes in murine models of LN recapitulate the key transcriptional processes active in human LN and suggests that there are functional differences between mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating different renal microenvironments.

  7. The renal metallothionein expression profile is altered in human lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund; Starklint, Henrik; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Metallothionein (MT) isoforms I + II are polypeptides with potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In healthy kidneys, MT-I+II have been described as intracellular proteins of proximal tubular cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the renal MT-I+II expression profile is altered during lupus nephritis. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on renal biopsies from 37 patients with lupus nephritis. Four specimens of healthy renal tissue served as controls. Clinicopathological correlation studies and renal survival analyses were performed by means of standard statistical methods. Results Proximal tubules displaying epithelial cell MT-I+II depletion in combination with luminal MT-I+II expression were observed in 31 out of 37 of the lupus nephritis specimens, but not in any of the control sections (P = 0.006). The tubular MT score, defined as the median number of proximal tubules displaying this MT expression pattern per high-power microscope field (40× magnification), was positively correlated to the creatinine clearance in the lupus nephritis cohort (P = 0.01). Furthermore, a tubular MT score below the median value of the cohort emerged as a significant predictor of a poor renal outcome in renal survival analyses. Thus, patients with a tubular MT score < 1.0 had a 6.2-times higher risk of developing end-stage renal disease than patients with a tubular MT score ≥ 1.0 (P = 0.03). Conclusion Lupus nephritis is associated with significant alterations in renal MT-I+II expression. Our data indicate that important prognostic information can be deduced from the renal MT-I+II expression profile in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with nephritis. PMID:18601746

  8. Identification of unique microRNA signature associated with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Te, Jeannie L; Dozmorov, Igor M; Guthridge, Joel M; Nguyen, Kim L; Cavett, Joshua W; Kelly, Jennifer A; Bruner, Gail R; Harley, John B; Ojwang, Joshua O

    2010-05-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) have emerged as an important new class of modulators of gene expression. In this study we investigated miRNA that are differentially expressed in lupus nephritis. Microarray technology was used to investigate differentially expressed miRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-transformed cell lines obtained from lupus nephritis affected patients and unaffected controls. TaqMan-based stem-loop real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for validation. Microarray analysis of miRNA expressed in both African American (AA) and European American (EA) derived lupus nephritis samples revealed 29 and 50 differentially expressed miRNA, respectively, of 850 tested. There were 18 miRNA that were differentially expressed in both racial groups. When samples from both racial groups and different specimen types were considered, there were 5 primary miRNA that were differentially expressed. We have identified 5 miRNA; hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-423-5P, hsa-miR-638, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-663 that were differentially expressed in lupus nephritis across different racial groups and all specimen types tested. Hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-423-5P, are reported here for the first time to be associated with lupus nephritis. Our work establishes EBV-transformed B cell lines as a useful model for the discovery of miRNA as biomarkers for SLE. Based on these findings, we postulate that these differentially expressed miRNA may be potential novel biomarkers for SLE as well as help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of lupus nephritis. The investigation of miRNA profiles in SLE may lead to the discovery and development of novel methods to diagnosis, treat and prevent SLE.

  9. Identification of urinary metabolites that distinguish membranous lupus nephritis from proliferative lupus nephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) is a chronic autoimmune disease, and kidney involvement with SLE, a.k.a. lupus nephritis (LN), is a frequent and severe complication of SLE that increases patient morbidity and mortality. About 50% of patients with SLE encounter renal abnormalities which, if left untreated, can lead to end-stage renal disease. Kidney biopsy is considered the criterion standard for diagnosis and staging of LN using the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) classification, which was developed to help predict renal outcomes and assist with medical decision-making. However, kidney biopsy-based classification of LN is highly invasive and impractical for real-time monitoring of LN status. Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling was used to identify urinary metabolites that discriminated between proliferative and pure membranous LN as defined by the ISN/RPS classification, and between LN and primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Methods Metabolic profiling was conducted using urine samples of patients with proliferative LN without membranous features (Class III/IV; n = 7) or pure membranous LN (Class V; n = 7). Patients with primary FSGS and proteinuria (n = 10) served as disease controls. For each patient, demographic information and clinical data was obtained and a random urine sample collected to measure NMR spectra. Data and sample collection for patients with LN occurred around the time of kidney biopsy. Metabolic profiling analysis was done by visual inspection and principal component analysis. Results Urinary citrate levels were 8-fold lower in Class V LN compared to Class III/IV patients, who had normal levels of urinary citrate (P < 0.05). Class III/IV LN patients had > 10-fold lower levels of urinary taurine compared to Class V patients, who had mostly normal levels (P < 0.01). Class V LN patients had normal urinary hippurate levels compared

  10. Clinical and Laboratory Predictors of Distinct Histopathogical Features of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Clio P.; Fragoulis, George E.; Somarakis, George; Drosos, Alexandros; Tzioufas, Athanasios G.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors aimed to explore whether distinct clinical, serological, and urinalysis findings are associated with specific histological classes of lupus nephritis. Clinical and laboratory features were recorded at the time of clinical diagnosis from 297 consecutive patients with biopsy-confirmed lupus nephritis. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed and a risk score was developed to estimate the risk for developing different classes of lupus nephritis. Variables independently associated with class II included absence of malar rash, negative anti-dsDNA, and ≤5 urine leucocytes/high power field (hpf); with III/IV: age at nephritis diagnosis ≤32 years old, presence of musculoskeletal features, new-onset hypertension, positive anti-dsDNA, >5 urine leucocytes/hpf, creatinine >1.2 mg/dL, cellular casts >1/hpf, and absence of nephrotic range proteinuria; with V: age at nephritis diagnosis >32 years, malar rash, absence of musculoskeletal complaints or serum C3 hypocomplementemia, nephrotic range proteinuria, and ≤9 urine erythrocytes/hpf. A risk predictive score of specific histological classes was calculated for each patient. Associations between 2, 3 or more risk factors with specific histological classes were also revealed [Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) (≥2 risk factors) was 6.7 (2.8–17.4) for class II nephritis, 15.6 (5.1–47.8), and 8.2 (3.6–19.0) for classes III/IV and for class V, respectively (≥3 risk factors)]. The identification of independent factors associated with specific classes of lupus nephritis can provide guidance in selecting specific therapeutic modalities, particularly in cases in which renal biopsy is contraindicated. PMID:26020385

  11. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1, Fractalkine, and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Different Pathological Types of Lupus Nephritis and Their Value in Different Treatment Prognoses

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lan; Han, Fei; Lang, Xiabing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis is important for the outcome of lupus nephritis (LN). However, the pathological type of lupus nephritis closely related to the clinical manifestations; therefore, the treatment of lupus nephritis depends on the different pathological types. Objective To assess the level of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1), fractalkine (Fkn), and receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) in different pathological types of lupus nephritis and to explore the value of these biomarkers for predicting the prognosis of lupus nephritis. Methods Patients included in this study were assessed using renal biopsy. Class III and class IV were defined as the proliferative group, class V as non-proliferative group, and class V+III and class V+IV as the mixed group. During the follow-up, 40 of 178 enrolled patients had a poor response to the standard immunosuppressant therapy. The level of markers in the different response groups was tested. Results The levels of urine and serum MCP-1, urine and serum fractalkine, and serum RAGE were higher in the proliferative group, and lower in the non-proliferative group, and this difference was significant. The levels of urine and serum MCP-1 and serum RAGE were lower in the poor response group, and these differences were also significant. The relationship between urine MCP-1 and urine and serum fractalkine with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index was evaluated. Conclusion The concentration of cytokines MCP-1, fractalkine, and RAGE may be correlated with different pathology type of lupus nephtitis. Urine and serum MCP-1 and serum RAGE may help in predicting the prognosis prior to standard immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:27458981

  12. C1q rs292001 polymorphism and C1q antibodies in juvenile lupus and their relation to lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mosaad, Y M; Hammad, A; Fawzy, Z; El-Refaaey, A; Tawhid, Z; Hammad, E M; Youssef, L F; ElAttar, E A A; Radwan, D F; Fawzy, I M

    2015-01-01

    C1q deficiency is related strongly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but very few and inconsistent studies explored the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the C1q gene in relation to juvenile SLE (jSLE) and lupus nephritis (LN). The objective of this study was to analyse whether C1q rs 292001 polymorphism is associated with SLE and disease phenotype, especially nephritis, and to investigate the relation between this polymorphism and clinical data, treatment outcome, serum level of C1q protein and antibodies. Typing of C1q rs292001 polymorphism using restriction fragment length polymorphism and measuring serum levels of C1q protein and antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed for 130 children with SLE and 208 healthy controls. The A allele of C1q rs292001 was associated with jSLE and LN (P = 0·005 and 0·013, respectively) and the AA genotype was associated with jSLE (P = 0·036). Low serum levels of C1q protein were found in jSLE and LN (P < 0·001 and 0·009, respectively), and these levels were increased after treatment in patients with LN (P = 0·009) and active renal disease (P = 0·027). Higher titres of C1q antibodies were found in patients with LN (P = 0·015) and correlated negatively with C1q protein level (P < 0·001) and patient age (P = 0·04). The A allele and AA genotype of C1q rs292001 can be considered a susceptibility risk factor and the GG genotype could be considered protective for jSLE and LN in the studied cohort of Egyptian children. Decreased serum levels of C1q protein and increased titres of C1q antibodies may be involved in the pathogenesis of jSLE, especially LN. PMID:26095468

  13. IgG4 deposits in pure and combined membranous lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Herrera van Oostdam, David; Martínez Martínez, Marco U; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc; Martínez-Gala, David; Jaimes Piñón, Gerardo T; Abud Mendoza, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and prognosis of IgG4 deposits in renal biopsy of patients with membranous lupus nephritis (MLN). This is a retrospective cohort study in which we included patients with class V alone or combined (III/V or IV/V) of lupus nephritis according to the 2004 ISN/RPS. All the patients included must have availability of renal tissue for immunohistochemistry analyses. We excluded other classes of lupus nephritis. The renal tissue was examined by a nephro-pathologist. We included 65 patients with MLN; of these, 24 (37 %) were class V, and the other had proliferative concomitant with membranous patterns. Seven renal specimens had IgG4 deposits (10 %). Patients with IgG4 deposits had higher levels of eosinophils in serum. All of the patients with IgG4 had renal involvement as first manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. The rate of renal failure was 42 and 43 % in IgG4 positive and negative, respectively, 28 % of IgG4 required renal replacement therapy. From a histological view, 42 % of IgG4 had evidence of arteriolar vasculitis in renal biopsies. Lupus patients with IgG4 deposits were more likely to have renal involvement as a first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, and they course with a worse prognosis since they required more dialysis. Also, they have more probability of vascular inflammation on the renal biopsy.

  14. Relation between serological data at the time of biopsy and renal histology in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nossent, J C; Henzen-Logmans, S C; Vroom, T M; Huysen, V; Berden, J H; Swaak, A J

    1991-01-01

    As autoantibodies are thought to participate in the pathogenesis of renal inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) we investigated associations between serological markers of disease activity in SLE and the activity of renal histopathological lesions in thirty-five patients with lupus nephritis (LN). We found the following prevalence of serum auto-antibodies in LN: IgG antinuclear antibodies (ANA) 100%, IgM ANA 69%, IgA ANA 60%, IgG anti-dsDNA 60%, IgM anti-dsDNA 71%, IgA anti-dsDNA 60%, anti-RNP 20%, anti-Sm 14%, anti-SSA 31%, anti-SSB 14%, anti-histone 37%, anti-cardiolipin 80% and antibody to ribosomal protein (anti-P) 6%. No correlation was found between serological parameters and the WHO-classification of biopsies. The activity-index of histological lesion, assessed according to the NIH-renal histology scoring system, correlated with IgM ANA and IgM anti-dsDNA titers. Of all the specific features of histological renal inflammation, glomerular proliferation showed the best overall correlation with serological parameters of disease activity. Anticardiolipin antibodies were correlated with overall disease activity, but not with renal histological activity. Thus, serological markers of disease activity did not adequately reflect the amount of renal inflammation in LN and cannot replace renal biopsy as a diagnostic tool.

  15. Steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome in lupus nephritis. Response to chlorambucil.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Esparza, A R; Garella, S

    1984-12-01

    Nephrotic syndrome associated with mesangial lupus nephritis developed in a young woman. The heavy proteinuria exhibited a striking steroid-dependent course during a three-year period of time, with ten relapses occurring whenever attempts were made to withdraw prednisone therapy. A prolonged remission was induced by the administration of chlorambucil.

  16. Anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and the lupus anticoagulant: significant factors associated with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alba, P; Bento, L; Cuadrado, M; Karim, Y; Tungekar, M; Abbs, I; Khamashta, M; D'Cruz, D; Hughes, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantibodies and ethnicity have been associated with LN, but the results are controversial. Objective: To study the immunological and demographic factors associated with the development of LN. Patients and methods: A retrospective case-control study of 127 patients with biopsy-proven LN, and 206 randomly selected patients with SLE without nephritis as controls was designed. All patients had attended our lupus unit during the past 12 years. Standard methods were used for laboratory testing. Results: Patients with LN were significantly younger than the controls at the time of SLE diagnosis (mean (SD) 25.6 (8.8) years v 33.7 (12.5) years; p<0.0001). The proportion of patients of black ethnic origin was significantly higher in the group with nephritis (p=0.02). There were no differences in sex distribution or duration of follow up. A higher proportion of anti-dsDNA, anti-RNP, anti-Sm, and lupus anticoagulant (LA) was seen in the group with nephritis (p=0.002; p=0.005; p=0.0001; p=0.01, respectively). In univariate, but not in multivariate, analysis male sex and absence of anti-dsDNA were associated with earlier onset of renal disease (p=0.03; p=0.008). In multivariate analysis the only factors associated with nephritis were younger age at diagnosis of SLE, black race, presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, and LA. No demographic or immunological associations were seen with WHO histological classes. Conclusions: Young, black patients with anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and positive LA, appear to have a higher risk of renal involvement. These patients should be carefully monitored for the development of LN. PMID:12759294

  17. Lupus nephritis in children: a longitudinal study of prognostic factors and therapy.

    PubMed

    Baqi, N; Moazami, S; Singh, A; Ahmad, H; Balachandra, S; Tejani, A

    1996-06-01

    There are only a few studies in the pediatric literature that have analyzed risk factors for renal failure in childhood lupus nephritis. This study reviewed the outcome of 56 children (4 to 18 yr of age) with lupus nephritis seen at the authors' institution over a 27-yr period (1965 to 1992), in relation to risk factors and therapy. All children underwent percutaneous renal biopsy before the institution of therapy. From 1965 to 1987, treatment for Class III and IV lupus nephritis consisted of high-dose pulse methylprednisolone, 500 mg daily for 10 days, followed by oral prednisone. From 1987 to 1992, IV cyclophosphamide was given monthly for 6 months and then every 3 months for a period of 3 yr for patients with Class III and Class IV disease. Of 56 children, 42% had Class IV and 21% had Class III histology at onset. The mean follow-up period was 4 yr and ranged from 0.5 to 20.3 yr. Life-table analysis showed that the cumulative proportion of patients surviving was 82.8% at 5 yr and 67.7% at 10 yr. Renal survival was 44.4% at 5 yr and 29% at 10 yr, after the initial diagnosis of lupus nephritis was made. Age at diagnosis, race, sex, initial serum creatinine level, and the presence of proteinuria, hypertension, and DNA antibody titers were reviewed with respect to disease progression, as was the histological class at diagnosis. The effect of the different therapies was also examined. Univariate analysis revealed a significant association of progression to ESRD with an elevated serum creatinine level (P = 0.021), decreased C3 complement (P = 0.024), hypertension (P = 0.053), and histological classification of Class IV lupus nephritis (P = 0.031). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that progression to ESRD was independently associated with an initial Class IV histology (relative risk, 1.78; P < 0.003), hypertension at presentation (relative risk, 1.67; P < 0.003), and a low C3 complement level in conjuction with a high creatinine level (relative risk, 1.52; P < 0

  18. [Clinical guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and single-centre results of mycofenolate mofetil among patients with lupus nephritis in the National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Emese

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the latest guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and their own single-centre results with mycofenolate mofetil treated lupus nephritis. Lupus nephritis and mainly its proliferative form is a frequent and potentially life-threatening manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus that can lead to end-stage renal disease. The treatment of lupus nephritis greatly improved in the last decades; mycofenolate mofetil has become an alternative of cyclophosphamide both in remission induction and as a maintenance regimen as well in the treatment of Class III and IV glomerulonephritis. The authors ordered mycofenolate mofetil for 25 patients with lupus nephritis so far. Histologically most of them had Class III (A/C) or IV (A) glomerulonephritis (30-30%), and only 16% of the patients had renal impairment at that time. Mycofenolate mofetil given after glucocorticoid and cyclophosphamide induction therapy reduced the daily proteinuria from 3.18 grs to 1.06 grs. Complete remission could be achieved in 24% and partial remission in 48% of the patients. The authors conclude that mycofenolate mofetil is effective in the therapy of lupus nephritis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1385-1393. PMID:27569461

  19. CXCL13 as a new biomarker of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis - from bench to bedside?

    PubMed

    Schiffer, L; Worthmann, K; Haller, H; Schiffer, M

    2015-01-01

    Different studies over the last decade have linked the B cell-attracting chemokine CXC ligand 13 (CXCL13) to the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A pathogenetic role of this chemokine for disease manifestation in SLE was described initially in mouse models for SLE. Mechanisms of CXCL13 actions were also identified in SLE patients. Moreover, various clinical studies have identified CXCL13 serum levels as a useful biomarker in patients with SLE of different ethnicities for disease activity. In addition, CXCL13 seems to be a promising marker for the diagnosis of lupus nephritis, one of the most severe complications of SLE. However, its exact place within the mechanisms that lead to SLE remains to be defined. Further research is needed to resolve more details of the pathomechanism and the signalling pathway of CXCL13 in SLE. Blocking CXCL13 or the signal pathways of CXCL13 is seen as a promising therapeutic approach for SLE and will be addressed in the near future. This review summarizes all papers that linked CXCL13 to SLE and highlights its importance in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of SLE.

  20. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  1. "Kill" the messenger: Targeting of cell-derived microparticles in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-07-01

    Immune complex (IC) deposition in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a key early pathogenic event in lupus nephritis (LN). The clarification of the mechanisms behind IC deposition will enable targeted therapy in the future. Circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been proposed as major sources of extracellular autoantigens and ICs and triggers of autoimmunity in LN. The overabundance of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) along with immunoglobulins and a few other proteins specifically distinguish circulating MPs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and this is most pronounced in patients with active LN. G3BP co-localizes with deposited ICs in renal biopsies from LN patients supporting a significant presence of MPs in the IC deposits. G3BP binds strongly to glomerular basement membrane proteins and integrins. Accordingly, MP surface proteins, especially G3BP, may be essential for the deposition of ICs in kidneys and thus for the ensuing formation of MP-derived electron dense structures in the GBM, and immune activation in LN. This review focuses on the notion of targeting surface molecules on MPs as an entirely novel treatment strategy in LN. By targeting MPs, a double hit may be achieved by attenuating both the autoantigenic fueling of immune complexes and the triggering of the adaptive immune system. Thereby, early pathogenic events may be blocked in contrast to current treatment strategies that primarily target and modulate later events in the cellular and humoral immune response.

  2. A Unique Cause of Proteinuria in Pregnancy: Class II Lupus Nephritis with Concomitant Minimal Change Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kunjal, Ryan; Adam-Eldien, Rabie; Makary, Raafat; Jo-Hoy, Francois; Heilig, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old African American female who presented to another facility for routine follow-up in the 34th week of pregnancy with lower extremity swelling and nephrotic-range proteinuria. Although she was normotensive, it was initially thought that she had preeclampsia. She was monitored carefully and delivery was induced at 37 weeks of gestation. She was transferred to our hospital, where she was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) based on clinical and laboratory criteria. Renal biopsy revealed a surprising finding of minimal change disease (MCD) concomitant with class II lupus nephritis (LN). She was managed with pulses and then tapering doses of steroid therapy with dramatic resolution of the nephrotic syndrome. This case demonstrates not only the rare de novo occurrence of SLE in pregnancy, but the unique finding of MCD coexisting with class II LN. We propose that altered T cell activity may be the link between these seemingly distinct entities. PMID:27781205

  3. Correlation of renal histology with outcome in children with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Rush, P J; Baumal, R; Shore, A; Balfe, J W; Schreiber, M

    1986-05-01

    We assessed renal histological features in 20 children with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) to determine whether they were useful in predicting clinical outcome. Renal biopsies were analyzed by assigning scores indicating an activity index (AI) and chronicity index (CI). Clinical assessment of renal function at biopsy and outcome were graded according to urinalysis, serum creatinine, need for dialysis and/or transplantation, and/or death from end-stage renal failure. Renal function at biopsy correlated significantly with AI and CI. Serum complement (C3 and C4) correlated significantly with CI but not with AI. The usefulness of the clinical grading system was confirmed in ten patients who underwent repeat biopsies. Of these, four converted from DPLN to mesangial or membranous lupus and showed improvement in their grade, while only one of the six with DPLN on both biopsies improved. After a mean follow-up of 4.0 years, 14 of the 20 patients showed clinical improvement, four were unchanged, and two were worse. CI predicted clinical outcome (P less than 0.01) but AI did not. Histologic scores of AI and CI obtained from renal biopsies showing DPLN may be useful in predicting therapeutic responses and designing prospective clinical trials to determine optimum management of children with DPLN.

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis Accelerates the Progression of Renal Fibrosis in Lupus Nephritis by Activating SMAD and p38 MAPK in TGF-β1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Xue, Leixi; Liu, Zhichun; Huang, Jun; Wen, Jian; Hu, Ji; Bo, Lin; Yang, Ru

    2016-01-01

    This study aim was to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) in lupus nephritis and its potential underlying mechanisms. MRL/lpr mice were used for in vivo experiments and human proximal tubular cells (HK2 cells) were used for in vitro experiments. Results showed that MRL/lpr mice treated with vehicle solution or LV-Control shRNA displayed significant proteinuria and severe renal histopathological changes. LV-TWEAK-shRNA treatment reversed these changes and decreased renal expressions of TWEAK, TGF-β1, p-p38 MAPK, p-Smad2, COL-1, and α-SMA proteins. In vitro, hTWEAK treatment upregulated the expressions of TGF-β1, p-p38 MAPK, p-SMAD2, α-SMA, and COL-1 proteins in HK2 cells and downregulated the expressions of E-cadherin protein, which were reversed by cotreatment with anti-TWEAK mAb or SB431542 treatment. These findings suggest that TWEAK may contribute to chronic renal changes and renal fibrosis by activating TGF-β1 signaling pathway, and phosphorylation of Smad2 and p38 MAPK proteins was also involved in this signaling pathway. PMID:27365897

  5. The Role of Anti-DNA Antibodies in the Development of Lupus Nephritis: A Complementary, or Alternative, Viewpoint?

    PubMed

    Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-09-01

    Kidney disease, or lupus nephritis, is the organ involvement that is most closely associated with specific autoantibodies in patients with SLE. The concept of anti-DNA antibodies being instrumental in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis emerged ~50 years ago, and has been a topic of debate ever since. This article focuses on the description of the renal sub-cellular targets of nephritogenic autoantibodies and offers a counter-point opinion to the article by Pedersen et al. In addition, we provide an overview of some of the mechanisms by which anti-DNA antibodies bind to their renal targets and the pathogenic relevance to clinical nephritis.

  6. Functional Characterization of Autoantibodies against Complement Component C3 in Patients with Lupus Nephritis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasilev, Vasil V.; Noe, Remi; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Chauvet, Sophie; Lazarov, Valentin J.; Deliyska, Boriana P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a complication of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Because the complement system plays a critical role in orchestrating inflammatory and immune responses as well as in the clearance of immune complexes, autoreactivity to complement components may have considerable pathological consequences. Autoantibodies against the central complement component C3 have been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus, but their molecular mechanism and functional relevance are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and the functional properties of the anti-C3 autoantibodies. Anti-C3 autoantibodies were measured in plasma of 39 LN patients, and identification of their epitopes on the C3 molecule was performed. By using surface plasmon resonance, we analyzed the influence of patient-derived IgG antibodies on the interaction of C3b with Factor B, Factor H, and complement receptor 1. The capacity of these antibodies to dysregulate the C3 convertase on the surface of endothelial cell was measured by flow cytometry. Here we report that the frequency of anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN is ∼30%. They inhibited interactions of the negative complement regulators Factor H and complement receptor 1 with C3b. An enhanced C3 deposition was also observed on human endothelial cells in the presence of C3 autoantibodies. In addition, anti-C3 autoantibody levels correlated with disease activity. In conclusion, the anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN may contribute to the autoimmune pathology by their capacity to overactivate the complement system. PMID:26245903

  7. Multi-antibody composition in lupus nephritis: isotype and antigen specificity make the difference.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alice; Vaglio, Augusto; Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Moroni, Gabriella; Franceschini, Franco; Allegri, Landino; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Candiano, Giovanni; Pesce, Giampaola; Ravelli, Angelo; Puppo, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Tincani, Angela; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Research on autoimmune processes involved in glomerulonephritis has been for years based on experimental models. Recent progress in proteomics has radically modified perspectives: laser microdissection and proteomics were crucial for an in vivo analysis of autoantibodies eluted from human biopsies. Lupus nephritis has been the subject of recent independent researches. Main topics have been the definition of renal autoimmune components in human lupus biopsies; methods were laser capture of glomeruli and/or of single cells (CD38+ or Ki-67+) from tubulointerstitial areas as starting step followed by elution and characterization of renal antibodies by proteomics. The innovative approach highlighted different panels of autoantibodies deposited in glomeruli and in tubulo-interstitial areas that actually represented the unique autoimmune components in these patients. IgG2 was the major isotype; new podocyte proteins (αenolase, annexin AI) and already known implanted molecules (DNA, histone 3, C1q) were their target antigens in glomeruli. Vimentin was the antigen in tubulo-interstitial areas. Matching renal autoantibodies with serum allowed the definition of a typical autoantibody serum map that included the same anti-αenolase, anti-annexin AI, anti-DNA, and anti-histone 3 IgG2 already detected in renal tissue. Serum levels of specific autoantibodies were tenfold increased in patients with lupus nephritis allowing a clear differentiation from both rheumatoid arthritis and other glomerulonephritis. In all cases, targeted antigens were characterized as components of lupus NETosis. Matching renal/serum autoantibody composition in vivo furnishes new insights on human lupus nephritis and allows to refine composition of circulating antibodies in patients with lupus. A thoughtful passage from bench to bedside of new knowledge would expand our clinical and therapeutic opportunities.

  8. Renal Interstitial Arteriosclerotic Lesions in Lupus Nephritis Patients: A Cohort Study from China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dan-dan; Wu, Li-hua; Song, Yan; Yu, Feng; Wang, Su-xia; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate renal arteriosclerotic lesions in patients with lupus nephritis and investigate their associations with clinical and pathological characteristics, especially cardio-vascular features. Design A retrospective cohort study. Participants Seventy-nine patients with renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, diagnosed between January 2000 and June 2008 from Peking University First Hospital. Results In clinico-pathological data, patients with arteriosclerosis had higher ratio of hypertension and more severe renal injury indices compared with patients with no renal vascular lesions. More importantly, patients with renal arteriosclerosis had worse cardiac structure and function under transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients with renal arteriosclerosis tend to have higher ratios of combined endpoints compared with those of no renal vascular lesions, although the difference didn’t reach statistical meanings (P = 0.104). Conclusion Renal arteriosclerotic lesion was common and associated with vascular immune complex deposits in lupus nephritis. It might have a certain degree of association with poor outcomes and cardiovascular events, which needs further explorations. PMID:26544865

  9. Complement in lupus nephritis: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The complement system consists of 3 pathways and more than 30 proteins, including those with biological activity that directly or indirectly mediate the effects of this system, plus a set of regulatory proteins necessary to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The role for complement in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is paradoxic. On one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classic pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, immune complex-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathologic features that are logical consequences of complement activation. By using accurate mouse models of SLE, we have gained remarkable insights into pathogenic features likely relevant to the human disease, and the ability to test potential therapies, some of which have made it to standard clinical use. Studies in genetically altered mice and using recombinant protein inhibitors of complement have confirmed what was believed but unproven-early complement proteins C1q and C4 are protective whereas complement activation later in the pathways is proinflammatory and deleterious. Two complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10, Avant Immunotherapeutics, Needham, MA) and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (Eculizumab, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cheshire, CT) have been shown to inhibit complement safely and now are being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Although these and others earlier in their clinical development hold promise to be used therapeutically in lupus nephritis, this optimism must be tempered by the fact that the clinical trials to prove this remain fraught with obstacles.

  10. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  11. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus in three ethnic groups. XII. Risk factors for lupus nephritis after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bastian, H M; Roseman, J M; McGwin, G; Alarcón, G S; Friedman, A W; Fessler, B J; Baethge, B A; Reveille, J D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative incidence of lupus nephritis (LN) and the factors predictive of its occurrence in a multiethnic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cohort. We studied 353 SLE patients as defined by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria (65 Hispanics, 93 African-Americans and 91 Caucasians). First, we determined the cumulative incidence of LN in all patients. Next, we determined the predictors for LN in those with nephritis occurring after diagnosis. The dependent variable, LN, was defined by: (1) A renal biopsy demonstrating World Health Organization (WHO), class II-V histopathology; and/or (2) proteinuria > or = 0.5 g/24 h or 3+ proteinuria attributable to SLE; and/or (3) one of the following features also attributable to SLE and present on two or more visits, which were performed at least 6 months apart--proteinuria > or = 2+, serum creatinine > or = 1.4 mg/dl, creatinine clearance < or = 79 ml/min, > or = 10 RBCs or WBCs per high power field (hpf), or > or = 3 granular or cellular casts per hpf. Independent variables assessed at diagnosis, and if absent, at baseline, were from four domains: sociodemographic, clinical, immunologic and immunogenetic (including the complete antibody profile and MHC class II alleles), and health habits. Variables with P < 0.05 by chi square analyses were entered into domain-specific stepwise logistic regression analyses controlling for disease duration, with LN as the dependent variable. Significant domain-specific regression variables (P < or = 0.1) were then entered into an overall model. The cumulative incidence of LN was 54.3% in all patients, and 35.3% for those developing LN after diagnosis. LN after diagnosis occurred in 43.1% of 65 Hispanics, 50.5% of 93 African-Americans, and 14.3% of 91 Caucasians, P < 0.0001. The duration of follow-up for those with LN after diagnosis was 5.5+/-2.4 vs 4.0+/-2.9 years for those without LN. Hispanic (odds ratio (OR) = 2.71, 95

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus in three ethnic groups. XII. Risk factors for lupus nephritis after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bastian, H M; Roseman, J M; McGwin, G; Alarcón, G S; Friedman, A W; Fessler, B J; Baethge, B A; Reveille, J D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative incidence of lupus nephritis (LN) and the factors predictive of its occurrence in a multiethnic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cohort. We studied 353 SLE patients as defined by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria (65 Hispanics, 93 African-Americans and 91 Caucasians). First, we determined the cumulative incidence of LN in all patients. Next, we determined the predictors for LN in those with nephritis occurring after diagnosis. The dependent variable, LN, was defined by: (1) A renal biopsy demonstrating World Health Organization (WHO), class II-V histopathology; and/or (2) proteinuria > or = 0.5 g/24 h or 3+ proteinuria attributable to SLE; and/or (3) one of the following features also attributable to SLE and present on two or more visits, which were performed at least 6 months apart--proteinuria > or = 2+, serum creatinine > or = 1.4 mg/dl, creatinine clearance < or = 79 ml/min, > or = 10 RBCs or WBCs per high power field (hpf), or > or = 3 granular or cellular casts per hpf. Independent variables assessed at diagnosis, and if absent, at baseline, were from four domains: sociodemographic, clinical, immunologic and immunogenetic (including the complete antibody profile and MHC class II alleles), and health habits. Variables with P < 0.05 by chi square analyses were entered into domain-specific stepwise logistic regression analyses controlling for disease duration, with LN as the dependent variable. Significant domain-specific regression variables (P < or = 0.1) were then entered into an overall model. The cumulative incidence of LN was 54.3% in all patients, and 35.3% for those developing LN after diagnosis. LN after diagnosis occurred in 43.1% of 65 Hispanics, 50.5% of 93 African-Americans, and 14.3% of 91 Caucasians, P < 0.0001. The duration of follow-up for those with LN after diagnosis was 5.5+/-2.4 vs 4.0+/-2.9 years for those without LN. Hispanic (odds ratio (OR) = 2.71, 95

  14. Immunological aspects of biopsy-proven lupus nephritis in Bahraini patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Farid, Eman M; Hassan, Adla B; Abalkhail, Ali A; El-Agroudy, Amgad E; Arrayed, Sameer Al-M; Al-Ghareeb, Sumaya M

    2013-11-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a frequent and potentially serious complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that may influence morbidity and mortality. Immunological investigations are aiding tools to the kidney biopsy findings in early diagnosis, in addition to monitoring the effect of therapy. The aim of the present study is to highlight the role of these investigations in a group of Bahraini patients and to determine whether there is any positive association between these findings and the outcome of LN. The current study is a retrospective case-control study of randomly selected 88 SLE patients, 44 with biopsy-proven LN and 44 without, acting as controls. All renal biopsies performed during the period from 1996 to 2012 were classified according to the World Health Organization classification. Immunological investigations analyzed are: Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-ds DNA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (abs) and complement components C3, C4. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing class II was performed on selected cases. All patients had positive ANA (100%). A significantly high frequency of anti-Smith abs among the non-LN group (43.18%) compared with the LN group (18.18%) was found (P <0.001). On the other hand, the anti-Ro/SSA abs in the non-LN group was also found at a statistically higher frequency (20.45%) compared with that in the LN group (4.54%) (P <0.01). Anti-ds-DNA abs were found to be higher in the LN group (84.09%) compared with the non-LN group (70.45%), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.082). There was a positive association of ANA positivity and low C3 and or C4 in the studied group. In our study, 88.2% of the HLA typed patients had HLADR2, DR3 or both. In conclusion, in our Arabic Bahraini SLE patients, the presence of anti-Smith, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-RNP antibodies and the absence of anti-dsDNA antibodies are independent predictive markers for renal involvement. However, more prospective studies with a

  15. No evidence for an independent role of anti-heparan sulphate reactivity apart from anti-DNA in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hylkema, M N; Zwet, I V; Kramers, C; Van Bruggen, M C; Swaak, A J; Berden, J H; Smeenk, R J

    1995-01-01

    The presence of anti-heparan sulphate (HS) reactivity in serum is closely related to the occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Since patients with lupus nephritis in general also have high titres of anti-DNA antibodies, we wanted to clarify the relationship between anti-HS and anti-DNA reactivity in serum. Therefore, we studied longitudinally six patients with lupus nephritis who experienced 12 exacerbations of their disease, and five SLE patients without nephritis experiencing 10 periods of non-renal disease exacerbations. In addition, we tested single serum samples of another 24 patients obtained during a renal disease exacerbation and 22 sera of patients without nephritis. The sera of all patients were tested for anti-DNA (Farr assay) and anti-HS reactivity (ELISA). We confirmed that SLE patients during renal exacerbations have a significantly higher anti-HS reactivity than patients without nephritis (P < 0.003). In addition, patients with nephritis also had higher titres of anti-DNA antibodies during renal exacerbations than during non-renal exacerbations (P < 0.01). A correlation between anti-DNA and anti-HS reactivity was observed (r = 0.40, P < 0.02), which in itself explains the correlation between nephritis and anti-HS reactivity. Comparing sera from nephritis and non-nephritis patients matched for anti-DNA titre, we found no difference in anti-HS reactivity, and therefore must conclude that the anti-HS reactivity is a direct reflection of anti-DNA reactivity. PMID:7621592

  16. Successful modulation of murine lupus nephritis with tuftsin-phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bashi, Tomer; Blank, Miri; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Fridkin, Mati; Versini, Mathilde; Gendelman, Omer; Volkov, Alexander; Barshak, Iris; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    In areas where helminths infections are common, autoimmune diseases are rare. Treatment with helminths and ova from helminths, improved clinical findings of inflammatory bowel disease, multiple-sclerosis and rheumatoid-arthritis. The immunomodulatory functions of some helminths were attributed to the phosphorylcholine (PC) moiety. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of Tuftsin-PC (TPC) compound in mice genetically prone to develop lupus. Lupus prone NZBXW/F1 mice received subcutaneously TPC (5 μg/1 ml), 3 times a week starting at 14 weeks age. Autoantibodies were tested by ELISA, T-regulatory-cells by FACS, cytokines profile by RT-PCR and cytokines protein levels by DuoSet ELISA. Glomerulonephritis was addressed by detection of proteinuria, and immunoglobulin complex deposition in the mesangium of the kidneys of the mice by immunofluorescence. Our results show that TPC attenuated the development of glomerulonephritis in lupus prone mice, in particular, it ameliorated proteinuria (p < 0.02), and reduced immunoglobulin deposition in the kidney mesangium. TPC also enhanced the expression of TGFβ and IL-10 (p < 0.001), and inhibited the production of IFNγ and IL-17 (p < 0.03). TPC Significantly enhanced the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) phenotype in the treated mice. These data indicate that TPC hampered lupus development in genetically lupus prone mice which was exemplified by moderate glomerulonephritis, attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokines expression, as well as Tregs expansion. Our results propose harnessing novel natural therapy for lupus patients.

  17. Ac-SDKP ameliorates the progression of lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hechang; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Hongyue; Huang, Bin; Liang, Yingjie; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Niansheng

    2012-12-01

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is an endogenous tetrapeptide which can inhibit the differentiation, migration and activation of macrophages and suppress the proliferation of fibroblast. This study examined the effects of Ac-SDKP on the progression of lupus nephritis (LN). MRL/lpr mice received subcutaneous infusion of Ac-SDKP (1.0 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or vehicle through implanted osmotic mini-pumps from 12 to 20 weeks until being euthanized. MRL/MpJ mice served as normal controls. The data indicative of renal inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated before and after treatment. Ac-SDKP-treated MRL/lpr mice showed reduced proteinuria and improved renal function compared with vehicle-treated controls. Ac-SDKP-treated mice demonstrated decreased inflammatory infiltrates of T cells and macrophages in the kidneys as compared to vehicle-treated animals. The treatment also inhibited the activation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α. Despite this, immune complex deposition and plasma anti-dsDNA levels were not statistically different between the two groups. In addition, the treatment inhibited renal expression of TGF-β1, α-SMA and fibronectin as well as the phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Ac-SDKP treatment ameliorated LN through exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects on MRL/lpr mice, providing therapeutic potential for halting the progression of LN.

  18. An Overlapping Case of Lupus Nephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Weerasinghe, Chanudi; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 71-year-old Filipino female who was admitted to the hospital for abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea of 8 days duration. The patient was found to have marked acute kidney injury (AKI), which required hemodialysis in the next 3 days. Extensive workup revealed hematuria, subnephrotic range proteinuria, elevated anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and elevated total immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, with normal IgG4 and anti-dsDNA levels. On kidney biopsy, mild membranous glomerulonephritis was found, along with autoimmune tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) with a “full-house” pattern of immune deposits. These findings were suggestive of lupus interstitial nephritis. However, IgG4+ plasma cells were detected in the interstitium by immunostaining, favoring a diagnosis of IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD). Our case highlights the difficulty in differentiating lupus nephritis (LN) from IgG4-RKD in some patients, raising the suspicion that these two entities can co-exist. PMID:26015827

  19. Kidney Expression of Toll Like Receptors in Lupus Nephritis: Quantification and Clinicopathological Correlations.

    PubMed

    Conti, Fabrizio; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Truglia, Simona; Miranda, Francesca; Alessandri, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Bombardieri, Michele; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Valesini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed at locating and quantifying Toll Like Receptor (TLR) 3, 7, 8, and 9 expression in kidney of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and correlating them with clinicopathological features. Methods. Kidney sections from 26 LN patients and 4 controls were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-human TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 polyclonal antibodies; the number of TLR-positive nuclei/mm(2) was evaluated on digitalized images. Results. Compared to controls, LN showed a significantly higher amount of glomerular and tubulointerstitial TLR9 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007), whole and tubulointerstitial TLR3 (p = 0.026 and p = 0.031), and a higher tubulointerstitial TLR7 (p = 0.022). TLR9 positively correlated with activity index (p = 0.0063) and tubular TLR7 with chronicity index (p = 0.026). TLR9 positively correlated with Renal-SLEDAI (p = 0.01). Conclusions. This is the first study quantifying kidney expressions of TLRs in LN patients; the results show an overexpression of TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9 and demonstrate a correlation with clinicopathological indices supporting a role of these mediators in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:27635115

  20. Kidney Expression of Toll Like Receptors in Lupus Nephritis: Quantification and Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Francesca; Bombardieri, Michele; Valesini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed at locating and quantifying Toll Like Receptor (TLR) 3, 7, 8, and 9 expression in kidney of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and correlating them with clinicopathological features. Methods. Kidney sections from 26 LN patients and 4 controls were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-human TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 polyclonal antibodies; the number of TLR-positive nuclei/mm2 was evaluated on digitalized images. Results. Compared to controls, LN showed a significantly higher amount of glomerular and tubulointerstitial TLR9 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007), whole and tubulointerstitial TLR3 (p = 0.026 and p = 0.031), and a higher tubulointerstitial TLR7 (p = 0.022). TLR9 positively correlated with activity index (p = 0.0063) and tubular TLR7 with chronicity index (p = 0.026). TLR9 positively correlated with Renal-SLEDAI (p = 0.01). Conclusions. This is the first study quantifying kidney expressions of TLRs in LN patients; the results show an overexpression of TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9 and demonstrate a correlation with clinicopathological indices supporting a role of these mediators in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:27635115

  1. Biomarkers for Refractory Lupus Nephritis: A Microarray Study of Kidney Tissue.

    PubMed

    Benjachat, Thitima; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Tantivitayakul, Pornpen; Somparn, Poorichaya; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Prom-On, Santitham; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Townamchai, Natavudh

    2015-06-23

    The prognosis of severe lupus nephritis (LN) is very different among individual patients. None of the current biomarkers can be used to predict the development of refractory LN. Because kidney histology is the gold standard for diagnosing LN, the authors hypothesize that molecular signatures detected in kidney biopsy tissue may have predictive value in determining the therapeutic response. Sixty-seven patients with biopsy-proven severely active LN by International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) classification III/IV were recruited. Twenty-three kidney tissue samples were used for RNA microarray analysis, while the remaining 44 samples were used for validation by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) gene expression analysis. From hundreds of differential gene expressions in refractory LN, 12 candidates were selected for validation based on gene expression levels as well as relevant functions. The candidate biomarkers were members of the innate immune response molecules, adhesion molecules, calcium-binding receptors, and paracellular tight junction proteins. S100A8, ANXA13, CLDN19 and FAM46B were identified as the best kidney biomarkers for refractory LN, and COL8A1 was identified as the best marker for early loss of kidney function. These new molecular markers can be used to predict refractory LN and may eventually lead to novel molecular targets for therapy.

  2. Kidney Expression of Toll Like Receptors in Lupus Nephritis: Quantification and Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Francesca; Bombardieri, Michele; Valesini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed at locating and quantifying Toll Like Receptor (TLR) 3, 7, 8, and 9 expression in kidney of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and correlating them with clinicopathological features. Methods. Kidney sections from 26 LN patients and 4 controls were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-human TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 polyclonal antibodies; the number of TLR-positive nuclei/mm2 was evaluated on digitalized images. Results. Compared to controls, LN showed a significantly higher amount of glomerular and tubulointerstitial TLR9 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007), whole and tubulointerstitial TLR3 (p = 0.026 and p = 0.031), and a higher tubulointerstitial TLR7 (p = 0.022). TLR9 positively correlated with activity index (p = 0.0063) and tubular TLR7 with chronicity index (p = 0.026). TLR9 positively correlated with Renal-SLEDAI (p = 0.01). Conclusions. This is the first study quantifying kidney expressions of TLRs in LN patients; the results show an overexpression of TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9 and demonstrate a correlation with clinicopathological indices supporting a role of these mediators in the pathogenesis of LN.

  3. Biomarkers for Refractory Lupus Nephritis: A Microarray Study of Kidney Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Benjachat, Thitima; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Tantivitayakul, Pornpen; Somparn, Poorichaya; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Prom-On, Santitham; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Townamchai, Natavudh

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of severe lupus nephritis (LN) is very different among individual patients. None of the current biomarkers can be used to predict the development of refractory LN. Because kidney histology is the gold standard for diagnosing LN, the authors hypothesize that molecular signatures detected in kidney biopsy tissue may have predictive value in determining the therapeutic response. Sixty-seven patients with biopsy-proven severely active LN by International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) classification III/IV were recruited. Twenty-three kidney tissue samples were used for RNA microarray analysis, while the remaining 44 samples were used for validation by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) gene expression analysis. From hundreds of differential gene expressions in refractory LN, 12 candidates were selected for validation based on gene expression levels as well as relevant functions. The candidate biomarkers were members of the innate immune response molecules, adhesion molecules, calcium-binding receptors, and paracellular tight junction proteins. S100A8, ANXA13, CLDN19 and FAM46B were identified as the best kidney biomarkers for refractory LN, and COL8A1 was identified as the best marker for early loss of kidney function. These new molecular markers can be used to predict refractory LN and may eventually lead to novel molecular targets for therapy. PMID:26110394

  4. Pregnancy and patients with preexisting lupus nephritis: 15 years of experience at a single center in Korea.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-06-01

    We investigated obstetric outcomes and comorbidities during pregnancy in females with preexisting lupus nephritis (LN) and identified predictors for renal flare. In cases of renal flare during pregnancy, we assessed the long-term post-delivery renal outcome. We performed a retrospective analysis of 183 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pregnancies including blood chemistry, urinalysis, urinary protein, and disease activity recorded at prepregnancy, during pregnancy, and at one month, six months, and one year post-delivery. Pregnancies with preexisting LN had a greater frequency of adverse obstetric outcomes and maternal comorbidity. Renal flares occurred in 50.7% of pregnancies with preexisting LN, 89.2% of which were reactivations. Renal flare among pregnancies with SLE was predicted based on preexisting lupus nephritis (OR 17.73; 95% CI, 5.770-54.484), an active disease prior to pregnancy (OR 2.743; 95% CI, 1.074-7.004), and prepregnancy eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (OR 11.151; 95% CI, 3.292-37.768). Persistent LN one year after delivery was observed in 33.3% of pregnancies. The median follow-up time after delivery was 5.9 (3.1-9.7) years and chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurred in 21.4% of pregnancies with renal flare. In patients with renal flare, failing to achieve a ≥ 50% reduction in urine protein levels within six months, longer total duration of renal flare, and acute kidney injury at renal flare was associated with CKD development. Females with preexisting LN should achieve remission before pregnancy. When patients experience renal flares during pregnancy, it is important to reduce the proteinuria level by >50% within six months and to achieve early remission for excellent long-term renal outcomes.

  5. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Secondary to Lupus Nephritis, Responsive to Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Raufi, Alexander G.; Scott, Shruti; Darwish, Omar; Harley, Kevin; Kahlon, Kanwarpal; Desai, Sheetal; Lu, Yuxin; Tran, Minh-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) – a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage. Although plasma exchange is considered first-line therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura – a TMA classically associated with autoimmune depletion of ADAMTS-13 – aHUS demonstrates less reliable responsiveness to this modality. Instead, use of the late complement inhibitor Eculizumab has emerged as an effective modality for the management of such patients. Diagnosis of aHUS, however, is largely clinically based, relying heavily upon a multidisciplinary approach. Herein we present the case of a patient with atypical HUS successfully treated with Eculizumab in the setting of Class IV-G (A) lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia. PMID:27781079

  6. Significance of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to double stranded and single stranded DNA in patients with lupus nephritis: correlation with severity of renal histology.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Kanayama, Y; Amastu, K; Negoro, N; Kohda, S; Takeda, T; Inoue, T

    1993-01-01

    The correlation between renal histology and class specific (IgG and IgM) antibodies to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 40 untreated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The levels of IgG antibodies to dsDNA were significantly higher in patients with World Health Organisation class IV nephritis than in those with class I, class II, or class III nephritis. IgG antibodies to ssDNA were higher in patients with class IV than in those with class II nephritis. IgG antibodies to dsDNA showed a close correlation with the histological activity score and the amount of electron dense deposit. IgG antibodies to ssDNA showed only a weak correlation with the renal histological activity score. IgM antibodies to dsDNA and IgM antibodies to ssDNA were not correlated with renal histological features. Patients with moderate to severe nephritis had a lower ratio of IgM antibodies to dsDNA to IgG antibodies to dsDNA than those with mild nephritis. These results indicate that the measurement of IgG antibodies to dsDNA is predictive in evaluating renal histological activity in patients with SLE.

  7. CD3+CD8+CD28− T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3+CD8+CD28− cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3+CD8+CD28− as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3+CD8+CD28− T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3+CD8+CD28− cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− and CD3+CD8+CD28−Foxp3+ subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3+CD8+CD28− in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3+CD8+CD28− number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3+CD8+CD28− lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  8. Psychotic Symptoms in a Child with Long Standing SLE Nephritis: Neuropsychiatric Manifestation or Sequelae to Lupus?

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, which affects multiple organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS). Though not common, childhood onset SLE is a known and established entity. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in childhood onset SLE. Of these, psychosis and behavioural symptoms are relatively rare, and there is no consensus on the proper treatment of such cases. We report a case of 13-year-old boy, diagnosed with lupus nephritis, and presented with psychosis and behavioural symptoms. The highlight of this case is that the psychiatric symptoms were present despite the primary illness being quiescent. Thus, the patient was treated with Olanzapine and lorazepam, while continuing immunosuppressive therapy as previously. Also, MRI brain revealed vasculitic changes in the right hemisphere, which might be one of the etiological factors playing role in the development of these neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:27274749

  9. Comparison of renal response parameters for juvenile membranous plus proliferative lupus nephritis versus isolated proliferative lupus nephritis: a cross-sectional analysis of the CARRA Registry.

    PubMed

    Boneparth, A; Ilowite, N T

    2014-08-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) affects many patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is a significant cause of disease morbidity. Membranous plus proliferative LN (M + PLN) may represent a more difficult to treat subtype of juvenile LN, compared to isolated proliferative LN (PLN). In this retrospective observational study, we utilized data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatism Research Alliance (CARRA) registry to compare response rates for pediatric M + PLN versus PLN. Response was assessed at the most recent CARRA registry visit gathered ≥6 months after diagnostic kidney biopsy. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), indicating renal insufficiency, was found in 16.1% of patients with M + PLN and 6.1% of patients with PLN (P = 0.071). We found no significant difference in achievement of response in either hematuria or proteinuria between PLN and M + PLN groups or between subgroups determined by presence of class III vs. class IV proliferative disease. Exposure rates to mycophenolate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab were similar between groups. Future studies will be necessary to correlate pediatric LN renal histology data with treatment response as well as other disease outcome measures.

  10. Effects of fludarabine treatment on murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, O Y; Alexander, P J; Lacson, A; Gok, F; Feliz, A; Marikar, Y; Madivi, C; Jones, J M; Good, R A

    2004-01-01

    BXSB mice, a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), were treated with two different doses of fludarabine for a four-week period and examined two weeks after the final dose. Control mice were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide. Mice treated with fludarabine had a significant reduction in renal pathology compared to control mice. Fludarabine-treated mice also had an almost 10-fold increase in percentile of CD8+CD25+ T cells in the spleen and a smaller but significant increase in CD4+CD25+ cells. Mice treated with cyclophosphamide had a greater leucopenia compared to the other groups and a significant reduction in percentile of B220+ cells in peripheral blood and spleen. Serum autoantibody levels to dsDNA did not differ significantly among the groups, but were higher in 4/10 mice treated with fludarabine. Although few trials of fludarabine for human SLE have been conducted, additional studies may be warranted.

  11. Influence of race/ethnicity on response to lupus nephritis treatment: the ALMS study

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, David; Appel, Gerald B.; Contreras, Gabriel; Dooley, Mary A.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Jayne, David; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Wofsy, David; Yu, Xueqing

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVC) as induction treatment for lupus nephritis (LN), by race, ethnicity and geographical region. Methods. A total of 370 patients with active Class III–V LN received MMF (target dose 3.0 g/day) or IVC (0.5–1.0 g/m2/month), plus tapered prednisone, for 24 weeks. Renal function, global disease activity, immunological complement (C3 and C4) and anti-dsDNA levels are the outcomes that were assessed in this study. Results. MMF was not superior to IVC as induction treatment (primary objective). There were important pre-specified interactions between treatment and race (P = 0.047) and treatment and region (P = 0.069) (primary endpoint). MMF and IVC response rates were similar for Asians (53.2 vs 63.9%; P = 0.24) and Whites (56.0 vs 54.2%; P = 0.83), but differed in the combined Other and Black group (60.4 vs 38.5%; P = 0.03). Fewer patients in the Black (40 vs 53.9%; P = 0.39) and Hispanic (38.8 vs 60.9%; P = 0.011) groups responded to IVC. Latin American patients had lower response to IVC (32 vs 60.7%; P = 0.003). Baseline disease characteristics were not predictive of response. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar across groups. Serious AEs were slightly more prevalent among Asians. Conclusions. MMF and IVC have similar efficacy overall to short-term induction therapy for LN. However, race, ethnicity and geographical region may affect treatment response; more Black and Hispanic patients responded to MMF than IVC. As these factors are inter-related, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about their importance. Trial registration. National Institutes of Health, www.clinicaltrials.gov, registration number NCT00377637. PMID:19933596

  12. Immunoadsorption: A New Strategy to Induce Remission in Membranous Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ulinski, Tim; Davourie-Salandre, Aurélie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Aoun, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old previously healthy girl who presented for microscopic hematuria and nephrotic proteinuria with normal renal function, which persisted after 6 months of steroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi)/angiotensin receptor blockers, hydroxychloroquine, mycophenolic acid and a low-salt diet. A serum investigation suggested lupus nephritis and a renal biopsy, performed 2 weeks after the first proteinuria detection, revealed membranous lupus nephritis. We decided to perform ten sessions of daily immunoadsorption. Proteinuria decreased significantly over these ten sessions from 8 to 0.12 g/l. After the tenth immunoadsorption session, the patient received the first rituximab (RTX) infusion leading to complete B-cell depletion. The patient was maintained on ACEi associated with mycophenolic acid and hydroxychloroquine. Three RTX reinjections were performed when CD19-positive cells reappeared in peripheral blood. Despite complete B-cell recovery and positive anti-dsDNA-Ab, the patient remained in complete remission 18 months after the initial diagnosis with negative proteinuria and a normal renal function. PMID:24803916

  13. NMR based serum metabolomics reveals a distinctive signature in patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Guleria, Anupam; Pratap, Avadhesh; Dubey, Durgesh; Rawat, Atul; Chaurasia, Smriti; Sukesh, Edavalath; Phatak, Sanat; Ajmani, Sajal; Kumar, Umesh; Khetrapal, Chunni Lal; Bacon, Paul; Misra, Ramnath; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Management of patient with Lupus Nephritis (LN) continues to remain a challenge for the treating physicians because of considerable morbidity and even mortality. The search of biomarkers in serum and urine is a focus of researchers to unravel new targets for therapy. In the present study, the utility of NMR-based serum metabolomics has been evaluated for the first time in discriminating LN patients from non-nephritis lupus patients (SLE) and further to get new insights into the underlying disease processes for better clinical management. Metabolic profiling of sera obtained from 22 SLE patients, 40 LN patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) were performed using high resolution 1D 1H-CPMG and diffusion edited NMR spectra to identify the potential molecular biomarkers. Using multivariate analysis, we could distinguish SLE and LN patients from HC and LN from SLE patients. Compared to SLE patients, the LN patients had increased serum levels of lipid metabolites (including LDL/VLDL lipoproteins), creatinine and decreased levels of acetate. Our results revealed that metabolic markers especially lipids and acetate derived from NMR spectroscopy has high sensitivity and specificity to distinguish LN among SLE patients and has the potential to be a useful adjunctive tool in diagnosis and clinical management of LN. PMID:27739464

  14. Comparison of Outcomes between Individuals with Pure and Mixed Lupus Nephritis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilori, Titilayo O.; Enofe, Nosayaba; Oommen, Anju; Cobb, Jason; Navarrete, Jose; Adedinsewo, Demilade A.; Oshikoya, Oluwatobiloba; Fevrier, Helene; Farris, Alton B.; Plantinga, Laura; Ojo, Akinlolu O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious organ manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Histologic overlap is relatively common in the six pathologic classes (I to VI) of LN. For example, mixed proliferative LN (MPLN) often includes features of classes III & V or classes IV & V combined. We performed a comparative evaluation of renal outcomes in patients with MPLN to patients with pure proliferative LN (PPLN) against pre-specified renal outcomes, and we also identified predictor of clinical outcomes among those with PPLN and MPLN. Hypothesis Individuals with MPLN will have worse short-term renal outcomes compared to those with PPLN. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 278 adult LN patients (≥18 years old) identified from an Emory University Hospital registry of native renal biopsies performed between January 2000 and December 2011. The final analytic sample consisted of individuals with a diagnosis of PPLN (n = 60) and MPLN (n = 96). We analyzed differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics at baseline. We also assessed associations between LN category and renal outcomes (complete remission and time to ESRD) with logistic and Cox proportional hazards models within two years of baseline. Results The study population was predominantly female (83.97%) and African American (71.8%) with a mean age of 33.4 years at baseline. Over a median follow up of 1.02 years, we did not find any statistically significant associations between MPLN and the development of ESRD or remission when compared to patients with PPLN (adjusted HR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.07, 1.26). Conclusion There was no association between mixed or pure histopathologic features of LN at presentation and rate of complete or partial remission but higher baseline eGFR was associated with a lower probability of complete remission among patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:27304068

  15. CR1 stump peptide and terminal complement complexes are found in the glomeruli of lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, J E; Costa, R S; Lachmann, P J; Würzner, R; Barbosa, J E

    1996-09-01

    The number of CR1 on podocytes is reduced in nephropathies with severe glomerular damage, especially in the diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reduction of CR1 number on erythrocytes is due to proteolysis of CR1 by macrophage proteases activated by the reaction of their complement receptors, which leaves a 'CR1 stump peptide' on the erythrocyte. In the present study, we demonstrated the presence of the terminal complement complex (TCC) and the CR1 stump in histological sections of biopsies from patients with SLE by the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Less severe glomerular lesions presented TCC deposits mainly in the mesangium (mesangial pattern). In lupus nephritis, with more severe glomerular damage, TCC deposits were detected both in the mesangium and in the capillary loops with podocyte involvement (mixed pattern). Patients with highly active DPGN presented a marked reduction of intact podocyte CR1 receptors in association with increased reactivity to the anti-CR1 stump antibody and with glomerular TCC deposits of mixed histological pattern. These results suggest that the decrease in the number of podocyte CR1 receptors in severe glomerular lesions of SLE may be due to a local proteolytic activity associated with activation and deposition of TCC. PMID:8809140

  16. Clinical outcomes of kidney transplants on patients with end-stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Builes-Rodriguez, Sheila Alexandra; Restrepo-Correa, Ricardo Cesar; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Serna-Campuzano, Angélica; Cardona-Díaz, Natalia; Giraldo-Ramirez, Nelson Darío; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with lupus nephritis could progress to end-stage renal disease (10-22%); hence, kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for these patients. Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcomes after kidney transplants in patients with chronic kidney diseases secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetes nephropathy at Pablo Tobon Uribe Hospital. Methods: A descriptive and retrospective study performed at one kidney transplant center between 2005 and 2013. Results: A total of 136 patients, 27 with lupus nephritis (19.9%), 31 with polycystic kidney disease (22.8%) and 78 with diabetes nephropathy (57.4%), were included in the study. The graft survivals after one, three and five years were 96.3%, 82.5% and 82.5% for lupus nephritis; 90%, 86% and 76.5% for polycystic kidney disease and 91.7%, 80.3% and 67.9% for diabetes nephropathy, respectively, with no significant differences (p= 0.488); the rate of lupus nephritis recurrence was 0.94%/person-year. The etiology of lupus vs diabetes vs polycystic disease was not a risk factor for a decreased time of graft survival (Hazard ratio: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.52-3.93). Conclusion: Kidney transplant patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis has similar graft and patient survival success rates to patients with other kidney diseases. The complication rate and risk of recurrence for lupus nephritis are low. Kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis. PMID:27226665

  17. A benzenediamine derivate FC-99 attenuates lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice via inhibiting myeloid dendritic cell-secreted BAFF.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianjian; Xu, Jingjing; Li, Fanlin; Li, Xiaojing; Gong, Wei; Song, Yuxian; Dou, Huan; Hou, Yayi

    2016-05-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) can produce B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) that modulates survival and differentiation of B cells and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling has important functions in the process of BAFF production. Our previous study showed that a benzenediamine derivate FC-99 possesses anti-inflammation activity and directly interacts with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4), which was a pivotal molecule in TLR4 signaling. In this study, we demonstrated that FC-99 attenuated lupus nephritis in the MRL/lpr mice. FC-99 also decreased the levels of total immunoglobulin G (IgG), total IgG2a and IgM in sera, as well as the activation of B cells in the spleens of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, FC-99 inhibited abnormal activation of myeloid DCs in spleens and reduced the levels of BAFF in sera, spleens, and kidneys of MRL/lpr mice. Furthermore, upon TLR4 stimulation with lipopolysaccharide in vitro, FC-99 inhibited IRAK4 phosphorylation, as well as the activation and BAFF production in murine bone marrow-derived DCs. These data indicate that FC-99 attenuates lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice via inhibiting DC-secreted BAFF, suggesting that FC-99 may be a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of SLE. PMID:27121231

  18. Genetic linkage of IgG autoantibody production in relation to lupus nephritis in New Zealand hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Vyse, T J; Drake, C G; Rozzo, S J; Roper, E; Izui, S; Kotzin, B L

    1996-10-15

    F1 hybrids of New Zealand black (NZB) and New Zealand white (NZW) mice are a model of human systemic lupus erythematosus. These mice develop a severe immune com-plex-mediated nephritis, in which antinuclear autoantibodies are believed to play the major role. We used a genetic analysis of (NZB x NZW)F1 x NZW backcross mice to provide insight into whether different autoantibodies are subject to separate genetic influences and to determine which autoantibodies are most important in the development of lupus-like nephritis. The results showed one set of loci that coordinately regulated serum levels of IgG antibodies to double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, total histones, and chromatin, which overlapped with loci that were linked to the production of autoantibodies to the viral glycoprotein, gp70. Loci linked with anti-gp70 compared with antinuclear antibodies demonstrated the strongest linkage with renal disease, suggesting that autoantibodies to gp70 are the major pathogenic antibodies in this model of lupus nephritis. Interestingly, a distal chromosome 4 locus, Nba1, was linked with nephritis but not with any of the autoantibodies measured, suggesting that it contributes to renal disease at a checkpoint distal to autoantibody production.

  19. Pauci-Immune Necrotizing and Crescentic Glomerulonephritis with Membranous Lupus Nephritis, Fifteen Years after Initial Diagnosis of Secondary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Abel, Michael; Oliver, James D.; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is usually immune complex mediated and may have multiple different presentations. Pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) refers to extensive glomerular inflammation with few or no immune deposits that may result in rapid decline in renal function. We report a case of a 79-year-old Hispanic male with a history of secondary membranous nephropathy (diagnosed by renal biopsy 15 years previously) who was admitted with acute kidney injury and active urinary sediment. P-ANCA titers and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies were positive. The renal biopsy was diagnostic for NCGN superimposed on a secondary membranous nephropathy. A previous diagnosis of SLE based on American College of Rheumatology criteria was discovered via Veteran's Administration records review after the completion of treatment for pauci-immune NCGN. ANCAs are detected in 20–31% of patients with SLE. There may be an association between SLE and ANCA seropositivity. In patients with lupus nephritis and biopsy findings of necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, without significant immune complex deposition, ANCA testing should be performed. In patients with secondary membranous nephropathy SLE should be excluded. PMID:26558120

  20. Treatment with Anti-HMGB1 Monoclonal Antibody Does Not Affect Lupus Nephritis in MRL/lpr Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Fleur; van Timmeren, Mirjan M; Petersen, Arjen; Horst, Gerda; Bijl, Marc; Limburg, Pieter C; Westra, Johanna; Heeringa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear DNA binding protein that acts as an alarmin when secreted. HMGB1 is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus and might represent a potential therapeutic target. We investigated whether treatment with an anti-HMGB1 antibody affects the development of lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice. Seven-week-old MRL/lpr mice were injected intraperitoneally twice weekly for 10 wks with 50 μg monoclonal anti-HMGB1 (2G7, mouse IgG2b) (n = 12) or control antibody (n = 11). Control MRL/MPJ mice (n = 10) were left untreated. Every 2 wks, blood was drawn and urine was collected at wk 7, 11 and 17. Mice were sacrificed at 17 wks for complete disease evaluation. Plasma HMGB1 and anti-HMGB1 levels were increased in MRL/lpr mice compared with control MRL/MPJ mice. There were no differences in albuminuria, urine HMGB1 and plasma levels of complement C3, anti-dsDNA and proinflammatory cytokines between untreated and treated mice at any time point. Lupus nephritis of mice treated with anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was classified as class III (n = 3) and class IV (n = 9), while mice treated with control mAb were classified as class II (n = 4), class III (n = 2) and class IV (n = 5). IgG and C3 deposits in kidneys were similar in mice treated with anti-HMGB1 mAb or control mAb. In conclusion, treatment with monoclonal anti–HMGB-1 antibody 2G7 does not affect development of lupus nephritis, disease progression or proinflammatory cytokine levels in MRL/lpr mice. This result indicates that blocking of HMGB1 by this neutralizing antibody does not affect lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice. PMID:26837069

  1. Remission of proteinuria indicates good prognosis in patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Koo, H S; Kim, S; Chin, H J

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a well-known risk factor for the progression of renal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease; however, its importance for estimating the prognosis of lupus nephritis requires verification. Korean adult patients with renal biopsy-diagnosed diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis who had undergone three or more consecutive urine protein to creatinine ratio or urine dipstick tests within six months after renal biopsy were enrolled. The cumulative risks, predictors, and outcomes of proteinuric remission and flare were evaluated. This study included 26 men and 167 women with a mean age at renal biopsy of 31.2 ± 9.8 years. Eighty-two (42.5%) patients experienced proteinuric remission during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up of 157.9 ± 69.5 months, among patients who achieved proteinuric remission, one died, one developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and two had composite outcomes; among patients without remission, nine died, 24 developed ESRD, and 30 had composite outcomes. Patients who achieved proteinuric remission had a 0.089-fold risk (95% CI: 0.011-0.736) of mortality, 0.110-fold risk (95% CI: 0.013-0.904) of incident ESRD, and 0.210-fold risk (95% CI: 0.048-0.920) of a composite outcome compared to patients without remission. Among the 82 patients who achieved proteinuric remission, 59 (72.0%) experienced at least one proteinuria flare; however, relapse did not correlate with the incidence of outcomes. In conclusion, proteinuric remission is an independent predictive prognostic marker of good renal survival and mortality, regardless of the interval from biopsy to remission, recurrence of proteinuria after remission, renal function status at remission, or hematuria remission.

  2. [The repeated biopsy in patients with lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Subils, Gisella; Alba, Paula; Gobbi, Carla; Astesana, Pablo; Babini, Alejandra; Albiero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively studied patients with SLE according to ACR criteria, with NL who underwent a repeat renal biopsy from 2005 to 2012. We analyzed the main indications of renal biopsies, the histopathological Class and activity and chronicity changes. RESULTS The total number of patients with NL was 120, of which 18 (15%) patients underwent repeat renal biopsy, 18 had 2 renal biopsies and 6 had 3 biopsies. 3 (16.7%) patients were smokers; 1 (5.6%) had a history of previous DBT, 2 (11.1%) had a history of hypertension; and 3 (16.7%) patients had previous obesity. The duration of SLE was 15 ± 96 months; the time between the 1st and the 2nd biopsy was 45 ± 11 months and the time between the 2nd and 3rd biopsy was 56 ± 12 months. Indications for repeat biopsy were proteinuria in 10 biopsies (41.6%); proteinuria with impaired renal function in 2 biopsies (8.3%); proteinuria with pathological urine sediment in 8 (33.3%); . and pathological proteinuria with pathological urine sediment and impaired renal function in 4 biopsies (16.6%) The most frequent histological changes found between first and repeat biopsies were class IV to class III: 2 (8.2%) ; Class IV to Class IV: 8 (33.3%), class IV to class III + V: 2 (8.2%); class IV to class IV + V 3 (12.5%); class IV to class V: 2 (8.2%). Changes in NL biopsies with proliferative activity and chronicity indices (A / C) were: A to A / C: 7 (29.1%), A / C to A / C: 7 (29.1%). The immunosuppressive therapy was increased in 79.1% and 16.6% remained without changes. 20% patients received cyclophosphamide 1 g every 30 days, 26% Cyclophosphamide 500 mg every 15 days, 23% induction therapy with mycophenolate mofetil; 23% with Rituximab; 8% Cyclosporin A. Maintenance therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was performed in 87.5%; azathioprine in 1 case. Hydroxychloroquine was used in all cases.

  3. Lupus Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil alleviates lupus nephritis through urokinase receptor signaling in a mice model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-C; Lee, Y-F; Lan, J-L; Wu, M-J; Hsieh, T-Y; Lin, N-N; Wang, J-M; Chiu, Y-T

    2013-05-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is usually associated with widespread effacement of the podocytes' foot processes leading to proteinuria. Induction of urokinase receptor (uPAR) signaling in podocytes leads to foot process effacement and urinary protein loss via promoting podocytes' motility and kidney permeability in the glomerulus. Very little is known about uPAR signaling in LN. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an immunosuppressive agent, efficiently modulates the development of LN in humans and mice, but there are no data concerning the direct uPAR involvement on podocytes in LN. The MMF efficiency and uPAR involvement signaling in NZB×NZW F1 lupus-prone mice were examined by proteinuria, renal function and pathology, immune complex deposits, and uPAR expression of podocytes by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative RT-PCR. After MMF treatment, the proteinuria (p < 0.01), BUN level (p < 0.05) and immunodeposition in glomeruli (p < 0.001) were significantly improved. Most important, the renal uPAR mRNA levels (p < 0.001) and uPAR protein level of podocytes (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced. The beneficial effect of MMF on LN could be attributed, at least in part, to the inhibition of uPAR expression in podocytes. These findings demonstrated uPAR could have potential as a predictive index for response to LN therapeutics. PMID:23478030

  5. Soluble Fas and the −670 Polymorphism of Fas in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Arellano-Rodríguez, Mariela; Torres-Del-Muro, Felipe de Jesús; Daza-Benítez, Leonel; Francisco Muñoz-Valle, José; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to clarify the role of soluble Fas (sFas) in lupus nephritis (LN) and establish a potential relationship between LN and the −670 polymorphism of Fas in 67 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including a subset of 24 LN patients with proteinuria. Additionally, a group of 54 healthy subjects (HS) was included. The allelic frequency of the −670 polymorphism of Fas was determined using PCR-RFLP analysis, and sFas levels were assessed by ELISA. Additionally, the WT-1 protein level in urine was measured. The Fas receptor was determined in biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (FISH) and apoptotic features by TUNEL. Results. The −670 Fas polymorphism showed that the G allele was associated with increased SLE susceptibility, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86. The sFas was significantly higher in LN patients with the G/G genotype, and this subgroup exhibited correlations between the sFas level and proteinuria and increased urinary WT-1 levels. LN group shows increased expression of Fas and apoptotic features. In conclusion, our results indicate that the G allele of the −670 polymorphism of Fas is associated with genetic susceptibility in SLE patients with elevated levels of sFas in LN with proteinuria. PMID:25505993

  6. Mycophenolate mofetil alleviates lupus nephritis through urokinase receptor signaling in a mice model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-C; Lee, Y-F; Lan, J-L; Wu, M-J; Hsieh, T-Y; Lin, N-N; Wang, J-M; Chiu, Y-T

    2013-05-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is usually associated with widespread effacement of the podocytes' foot processes leading to proteinuria. Induction of urokinase receptor (uPAR) signaling in podocytes leads to foot process effacement and urinary protein loss via promoting podocytes' motility and kidney permeability in the glomerulus. Very little is known about uPAR signaling in LN. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an immunosuppressive agent, efficiently modulates the development of LN in humans and mice, but there are no data concerning the direct uPAR involvement on podocytes in LN. The MMF efficiency and uPAR involvement signaling in NZB×NZW F1 lupus-prone mice were examined by proteinuria, renal function and pathology, immune complex deposits, and uPAR expression of podocytes by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative RT-PCR. After MMF treatment, the proteinuria (p < 0.01), BUN level (p < 0.05) and immunodeposition in glomeruli (p < 0.001) were significantly improved. Most important, the renal uPAR mRNA levels (p < 0.001) and uPAR protein level of podocytes (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced. The beneficial effect of MMF on LN could be attributed, at least in part, to the inhibition of uPAR expression in podocytes. These findings demonstrated uPAR could have potential as a predictive index for response to LN therapeutics.

  7. Co-existing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and nephrotic syndrome in a Nigerian patient with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Akinbodewa, A A; Adejumo, O A; Ogunsemoyin, A O; Osasan, S A; Adefolalu, O A

    2016-01-01

    A little over 30 cases on co-existing nephrotic syndrome and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported from different regions of the world since 1957. We present a case report on co-existence of nephrotic syndrome (secondary to lupus nephritis) with ADPKD in a 24-year-old woman from Nigeria. She was positive for anti-double stranded DNA. Renal histology showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class II lupus nephritis. The co-existence of nephrotic syndrome and ADPKD may have been overlooked in Africa in the past. There is a need to screen for nephrotic syndrome in patients with ADPKD among clinicians in the African setting. PMID:27044732

  8. Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy, Associated With Antibodies to Signal Recognition Particle, Together With Lupus Nephritis: Case Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, John; Harty, Len; Mayer, Nick; Critcher, Val; Ryan, John

    2015-01-01

    A male patient with limb weakness, myalgia and edema was subsequently found to have an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) on biopsy. Targeted myopathic antibody analysis revealed antibodies to signal recognition particle (SRP). Anti-SRP-associated necrotizing myopathy was diagnosed. This case was complicated by the concurrent development of class III lupus nephritis. We discuss an interesting case progression and development as well as the management of these difficult to treat conditions. PMID:25883715

  9. Glomerular autoimmune multicomponents of human lupus nephritis in vivo: α-enolase and annexin AI.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-11-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti-α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti-α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti-α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti-α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum.

  10. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo: α-Enolase and Annexin AI

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D’Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino

    2014-01-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti–α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti–α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti–α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti–α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum. PMID:24790181

  11. IFN-α confers resistance of systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis to therapy in NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Huang, Weiqing; Ramanujam, Meera; Madaio, Michael P; Davidson, Anne

    2011-08-01

    The critical role of IFN-α in the pathogenesis of human systemic lupus erythematosus has been highlighted in recent years. Exposure of young lupus-prone NZB/W F1 mice to IFN-α in vivo leads to an accelerated lupus phenotype that is dependent on T cells and is associated with elevated serum levels of BAFF, IL-6, and TNF-α, increased splenic expression of IL-6 and IL-21, formation of large germinal centers, and the generation of large numbers of short-lived plasma cells that produce IgG2a and IgG3 autoantibodies. In this study, we show that both IgG2a and IgG3 autoantibodies are pathogenic in IFN-α-accelerated lupus, and their production can be dissociated by using low-dose CTLA4-Ig. Only high-dose CTLA4-Ig attenuates both IgG2a and IgG3 autoantibody production and significantly delays death from lupus nephritis. In contrast, BAFF/APRIL blockade has no effect on germinal centers or the production of IgG anti-dsDNA Abs but, if given at the time of IFN-α challenge, delays the progression of lupus by attenuating systemic and renal inflammation. Temporary remission of nephritis induced by combination therapy with cyclophosphamide, anti-CD40L Ab, and CTLA4-Ig is associated with the abrogation of germinal centers and depletion of short-lived plasma cells, but relapse occurs more rapidly than in conventional NZB/W F1 mice. This study demonstrates that IFN-α renders NZB/W F1 relatively resistant to therapeutic intervention and suggests that the IFN signature should be considered when randomizing patients into groups and analyzing the results of human clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  13. The expression of EBV-encoded LMP1 in young patients with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; He, Xiaojie; Liao, Wang; Yi, Zhuwen; Yang, Huilan; Xiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the major disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is lupus nephritis (LN), and the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation was associated with the induction of SLE, with EBV-encoded latent membrane protein1 (LMP1) plays a vital role in this process. Although it was reported that LN was associated with LMP1, most of these results are from patients with ages differed greatly (range, 10-56 years). Given the increased prevalence of EBV infection in young patients, we focused on the association of LN and LMP1 expression in the renal tissues of young patients (range, 6-16 years) in this study. We found that the positive rate of LMP1 in the renal tissues was significantly higher in patients with LN compared with control (P<0.001), which is consistent with the previous reports. The positive rates of LMP1 were similar between the patients of initial onset and relapse, and there was no detectable difference between the patients with and without concurrent infection (P>0.05). However, we reported for the first time about the positive correlation of LMP1 with classification of LN. The proportion of young patients positive for anti‑Sm antibody was significantly higher in the LMP1 positive group compared with the LMP1 negative control (P>0.05). These results indicate that EBV infection in the renal of young patients may lead to the increased severity of LN, and the expression of anti-Sm is likely contributed to this process. PMID:26131206

  14. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agent Use among Patients with Lupus Nephritis Approaching End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Puerta, José A; Waikar, Sushrut S; Solomon, Daniel H; Liu, Jun; Alarcón, Graciela S; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) utilization among lupus nephritis (LN) patients with incipient ESRD. We aimed to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with ESA use among incident LN ESRD patients. Methods Among all individuals age ≥18 with incident ESRD from 1995-2008 in the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), we identified those with systemic lupus erythematosus (ICD-9 code 710.0) as the cause of ESRD. ESA use at ESRD onset was ascertained from the Medical Evidence Report. Year of onset, age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical insurance, employment status, residential region, clinical factors and comorbidities were considered potentially associated with ESA use in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results We identified 12,533 individuals with incident LN ESRD (1% of entire population). Of those, 4,288 (34%) received an ESA preceding ESRD. In multivariable-adjusted models, ESA users had higher serum albumin and hemoglobin concentrations, were more likely to be women, and to live in the Northeast. Conversely, Medicaid beneficiaries, the uninsured, unemployed, African Americans, Hispanics, and those with IV drug use, congestive heart failure and obesity had lower ESA use. Conclusion Among all U.S. patients and those with LN who developed ESRD, approximately one third received ESAs. Patient sex, race, age, medical insurance, residential region and clinical factors were significantly associated with ESA therapy. While there are no guidelines for ESA use in LN patients approaching ESRD, there has been wide sociodemographic variation, raising questions about ESA prescription practices. PMID:24672742

  15. Infusion of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alleviates Autoimmune Nephritis in a Lupus Model by Suppressing Follicular Helper T-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunkyeong; Jeong, Mini; Kim, Sukhyung; Jang, Kiseok; Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Dong Yun; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Suk; Youn, Jeehee

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to components of the cell nucleus. These autoantibodies are predominantly produced with the help of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and form immune complexes that trigger widespread inflammatory damage, including nephritis. In recent studies, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) elicited diverse, even opposing, effects in experimental and clinical SLE. Here we investigated the effect of human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs) in a murine model of SLE, the F1 hybrid between New Zealand Black and New Zealand White strains (NZB/W). We found that infusion of female NZB/W mice with hBM-MSCs attenuated glomerulonephritis; it also decreased levels of autoantibodies and the incidence of proteinuria and improved survival. These effects coincided with a decrease in Tfh cells and downstream components. Infiltration of long-lived plasma cells into the inflamed kidney was also reduced in the hBM-MSC-treated mice. Importantly, hBM-MSCs directly suppressed the in vitro differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells toward Tfh cells in a contact-dependent manner. These results suggest that MSCs attenuate lupus nephritis by suppressing the development of Tfh cells and the subsequent activation of humoral immune components. They thus reveal a novel mechanism by which MSCs regulate humoral autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  16. RNA sensing by conventional dendritic cells is central to the development of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Celhar, Teja; Hopkins, Richard; Thornhill, Susannah I; De Magalhaes, Raquel; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Lee, Hui-Yin; Yasuga, Hiroko; Jones, Leigh A; Casco, Jose; Lee, Bernett; Thamboo, Thomas P; Zhou, Xin J; Poidinger, Michael; Connolly, John E; Wakeland, Edward K; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2015-11-10

    Glomerulonephritis is a common and debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The precise immune mechanisms that drive the progression from benign autoimmunity to glomerulonephritis are largely unknown. Previous investigations have shown that a moderate increase of the innate Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is sufficient for the development of nephritis. In these systems normalization of B-cell TLR7 expression or temporal depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) slow progression; however, the critical cell that is responsible for driving full immunopathology remains unidentified. In this investigation we have shown that conventional DC expression of TLR7 is essential for severe autoimmunity in the Sle1Tg7 model of SLE. We show that a novel expanding CD11b(+) conventional DC subpopulation dominates the infiltrating renal inflammatory milieu, localizing to the glomeruli. Moreover, exposure of human myeloid DCs to IFN-α or Flu increases TLR7 expression, suggesting they may have a role in self-RNA recognition pathways in clinical disease. To our knowledge, this study is the first to highlight the importance of conventional DC-TLR7 expression for kidney pathogenesis in a murine model of SLE. PMID:26512111

  17. Therapeutic trials in lupus nephritis. Problems related to renal histology, monitoring of therapy and measures of outcome.

    PubMed

    Balow, J E

    1981-01-01

    Approaches to treatment of lupus nephritis have been complicated by controversies in the definitions of the types of renal histology, the relevance of immunological and renal monitoring techniques as therapeutic guidelines, and lack of definitive clinical trials. It is suggested that demonstration of the efficacy of various therapeutic agents in clinical trials may be identified earlier by renal histological changes and/or assessment of drug toxicity compared to the time required for differences based on renal functional changes to emerge as ultimate measures of outcome.

  18. The expression of renal Epstein-Barr virus markers in patients with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAO-XIA; YAO, CUI-WEI; TAO, JING-LI; YANG, CHEN; LUO, MIAN-NA; LI, SHANG-MEI; LIU, HUA-FENG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of renal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). A total of 58 renal tissue samples from patients with LN, seven normal renal tissue samples from patients with non-glomerular hematuria and 37 renal tissue samples from patients with minimal change nephropathy were collected. The expression of EBV-latent membrane protein-1 (EBV-LMP1) and EBV-encoded RNA 1 (EBER-1) in the renal tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. The sera levels of anti-nuclear antibody as well as antibodies to extractable nuclear antigen in patients with LN were also measured. An equivalence test showed that the results from the IHC and the ISH analyses had strong agreement. The positive rates of renal EBER-1 and EBV-LMP1 in the LN patients were significantly higher than those of the normal and minimal change nephropathy patients (P<0.001), while no significant difference was identified between those of the normal and minimal change nephropathy groups (P>0.05). The positive rates of EBV-LMP1 and EBER-1 in the renal tissues of patients with LN were not determined to be significantly different between the relapse (immunosuppressant-treated) and initial onset (non-treated) patients, between the patients with and without concurrent infection, and among the patients with different age ranges (P>0.05). The proportion of LN patients positive for anti-Sm antibody was significantly higher in the renal EBV-positive group than in the EBV-negative group (P<0.05), while the proportions of LN patients positive for the other autoantibodies that were examined were not identified to be significantly different between these two groups (P>0.05). The present study shows that renal EBV infection may contribute to the pathogenesis of LN by inducing anti-Sm antibody production. PMID:24940399

  19. Glutathione S Transferases Polymorphisms Are Independent Prognostic Factors in Lupus Nephritis Treated with Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Verstuyft, Céline; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hummel, Aurélie; Le Guern, Véronique; Sacré, Karim; Meyer, Olivier; Daugas, Eric; Goujard, Cécile; Sultan, Audrey; Lobbedez, Thierry; Galicier, Lionel; Pourrat, Jacques; Le Hello, Claire; Godin, Michel; Morello, Rémy; Lambert, Marc; Hachulla, Eric; Vanhille, Philippe; Queffeulou, Guillaume; Potier, Jacky; Dion, Jean-Jacques; Bataille, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Moulis, Guillaume; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Duhaut, Pierre; Saint-Marcoux, Bernadette; Deroux, Alban; Manuzak, Jennifer; Francès, Camille; Aumaitre, Olivier; Bezanahary, Holy; Becquemont, Laurent; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate association between genetic polymorphisms of GST, CYP and renal outcome or occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in lupus nephritis (LN) treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC). CYC, as a pro-drug, requires bioactivation through multiple hepatic cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases (GST). Methods We carried out a multicentric retrospective study including 70 patients with proliferative LN treated with CYC. Patients were genotyped for polymorphisms of the CYP2B6, CYP2C19, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes. Complete remission (CR) was defined as proteinuria ≤0.33g/day and serum creatinine ≤124 µmol/l. Partial remission (PR) was defined as proteinuria ≤1.5g/day with a 50% decrease of the baseline proteinuria value and serum creatinine no greater than 25% above baseline. Results Most patients were women (84%) and 77% were Caucasian. The mean age at LN diagnosis was 41 ± 10 years. The frequency of patients carrying the GST null genotype GSTT1-, GSTM1-, and the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype were respectively 38%, 60% and 44%. In multivariate analysis, the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype was an independent factor of poor renal outcome (achievement of CR or PR) (OR = 5.01 95% CI [1.02–24.51]) and the sole factor that influenced occurrence of ADRs was the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 3.34 95% CI [1.064–10.58]). No association between polymorphisms of cytochrome P450s gene and efficacy or ADRs was observed. Conclusion This study suggests that GST polymorphisms highly impact renal outcome and occurrence of ADRs related to CYC in LN patients. PMID:27002825

  20. Diagnostic value of serum anti-C1q antibodies in patients with lupus nephritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Wu, X; Shan, G; Zhang, X

    2012-09-01

    The autoantibodies against C1q (anti-C1q) have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the past decade, though there were increasing studies suggesting it is relatively specific in lupus nephritis (LN), its overall diagnostic value in LN has not been evaluated. The meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of autoantibodies against C1q in patients with LN, and to provide more precise evidence of a correlation between anti-C1q antibodies and activity of LN. We searched Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases and contacted authors if necessary. A total of 25 studies including 2,502 patients with SLE and 1,317 with LN met our inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Among all 25 studies, 22 studies were available for comparison between SLE with and without LN, and 9 studies compared anti-C1q between patients with active and inactive LN. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve was used to summarize comprehensive test performance. The QUADAS tool was used to assess the quality of the studies. For the diagnosis of LN, the pooled sensitivity and specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of anti-C1q were 0.58 (0.56-0.61, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]), 0.75 (0.72-0.77, 95% CI), 2.60 (2.06-3.28, 95% CI), 0.51 (0.41-0.63, 95% CI), and 6.08 (3.91-9.47, 95% CI) respectively. The area under the SROC curve (AUC) was 0.7941. For comparison between active and inactive LN, the weighted sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR and DOR were 0.74 (0.68-0.79, 95% CI), 0.77 (0.71-0.82, 95% CI), 2.91 (1.83-4.65, 95% CI), 0.33 (0.19-0.56, 95% CI), and 10.56 (4.56-24.46, 95% CI) respectively. The AUC was 0.8378. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that anti-C1q antibodies have relatively fair sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of LN, suggesting that the presence of anti-C1q antibodies may be a valuable adjunct for predicting

  1. Evaluation of B lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation inducing ligand as candidate biomarkers in lupus nephritis based on clinical and histopathological outcome following induction therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parodis, Ioannis; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Axelsson, Magnus; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Malmström, Vivianne; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). B cells have a central role in the pathogenesis of SLE. B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) are pivotal in B cell homeostasis. We aimed to investigate a potential role of serum BLyS and APRIL as biomarkers in LN, especially as predictors of treatment response. Methods Sixty-four patients with active LN (52 proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN); 12 membranous LN) were included. Renal biopsies were performed at baseline and after immunosuppressive treatment. Serum levels of BLyS, APRIL and autoantibodies were measured on both biopsy occasions and in 64 individually matched controls. Renal biopsies were evaluated using the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society classification, and scored for Activity Index and Chronicity Index. Clinical responders (CR) were required to have ≥50% reduction in proteinuria, normal or improved renal function, and inactive urinary sediment. Histopathological responders (HR) were required to have ≥50% improvement in Activity Index. Results Baseline BLyS levels were significantly higher in LN patients compared with controls (p<0.001) and remained unchanged following induction treatment. APRIL levels were significantly higher in patients compared with controls at baseline (p=0.005) and decreased following treatment (p<0.001). Among PLN patients, APRIL levels decreased significantly only in responders (CR: p=0.009; HR: p=0.01). Baseline BLyS levels <1.5 ng/mL predicted treatment response, attaining a positive predictive value of 92% for CR with PLN at baseline. Conclusions BLyS and APRIL were affected differently by immunosuppression; BLyS levels remained unchanged following therapy while APRIL levels decreased. Despite unchanged BLyS levels following therapy, low baseline levels predicted both clinical and histopathological improvement. Our data support APRIL as a

  2. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  3. Complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily reduces murine lupus nephritis and cutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Linda A; Mizui, Masayuki; Nalbandian, Angèle; Bossé, Robin; Crispín, José C; Tsokos, George C

    2015-10-01

    Complement activation takes place in autoimmune diseases and accounts for tissue inflammation. Previously, complement inhibition has been considered for the treatment of SLE. Complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) is a selective inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement and a soluble form reverses established inflammation and bone destruction in experimental autoimmune arthritis. We asked whether specific inhibition of the alternative pathway could inhibit autoimmunity and/or organ damage in lupus-prone mice. Accordingly, we treated lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice with a soluble form of CRIg (CRIg-Fc) and we found that it significantly diminished skin lesions, proteinuria and pyuria, and kidney pathology. Interestingly, serum levels of anti-DNA antibodies were not affected despite the fact that serum complement 3 (C3) levels increased significantly. Immunofluorescent staining of kidney tissues revealed a reduction in staining intensity for C3, IgG, and the macrophage marker Mac-2. Thus our data show that inhibition of the alternative pathway of complement controls skin and kidney inflammation even in the absence of an effect on the production of autoantibodies. We propose that CRIg should be considered for clinical trials in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Carbon monoxide inhibits T cell activation in target organs during systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, J P; Obreque, J; Méndez, G P; Llanos, C; Kalergis, A M

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by the presence of circulating anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and systemic damage that includes nephritis, haematological manifestations and pulmonary compromise, among others. Although major progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoimmunity, current therapies for lupus have not improved considerably. Because the exposure of carbon monoxide (CO) has been shown to display beneficial immunoregulatory properties in different immune-mediated diseases, we investigated whether CO therapy improves lupus-related kidney injury in lupus mice. MRL-Faslpr lupus mice were exposed to CO and disease progression was evaluated. ANA, leucocyte-infiltrating populations in spleen, kidney and lung and kidney lesions, were measured. CO therapy significantly decreased the frequency of activated B220+ CD4− CD8− T cells in kidneys and lungs, as well as serum levels of ANA. Furthermore, we observed that CO therapy reduced kidney injury by decreasing proliferative glomerular damage and immune complexes deposition, decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and finally delayed the impairment of kidney function. CO exposure ameliorates kidney and lung leucocyte infiltration and delays kidney disease in MRL-Faslpr lupus mice. Our data support the notion that CO could be explored as a potential new therapy for lupus nephritis. PMID:26095291

  5. Carbon monoxide inhibits T cell activation in target organs during systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, J P; Obreque, J; Méndez, G P; Llanos, C; Kalergis, A M

    2015-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by the presence of circulating anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and systemic damage that includes nephritis, haematological manifestations and pulmonary compromise, among others. Although major progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoimmunity, current therapies for lupus have not improved considerably. Because the exposure of carbon monoxide (CO) has been shown to display beneficial immunoregulatory properties in different immune-mediated diseases, we investigated whether CO therapy improves lupus-related kidney injury in lupus mice. MRL-Fas(lpr) lupus mice were exposed to CO and disease progression was evaluated. ANA, leucocyte-infiltrating populations in spleen, kidney and lung and kidney lesions, were measured. CO therapy significantly decreased the frequency of activated B220(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) T cells in kidneys and lungs, as well as serum levels of ANA. Furthermore, we observed that CO therapy reduced kidney injury by decreasing proliferative glomerular damage and immune complexes deposition, decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and finally delayed the impairment of kidney function. CO exposure ameliorates kidney and lung leucocyte infiltration and delays kidney disease in MRL-Fas(lpr) lupus mice. Our data support the notion that CO could be explored as a potential new therapy for lupus nephritis.

  6. ESRD From Lupus Nephritis in the United States, 1995–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Donal J.; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives While ESRD from lupus nephritis (ESLN) increased in the United States after the mid-1990s and racial disparities were apparent, current trends are unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Retrospective US Renal Data System data (n=1,557,117) were used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (standardized to 1995–1996) and outcomes of ESLN (n=16,649). For events occurring after initiation of RRT, follow-up ended on June 30, 2011. Results Overall ESLN rates (95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) in 1995–1996 were 3.1 (2.9 to 3.2) cases per million per year. Rates were higher for subgroups characterized by African-American race (11.1 [95% CI, 10.3 to 11.9]); other race (4.9 [95% CI, 4.0 to 5.8]); female sex (4.9 [95% CI, 4.6 to 5.2]); and ages 20–29 years (4.9 [95% CI, 4.4 to 5.4]), 30–44 years (4.6 [95% CI, 4.2 to 5.0]), and 45–64 years (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7 to 4.4]). Standardized incidence ratios for the overall population in subsequent biennia were 1.19 (1.14 to 1.24) in 1997–1998, 1.17 (1.12 to 1.22) in 1999–2000, 1.17 (1.12 to 1.22) in 2001–2002, 1.21 (1.16 to 1.26) in 2003–2004, 1.18 (1.13 to 1.23) in 2005–2006, 1.16 (1.11 to 1.21) in 2007–2008, and 1.05 (1.01 to 1.09) in 2009–2010, respectively. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 4.4 (6.3) years, 42.6% of patients with ESLN died, 45.3% were listed for renal transplant, and 28.7% underwent transplantation. Patients with ESLN were more likely than matched controls to be listed for and to undergo transplantation, and mortality rates were similar. Among patients with ESLN, African Americans were less likely to undergo transplantation (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.54 [0.51 to 0.58]) and more likely to die prematurely (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23 [1.17 to 1.30]). Conclusions While ESLN appears to have stopped increasing in the last decade, racial disparities in outcomes persist. PMID:25534208

  7. Long-term Outcome of Lupus Nephritis Class II in Argentine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Maria Victoria; Dorado, Enrique; Rausch, Silvia; Gomez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Zazzetti, Federico; Gargiulo, María; Suarez, Lorena; Chaparro, Rafael; Paira, Sergio; Galvan, Laura; Juarez, Vicente; Pisoni, Cecilia; Garcia, Mercedes; Martinez, Liliana; Alvarez, Analia; Alvarez, Clarisa; Barreira, Juan; Sarano, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background There is controversy in medical literature over the outcome of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) class II. The aim of this study was to explore the risk of histological transformation (HT) and possible factors related to negative response to treatment in patients with mesangial LN class II. Methods A retrospective and multicenter study was carried out that includes patients who had received a diagnosis of LN class II on their first renal biopsy. Creatinine, urine sediment, and proteinuria were recorded at the time of the first biopsy, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 5 years after the first biopsy. Response to treatment, HT, and long-term outcome were evaluated. Results Forty-one patients were included. The manifestation at first biopsy was proteinuria greater than 0.5 g/d in 28 patients (68.29%; 8 [28.57%] of 28 patients had nephrotic syndrome), hematuria in 18 patients (43.90%), and deterioration of renal function in 3 patients (7.31%). During the follow-up (median, 8 years; range, 1–35 years), a new biopsy was performed in 18 patients (43.90%), and in 17 patients (17/18 [94.44%]), there was HT. Median time at rebiopsy was 32 months (range, 11–305 months). Of the 18 patients who had a second biopsy, 10 (55.55%) were on hydroxychloroquine versus 100% (19/19) of patients who did not undergo the procedure (P = 0.001). A year after the first renal biopsy, there are data available from 34 patients; of them, 24 patients (70.58%) had achieved response, and 10 patients (29.41%) had no response (NR) (missing data in 7). A higher 24-hour urinary protein at 6 months was predictor of worse outcome at 1 year, with statistical significance difference for the nonresponder group (median proteinuria, 2.3 g/d [range, 0–4.7 g/d]) compared with responders (median proteinuria, 0.28 g/d [range, 0–1.7 g/d]) (P = 0.0133). In the long-term follow-up (5 years), HT was the main cause of unfavorable outcome and was measured in 78.57% of patients (11/14 patients). Conclusions This

  8. Characterization of Patients With Lupus Nephritis Included in a Large Cohort From the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Registry of Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (RELESSER).

    PubMed

    Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Rodriguez-Almaraz, Esther; Pego-Reigosa, José M; López-Longo, Francisco J; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé, Alejandro; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Martinez-Taboada, Víctor; Vela-Casasempere, Paloma; Freire, Mercedes; Narváez, Francisco J; Rosas, José; Ibáñez-Barceló, Mónica; Uriarte, Esther; Tomero, Eva; Zea, Antonio; Horcada, Loreto; Torrente, Vicenç; Castellvi, Iván; Calvet, Joan; Menor-Almagro, Raúl; Zamorano, María A Aguirre; Raya, Enrique; Díez-Álvarez, Elvira; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás; García de la Peña, Paloma; Movasat, Atusa; Andreu, José L; Richi, Patricia; Marras, Carlos; Montilla-Morales, Carlos; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Marenco de la Fuente, José L; Gantes, María; Úcar, Eduardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Manero, Javier; Ibáñez-Ruán, Jesús; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Quevedo, Víctor; Hernández-Beriaín, José; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Alonso, Fernando; Pérez, Sabina; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to profile those patients included in the RELESSER registry with histologically proven renal involvement in order to better understand the current state of lupus nephritis (LN) in Spain. RELESSER-TRANS is a multicenter cross-sectional registry with an analytical component. Information was collected from the medical records of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who were followed at participating rheumatology units. A total of 359 variables including demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity, severity, comorbidities, LN outcome, treatments, and mortality were recorded. Only patients with a histological confirmation of LN were included. We performed a descriptive analysis, chi-square or Student's t tests according to the type of variable and its relationship with LN. Odds ratio and confidence intervals were calculated by using simple logistic regression. LN was histologically confirmed in 1092/3575 patients (30.5%). Most patients were female (85.7%), Caucasian (90.2%), and the mean age at LN diagnosis was 28.4 ± 12.7 years. The risk for LN development was higher in men (M/F:47.85/30.91%, P < 0.001), in younger individuals (P < 0.001), and in Hispanics (P = 0.03). Complete response to treatment was achieved in 68.3% of patients; 10.35% developed ESRD, which required a kidney transplant in 45% of such cases. The older the patient, the greater was the likelihood of complete response (P < 0.001). Recurrences were associated with persistent lupus activity at the time of the last visit (P < 0.001) and with ESRD (P < 0.001). Thrombotic microangiopathy was a risk factor for ESRD (P = 0.04), as for the necessity of dialysis (P = 0.01) or renal transplantation (P = 0.03). LN itself was a poor prognostic risk factor of mortality (OR 2.4 [1.81-3.22], P < 0.001). Patients receiving antimalarials had a significantly lower risk of developing LN (P < 0.001) and ESRD (P < 0

  9. Characterization of Patients With Lupus Nephritis Included in a Large Cohort From the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Registry of Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (RELESSER).

    PubMed

    Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Rodriguez-Almaraz, Esther; Pego-Reigosa, José M; López-Longo, Francisco J; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé, Alejandro; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Martinez-Taboada, Víctor; Vela-Casasempere, Paloma; Freire, Mercedes; Narváez, Francisco J; Rosas, José; Ibáñez-Barceló, Mónica; Uriarte, Esther; Tomero, Eva; Zea, Antonio; Horcada, Loreto; Torrente, Vicenç; Castellvi, Iván; Calvet, Joan; Menor-Almagro, Raúl; Zamorano, María A Aguirre; Raya, Enrique; Díez-Álvarez, Elvira; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás; García de la Peña, Paloma; Movasat, Atusa; Andreu, José L; Richi, Patricia; Marras, Carlos; Montilla-Morales, Carlos; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Marenco de la Fuente, José L; Gantes, María; Úcar, Eduardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Manero, Javier; Ibáñez-Ruán, Jesús; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Quevedo, Víctor; Hernández-Beriaín, José; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Alonso, Fernando; Pérez, Sabina; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to profile those patients included in the RELESSER registry with histologically proven renal involvement in order to better understand the current state of lupus nephritis (LN) in Spain. RELESSER-TRANS is a multicenter cross-sectional registry with an analytical component. Information was collected from the medical records of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who were followed at participating rheumatology units. A total of 359 variables including demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity, severity, comorbidities, LN outcome, treatments, and mortality were recorded. Only patients with a histological confirmation of LN were included. We performed a descriptive analysis, chi-square or Student's t tests according to the type of variable and its relationship with LN. Odds ratio and confidence intervals were calculated by using simple logistic regression. LN was histologically confirmed in 1092/3575 patients (30.5%). Most patients were female (85.7%), Caucasian (90.2%), and the mean age at LN diagnosis was 28.4 ± 12.7 years. The risk for LN development was higher in men (M/F:47.85/30.91%, P < 0.001), in younger individuals (P < 0.001), and in Hispanics (P = 0.03). Complete response to treatment was achieved in 68.3% of patients; 10.35% developed ESRD, which required a kidney transplant in 45% of such cases. The older the patient, the greater was the likelihood of complete response (P < 0.001). Recurrences were associated with persistent lupus activity at the time of the last visit (P < 0.001) and with ESRD (P < 0.001). Thrombotic microangiopathy was a risk factor for ESRD (P = 0.04), as for the necessity of dialysis (P = 0.01) or renal transplantation (P = 0.03). LN itself was a poor prognostic risk factor of mortality (OR 2.4 [1.81-3.22], P < 0.001). Patients receiving antimalarials had a significantly lower risk of developing LN (P < 0.001) and ESRD (P < 0

  10. Characterization of Patients With Lupus Nephritis Included in a Large Cohort From the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Registry of Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (RELESSER)

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Rodriguez-Almaraz, Esther; Pego-Reigosa, José M.; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé, Alejandro; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Martinez-Taboada, Víctor; Vela-Casasempere, Paloma; Freire, Mercedes; Narváez, Francisco J.; Rosas, José; Ibáñez-Barceló, Mónica; Uriarte, Esther; Tomero, Eva; Zea, Antonio; Horcada, Loreto; Torrente, Vicenç; Castellvi, Iván; Calvet, Joan; Menor-Almagro, Raúl; Zamorano, María A. Aguirre; Raya, Enrique; Díez-Álvarez, Elvira; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás; García de la Peña, Paloma; Movasat, Atusa; Andreu, José L.; Richi, Patricia; Marras, Carlos; Montilla-Morales, Carlos; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Marenco de la Fuente, José L.; Gantes, María; Úcar, Eduardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Manero, Javier; Ibáñez-Ruán, Jesús; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Quevedo, Víctor; Hernández-Beriaín, José; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Alonso, Fernando; Pérez, Sabina; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to profile those patients included in the RELESSER registry with histologically proven renal involvement in order to better understand the current state of lupus nephritis (LN) in Spain. RELESSER-TRANS is a multicenter cross-sectional registry with an analytical component. Information was collected from the medical records of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who were followed at participating rheumatology units. A total of 359 variables including demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity, severity, comorbidities, LN outcome, treatments, and mortality were recorded. Only patients with a histological confirmation of LN were included. We performed a descriptive analysis, chi-square or Student's t tests according to the type of variable and its relationship with LN. Odds ratio and confidence intervals were calculated by using simple logistic regression. LN was histologically confirmed in 1092/3575 patients (30.5%). Most patients were female (85.7%), Caucasian (90.2%), and the mean age at LN diagnosis was 28.4 ± 12.7 years. The risk for LN development was higher in men (M/F:47.85/30.91%, P < 0.001), in younger individuals (P < 0.001), and in Hispanics (P = 0.03). Complete response to treatment was achieved in 68.3% of patients; 10.35% developed ESRD, which required a kidney transplant in 45% of such cases. The older the patient, the greater was the likelihood of complete response (P < 0.001). Recurrences were associated with persistent lupus activity at the time of the last visit (P < 0.001) and with ESRD (P < 0.001). Thrombotic microangiopathy was a risk factor for ESRD (P = 0.04), as for the necessity of dialysis (P = 0.01) or renal transplantation (P = 0.03). LN itself was a poor prognostic risk factor of mortality (OR 2.4 [1.81–3.22], P < 0.001). Patients receiving antimalarials had a significantly lower risk of developing LN (P < 0.001) and ESRD (P

  11. Serum level of proximal renal tubular epithelial cell-binding immunoglobulin G in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Yap, D Y H; Yung, S; Zhang, Q; Tang, C; Chan, T M

    2016-01-01

    In vitro data showed that immunoglobulin G (IgG) from lupus nephritis (LN) patients could bind to proximal renal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC), but the clinical relevance of such binding remained unclear. Binding of IgG and subclasses to PTEC was measured by cellular ELISA (expressed as OD index) in 189 serial serum samples from 23 Class III/IV ± V LN patients who had repeated renal flares (48 during renal flares, 141 during low level disease activity (LLDA)), and compared with 64 patients with non-lupus glomerular diseases (NLGD) and 23 healthy individuals. Total IgG PTEC-binding index was 0.34 ± 0.16, 0.29 ± 0.16, 0.62 ± 0.27 and 0.83 ± 0.38 in healthy controls, NLGD, LN patients during LLDA, and LN patients during nephritic flare, respectively (p < 0.001, LLDA vs. renal flare; p < 0.001, healthy controls or NLGD vs. LN during LLDA or renal flare). PTEC-binding index for IgG1 was 0.09 ± 0.05, 0.16 ± 0.12, 0.44 ± 0.34 and 0.71 ± 0.46 for the corresponding groups (p < 0.001, LLDA vs. renal flare; p < 0.001, healthy controls or NLGD vs. LN during LLDA or renal flare). Sixteen of 48 episodes (33.3%) of nephritic flare showed persistent PTEC-binding IgG seropositivity for more than 9.4 ± 3.1 months, despite clinical response to immunosuppressive treatment. Total IgG and IgG1 PTEC-binding correlated with anti-dsDNA level (r = 0.34 and 0.52, respectively, p < 0.001 for both), and inversely with C3 level (r = -0.26 and -0.50, respectively, p = 0.002 and<0.001). Sensitivity/specificity of PTEC-binding index in detecting renal flares was 45.8%/80.1% for total IgG (ROC AUC 0.630, p = 0.007) and 87.5%/35.5% for IgG1 (ROC AUC 0.615, p = 0.018). IgG1 PTEC-binding index correlated with tubulo-interstitial inflammation score in renal biopsy from corresponding patients. Our data suggested that total IgG and IgG1 PTEC-binding index in serum of LN patients correlate with serological activity, and in combination could predict renal flares. The correlation between IgG1

  12. Deletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products exacerbates lymphoproliferative syndrome and lupus nephritis in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice.

    PubMed

    Goury, Antoine; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Belmokhtar, Karim; Vuiblet, Vincent; Ortillon, Jeremy; Jaisson, Stéphane; Devy, Jerôme; Le Naour, Richard; Tabary, Thierry; Cohen, Jacques H M; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Rieu, Philippe; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-04-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that interacts with advanced glycation end products, but also with C3a, CpG DNA oligonucleotides, and alarmin molecules such as HMGB1 to initiate a proinflammatory reaction. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder associated with the accumulation of RAGE ligands. We generated mice invalidated for RAGE in the lupus-prone B6-MRL Fas lpr/j background to determine the role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. We compared the phenotype of these mice with that of their wild-type and B6-MRL Fas lpr/j littermates. Lymphoproliferative syndrome, production of anti-dsDNA Abs, lupus nephritis, and accumulation of CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) autoreactive T cells (in the peripheral blood and the spleen) were significantly increased in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j RAGE(-/-) mice compared with B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (respectively p < 0.005, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). A large proportion of autoreactive T cells from B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice expressed RAGE at their surface. Time course studies of annexin V expression revealed that autoreactive T cells in the spleen of B6-MRL Fas lpr/j-RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited a delay in apoptosis and expressed significantly less activated caspase 3 (39.5 ± 4.3%) than T cells in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (65.5 ± 5.2%) or wild-type mice (75.3 ± 2.64%) (p = 0.02). We conclude that the deletion of RAGE in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice promotes the accumulation of autoreactive CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, therefore exacerbating lymphoproliferative syndrome, autoimmunity, and organ injury. This suggests that RAGE rescues the apoptosis of T lymphocytes when the death receptor Fas/CD95 is dysfunctional.

  13. Deletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products exacerbates lymphoproliferative syndrome and lupus nephritis in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice.

    PubMed

    Goury, Antoine; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Belmokhtar, Karim; Vuiblet, Vincent; Ortillon, Jeremy; Jaisson, Stéphane; Devy, Jerôme; Le Naour, Richard; Tabary, Thierry; Cohen, Jacques H M; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Rieu, Philippe; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-04-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that interacts with advanced glycation end products, but also with C3a, CpG DNA oligonucleotides, and alarmin molecules such as HMGB1 to initiate a proinflammatory reaction. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder associated with the accumulation of RAGE ligands. We generated mice invalidated for RAGE in the lupus-prone B6-MRL Fas lpr/j background to determine the role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. We compared the phenotype of these mice with that of their wild-type and B6-MRL Fas lpr/j littermates. Lymphoproliferative syndrome, production of anti-dsDNA Abs, lupus nephritis, and accumulation of CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) autoreactive T cells (in the peripheral blood and the spleen) were significantly increased in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j RAGE(-/-) mice compared with B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (respectively p < 0.005, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). A large proportion of autoreactive T cells from B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice expressed RAGE at their surface. Time course studies of annexin V expression revealed that autoreactive T cells in the spleen of B6-MRL Fas lpr/j-RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited a delay in apoptosis and expressed significantly less activated caspase 3 (39.5 ± 4.3%) than T cells in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (65.5 ± 5.2%) or wild-type mice (75.3 ± 2.64%) (p = 0.02). We conclude that the deletion of RAGE in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice promotes the accumulation of autoreactive CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, therefore exacerbating lymphoproliferative syndrome, autoimmunity, and organ injury. This suggests that RAGE rescues the apoptosis of T lymphocytes when the death receptor Fas/CD95 is dysfunctional. PMID:25762779

  14. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis; Nephritis - interstitial; Acute interstitial (allergic) nephritis ... Interstitial nephritis may be temporary ( acute ), or it may be long-lasting ( chronic ) and get worse over ...

  15. Anti-alpha-actinin antibodies are part of the anti-cell membrane antibody spectrum that characterize patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Seret, Guillaume; Cañas, Felipe; Pougnet-Di Costanzo, Laurence; Hanrotel-Saliou, Catherine; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Le Meur, Yannick; Saraux, Alain; Valeri, Antoine; Putterman, Chaim; Youinou, Pierre; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-07-01

    Anti-membrane autoantibodies (MbA) have been reported in sera from patients with lupus nephritis (LN) but the targets of the MbA remain to be explored, which is the aim of the current study. Sera were collected from 40 patients with LN determined by renal biopsy, and from 30 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without clinical evidence of LN. Thirty autoimmune disease control patients (rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis), and 30 healthy controls were also included. Using flow cytometry, the presence of anti-MbA was explored revealing that IgG anti-MbA positivity was associated with LN (62.5% vs 13.3%) when compared to non-LN SLE patients, autoimmune disease patients (6.7%) and healthy controls (0%). Next, using purified plasma membrane fractions from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, the more prominent targets and their occurrence rates were located at 50 kDa, 60/65 kDa, 90 kDa, 110 kDa, 180 kDa and 220 kDa. Alpha-actinin (110 kDa) autoAb was characterized as a major target in LN patients positive for anti-MbA, and anti-MbA binding activity was reduced (36.9 ± 13.7%) in the presence of α-actinin. Laminin (200 kDa) was also characterized as a minor target, which was not the case for annexin A2 (36 kDa). Finally, anti-MbA IgG subclass analysis indicated a predominance of IgG2. In conclusion, IgG anti-MbA were detected at high levels in LN patients supporting a primary pathogenic role for anti-MbA and anti-MbA/α-actinin+ in LN that needs further research.

  16. Cost-Utility Analysis of Mycophenolate Mofetil versus Azathioprine Based Regimens for Maintenance Therapy of Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Robert; Rivera, Ian; Little, Dustin J.; Yuan, Christina M.; Abbott, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims. We aimed to examine the cost-effectiveness of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and azathioprine (AZA) as maintenance therapy for patients with Class III and Class IV lupus nephritis (LN), from a United States (US) perspective. Methods. Using a Markov model, we conducted a cost-utility analysis from a societal perspective over a lifetime horizon. The modeled population comprised patients with proliferative LN who received maintenance therapy with MMF (2 gm/day) versus AZA (150 mg/day) for 3 years. Risk estimates of clinical events were based on a Cochrane meta-analysis while costs and utilities were retrieved from other published sources. Outcome measures included costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALY), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER), and net monetary benefit. Results. The base-case model showed that, compared with AZA strategy, the ICER for MMF was $2,630,592/QALY at 3 years. Over the patients' lifetime, however, the ICER of MMF compared to AZA was $6,454/QALY. Overall, the ICER results from various sensitivity and subgroup analyses did not alter the conclusions of the model simulation. Conclusions. In the short term, an AZA-based regimen confers greater value than MMF for the maintenance therapy of proliferative LN. From a lifelong perspective, however, MMF is cost-effective compared to AZA. PMID:26600951

  17. Renal tubular acidosis type IV as a complication of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marcos, C; Hoffman, V; Prieto-González, S; Hernández-Rodríguez, J; Espinosa, G

    2016-03-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a rare complication of renal involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a 24-year-old male with type IV lupus nephropathy as a presenting manifestation of SLE. He presented with improvement of renal function following induction therapy with three pulses of methylprednisolone and 500 mg biweekly pulses of cyclophosphamide. However, a week after the first pulse of cyclophosphamide, the patient presented with a significant increase in legs edema and severe hyperkalemia. Type IV RTA associated with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism was suspected in the presence of metabolic acidosis with a normal anion gap, severe hyperkalemia without worsening renal function, and urinary pH of 5. RTA was confirmed with a transtubular potassium concentration gradient of 2 and low levels of plasma aldosterone, renin, angiotensin II, and cortisol. Intravenous bicarbonate, high-dose furosemide, and fludrocortisone were administered with normalization of potassium levels and renal function.

  18. A proteinuria cut-off level of 0.7 g/day after 12 months of treatment best predicts long-term renal outcome in lupus nephritis: data from the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tamirou, Farah; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Dall'Era, Maria; Mackay, Meggan; Rovin, Brad; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although an early decrease in proteinuria has been correlated with good long-term renal outcome in lupus nephritis (LN), studies aimed at defining a cut-off proteinuria value are missing, except a recent analysis performed on patients randomised in the Euro-Lupus Nephritis Trial, demonstrating that a target value of 0.8 g/day at month 12 optimised sensitivity and specificity for the prediction of good renal outcome. The objective of the current work is to validate this target in another LN study, namely the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial (MNT). Methods Long-term (at least 7 years) renal function data were available for 90 patients randomised in the MNT. Receiver operating characteristic curves were built to test the performance of proteinuria measured within the 1st year as short-term predictor of long-term renal outcome. We calculated the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV). Results After 12 months of treatment, achievement of a proteinuria <0.7 g/day best predicted good renal outcome, with a sensitivity and a specificity of 71% and 75%, respectively. The PPV was high (94%) but the NPV low (29%). Addition of the requirement of urine red blood cells ≤5/hpf as response criteria at month 12 reduced sensitivity from 71% to 41%. Conclusions In this cohort of mainly Caucasian patients suffering from a first episode of LN in most cases, achievement of a proteinuria <0.7 g/day at month 12 best predicts good outcome at 7 years and inclusion of haematuria in the set of criteria at month 12 undermines the sensitivity of early proteinuria decrease for the prediction of good outcome. The robustness of these conclusions stems from the very similar results obtained in two distinct LN cohorts. Trial registration number: NCT00204022. PMID:26629352

  19. Prolonged CD154 Expression on Pediatric Lupus CD4 T Cells Correlates with Increased CD154 Transcription, Increased NFAT Activity, and Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jay; Genin, Anna; Brunner, Michael; Scalzi, Lisabeth V; Mishra, Nilamadhab; Beukelman, Timothy; Cron, Randy Q

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess CD154 expression in pediatric lupus and explore a transcriptional mechanism explaining dysregulated CD154 expression. Methods Cell surface CD154 expression was examined, pre- and post-activation, on peripheral blood CD4 T cells from 29 children with lupus and matched controls by flow cytometry. CD154 expression was correlated with clinical features, laboratory parameters, and treatments received. Increased CD154 expression on lupus CD4 T cells was correlated with CD154 message and transcription rates by real-time RT-PCR and nuclear run-on assays, respectively. NFAT transcriptional activity and NFAT mRNA levels in lupus CD4 T cells were explored by reporter gene analysis and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Results CD154 surface protein levels were increased 1.44-fold on lupus CD4 T cells compared to controls at one day post-activation ex vivo. This increase correlated clinically with the presence of nephritis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Increased CD154 protein also correlated with increased CD154 mRNA levels and rates of CD154 transcription, particularly at later time-points post-T cell activation. Reporter gene analyses revealed a trend for increased NFAT, but decreased AP-1 and similar NFκB, activity in lupus CD4 T cell compared to controls. Moreover, NFAT1 and, in particular, NFAT2 mRNA levels were notably increased in lupus CD4 T cells compared to controls. Conclusion Following activation, cell surface CD154 is increased on pediatric lupus CD4 T cells compared to controls, and this correlates with the presence of nephritis, increased CD154 transcription rates, and NFAT activity. These results suggest that NFAT/calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine, may be beneficial in treating lupus nephritis. PMID:20506525

  20. Organ-specific systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Sara K; Guan, Hongshu; Fine, Alexander; Costenbader, Karen H; Bermas, Bonnie

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease of reproductive-age women, and thus questions regarding how disease influences pregnancy outcomes arise. We investigated whether five specific types of SLE activity during the 6 months before conception or during pregnancy (nephritis, cytopenias, skin disease, arthritis, serositis) were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcomes among women with SLE at the Brigham and Women's Hospital Lupus Center. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included pre-eclampsia, pre-term delivery, elective termination due to SLE, spontaneous miscarriage at weeks 12-20, and stillbirth. SLE and obstetric history, laboratories, and medications were obtained from electronic medical records. Generalized linear mixed models adjusting for potential confounders were used to identify predictors of any adverse pregnancy outcome. Most pregnancies resulted in a live term delivery (76.5 %). After adjustment for Hispanic ethnicity, prior adverse pregnancy outcome and medication use 6 months before conception, nephritis during pregnancy (odds ratio (OR) 3.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-12.8), cytopenias during pregnancy (OR 3.9, 95 % CI 1.3-11.4), and serositis during pregnancy (OR 5.9, 95 % CI 1.0-34.0) were significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Specific types of SLE disease activity during pregnancy were related to adverse pregnancy outcome. Nephritis, cytopenias, and serositis carried a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, suggesting that these abnormalities should be carefully monitored during pregnancy. PMID:27166627

  1. Efficacy and safety of cyclophosphamide combined with mycophenolate mofetil for induction treatment of class IV lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Hao; Ji, Ying; Gui, Ming; Yi, Bin; Wang, Jianwen; Jiang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination of cyclophosphamide (CTX) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as induction treatment in Chinese patients with class IV lupus nephritis (LN). 82 patients were randomly divided into control (CTX, n=40) and test (CTX+MMF, n=42) groups, and they received monthly dose of 0.75 g/m2 of body surface area of CTX and monthly dose of 0.4 g/m2 CTX plus 1.0 g/d MMF, respectively. Patients were followed up for six months after treatment; and their efficacy rates, complete remission rates, adverse events, and certain indices in blood were compared between the two groups. Compared with the baseline levels, significant differences in the levels of hemoglobin, urinary proteins, albumin, serum creatinine, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, complement C3 and anti-dsDNA were observed after treatment in both groups (P<0.05). While the two groups did not differ significantly after treatment (P>0.05). There was a trend toward higher complete remission (54.8%) and efficacy rates (88.1%) after treatment in the test group without statistical significance. However, the incidence rate of gastrointestinal reactions (7.1%) and infections (11.9%) in the test group were significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05). The efficacy of lower dose of CTX combined with MMF as induction therapy for LN was not lower than the traditional treatment with CTX. Moreover, the low dose of CTX in combination with MMF could result in lesser adverse events and improved safety. PMID:26885107

  2. Histones have high affinity for the glomerular basement membrane. Relevance for immune complex formation in lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmiedeke, T.M.; Stoeckl, F.W.W.; Weber, R.; Sugisaki, Y.; Batsford, S.R.; Vogt, A.

    1989-06-01

    An effort has been made to integrate insights on charge-based interactions in immune complex glomerulonephritis with nuclear antigen involvement in lupus nephritis. Attention was focussed on the histones, a group of highly cationic nuclear constituents, which could be expected to bind to fixed anionic sites present in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). We demonstrated that all histone subfractions, prepared according to Johns, have a high affinity for GBM and the basement membrane of peritubular capillaries. Tissue uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled histones was measured by injecting 200 micrograms of each fraction into the left kidney via the aorta and measuring organ uptake after 15 min. In glomeruli isolated from the left kidneys, the following quantities of histones were found: f1, 13 micrograms; f2a (f2al + f2a2), 17 micrograms; f2b, 17 micrograms; and f3, 32 micrograms. Kinetic studies of glomerular binding showed that f1 disappeared much more rapidly than f2a. The high affinity of histones (pI between 10.5 and 11.0; mol wt 10,000-22,000) for the GBM correlates well with their ability to form aggregates (mol wt greater than 100,000) for comparison lysozyme (pI 11, mol wt 14,000), which does not aggregate spontaneously bound poorly (0.4 micrograms in isolated glomeruli). The quantity of histones and lysozyme found in the isolated glomeruli paralleled their in vitro affinity for a Heparin-Sepharose column (gradient elution studies). This gel matrix contains the sulfated, highly anionic polysaccharide heparin, which is similar to the negatively charged heparan sulfate present in the GBM. Lysozyme eluted with 0.15 M NaCl, f1 with 1 M NaCl, and f2a, f2b, and f3 could not be fully desorbed even with 2 M NaCl; 6 M guanidine-HCl was necessary.

  3. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  4. Immunophilins, Refsum disease, and lupus nephritis: the peroxisomal enzyme phytanoyl-COA alpha-hydroxylase is a new FKBP-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Chambraud, B; Radanyi, C; Camonis, J H; Rajkowski, K; Schumacher, M; Baulieu, E E

    1999-03-01

    FKBP52 (FKBP59, FKBP4) is a "macro" immunophilin that, although sharing high structural and functional homologies in its amino-terminal domain with FKBP12 (FKBP1), does not have immunosuppressant activity when complexed with FK506, unlike FKBP12. To investigate the physiological function of FKBP52, we used the yeast two-hybrid system as an approach to find its potential protein partners and, from that, its cellular role. This methodology, which already has allowed us to find the FK506-binding protein (FKBP)-associated protein FAP48, also led to the detection of another FKBP-associated protein. Determination of the sequence of this protein permitted its identification as phytanoyl-CoA alpha-hydroxylase (PAHX), a peroxisomal enzyme that so far was unknown as an FKBP-associated protein. Inactivation of this enzyme is responsible for Refsum disease in humans. The protein also corresponds to the mouse protein LN1, which could be involved in the progress of lupus nephritis. We show here that PAHX has the physical capacity to interact with the FKBP12-like domain of FKBP52, but not with FKBP12, suggesting that it is a particular and specific target of FKBP52. Whereas the binding of calcineurin to FKBP12 is potentiated by FK506, the specific association of PAHX and FKBP52 is maintained in the presence of FK506. This observation suggests that PAHX is a serious candidate for studying the cellular signaling pathway(s) involving FKBP52 in the presence of immunosuppressant drugs.

  5. miR-148a-3p overexpression contributes to glomerular cell proliferation by targeting PTEN in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Qingjuan, Liu; Xiaojuan, Feng; Wei, Zhang; Chao, Wu; Pengpeng, Kang; Hongbo, Li; Sanbing, Zhang; Jun, Hao; Min, Yang; Shuxia, Liu

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of miR-148a-3p in lupus nephritis (LN) based on data from previous studies and a microRNA assay. We evaluated the miR-148a-3p expression level in LN renal tissues and blood serum to determine its clinicopathological significance and effect on glomerular cell proliferation. Then, we collected renal glomeruli from LN mice and determined the miR-148a-3p, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and PCNA/Thy1 expression. We performed functional analyses of miR-148a-3p in vitro and in vivo. We also investigated the target gene of miR-148a-3p in LN. The results showed that miR-148a-3p expression levels were significantly higher not only in glomeruli but also in the blood serum during LN and increased in the glomeruli of LN mice and that at the same time there was positive correlation between miR-148a-3p and PCNA expression of glomruli. Overexpression of miR-148a-3p accelerated cell proliferation and PCNA expression, while a miR-148a-3p inhibitor inhibited cell proliferation via the Akt/cyclin D1 pathway. Furthermore, miR-148a-3p overexpression reduced the phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) expression level, while miR-148a-3p silencing increased its expression in high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1)-induced mouse mesangial cells (MMCs). Luciferase assays demonstrated that miR-148a-3p could directly bind to the PTEN 3'-UTR. PTEN overexpression inhibited MMC proliferation considerably, resembling the results observed during miR-148a-3p inhibition. Reducing miR-148a-3p expression upregulated PTEN in the glomeruli and improved renal function in LN mice. Thus miR-148a-3p may promote proliferation and contribute to LN progression by targeting PTEN.

  6. Association of Macrophage Activating Syndrome with Castleman’s Syndrome in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Shariatpanahi, Shamsa; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Gheini, Mohammadhosein

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Activating Syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening disease seen in autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Still's disease, polyarteritis nodosa. It is characterized by fever, pancytopenia, liver failure, coagulopathy, and neurologic symptoms and high serum ferritin. A 27 yr. old female patient was admitted in shahid Mostafa Khomeini Hospital (Tehran-Iran) in May 2011 because of lower extremities edema and ascites and fever from 1.5 month ago. In physical examinations she had generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and pleural effusion. In laboratory tests she had pancytopenia, positive ANA and Anti DNA (ds), hypocomplementemia, hypertriglyceridemia and high ferritin level. Gradually she had signs of RPGN and ARDS. The patient had no skin and musculoskeletal signs of SLE and no liver failure nor coagulopathy of MAS. Her lymph node biopsy was reported as Castleman syndrome. Unlike other studies, the patient showed MAS before treatment with cytotoxic for lupus nephritis. PMID:27799976

  7. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Reduces Crescentic and Necrotic Glomerular Lesions, Reactive Oxygen Production, and MCP1 Production in Murine Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gilkeson, Gary S.; Mashmoushi, Ahmad K.; Ruiz, Phillip; Caza, Tiffany N.; Perl, Andras; Oates, Jim C.

    2013-01-01

    chemotactic protein-1. These results suggest that modulation of eNOS may be a novel therapeutic approach to treating lupus nephritis. PMID:23741359

  8. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells preserve kidney function and extend lifespan in NZB/W F1 mouse model of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Austin; Yavanian, Gregory; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Morales, Peter; Kouris, Nicholas A; Kimbrel, Erin A; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are showing promise in clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the inability to manufacture large quantities of functional cells from a single donor as well as donor-dependent variability in quality limits their clinical utility. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative to adult MSCs that can circumvent issues regarding scalability and consistent quality due to their derivation from a renewable starting material. Here, we show that hESC-MSCs prevent the progression of fatal lupus nephritis (LN) in NZB/W F1 (BWF1) mice. Treatment led to statistically significant reductions in proteinuria and serum creatinine and preserved renal architecture. Specifically, hESC-MSC treatment prevented disease-associated interstitial inflammation, protein cast deposition, and infiltration of CD3(+) lymphocytes in the kidneys. This therapy also led to significant reductions in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two inflammatory cytokines associated with SLE. Mechanistically, in vitro data support these findings, as co-culture of hESC-MSCs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BWF1 lymphocytes decreased lymphocyte secretion of TNFα and IL-6, and enhanced the percentage of putative regulatory T cells. This study represents an important step in the development of a commercially scalable and efficacious cell therapy for SLE/LN. PMID:26628350

  9. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells preserve kidney function and extend lifespan in NZB/W F1 mouse model of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Austin; Yavanian, Gregory; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Morales, Peter; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Kimbrel, Erin A.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are showing promise in clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the inability to manufacture large quantities of functional cells from a single donor as well as donor-dependent variability in quality limits their clinical utility. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative to adult MSCs that can circumvent issues regarding scalability and consistent quality due to their derivation from a renewable starting material. Here, we show that hESC-MSCs prevent the progression of fatal lupus nephritis (LN) in NZB/W F1 (BWF1) mice. Treatment led to statistically significant reductions in proteinuria and serum creatinine and preserved renal architecture. Specifically, hESC-MSC treatment prevented disease-associated interstitial inflammation, protein cast deposition, and infiltration of CD3+ lymphocytes in the kidneys. This therapy also led to significant reductions in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two inflammatory cytokines associated with SLE. Mechanistically, in vitro data support these findings, as co-culture of hESC-MSCs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BWF1 lymphocytes decreased lymphocyte secretion of TNFα and IL-6, and enhanced the percentage of putative regulatory T cells. This study represents an important step in the development of a commercially scalable and efficacious cell therapy for SLE/LN. PMID:26628350

  10. Pristane-Accelerated Autoimmune Disease in (SWR X NZB) F1 Mice Leads to Prominent Tubulointerstitial Inflammation and Human Lupus Nephritis-Like Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardet, Agnes; Chou, Wei C.; Reynolds, Taylor L.; Velez, Diana B.; Fu, Kai; Czerkowicz, Julia M.; Bajko, Jeffrey; Ranger, Ann M.; Allaire, Normand; Kerns, Hannah M.; Ryan, Sarah; Legault, Holly M.; Dunstan, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert; Lukashev, Matvey; Viney, Joanne L.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Rabah, Dania

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models lupus nephritis (LN) have provided important insights into disease pathogenesis, although none have been able to recapitulate all features of the human disease. Using comprehensive longitudinal analyses, we characterized a novel accelerated mouse model of lupus using pristane treatment in SNF1 (SWR X NZB F1) lupus prone mice (pristane-SNF1 mice). Pristane treatment in SNF1 mice accelerated the onset and progression of proteinuria, autoantibody production, immune complex deposition and development of renal lesions. At week 14, the pristane-SNF1 model recapitulated kidney disease parameters and molecular signatures seen in spontaneous disease in 36 week-old SNF1 mice and in a traditional IFNα-accelerated NZB X NZW F1 (BWF1) model. Blood transcriptome analysis revealed interferon, plasma cell, neutrophil, T-cell and protein synthesis signatures in the pristane-SNF1 model, all known to be present in the human disease. The pristane-SNF1 model appears to be particularly useful for preclinical research, robustly exhibiting many characteristics reminiscent of human disease. These include i) a stronger upregulation of the cytosolic nucleic acid sensing pathway, which is thought to be key component of the pathogenesis of the human disease, and ii) more prominent kidney interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, which have been both associated with poor prognosis in human LN. To our knowledge, this is the only accelerated model of LN that exhibits a robust tubulointerstitial inflammatory and fibrosis response. Taken together our data show that the pristane-SNF1 model is a novel accelerated model of LN with key features similar to human disease. PMID:27760209

  11. miR-410 suppresses the expression of interleukin-6 as well as renal fibrosis in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaofei

    2016-06-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a highly complex autoimmune disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in the pathogenesis of SLE. Previously, a total of 29 miRNAs were identified to be down-regulated in SLE patients, in which miR-410 was likely to be involved in the signalling transduction pathways in regulating the pathogenesis of SLE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of miR-410 in LN and to find out whether miR-410 regulates the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and fibrosis in LN. It was found that the expression level of miR-410 in kidney tissue of MRL/lpr mice was decreased compared to that in BALB/C mice, whereas the level of IL-6 was overexpressed in MRL/lpr mice. Luciferase assay showed that miR-410 binds directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of IL-6, with the results showing that overexpression of miR-410 significantly decreased the expression level of IL-6 in SV40MES13 cells. Moreover, overexpression of miR-410 significantly reduced the expression levels of fibrosis factors such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen I/III in SV40MES13 cells; Inhibition of the expression of miR-410 with miR-410 inhibitor resulted in increased levels of IL-6 as well as fibrosis factors. The results identify that miR-410, as a novel and critical factor in the pathogenesis of LN, decreases IL-6 expression by binding directly to the 3'UTR and suppresses fibrosis through down-regulation of TGF-β1 in SV40MES13 cells. Our study brings new insight into understanding the complex mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of lupus disease. PMID:27028192

  12. Inflammasome activation of IL-18 results in endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Thacker, Seth G; Berthier, Celine C; Cohen, Clemens D; Kretzler, Matthias; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with heterogeneous manifestations including severe organ damage and vascular dysfunction leading to premature atherosclerosis. IFN-α has been proposed to have an important role in the development of lupus and lupus-related cardiovascular disease, partly by repression of IL-1 pathways leading to impairments in vascular repair induced by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CACs). Counterintuitively, SLE patients also display transcriptional upregulation of the IL-1β/IL-18 processing machinery, the inflammasome. To understand this dichotomy and its impact on SLE-related cardiovascular disease, we examined cultures of human and murine control or lupus EPC/CACs to determine the role of the inflammasome in endothelial differentiation. We show that caspase-1 inhibition improves dysfunctional SLE EPC/CAC differentiation into mature endothelial cells and blocks IFN-α-mediated repression of this differentiation, implicating inflammasome activation as a crucial downstream pathway leading to aberrant vasculogenesis. Furthermore, serum IL-18 levels are elevated in SLE and correlate with EPC/CAC dysfunction. Exogenous IL-18 inhibits endothelial differentiation in control EPC/CACs and neutralization of IL-18 in SLE EPC/CAC cultures restores their capacity to differentiate into mature endothelial cells, supporting a deleterious effect of IL-18 on vascular repair in vivo. Upregulation of the inflammasome machinery was operational in vivo, as evidenced by gene array analysis of lupus nephritis biopsies. Thus, the effects of IFN-α are complex and contribute to an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease by suppression of IL-1β pathways and by upregulation of the inflammasome machinery and potentiation of IL-18 activation.

  13. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zollars, Eric; Courtney, Sean M; Wolf, Bethany J; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus-specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  14. [Peritoneal dialysis in a patient with right hemiparesis, lupus nephritis, significant insufficiency of arteries of aortic arch and celiac disease: case report].

    PubMed

    Altabas, Karmela; Crne, Natasa; Franjić, Björn Dario; Pavlović, Drasko; Josipović, Josipa

    2012-10-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a method of choice in patients in whom there are difficulties concerning creation of AV fistula. A 38-year old female patient came to our hospital because of a need of making an AV fistula. She had end-stage renal insufficiency of unknown origin. She had a right hemiparesis with a contracture of the right fist and epilepsy because of the stroke she suffered in 1993. After doing the diagnostics, we have found that patient had lupus nephritis, occlusion of brachiocephalic trunk, right and left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. We also diagnosed celiac disease and a significant anemia. It was not possible to form an AV fistula, as it was not possible to do an assisted PD. Because of the right hemiparesis and contracture of the right fist, the possibility of performing PD independently was questionable. Despite the handicap, the patient had strong motivation and she managed to master the technique of PD independently. Even though it was estimated that she had a high risk score for applying anesthesia (ASA IV), the insertion of the peritoneal catheter went without complications. Because of the comorbidity, especially because of the significant stenosis and occlusions of the arteries of aortic arch, the kidney transplantation will not be performed. In the last fifteen months, the patient is performing PD independently, without any infectious complications, she is feeling well and is satisfied with the quality of her life. The consequences of the renal insufficiency are under control, systemic lupus erythematosus is, with a low dose of corticosteroids, in a steady state, malnutrition is corrected, but there is still hypoalbuminemia noted.

  15. Up-regulation of Serum MiR-130b-3p Level is Associated with Renal Damage in Early Lupus Nephritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanpeng; Mou, Shan; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Minfang; Shao, Xinghua; Fang, Wei; Lu, Renhua; Qi, Chaojun; Fan, Zhuping; Cao, Qin; Wang, Qin; Fang, Yan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a common but severe autoimmune systemic inflammatory disease. Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious complication of SLE,affecting up to 70% of SLE patients. Circulating microRNAs (miRNA) are emerging as biomarkers for pathological conditions and play significant roles in intercellular communication. In present research, serum samples from healthy control, early and late stage LN patients were used to analyze the expression profile of miRNAs by microarray. Subsequent study demonstrated that miR-130b-3p in serum of patients with early stage LN were significantly up-regulated when compared with healthy controls. In addition,we have also observed that the expression of a large amount of circulating microRNAs significantly decreased in patients with late stage LN. The further analysis found that the expression of serum miR-130b-3p was positively correlated with 24-hour proteinuria and renal chronicity index in patients with early stage LN.Transfection of renal tubular cellline(HK-2)with miR-130b-3p mimics can promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The opposite effects were observed when transfected with miR-130b-3p inhibitors. MiR-130b-3p negatively regulated ERBB2IP expression by directly targeting the 3‧-UTR of ERBB2IP The circulating miR-130b-3p might serve as a biomarker and play an important role in renal damage in early stage LN patients.

  16. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  17. Combined transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells and allogenic mesenchymal stem cells increases T regulatory cells in systemic lupus erythematosus with refractory lupus nephritis and leukopenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Qian, S; Li, J; Che, N; Gu, L; Wang, Q; Liu, Y; Mei, H

    2015-10-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is currently being evaluated as a novel treatment for autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report a case of autologous HSC transplantation combined with MSCs in a 25-year-old severe SLE patient with multiple life-threatening complications and refractory to conventional cyclophosphamide (CYC) therapy. After being pretreated with CYC, fludarabine and antithymocyte globulin, the patient was transplanted with autologous CD34+HSCs and MSCs by intravenous infusion. Hematopoietic regeneration was observed on day 12 thereafter. After HSC and MSC transplantation, the patient's clinical symptoms caused by SLE were remitted, and the SLEDAI score decreased. Moreover, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+Treg cells increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after transplantation. This result suggests that the combined transplantation of HSCs and MSCs may reset the adaptive immune system to re-establish self-tolerance in SLE. A 36-month follow-up showed that the clinical symptoms remained in remission. Although a longer follow-up is required for assessing the long-term efficacy, our present results suggest that the combined transplantation of HSCs and MSCs may be a novel and effective therapy for refractory SLE.

  18. [Evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Olesińska, Marzena; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Chwalińska-Sadowska, Hanna

    2007-07-01

    Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a high-risk pregnancy. It is complicated by preeclampsia, premature labour and miscarriage more frequently than in the general population. Improved prognosis depends on low disease activity during conception and on appropriate medical care (SLE activity monitoring, selection of therapy safe for the mother and the developing foetus, advances in neonatology). Because symptoms of physiological pregnancy and SLE exacerbation are similar, their correct interpretation is essential for skin lesions, arthralgias, arterial hypertension or results of laboratory tests: proteinuria, thrombocytopenia or leucopenia observed in the patient. In order to standardise the assessment of SLE activity during pregnancy, scores of this activity are used. In the past, scores validated on non-pregnant populations (including male patients) were used: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurment (ECLAM). Only recently have SLE activity scores been introduced that are specific for pregnant women: Lupus Activity Index In Pregnancy (LAI-P), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancy Disease Activity Index (SLEPDAI), modified--Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (m-SLAM) and a visual three-grade score modified--Physician Global Assessment (m-PGA). So far, only scores LAI-P and m-PGA have been validated. According to the LAI-P score, clinical data are divided into 4 groups. Group 1 includes mild clinical symptoms, group 2--symptoms of involvement of internal organs, group 3 pertains to modifications of treatment and group 4 to laboratory parameters. Point values are ascribed to individual parameters depending on their intensity.

  19. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations.

  20. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  1. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Bethany J.; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus—specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  2. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Bethany J.; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus—specifically lupus nephritis.

  3. Association of elevated transcript levels of interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cui, Huijuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nan; Bao, Chunde

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous course and varying degrees of severity and organ damage; thus, there is increasing interest in identifying biomarkers for SLE. In this study we correlated the combined expression level of multiple interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity, degree of organ damage and clinical features in SLE, and we investigated their roles as biomarkers. Methods Peripheral blood cells obtained from 67 patients with SLE patients, 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 23 healthy donors were subjected to real-time PCR in order to measure the transcriptional levels of seven interferon-inducible chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, CCL19, MIG, IP-10, CXCL11, and IL-8). The data were used to calculate a chemokine score for each participant, after which comparisons were performed between various groups of SLE patients and control individuals. Results Chemokine scores were significantly elevated in SLE patients versus RA patients and healthy donors (P = 0.012 and P = 0.002, respectively). Chemokine scores were correlated positively with SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 scores (P = 0.005) and negatively with C3 levels (P < 0.001). Compared with patients without lupus nephritis and those with inactive lupus nephritis, chemokine scores were elevated in patients with active lupus nephritis, especially when their daily prednisone dosage was under 30 mg (P = 0.002 and P = 0.014, respectively). Elevated chemokine scores were also associated with the presence of cumulative organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American Society of Rheumatology Damage Index ≥ 1; P = 0.010) and the occurrence of anti-Sm or anti-RNP autoantibodies (both P = 0.021). Conclusions The combined transcription level of interferon-inducible chemokines in peripheral blood leucocytes is closely associated with disease activity, degree of organ damage, and specific autoantibody patterns

  4. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-07-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental.

  5. Functional relevance of activated beta1 integrins in mercury-induced nephritis.

    PubMed

    Escudero, E; Martín, A; Nieto, M; Nieto, E; Navarro, E; Luque, A; Cabañas, C; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Mampaso, F

    2000-06-01

    Cell adhesion through different adhesion molecules is a crucial event in the inflammatory response. Integrins can only bind and mediate cellular adhesion after their activation by different specific stimuli. The state of beta1 integrin activation can be assessed by a group of monoclonal antibodies (HUTS) that selectively recognize beta1 integrins in their active form. A similar activated epitope in the rat was defined using the anti-human monoclonal antibody HUTS-21, which recognizes an activation-dependent epitope on the beta1 chain. It was found that the divalent cations Mn(2+) and Hg(2+) were able to induce in vitro the activation of beta1 integrins on rat lymphocytes. The Hg(2+) cation induces an autoimmune disease in the Brown Norway rat characterized by synthesis and glomerular deposits of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies, proteinuria, and interstitial nephritis. Using the mercury model of nephritis, it was found that the expression of HUTS-21 epitope is induced in vivo in rat lymphocytes, and its appearance is correlated with the other parameters at the onset of the disease. In addition, the administration of HUTS-21 monoclonal antibody to HgCl(2)-treated rats offered evidence of its protective effects (1) against infiltration of renal interstitium by leukocytes, and (2) in the reduction of anti-glomerular basement membrane synthesis and glomerular deposition. Nevertheless, urinary protein values remained unaffected. These results demonstrate a key role of beta1-activated integrins in both leukocyte cell-cell interactions and leukocyte infiltration pathway mechanism, and also indicate that leukocyte migration may have less importance in the development of this disease than previously thought.

  6. Comparative Effects of n-3, n-6 and n-9 Unsaturated Fatty Acid-Rich Diet Consumption on Lupus Nephritis, Autoantibody Production and CD4+ T Cell-Related Gene Responses in the Autoimmune NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.; Vines, Laura L.; Bates, Melissa A.; He, Kaiyu; Langohr, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease, correlates with the onset and severity of kidney glomerulonephritis. There are both preclinical and clinical evidence that SLE patients may benefit from consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) found in fish oil, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we employed the NZBWF1 SLE mouse model to compare the effects of dietary lipids on the onset and severity of autoimmune glomerulonephritis after consuming: 1) n-3 PUFA-rich diet containing docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil (DFO), 2) n-6 PUFA-rich Western-type diet containing corn oil (CRN) or 3) n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich Mediterranean-type diet containing high oleic safflower oil (HOS). Elevated plasma autoantibodies, proteinuria and glomerulonephritis were evident in mice fed either the n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets, however, all three endpoints were markedly attenuated in mice that consumed the n-3 PUFA diet until 34 wk of age. A focused PCR array was used to relate these findings to the expression of 84 genes associated with CD4+ T cell function in the spleen and kidney both prior to and after the onset of the autoimmune nephritis. n-3 PUFA suppression of autoimmunity in NZBWF1 mice was found to co-occur with a generalized downregulation of CD4+ T cell-related genes in kidney and/or spleen at wk 34. These genes were associated with the inflammatory response, antigen presentation, T cell activation, B cell activation/differentiation and leukocyte recruitment. Quantitative RT-PCR of representative affected genes confirmed that n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with reduced expression of CD80, CTLA-4, IL-10, IL-18, CCL-5, CXCR3, IL-6, TNF-α and osteopontin mRNAs in kidney and/or spleens as compared to mice fed n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets. Remarkably, many of the genes identified in this study are currently under consideration as biomarkers and/or biotherapeutic targets for SLE and other autoimmune

  7. Serum and Urinary Interleukin-6 in Assessment of Renal Activity in Egyptian Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    EL-Shereef, Rawhya R.; Lotfi, Ahmed; Abdel-Naeam, Emad A.; Tawfik, Heba

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF THE WORK This study investigates whether serum and urinary interleukin-6 (IL-6) represent an early marker of kidney involvement and assesses the difference between them and renal biopsy in lupus nephritis (LN). PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 60 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients were compared to 20 healthy controls. Urinary and serum IL-6 were measured in both patients and controls. In addition, renal biopsy was done prior or shortly after urine and blood sampling; the results were classified according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society classification of LN by recording the activity score and chronicity score for each sample. RESULTS There was a significant higher level of urinary IL-6 in the SLE patients with biopsy-proven LN than in those without LN and those of the control group. However, no significant difference was reported between the three groups as regards serum IL-6. A strong positive correlation was found between urinary IL-6 and renal disease activity based on the renal SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score with no significant correlation regarding the extra renal SLEDAI. Urinary IL-6 was positively correlated with renal biopsy results and with its activity scores but weakly correlated with the chronicity scores. CONCLUSION Urinary IL-6 may provide a simple noninvasive potential marker of disease activity of renal involvement in adult patients with SLE. PMID:26966395

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura: a refractory case without lupus activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia Boyero, Raimundo; Mas Esteve, Eva; Mas Esteve, Maria; Millá Perseguer, M Magdalena; Marco Buades, Josefa; Beltran Fabregat, Juan; Cañigral Ferrando, Guillermo; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been infrequently reported. Usually, patients with TTP have more SLE activity and frequent renal involvement. Here we present a case of TTP associated to low-activity SLE. The absence of renal and major organ involvement increased the difficulty in making the initial diagnosis. ADAMTS13 activity in plasma in this patient was very low, as seen in other similar cases. The evolution of the patient was poor, needing plasma exchanges and immunosuppressive therapy, including the use of rituximab.

  9. Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy on lupus flares in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and identified lupus flare predictors during pregnancy. Additionally, we examined lupus activity and pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients who continued, discontinued or underwent no hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment during pregnancy. We retrospectively analyzed 179 pregnancies in 128 SLE patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Korea, between 1998 and 2012 and then assessed the clinical profiles and maternal and fetal outcomes. Overall, 90.5% of pregnancies resulted in a successful delivery and were divided into two groups: those who experienced lupus flares (80 pregnancies, 44.7%) and those who did not (99 pregnancies, 55.3%). Increased preeclampsia, preterm births, low birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and low 1-minute Apgar scores occurred in pregnancies with lupus flares compared to pregnancies in quiescent disease. Lupus flares were predicted by HCQ discontinuation, a history of lupus nephritis, high pre-pregnancy serum uric acid and low C4 levels. Our study indicates that achieving pre-pregnancy remission and continuing HCQ treatment during pregnancy are important for preventing lupus flares.

  10. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  11. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  12. Personalized Immunomonitoring Uncovers Molecular Networks that Stratify Lupus Patients.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Hong, Seunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Baldwin, Nicole; Baisch, Jeanine; Edens, Michelle; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Acs, Peter; Turner, Jacob; Anguiano, Esperanza; Vinod, Parvathi; Kahn, Shaheen; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Wakeland, Edward; Nassi, Lorien; Gotte, Alisa; Punaro, Marilynn; Liu, Yong-Jun; Banchereau, Jacques; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Wright, Tracey; Pascual, Virginia

    2016-04-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by loss of tolerance to nucleic acids and highly diverse clinical manifestations. To assess its molecular heterogeneity, we longitudinally profiled the blood transcriptome of 158 pediatric patients. Using mixed models accounting for repeated measurements, demographics, treatment, disease activity (DA), and nephritis class, we confirmed a prevalent IFN signature and identified a plasmablast signature as the most robust biomarker of DA. We detected gradual enrichment of neutrophil transcripts during progression to active nephritis and distinct signatures in response to treatment in different nephritis subclasses. Importantly, personalized immunomonitoring uncovered individual correlates of disease activity that enabled patient stratification into seven groups, supported by patient genotypes. Our study uncovers the molecular heterogeneity of SLE and provides an explanation for the failure of clinical trials. This approach may improve trial design and implementation of tailored therapies in genetically and clinically complex autoimmune diseases. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27040498

  13. The Many Faces of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    El-Gabalawy, Hani

    1990-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem disorder that presents itself in several different ways. Arthritis, dermatitis, nephritis, and pleuropericarditis are the most common features initially. Various hematologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations are also seen during the course of the disease. Anti-nuclear antibodies are the hallmark of lupus but are nonspecific and detectable in many other disorders. Once the diagnosis is established, the severity of the disease needs to be determined, in particular the extent of major organ involvement. The level of disease activity should be repeatedly estimated using clinical and laboratory parameters. Therapeutic decisions are based on disease severity and activity. Aggressive suppression of major organ inflammation and reduction of long-term toxicity are the main goals of therapy. PMID:21233973

  14. An Extract of Antrodia camphorata Mycelia Attenuates the Progression of Nephritis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Prone NZB/W F1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jia-Ming; Lee, Yi-Ru; Hung, Le-Mei; Liu, Sheng-Yung; Kuo, Mao-Tien; Wen, Wu-Che; Chen, Peini

    2011-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammation syndromes and liver-related diseases in Taiwan. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the mycelial extract of A. camphorata (ACE) for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in SLE-prone NZB/W F1 mice. After antibodies against double-stranded DNA appeared in NZB/W mice, the mice were orally administered varying dosages of ACE (100, 200 and 400 mg kg−1) for 5 consecutive days per week for 12 weeks via gavage. To assess the efficacy of ACE, we measured SLE-associated biochemical and histopathological biomarkers levels of blood urine nitrogen (BUN), blood creatinine, urine protein and urine creatinine and thickness of the kidney glomerular basement membrane by staining with periodic acid-Schiff. Antroquinonol, an active component of ACE, was investigated for anti-inflammation activity in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 267.4 cells. ACE at 400 mg kg−1 significantly suppressed urine protein and serum BUN levels and decreased the thickness of the kidney glomerular basement membrane. Antroquinonol significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β by 75 and 78%, respectively. In conclusion, ACE reduced urine protein and creatinine levels and suppressed the thickening of the kidney glomerular basement membrane, suggesting that ACE protects the kidney from immunological damage resulting from autoimmune disease. PMID:18955361

  15. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38α Regulates Tubular Damage in Murine Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ralf; Daniel, Christoph; Hugo, Christian; Amann, Kerstin; Mielenz, Dirk; Endlich, Karlhans; Braun, Tobias; van der Veen, Betty; Heeringa, Peter; Schett, Georg; Zwerina, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is thought to play a central role in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Whether p38MAPK plays a pathogenic role in crescentic GN (GN) and which of its four isoforms is preferentially involved in kidney inflammation is not definitely known. We thus examined expression and activation of p38MAPK isoforms during anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis. Therefore, p38α conditional knockout mice (MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ) were used to examine the role of p38α in anti-GBM induced nephritis. Both wild type and MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice developed acute renal failure over time. Histological examinations revealed a reduced monocyte influx and less tubular damage in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice, whereas glomerular crescent formation and renal fibrosis was similar. Likewise, the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 were similar, but IL-8 was even up-regulated in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In contrast, we could detect strong down-regulation of chemotactic cytokines such as CCL-2, -5 and -7, in the kidneys of MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In conclusion, p38α is the primary p38MAPK isoform expressed in anti-GBM nephritis and selectively affects inflammatory cell influx and tubular damage. Full protection from nephritis is however not achieved as renal failure and structural damage still occurs. PMID:23441175

  16. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. ); Lewis, G.C. ); Hansen, J.A. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  17. Acute Unilateral Blindness from Superior Ophthalmic Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Presentation of Nephrotic Syndrome from Class IV Lupus Nephritis in the Absence of Antiphospholipid or Anticardiolipin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baidoun, Firas; Issa, Rommy; Al-Turk, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis secondary to anti-phospholipid antibodies. Herein, we are presenting an interesting case of venous thrombosis in a patient with SLE in the absence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. PMID:26858847

  18. A benzenediamine derivative fc-99 attenuates lupus-like syndrome in MRL/lpr mice related to suppression of pDC activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianjian; Fan, Hongye; Li, Fanlin; Li, Xiaojing; Dong, Guanjun; Gong, Wei; Song, Yuxian; Liu, Fei; Hua, Chunyan; Tan, Renxiang; Dou, Huan; Hou, Yayi

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with prominent chronic inflammatory aspects. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which are the principal interferon-α (IFN-α)-producing cells, have known to be critically involved in SLE pathogenesis. Our previous research demonstrated that a benzenediamine derivative FC-99 possessed anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of FC-99 on SLE have not been investigated to date. In this study, we found that FC-99 attenuated lupus-like pathological symptoms and lupus nephritis as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in kidneys of MRL/lpr mice. FC-99 also decreased both the total IgM, total IgG and anti-dsDNA IgG levels in sera and the activation of B cells in the PBMCs and spleens of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, FC-99 inhibited the abnormal activation and number of pDCs from PBMCs and spleens and levels of IFN-α in MRL/lpr mice. Notably, FC-99 significantly suppressed the expression of IFN-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and spleens from MRL/lpr mice. As expected, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FC-99 decreased both the activation and IFN-α production of pDCs and inhibited IRAK4 phosphorylation in pDCs upon TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation. We further confirm that the inhibition of FC-99 on B cell activation depended on level of pDCs-secreting IFN-α. These data indicate that FC-99 attenuated lupus-like syndrome in MRL/lpr mice related to suppression of pDC activation, especially pDCs-secreting IFN-α. This study suggests that FC-99 may be a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of SLE.

  19. Discordant assessment of lupus activity between patients and their physicians: the Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Leong, K P; Chong, E Y Y; Kong, K O; Chan, S P; Thong, B Y H; Lian, T Y; Chng, H H; Koh, E T; Teh, C L; Lau, T C; Law, W G; Cheng, Y K; Badsha, H; Chew, L C; Yong, W H; Howe, H S

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus often assess their disease activity differently from their physicians. We studied the factors associated with this discordance. The data provided by 534 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were analyzed. We compared the physician and patient assessments of lupus activity on a visual-assessment scale from the same visit. We collected clinical data and scores from MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Quality-of-Life Questionnaire, Rheumatology Attitudes Index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, and revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure. Patients tended to score their disease activity higher than do their physicians, when these factors were present: poorer general health assessment, presence of thrombocytopenia, hypertension and urinary sediments, and difficulty in carrying groceries. Physicians tended to score the disease activity higher than do the patients in these circumstances proteinuria, hemolysis, use of azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, tiredness, photosensitivity, higher revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure score, casturia, and patient report of being more easily ill than are other patients. There was only moderate correlation between the discordance in the baseline and the subsequent visits. The physician assessment of disease activity at baseline correlated better with an objective measure of disease activity (revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure) in the subsequent visit than the patient assessment. In conclusion, discordance in the perception of disease activity between patients and physicians may be amenable to intervention.

  20. Interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, A J; Winearls, C G; Dunnill, M S

    1981-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings are reviewed in ten cases where renal biopsy showed abnormalities predominantly within the interstitium. In six the nephritis was considered to be drug-induced; in two the aetiology was slightly obscure but the most likely diagnosis was considered to be sarcoidosis. Of the remaining two cases one was chronic pyelonephritis and the other polyarteritis nodosa. The diagnosis and pathogenesis of the renal lesions are discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of distinguishing primary interstitial changes from those found in association with glomerular disease. Images PMID:7251904

  1. Relationship between renal pathology and the size of circulating immune complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Wener, M.H.; Mannik, M.; Schwartz, M.M.; Lewis, E.J.

    1987-03-01

    Sera from 35 patients with biopsy-proven diffuse proliferative (WHO class IV) or membranous (WHO class V) lupus nephritis were analyzed for the presence and size of circulating immune complexes. Elevations of the C1q solid-phase assay (C1qSP) for immune complexes were found in sera from all patients with diffuse proliferative nephritis, with a mean +/- 1 SEM of 166.8 +/- 42.0 micrograms/AHG-equivalents/ml serum, and in 71.4% of the patients with membranous nephritis (83.1 +/- 26.7, p = 0.06). Using the WHO criteria for subclasses of membranous lupus nephritis, we also designated renal biopsies as nonproliferative (WHO classes Va and Vb) or proliferative (WHO classes IV and Vc). Employing the latter groupings, we observed significant differences between C1qSP results of patients with nonproliferative (30.3 +/- 8.8) and proliferative (172.8 +/- 36.8, p less than 0.001) lupus nephritis. These data suggest that the presence of C1q-binding material in serum is pathophysiologically related to proliferative glomerular lesions, and that levels of C1qSP binding reflect renal lesions in SLE patients. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation was performed on each serum, and gradient fractions analyzed for C1qSP-binding and total IgG, using techniques to minimize losses of immune complexes. The predominant peak of C1qSP activity sedimented with the 6.6S monomeric IgG. The 6.6S C1q-binding IgG was increased only in 1 of 10 patients with membranous lupus nephritis without proliferative changes, and was elevated in 16 of 25 patients with proliferative lesions (WHO classes IV and Vc).

  2. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Olowu, Wasiu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the initial clinicolaboratory manifestations and short-term outcome in a series of Nigerian children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: A nonrandomized prospective study of consecutive cases of childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up clinicolaboratory data were collected and analyzed. Each patient was followed up for 12 months. RESULTS: Eleven children were studied. There were seven girls (F:M, 1.75). Mean ages at lupus onset and diagnosis were 10.0 +/- 2.53 years and 11.2 +/- 2.53 years, respectively. Mean time at onset of renal disease following SLE symptoms onset was 1.22 +/- 0.93 years. All cases were misdiagnosed prior to presentation; diagnosis was delayed in nine patients. Lupus activity was mild, moderate and severe in two, five and four patients, respectively. Hypertension (n = 5), nephrotic syndrome (n = 6), microerythrocyturia (n = 6) and acute renal failure (n = 7) were associated morbidities. Of the 27 presenting clinical features, 17 were nondiagnostic, while 10 were diagnostic. Fever (n = 9) was a major nondiagnostic symptom; major diagnostic manifestations were lupus nephritis (n = 11), arthritis (n = 10) and serositis (n = 7). Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed in three. The glomerular lesions were nonproliferative (n = 1), focal (n = 3) and diffuse (n = 7) proliferative lupus nephritis. Complete remission rate at end-point was 71.4%. Fourteen percent of the patients relapsed. Renal survival and mortality rates were 86.0% and 30.0%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In this study, severe renal and extrarenal comorbidities were common; mortality rate was also high. High frequency of misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis were probably responsible for these. PMID:17668644

  3. Development of Th17-associated interstitial kidney inflammation in lupus-prone mice lacking the gene encoding Signal Transduction and Activator of Transcription-1 (STAT-1)

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Gloria; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Ajami, Bahareh; Haddon, David J.; Chu, Alvina D.; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Haynes, Winston A.; Diep, Vivian; Steinman, Larry; Faix, James; Utz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling is a central pathogenic pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and therapeutics targeting IFN-I signaling are in development. Multiple proteins with overlapping function participate in IFN signaling, but the signaling events downstream of receptor engagement are unclear. We employed highly-multiplexed assays to characterize autoantibody production, cytokine/chemokine profiles, and Signal Transduction and Activators of Transcription (STAT) phosphorylation to investigate the individual roles of IFNAR2, IRF9 and STAT1 in MRL/lpr (lpr) mice. Surprisingly, we found that Stat1−/−, but not Irf9−/− or Ifnar2−/− mice, developed interstitial nephritis characterized by infiltration with RORγT+ lymphocytes, macrophages and eosinophils. Despite pronounced interstitial kidney disease and abnormal kidney function, Stat1−/− mice had decreased proteinuria, glomerulonephritis and autoantibody production. Phospho-specific flow cytometry (phosphoflow) revealed shunting of STAT phosphorylation from STAT1 to STAT3/4. In summary, we describe unique contributions of STAT1 to pathology in different kidney compartments, and provide novel insight into tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) a poorly understood complication that predicts end-stage kidney disease in SLE patients. PMID:26636548

  4. Anti-C1q autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus patients activate the complement system via both the classical and lectin pathways.

    PubMed

    Thanei, Sophia; Vanhecke, Dominique; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-10-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q) strongly correlate with the occurrence of lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although a direct pathogenic role of anti-C1q has been suggested, the assumed complement-activating capacity remains to be elucidated. Using an ELISA-based assay, we found that anti-C1q activate the classical (CP) and lectin pathways (LP) depending on the anti-C1q immunoglobulin-class repertoire present in the patient's serum. IgG anti-C1q resulted in the activation of the CP as reflected by C4b deposition in the presence of purified C1 and C4 in a dose-dependent manner. The extent of C4b deposition correlated with anti-C1q levels in SLE patients but not in healthy controls. Our data indicate that SLE patient-derived anti-C1q can activate the CP and the LP but not the alternative pathway of complement. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the role of anti-C1q in SLE suggesting a direct link to hypocomplementemia.

  5. Joint European League Against Rheumatism and European Renal Association–European Dialysis and Transplant Association (EULAR/ERA-EDTA) recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bertsias, George K; Tektonidou, Maria; Amoura, Zahir; Aringer, Martin; Bajema, Ingeborg; Berden, Jo H M; Boletis, John; Cervera, Ricard; Dörner, Thomas; Doria, Andrea; Ferrario, Franco; Floege, Jürgen; Houssiau, Frederic A; Ioannidis, John P A; Isenberg, David A; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Lightstone, Liz; Marks, Stephen D; Martini, Alberto; Moroni, Gabriela; Neumann, Irmgard; Praga, Manuel; Schneider, Matthias; Starra, Argyre; Tesar, Vladimir; Vasconcelos, Carlos; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Zakharova, Helena; Haubitz, Marion; Gordon, Caroline; Jayne, David; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis (LN). Methods The available evidence was systematically reviewed using the PubMed database. A modified Delphi method was used to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Results Immunosuppressive treatment should be guided by renal biopsy, and aiming for complete renal response (proteinuria <0.5 g/24 h with normal or near-normal renal function). Hydroxychloroquine is recommended for all patients with LN. Because of a more favourable efficacy/toxicity ratio, as initial treatment for patients with class III–IVA or A/C (±V) LN according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification, mycophenolic acid (MPA) or low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (CY) in combination with glucocorticoids is recommended. In patients with adverse clinical or histological features, CY can be prescribed at higher doses, while azathioprine is an alternative for milder cases. For pure class V LN with nephrotic-range proteinuria, MPA in combination with oral glucocorticoids is recommended as initial treatment. In patients improving after initial treatment, subsequent immunosuppression with MPA or azathioprine is recommended for at least 3 years; in such cases, initial treatment with MPA should be followed by MPA. For MPA or CY failures, switching to the other agent, or to rituximab, is the suggested course of action. In anticipation of pregnancy, patients should be switched to appropriate medications without reducing the intensity of treatment. There is no evidence to suggest that management of LN should differ in children versus adults. Conclusions Recommendations for the management of LN were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus. PMID:22851469

  6. Apoptotic Debris Accumulates on Hematopoietic Cells and Promotes Disease in Murine and Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Rogers, Jennifer L; Monteith, Andrew J; Jiang, Chuancang; Schmitz, John; Clarke, Stephen H; Tarrant, Teresa K; Truong, Young K; Diaz, Marilyn; Fedoriw, Yuri; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-05-15

    Apoptotic debris, autoantibody, and IgG-immune complexes (ICs) have long been implicated in the inflammation associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, it remains unclear whether they initiate immune-mediated events that promote disease. In this study, we show that PBMCs from SLE patients experiencing active disease, and hematopoietic cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr and NZM2410 mice accumulate markedly elevated levels of surface-bound nuclear self-antigens. On dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs), the self-antigens are part of IgG-ICs that promote FcγRI-mediated signal transduction. Accumulation of IgG-ICs is evident on ex vivo myeloid cells from MRL/lpr mice by 10 wk of age and steadily increases prior to lupus nephritis. IgG and FcγRI play a critical role in disease pathology. Passive transfer of pathogenic IgG into IgG-deficient MRL/lpr mice promotes the accumulation of IgG-ICs prior to significant B cell expansion, BAFF secretion, and lupus nephritis. In contrast, diminishing the burden IgG-ICs in MRL/lpr mice through deficiency in FcγRI markedly improves these lupus pathologies. Taken together, our findings reveal a previously unappreciated role for the cell surface accumulation of IgG-ICs in human and murine lupus. PMID:27059595

  7. Btk inhibition treats TLR7/IFN driven murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew T; Pereira, Albertina; Fu, Kai; Samy, Eileen; Wu, Yin; Liu-Bujalski, Lesley; Caldwell, Richard; Chen, Yi-Ying; Tian, Hui; Morandi, Federica; Head, Jared; Koehler, Ursula; Genest, Melinda; Okitsu, Shinji L; Xu, Daigen; Grenningloh, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is expressed in a variety of immune cells and previous work has demonstrated that blocking Btk is a promising strategy for treating autoimmune diseases. Herein, we utilized a tool Btk inhibitor, M7583, to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Btk inhibition in two mouse lupus models driven by TLR7 activation and type I interferon. In BXSB-Yaa lupus mice, Btk inhibition reduced autoantibodies, nephritis, and mortality. In the pristane-induced DBA/1 lupus model, Btk inhibition suppressed arthritis, but autoantibodies and the IFN gene signature were not significantly affected; suggesting efficacy was mediated through inhibition of Fc receptors. In vitro studies using primary human macrophages revealed that Btk inhibition can block activation by immune complexes and TLR7 which contributes to tissue damage in SLE. Overall, our results provide translational insight into how Btk inhibition may provide benefit to a variety of SLE patients by affecting both BCR and FcR signaling.

  8. Heparin-Related Thrombocytopenia Triggered by Severe Status of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shihoko; Ando, Taiki; Oda, Keisuke; Sugita, Manabu; Maeda, Kunimi; Nakiri, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A patient with severe lupus nephritis developed thrombocytopenia during treatment with high-dose steroids. In addition to viral- or disease-induced cytopenia, the pathology was believed to arise from diverse contributing factors, such as thrombotic microangiopathy and heparin-related thrombocytopenia (HIT). By combining plasma exchange therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, we successfully controlled the SLE activity and improved the thrombocytopenia. An antecedent bacterial infection or SLE activity is believed to have contributed to the concurrent HIT. PMID:27699076

  9. Heparin-Related Thrombocytopenia Triggered by Severe Status of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shihoko; Ando, Taiki; Oda, Keisuke; Sugita, Manabu; Maeda, Kunimi; Nakiri, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A patient with severe lupus nephritis developed thrombocytopenia during treatment with high-dose steroids. In addition to viral- or disease-induced cytopenia, the pathology was believed to arise from diverse contributing factors, such as thrombotic microangiopathy and heparin-related thrombocytopenia (HIT). By combining plasma exchange therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, we successfully controlled the SLE activity and improved the thrombocytopenia. An antecedent bacterial infection or SLE activity is believed to have contributed to the concurrent HIT.

  10. Anti-DNA autoantibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blatt, N B; Glick, G D

    1999-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects most of the organs and tissues of the body, causing glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and cerebritis. SLE can be fatal with nephritis, in particular, predicting a poor outcome for patients. In this review, we highlight what has been learned about SLE from the study of mouse models, and pay particular attention to anti-DNA autoantibodies, both as pathological agents of lupus nephritis and as DNA-binding proteins. We summarize the current approaches used to treat SLE and discuss the targeting of anti-DNA autoantibodies as a new treatment for lupus nephritis.

  11. Anti-chromatin antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: a useful marker for lupus nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, R; Vinas, O; Ramos-Casals, M; Font, J; Garcia-Carrasco, M; Siso, A; Ramirez, F; Machuca, Y; Vives, J; Ingelmo, M; Burlingame, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Anti-chromatin antibodies have recently been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and it has been suggested that their presence is associated with lupus nephritis. Objective: To assess the prevalence and clinical associations of these antibodies in SLE. Methods: The presence of anti-chromatin antibodies in 100 patients with SLE was investigated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To determine the specificity of these antibodies, 100 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 30 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), 10 with systemic sclerosis, and 100 normal controls were also tested. Results: Positive levels were detected in 69/100 (69%) patients with SLE. In contrast, they were found in only 8/100 (8%) of those with primary Sjögren's syndrome, in 1/10 (10%) with systemic sclerosis, in 2/30 (7%) with primary APS, and in none of the 100 healthy controls. Patients with anti-chromatin antibodies had a twofold higher prevalence of lupus nephropathy than those without these antibodies (58% v 29%, p<0.01). A significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-chromatin antibodies and disease activity score as measured by the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM; p=0.011). Conclusions: The measurement of anti-chromatin antibodies appears to be a useful addition to the laboratory tests that can help in the diagnosis and treatment of SLE. These antibodies are both sensitive and specific for SLE, and are a useful marker for an increased risk of lupus nephritis. PMID:12695155

  12. Urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein as biomarkers of renal disease activity in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Watson, L; Midgley, A; Pilkington, C; Tullus, K; Marks, Sd; Holt, Rcl; Jones, Ca; Beresford, Mw

    2012-04-01

    A higher proportion of patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) will have renal involvement compared with adult-onset disease, some progressing to renal failure in adulthood. Histological examination is the gold standard for diagnosing lupus nephritis (LN), but its invasive nature limits routine use. Using cross-sectional cohort analysis, we aimed to determine whether urinary concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP10) are biomarkers of active LN. Sixty JSLE patients recruited to the UK JSLE Cohort Study were categorized according to the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) activity index. Patients with active renal JSLE (n = 8; renal BILAG score A, B) had significantly higher urinary MCP1 concentrations than patients with inactive renal disease (n = 52; renal BILAG score C, D, E; 582 pg/mg creatinine [Cr], 207 pg/mg Cr; p = 0.018) or healthy controls (n = 23; 117 pg/mg Cr; p = 0.005). Urinary AGP concentration was significantly elevated in patients with active renal disease compared with inactive renal disease (1517 ng/mg Cr, 485 ng/mg Cr; p = 0.027) or healthy controls (313 ng/mg Cr; p = 0.013). Urinary IP10 concentration was not significantly different between groups, but did strongly correlate with uMCP and uAGP levels (rho = 0.38, p = 0.009; rho = 0.33, p = 0.021). Urinary MCP1 and AGP are biomarkers of LN, providing insight into its pathophysiology. Longitudinal studies are warranted.

  13. Renal infarction due to lupus vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Varalaxmi, B; Sandeep, P; Sridhar, A V S S N; Raveendra, P; Kishore, C Krishna; Ram, R; Kumar, V Siva

    2015-08-01

    In the ISN/RPS 2003 classification of lupus nephritis (LN) renal vascular lesions are not mentioned. We present a patient with postpartum lupus vasculopathy. The renal biopsy in our patient showed concentric intimal thickening with narrowed lumen. No inflammatory changes were found. It also revealed immunoglobulin and complement deposition on the wall of the arteriole. These changes indicate lupus vasculopathy. The glomeruli revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, with wire loops and cellular crescent in one glomerulus. The patient showed improvement with immunosuppression.

  14. Radical improvement of signs and symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus when treated with hemodiafiltration with endogenous reinfusion dialysis.

    PubMed

    Solano, Francesco Giuseppe; Bellei, Elisa; Cuoghi, Aurora; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Bruni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the kidney, immune complexes and autoantibodies activate mesangial cells that secrete cytokines that can further amplify inflammatory processes. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with lupus nephritis accompanied by periods of exacerbation of SLE, with necrotic-like skin lesions, psoriatic arthritis without skin psoriasis, purpura of the lower limb, petechial rash, joint pain, fever, eyelid edema with bilateral conjunctival hyperemia and itching. The patient underwent a dialytic treatment of hemodiafiltration with endogenous reinfusion. The technique uses the super-high-flux membrane Synclear 02 (SUPRA treatment) coupled with an adsorbent cartridge that has affinity for many toxins and mediators. Fever and joint pain were immediately reduced after treatment and, subsequently, there was a notable reduction of the skin damage. Prednisone and immunosuppressive drugs were gradually reduced until complete suspension. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was performed for identification of proteins captured by a resin bed during a dialysis session of the patient. This technique identified several biomarkers of kidney injuries, uremic toxins, fragments of immunoglobulins, antigens involved in antiphospholipid syndrome and a new marker (α-defensin) that correlated significantly with disease activity. The removal of these different proteins could possibly provide an explanation of the improvement in the patient's symptoms and the normalization of her SLE. SUPRA coupled with an adsorption may be a promising new technique for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:26034748

  15. Radical Improvement of Signs and Symptoms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus when Treated with Hemodiafiltration with Endogenous Reinfusion Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Francesco Giuseppe; Bellei, Elisa; Cuoghi, Aurora; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Bruni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the kidney, immune complexes and autoantibodies activate mesangial cells that secrete cytokines that can further amplify inflammatory processes. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with lupus nephritis accompanied by periods of exacerbation of SLE, with necrotic-like skin lesions, psoriatic arthritis without skin psoriasis, purpura of the lower limb, petechial rash, joint pain, fever, eyelid edema with bilateral conjunctival hyperemia and itching. The patient underwent a dialytic treatment of hemodiafiltration with endogenous reinfusion. The technique uses the super-high-flux membrane Synclear 02 (SUPRA treatment) coupled with an adsorbent cartridge that has affinity for many toxins and mediators. Fever and joint pain were immediately reduced after treatment and, subsequently, there was a notable reduction of the skin damage. Prednisone and immunosuppressive drugs were gradually reduced until complete suspension. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was performed for identification of proteins captured by a resin bed during a dialysis session of the patient. This technique identified several biomarkers of kidney injuries, uremic toxins, fragments of immunoglobulins, antigens involved in antiphospholipid syndrome and a new marker (α-defensin) that correlated significantly with disease activity. The removal of these different proteins could possibly provide an explanation of the improvement in the patient's symptoms and the normalization of her SLE. SUPRA coupled with an adsorption may be a promising new technique for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:26034748

  16. Coincidence of tuberous sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus-a case report.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Cubero, Carmen; Bejarano Moguel, Verónica; Fernández Gil, M Ángeles; Álvarez Vega, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis, also called Bourneville Pringle disease, is a phakomatosis with potential dermal, nerve, kidney and lung damage. It is characterized by the development of benign proliferations in many organs, which result in different clinical manifestations. It is associated with the mutation of two genes: TSC1 (hamartin) and TSC2 (tuberin), with the change in the functionality of the complex target of rapamycin (mTOR). MTOR activation signal has been recently described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its inhibition could be beneficial in patients with lupus nephritis. We report the case of a patient who began with clinical manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 30 years after the onset of SLE with severe renal disease (tipe IV nephritis) who improved after treatment with iv pulses of cyclophosphamide. We found only two similar cases in the literature, and hence considered the coexistence of these two entities of great interest. PMID:26526985

  17. Coincidence of tuberous sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus-a case report.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Cubero, Carmen; Bejarano Moguel, Verónica; Fernández Gil, M Ángeles; Álvarez Vega, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis, also called Bourneville Pringle disease, is a phakomatosis with potential dermal, nerve, kidney and lung damage. It is characterized by the development of benign proliferations in many organs, which result in different clinical manifestations. It is associated with the mutation of two genes: TSC1 (hamartin) and TSC2 (tuberin), with the change in the functionality of the complex target of rapamycin (mTOR). MTOR activation signal has been recently described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its inhibition could be beneficial in patients with lupus nephritis. We report the case of a patient who began with clinical manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 30 years after the onset of SLE with severe renal disease (tipe IV nephritis) who improved after treatment with iv pulses of cyclophosphamide. We found only two similar cases in the literature, and hence considered the coexistence of these two entities of great interest.

  18. Remission of systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity with regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-35 in Murphy Roths Large (MRL)/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Wong, C K; Dong, J; Chu, M; Jiao, D; Kam, N W; Lam, C W K; Tam, L S

    2015-08-01

    The immunological mechanisms mediated by regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-35 are unclear in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) regulatory T (Treg ) and IL-10(+) regulatory B (Breg ) cells and related immunoregulatory mechanisms in a female Murphy Roths Large (MRL)/lpr mouse model of spontaneous lupus-like disease, with or without IL-35 treatment. A remission of histopathology characteristics of lupus flare and nephritis was observed in the MRL/lpr mice upon IL-35 treatment. Accordingly, IL-35 and IL-35 receptor subunits (gp130 and IL-12Rβ2) and cytokines of MRL/lpr and BALB/c mice (normal controls) were measured. The increased anti-inflammatory cytokines and decreased proinflammatory cytokines were possibly associated with the restoration of Treg and Breg frequency in MRL/lpr mice with IL-35 treatment, compared to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treatment. mRNA expressions of Treg -related FoxP3, IL-35 subunit (p35 and EBI3) and soluble IL-35 receptor subunit (gp130 and IL12Rβ2) in splenic cells were up-regulated significantly in IL-35-treated mice. Compared with the PBS treatment group, IL-35-treated MRL/lpr mice showed an up-regulation of Treg -related genes and the activation of IL-35-related intracellular Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signal pathways, thereby indicating the immunoregulatory role of IL-35 in SLE. These in vivo findings may provide a biochemical basis for further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms of IL-35 for the treatment of autoimmune-mediated inflammation.

  19. Anti-nucleosome and anti-chromatin antibodies are present in active systemic lupus erythematosus but not in the cutaneous form of the disease.

    PubMed

    Souza, A; da Silva, L M; Oliveira, F R; Roselino, A M F; Louzada-Junior, P

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the presence of anti-nucleosome (anti-NCS) and anti-chromatin (anti-CRT) antibodies in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) compared with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 154 subjects were evaluated: 54 patients presenting CLE, 66 patients with active SLE and 34 with inactive SLE. Lupus activity was assessed using the disease activity index (SLEDAI). Anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only one of 54 patients with CLE tested positive for both anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies. The prevalence of anti-CRT antibodies was significantly higher in active SLE (84.8%) when compared with inactive SLE (26.4%) and CLE (1.8%) (P < 0.001). Anti-NCS antibodies were also more prevalent in active SLE patients (74.2%) than inactive SLE (11.7%) and CLE patients (1.8%) (P < 0.001). The presence of anti-CRT and anti-NCS antibodies was correlated to disease activity in patients with SLE (r = 0.4937, r = 0.5621, respectively). Furthermore, the detection of both antibodies was correlated with disease activity in patients with SLE who tested negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.4754 for anti-NCS and r = 0.4281 for anti-CRT). The presence of these two auto-antibodies was strongly associated with renal damage in patients with SLE (OR = 13.1, for anti-CRT antibodies and OR = 25.83, for anti-NCS antibodies). The anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were not found in CLE. In patients with SLE, there is a correlation of these antibodies with disease activity and active nephritis. When compared with anti-dsDNA antibodies, anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were more sensitive in detecting disease activity and kidney damage in lupus patients.

  20. Circulating levels of soluble MER in lupus reflect M2c activation of monocytes/macrophages, autoantibody specificities and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by impaired efferocytosis and aberrant activation of innate immunity. We asked if shedding of MER receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) and AXL into soluble (s) ectodomains was related to immunological and clinical aspects of SLE. Methods Levels of sMER and sAXL in the plasma of 107 SLE patients and 45 matched controls were measured by ELISA. In 40 consecutive SLE patients, we examined potential correlations between either sMER or sAXL and plasma levels of sCD163, a marker of M2 activation. All three soluble receptors were measured in supernatants of monocytes/macrophages cultured in various immunological conditions. Membrane expression of MerTK, AXL and CD163 was assessed by flow cytometry. Results Both sMER and sAXL were associated with anti-chromatin and anti-phospholipid autoantibodies, and with hematological and renal involvement. However, sMER and sAXL did not significantly correlate with each other; sAXL correlated with growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), whereas sMER correlated with reduced free protein S (PROS) levels. Only sMER showed significant associations with lupus-specific anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, anti-ribonucleoprotein (anti-RNP) and anti-Ro60 autoantibodies. Strong correlations with disease activity indices (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), complement reduction, titer of circulating anti-dsDNA) were found for sMER, not for sAXL. Patients with active SLEDAI, nephritis, anti-dsDNA and anti-Ro60 positivity showed higher levels of sMER compared to controls. Levels of sMER, not sAXL, correlated with sCD163 levels, and these correlated with SLEDAI. Production of sMER and sCD163 occurred under “M2c” polarizing conditions, whereas sAXL was released upon type-I IFN exposure. Conclusions Alterations in homeostasis of anti-inflammatory and efferocytic “M2c” monocytes/macrophages may have a role in immunopathogenesis of SLE. PMID:24325951

  1. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A M E G; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  2. Specific systemic lupus erythematosus disease manifestations in the six months prior to conception are associated with similar disease manifestations during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, S K; Massarotti, E; Guan, H; Fine, A; Bermas, B L; Costenbader, K H

    2015-10-01

    Past studies have focused on aggregate lupus disease activity during pregnancy and have produced conflicting results. Our study evaluated lupus activity based on involvement of five specific organ systems during the six months prior to conception and during pregnancy. We assessed 147 pregnancies among 113 women followed at Brigham and Women's Lupus Center, 1990-2013. Organ-specific activity included hematologic disorder, nephritis, skin disease, arthritis, and serositis. We hypothesized that the presence of organ-specific activity six months prior to conception would increase the risk for that same type of activity during pregnancy. Our study population was 68% white; 100% had a positive ANA and 30% had a history of nephritis. Among women with organ-specific lupus activity during the six months before conception, the crude odds for the same type of activity during pregnancy was 7.7- to 32.5-fold higher compared to women without that type of activity immediately before conception. An adjusted logistic regression model also indicated significantly higher odds of organ-specific activity during pregnancy if that type of activity were present six months before conception. Approaching lupus based on specific organ systems may be a useful way for women and their physicians to consider the potential risk for disease activity during pregnancy.

  3. What Is Lupus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... better about themselves Remain more active. Pregnancy and Contraception for Women With Lupus Women with lupus can ... harmful to an unborn baby may want reliable birth control. Recent studies have shown that oral contraceptives (birth ...

  4. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-02-01

    Kidney involvement affects 40-60% of patients with lupus, and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, "off target" effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, and BUN seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with lupus nephritis. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  5. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials.

  6. Childhood- and adult-onset lupus: an update of similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Papadimitraki, Eva D; Isenberg, David A

    2009-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune rheumatic disease. Although its highest prevalence is among women of childbearing age, the disease is not confined within this population. A total of 15-20% of cases of SLE are diagnosed in children younger than 16 years (childhood-onset lupus). Although there have been few studies directly comparing childhood- to adult-onset lupus, there is substantial evidence to suggest that pediatric lupus patients display some differences in their disease profile compared with adult-onset populations. Overall, an increased male-to-female ratio, a higher prevalence of nephritis and CNS involvement necessitating a more sustained need for steroids and immnosuppressive drugs, and a higher prevalence of progression to end-stage renal disease are distinguishing features of childhood-onset lupus. In contrast, a higher prevalence of pulmonary involvement, arthritis and discoid lupus are reported in adult-onset SLE patients. Furthermore, childhood-onset lupus patients may experience a serious negative impact on their psychosocial and physical development, issues that pose extra challenges to healthcare providers. Growth delay, osteoporosis, the psychological effect of steroid-induced alterations of the physical image, and often poor treatment compliance are the issues that need to be addressed in pediatric lupus populations. In this review, we compare the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features, and treatment options of childhood- and adult-onset lupus, and comment on the applicability of the instruments that measure activity, severity and cumulative disease damage in childhood-onset disease. In addition, we highlight special issues of concern for pediatric lupus patients, discussing the significance in the transition from pediatric to adult rheumatology care.

  7. Lupus anticoagulant and history of thrombosis are not associated with persistent endothelial cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Frijns, C J M; Derksen, R H W M; De Groot, PH G; Algra, A; Fijnheer, R

    2001-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), especially lupus anticoagulant (LAC), characterize systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients at increased risk for arterial and venous thromboembolic complications. It has been reported that purified human anti-phospholipid antibodies cause endothelial cell activation in in vitro experiments. In order to investigate whether increased endothelial cell activation is associated with thromboembolic events in SLE patients with LAC, we measured plasma levels of thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand factor (vWf), sP-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and ED1-fibronectin in a study of 76 patients with SLE. Patients were subdivided on the basis of: no history of thrombosis and LAC-negative (n = 22) or LAC-positive (n = 17); positive history of thrombosis and LAC-negative (n = 16) or LAC-positive (n = 21). The median SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was 4. Although concentrations of sTM, vWf, sP-selectin and sVCAM-1 were significantly elevated in SLE compared with values in healthy controls, they did not differ between the four groups, between patients with or without history of thrombosis, and between patients with or without LAC. Presence of anticardiolipin antibodies could not explain these negative findings. Adjustment of the concentrations for significantly associated variables, such as age, hypertension, smoking, immunosuppressive treatment and concentrations of creatinine, cholesterol and homocysteine, did not change the main results of the study. Only sTM was significantly lower in patients with both LAC and thrombosis than in patients without both these features after adjustment for serum creatinine concentrations. In conclusion, we did not find an association between endothelial cell activation and presence of LAC or history of thrombosis in SLE. PMID:11472438

  8. Disease activity and damage accrual during the early disease course in a multinational inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nossent, J; Kiss, E; Rozman, B; Pokorny, G; Vlachoyiannopoulos, P; Olesinska, M; Marchesoni, A; Mosca, M; Påi, S; Manger, K; Schneider, M; Nielsen, H; van Vollenhoven, R; Swaak, T

    2010-07-01

    An inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus from 14 European centres was followed for up to 5 years in order to describe the current early disease course. At inclusion patients (n = 200, 89% female, mean age 35 years, 97% Caucasian, mean SLEDAI 12.2) fulfilled a mean of 6.5 ACR classification criteria. The most prevalent criteria were antinuclear Ab presence (97%) followed by anti-dsDNA Ab (74%), arthritis (69%), leukocytopenia (54%) and malar rash (53%), antiphospholipid Ab (48%) and anti-synovial membrane Ab (21.6%). Clinical signs of lupus nephritis (LN) were present in 39% with biopsy-confirmed LN seen in 25%. Frequent additional findings were hypocomplementaemia (54%), anti-SSA Ab (49%), alopecia (26%) and Raynaud's phenomenon (31%). There were few regional differences in disease presentation and management. One and 5-year survival rates were 99% and 97% respectively. During the mean follow-up of 4.1 years 25% entered a state of early disease quiescence by global physician assessment, but the overall risk of subsequent flare was 60%. Maximum SLEDAI scores decreased over time, but 45% of patients accrued damage (SDI >or=1) for which baseline presence of proteinuria and persistent disease activity were independent predictors. The results indicate minor differences in SLE presentation and treatment within various regions of Europe and a high diagnostic reliance on anti-dsDNA Ab. Despite early reductions in disease activity and improved mortality, the risk for disease flare and damage development is, however, still substantial, especially in patients not entering an early remission.

  9. Serum cystatin C, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in juvenile and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Correlation with clinical manifestations, disease activity and damage.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Abd El Baky, Abeer M Nour El Din; Assal, Heba S; Farid, Tarek M; Rasheed, Inas A; Thabet, Eman H

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially devastating outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is important to identify reliable, non-invasive methods to assess the kidneys in patients with SLE. The aim of the study was to measure the level of novel markers of renal involvement in these patients and assess their correlation with disease activity and damage. Sixtyone patients with SLE (33 adults and 28 juvenile) were included in the study. Fifty-two ageand sex-matched healthy individuals served as controls. Full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations were performed and disease activity and damage were assessed for all patients. Renal bio-markers including serum cystatin C, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (UNGAL) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (UNAG) were assessed in patients and controls. There was a significant increase in serum cystatin C, UNGAL and UNAG levels in the adult SLE patients compared with controls (P = 0.000, P = 0.013 and P = 0.018, respectively); serum cystatin C and UNGAL levels were higher in the juvenile patients compared with controls (P = 0.038 and P = 0.000, respectively). Serum cystatin C significantly correlated with the damage index, renal biopsy class and negatively with the serum albumin; UNGAL correlated with albuminuria and the level of nephritis and UNAG negatively correlated with serum albumin level. Our study suggests that serum cystatin C, UNGAL and UNAG are important markers of LN and both cystatin C and UNAG would help in predicting the renal biopsy class.

  10. Towards new avenues in the management of lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mok, C C

    2016-04-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) carries substantial morbidity and mortality. Conventional immunosuppressive agents (cyclophosphamide and azathioprine) have suboptimal efficacy and substantial toxicity. Mycophenolate mofetil has emerged as an alternative agent for both induction and maintenance therapy in lupus nephritis because of its reduced gonadal toxicity, despite its failure to demonstrate superiority over cyclophosphamide in pivotal studies. The calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus has equivalent efficacy to cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil for inducing remission of lupus nephritis. Although rituximab has shown promise in refractory lupus nephritis, combining rituximab with mycophenolate mofetil as initial therapy offers no additional benefit. Considerable interethnic variation is evident in the efficacy and tolerability of the various immunosuppressive regimens, which necessitates individualized treatment and comparison of the efficacy of new regimens across different ethnic groups. For example, low-dose combinations of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil seem to be more effective than pulse cyclophosphamide as induction therapy in Chinese patients. The same regimen has also been used successfully to treat refractory proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis in patients of various ethnic groups. Finally, novel serum and urinary biomarkers are being validated for diagnosis, prognostic stratification and early recognition of flares in lupus nephritis. PMID:26729459

  11. Inhibition of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway attenuates renal disease in nephrotoxic serum nephritis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Campbell, Sean R; Broder, Anna; Herlitz, Leal; Abadi, Maria; Wu, Ping; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Burkly, Linda C; Putterman, Chaim

    2012-11-01

    Previously it was shown that the TNF superfamily member TWEAK (TNFSF12) acts through its receptor, Fn14, to promote proinflammatory responses in kidney cells, including the production of MCP-1, RANTES, IP-10 and KC. In addition, the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway promotes mesangial cell proliferation, vascular cell activation, and renal cell death. To study the relevance of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in the pathogenesis of antibody-induced nephritis using the mouse model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTN), we induced NTN by passive transfer of rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies into Fn14 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. Severe proteinuria as well as renal histopathology were induced in WT but not in Fn14 KO mice. Similarly, a pharmacologic approach of anti-TWEAK mAb administration into WT mice in the NTN model significantly ameliorated proteinuria and improved kidney histology. Anti-TWEAK treatment did not affect the generation of mouse anti-rabbit antibodies; however, within the kidney there was a significant decrease in glomerular immunoglobulin deposition, as well as macrophage infiltrates and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The mechanism of action is most likely due to reductions in downstream targets of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling, including reduced renal expression of MCP-1, VCAM-1, IP-10, RANTES as well as Fn14 itself, and other molecular pathways associated with fibrosis in anti-TWEAK treated mice. Thus, TWEAK/Fn14 interactions are instrumental in the pathogenesis of nephritis in the NTN model, apparently mediating a cascade of pathologic events locally in the kidney rather than by impacting the systemic immune response. Disrupting TWEAK/Fn14 interactions may be an innovative kidney-protective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis and other antibody-induced renal diseases.

  12. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option.

  13. Lupus - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America -- www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

  14. Understanding and Managing Pregnancy in Patients with Lupus

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Guilherme Ramires; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; de Jesus, Nilson Ramires; dos Santos, Flávia Cunha; Klumb, Evandro Mendes; Carrasco, Mario García; Levy, Roger Abramino

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystemic autoimmune disease that occurs predominantly in women of fertile age. The association of SLE and pregnancy, mainly with active disease and especially with nephritis, has poorer pregnancy outcomes, with increased frequency of preeclampsia, fetal loss, prematurity, growth restriction, and newborns small for gestational age. Therefore, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk condition, should be monitored frequently during pregnancy and delivery should occur in a controlled setting. Pregnancy induces dramatic immune and neuroendocrine changes in the maternal body in order to protect the fetus from immunologic attack and these modifications can be affected by SLE. The risk of flares depends on the level of maternal disease activity in the 6–12 months before conception and is higher in women with repeated flares before conception, in those who discontinue useful medications and in women with active glomerulonephritis at conception. It is a challenge to differentiate lupus nephritis from preeclampsia and, in this context, the angiogenic and antiangiogenic cytokines are promising. Prenatal care of pregnant patients with SLE requires close collaboration between rheumatologist and obstetrician. Planning pregnancy is essential to increase the probability of successful pregnancies. PMID:26246905

  15. Reduced expressions of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins in CD14+ monocytes and normal CD14 soluble levels in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Liphaus, B L; Kiss, M H B; Carrasco, S; Goldenstein-Schainberg, C

    2013-08-01

    In order to evaluate Fas and Bcl-2 expressions in CD14+ monocytes, to measure soluble CD14 serum levels and to analyze the relationships with lupus nephritis and disease activity, we enrolled 41 patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and 27 healthy volunteers. Disease activity was determined by SLEDAI score. Peripheral monocytes were stained for CD14, Fas and Bcl-2 molecules, and cellular expressions were determined by flow cytometry. Soluble CD14 levels were measured by a quantitative ELISA kit. JSLE patients, those with active disease and those with nephritis, presented significantly reduced expressions of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins in CD14+ monocytes compared with healthy controls. Significant inverse correlations between percentages of CD14+Fas+ cells, SLEDAI score and anti-dsDNA antibodies were observed. JSLE patients had soluble CD14 levels similar to controls, although sCD14 levels positively correlated with ESR, but not with SLEDAI score. JSLE patients with nephritis also presented sCD14 levels similar to controls. In conclusion, the reduced expressions of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins in CD14+ monocytes from JSLE patients depict that monocyte apoptotic mechanisms may be important in lupus pathogenesis.

  16. Characteristics of azathioprine use and cessation in a longitudinal lupus cohort

    PubMed Central

    Croyle, Lucy; Hoi, Alberta; Morand, Eric F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines for azathioprine (AZA) use in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including indications for initiation and cessation, are lacking. Clinical decision-making could be improved if reasons for cessation of AZA treatment were standardised. Methods We determined the characteristics of AZA use in a cohort of patients with SLE and evaluated reasons for AZA cessation. Patients with SLE in a single centre had longitudinal recording of disease activity (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI)-2k), laboratory investigations and treatment from 2007 to 2012. Results Of 183 patients studied, 67 used AZA on at least one occasion. There was no significant difference between AZA users and non-users in age or American College of Rheumatology criteria. Compared with those not treated with AZA, patients treated with AZA had higher disease activity (time-adjusted mean SLEDAI 5.2±0.3 vs 3.8±0.3, p=0.0028) and damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)-SDI 1.6±0.3 vs 1.2±0.1, p=0.0445), and were more likely to have a positive dsDNA (p=0.0130) and receive glucocorticoids (p<0.0001). AZA therapy was ceased in 30/67 (45%) patients. The predominant reasons for cessation were treatment de-escalation 14 (47%), treatment failure 12 (40%) and toxicity 3 (10%). AZA was switched to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in 9/12 (75%) of treatment failures, and this choice was strongly associated with active lupus nephritis. Conclusions AZA toxicity was uncommon, and many patients ceased therapy in the context of treatment de-escalation. However, the frequent development of active lupus nephritis requiring MMF suggests the need to distinguish refractoriness, under-treatment and non-adherence to AZA in patients with SLE. These findings suggest that future studies of AZA metabolite measurement could prove valuable in the management of SLE. PMID:26322237

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Neuroretinitis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Das, Indrani

    2015-10-01

    Neuroretinitis is the inflammation of retina and optic nerve. It is associated with optic disc edema accompanied by peripapillary or macular hard exudates. A 17 yr old female presented with headache and nausea of five days duration. She had periorbital edema and mild splenomegaly. Neurological assessment was non-contributory. She was found to have pancytopenia, albuminuria and a high ESR. Thereafter she developed blurring of vision of both eyes. Opthalmological examination showed it to be due to bilateral neuroretinitis. ANA and anti-ds DNA were strongly positive. Renal biopsy with immunofluorescence study revealed diffuse global proliferative lupus nephritis with active lesions [class IV-G (A)]. She was diagnosed as a case of SLE presenting with neuroretinitis. PMID:27608700

  18. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant. PMID:27355205

  19. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients.

    PubMed

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant.

  20. Renal involvement in lupus is characterized by unique DNA methylation changes in naïve CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Renauer, Paul; Jeffries, Matlock A; Merrill, Joan T; McCune, W Joseph; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multi-system disease characterized by wide-spread DNA methylation changes. To identify epigenetic susceptibility loci for lupus nephritis, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in naïve CD4+ T cells were compared between two sets of lupus patients with and without a history of renal involvement. A total of 56 lupus patients (28 with renal involvement and 28 without renal involvement), and 56 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls were included in our study. We identified 191 CG sites and 121 genes that were only differentially methylated in lupus patients with but not without a history of renal involvement. The tyrosine kinase gene TNK2 involved in cell trafficking and tissue invasion, and the phosphatase gene DUSP5 which dephosphorylates and inhibits the ERK signaling pathway, were among the most hypomethylated. Independent of disease activity, renal involvement is characterized by more robust demethylation in interferon regulated genes differentially methylated in both sets of lupus patients with and without renal involvement (fold change 1.4, P = 0.0014). The type-I interferon master regulator gene IRF7 is only hypomethylated in lupus patients with renal involvement. IRF-7 is an upstream transcription factor that regulates several loci demethylated only with renal involvement such as CD80, HERC5, IFI44, IRF7, ISG15, ISG20, ITGAX, and PARP12 (P = 1.78 × 10(-6)). Among the CG sites only hypomethylated with renal involvement, CG10152449 in CHST12 has a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 64.3% for stratifying lupus patients for a history of renal involvement (P = 0.0029). Our data identified novel epigenetic susceptibility loci that are differentially methylated with renal involvement in lupus. These loci will help better understand lupus nephritis, and provide a proof of principle for the potential applicability of specific methylation changes as predictors for specific organ involvement in lupus. PMID

  1. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  2. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  3. Is there any correlation between high sensitive CRP and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed

    Rezaieyazdi, Z; Sahebari, M; Hatef, M R; Abbasi, B; Rafatpanah, H; Afshari, J Tavakol; Esmaily, H

    2011-12-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as an inflammatory marker is still controversial. Recently, more sensitive methods, such as high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) have been used to detect micro-inflammation. The role of hs-CRP in lupus flare has not been documented well. We conducted this study to examine the correlation between hs-CRP serum concentrations and disease activity in lupus. Ninety-two SLE patients and 49 healthy controls contributed to our study. Most confounding factors influencing the hs-CRP values were excluded. Disease activity was estimated using the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI-2K). hs-CRP values were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Serum values of hs-CRP were significantly higher (p < 0.001, z = 3.29) in patients compared with healthy controls. The cutoff point for hs-CRP between patients and controls was 0.93 mg/L (Youden's Index = 0.39). There was no correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and disease activity. Furthermore, hs-CRP values did not correlate with any of the laboratory parameters, except for C3 (p = 0.003, r(s)  = -0.2) and C4 (p = 0.02, r(s) = -0.1). Although hs-CRP serum levels were significantly higher in lupus patients compared with healthy controls, it seems that this marker is not a good indicator for disease activity.

  4. Natural autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Matsiota, P; Druet, P; Dosquet, P; Guilbert, B; Avrameas, S

    1987-01-01

    We have tested the sera of 25 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for antibody activity against a panel of six antigens: DNA, TNP, actin, tubulin, myosin, albumin. Eluates from renal biopsy tissue were also tested. Sera from patients with lupus nephritis were found to contain high titres of IgA antibodies directed against the antigens of the panel, and marked IgG anti-DNA and anti-TNP antibody activity. The IgG anti-TNP antibodies isolated from SLE serum by affinity chromatography on a TNP-immunoadsorbent, were also found to possess anti-DNA activity. Kidney eluates obtained from biopsy specimens of SLE patients contained IgG antibodies strictly specific for DNA in three out of the nine patients tested, while three eluates from the remaining six patients reacted with DNA and TNP and three with DNA and all the other antigens of the panel. These results strongly suggest that in SLE sera there are at least three populations of circulating anti-DNA antibodies: those strictly specific for DNA, those recognizing DNA and TNP and those recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. Furthermore, because six out of nine of the eluates contained antibodies with an absolute or restricted specificity for DNA, this suggests that these antibodies are more often pathogenic than the polyspecific ones recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. PMID:3498588

  5. An Lck-cre transgene accelerates autoantibody production and lupus development in (NZB × NZW)F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R K; Gould, K A

    2016-02-01

    Lupus is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of antinuclear autoantibodies and immune complex-mediated tissue damage. T cells in lupus patients appear to undergo apoptosis at an increased rate, and this enhanced T cell apoptosis has been postulated to contribute to lupus pathogenesis by increasing autoantigen load. However, there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we show that an Lck-cre transgene, which increases T cell apoptosis as a result of T cell-specific expression of cre recombinase, accelerates the development of autoantibodies and nephritis in lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mice. Although the enhanced T cell apoptosis in Lck-cre transgenic mice resulted in an overall decrease in the relative abundance of splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, the proportion of activated CD4(+) T cells was increased and no significant change was observed in the relative abundance of suppressive T cells. We postulate that the Lck-cre transgene promoted lupus by enhancing T cell apoptosis, which, in conjunction with the impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in lupus-prone mice, increased the nuclear antigen load and accelerated the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results also underscore the importance of including cre-only controls in studies using the cre-lox system.

  6. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C.; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E. Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Kidney involvement affects 40–60% of patients with lupus and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, “off target” effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. Methods In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. Results We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, or serum urea seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with LN. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Conclusions Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  7. Alternatively activated dendritic cells derived from systemic lupus erythematosus patients have tolerogenic phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Jing; Lo, Yi; Luk, Daniel; Lau, Chak Sing; Lu, Liwei; Mok, Mo Yin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are potential cell-based therapy in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we generated alternatively activated DCs (aaDCs) by treating monocyte-derived DCs from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and healthy subjects with combination of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vitD3) and dexamethasone followed by lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation. Lupus aaDCs were found to acquire semi-mature phenotype that remained maturation-resistant to immunostimulants. They produced low level of IL-12 but high level of IL-10. They had attenuated allostimulatory effects on T cell activation and proliferation comparable to normal aaDCs and demonstrated differential immunomodulatory effects on naïve and memory T cells. These aaDCs were capable of inducing IL-10 producing regulatory T effectors from naïve T cells whereas they modulated cytokine profile with suppressed production of IFN-γ and IL-17 by co-cultured memory T cells with attenuated proliferation. These aaDCs were shown to be superior to those generated using vitD3 alone in lupus patients.

  8. Pregnancy-related issues in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abha G; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R

    2015-02-01

    While fertility is preserved in females with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), it is well established that pregnancy in these patients is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation, as well as neonatal mortality. Mechanisms underlying these adverse outcomes are poorly understood, and better understanding of these would allow development of targeted and personalized treatment strategies. Established risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes include active disease within 6 months prior to conception and during pregnancy, active nephritis, maternal hypertension, antiphospholipid antibodies and hypocomplementemia. While intensive monitoring is recommended, the comparative effectiveness of appropriate management strategies is unclear. While current strategies are able to achieve live births in 85-90% of pregnancies, certain aspects such as prevention of preterm birth, treatment of congenital heart block due to neonatal lupus and recurrent pregnancy loss despite best management, remains challenging. Pregnancy is also associated with an increased risk of flare of lupus, particularly in patients with active disease at time of conception or within 6 months prior to conception. Pregnant patients with SLE should be followed in a high-risk obstetric clinic, and care should be closely coordinated between the obstetrician and rheumatologist. PMID:25545844

  9. [Treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: myths, certainties and doubts].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Danza, Alvaro; Khamashta, Munther

    2013-12-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with different clinical forms of presentation, including a wide range of severity and organic involvement. Such circumstance, along with the fact of the uncommon nature of the disease and the absence of clinically representative response criteria, make it difficult to design controlled clinical trials in SLE patients. As a result, observational studies have a special relevance, being a source of valuable information of SLE prognosis and outcome as well as of the efficacy and adverse effects of the different therapies. Herein we update some of the main treatments used in SLE. Steroids may have more risks than benefits if used at high doses. New mechanisms of action have been described, supporting the use of lower doses, possibly with the same efficacy and less adverse effects. Intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide still have a role in the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis and other serious SLE manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil has shown its efficacy both as induction and maintenance therapy of selected cases of lupus nephritis. Biological therapies have emerged as new promising options. Although clinical trials have not confirmed a clear superiority of rituximab in SLE, observational studies have shown good response rates in severe SLE manifestations or refractory forms. Belimumab has recently been added to the therapeutic armamentarium of SLE; although its place in clinical practice is not well-defined, it may be recommended in active patients with no response or good tolerance to standard therapies. Hydroxichloroquine improves survival, decreases the risk of thrombosis and flares and is safe in pregnancy, and should be considered the baseline therapy in most SLE patients.

  10. Spontaneous coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active lupus mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Sundaram, V; Tam, M; Parikh, S A

    2015-07-01

    A 33-year-old male with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with acute abdominal pain and was found to have lupus mesenteric vasculitis on imaging and during exploratory laparotomy. Post laparotomy he continued to have persistent nausea and dyspepsia and an electrocardiogram showed evidence of an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergency cardiac catheterization showed evidence of thrombotic right coronary artery occlusion. His coronaries were otherwise normal with no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease. Extensive workup with trans-esophageal echo, serologies for antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and bubble study was negative. This effectively ruled out Libman-Sacks endocarditis, APS-induced arterial thrombus and paradoxical emboli as potential causes of his STEMI. By exclusion of other causes, the etiology of his STEMI was felt to be secondary to in-situ coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active SLE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with SLE presenting with both lupus mesenteric vasculitis and in-situ coronary arterial thrombosis in the absence of APS.

  11. Impaired T cell protein kinase C delta activation decreases ERK pathway signaling in idiopathic and hydralazine-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Gabriela; Fang, Jing Yuan; Wu, Ailing; Sawalha, Amr H; Richardson, Bruce

    2007-10-15

    T cells from patients with lupus or treated with the lupus-inducing drug hydralazine have defective ERK phosphorylation. The reason for the impaired signal transduction is unknown but important to elucidate, because decreased T cell ERK pathway signaling causes a lupus-like disease in animal models by decreasing DNA methyltransferase expression, leading to DNA hypomethylation and overexpression of methylation-sensitive genes with subsequent autoreactivity and autoimmunity. We therefore analyzed the PMA stimulated ERK pathway phosphorylation cascade in CD4(+) T cells from patients with lupus and in hydralazine-treated cells. The defect in these cells localized to protein kinase C (PKC)delta. Pharmacologic inhibition of PKCdelta or transfection with a dominant negative PKCdelta mutant caused demethylation of the TNFSF7 (CD70) promoter and CD70 overexpression similar to lupus and hydralazine-treated T cells. These results suggest that defective T cell PKCdelta activation may contribute to the development of idiopathic and hydralazine-induced lupus through effects on T cell DNA methylation.

  12. Clinical and financial burden of active lupus in Greece: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Bertsias, G; Karampli, E; Sidiropoulos, P; Gergianaki, I; Drosos, A; Sakkas, L; Garyfallos, A; Tzioufas, A; Vassilopoulos, D; Tsalapaki, C; Sfikakis, P; Panopoulos, S; Athanasakis, K; Perna, A; Psomali, D; Kyriopoulos, J; Boumpas, D

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of the medical and economic burden of chronic disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are valuable for clinical and health policy decisions. We performed a chart-based review of 215 adult SLE patients with active autoantibody-positive disease at the predefined ratio of 30% severe (involvement of major organs requiring treatment) and 70% non-severe, followed at seven hospital centres in Greece. We reviewed 318 patients consecutively registered over three months (sub-study). Disease activity, organ damage, flares and healthcare resource utilization were recorded. Costs were assessed from the third-party payer perspective. Severe SLE patients had chronic active disease more frequently (22.4% vs 4.7%), higher average SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (10.5 vs 6.1) and systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) damage index (1.1 vs 0.6) than non-severe patients. The mean annual direct medical cost was €3741 for severe vs €1225 for non-severe patients. Severe flares, active renal disease and organ damage were independent cost predictors. In the sub-study, 19% of unselected patients were classified as severe SLE, and 30% of them had chronic active disease. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the significant clinical and financial burden of Greek SLE patients with active major organ disease. Among them, 30% display chronic activity, in spite of standard care, which represents a significant unmet medical need.

  13. Assessment of disease activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Massaro, Laura; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of disease activity in patients affected by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) represents an important issue, as recommended by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). Two main types of disease activity measure have been proposed: the global score systems, providing an overall measure of activity, and the individual organ/system assessment scales, assessing disease activity in different organs. All the activity indices included both clinical and laboratory items, related to the disease manifestations. However, there is no gold standard to measure disease activity in patients affected by SLE. In this review, we will analyze the lights and shadows of the disease activity indices, by means of a critical approach. In particular, we will focus on SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG), the most frequently used in randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The evaluation of data from the literature underlined some limitations of these indices, making their application in clinical practice difficult and suggesting the possible use of specific tools in the different subset of SLE patients, in order to capture all the disease features.

  14. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago. A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m2, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA). The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  15. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  16. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index (SRI); a new SLE disease activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Luijten, K M A C; Tekstra, J; Bijlsma, J W J; Bijl, M

    2012-03-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), because of its complex and multisystemic presentation, lacks a reliable and sensitive gold standard for measuring disease activity. In addition, there is no standardized method for defining response to therapy. Several disease activity indices have been developed over the years, each with their own positive and negative aspects. Growing insight in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases like SLE leads to the introduction of specific targeted biologic therapies. To investigate the efficacy of these new biologic agents, disease activity must be monitored regularly by a reliable and validated instrument. Recent studies on new biologics for treatment of SLE use a new composite measurement for disease activity and response in SLE. This new disease activity assessment, called SLE Responder Index (SRI), comprises criteria from three different internationally validated indices, SELENA-SLE Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI), Physician Global Assessment (PGA) and the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) 2004. This review gives an overview of current available disease activity indices in relation to the newly developed composite SRI.

  17. Management considerations for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and implications on therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis Artur; Aikawa, Nadia Emi; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease that may involve various organs and systems. This narrative review focuses on the recent evidence relating to cSLE management. The general management considerations of cSLE patients require the use of validated classification criteria, disease and health-related quality of life tools evaluation, as well as assessments of lupus nephritis biomarkers and cSLE quality indicators. The drug treatment for cSLE patients includes general supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy. Important implications on cSLE therapy are also updated such as infection, vaccination, infertility, pregnancy, contraception, dyslipidemia, physical activity, cancer, bone health, drug pharmacokinetics, adherence, academic outcomes, transition to adult care and cumulative organ damage.

  18. Infection of Female BWF1 Lupus Mice with Malaria Parasite Attenuates B Cell Autoreactivity by Modulating the CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis and Its Downstream Signals PI3K/AKT, NFκB and ERK.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Sayed, Ayat; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A; Mohamed, Amany O; El-Amir, Azza; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mahmoud, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal autoreactivity in B cells. Lymphocytes and their soluble mediators contribute to the disease pathogenesis. We recently demonstrated that infecting lupus mice with malaria confers protection against lupus nephritis by attenuating oxidative stress in both liver and kidney tissues. In the current study, we further investigated B cell autoreactivity in female BWF1 lupus mice after infection with either live or gamma-irradiated malaria, using ELISA, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The lupus mice exhibited a significant elevation in plasma levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β, BAFF and APRIL and a marked elevation of IgG2a, IgG3 and ant-dsDNA autoantibodies compared with normal healthy mice. Infecting lupus mice with live but not gamma-irradiated malaria parasite partially and significantly restored the levels of the soluble mediators that contribute to the progression of lupus. Furthermore, the B cells of lupus mice exhibited an increased proliferative capacity; aberrant overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4; and a marked elevation in responsiveness to their cognate ligand (CXCL12) via aberrant activation of the PI3K/AKT, NFκB and ERK signaling pathways. Interestingly, infecting lupus mice with live but not gamma-irradiated malaria parasite restored a normal proliferative capacity, surface expression of CXCR4 and B cell response to CXCL-12. Taken together, our data present interesting findings that clarify, for the first time, the molecular mechanisms of how infection of lupus mice with malaria parasite controls B cell autoreactivity and thus confers protection against lupus severity.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus with membranous glomerulonephritis and uterine vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Feriozzi, S; Muda, A O; Amini, M; Faraggiana, T; Ancarani, E

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of lupus vasculitis with uterine localization and concurrent membranous nephropathy. Immunofluorescence study suggested the occurrence of an immune complex nephropathy and a pauci-immune pathogenesis of vasculitis. Our case points out the event of tissue damage in two organs mediated by different pathogenetic mechanisms. In addition, uterine vasculitis without pregnancy may be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis.

  20. Macrophage activation syndrome as the initial manifestation of severe juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Favorable response to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Torres Jiménez, Alfonso; Solís Vallejo, Eunice; Zeferino Cruz, Maritza; Céspedes Cruz, Adriana; Sánchez Jara, Berenice

    2014-01-01

    The macrophage activation syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This is a clinicopathological entity characterized by activation of histiocytes with prominent hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and other reticuloendothelial systems. In patients with lupus it may mimic an exacerbation of the disease or infection. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl in whom the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus and macrophage activation syndrome was simultaneously made with response to the use of cyclophosphamide.

  1. Why and how should we measure disease activity and damage in lupus?

    PubMed

    Feld, Joy; Isenberg, David

    2014-06-01

    The assessment of disease activity and flare and differentiating them from permanent damage in patients with SLE is challenging. The SLEDAI, SLEDAI-2K and SELENA-SLEDAI measure global disease activity. The BILAG measures organ-specific activity. The BILAG better captures the change in the different organs at the expense of complexity. The SRI is a composite index incorporating both BILAG and SLEDAI indices and a physician's global assessment. It has been used in the most recent clinical trials. Damage correlates with prognosis; it is assessed by the SLICC/SDI index. This index scores damage whatever the cause, disease or treatment related, or the consequence of concomitant disease. The disease activity and damage indices do not correlate well with the patient's health related quality of life (HRQoL), the degree of disability or the impact of disease. The impact of the patients' joint disease on their HRQoL is assessed via the HAQ questionnaire and the global health status via the SF-36 index, or one of the more recently described lupus specific quality of life indices [Lupus QoL]. The global assessment instruments and the BILAG index can also be used in children and adolescents with SLE. However, a modified paediatric version of the SLICC/SDI damage index is advised. Many advances have been achieved in disease activity and damage measurement in the past 20 years but the problem of how best to capture flare accurately remains.

  2. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  3. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—An Immunological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg) cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth) or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis) may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother's disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology. PMID:26090485

  4. The spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with the disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kusyairi, K A; Gendeh, B S; Sakthiswary, R; Shaharir, S S; Haizlene, A H; Yusof, K H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its association with the disease activity of SLE based on the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). This was a cross-sectional and observational study involving 73 stable SLE patients. All subjects were evaluated for the SLEDAI scores and had nasal endoscopic examination. The most commonly reported symptom was nasal congestion (31.5%) followed by nasal itchiness (26.0%), runny nose (20.5%) and nasal dryness (19.2%). Almost half (42.9%) of the subjects had nasal mucosal abnormalities, which included mucositis, crusting, ulceration, bifid middle turbinate, septal spur, Jacobson's organ, deviated nasal septum, bilateral inferior turbinate hypertrophy, everted uncinate process, nasopharynx cleft and torus palatinus. The median SLEDAI score for subjects with nasal symptoms was significantly higher than subjects without nasal symptoms (p < 0.05). Similarly, subjects with moderate to high activity (SLEDAI scores of 6-19) had a significantly higher frequency of both nasal symptoms and nasal mucosal abnormalities (p < 0.05) compared to subjects with no to mild activity (SLEDAI scores of 0-5).

  5. Association between serum trace element concentrations and the disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sahebari, M; Abrishami-Moghaddam, M; Moezzi, A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, M; Mirfeizi, Z; Esmaily, H; Ferns, G

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a complex, incompletely understood, etiology. Several genetic and environmental factors are suspected to be involved in its aetiology. Oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE and may be affected by trace element status. Zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are essential components of several anti-oxidative enzymes and are also involved in several immune functions. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between serum concentrations of these trace elements and the clinical disease activity of SLE assessed using the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). Serum concentrations of albumin (Alb) (p = 0.001), Se (p = 0.001), Zn (p = 0.001) and the Zn to Cu ratio (Zn/Cu R) (p = 0.001) were lower in patients with SLE than the age- and sex-matched healthy controls. However, only Alb (p = 0.001) and Cu (p = 0.03) were negatively correlated with disease activity, which was supported by regression analysis. In summary, lower serum values of Alb, Zn, Se and Zn/Cu R were found in SLE patients compared with healthy controls; however, in addition to serum Alb concentrations, serum Cu concentrations were also negatively correlated with lupus disease activity.

  6. Common mental disorders and psychological distress in systemic lupus erythematosus are not associated with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Jarpa, E; Babul, M; Calderón, J; González, M; Martínez, M E; Bravo-Zehnder, M; Henríquez, C; Jacobelli, S; González, A; Massardo, L

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is controversial: variations have been reported in frequency, diagnostic assays, associations with disease activity, autoantibodies, and contributing social factors. Eighty-three consecutive non-selected Chilean patients with SLE were evaluated for: (i) 26 common mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-plus); (ii) psychological suffering measured by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); (iii) ACR 1999 neuropsychiatric (NP)SLE criteria; (iv) SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K); (v) cumulative damage (SLICC/ACR); and (vi) anti-ribosomal P antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoassay and immunoblot. Psychiatric diagnoses occurred in 44.6% of patients; the most frequent (21.7%) was major depressive episode (MDE). No association with lupus activity was observed in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis or MDE or psychological suffering. ACR 1999 NPSLE criteria were present in 42.2% of patients, the majority corresponding to mood (28.9%) or anxiety disorders (15.6%). Suicidal risk was present in 9.6% of patients. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies (13.3%) were not associated with DSM-IV diagnosis. Severe psychiatric disorders in SLE are common and not associated with disease activity.

  7. Defects in lysosomal maturation facilitate the activation of innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Monteith, Andrew J.; Kang, SunAh; Scott, Eric; Hillman, Kai; Rajfur, Zenon; Jacobson, Ken; Costello, M. Joseph; Vilen, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in clearing apoptotic debris disrupt tissue and immunological homeostasis, leading to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Herein, we report that macrophages from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice have impaired lysosomal maturation, resulting in heightened ROS production and attenuated lysosomal acidification. Impaired lysosomal maturation diminishes the ability of lysosomes to degrade apoptotic debris contained within IgG–immune complexes (IgG-ICs) and promotes recycling and the accumulation of nuclear self-antigens at the membrane 72 h after internalization. Diminished degradation of IgG-ICs prolongs the intracellular residency of nucleic acids, leading to the activation of Toll-like receptors. It also promotes phagosomal membrane permeabilization, allowing dsDNA and IgG to leak into the cytosol and activate AIM2 and TRIM21. Collectively, these events promote the accumulation of nuclear antigens and activate innate sensors that drive IFNα production and heightened cell death. These data identify a previously unidentified defect in lysosomal maturation that provides a mechanism for the chronic activation of intracellular innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27035940

  8. Defects in lysosomal maturation facilitate the activation of innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Andrew J; Kang, SunAh; Scott, Eric; Hillman, Kai; Rajfur, Zenon; Jacobson, Ken; Costello, M Joseph; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-04-12

    Defects in clearing apoptotic debris disrupt tissue and immunological homeostasis, leading to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Herein, we report that macrophages from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice have impaired lysosomal maturation, resulting in heightened ROS production and attenuated lysosomal acidification. Impaired lysosomal maturation diminishes the ability of lysosomes to degrade apoptotic debris contained within IgG-immune complexes (IgG-ICs) and promotes recycling and the accumulation of nuclear self-antigens at the membrane 72 h after internalization. Diminished degradation of IgG-ICs prolongs the intracellular residency of nucleic acids, leading to the activation of Toll-like receptors. It also promotes phagosomal membrane permeabilization, allowing dsDNA and IgG to leak into the cytosol and activate AIM2 and TRIM21. Collectively, these events promote the accumulation of nuclear antigens and activate innate sensors that drive IFNα production and heightened cell death. These data identify a previously unidentified defect in lysosomal maturation that provides a mechanism for the chronic activation of intracellular innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27035940

  9. Genetic risk and longitudinal disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus using targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, M A; Balzer, L; Taylor, K E; Trupin, L; Nititham, J; Seldin, M F; Singer, A W; Criswell, L A; Barcellos, L F

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors. However, the extent to which genetic risk is causally associated with disease activity is unknown. We utilized longitudinal-targeted maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the causal association between a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 41 established SLE variants and clinically important disease activity as measured by the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) in a multiethnic cohort of 942 individuals with SLE. We did not find evidence of a clinically important SLAQ score difference (>4.0) for individuals with a high GRS compared with those with a low GRS across nine time points after controlling for sex, ancestry, renal status, dialysis, disease duration, treatment, depression, smoking and education, as well as time-dependent confounding of missing visits. Individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses revealed that 12 of the 41 variants were significantly associated with clinically relevant changes in SLAQ scores across time points eight and nine after controlling for multiple testing. Results based on sophisticated causal modeling of longitudinal data in a large patient cohort suggest that individual SLE risk variants may influence disease activity over time. Our findings also emphasize a role for other biological or environmental factors. PMID:27467283

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches to lupus glomerulonephritis: translating animal models to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bagavant, Harini; Kalantarinia, Kambiz; Scindia, Yogesh; Deshmukh, Umesh

    2011-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease frequently affecting the kidney. Renal involvement is characterized by glomerular immune complex deposits and proliferative glomerulonephritis progressing to glomerulosclerosis and kidney failure. The development of systemic lupus erythematosus is regulated genetically, and lupus susceptibility genes have been linked to immune hyper-responsiveness and loss of immune regulation. In addition to the systemic immune defects, recent studies in animal models show that susceptibility to lupus nephritis is influenced by intrinsic renal factors. Thus, renal cell responses to immune-mediated glomerular injury determine disease outcome. This supports the idea that future treatments for lupus nephritis need to focus on regulating end-organ responses. The feasibility of this approach has been shown in animal models of kidney disease. For more than 50 years, the emphasis in management of lupus nephritis has been suppression of autoimmune responses and systemic control of inflammation. This review describes recently developed targeted drug delivery technologies and potential targets that can regulate glomerular cell responses, offering a novel therapeutic approach for lupus nephritis.

  11. Two systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) global disease activity indexes--the SLE Disease Activity Index and the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure--demonstrate different correlations with activation of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Daca, Agnieszka; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Smoleńska, Zaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Jacek M; Bryl, Ewa

    2011-12-01

    Global disease activity measurement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is important for the clinical estimation and adjustment of therapy. By contrast, immune system activation plays a significant role in disease pathogenesis, with CD4+ lymphocytes acting as central cells in the immune response. We investigated which scale better correlates with immunologic changes in the blood of SLE patients, the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) or the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) scale. Samples of peripheral blood were obtained from 45 SLE patients with different disease activity as assessed by the SLEDAI and the SLAM scales on the same day. We assessed the percentage of CD4+ T cells with activation-associated receptors: CD69, CD25int, CD95, HLA-DR, and CD4+ T cells with killing properties containing perforin and granzyme B. Our results indicated that the percentage of CD4+CD69+ and CD4+CD25(int) cells did not correlate with either the SLEDAI or the SLAM scale. Significant and positive correlations were observed between percentages of CD4+CD95+ and CD4+HLA-DR+ lymphocytes and SLE activity, but only when activity was measured using the SLAM scale, not with the SLEDAI scale. The percentage of CD4+perforin+ and CD4+granzyme B+ cells also strongly correlated with disease activity measured only with the SLAM scale. We conclude that the SLAM scale better reflects changes of immune system activity in SLE patients compared with the SLEDAI scale.

  12. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Eudy, A M; Vines, A I; Dooley, M A; Cooper, G S; Parks, C G

    2014-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at a median 13 months since diagnosis. Models estimated prevalence differences in the association of baseline CRP with self-reported flares, adjusting for age, sex, race and education. Active disease or flare was reported by 59% at baseline and 58% at follow-up. Higher CRP (>10 µg/ml vs. <3 µg/ml) was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval (CI): -20, 53%) higher prevalence of flare at baseline and a 26% (95% CI: -9, 62%) higher prevalence of flare at follow-up. These CRP-flare associations were notably stronger in patients with lower education at baseline and in African-Americans at follow-up. These findings suggest that CRP may be a useful marker in studies of SLE health disparities.

  13. Anti-CII antibody as a novel indicator to assess disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    He, C; Mao, T; Feng, Y; Song, T; Qin, C; Yan, R; Feng, P

    2015-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects a variety of organ systems. Anti-dsDNA Abs and complement factors have been used as indicators of lupus activity for more than 50 years. A novel indicator of activation in SLE is reported in this paper. Anti-collagen type II (CII) Ab was obviously elevated in patients with SLE compared to those patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and healthy controls (HCs). Anti-CII-Ab-positive patients with SLE showed significantly higher levels of serum IgG and higher titers of ANA but lower levels of C3 and C4 than controls. A positive correlation was demonstrated between anti-CII Ab and serum IgG in SLE patients (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). The negative correlations of anti-CII Ab with C3 and C4 were observed in SLE patients (r = -0.36, p = 0.0013; r = -0.37, p = 0.0006, respectively). The reduced anti-CII Ab level was accompanied by decreased level of serum IgG and increased levels of C3 and C4 after regular treatment. Therefore, anti-CII Ab could be a novel indicator for monitoring activity of SLE.

  14. Interleukin-9 Is Associated with Elevated Anti-Double-Stranded DNA Antibodies in Lupus-Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Li, Qiao; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming

    2015-04-15

    Interleukin (IL)-9, which is produced mainly by CD4(+) T cells, is implicated in mast cell-related allergic diseases, although its involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pathogenesis remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the presence of IL-9 in lupus-prone MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice and examined the role of IL-9 in lupus pathogenesis. Increased levels of IL-9(+) lymphocytes were detected in the spleens and kidneys of MRL/lpr mice and increased IL-9 levels in the spleen correlated with PNA(+) germinal center (GC) cell expansion. The percentage of CD4(+)IL-9(+) (Th9) cells was increased in MRL/lpr mice and serum IL-9 levels were elevated and closely related to the production of antibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). IL-9 appears to promote B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production, which could be blocked by inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Treatment with neutralizing anti-IL-9 antibody in vivo decreased serum anti-dsDNA-antibody titers and alleviated lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice. Our findings indicate expansion of Th9 cells in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and the correlation of IL-9 with B-cell proliferation and autoantibody production. These findings suggest that IL-9 is a potential therapeutic target for SLE.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Associated Protein Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Is Enhanced in Lupus Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, J. Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), while NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. In order to better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on the NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2×7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines which further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage. PMID:23267025

  16. Neutrophil extracellular trap-associated protein activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is enhanced in lupus macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. To better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2X7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines that further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage.

  17. The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone modulates aberrant T cell responses in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenpu; Berthier, Celine C; Lewis, Emily E; McCune, W Joseph; Kretzler, Matthias; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-10-01

    PPAR-γ agonists can suppress autoimmune responses and renal inflammation in murine lupus but the mechanisms implicated in this process remain unclear. We tested the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone in human lupus and control PBMCs with regard to gene regulation and various functional assays. By Affymetrix microarray analysis, several T cell-related pathways were significantly highlighted in pathway analysis in lupus PBMCs. Transcriptional network analysis showed IFN-γ as an important regulatory node, with pioglitazone treatment inducing transcriptional repression of various genes implicated in T cell responses. Confirmation of these suppressive effects was observed specifically in purified CD4+ T cells. Pioglitazone downregulated lupus CD4+ T cell effector proliferation and activation, while it significantly increased proliferation and function of lupus T regulatory cells. We conclude that PPAR-γ agonists selectively modulate CD4+ T cell function in SLE supporting the concept that pioglitazone and related,-agents should be explored as potential therapies in this disease.

  18. Therapeutic targeting of BET protein BRD4 delays murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shitong; Sun, Yonghua; Sha, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    BRD4 is a member of the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal domain) family proteins that can bind acetylated histones and influence transcription, which are considered as potential therapeutic targets in many distinct diseases. And the BET inhibitor JQ1 has been proven to be effective in suppressing multiple inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to examine the therapeutic potential of JQ1 on a lupus model, MRL-lpr mice. Ten-week-old MRL-lpr mice were treated with JQ1 (oral administration of 200mg/kg) or vehicle for 8weeks. The proteinuria, nephritic damage, serum biochemistry, autoantibodies and cytokines were examined. Splenocytes of MRL-lpr mice were isolated for in vitro experiments. Treatment with JQ1 significantly attenuated the progression of proteinuria and nephritis. The serum concentrations of anti-dsDNA antibody as well as B-cell activating factor (BAFF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1. Importantly, JQ1 improved the survival of lupus mice. In vitro, BAFF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1 (500nM) in the cultures of splenocytes from diseased MRL-lpr mice, which was further supported by a significant reduction in immune complex-mediated activation of human monocytes in vitro by JQ1. Taken together, JQ1 effectively alleviates lupus in MRL-lpr mice by suppressing BAFF, pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity, supporting the therapeutic value of JQ1 in lupus disease. PMID:26590112

  19. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis.

  1. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27041383

  2. Altered glycosylation of complexed native IgG molecules is associated with disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, C; Zapf, J; von Löhneysen, S; Magorivska, I; Biermann, M; Janko, C; Winkler, S; Bilyy, R; Schett, G; Herrmann, M; Muñoz, L E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the redundancy of the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, glycans result in potential ligands for a plethora of lectin receptors found in immune effector cells. Here we analysed the exposure of glycans containing fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-type core by complexed native IgG in longitudinal serum samples of well-characterized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Consecutive serum samples of a cohort of 15 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus during periods of increased disease activity and remission were analysed. All patients fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Sera of 15 sex- and age-matched normal healthy blood donors served as controls. The levels and type of glycosylation of complexed random IgG was measured with lectin enzyme-immunosorbent assays. After specifically gathering IgG complexes from sera, biotinylated lectins Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin were employed to detect IgG-associated fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-glycan core, respectively. In sandwich-ELISAs, IgG-associated IgM, IgA, C1q, C3c and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected as candidates for IgG immune complex constituents. We studied associations of the glycan of complexed IgG and disease activity according to the physician's global assessment of disease activity and the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 documented at the moment of blood taking. Our results showed significantly higher levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin binding sites exposed on IgG complexes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than on those of normal healthy blood donors. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlated with higher exposure of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactive fucosyl residues by immobilized IgG complexes. Top levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactivity were found in samples taken during the

  3. Lupus autoantibodies to native DNA preferentially bind DNA presented on PolIV.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Bunting, Karen A; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Hinks, John A; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2005-03-01

    While immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to double-stranded (ds)DNA are serological markers of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), not all antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are able to cause tissue damage to a similar extent. It has been proposed that anti-DNA-induced renal damage could be linked to differences in the fine specificity of the antibodies. In an attempt to gain insight into their fine binding properties, we investigated the cross-reactivity of two human lupus monoclonal IgG anti-dsDNA (B3 and RH14) to a recently described Escherichia coli PolIV (a DNA polymerase). These autoantibodies possess distinct pathogenic properties in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Although both antibodies cause proteinuria, only RH14 induces early histological features of lupus nephritis. Both RH14 and B3 bound PolIV; however, they exhibited a marked difference in their reactivity to the PolIV-dsDNA complex. Alhough RH14 exhibited significant activity to the complex, the binding of B3 to PolIV complexed with dsDNA was almost abolished. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the way the lupus sera recognized naked dsDNA and that presented on PolIV. Although 67% of lupus sera bound naked dsDNA, approximately 90% of these sera (93% calf thymus DNA; 90% synthetic oligonucleotide) reacted to the complex when dsDNA was presented on PolIV. Thus, the IgG anti-dsDNA likely to exist in lupus patients may be distinguished into those that recognize dsDNA in the context of PolIV and those which do not. This difference in binding ability may help to distinguish those dsDNA antibodies that are more pathogenic.

  4. Current role of rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by periods of flares and remission, resulting in organ damage over time caused by persistent disease activity and treatment-related complications. Conventional therapies are not ideal in terms of efficacy and safety. Novel biological therapies are being developed to enhance therapeutic efficacy, minimize disease exacerbation and reduce toxicities. As dysregulation of B cells is the hallmark of SLE, B-cell targeted therapies are the focus of recent clinical research. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been used with success in recalcitrant lupus manifestations. However, randomized controlled trials have failed to reveal its benefit in renal and non-renal SLE when combined with conventional immunosuppressive protocols. Although heterogeneity of SLE manifestations, pitfalls in study design and the limitations of the assessment tools for various clinical end points may have contributed to the discouraging results, rituximab remains an option in patients who are refractory or intolerant to conventional therapies. Recently, a regimen consisting of rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil without oral corticosteroids was reported to be effective in lupus nephritis. While the efficacy of this regimen has to be confirmed, future controlled trials should focus on the efficacy of rituximab in refractory lupus manifestations and its synergistic effect with other immunosuppressive agents such as cyclophosphamide. In short-term randomized controlled trials, a non-significant increase in serious adverse events was observed in SLE patients treated with rituximab. Long-term safety data of rituximab in SLE, in particular the incidence of hypogammaglobulinemia and serious/opportunistic infections, have to be continuously surveyed.

  5. Has the diversity of clinical and biological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus a correspondent in the diversity of immune mechanisms? Observations based on a Rowell's syndrome case associated with arthritis and nephritis.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Gh; Trandafirescu, V; Solovan, C; Lazăr, E; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Petrica, Ligia; Bob, F; Bozdog, Gh; Gadalean, F; Cornianu, M; Velciov, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws attention to the relationship between the clinical and biological picture of SLE and the immune mechanisms of this disease. The presence, in the same patient, of erythema multiforme-like skin lesions and erythemato-squamous lesions specific for SLE together with a characteristic immune picture (speckled antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), positive anti-Ro antibodies, positive rheumatoid factor) raise the question of a relationship between the immune mechanisms in SLE and the clinical picture. A case of Rowell's syndrome is discussed: systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed on the occasion of an erythema multiforme-like rash. Starting from this case, we analyse if the clinical and biological picture in SLE is an expression of the immune mechanisms involved in this disease. Our patient presented with speckled antinuclear antibodies, positive rheumatoid factor, anti-Ro antibodies, suggestive of Rowell's syndrome. The patient manifested rheumatoid-like articular pain and high titer rheumatoid factor. Clinically, we found erythema multiforme-like and erythemato-squamous lesions. The patient developed nephrotic syndrome (proteinuria 11.8g/24h), and renal failure (creatinine 3.08 mg/dl). The renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis class II (ISN/RPS). Under treatment with prednisone the nephrotic syndrome evolved into remission (traces of proteinuria) and serum creatinine declined (1.03 mg/dl). The cutaneous syndrome had a spectacular evolution, too. The question is raised of the existence in Rowell's syndrome of immune mechanisms commonly encountered in SLE and a subset associated with the cutaneous erythema multiforme-like rash and pseudo-rheumatoid arthritis manifestations. PMID:23330294

  6. Vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Z S; Jahanshahifar, L; Jahanshahifar, F; Gholamrezaei, A

    2011-10-01

    Evidence has shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of SLE. Women with newly diagnosed SLE, based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, were enrolled consecutively. Those receiving vitamin D supplements and postmenopausal women were not included. Disease activity was measured by the BILAG index (2004) and serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured by radioimmunoassay method. Forty SLE patients with mean age of 25.3 ± 4.2 years were studied. Severe, moderate, and mild vitamin D deficiency, corresponding to serum 25[OH]D concentrations of <12.5, 12.5-24.9, and 25-39.9  nmol/l, were found in 12.5%, 62.5%, and 17.5% of the patients, respectively. Serum 25[OH]D concentration was inversely correlated with the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index score (r = -0.486, p = 0.001). Those with a more severe vitamin D deficiency had also higher concentrations of liver enzymes (p < 0.05), lower serum albumin and hemoglobin concentrations (p < 0.05), and higher titers of antibodies to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) (p < 0.001). This study showed that most of the SLE patients in our society have vitamin D deficiency at the time of diagnosis that is associated with a higher disease activity. Routine screening for vitamin D deficiency and its prompt treatment in patients with newly diagnosed SLE is recommended.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in Moderately-to-Severely Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Joan T.; Neuwelt, C. Michael; Wallace, Daniel J.; Shanahan, Joseph C.; Latinis, Kevin M.; Oates, James C.; Utset, Tammy O.; Gordon, Caroline; Isenberg, David A.; Hsieh, Hsin-Ju; Zhang, David; Brunetta, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective B cells are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and rituximab induces depletion of B cells. The Exploratory Phase II/III SLE Evaluation of Rituximab (EXPLORER) trial tested the efficacy and safety of rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderately-to-severely active extrarenal SLE. Methods Patients entered with ≥1 British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) A score or ≥2 BILAG B scores despite background immunosuppressant therapy, which was continued during the trial. Prednisone was added and subsequently tapered. Patients were randomized at a ratio of 2:1 to receive rituximab (1,000 mg) or placebo on days 1, 15, 168, and 182. Results In the intent-to-treat analysis of 257 patients, background treatment was evenly distributed among azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. Fifty-three percent of the patients had ≥1 BILAG A score at entry, and 57% of the patients were categorized as being steroid dependent. No differences were observed between placebo and rituximab in the primary and secondary efficacy end points, including the BILAG-defined response, in terms of both area under the curve and landmark analyses. A beneficial effect of rituximab on the primary end point was observed in the African American and Hispanic subgroups. Safety and tolerability were similar in patients receiving placebo and those receiving rituximab. Conclusion The EXPLORER trial enrolled patients with moderately-to-severely active SLE and used aggressive background treatment and sensitive cutoffs for nonresponse. No differences were noted between placebo and rituximab in the primary and secondary end points. Further evaluation of patient subsets, biomarkers, and exploratory outcome models may improve the design of future SLE clinical trials. PMID:20039413

  8. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high.

  9. Binding of synthetic double-stranded DNA by serum from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with renal histology.

    PubMed

    Steinman, C R; Grishman, E; Spiera, H; Deesomochok, U

    1977-03-01

    Detection of antibody to double-stranded DNA by direct binding assays has proved useful in clinical management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recent confusion regarding specificity of these antibodies for SLE appears to be due, at least in part, to contamination of natural DNA preparations with nondouble-stranded DNA antigens. Measurement of binding of a synthetic, self-complementary DNA copolymer (dAT) rather than of natural DNA (KB) has been shown to obviate some of these difficulties, apparently because of freedom of dAT from nondouble-stranded DNA antigens. Among the advantages found in this way was a higher degree of specificity of antibodies to double-stranded DNA for clinically-judged active lupus nephritis than had been suspected. Since activity of nephritis is difficult to assess clinically, histologic data were sought to confirm these observations. Thirty-two kidney specimens were examined by light and/or electron microscopy. The degree of histologic activity and the amount and location of glomerular electron-dense deposits were semiquantitated blindly. The binding of both dAT and KB DNA was measured by the ammonium sulfate method. Correlation with the amount of electron-defense deposits was highly significant for dAT binding and somewhat less so for KB DNA binding as determined by both parametric and nonparametric statistical methods. Significant correlation with histologic activity was found for dAT but not KB DNA binding. These results are consistent with previous data and suggest that dAT binding may provide a useful, noninvasive means of clinically assessing both nephritis activity and the intensity of glomerular immune-complex deposition as reflected by the amount of electron-dense deposits. If it can be confirmed that the latter provides long-term prognostic information, then dAT binding (and perhaps its reponse to therapy) may also prove of value in this regard.

  10. Neutrophil extracellular traps that are not degraded in systemic lupus erythematosus activate complement exacerbating the disease.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Jonatan; Martin, Myriam; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Tydén, Helena; Lood, Christian; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing inflammation including activation of the complement system is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Antimicrobial neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of secreted chromatin that may act as a source of autoantigens typical for SLE. In this study, we investigated how complement interacts with NETs and how NET degradation is affected by complement in SLE patients. We found that sera from a subset of patients with active SLE had a reduced ability to degrade in vitro-generated NETs, which was mostly restored when these patients were in remission. Patients that failed to degrade NETs had a more active disease and they also displayed lower levels of complement proteins C4 and C3 in blood. We discovered that NETs activated complement in vitro and that deposited C1q inhibited NET degradation including a direct inhibition of DNase-I by C1q. Complement deposition on NETs may facilitate autoantibody production, and indeed, Abs against NETs and NET epitopes were more pronounced in patients with impaired ability to degrade NETs. NET-bound autoantibodies inhibited degradation but also further increased C1q deposition, potentially exacerbating the disease. Thus, NETs are a potent complement activator, and this interaction may play an important role in SLE. Targeting complement with inhibitors or by removing complement activators such as NETs could be beneficial for patients with SLE.

  11. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies.

  12. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  13. The use of laboratory tests in diagnosis and monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Renato Alberto; Bollini, Bruna; Sabadini, Ettore; Di Toma, Luca; Radice, Antonella

    2002-01-01

    Clinical immunology laboratories play an essential role in diagnosis and monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To obtain the best results in terms of diagnostic performance and clinical usefulness, the following recommendations should be fulfilled: Indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells remains the method of choice for the detection of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). The sensitivity of ANA test for SLE is very high (almost 100%) but its specificity low since ANA can be present in a number of different clinical conditions and even in normal controls. Anti-dsDNA antibodies are highly specific for SLE and present in a high proportion of SLE patients (40-80%). The method of choice for anti-ds DNA is the Farr assay; however, the necessity of using radioactive material decreases its applicability. As an alternative, immunofluorescence on Crithidia Luciliae can be used in the diagnostic phase for its high specificity. It is not advisable to use ELISA, in the diagnostic phase, due to its low specificity. The quantitative determination of anti-dsDNA is useful for monitoring patients, in particular in the presence of nephritis. For monitoring, a quantitative method should be used (Farr assay or ELISA). The detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) and to phospholipids (Lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin antibodies with a beta2 glycoprotein I-dependent method) are useful to identify subgroups of patients at risk for some clinical manifestations (i.e. anti-phospholipid syndrome). New assays (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies) have been recently proposed for diagnosis (anti-nucleosome) and monitoring SLE patients (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies), with promising results. Among biological parameters, urinary levels of monocyte chemoattranct protein 1 (MCP1) seem to be the most useful to monitor nephritis activity in lupus patients.

  14. Hand function and performance of daily activities in systemic lupus erythematosus: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Malcus Johnsson, P; Sandqvist, G; Nilsson, J-Å; Bengtsson, A A; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O

    2015-07-01

    This clinical study was performed to investigate hand problems in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in comparison with healthy controls, and to explore problems in the performance of daily activities related to these hand problems, in order to objectify findings from a previous mail survey. We also investigated whether a simple hand test could detect hand problems in SLE. All individuals, 71 with SLE and 71 healthy controls, were examined for manifestations in body structures and body functions of the hands with a study-specific protocol. The simple hand test was performed by all the individuals and the arthritis impact measurement scale (AIMS 2) questionnaire was completed by the SLE individuals. In the SLE group, 58% had some kind of difficulty in the simple hand test, compared with 8% in the control group. Fifty percent of the SLE individuals experienced problems in performing daily activities due to hand deficits. Pain in the hands, reduced strength and dexterity, Raynaud's phenomenon and trigger finger were the most prominent body functions affecting the performance of daily activities. Deficits in hand function are common in SLE and affect the performance of daily activities. The simple hand test may be a useful tool in detecting hand problems.

  15. Increased CD28 serum levels are not associated with specific clinical activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel J L; Gámez-Nava, Jorge I; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; Munoz-Valle, José F; González-López, Laura; Llamas-Covarrubias, Mara A; Gutiérrez-Urena, Sergio R; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid P

    2011-10-01

    CD28 is one of the main activator receptors involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pathogenesis, and its expression and serum levels are significantly higher in patients with SLE and other autoimmune diseases than in healthy controls (HC). However, it is unknown whether this increase is associated with specific organ damage. Therefore, our objective was to measure the CD28 levels in serum from SLE and HC groups to confirm the CD28 serum levels increase, as reported previously, and to determine whether this increase was associated with specific organ activity and the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Forty SLE patients and 40 matched HC were included, and the age, disease duration, SLEDAI and Mexican SLEDAI were recorded for the SLE group. CD28 serum levels were measured by ELISA. There was a statistically significant increase in the CD28 serum levels of SLE patients compared to controls (p = 0.039); however, we did not find any significant correlation with disease activity indices or organ involvement, although we found a significant but low correlation with C3. Our results and a review of the literature suggest that the increase in CD28 serum levels may be the result of CD28 gene overexpression, which could be related to the decrease in CD28+ T cells, T-cell hyporesponsiveness and immune impairment that occurs in SLE.

  16. Relationship Between Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index Scores and Subclinical Cardiac Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mirfeizi, Zahra; Poorzand, Hoorak; Javanbakht, Aida; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune connective-tissue disease involving multiple organs and systems. Some evidence has demonstrated that disease activity could be associated with increased risk of organ damage. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between systemic lupus erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores and subclinical cardiac involvement. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 45 SLE patients (88% female; mean age: 31.2 ± 8.2 years) from 2011 to 2013 in Mashhad, Iran. The patients had no clinical signs and symptoms of cardiac problems or risk factors for cardiovascular disease and were selected consecutively. All patients underwent complete echocardiographic examinations (using two dimensional (2D) tissue Doppler and 2D speckle tracking). Disease activity was evaluated by using the SLEDAI. Results Patients with higher SLEDAI scores had higher pulmonary artery pressure rates (r = 0.34; P = 0.024; 95% CI (0.086 to 0.595)) and SLE durations (r = 0.43; P = 0.004; 95% CI (0.165 to 0.664). The correlation between disease duration and left ventricular mass was also significant (r = 0.43; P = 0.009; 95% CI (0.172 to 0.681)), even after adjusting for age (r = 0.405; P = 0.016). There was no correlation between SLEDAI scores or disease duration and the left/right ventricle systolic function parameters. This was true while assessing the right ventricle’s diastolic function. A statistically significant correlation was found between mitral E/E’ as an index of left ventricle diastolic impairment and the SLEDAI scores (r = 0.33; P = 0.037; 95% CI (0.074 to 0.574)) along with disease duration (r = 0.45; P = 0.004; 95% CI (0.130 to 0.662); adjusted for age: r = 0.478; P = 0.002). Conclusions Echocardiography is a useful noninvasive technique for screening subclinical heart problems in SLE patients. Although disease activity in general should suggest a closer follow-up, regular scanning

  17. Interleukin-17 in systemic lupus erythematosus: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo; Guo, Bin; Wu, Haijing; Tan, Lina; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complicated autoimmune disease of multifactorial pathoaetiology. One of the most serious manifestations is lupus nephritis. The pathogenesis of SLE has not been well elucidated, but it has been reported that interleukin-17 (IL-17) and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. IL-17A, a member of IL-17 family, amplifies the immune response by inducing the local production of chemokines and cytokines, recruiting neutrophils and monocytes, augmenting the production of autoantibodies, and aggravating the inflammation and damage of target organs such as the kidney in SLE. In recent years, several IL-17A pathway inhibitors have advanced into clinical trials, including the anti-IL-17A monoclonal antibody and the anti-17RA monoclonal antibody. Several agents have shown great success in Phase II trials in multiple autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, and non-infectious uveitis, which has sparked the urgent need of anti-IL-17A as innovative therapeutic option in controlling disease activity of moderate-to-severe SLE. Here, we review and summarize current progress in IL-17A and SLE from in vitro studies, human expression studies, and animal models, providing novel insight into its therapeutic potential.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Circulating Plasma Cells in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Patricia L.; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P1, suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:23028528

  19. Molecular characterization of circulating plasma cells in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lugar, Patricia L; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C; Dave, Sandeep S; Lipsky, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P(1), suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype.

  20. Interstitial nephritis. A brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Heptinstall, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common condition, which in spite of a relatively constant pathologic picture has different etiologic agents and pathogenetic mechanisms. Failure to appreciate this, particularly in the chronic group, has led to considerable confusion and has been largely responsible for the overdiagnosis of chronic pyelonephritis. Although we are still largely ignorant of the causes of interstitial nephritis, it is now possible to define many of them. While experimental studies have not made spectacular contributions to our understanding, an attempt is now being made to develop appropriate models, and we hope these will enable us to still further clarify our understanding of other entities. PMID:776003

  1. Early cerebral volume reductions and their associations with reduced lupus disease activity in patients with newly-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anselm; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Tng, Han-Ying; Koh, Hui Li; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We examined if cerebral volume reduction occurs very early during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and observed prospectively whether gray (GMV) and white matter volumes (WMV) of the brain would improve with lowered SLE disease activity. T1-weighted MRI brain images were obtained from 14 healthy controls (HC) and 14 newly-diagnosed SLE patients within 5 months of diagnosis (S1) and after achieving low disease activity (S2). Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to detect differences in the GMV and WMV between SLE patients and HC and those between SLE patients at S1 and S2. SLE patients were found to have lower GMV than HC in the middle cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and right supplementary motor area, and lower WMV in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum cingulate gyrus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at both S1 and S2. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed increased GMV chiefly in the prefrontal regions at S2 compared to S1 in SLE patients. The GMV increase in the left superior frontal gyrus was significantly associated with lowered SLE disease activity. In conclusion, GMV and WMV reduced very early in SLE patients. Reduction of SLE disease activity was accompanied by region-specific GMV improvement in the prefrontal regions.

  2. Early cerebral volume reductions and their associations with reduced lupus disease activity in patients with newly-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Tng, Han-Ying; Koh, Hui Li; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We examined if cerebral volume reduction occurs very early during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and observed prospectively whether gray (GMV) and white matter volumes (WMV) of the brain would improve with lowered SLE disease activity. T1-weighted MRI brain images were obtained from 14 healthy controls (HC) and 14 newly-diagnosed SLE patients within 5 months of diagnosis (S1) and after achieving low disease activity (S2). Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to detect differences in the GMV and WMV between SLE patients and HC and those between SLE patients at S1 and S2. SLE patients were found to have lower GMV than HC in the middle cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and right supplementary motor area, and lower WMV in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum cingulate gyrus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at both S1 and S2. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed increased GMV chiefly in the prefrontal regions at S2 compared to S1 in SLE patients. The GMV increase in the left superior frontal gyrus was significantly associated with lowered SLE disease activity. In conclusion, GMV and WMV reduced very early in SLE patients. Reduction of SLE disease activity was accompanied by region-specific GMV improvement in the prefrontal regions. PMID:26928214

  3. Disability in Valued Life Activities Among Individuals With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Patricia; Morris, Anne; Trupin, Laura; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence of disability in a wide range of valued life activities (VLAs) among individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 1-year changes in such disability, and predictors of and changes in VLA disability. Methods Data were from 2 waves of a cohort of 829 individuals with SLE interviewed annually by telephone. VLA disability was assessed using a scale rating the difficulty of performing 21 activities. Scores were also calculated for subscales corresponding to obligatory, committed, and discretionary activities. Changes in VLA disability from baseline to 1-year followup were assessed. Sociodemographic and disease status measures were examined as predictors of and changes in VLA disability using multiple regression analyses. Results Almost half of the subjects were unable to perform ≥1 VLA at baseline. Almost all (91%) reported ≥1 VLA affected by SLE. One-quarter of the subjects experienced a significant increase in the number of activities they were unable to perform; approximately half experienced significant increases in the number of activities affected and in difficulty scores. Proportions of individuals whose disability increased and whose disability decreased were roughly equivalent. Disease status measures accounted for 62–72% of the variation in VLA difficulty. More severe disease status was predictive of increases in VLA difficulty; few predictors of improvements were identified. Conclusion VLA disability was common, with more disability noted in committed and discretionary activities than in obligatory activities. Because VLA disability has been linked to psychological well-being in previous studies, identification of factors that may protect against such disability is important. PMID:18383406

  4. Nucleosome: a major immunogen for pathogenic autoantibody-inducing T cells of lupus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Only a fraction (12%) of 268 "autoreactive" T cell clones derived from lupus-prone mice can selectively induce the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in vitro and accelerate the development of lupus nephritis when transferred in vivo. The CDR3 loops of T cell receptor beta chains expressed by these pathogenic T helper (Th) clones contain a recurrent motif of anionic residues suggesting that they are selected by autoantigens with cationic residues. Herein, we found that approximately 50% of these pathogenic Th clones were specific for nucleosomal antigens, but none of them responded to cationic idiopeptides shared by variable regions of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Nucleosomes did not stimulate the T cells as a nonspecific mitogen or superantigen. Only the pathogenic Th cells of lupus responded to nucleosomal antigens that were processed and presented via the major histocompatibility class II pathway. Although the presentation of purified mononucleosomes to the Th clones could be blocked by inhibitors of endosomal proteases, neither of the two components of the nucleosomes--free DNA or histones by themselves-- could stimulate the Th clones. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the Th cells were probably protected during uptake and processing of the nucleosome particle as a whole. The nucleosome-specific Th clones preferentially augmented the production of IgG autoantibodies to histone-DNA complex in vitro. In vivo, nucleosome-specific, CD4+ T cells were not detectable in normal mice, but they were found in the spleens of lupus-prone mice as early as 1 mo of age, long before other autoimmune manifestations. Immunization of young, preautoimmune lupus mice with nucleosomes augmented the production of autoantibodies and markedly accelerated the development of severe glomerulonephritis. Previously, crude preparations containing nucleosomes were shown by others to have polyclonal mitogenic activity for B cells from normal as well as lupus mice

  5. Activation of natural killer T cells in NZB/W mice induces Th1-type immune responses exacerbating lupus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Defu; Liu, Yinping; Sidobre, Stephane; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Strober, Samuel

    2003-10-01

    In vivo treatment of mice with the natural killer T (NKT) cell ligand, alpha-galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer), ameliorates autoimmune diabetes and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by shifting pathogenic Th1-type immune responses to nonpathogenic Th2-type responses. In the current study, in vivo activation of NKT cells in adult NZB/W mice by multiple injections of alphaGalCer induced an abnormal Th1-type immune response as compared with the Th2-type response observed in nonautoimmune C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in decreased serum levels of IgE, increased levels of IgG2a and IgG2a anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Ab's, and exacerbated lupus. Conversely, treatment of NZB/W mice with blocking anti-CD1d mAb augmented Th2-type responses, increased serum levels of IgE, decreased levels of IgG2a and IgG2a anti-dsDNA Ab's, and ameliorated lupus. While total CD4+ T cells markedly augmented in vitro IgM anti-dsDNA Ab secretion by splenic B cells, the non-CD1d-reactive (CD1d-alphaGalCer tetramer-negative) CD4+ T cells (accounting for 95% of all CD4+ T cells) failed to augment Ab secretion. The CD1d-reactive tetramer-positive CD4+ T cells augmented anti-dsDNA Ab secretion about tenfold. In conclusion, activation of NKT cells augments Th1-type immune responses and autoantibody secretion that contribute to lupus development in adult NZB/W mice, and anti-CD1d mAb might be useful for treating lupus.

  6. Perceptions and measurements of physical activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, C A; Perna, M; Sargent, A B; Salmon, J E

    2011-03-01

    Promoting physical activity should be a priority for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) because a sedentary lifestyle compounds patients' already disproportionately high risk for cardiovascular events and other adverse health outcomes. The objectives of this pilot study were to assess physical activity in 50 patients with SLE and to compare activity levels with clinical and psychosocial variables, such as fatigue, depressive symptoms, and social support and stress. Patients were asked open-ended questions about physical activity, and responses were coded according to Grounded Theory. Patients then completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity and Exercise Index, a survey of lifestyle energy expenditure reported in kilocalories/week, performed a 2-minute walk test according to a standard protocol, and completed questionnaires measuring fatigue, depressive symptoms and social support and stress. Most patients (92%) were women, had a mean age of 45 years, and did not have extensive SLE. In response to open-ended questions, patients reported they avoided physical activity because they did not want to exacerbate SLE in the short term. However, if they could overcome initial hurdles, 46 patients (92%) thought physical activity ultimately would improve SLE symptoms. Walking was the preferred activity and 45 (90%) thought they could walk more. According to the Paffenbarger Index, mean energy expenditure was 1466 ± 1366 kilocalories/week and mean time spent in moderate-intensity activity was 132 ± 222 min/week. In total, 18 patients (36%) and 14 patients (28%) met physical activity goals for these values, respectively. Mean distance walked during the 2-minute test was 149 ± 28 m, equivalent to two blocks, which is similar to reports for stable patients with other chronic diseases. Patients with more social stress and more fatigue reported less physical activity. We conclude that the proportion of patients meeting physical activity goals was

  7. Modulation of nuclear factor-κB activity can influence the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kalergis, Alexis M; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu I; Barrientos, Magaly J; González, Pablo A; Herrada, Andres A; Leiva, Eduardo D; Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Jacobelli, Sergio H

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), result from deficiencies in self-antigen tolerance processes, which require regulated dendritic cell (DC) function. In this study we evaluated the phenotype of DCs during the onset of SLE in a mouse model, in which deletion of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb leads to the production of anti-nuclear antibodies and glomerulonephritis. Splenic DCs from FcγRIIb-deficient mice suffering from SLE showed increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Furthermore, diseased mice showed an altered function of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor, which is involved in DC maturation. Compared with healthy animals, expression of the inhibitory molecule IκB-α was significantly decreased in mice suffering from SLE. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity in FcγRIIb-deficient mice led to reduced susceptibility to SLE and prevented symptoms, such as anti-nuclear antibodies and kidney damage. Our data suggest that the occurrence of SLE is significantly influenced by alterations of NF-κB function, which can be considered as a new therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:19016912

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists in the prevention and treatment of murine systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aprahamian, Tamar R; Bonegio, Ramon G; Weitzner, Zachary; Gharakhanian, Raffi; Rifkin, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are known to have many immunomodulatory effects. We have previously shown that the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone is beneficial when used early in prevention of disease in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE-related atherosclerosis. In this report, we demonstrate that another PPARγ agonist, pioglitazone is also beneficial as a treatment for early murine lupus, indicating that this is a class effect and not agent-specific. We further attempt to define the ability of PPARγ agonists to ameliorate established or severe autoimmune disease using two mouse models: the MRL.lpr SLE model and the gld.apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis and SLE. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the marked amelioration of disease seen when PPARγ agonist treatment was started before disease onset, treatment with rosiglitazone after disease onset in MRL.lpr or gld.apoE−/− mice had minimal beneficial effect on the development of the autoimmune phenotype; however, rosiglitazone treatment remained highly effective at reducing lupus-associated atherosclerosis in gld.apoE−/− mice after disease onset or when mice were maintained on a high cholesterol Western diet. These results suggest that beneficial effects of PPARγ agonists on the development of autoimmunity might be limited to the early stages of disease, but that atherosclerosis, a major cause of death in SLE patients, may be ameliorated even in established or severe disease. PMID:24456224

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    Disseminated lupus erythematosus; SLE; Lupus; Lupus erythematosus; Butterfly rash - SLE; Discoid lupus ... Mouth sores. Sensitivity to sunlight. Skin rash: A "butterfly" rash in about half the people with SLE. ...

  10. Lupus in a patient with cystinosis: is it drug induced?

    PubMed

    Eroglu, F K; Besbas, N; Ozaltin, F; Topaloglu, R; Ozen, S

    2015-11-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a diagnosis of cystinosis since 2 years of age, on cysteamine therapy, presented with complaints of serositis and arthritis, and laboratory tests revealed high antinuclear antibody titers with hypocomplementemia. Kidney biopsy was not consistent with lupus nephritis. With prednisolone treatment her complaints resolved and creatinine level decreased, but on follow-up, serological features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) continued. Six years after cessation of prednisolone, lupus features were reactivated, with positive antihistone antibodies and ANCA. Coincidence of cystinosis and SLE is very rare, and to the best of our knowledge this is the fourth case reported in the literature. Physicians should be aware that cystinosis patients may have some autoimmune manifestations with features of true or drug-induced lupus. In the light of this case, pathophysiology and treatment are discussed.

  11. Functional neuronal network activity differs with cognitive dysfunction in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and often include neurocognitive dysfunction (NCD). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can measure brain activation during tasks that invoke domains of cognitive function impaired by cSLE. This study investigates specific changes in brain function attributable to NCD in cSLE that have potential to serve as imaging biomarkers. Methods Formal neuropsychological testing was done to measure cognitive ability and to identify NCD. Participants performed fMRI tasks probing three cognitive domains impacted by cSLE: visuoconstructional ability (VCA), working memory, and attention. Imaging data, collected on 3-Tesla scanners, included a high-resolution T1-weighted anatomic reference image followed by a T2*-weighted whole-brain echo planar image series for each fMRI task. Brain activation using blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast was compared between cSLE patients with NCD (NCD-group, n = 7) vs. without NCD (noNCD-group, n = 14) using voxel-wise and region of interest-based analyses. The relationship of brain activation during fMRI tasks and performance in formal neuropsychological testing was assessed. Results Greater brain activation was observed in the noNCD-group vs. NCD-group during VCA and working memory fMRI tasks. Conversely, compared to the noNCD-group, the NCD-group showed more brain activation during the attention fMRI task. In region of interest analysis, brain activity during VCA and working memory fMRI tasks was positively associated with the participants' neuropsychological test performance. In contrast, brain activation during the attention fMRI task was negatively correlated with neuropsychological test performance. While the NCD group performed worse than the noNCD group during VCA and working memory tasks, the attention task was performed equally well by both groups. Conclusions NCD in patients with cSLE is characterized by

  12. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  13. Treating Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... Postal Code: Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty Get social Facebook Twitter Instgram Lupus.org ...

  14. Blockade of CD354 (TREM-1) Ameliorates Anti-GBM-Induced Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Wu, Tianfu; Zhou, Xin J; Davis, Laurie S; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    CD354, Triggering Receptor of Myeloid Cells-1 (TREM-1), is a potent amplifier of myeloid immune responses. Our goal was to determine the expression and function of TREM-1 in immune-mediated nephritis. An anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM)-induced nephritis model was employed, where mice were sensitized with rabbit IgG followed by anti-GBM serum to induce disease. Anti-GBM-treated 129x1/svJ mice developed severe nephritis whereas C57BL/6 (B6) mice were resistant to disease. Anti-GBM disease resulted in elevated renal TREM-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels and increased urine TREM-1 levels in 129x1/svJ. TREM-1 blockade with an inhibitory peptide, LP17, inhibited proteinuria and renal disease as measured by glomerulonephritis class, severity of tubulointerstitial disease, crescent formation, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In sum, TREM-1 is upregulated in renal inflammation and plays a vital role in driving disease. Thus, TREM-1 blockade emerges as a potential therapeutic avenue for immune-mediated renal diseases such as lupus nephritis. PMID:27083877

  15. Antibodies against oxidized phospholipids in laboratory tests exploring lupus anti-coagulant activity

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, R; Vidali, M; Serino, R; Pergolini, P; Albano, E; Bellomo, G

    2007-01-01

    Lupus anti-coagulants (LA) are a variety of anti-phospholipid antibodies characterized by their capacity to interfere with phospholipid-dependent coagulation assays. LA are increasingly recognized as important predictors of thrombosis. However, the antigen specificity of LA is still poorly characterized. Growing evidence indicates that oxidized phospholipids are among the targets of anti-phospholipid antibodies. This prompted us to investigate the role of IgG directed against different oxidized phospholipids in 164 subjects without clotting factor defects that were tested for the presence of LA using a LA-sensitive activate partial thromboplastin time (aPTT-FSL) and a screening/confirmation assay based on diluted Russell's viper venom test (dRVVT-PL). The response to aPTT-FSL was significantly (P < 0·0005) associated with high titres of IgG against oxidized phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, whereas positivity to dRVVT-PL was associated with the elevation of IgG against oxidized phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine (P < 0·0005) and phosphatidylinositol (P < 0·01). No difference in reactivity against oxidized cardiolipin was evident between the different groups. Positivity to the dRVVT-PL test was also associated significantly (P < 0·005) with the elevation of anti-cardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein-1 IgG. However, stepwise logistic regression demonstrated that IgG recognizing oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine and oxidized phosphatidylcholine were the only independent predictors of the response to dRVVT-PL assay, while IgG recognizing oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine and oxidized phosphatidylinositol were independent predictors of the response to aPTT-FSL test. In conclusion, autoantibodies against defined oxidized phospholipids are independent predictors of LA detection by aPTT-FSL or dRVVT-PL assays and might contribute to the variability often observed in the responses to the functional

  16. Decreased serum levels of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Yao, Y S; Chen, G M; Sheng, J; Xu, L; Pan, H F

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the serum T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM)-1 and TIM-3 levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and analyze their correlations with clinical features. Sixtyone SLE patients and 69 healthy controls were enrolled, serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were detected by ELISA. Results demonstrated that both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were significantly decreased in SLE patients compared with controls (both P less than 0.05). Lower serum TIM-3 levels in SLE patients with nephritis were observed when compared to those without nephritis, with a marginal statistical significance (P=0.059). However, both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels had no significant correlation with SLE disease activity (both >0.05). In summary, decreased serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels and association of TIM-3 with nephritis suggest their possible role in the development and pathogenesis of SLE. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:27049082

  17. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chader, Driss; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Haroche, Julien; Fadlallah, Jehane; Claër, Laetitia; Musset, Lucile; Gorochov, Guy; Amoura, Zahir; Miyara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV) high dose methylprednisolone (MP) on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE. Methods We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1) naïve Treg (nTreg) FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2) effector Treg (eTreg) FoxP3highCD45RA− cells; and (3) non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA− cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0) and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8). The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score. Results Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range) percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53–8.43) at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83–14.60) at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0), 4.64% (0.50–12.40) at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1) and 7.50% (1.02–20.70) at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2), and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20–17.70) at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03–9.72) at day 2 (p = 0.005); nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2. Conclusion IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE. PMID:26629828

  18. Systemic lupus erythematous revealed by cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Amel, Rezgui; Monia, Karmani; Anis, Mzabi; Fatma, Ben Fredj; Chadia, Laouani

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have been described as exacerbing systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). The role of CMV in starting off SLE remains object of debate. We report a severe presentation of SLE revealed by CMV infection with hemophogocytic syndrome. A 22 old women without a history of systemic disease developed a cutaneous eruption with fever and myalgia persistant for 2 weeks. Laboratory studies revealed a CMV serology supporting acute CMV infection, with positive antinuclear antidody, anti ds DNA, elevated liver functions tests, pancytopenia. Further exams revealed an hemophagocytic syndrome and a lupus nephritis. While receiving antiviral and corticosteroid therapy, the patient developed seizures related to a cerebral vasculitis. The outcome was favorable when intravenous immunoglobulins were associated. This observation showed that CMV infection in patients with SLE is often serious and difficult to diagnose and to treat, especially when SLE is not yet recognized. So we suggest all patients with recent SLE have routine testing for CMV immunity. PMID:27800096

  19. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE.

  20. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  1. CD4(+) T cells from lupus-prone mice are hyperresponsive to T cell receptor engagement with low and high affinity peptide antigens: a model to explain spontaneous T cell activation in lupus.

    PubMed

    Vratsanos, G S; Jung, S; Park, Y M; Craft, J

    2001-02-01

    Polyclonal CD4(+) T cell activation is characteristic of spontaneous lupus. As a potential explanation for this phenotype, we hypothesized that T cells from lupus-prone mice are intrinsically hyperresponsive to stimulation with antigen, particularly to those peptide ligands having a low affinity for the T cell receptor (TCR). To test this hypothesis, we backcrossed the alpha and beta chain genes of the AND TCR specific for amino acids 88-104 of pigeon cytochrome C (PCC) to the Fas-intact MRL/Mp(+)(Fas-lpr) and to the H-2(k)-matched control backgrounds B10.BR and CBA/CaJ (MRL.AND, B10.AND, and CBA.AND, respectively), and assessed naive CD4(+) TCR transgenic T cell activation in vitro after its encounter with cognate antigen and lower affinity altered peptide ligands (APLs). MRL.AND T cells, compared with control B10.AND and CBA.AND cells, proliferated more when stimulated with agonist antigen. More strikingly, MRL.AND T cells proliferated significantly more and produced more interleukin 2 when stimulated with the APLs of PCC 88-104, having lower affinity for the transgenic TCR. These results imply that one of the forces driving polyclonal activation of alpha/beta T cells in lupus is an intrinsically heightened response to peptide antigen, particularly those with low affinity for the TCR, independent of the nature of the antigen-presenting cell and degree of costimulation.

  2. High-mobility Group Box-1 Protein Promotes Granulomatous Nephritis in Adenine-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Taniguchi, Noboru; Tancharoen, Salunya; Uchimura, Tomonori; Biswas, Kamal K.; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nitanda, Takao; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Lotz, Martin; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2011-01-01

    Granulomatous nephritis can be triggered by diverse factors and results in kidney failure. However, despite accumulating data about granulomatous inflammation, pathogenetic mechanisms in nephritis remain unclear. The DNA-binding high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) initiates and propagates inflammation when released by activated macrophages, functions as an “alarm cytokine” signaling tissue damage. In this study, we demonstrated elevated HMGB1 expression in renal granulomas in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis caused by feeding an adenine-rich diet. HMGB1 levels were also raised in urine and serum, as well as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a mediator of granulomatous inflammation. Injection of HMGB1 worsened renal function and upregulated MCP-1 in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis. HMGB1 also induced MCP-1 secretion through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in rat renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro. Hmgb1+/− mice with crystal-induced nephritis displayed reduced MCP-1 expression in the kidneys and in urine and the number of macrophages in the kidneys was significantly decreased. We conclude that HMGB1 is a new mediator involved in crystal-induced nephritis that amplifies granulomatous inflammation in a cycle where MCP-1 attracts activated macrophages, resulting in excessive and sustained HMGB1 release. HMGB1 could be a novel target for inhibiting chronic granulomatous diseases. PMID:20231821

  3. Semaphorin 3A - a marker for disease activity and a potential putative disease-modifying treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, Z; Toubi, E

    2012-10-01

    Semaphorin 3A (sema3A) and neuropilin-1 (NP-1) play a regulatory role in immune responses and have a demonstrated effect on the course of collagen-induced arthritis. Sema3A was also found to be involved in other immune-mediated diseases, e.g. psoriasis and allergic rhinitis. In this review we concentrated on the involvement of sema3A and NP-1 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and on the specific effect of sema3A on the auto-reactive properties of B cells in SLE patients. We demonstrated the expression of sema3A in renal biopsies from lupus glomerulonephritis patients. This expression was found to be inversely correlated with proteinuria and kidney function tests. Sema3A serum levels in SLE patients were found to be significantly lower than in RA patients (disease control) and lower yet than in normal individuals. Altered serum sema3A levels were found to be in inverse correlation with SLE disease activity, mainly with renal damage and the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The expression of both sema3A and NP-1 on B cells from SLE patients was significantly different in comparison with normal healthy individuals. Finally, we demonstrated that when sema3A was co-cultured with CpG-ODN-stimulated memory B cells of SLE patients, their TLR-9 expression was significantly reduced by almost 50% (p = 0.001). These findings, along with the observation of sema3A being reduced in SLE patients in correlation with disease severity and autoimmunity, and memory B cells being beneficially responsive to sema3A, suggest this regulatory molecule may be considered as a potential therapy for SLE. Such focused therapies will help in achieving the maintenance of self-tolerance and alter pro-inflammatory status in lupus.

  4. Arsenic intoxication associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V; Rossi, N F

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic poisoning is an often unrecognized cause of renal insufficiency. We report a case of tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with an elevated urinary arsenic concentration. Removal of the putative source of arsenic resulted in symptomatic improvement, resolution of abnormal abdominal radiographs, and stabilization of renal function. This case emphasizes the importance of heavy metal screening in patients with multisystem complaints and tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  5. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  6. Cyclic AMP level of lymphocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its relation to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Phi, N C; Takáts, A; Binh, V H; Vien, C V; González-Cabello, R; Gergely, P

    1989-11-01

    The basal and stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 control subjects and 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all fulfilling the ARA criteria, were studied. No significant difference in basal cAMP level was observed between SLE patients and controls. SLE lymphocytes (both active and inactive) elicited a diminished response to aminophylline and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). No correlation was seen between disease activity and either baseline cAMP levels or response to these stimulators. We suggest an intrinsic (not disease activity-related) impairment of the adenylate cyclase-dependent regulatory mechanism in the PBMC of SLE patients, which may result in a defective IL-2 production and IL-2 dependent biological functions. PMID:2558072

  7. Anti-dsDNA Antibodies are one of the many autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu Man; Dai, Chao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Gaskin, Felicia

    2015-01-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies are the most studied antibodies of the lupus-related autoantibodies. The dogma is that these are the most important autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, evidence is presented to show that these antibodies (as measured by modern clinical laboratories) are not the most important autoantibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, and are of limited value in clinical correlation and in predicting disease flares. In addition, they are not likely to be the initiating autoantibodies in lupus nephritis. Thus, several pervasively held beliefs on anti-dsDNA antibodies are not valid. We suggest that anti-dsDNA antibodies should be considered as just one of the many autoantibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26594353

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robak, Ewa; Robak, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by B cell hyperactivity and defective T-cell function, with production of high titer autoantibodies. In the recent years, conceptual advances and the introduction of new therapies are yielding improvements in the management of this disease. In recent years, clinical studies have been undertaken with selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of SLE. The important role of B cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders has provided a strong rationale to target B cells in SLE. Selective therapeutic depletion of B-cells became possible with the availability of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab. Several clinical studies confirm high activity of rituximab in SLE patients especially with lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric involvement. Recently, several new mAbs reacting with CD20 have been developed. New mAbs directed against CD20 include fully human mAb ofatumumab (HuMax CD20), IMMU-106 (hA20) which has a >90% humanized framework and GA-101, a novel third-generation fully humanized and optimized mAb. These agents are highly cytotoxic against B-cell lymphoid cells. Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and iterleukin-6 (IL-6) play an important role in propagating the inflammatory process responsible for tissue damage. Blocking of these cytokines by mAbs can be also a successful therapy for patients with SLE. Finally, mAb eculizumab that specifically inhibits terminal complement activation has been recently developed and investigated in the phase I single dose study in SLE. In this review, new mAbs, potentially useful in SLE are presented.

  9. Lower vitamin D levels are associated with higher systemic lupus erythematosus activity, but not predictive of disease flare-up

    PubMed Central

    Schoindre, Yoland; Jallouli, Moez; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Ghillani, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Aumaître, Olivier; Francès, Camille; Le Guern, Véronique; Lioté, Frédéric; Smail, Amar; Limal, Nicolas; Perard, Laurent; Desmurs-Clavel, Hélène; Thi Huong, Du Le; Asli, Bouchra; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Sailler, Laurent; Ackermann, Félix; Papo, Thomas; Sacré, Karim; Fain, Olivier; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Cacoub, Patrice; Leroux, Gaëlle; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Lechat, Philippe; Musset, Lucile; Piette, Jean-Charles; Amoura, Zahir; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recent studies have found an association between lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and higher SLE activity. We studied the relationship between 25(OH)D levels and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score, and we assessed for the first time the role of vitamin D in predicting SLE flare-ups. Methods Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured in 170 patients with SLE who were prospectively followed up for 6 months (Plaquenil LUpus Systemic study, ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00413361). Results The mean SLEDAI score was 2.03±2.43 and 12.3% patients had active disease (SLEDAI ≥6). The mean 25(OH)D level was 20.6±9.8 ng/mL. Deficiency (25(OH)D <10 ng/mL) was observed in 27 (15.9%), insufficiency (10≤25(OH)D<30) in 112 (65.9%) and optimal vitamin D status (25(OH)D≥30) in 31 (18.2%) patients. In multivariate analysis, female gender (p=0.018), absence of defined antiphospholipid syndrome (p=0.002) and higher creatinine clearance (p=0.004) were predictive of lower 25(OH)D levels. In multivariate analysis, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with high SLE activity (p=0.02). Relapse-free survival rate was not statistically different according to the vitamin D status during the 6-month follow-up (p=0.22). Conclusions We found a low vitamin D status in the majority of patients with SLE, and a modest association between lower 25(OH)D levels and high disease activity. There was no association between baseline 25(OH)D levels and relapse-free survival rate. PMID:25379192

  10. Role of anti-nucleosome antibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and as a marker for lupus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abdel Gawad, Eman R; Mansour, Amira I; Abdel Aziz, Yasser A; Soliman, Aml F; Fawzy, Rasha M

    2014-01-01

    SLE is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by variation in clinical and serological manifestations. This study intended to verify the role of anti-nucleosome (anti-NCS) antibodies in diagnosis of SLE and lupus nephritis and to establish the correlation between antibody reactivity and disease activity. Study subjects included 35 patients diagnosed as SLE and two control groups. While the first is a group with other collagen diseases (n = 80), the second included 50 matched apparently healthy subjects. Serum IgG anti-NCS antibodies in all subjects were detected by ELISA. Serum anti-NCS were higher in SLE than in the two control groups (P < 0.001). Serum anti-NCS antibody levels were higher in SLE patients with renal affection (P < 0.001), malar rash and with hematological disorders (P < 0.05). Anti-NCS antibodies showed a higher diagnostic sensitivity (74.7%) and specificity (96%) than anti-dsDNA. Combining data of anti-NCS and anti-dsDNA antibodies increased the diagnostic specificity to 97.3%. In conclusion, serum anti-NCS antibodies have diagnostic value and play role in the assessment of disease activity especially active renal disease and may predict disease outcome.

  11. Structural characteristics of the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes encoding a pathogenic autoantibody in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Tsao, B P; Ebling, F M; Roman, C; Panosian-Sahakian, N; Calame, K; Hahn, B H

    1990-02-01

    We have studied several monoclonal anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies for their ability to accelerate lupus nephritis in young NZB X NZW F1 female mice and to induce it in BALB/c mice. Two identified as pathogens in both strains have characteristics previously associated with nephritogenicity: expression of IgG2a isotype and IdGN2 idiotype. Both pathogenic antibodies used the combination of genes from the VHJ558 and VK9 subfamilies. Two weak pathogens failed to accelerate nephritis in young BW mice, but induced lupus nephritis in BALB/c mice. They both express IdGN2; one is cationic and an IgG3, the other is an IgG2a. Additional MAbs (some IgG2a, one IdGN2-positive) did not accelerate or induce nephritis. We have cloned and sequenced the variable regions of the immunoglobulin genes of one pathogenic autoantibody. No unique V, D, or J gene segments and no evidence of unusual mechanisms in generating diversity were used to construct this antibody. These data argue against use of unique abnormal Ig genes by systemic lupus erythematosus individuals to construct pathogenic autoantibody subsets. Instead, the major abnormality may be immunoregulatory.

  12. Epratuzumab for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D J; Goldenberg, D M

    2013-04-01

    Epratuzumab (EMab, UCB, Immunomedics) is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting CD22 that is being studied in clinical trials for patients with a variety of rheumatic and hematologic conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An overview of its mechanism of action is followed by a summary of completed lupus studies, and a preview of studies in progress. The agent clearly has anti-inflammatory activity and is a potentially useful agent in the management of autoimmune disorders.

  13. Increased expression of low density granulocytes in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A; Beresford, M W

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in a wide range of non-infectious inflammatory conditions. A subset of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been described and termed low density granulocytes (LDGs). This study investigates the expression of LDG in juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) patients compared to controls, and any correlations with disease activity.Neutrophils and LDGs were isolated from JSLE (n = 13) and paediatric non-inflammatory control patients (n = 12). Cell populations were assessed and compared using flow cytometry and morphological analysis. Standard clinical data, which included disease activity markers/scores, were collected for each patient.Significantly increased LDG expression (%mean ± SEM, range) was observed in JSLE patients (10.4 ± 3.26, 3.41-36.3) compared to controls (2.4 ± 0.44, 0.36-5.27; p = 0.005). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between LDG expression and the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (correlation coefficient 0.685; p = 0.010) and SLE Disease Activity Index (correlation coefficient 0.567; p = 0.043) and the biomarker of dsDNA-antibodies (correlation coefficient 0.590; p = 0.043).Here we observe increased expression in LDGs in JSLE patients, which correlate with dsDNA antibody concentration and scores of disease activity. These correlations indicate that the increased LDG expression observed in this study may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of JSLE, and may be a useful biomarker.

  14. Reduced serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Relation to disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Rasha T.; Awwad, Khaled S.; Ali, Mohamed K.; Hamed, Amira I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Recently, vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a potential environmental factor triggering some autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)). In addition, patients with SLE, especially those with increased disease activity, were suggested to have decreased vitamin D level, suggesting that vitamin D might play a role in regulating autoantibody production. Material/Methods To assess 25 hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] status in Egyptian patients with SLE and its relation to disease activity. Clinical evaluation and assay of serum 25(OH)D, total calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were done on 60 SLE patients in comparison to 60 matched-healthy subjects. Serum 25(OH)D levels <30 and 10 ng/ml were defined as vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, respectively. Results Serum 25(OH)D was significantly lower in patients than in controls (26.33±12.05 vs. 42.66±9.20 respectively, p<0.0001), with 13.30% and 60% being deficient and insufficient, respectively. Serum 25(OH)D levels were lower with increased disease activity (p=0.03) and frequency of photosensitivity(p=0.02) and photoprotection (p=0.002). Systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) score (OR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.42–5.18, P=0.002), photosensitivity (OR: 3.6, 95% CI: 1.9–6.8, P<0.01) and photoprotection (OR: 6.7, 95% CI: 2.9–8.8, P<0.001) were significant predictors of 25(OH)D level among SLE cases. Conclusions Low vitamin D status is prevalent in Egyptian SLE patients despite plentiful exposure to sunlight throughout the year, and its level is negatively correlated to disease activity. Future studies looking at a potential role of vitamin D in the pathophysiology and treatment of SLE are warranted. PMID:22129903

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a multiethnic U.S. cohort (LUMINA) XXVII: factors predictive of a decline to low levels of disease activity.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, A M; Alarcón, G S; McGwin, G; Fernández, M; Bastian, H M; Fessler, B J; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine factors predictive of a decline to low levels of disease activity in a cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Patients with SLE of Hispanic (from Texas or Puerto Rico), African-American or Caucasian ethnicity from a multiethnic cohort were included. A decline to low levels of disease activity was defined as a score < or =5 as per the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure-Revised (SLAM-R) at any annual study visit if preceded by a SLAM-R > or =8. Using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE), socioeconomic-demographic, behavioral, function, psychological, laboratory and clinical data [disease manifestations, number of ACR criteria accrued at diagnosis and damage accrual as per the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Damage Index (SDI)] from the visit preceding that meeting the definition were examined as predictors of decline to low levels of disease activity. Two-hundred and eighty-seven patients (67 Hispanics from Texas, 32 Hispanics form Puerto Rico, 120 African-Americans and 68 Caucasians), accounting for 632 visits were analyzed. In the GEE multivariable analysis, higher degrees of social support (OR = 1.208, 95% CI 1.059-1.379; P = 0.005) were predictive of a decline to low levels of disease activity, while the number of ACR criteria accrued at diagnosis (OR = 0.765, 95% CI 0.631-0.927; P = 0.006) and damage (OR = 0.850, 95% CI 0.743-0.972, P = 0.018) were negatively associated. These data suggest that a decline to low levels of disease activity in lupus patients seems to be multifactorial; this study also underscores the importance of social support for lupus patients.

  16. Adalimumab (TNF α Inhibitor) Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient.

    PubMed

    Wei, S S; Sinniah, R

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab (Humira) is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNF α ) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009), Klinkhoff (2004), and Medicare Australia). Use of TNF α inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas) (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010)). We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab.

  17. Off-label use of rituximab for systemic lupus erythematosus in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rydén-Aulin, Monica; Boumpas, Dimitrios; Bultink, Irene; Callejas Rubio, Jose Luis; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Castro, Antoni; Colodro Ruiz, Agustín; Doria, Andrea; Dörner, Thomas; Gonzalez-Echavarri, Cristina; Gremese, Elisa; Houssiau, Frederic A; Huizinga, Tom; Inanç, Murat; Isenberg, David; Iuliano, Annamaria; Jacobsen, Søren; Jimenéz-Alonso, Juan; Kovács, Lászlo; Mariette, Xavier; Mosca, Marta; Nived, Ola; Oristrell, Joaquim; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Rascón, Javier; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Salvador Cervelló, Gonzalo; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Squatrito, Danilo; Szücs, Gabriella; Voskuyl, Alexandre; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rituximab (RTX) is a biological treatment used off-label in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This survey aimed to investigate the off-label use of RTX in Europe and compare the characteristics of patients receiving RTX with those receiving conventional therapy. Methods Data on patients with SLE receiving RTX were taken from the International Registry for Biologics in SLE retrospective registry and complemented with data on patients with SLE treated with conventional therapy. For nationwide estimates of RTX use in patients with SLE, investigators were asked to provide data through case report forms (CRFs). Countries for which no data were submitted through CRFs, published literature and/or personal communication were used, and for European countries where no data were available, estimates were made on the assumption of similarities with neighbouring countries. Results The estimated off-label use of RTX in Europe was 0.5%–1.5% of all patients with SLE. In comparison with patients with SLE on conventional therapy, patients treated with RTX had longer disease duration, higher disease activity and were more often treated with immunosuppressives. The most frequent organ manifestations for which either RTX or conventional therapy was initiated were lupus nephritis followed by musculoskeletal and haematological. The reason for treatment was, besides disease control, corticosteroid-sparing for patients treated with conventional therapy. Conclusions RTX use for SLE in Europe is restrictive and appears to be used as a last resort in patients for whom other reasonable options have been exhausted.

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus: pharmacological developments and recommendations for a therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Pego-Reigosa, Jose Maria; Isenberg, David A

    2008-01-01

    The management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved thanks to a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis of the disease and important advances in drug development. In contrast to the worrying paucity of new therapies for SLE at the end of the last century, several agents have emerged as useful treatments for this condition in the last decade. The efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of patients with lupus nephritis has been recently established in several clinical trials. There are increasing data from open-label studies to support the belief that B-cell depletion using the chimeric antibody rituximab is useful in the treatment of SLE. However, larger double-blind clinical trials to confirm this belief are awaited. Other specific targeted therapeutic agents that act by inducing B-cell depletion, inhibiting co-stimulatory molecules necessary for T-cell activation, tolerising B and T cells, blocking pro-inflammatory cytokines or complement and immunoablation are exciting advances in the race towards improving the outcome for patients with SLE.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus and ethnicity: nature versus nurture or nature and nurture?

    PubMed

    Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2007-07-01

    Ethnic variation in the frequency and outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been recognized for decades. The reasons underlying these discrepancies are not completely understood but it is most likely that both genetic and nongenetic factors are responsible for them. Sorting out the extent to which these factors, particularly those of a nongenetic nature, exert their influence in SLE is not easy given inherent methodological difficulties in studying them. To establish this review properly, we would like to make it clear from the outset that ethnicity is a broad construct that implies not only biological but also nonbiological features including cultural and sociodemographic, among others. We will then describe the epidemiological differences of SLE among Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations followed by a succinct review of the genetic predisposition to SLE with special emphasis in ethnic heterogeneity. Differences in disease activity, lupus nephritis, damage and mortality as a function of ethnic group will then be described. Finally, we will present a comprehensive model of the influence of ethnicity on SLE. PMID:20477163

  20. Off-label use of rituximab for systemic lupus erythematosus in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rydén-Aulin, Monica; Boumpas, Dimitrios; Bultink, Irene; Callejas Rubio, Jose Luis; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Castro, Antoni; Colodro Ruiz, Agustín; Doria, Andrea; Dörner, Thomas; Gonzalez-Echavarri, Cristina; Gremese, Elisa; Houssiau, Frederic A; Huizinga, Tom; Inanç, Murat; Isenberg, David; Iuliano, Annamaria; Jacobsen, Søren; Jimenéz-Alonso, Juan; Kovács, Lászlo; Mariette, Xavier; Mosca, Marta; Nived, Ola; Oristrell, Joaquim; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Rascón, Javier; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Salvador Cervelló, Gonzalo; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Squatrito, Danilo; Szücs, Gabriella; Voskuyl, Alexandre; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rituximab (RTX) is a biological treatment used off-label in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This survey aimed to investigate the off-label use of RTX in Europe and compare the characteristics of patients receiving RTX with those receiving conventional therapy. Methods Data on patients with SLE receiving RTX were taken from the International Registry for Biologics in SLE retrospective registry and complemented with data on patients with SLE treated with conventional therapy. For nationwide estimates of RTX use in patients with SLE, investigators were asked to provide data through case report forms (CRFs). Countries for which no data were submitted through CRFs, published literature and/or personal communication were used, and for European countries where no data were available, estimates were made on the assumption of similarities with neighbouring countries. Results The estimated off-label use of RTX in Europe was 0.5%–1.5% of all patients with SLE. In comparison with patients with SLE on conventional therapy, patients treated with RTX had longer disease duration, higher disease activity and were more often treated with immunosuppressives. The most frequent organ manifestations for which either RTX or conventional therapy was initiated were lupus nephritis followed by musculoskeletal and haematological. The reason for treatment was, besides disease control, corticosteroid-sparing for patients treated with conventional therapy. Conclusions RTX use for SLE in Europe is restrictive and appears to be used as a last resort in patients for whom other reasonable options have been exhausted. PMID:27651920

  1. IgA nephropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leonardo Sales; Almeida, Bruna Laiza Fontes; de Melo, Ana Karla Guedes; de Brito, Danielle Christine Soares Egypto; Braz, Alessandra Sousa; Freire, Eutília Andrade Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Systemic erythematosus lupus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease which has nephritis as one of the most striking manifestations. Although it can coexist with other autoimmune diseases, and determine the predisposition to various infectious complications, SLE is rarely described in association with non-lupus nephropathies etiologies. We report the rare association of SLE and primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most frequent primary glomerulopathy in the world population. The patient was diagnosed with SLE due to the occurrence of malar rash, alopecia, pleural effusion, proteinuria, ANA 1: 1280, nuclear fine speckled pattern, and anticardiolipin IgM and 280U/mL. Renal biopsy revealed mesangial hypercellularity with isolated IgA deposits, consistent with primary IgAN. It was treated with antimalarial drug, prednisone and inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme, showing good progress. Since they are relatively common diseases, the coexistence of SLE and IgAN may in fact be an uncommon finding for unknown reasons or an underdiagnosed condition. This report focus on the importance of the distinction between the activity of renal disease in SLE and non-SLE nephropathy, especially IgAN, a definition that has important implications on renal prognosis and therapeutic regimens to be adopted in both the short and long terms.

  2. Abnormalities in the cellular phase of blood fibrinolytic activity in systemic lupus erythematosus and in venous thromboembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, L.A.; MacLean, L.D.; Langleben, D.

    1986-09-15

    Fibrinolytic activities of whole blood and plasma were determined by /sup 125/I-fibrin radiometric assay in 16 normal subjects, and in 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 14 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 23 with venous thromboembolic disease, and 20 patients awaiting elective surgery. Mean whole blood and plasma activities for patients with PSS, and for those awaiting elective surgery, were similar to normal values, as was the mean plasma activity in patients with SLE. However, mean whole blood activity in SLE was significantly decreased compared with normals (p less than 0.05), with mean plasma activity accounting for 44% of mean whole blood activity (compared with 17% in normal subjects), representing a 67% decrease in mean calculated cellular phase activity in SLE, when compared with normals. Since the numbers of cells (neutrophils, monocytes) possibly involved in cellular activity were not decreased, the findings suggest a functional defect in fibrinolytic activity of one or more blood cell types in SLE. An additional finding was the participation of the cellular phase as well as the well-known plasma phase of blood in the fibrinolytic response to thromboembolism.

  3. Blood-Borne RNA Correlates with Disease Activity and IFN-Stimulated Gene Expression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Doedens, John R; Jones, Wendell D; Hill, Kay; Mason, Michael J; Gersuk, Vivian H; Mease, Philip J; Dall'Era, Maria; Aranow, Cynthia; Martin, Richard W; Cohen, Stanley B; Fleischmann, Roy M; Kivitz, Alan J; Burge, Daniel J; Chaussabel, Damien; Elkon, Keith B; Posada, James A

    2016-10-01

    The loss of tolerance and the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed against nuclear Ags is the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many of these Ags are complexed with short, noncoding RNAs, such as U1 and Y1. The amount of U1 and Y1 RNA complexed with SLE patient Abs and immune complexes was measured in a cross-section of 228 SLE patients to evaluate the role of these RNA molecules within the known biochemical framework of SLE. The study revealed that SLE patients had significantly elevated levels of circulating U1 and/or Y1 RNA compared with healthy volunteers. In addition, the blood-borne RNA molecules were correlated with SLE disease activity and increased expression of IFN-inducible genes. To our knowledge, this study provides the first systematic examination of the role of circulating RNA in a large group of SLE patients and provides an important link with IFN dysregulation.

  4. Blood-Borne RNA Correlates with Disease Activity and IFN-Stimulated Gene Expression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Doedens, John R; Jones, Wendell D; Hill, Kay; Mason, Michael J; Gersuk, Vivian H; Mease, Philip J; Dall'Era, Maria; Aranow, Cynthia; Martin, Richard W; Cohen, Stanley B; Fleischmann, Roy M; Kivitz, Alan J; Burge, Daniel J; Chaussabel, Damien; Elkon, Keith B; Posada, James A

    2016-10-01

    The loss of tolerance and the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed against nuclear Ags is the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many of these Ags are complexed with short, noncoding RNAs, such as U1 and Y1. The amount of U1 and Y1 RNA complexed with SLE patient Abs and immune complexes was measured in a cross-section of 228 SLE patients to evaluate the role of these RNA molecules within the known biochemical framework of SLE. The study revealed that SLE patients had significantly elevated levels of circulating U1 and/or Y1 RNA compared with healthy volunteers. In addition, the blood-borne RNA molecules were correlated with SLE disease activity and increased expression of IFN-inducible genes. To our knowledge, this study provides the first systematic examination of the role of circulating RNA in a large group of SLE patients and provides an important link with IFN dysregulation. PMID:27534558

  5. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on levels of serum autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanay, A.; Schiffman, G.; Strober, S.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on serum levels of autoantibodies, and of antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and pneumococcal polysaccharide in patients with lupus nephritis were compared with those previously observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Baseline levels of antibodies to diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid decreased significantly after TLI in patients with lupus and RA, but antibody levels to pneumococcal polysaccharide remained unchanged. After TLI, the levels of antinuclear and anti-DNA antibodies were reduced significantly in lupus, but levels of rheumatoid factor, antinuclear, and antigranulocyte antibodies all tended to increase in RA.

  6. Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffanelli, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multisystem disease. Genetic predisposition, altered immunity, hormones, drugs, viruses, and ultraviolet light all may play a role in etiology. A wide range of cutaneous lesions occur, and variants such as subacute cutaneous LE, complement-deficient LE, and neonatal LE have recently been emphasized. Management of the LE patient, including appropriate diagnostic studies and therapy relevant to the dermatologist, is discussed in the review.

  7. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sean J.; Suarez-Fueyo, Abel; Moss, David R.; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Background T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification. Methods Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation. Results We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production. Conclusions Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction. PMID:26544975

  8. The complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Jonatan; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2014-09-01

    The complement system plays a major role in the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the role of complement in SLE is complex since it may both prevent and exacerbate the disease. In this review, we explore the latest findings in complement-focused research in SLE. C1q deficiency is the strongest genetic risk factor for SLE, although such deficiency is very rare. Various recently discovered genetic associations include mutations in the complement receptors 2 and 3 as well as complement inhibitors, the latter related to earlier onset of nephritis. Further, autoantibodies are a distinct feature of SLE that are produced as the result of an adaptive immune response and how complement can affect that response is also being reviewed. SLE generates numerous disease manifestations involving contributions from complement such as glomerulonephritis and the increased risk of thrombosis. Furthermore, since most of the complement system is present in plasma, complement is very accessible and may be suitable as biomarker for diagnosis or monitoring of disease activity. This review highlights the many roles of complement for SLE pathogenesis and how research has progressed during recent years.

  9. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  10. Dissecting complex epigenetic alterations in human lupus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipak R; Richardson, Bruce C

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic relapsing autoimmune disease that primarily afflicts women, and both a genetic predisposition and appropriate environmental exposures are required for lupus to develop and flare. The genetic requirement is evidenced by an increased concordance in identical twins and by the validation of at least 35 single-nucleotide polymorphisms predisposing patients to lupus. Genes alone, though, are not enough. The concordance of lupus in identical twins is often incomplete, and when concordant, the age of onset is usually different. Lupus is also not present at birth, but once the disease develops, it typically follows a chronic relapsing course. Thus, genes alone are insufficient to cause human lupus, and additional factors encountered in the environment and over time are required to initiate the disease and subsequent flares. The nature of the environmental contribution, though, and the mechanisms by which environmental agents modify the immune response to cause lupus onset and flares in genetically predisposed people have been controversial. Reports that the lupus-inducing drugs procainamide and hydralazine are epigenetic modifiers, that epigenetically modified T cells are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in animal models, and that patients with active lupus have epigenetic changes similar to those caused by procainamide and hydralazine have prompted a growing interest in how epigenetic alterations contribute to this disease. Understanding how epigenetic mechanisms modify T cells to contribute to lupus requires an understanding of how epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression. The roles of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs in lupus pathogenesis will be reviewed here. PMID:23374884

  11. The predictive factors of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin D deficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sumethkul, Kittiwan; Boonyaratavej, Smonporn; Kitumnuaypong, Tasanee; Angthararuk, Sungchai; Cheewasat, Patcharin; Manadee, Naruimon; Sumethkul, Vasant

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with pleiotropic effects. The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level [25(OH) D] and lupus nephritis are not clearly known. We aim to determine serum 25(OH) D levels in patients with inactive SLE, active SLE without lupus nephritis (LN) and active SLE with LN and to identify clinical predictor of vitamin D deficiency. One hundred and eight SLE patients were included. Patients were classified as Group (Gr) 1, 2 and 3 if they had SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) <3, ≥ 3 but no LN and ≥ 3 with LN. Important baseline characteristics were collected. 25(OH) D was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SLEDAI in Gr1, Gr2 and Gr3 was 0.7 (0.9), 5.6 (2.3) and 9.2 (5.2), respectively. 43.5 % had vitamin D insufficiency and 29.6 % had vitamin D deficiency. Mean 25(OH) D in each groups was 28.3 (8.0), 26.7 (9.5) and 19.9 (7.6) ng/ml (p < 0.001 comparing Gr1 and 3) (p = 0.003 comparing Gr2 and 3). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 11.1, 22.2 and 55.6 % of Gr1, 2 and 3. Linear regression analysis found that 25(OH) D was significantly correlated with serum albumin (r = 0.28, p = 0.004), inversely correlated with SLEDAI (r = -0.22, p = 0.03) and urinary protein creatinine index (UPCI) (r = -0.28, p = 0.005), but not with sun exposure score, body mass index and estimated GFR. Only UPCI was significantly inversely correlated with 25(OH) D (p = 0.02) from multiple linear regression. LN was a significant predictor of vitamin D deficiency from multivariate logistic regression (OR 5.97; p = 0.006). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was found in 93 and 86 % of LN with proteinuria ≥ and <500 mg/day. We conclude that SLE patients with LN have significantly lower vitamin D level than inactive SLE and active SLE without LN. Hence, nephritis is a significant predictor of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients.

  12. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... in: Cancer Certain infections Ulcerative colitis Decreased complement activity may be seen in: Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hereditary angioedema Hepatitis Kidney transplant rejection Lupus nephritis Malnutrition Systemic lupus erythematosis

  13. Evaluation of Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Correlation with Different Organs Damages

    PubMed Central

    Ktona, Ergeta; Barbullushi, Myftar; Backa, Teuta; Idrizi, Alma; Shpata, Vjolica; Roshi, Enver

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombocytopenia is highly prevalent among patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematous(SLE) and at the same time it has been reported that a correlation exists between Thrombocytopenia and organ damage. The aim of this study is to highlight the correlation between Thrombocytopenia and the clinical manifestations of SLE. Objectives: The objective is to show the clinical manifestations and organ damage of Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) patients who have been found to have Thrombocytopenia. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted examining all patient charts diagnosed and treated for SLE at the Rheumatology Service of Mother Teresa Hospital Centre. All the data were collected from discharged patient charts. The data included were Anti DNA,AAN,C3 , thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and organ damage. Data were taken from 2009 to 2013. The classification criteria of the American College of Rheumatology was used for all patients regarding the diagnosis. Results: Out of 330 patients, 12 (3.64%) are men and 318 (96.3%) women. 73 of all patients have thrombocytopenia as cases and 257 patients had SLE without thrombocytopenia, which was considered as the control group. AAN 68(93.1%), Anti DNA 50 (64.3%) , low value of C3 46 (63%), and leucopenia were higher in thrombocytopenic patients compared with control group (p<0.05) 48 (65.7%) of thrombocytopenic patients develop lupus nephritis, 10 (13.6%) were with pulmonary involvement, and 42 (57.5%) had leukopenia. Conclusion: Thrombocytopenia is not directly associated with any disease activity, organ damage and mortality, but it should be considered as a prognostic factor which may help identifying a category of patients whose disease course can be aggravated. PMID:24944538

  14. Poor agreement of objectively measured and self-reported physical activity in juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Jéssica; Roschel, Hamilton; Benatti, Fabiana Braga; de Sá Pinto, Ana Lúcia; Sallum, Adriana Maluf Elias; Silva, Clóvis Arthur; Gualano, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    To examine the agreement and association between objectively measured and indirectly assessed physical activity levels in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients. The sample consisted of 19 JDM patients (age 8 to 22 years) and 20 JSLE patients (age 9 to 18 years). Physical activity level was objectively measured using Actigraph® accelerometers and indirectly assessed by the short-form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to test possible associations between physical activity levels across the two instruments. The Bland-Altman technique was used to calculate bias and limits of agreement. Correlations between objectively measured and indirectly assessed physical activity levels in JDM and JSLE were weak, varying from R = 0.03 to R = 0.33 (all p > 0.05). Total physical activity was correlated between accelerometer and IPAQ in JSLE (R = 0.51, p = 0.021). Bland-Altman analyses suggested that IPAQ tended to highly underestimate sedentary time and light physical activity in JDM (mean bias 105.7 and 199.8 min, respectively) and JSLE (mean bias 36.4 and 127.8 min, respectively). Mean biases of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were also highly variable, ranging from -42.9 to 54.9 min and -59.4 to 89.8 min for JDM and JSLE, respectively. IPAQ was shown to not be valid to assess physical activity levels in patients with JDM and JSLE when compared against accelerometry. While the validation of reliable self-reported instruments that measure physical activity in pediatric rheumatic patients remains necessary, the use of validated tools that objectively measure physical activity is recommended in both clinical and research settings.

  15. Reduced opsonisation of protein A containing Staphylococcus aureus in sera with cryoglobulins from patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Nived, O; Linder, C; Odeberg, H; Svensson, B

    1985-01-01

    Among a total of 41 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 11 of 14 patients with active disease had reduced capacity (p less than 0.05) to opsonify Staphylococcus aureus in undiluted sera, as compared with nine of 27 patients with inactive disease (p less than 0.02). The opsonic reduction in the active patients increased with the number of active organ systems (p less than 0.002). No correlation was found between reduced opsonisation and corticosteroid treatment, or serum concentrations of complement components (C) of the classical pathway, or bacteria-associated activated C3. When the cryoglobulin fraction of immune complexes (IC) was removed, normal opsonic capacity was restored, and the opsonic reduction could be transferred with the cryoglobulins to pooled serum. Increased IC values, as measured by C1q binding assay, were found in conjunction with reduced opsonic capacity (p less than 0.04). Since opsonisation in SLE sera of a protein A deficient strain of S. aureus was normal, reduced S. aureus phagocytosis in SLE sera may be explained by IC binding to staphylococcal protein A. PMID:3872638

  16. Autoantibodies to the functionally active RING-domain of Ro52/SSA are associated with disease activity in patients with lupus.

    PubMed

    Kvarnström, M; Dzikaite-Ottosson, V; Ottosson, L; Gustafsson, J T; Gunnarsson, I; Svenungsson, E; Wahren-Herlenius, M

    2013-04-01

    The Ro52 protein of the Ro/SSA antigen was recently defined as an E3 ligase controlling cytokine production. Autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients targeting the Ro52-RING domain, containing the E3 ligase activity, have been shown to inhibit the E3 ligase activity of Ro52. The objective of the present study was to investigate correlations between clinical parameters in patients with SLE and levels of Ro/SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and La/SSB autoantibodies, including autoantibodies directed towards the functional RING and B-box domains of the Ro52 protein. SLE patients (n=232) were clinically examined and disease activity indices collected concurrently to blood sampling. The samples were analyzed for immunological parameters including autoantibodies. Ro52 autoantibody levels were associated with more variables than the other analyzed antibodies and were significantly associated with several individual items related to sSS and the diagnosis of sSS itself (p=0.004). Other associated variables were high sedimentation rate (p=0.0003), levels of immunoglobulins (p=0.0003), and an inverse correlation with levels of lymphocytes (p=0.003) and leukocytes (p=0.01). Antibodies to the RING domain of Ro52, which is the functionally active domain with E3 ligase activity, were significantly correlated with disease activity as measured by the SLAM score. We conclude that autoantibodies against Ro52 and in particular its functional RING domain are important in lupus patients and associated with several clinical and laboratory features of the disease. The impact on disease activity of Ro52-RING specific antibodies was especially noted, and could imply a functional role for these autoantibodies in inhibiting Ro52 activity, which is important for the control of proinflammatory cytokine production, including type 1 interferons.

  17. Carotid subclinical atherosclerosis is associated with disease activity but not vitamin D in Korean systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jung, J-Y; Koh, B-R; Bae, C-B; Kim, H-A; Suh, C-H

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerosis develops early in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and is an important cause of mortality. Vitamin D deficiency is found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity. We evaluated the extent of carotid subclinical atherosclerosis and analyzed its correlation with vitamin D in SLE. One hundred and two female patients with SLE and 52 normal controls (NCs) were recruited. The mean carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) of SLE patients was 0.41 ± 0.08 mm, which was higher than that of NCs (0.32 ± 0.08 mm, p = 0.012). In addition, carotid plaques were more frequent and the plaque index was higher in SLE patients than in NCs (0.68 ± 1.39 vs. 0.26 ± 0.87, p = 0.026). Carotid IMT was correlated with age, body mass index, SLE disease activity index, and aspirin use in SLE patients. The plaque index was correlated with renal involvement. Vitamin 25(OH)D3 level was not correlated with carotid IMT, plaque index or disease activity markers. In SLE, the risk of cardiovascular disease is higher than that in NCs, which may be derived from systemic inflammation. It may be not suitable to assess vitamin D as a marker of disease activity or subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE patients.

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  20. Lupus-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Daniel; Blake, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Recently reported cases of lupus complicated by a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like syndrome suggest a survival benefit to early treatment with plasma exchange. The following is a report of the eighth such case in the last ten years. A 44-year-old lady known for lupus presented with the nephrotic syndrome and a renal biopsy was consistent with class 4G lupus nephritis. She was given high-dose steroids and cytotoxic therapy, but her induction therapy was complicated by the classic pentad of TTP. She was subsequently treated with another course of high-dose steroids, a different cytotoxic agent, and plasma exchange, with clinical resolution shortly thereafter. Similar to seven recently reported cases of microangiopathy in lupus, this lady’s TTP-like syndrome improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange, despite not having a severely deficient ADAMTS13. This has implications on both current clinical practice and on the pathogenesis of TTP-like syndromes in lupus. PMID:26558190

  1. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Elaine V; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can form immune complexes and deposit in tissues, causing inflammation and organ damage. There is evidence that interferons and some interleukins can have an active role in the pathogenesis of SLE and can contribute significantly to the immune imbalance in the disease, whereas the role of some cytokines (such as TNF) is still debated. This review discusses the activity of several cytokines in SLE, their effects on the immune cells in relation to the disease pathogenesis, and the promise and limitations of cytokine-based therapies in clinical trials for lupus patients.

  2. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.; Shkolnik, A.; Yogev, R.; Firlit, C.; Traisman, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis.

  3. Annexin A5 anticoagulant activity in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and the association with antibodies to domain I of β2-glycoprotein I.

    PubMed

    Wahezi, D M; Ilowite, N T; Wu, X X; Pelkmans, L; Laat, B; Schanberg, L E; Rand, J H

    2013-06-01

    Children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high prevalence of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies and are at increased risk for aPL-related thrombosis. We investigated the association between annexin A5 anticoagulant activity and antibodies to the domain I portion of β2-glycoprotein I (anti-DI antibodies), and propose a potential mechanism for the pathogenesis of aPL-related thrombosis. Using samples from 183 children with SLE collected during the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial, we examined resistance to the anticoagulant effects of annexin A5, using the annexin A5 resistance (A5R) assay, and evaluated for anti-DI IgG antibodies. Children with SLE had higher frequency of anti-D1 antibodies (p = 0.014) and significantly reduced A5R compared to pediatric controls: mean A5R = 172 ± 30% versus 242 ± 32% (p < 0.0001). Children with SLE and positive anti-DI antibodies had significantly lower mean A5R levels compared to those with negative anti-DI antibodies: mean A5R = 155 ± 24% versus 177 ± 30% (p < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, anti-DI antibodies (p = 0.013) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) (p = 0.036) were both independently associated with reduced A5R. Children with SLE have significantly reduced annexin A5 anticoagulant activity that is associated with the presence of LA and anti-DI antibodies.

  4. Oridonin ameliorates lupus-like symptoms of MRL(lpr/lpr) mice by inhibition of B-cell activating factor (BAFF).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Sun, Lijuan; Wu, Hongkun; Zhang, Lingzhen; Chen, Mingcang; Liu, Jianwen; Zhong, Renqian

    2013-09-01

    Oridonin, a pharmacologically safe agent extracted from Isodon Serra, has been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not clear whether Oridonin affects B-cell activating factor (BAFF) expression, thereby exerting beneficial effects in the treatment of BAFF-associated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, the current study aimed to find the function of Oridonin in regulation of BAFF and amelioration of SLE. In vitro, we explored the effect of Oridonin on BAFF expression and production in mouse macrophages. Moreover, using a spontaneous murine SLE model, we investigated the role of Oridonin delivery in the treatment of lupus-like disease in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, by measuring the changes in lupus symptoms, renal damage, BAFF expression, and B cell subsets. Our results showed that Oridonin significantly inhibited BAFF expression in mouse macrophages by suppressing the transcriptional activation of its promoter. And in vivo administration of Oridonin efficiently ameliorated the serological and clinical manifestations of SLE in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, as shown by increased survival benefit, reduced proteinuria levels, diminished production of specific auto-antibodies, and attenuated renal damage, in association with down-regulation of BAFF and a lower rate of B-cell maturation and differentiation. Thus, it suggests that Oridonin will serve as a novel natural therapeutic strategy for SLE by inhibition of BAFF. PMID:23712004

  5. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  6. Streptococcal Infection-related Nephritis (SIRN) Manifesting Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type I.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Oda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 18-year-old boy who developed nephrotic syndrome and hypertension after upper airway inflammation. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of a high antistreptolysin O titer, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria. A renal biopsy was performed due to persistent proteinuria, and the pathological diagnosis was membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I. Glomeruli showed positive staining for nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr), a nephritogenic group A streptococcal antigen, and plasmin activity was found in a similar distribution as NAPlr deposition. This rare case of streptococcal infection-related nephritis (SIRN) manifesting MPGN type I supports the histological diversity of SIRN. PMID:26984084

  7. Circulating microparticles in systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup

    2012-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease presenting with a wide array of clinical manifestations and an elusive pathogenesis. A characteristic feature in SLE is the occurrence of autoantibodies against chromatin, double-stranded DNA, and RNA-binding ribonucleoproteins. Observations of defective clearance of dying cells in SLE combined with the generation and exposure of nuclear autoantigens during apoptosis have led to the hypothesis that improperly cleared apoptotic debris constitutes a source of autoantigens capable of triggering autoimmune disease. In blood, circulating, heterogeneous subcellular microparticles (MPs) are released from cells and platelets constitutively and upon cellular activation or apoptosis. Such MPs may reflect the state of their parental cells and tissues, and could serve as markers of pathology. Particular in SLE MPs may serve as carriers of autoantigens and constituents of immune complexes (ICs). The purposes of this PhD thesis were to develop and apply qualitative and quantitative methods to characterize circulating MPs with respect to numbers, cellular origins and composition in a large cohort of well-characterized SLE patients compared to healthy and disease controls and to explore associations with clinical, biochemical and serological parameters. The PhD thesis consists of a review and three papers. In the first paper we show that SLE patients have significantly decreased numbers of annexin V binding MPs and MPs from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells using flow cytometry. Two morphologically distinguishable populations of annexin V non-binding MPs were increased in the SLE patients. The annexin V non-binding MPs of most likely cellular origin were associated with the presence of lupus nephritis, markers of increased disease activity and levels of endothelial cell-derived MPs. In the second paper we present the development of a proteomic method to characterize the protein composition of purified

  8. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  9. Living Well with Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... following a specific diet or nutrition plan for my lupus? How do I explain lupus to others? ...

  10. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  11. Cavitary pulmonary lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus: an unusual manifestation.

    PubMed

    Dalili, Amir Reza; Lotfi, Reza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis. The frequency of SLE with cavitary lesion manifestation is very rare and is thought to be due to infection or pulmonary embolism. A 19-year-old female diagnosed with SLE complicated by lupus nephritis and cavitary pulmonary lesion is presented in this case report. Other diseases that can lead to such lesions were ruled out in the patient. The patient improved briefly after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy, but was unresponsive to supportive treatment due to pneumothorax. Pneumothorax is caused by cavitary lesions and possibly bronchopleural fistulas - these later caused respiratory distress and death. The patient did not show any improvement in the lesions after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. This case report suggests that the differential diagnosis of cavitary lung lesions should include SLE. PMID:25763160

  12. Toxocara canis infection: Unusual trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michaël; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Baudouin, Véronique; Guillem, Colette; Peuchmaur, Michel; Deschênes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Infection by Toxocara canis can cause systemic vasculitis. We report here a unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) triggered by T. canis infection. An 8-year-old girl was treated with albendazole therapy for common toxocariasis, but she developed two weeks later, asthenia, fever, infiltrated maculopapular eruption of the face, peripheral vascular disease with necrosis of the fingers and inflammatory anemia with proteinuria. Anti-nuclear, anti-DNA and anti-Sm antibodies positivity, together with minimal change nephritis with mesangial exclusive IgM deposit on renal biopsy and clinical relapse after initially successful steroid therapy, led to the diagnosis of SLE. T. canis infection can trigger systemic lupus but must also be ruled out of the differential diagnosis given its association with autoimmunity. PMID:26147636

  13. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  14. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis. PMID:23628898

  15. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis.

  16. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Clinical Activity of Multiple Doses of RCT-18 in Chinese Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Xia; Hou, Yong; Jiang, Ji; Zhong, Wen; Yao, Xuejing; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Lin; Fang, Jianmin; Zhang, Fengchun; Hu, Pei

    2016-08-01

    RCT-18 is a novel recombinant fusion protein that blocks the activity of a B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand. This was a randomized, single-blind, and placebo-controlled phase 1 study in 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Eligible patients were randomized 3:1 to receive multiple subcutaneous doses of RCT-18 for 4 weeks (180 mg, once weekly) or placebo and monitored over an 84-day observation period for pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, safety, and clinical activity. After multiple-dose RCT-18, the maximal serum concentration (Cmax ) of total and free RCT-18 was reached within 1 to 2 days. Mean elimination half-life for total RCT-18 and free RCT-18 was 11.4 to 26.4 days and 2.4 to 26.5 days, respectively. Slight accumulation was found after multiple subcutaneous administrations. The average accumulation ratios of AUC and Cmax after the fourth administration of RCT-18 were 2.0 and 1.7 for total RCT-18, and 1.8 and 1.6 for free RCT-18. The formation and elimination of BLyS-RCT-18 complex were much slower, with a time to Cmax of 14 to 46 days. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of RCT-18 in SLE patients were similar to those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No positive reaction was detected in the immunogenicity assessments. RCT-18 was biologically active, according to serum immunoglobulin and B-cell levels. Treatment-related IgM and IgA reduction was found during this study. CD19(+) , IgD(+) , and CD27(+) B-cell counts were increased after administration and decreased subsequently. SLE patients treated with RCT-18 were more prone to infections, including moderate and severe infections. Lower dosages of RCT-18 should be considered in further clinical development.

  17. Reversible Fluindione-Induced Chronic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thomas; Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Dahmani, Omar; Felix, Sophie; Ducloux, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Fluindione is well known to induce acute drug-induced interstitial nephritis (IN). Most cases occurred soon after the onset of treatment. We report a unique case of severe subacute fluindione-induced IN diagnosed 2 years after the treatment was begun. Renal function dramatically improved after fluindione withdrawal and steroid therapy. PMID:27127666

  18. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Aerobic capacity correlates to self-assessed physical function but not to overall disease activity or organ damage in women with systemic lupus erythematosus with low-to-moderate disease activity and organ damage.

    PubMed

    Boström, C; Dupré, B; Tengvar, P; Jansson, E; Opava, C H; Lundberg, I E

    2008-02-01

    The present aim is to investigate the relationships between aerobic capacity and disease activity, organ damage, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and physical activity in 34 women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with low-to-moderate disease activity and organ damage. Mean age was 51 (SD 10) years, disease duration 17 (SD 11) years. Aerobic capacity (maximal oxygen uptake/VO2 max) was measured with a bicycle ergometer exercise test. Overall disease activity was assessed with Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) and the modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Disease Activity Index (modified SLE-DAI), overall organ damage with the Systemic Lupus International Collaboration Clinics/American College of Rheumatology-Damage Index, [SLICC/(ACR)-DI], HRQL with the 36-item Short-form health-survey (SF-36) and physical activity with a self-assessed question. The women who were low-to-moderately physically active had 89-92% (P < or = 0.001) of VO2 max predicted for sedentary women. Maximal oxygen uptake (L/min, mL/min/kg) correlated to SF-36 physical function (rs = 0.49, rs = 0.72) (P < or = 0.01), but not (rs < or = 0.25) to other HRQL scales, overall disease activity or organ damage or physical activity. The correlation between aerobic capacity and physical function and the absence of correlation between aerobic capacity and physical activity, suggest a possible disease-related factor behind the low aerobic capacity. However, with no correlation between aerobic capacity and overall disease activity and organ damage, low physical activity may contribute to the low aerobic capacity in our sample.

  20. Soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk when compared with healthy individuals, due to distinct factors and mechanisms. Bone remodeling is a tightly orchestrated process dependent on several factors, including the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Our aim was to assess serum OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) levels as well as sRANKL/OPG ratio in female SLE patients and compare it with female controls. Methods We have evaluated 103 SLE patients and 114 healthy controls, all Caucasian females. All participants underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation. sRANKL and OPG were quantified in serum by ELISA based methods. sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels were compared between SLE patients and age, sex and race matched healthy controls. For SLE patients, a multivariate analysis was performed, to find the possible predictors of the changes in sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels. Results Although sRANKL levels did not differ between the two groups, serum OPG was lower in SLE patients (P < 0.001). This led to an increased sRANKL/OPG ratio (P = 0.010) in the patients' group. The multivariate analysis was performed considering age and other clinical and laboratorial potential confounders for these variations in the SLE patients group. We have showed that age (P = 0.001) and levels of anti-Sm antibodies (P = 0.016) were independent predictors of sRANKL/OPG ratio variations in SLE patients. No relationship with therapy or disease activity measured by SLEDAI2K was found. Conclusions These results are suggestive of increased osteoclastic stimuli driven by the SLE disease mechanisms. PMID:22027240

  1. Pre-Clinical Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, Rebecka; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is often preceded by immune dysregulation and clinical manifestations below the threshold for SLE classification. This review discusses current and evolving concepts about the pre-classification period of SLE, including clinical and mechanistic observations, and potential avenues for early identification and intervention. Recent findings Although incomplete lupus erythematosus (ILE) involves fewer clinical manifestations than SLE, ILE can cause organ damage and mortality. Common clinical features in ILE include antinuclear antibody seropositivity, polyarthritis, immunologic manifestations, and hematological disorders. Despite having lower disease activity and damage scores than SLE patients, ILE patients may develop pulmonary arterial hypertension or renal, neurological, or peripheral vascular damage. The recently proposed SLICC SLE classification criteria could shift the period considered “preclinical SLE”. Murine studies suggest that the balance of T helper/T regulatory cells, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell pathways may be valuable targets for early intervention. Summary Advances in our understanding of early SLE, including stages before clinical features are fully developed, will improve our ability to identify individuals at high risk of classification for potential prevention trials, provide necessary information to improve diagnostic testing, and perhaps identify novel targets for directed therapeutics in clinical SLE. PMID:26125103

  2. [Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, a multidimensional entity].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions caused by systemic lupus erythematosus are among the most frequent manifestations of this disease. These lesions show great variability in both their clinical and histological expression, making their understanding and study difficult. Patients presenting with cutaneous lupus do not necessarily have serious systemic complications, but they do have significant morbidity from impact on quality of life given the extent of the lesions, chronic tendency, and the risk of scarring; hence the importance of establishing a fast and effective treatment. This paper addresses the different varieties of specific injuries attributed to lupus erythematosus, correlation with systemic activity, quality of life, and the treatments available.

  3. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p < 0.001); and less frequently had a history of neuropsychiatric lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment

  4. Evaluation of Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecules and Anti-C1q Antibody in Discriminating between Active and Non-Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahayidin, Hasni; Yahya, Nurul Khaiza; Wan Ghazali, Wan Syamimee; Mohd Ismail, Asmahan; Wan Ab Hamid, Wan Zuraida

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting the active state of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is important but challenging. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE. Methods Using SELENA-SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), 95 SLE patients (45 active and 50 non-active) were assessed. A score above five was considered indicative of active SLE. The blood samples were tested for serum ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The levels of serum VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody were significantly higher in active SLE patients. Both VCAM-1 and anti-C1q were able to discriminate between active and non-active SLE (p-value < 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). From the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) constructed, the optimal cut-off values for VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE were 30.5 ng/mL (69.0% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity, PPV 58.5%, NPV 66.7%) and 7.86 U/mL (75.6% sensitivity, 80% specificity, PPV 77.3%, NPV 78.4%), respectively. However, serum ICAM-1 level was unable to discriminate between the two groups (p-value = 0.193). Conclusion Anti-C1q antibody demonstrated the best diagnostic accuracy in discriminating between active and non-active SLE patients. PMID:27418866

  5. Predictors of the rate of change in disease activity over time in LUMINA, a multiethnic US cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: LUMINA LXX.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; González, L A; Roseman, J M; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D; Alárcon, G S

    2010-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to clarify and quantify the relationship between age and disease duration with the rate of change in disease activity over time in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and (2) to explore other possible factors associated with this rate of change. To this end, SLE patients from LUMINA were studied if they had at least three visits in which disease activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Measure-Revised [SLAM-R]) had been ascertained. Variables associated with the rate (slope) of change in disease activity (obtained by regressing the SLAM-R score against the length of time from diagnosis to visit date) were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Five hundred and forty two of the 632 patients had at least three SLAM-R score. In multivariable analyses, Whites exhibited the fastest decline in disease activity, Texan Hispanics exhibited the slowest, trailed by the African Americans. Longer disease duration and HLA-DRB1*1503 positivity were associated with a slower decline whereas a greater number of American College of Rheumatology criteria and abnormal laboratory parameters (white blood cell counts, hematocrit and serum creatinine) were associated with a faster decline. These findings complement existing knowledge on SLE disease activity and are potentially useful to clinicians managing these patients.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Abid, N; Khan, A Sattar; Al Otaibi, F Huzam

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to collect data related to the clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia, in one of the tertiary-care centers, King Fahd Hospital Al-Hasa, and to compare it with other regions of Saudi Arabia. Forty-six patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1997 criteria (ACR) were collected over a period from January 2004 to December 2008. The results showed an average age of onset of 26.17 (±9.17). The most common clinical features were nonspecific constitutional symptoms (fever, fatigue and malaise) seen in 44 patients (95.7%). Musculoskeletal features seen were mostly arthralgias (91.3%) and arthritis (76.1%). Nephritis was seen in 58.7% and hypertension in 52.2%. Mucocutaneous involvement included oral ulcers (71.7%), hair loss (65.2%), butterfly rashes (67.4%), photosensitivity (47.8%) and discoid lupus (13%). Neurologic manifestations showed psychosis in 17.4%, depression in 15.2% and headache in 28.3%. The most common hematologic presentation was leukopenia (58.7%) followed by hemolytic anemia and anemia of chronic disease (47.8%). Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 44 (95.7%), anti-dsDNA in 38 (42.6%), anti-Ro SSA and La SSB in 38 (82.6%). Anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant were positive in eight (17.4%). Low complement levels (C3 and C4) were seen in 41 (89.1%) of the patients with active disease. The drugs used in treatment were NSAIDs (100%), antimalarials (97.8%), steroids (100%), intermittent cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressive drugs (71.7%). We found that the age of onset and sex distributions were different from other areas of Saudi Arabia, while clinical manifestations were the same as in other areas. The prognosis of lupus was good overall despite the multi-organ involvement. However, further studies based on larger number of patients are needed.

  7. The stellar population of the Lupus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Joanne; Hartigan, Patrick; Krautter, Joachim; Kelemen, Janos

    1994-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of the H alpha emission stars in the Lupus dark cloud complex. We estimate the effective temperatures of the stars from their spectral types and calculate the reddening towards each object from the (R-I) colors. From these data, we derive mass and age distributions for the Lupus stars using a new set of pre-main sequence evolutionar tracks. We compare the results for the Lupus stars with those for a similar population of young stellar objects in Taurus-Auriga and Chamaeleon and with the initial mass function for field stars in the solar neighborhood. From the H-R diagrams, Lupus appears to contain older stars than Taurus. The Lupus dark clouds form a greater proportion of low mass stars than the Taurus complex. Also, the proportion of low mass stars in Lupus is higher than that predicted by the Miller-Scalo initial mass function, and the lowest mass stars in Lupus are less active than similar T Tauri stars in other regions.

  8. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  9. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  10. Antibody induction of lupus-like neuropsychiatric manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David A; Bolivar, Valerie J; Hudson, Chad A; Mondal, Tapan K; Pabello, Nina G

    2007-01-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is usually evaluated with regard to autoimmune reactivity toward the kidney, there are multiple psychiatric abnormalities associated with this autoimmune disease. Lupus-prone male NZM88 mice, derived from NZB/NZW F1 mice, develop early neuropsychiatric manifestations without any signs of nephritis. In addition to the usual repertoire of antibody specificities, including autoantibodies to dsDNA and renal antigens, mice of this inbred strain express autoantibodies to numerous brain antigens. Here, we show that autoantibodies to brain antigens, assessed by Western analysis, are as individually varied as are the diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations observed in SLE patients. Additionally, a monoclonal antibody derived from the spleen of an untreated NZM88 male when injected into healthy BALB/cByJ, but not C57BL/6J, mice induced behaviors similar to those of lupus-prone NZM88 mice. This monoclonal antibody, which is specific to dynamin-1, binds preferentially in BALB/cByJ cortex and induces substantial expression of cytokines mainly in the hypothalamus. Thus, an antibody to just one brain antigen can induce multiple behavioral changes, and multiple autoantibodies to different brain antigens exist in lupus-prone mice; however, susceptibility to the induction of neurobehavioral deficits is dependent on host genetics.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus and primary fibromyalgia can be distinguished by testing for cell-bound complement activation products

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel J; Silverman, Stuart L; Conklin, John; Barken, Derren; Dervieux, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to establish the performance of cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPs) as a diagnostic tool to distinguish primary fibromyalgia (FM) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods A total of 75 SLE and 75 primary FM adult subjects who fulfilled appropriate classification criteria were enrolled prospectively. CB-CAPs (erythrocyte-C4d (EC4d) and B-lymphocyte-C4d (BC4d)) were determined by flow cytometry. Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were determined using indirect immunofluorescence while other autoantibodies were determined by solid-phase assays. The CB-CAPs in a multi-analyte assay with algorithm (MAAA) relied on two consecutive tiers of analysis that was reported as an overall positive or negative assessment. Test performance was assessed using sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR). Results ANAs yielded 80% positives for SLE and 33% positives for FM. High CB-CAP expression (EC4d >14 units or BC4d >60 units) was 43% sensitive and 96% specific for SLE. The CB-CAPs in MAAA assessment was evaluable in 138 of the 150 subjects enrolled (92%) and yielded 60% sensitivity (CI 95% 48% to 72%) for SLE with no FM patient testing positive (100% specificity). A positive test result was associated with a strong positive LR for SLE (>24, CI 95%; 6 to 102), while a negative test result was associated with a moderate negative LR (0.40; CI 95% 0.30 to 0.54). Conclusion Our data indicate that CB-CAPs in MAAA can distinguish FM from SLE. PMID:26870391

  12. Increased serum β2-microglobulin is associated with clinical and immunological markers of disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, M-L F; Hummelshøj, L; Lundsgaard, D; Hornum, L; Keller, P; Fleckner, J; Fox, B; Poulsen, L K; Jacobsen, S

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between serum levels of β2-microglobulin (β2MG), which some studies suggest reflect disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and various clinical and immunological markers of disease activity in SLE. Twenty-six SLE patients and 10 healthy controls were included. Disease activity was assessed by: SLEDAI, 24 hr-proteinuria, circulating levels of complement C3, anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), β2MG and various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18) measured with a multiplex assay, IFN-α assessed with a reporter gene assay, and a combined expression score of 12 IFN-α inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Median serum levels of β2MG were significantly higher in SLE patients vs controls (2.8 mg/L, range: 1.1-21.6 and 1.2 mg/L, range: 0.9-1.7, respectively, p < 0.001). β2MG was correlated with SLEDAI score (R = 0.68, p < 0.001), 24 hr-proteinuria (R = 0.64, p < 0.001), and complement C3 (R = -0.52, p = 0.007). The cytokines were significantly correlated with β2MG: IL-6 (R = 0.45, p = 0.02), IL-8 (R = 0.75, p < 0.001), IL-10 (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and IL-18 (R = 0.71, p < 0.001) as were serum IFN-α (R = 0.45, p = 0.02) and the IFN-α inducible gene-score (R = 0.51, p = 0.01). The results support that β2MG may serve as a marker of disease activity in SLE. The correlations with the measured cytokines indicate that increased β2MG in SLE reflects immunological activity.

  13. Nephritogenic Lupus Antibodies Recognize Glomerular Basement Membrane-Associated Chromatin Fragments Released from Apoptotic Intraglomerular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:16723695

  14. Nephritogenic lupus antibodies recognize glomerular basement membrane-associated chromatin fragments released from apoptotic intraglomerular cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-06-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Validation of the Japanese version of the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire that includes physician-based assessments in a large observational cohort.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Katsumata, Y; Baba, S; Kawaguchi, Y; Gono, T; Hanaoka, M; Kawasumi, H; Yamanaka, H

    2016-04-01

    The Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) is a patient-reported outcome for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to translate it into Japanese and further investigate its validity and reliability. The English version of the SLAQ was translated into Japanese and administered to Japanese SLE patients at our university clinic. Physicians assessed disease activity using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K). The patients were prospectively followed for repeat assessment a year later. Ultimately, 255 patients participated. The patients' 10-point ratings of disease activity and SLAQ scores were significantly correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.53). The SLAQ score was weakly correlated with the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K)-nolab (omitting laboratory items; ρ = 0.18) but not with the SLEDAI-2K (ρ = 0.02). These results suggested its convergent and discriminant validity. The SLAQ demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.80), and good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.85). The effect sizes and the standardized response means of the SLAQ were as follows: clinical worsening, 0.26 and 0.31, and improvement, -0.39 and -0.41, respectively, which indicated a small but significant responsiveness. The Japanese version of the SLAQ demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity; its performance was comparable to that of the original version.

  16. Galectin-1-induced down-regulation of T lymphocyte activation protects (NZB x NZW) F1 mice from lupus-like disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, S D; Lee, S; La Cava, A; Motran, C C; Hahn, B H; Miceli, M C

    2011-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by a hyperactive immune system, including activation of autoreactive T and B cells. These studies demonstrate that administration of recombinant galectin-1, a β-galactose binding protein, to SLE-prone (NZB × NZW) F1 mice reduced lymphocyte activation, inhibited serum anti-double-stranded DNA(dsDNA) IgG antibody production, decreased the incidence of proteinuria, and increased survival rate. In addition, recombinant galectin-1'-treated mice had a higher frequency of Foxp3 expression, which suggested an increase in the percentage of peripheral regulatory T cells. Consistent with the finding that there were fewer activated T lymphocytes, ex vivo T cells from mice treated with recombinant galectin-1 exhibited less proliferation in response to TCR stimulation. Furthermore, these cells were less efficient at lipid raft clustering in response to TCR/CD28 engagement, consistent with published reports that galectin-1 can reorganize the synaptic contact to interfere with TCR signaling and activation to prevent T cell activation. Aged galectin-1-deficient mice had higher serum levels of antibodies against dsDNA, elucidating a role for endogenous galectin-1 in decreasing susceptibility to autoimmunity. Together, the findings highlight galectin-1 as a novel potential therapeutic immune modulator for treatment of lupus-like disease.

  17. Coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis: another case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Figen; Argın, Mehmet; Can, Gerçek; Özmen, Mustafa; Keser, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is very rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, there are only 8 reported cases in the English literature. Here, we present another case with the coexistence of these two diseases, and review the clinical and laboratory features of the previously reported cases. A 55 year-old female patient, with a diagnosis of SLE with locomotor, skin, renal and hematopoietic system involvement, which had been confirmed by relevant autoantibody positivity, and hypocomplementemia and biopsy-proven membranous lupus nephritis, was referred to our clinic suffered from typical inflammatory low-back pain after eight years of follow-up. Sacroiliac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the presence of bilateral active sacroiliitis with bone marrow oedema. HLA-B27 was positive and bilateral calcaneal spurs were also detected by conventional radiography. Therefore, the additional diagnosis of AS was made, eight years after the diagnosis of SLE. Inflammatory low-back pain typically responded to treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Including the present case, most of the reported cases of the coexistence of SLE and AS are female, and SLE generally precedes the occurrence of AS. The present case is also notable as the patient had both MRI confirmation of bilateral active sacroiliitis and HLA-B27 positivity. The coexistence of these two diseases with different genetic backgrounds in the same patient is much lower than expected based upon their prevalence in the general population. Although it has been suggested that the very rare combination of the susceptibility genes of each disease may explain the rarity of coexistence, epidemiological data concerning the genetic risks for the coexistence of SLE and AS are not available.

  18. Successful Detection of Renal Involvement in Sjögren's Syndrome Secondary to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Renal Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Takemura, Koji; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Akira; Takano, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man presented with a mildly decreased renal function and increased anti-double-stranded-DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody levels, and met the diagnostic criteria of the American College of Rheumatology for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the incremental increase in creatinine levels and the mild proteinuria were inconsistent with lupus nephritis. We performed a renal biopsy, which revealed interstitial nephritis and minor glomerular abnormalities. Further examinations determined that the renal lesion was due to Sjögren's syndrome secondary to SLE. Following treatment with oral prednisolone, the patient's renal function improved as his anti-dsDNA antibody levels decreased. This case report indicates that renal biopsy should be considered even in elderly individuals when it may assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of the patient.

  19. A Novel Method for Real-Time, Continuous, Fluorescence-Based Analysis of Anti-DNA Abzyme Activity in Systemic Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Michelle F.; Kats, Anna M.; Chen, Ran; Hartmann, James X.; Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of antibodies against a variety of self-antigens including nucleic acids. These antibodies are cytotoxic, catalytic (hydrolyzing DNA, RNA, and protein), and nephritogenic. Current methods for investigating catalytic activities of natural abzymes produced by individuals suffering from autoimmunity are mostly discontinuous and often employ hazardous reagents. Here we demonstrate the utility of dual-labeled, fluorogenic DNA hydrolysis probes in highly specific, sensitive, continuous, fluorescence-based measurement of DNA hydrolytic activity of anti-ssDNA abzymes purified from the serum of patients suffering from SLE. An assay for the presence and levels of antibodies exhibiting hydrolytic activity could facilitate disease diagnosis, prediction of flares, monitoring of disease state, and response to therapy. The assay may allow indirect identification of additional targets of anti-DNA antibodies and the discovery of molecules that inhibit their activity. Combined, these approaches may provide new insights into molecular mechanisms of lupus pathogenesis. PMID:23251791

  20. Vitamin K-dependent proteins GAS6 and Protein S and TAM receptors in patients of systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with common genetic variants and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growth arrest-specific gene 6 protein (GAS6) and protein S (ProS) are vitamin K-dependent proteins present in plasma with important regulatory functions in systems of response and repair to damage. They interact with receptor tyrosine kinases of the Tyro3, Axl and MerTK receptor tyrosine kinase (TAM) family, involved in apoptotic cell clearance (efferocytosis) and regulation of the innate immunity. TAM-deficient mice show spontaneous lupus-like symptoms. Here we tested the genetic profile and plasma levels of components of the system in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and compare them with a control healthy population. Methods Fifty SLE patients and 50 healthy controls with matched age, gender and from the same geographic area were compared. Genetic analysis was performed in GAS6 and the TAM receptor genes on SNPs previously identified. The concentrations of GAS6, total and free ProS, and the soluble forms of the three TAM receptors (sAxl, sMerTK and sTyro3) were measured in plasma from these samples. Results Plasma concentrations of GAS6 were higher and, total and free ProS were lower in the SLE patients compared to controls, even when patients on oral anticoagulant treatment were discarded. Those parameters correlated with SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score, GAS6 being higher in the most severe cases, while free and total ProS were lower. All 3 soluble receptors increased its concentration in plasma of lupus patients. Conclusions The present study highlights that the GAS6/ProS-TAM system correlates in several ways with disease activity in SLE. We show here that this correlation is affected by common polymorphisms in the genes of the system. These findings underscore the importance of mechanism of regulatory control of innate immunity in the pathology of SLE. PMID:23497733

  1. [Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis: A new French case].

    PubMed

    Verine, Jérôme; Reade, Richard; Janin, Anne; Droz, Dominique

    2010-06-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare and slowly progressive chronic interstitial nephritis (CIN) (28 cases reported), described for the first time by Mihatsch et al. in 1979. Here, we report on a 50-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic renal failure and mild proteinuria without hematuria. Renal biopsy showed large tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and massively enlarged tubular epithelial cell nuclei, without viral inclusion. KIN is a rare CIN defined by a karyomegaly of tubular epithelial cell nuclei. Its pathogenesis remains obscure. Nevertheless, an exogenous factor is suspected, ochratoxin A particularly. The familial clustering of patients and the frequency of HLA-A9 and HLA-B35 haplotypes suggest the presence of a possible genetic susceptibility to this disorder.

  2. Radiation nephritis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiologic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Krochak, R.J.; Baker, D.G.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation nephritis is both volume and dose related. Clinical experience would indicate that a minimum of one third of the renal volume needs to be excluded from nephrotoxic doses which appears to have a threshold of 2,000 cGy. The site of damage leading to renal failure appears to be the microvasculature ultimately expressed as glomerulosclerosis. How much direct damage to the tubular system contributes to this process is unclear, but undoubtedly the resultant systemic physiologic effects potentiate the expression of damage in the irradiated kidney. The acute syndrome, with all the potential manifestations of renal failure, rarely presents sooner than six months and appears to have no clear prodrome, although it would seem reasonable that a subclinical syndrome consisting of abnormalities detectable by urinalysis may occur. Treatment of radiation-induced nephritis or hypertension is no different from treatment for nephritis from any other cause and should be aggressive with lifelong follow-up. Carcinogenesis is a rare late expression of radiation-induced kidney damage. 25 references.

  3. Disease Activity and Damage are not Associated with Increased Levels of Fatigue in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients from LUMINA LXVII, a Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Paula I.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; McGwin, Gerald; Crews, Kendra Q.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the factors associated with increased levels of fatigue over the course of the disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients from LUMINA (Lupus in Minorities: Nature versus Nurture), a longitudinal multiethnic cohort. Methods Patients with SLE (American College of Rheumatology revised and updated criteria), age ≥16 years, disease duration ≤ 5 years at entry into the cohort (T0), of Hispanic (Texan or Puerto Rican), African America or Caucasian ethnicity, were studied. The association between socioeconomic-demographic, health behaviors, behavioral and psychological, functional and clinical characteristics and fatigue was examined using generalized estimating equations to account for the longitudinal nature of the data. Results Five-hundred and fifteen patients (~91% female) contributed 2,609 visits to these analyses; there were: 93 (18.1%) Texan Hispanics, 101 (19.6%) Puerto Rican Hispanics, 169 (32.8%) African Americans, and 152 (29.5%) Caucasians; the patients mean (SD) age and follow up time were 37.2 (12.0) and 4.7 (3.2) years, respectively. Variables associated with increased levels of fatigue in the multivariable analyses were Caucasian ethnicity, the presence of constitutional symptoms(fever, weight loss), higher levels of pain, of abnormal illness-related behaviors and of helplessness (p’s between 0.0018 and <0.0001). Conclusions The presence of pain, abnormal illness-related behaviors, helplessness and constitutional manifestations were associated with increased levels of fatigue; however, lupus specific measures, such as disease activity and damage were not. Interventions aimed at decreasing fatigue need to take into account these findings. PMID:19714612

  4. Abnormal germinal center reactions in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrated by blockade of CD154-CD40 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grammer, Amrie C.; Slota, Rebecca; Fischer, Randy; Gur, Hanan; Girschick, Hermann; Yarboro, Cheryl; Illei, Gabor G.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the role of CD154-CD40 interactions in the B cell overactivity exhibited by patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), CD19+ peripheral B cells were examined before and after treatment with humanized anti-CD154 mAb (BG9588, 5c8). Before treatment, SLE patients manifested activated B cells that expressed CD154, CD69, CD38, CD5, and CD27. Cells expressing CD38, CD5, or CD27 disappeared from the periphery during treatment with anti-CD154 mAb, and cells expressing CD69 and CD154 disappeared from the periphery during the post-treatment period. Before treatment, active-SLE patients had circulating CD38bright Ig-secreting cells that were not found in normal individuals. Disappearance of this plasma cell subset during treatment was associated with decreases in anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Ab levels, proteinuria, and SLE disease activity index. Consistent with this finding, peripheral B cells cultured in vitro spontaneously proliferated and secreted Ig in a manner that was inhibited by anti-CD154 mAb. Finally, the CD38+/++IgD+, CD38+++, and CD38+IgD– B cell subsets present in the peripheral blood also disappeared following treatment with humanized anti-CD154. Together, these results indicate that patients with active lupus nephritis exhibit abnormalities in the peripheral B cell compartment that are consistent with intensive germinal center activity, are driven via CD154-CD40 interactions, and may reflect or contribute to the propensity of these patients to produce autoantibodies. PMID:14617752

  5. Abnormal germinal center reactions in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrated by blockade of CD154-CD40 interactions.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Slota, Rebecca; Fischer, Randy; Gur, Hanan; Girschick, Hermann; Yarboro, Cheryl; Illei, Gabor G; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-11-01

    To determine the role of CD154-CD40 interactions in the B cell overactivity exhibited by patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), CD19+ peripheral B cells were examined before and after treatment with humanized anti-CD154 mAb (BG9588, 5c8). Before treatment, SLE patients manifested activated B cells that expressed CD154, CD69, CD38, CD5, and CD27. Cells expressing CD38, CD5, or CD27 disappeared from the periphery during treatment with anti-CD154 mAb, and cells expressing CD69 and CD154 disappeared from the periphery during the post-treatment period. Before treatment, active-SLE patients had circulating CD38 (bright) Ig-secreting cells that were not found in normal individuals. Disappearance of this plasma cell subset during treatment was associated with decreases in anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Ab levels, proteinuria, and SLE disease activity index. Consistent with this finding, peripheral B cells cultured in vitro spontaneously proliferated and secreted Ig in a manner that was inhibited by anti-CD154 mAb. Finally, the CD38(+/++)IgD(+), CD38(+++), and CD38(+)IgD(-) B cell subsets present in the peripheral blood also disappeared following treatment with humanized anti-CD154. Together, these results indicate that patients with active lupus nephritis exhibit abnormalities in the peripheral B cell compartment that are consistent with intensive germinal center activity, are driven via CD154-CD40 interactions, and may reflect or contribute to the propensity of these patients to produce autoantibodies.

  6. Sjögren’s syndrome associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Hasan, Chiar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Canpolat, Nur; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome are chronic auto- inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious organ damage. Although systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome were previously considered two forms of the same disease because of presence of clinical coexistence of these two conditions, the view that they are two different conditions with mutual characteristics has become prominent in recent years. In this paper, we reported a 16 year-old girl who was followed up with a diagnosis of Sjögren’s syndrome for six years and then was observed to have overlap of systemic lupus erythematosus. In the baseline, she did not have any clinical or serological evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus. After six year, massive proteinuria and serological findings developed and systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis was diagnosed by kidney biopsy. Currently, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome cannot be differentiated definetely. We need more valuable diagnostic and classification criteria to differentiate these two important conditions. PMID:27738403

  7. IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis: aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, formation of IgA1-containing immune complexes, and activation of mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Renfrow, Matthew B; Yanagihara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Raska, Milan; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Huang, Wen-Qiang; Goepfert, Alice; Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Mestecky, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposits of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is aberrantly glycosylated; the hinge-region O-linked glycans are galactose-deficient. The circulating IgA1 of patients with Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) has a similar defect. This aberrancy exposes N-acetylgalactosamine-containing neoepitopes recognized by naturally occurring IgG or IgA1 antibodies resulting in formation of immune complexes. IgA1 contains up to six O-glycosylation sites per heavy chain; it is not known whether the glycosylation defect occurs randomly or preferentially at specific sites. We sought to define the aberrant glycosylation of a galactose-deficient IgA1 myeloma protein and analyze the formation of the immune complexes and their biological activities. Supplementation of serum or cord-blood serum with this IgA1 protein resulted in formation of new IgA1 complexes. These complexes stimulated proliferation of cultured human mesangial cells, as did the naturally-occurring IgA1-containing complexes from sera of patients with IgAN and HSPN. Uncomplexed IgA1 did not affect cellular proliferation. Using specific proteases, lectin Western blots, and mass spectrometry, we determined the O-glycosylation sites in the hinge region of the IgA1 myeloma protein and IgA1 proteins from sera of IgAN patients. The IgA1 myeloma protein had galactose-deficient sites at residues 228 and/or 230 and 232. These sites reacted with IgG specific to galactose-deficient IgA1. IgA1 from the IgAN patients had galactose-deficient O-glycans at the same residues. In summary, we identified the neoepitopes on IgA1 responsible for formation of the pathogenic immune complexes. These studies may lead to development of noninvasive diagnostic assays and future disease-specific therapy.

  8. FTY720 exerts a survival advantage through the prevention of end-stage glomerular inflammation in lupus-prone BXSB mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Seiichiro; Amano, Hirofumi; Amano, Eri; Minowa, Kentaro; Watanabe, Takashi; Nakano, Soichiro; Nakiri, Yutaka; Morimoto, Shinji; Tokano, Yoshiaki; Lin, Qingshun; Hou, Rong; Ohtsuji, Mareki; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Hirose, Sachiko; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2010-04-09

    FTY720 is a novel investigational agent targeting the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors with an ability to cause immunosuppression by inducing lymphocyte sequestration in lymphoid organs. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is refractory autoimmune disease characterized by the production of a wide variety of autoantibodies and immune complex (IC)-mediated lupus nephritis. Among several SLE-prone strains of mice, BXSB is unique in terms of the disease-associated monocytosis in periphery and the reduced frequency of marginal zone B (MZ B) cells in spleen. In the present study, we examined the effect of FTY720 on lupus nephritis of BXSB mice. FTY720 treatment resulted in a marked decrease in lymphocytes, but not monocytes, in peripheral blood, and caused relocalization of marginal zone B (MZ B) cells into the follicle in the spleen. These changes did not affect the production of autoantibodies, thus IgG and C3 were deposited in glomeruli in FTY720-treated mice. Despite these IC depositions, FTY720-treated mice showed survival advantage with the improved proteinuria. Histological analysis revealed that FTY720 suppressed mesangial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. These results suggest that FTY720 ameliorates lupus nephritis by inhibiting the end-stage inflammatory process following IC deposition in glomeruli.

  9. Environmental exposures, epigenetic changes and the risk of lupus.

    PubMed

    Somers, E C; Richardson, B C

    2014-05-01

    A dose-dependent combination of environmental exposures, estrogenic hormones and genetic predisposition is thought to be required for lupus to develop and flare, but how the environment modifies the immune system in genetically predisposed people is unclear. Current evidence indicates that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation can convert normal antigen-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes into autoreactive, cytotoxic, pro-inflammatory cells that are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in animal models, and that the same changes in DNA methylation characterize CD4+ T cells from patients with active lupus. Environmental agents implicated in inhibiting T-cell DNA methylation include the lupus-inducing drugs procainamide and hydralazine, as well as diet, and agents causing oxidative stress, such as smoking, UV light exposure, and infections, which have been associated with lupus onset or disease activity. Other studies demonstrate that demethylated T cells cause only anti-DNA antibodies in mice lacking a genetic predisposition to lupus, but are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in genetically predisposed mice and likely people, and that estrogens augment the disease. Collectively, these studies suggest that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation, together with lupus genes and estrogens or endocrine disruptors, combine in a dose-dependent fashion to cause lupus flares.

  10. Circulating interferon-α2 levels are increased in the majority of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with disease activity and multiple cytokine activation.

    PubMed

    Becker-Merok, A; Østli-Eilersten, G; Lester, S; Nossent, Jc

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in interferon (IFN) regulatory factor genes and the biological activity of type I IFN on expression of specific genes that are induced by IFN have been associated with various aspects of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Circulating levels of IFN-α in SLE has not been extensively studied because of limited sensitivity of available ELISA assays. We performed a cross-sectional case-control study where circulating levels of IFN-α2 were measured by a highly sensitive, solution phase multiplex magnetized bead assay and investigated the relation of IFN-α2 with autoantibody profiles, clinical disease activity and levels of inflammatory cytokines in SLE patients (n = 87). Cytokine levels were determined on stored sera aliquots with cut-off levels determined by the geometric mean + 2SD in healthy controls (n = 27). IFN-α2 levels were increased in 64% of SLE patients, who displayed more renal disease and higher disease activity (p = 0.06) and had a significantly higher sum of activated cytokines (median 4.5, range 7) compared to patients with normal IFN-α2 (median one, range 3; p < 0.001). Solution phase micro-bead assay thus identified increased IFN-α2 levels in two-thirds of SLE patients with longstanding disease. The association with clinical disease and activation of multiple inflammatory cytokines supports a role for IFN-α2 in disease perpetuation in a large subset of SLE patients.

  11. Cerebral hypoperfusion detected by SPECT in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is related to clinical activity and cumulative tissue damage.

    PubMed

    López-Longo, F J; Carol, N; Almoguera, M I; Olazarán, J; Alonso-Farto, J C; Ortega, A; Monteagudo, I; González, C Manuel; Carreño, L

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive technique for the detection of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective was to determine whether a relationship exists between cerebral hypoperfusion as detected by cerebral SPECT, cumulative tissue damage and the clinical activity of SLE. Cerebral technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) SPECT was performed in two groups of patients: 10 women with SLE (Group A) who had no previous history of major neuropsychiatric (NPS) manifestations and no minor NPS symptoms in the last six months, and 57 unselected women with SLE (Group B). In the same week that SPECT was performed, the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), SLICC/ACR damage index, native anti-DNA antibodies (ELISA) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined. In Group A, cerebral SPECT showed moderate or severe hypoperfusion (abnormal SPECT) in five patients without NPS symptoms, unrelated to age (mean 24.8 versus 27.8 years) or disease duration (mean 6.8 versus 9 years). Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had greater clinical disease activity (mean SLEDAI 13.6 versus 7.6) (SLEDAI > 7 in 5/5 versus 1/5; Fisher: 0.023; OR: 33; 95% CI: 2.3-469.8) and ESR (mean 43.6 versus 9.8; P < 0.05). In Group B, the mean age of the 57 unselected women with SLE was 37 years (SD 6.3) and the mean duration of the disease was 9.7 years (SD 6.3). Cerebral SPECT revealed normal perfusion or mild hypoperfusion (normal SPECT) in 30 patients (52.6%), and moderate or severe hypoperfusion in 27 (47.4%). Hypoperfusion was unrelated to age, duration of SLE or concentrations of anti-DNA antibodies and C3 and C4 fractions. Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had more active clinical disease (mean SLEDAI 13.92; SD 8.44 versus 4.56; SD 4.15) (Mann-Whitney, P < 0.005), more cumulative tissue damage (mean SLICC 2.66; SD 2.84 versus 1.03; SD 1.51) (Mann-Whitney, P = 0

  12. Possible association of VISA gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Jiao, Yulian; Wen, Xin; Wang, Laicheng; Ma, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Zhao, Yueran

    2011-10-01

    Virus-induced signaling adapter (VISA), an important adaptor protein linking both RIG-I and MDA-5 to downstream signaling events, may mediates the activation of NF kappaB and IRFs and the induction of type I IFN. As the evidence has showed that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), I-IFN and IFN-inducible genes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the aim of the current study was to investigate the possible associations between the VISA gene and SLE. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs17857295, rs2326369, rs7262903, and rs7269320, in VISA gene were genotyped in 123 SLE patients and 95 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using direct sequencing the purified PCR products. Associations were analyzed by using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Haplotype analysis was performed using haploview and PHASE2.1. None of the four SNPs was found to be associated with SLE. The four-SNPs haplotype analysis showed different effect between cases and controls. While the SNPs, rs17857295 and rs2326369, were found to be associated with the renal nephritis and arthritis of SLE patient, respectively. The SNPs rs7269320 showed associations with different manifestations. Our data reveal that polymorphisms in the VISA gene may be related to disease susceptibility and manifestations of SLE.

  13. Total serum IgE levels in systemic lupus erythematosus and associations with childhood onset allergies.

    PubMed

    Parks, C G; Biagini, R E; Cooper, G S; Gilkeson, G S; Dooley, M A

    2010-12-01

    Elevated serum IgE has been described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but associations with disease risk and characteristics remain unresolved. We assessed total serum IgE levels and atopy (IgE > 100 IU/ml) in recently diagnosed SLE patients (n = 228) compared with population controls (n = 293) and in relation to disease activity, autoantibodies, clinical features, total immunoglobulins, C-reactive protein, and allergy history. Multivariate models estimated determinants of IgE and atopy in patients and controls, and associations of SLE with allergy and atopy. Total IgE levels were higher in patients than controls (median = 42 vs. 29 IU/ml); 32% of patients and 25% of controls were atopic (p = 0.06). IgE levels were significantly higher in non-Whites and patients reporting childhood onset (<18 years) asthma and hives, and in controls reporting childhood asthma, hay fever, eczema, and adult onset hives. After accounting for racial differences, atopy was not associated with SLE, nephritis, or other clinical and laboratory parameters. In sum, our findings provide limited evidence of a direct association between total serum IgE and SLE overall or with other disease characteristics after adjusting for demographic characteristics and allergy history. Future studies may want to explore potentially shared risk factors for development of allergy, atopy, and SLE.

  14. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Radha, S; Tameem, A; Rao, B S

    2014-03-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare form of, progressive chronic interstitial nephritis. We present a case of KIN in a child, who was also found to have nephrotic syndrome because of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis on renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of KIN associated with glomerulopathy.

  15. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Radha, S.; Tameem, A.; Rao, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare form of, progressive chronic interstitial nephritis. We present a case of KIN in a child, who was also found to have nephrotic syndrome because of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis on renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of KIN associated with glomerulopathy. PMID:24701046

  16. Measuring disease activity in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus: the challenges of administrative burden and responsiveness to patient concerns in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Mikdashi, Jamal; Nived, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Measuring lupus disease activity accurately remains a challenging and demanding task given the complex multi-system nature of lupus, an illness known for its variability between patients and within the same patient over time. Many have attempted to define what disease activity means and how it should be measured, and several instruments were devised for a standardized assessment of disease activity and outcome domains in clinical research. Several of these measuring tools have been able to detect clinical improvement and have demonstrated adequate reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change in observational studies, and some were found to be useful in randomized controlled trials. However, several failed clinical trials have confronted these metrics, as they were not intended for clinical trials. The Outcome Measures Rheumatology group and the US Food and Drug Administration have recommended using measures of disease activity, cumulative organ damage, health-related quality of life, and adverse events as outcomes of interest. Composite responder indices that determine disease global improvement, ensure no significant worsening in unaffected organ systems, and include a physician's global assessment have been used in randomized clinical trials. Yet unmet therapeutic needs were further challenged by the complex content and psychometric information of the updated instruments, including increased administrative burden associated with demanding training and cost of instruments, and small effect size associated with responsiveness to patient concerns. Nevertheless, with the progress of novel targeted therapy, refining the disease activity metrics is essential. Selection of the disease activity endpoints which is a defining aspect of clinical trial design must be tailored to the outcome of interest and measured by a reliably rated scale characterized by minimal administrative burden. An optimal scale should be simple and practical and incorporate elements of patient

  17. Measuring disease activity in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus: the challenges of administrative burden and responsiveness to patient concerns in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Mikdashi, Jamal; Nived, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Measuring lupus disease activity accurately remains a challenging and demanding task given the complex multi-system nature of lupus, an illness known for its variability between patients and within the same patient over time. Many have attempted to define what disease activity means and how it should be measured, and several instruments were devised for a standardized assessment of disease activity and outcome domains in clinical research. Several of these measuring tools have been able to detect clinical improvement and have demonstrated adequate reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change in observational studies, and some were found to be useful in randomized controlled trials. However, several failed clinical trials have confronted these metrics, as they were not intended for clinical trials. The Outcome Measures Rheumatology group and the US Food and Drug Administration have recommended using measures of disease activity, cumulative organ damage, health-related quality of life, and adverse events as outcomes of interest. Composite responder indices that determine disease global improvement, ensure no significant worsening in unaffected organ systems, and include a physician's global assessment have been used in randomized clinical trials. Yet unmet therapeutic needs were further challenged by the complex content and psychometric information of the updated instruments, including increased administrative burden associated with demanding training and cost of instruments, and small effect size associated with responsiveness to patient concerns. Nevertheless, with the progress of novel targeted therapy, refining the disease activity metrics is essential. Selection of the disease activity endpoints which is a defining aspect of clinical trial design must be tailored to the outcome of interest and measured by a reliably rated scale characterized by minimal administrative burden. An optimal scale should be simple and practical and incorporate elements of patient

  18. Circulating anti-double-stranded DNA antibody-secreting cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a novel biomarker for disease activity.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, H; Okazaki, Y; Satoh, T; Kaneko, Y; Yasuoka, H; Seta, N; Kuwana, M

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) are widely used to diagnose systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and evaluate its activity in patients. This study was undertaken to examine the clinical utility of circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells for evaluating SLE patients. Anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells quantified using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay were detected in the spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood from MRL/lpr but not in control BALB/c mice. Circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells were detected in 29 (22%) of 130 patients with SLE, but in none of 49 with non-SLE connective-tissue disease or 18 healthy controls. The presence of circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells was associated with persistent proteinuria, high SLE disease activity index and systemic lupus activity measures, and a high serum anti-dsDNA antibody titre measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The positive predictive value for active disease was 48% for circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells versus 17% for serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. A prospective cohort of patients with circulating anti-dsDNA antibodies and inactive SLE showed that the cumulative disease flare-free rate was significantly lower in patients with than without circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells (p < 0.001). Circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells are a useful biomarker for assessing disease activity in SLE patients.

  19. Reduction in erythrocyte-bound complement activation products and titres of anti-C1q antibodies associate with clinical improvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Buyon, Jill; Furie, Richard; Putterman, Chaim; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Kalunian, Kenneth; Barken, Derren; Conklin, John; Dervieux, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPs: EC4d, EC3d), anti-C1q, soluble complement C3/C4 and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was evaluated. Methods Per protocol, at baseline all SLE subjects enrolled in this longitudinal study presented with active disease and elevated CB-CAPs. At each monthly visit, the non-serological (ns) Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA-SLEDAI) and the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG)-2004 index scores were determined as was a random urinary protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR). Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires were also collected. All soluble markers were determined using immunoassays, while EC4d and EC3d were determined using flow cytometry. Statistical analysis consisted of linear mixed models with random intercept and fixed slopes. Results A total of 36 SLE subjects (mean age 34 years; 94% female) were enrolled and evaluated monthly for an average 11 visits per subject. Clinical improvements were observed during the study, with significant decreases in ns-SELENA-SLEDAI scores, BILAG-2004 index scores and uPCR, and increases in all domains of SF-36 (p<0.01). The longitudinal decrease in ns-SELENA-SLEDAI and BILAG-2004 index scores was significantly associated with reduced EC4d and EC3d levels, reduced anti-C1q titres and increased serum complement C3/C4 (p<0.05). The changes in uPCR significantly correlated with C3, C4, anti-C1q and EC4d, with EC4d outperforming C3/C4 by a multivariate analysis. The reduced EC4d or EC3d was associated with improvements in at least six out of the eight domains of SF-36 and outperformed C3/C4. Anti-dsDNA titres did not correlate with changes in disease activity. Conclusions These data indicate that CB-CAPs and anti-C1q are helpful in monitoring patients with SLE. PMID:27752336

  20. Definition of risk factors for death, end stage renal disease, and thromboembolic events in a monocentric cohort of 338 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Manger, K; Manger, B; Repp, R; Geisselbrecht, M; Geiger, A; Pfahlberg, A; Harrer, T; Kalden, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: The survival rate in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved dramatically during the past four decades to 96.6% (five year) in the Erlangen cohort, but it is nearly three times as high as in an age and sex matched control population. Reasons for death are mainly cardiovascular diseases (37%) and infections (29%). Objective: To find risk factors existing at disease onset for a severe outcome in the Erlangen cohort. Patients and methods: By using a database of 338 patients with SLE from a single centre, documented at least one to 15 years and including Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage score data and index (SDI) and an activity score (European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM)), a retrospective search was made for risk factors for a severe outcome like death, end stage renal disease (ESRD), and thromboembolic events (TE) in SLE. For this purpose, multivariable Cox regression models were analysed using the statistical package SPSS 10.0 for Windows. Results: The following were defined as risk factors for death at disease onset: male sex (p<0.001, relative risk (RR)=3.5), age >40 at disease onset (p<0.0001, RR=19.9), nephritis (p<0.05, RR=1.6), a reduction of creatinine clearance (p<0.001, RR=1.8), heart disease (p=0.05, RR=1.5), and central nervous system (CNS) disease (p=0.06, RR=1.6). An increase in the SDI of two or more points from the first to the third year of disease was the worst prognostic factor (p<0.0001, RR=7.7). The existence of Ro or nRNP antibodies, or both, was protective (p<0.05, RR =0.1). A low C3 (p<0.01 RR=3.0) and splenomegaly (p<0.01 RR=2.7) at disease onset turned out to be risk factors for ESRD besides a nephritis. In patients with hypertension (p<0.05) and/or high titres of dsDNA antibodies (>70 U/l) (p<0.01) and/or a mean ECLAM score of 4 (p<0.01) in the course of disease, a prevalence of ESRD was recorded in 9% (p<0.05) and 10% (p

  1. A fully human monoclonal antibody with novel binding epitope and excellent neutralizing activity to multiple human IFN-α subtypes: A candidate therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Xu, Lei; Qiu, Weiyi; Zeng, Dadi; Yue, Junjie; Wang, Shuang; Huang, Peitang; Sun, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, heterogeneous autoimmune disease short of effective therapeutic agents. A multitude of studies of SLE in the last decade have accentuated a central role of the interferon alpha (IFN-α) pathway in SLE pathogenesis. We report here a candidate therapeutic neutralizing antibody, AIA22, with a different binding epitope and discrepant neutralizing profile from the anti-multiple IFN-α subtype antibodies currently in clinical trials. AIA22 specifically interacts with multiple IFN-α subtypes, binds to the type I IFN receptor 2 (IFNAR2) recognition region of IFN-α (considered a novel antigen epitope), and effectively neutralizes the activity of almost all of the IFN-α subtypes (with the exception of IFN-α7) both in vitro and in vivo. Concurrently, structural modeling and computational design yielded a mutational antibody of AIA22, AIAmut, which exhibited substantially improved neutralizing activity to multiple IFN-α subtypes.

  2. Treatment of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage secondary to lupus erythematosus with recombinant activated factor VII administered with a jet nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Esper, Raúl Carrillo; Estrada, Isis Espinoza de Los Monteros; de la Torre León, Teresa; Gutiérrez, Agustín Omar Rosales; López, Jorge Arturo Nava

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a serious pulmonary complication in patients with autoimmune diseases who are undergoing chemotherapy or have had hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) to treat the acute phase of DAH by endobronchial bronchoscopy has been shown to have a significant clinical impact on the survival and evolution of these patients. We report a clinical case of a patient with DAH secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who was treated with rFVIIa administered using a jet nebulizer, obtaining an adequate hemostatic effect with immediate control of DAH and a significant improvement in gas exchange.

  3. Fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Grace E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease often characterized by fatigue, with significant effects on physical functioning and wellbeing. The definition, prevalence and factors associated with fatigue, including physical activity, obesity, sleep, depression, anxiety, mood, cognitive dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, pain, effects of medications and comorbidities, as well as potential therapeutic options of fatigue in the systemic lupus erythematosus population are reviewed. Due to variability in the reliability and validity of various fatigue measures used in clinical studies, clinical trial data have been challenging to interpret. Further investigation into the relationships between these risk factors and fatigue, and improved measures of fatigue, may lead to an improvement in the management of this chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22737181

  4. Malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Mruganka; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Gordon, Caroline; Clarke, Ann E; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to underline important advancements in the understanding of cancer risks in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, there is an increased risk of specific kinds of malignancy. For example, the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is increased several-fold in SLE versus the general population. In addition, heightened risks for lung cancer, thyroid cancer and cervical dysplasia in SLE have been found. Some have postulated that immunosuppressive drugs play a role, as well as other important mediators, such as lupus disease activity itself. One new frontier being explored is the significant finding of a decreased risk of certain nonhematologic cancers (e.g., breast, ovarian, endometrial and prostate) in SLE. The reasons for this are currently under study. PMID:19643208

  5. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  6. Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Farley-Loftus, Rachel; Elmariah, Sarina B; Ralston, Jonathan; Kamino, Hideko; Franks, Andrew G

    2010-11-15

    Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus is a distinct form of chronic cutaneous (discoid) lupus, which is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques that typically are observed over the face, arms, and upper trunk. We present the case of a 43-year-old man with verrucous plaques that were distributed symmetrically over the face, who initially was treated with oral antibiotics and topical glucocorticoids for acne vulgaris. A biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus. The clinical and histopathologic features of this clinical variant are reviewed.

  7. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case–control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0–252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years

  8. Fatal suppurative nephritis caused by Pseudomonas in a chimpanzee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaki, G.; Asher, D.M.; Casey, H.W.; Locke, L.N.; Gibbs, C.J.; Gajdusek, C.

    1979-01-01

    Reports of nephritis in chimpanzees are relatively rare, compared with those in other nonhuman primates. McClure and Guilloud reported chronic pyelonephritis in a 35-year-old female chimpanzee; Schmidt and Butler reported glomerulonephritis in an 11-year-old female chimpanzee, and Kim reported on a 12-year-old male with subacute interstitial nephritis in a chimpanzee after the animal had recurrent hemolysis due to phenolic intoxication. The present report deals with supprative nephritis caused by Pseudomonas resulting in renal failure in a chimpanzee.

  9. Urtica dioica agglutinin, a V beta 8.3-specific superantigen, prevents the development of the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology of MRL lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Musette, P; Galelli, A; Chabre, H; Callard, P; Peumans, W; Truffa-Bachi, P; Kourilsky, P; Gachelin, G

    1996-08-01

    The V beta 8.3-specific superantigenic lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) was used to delete the V beta 8.3+ T cells in MRL lpr/lpr mice. In contrast to the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology which progresses with age in the phosphate-buffered saline-injected MRL lpr/lpr controls, UDA-treated animals did not develop overt clinical signs of lupus and nephritis. The pathogenic T cell clones thus reside within the V beta 8.3+ T cell population, which includes an expanded T cell clone described previously. Finally, UDA alters the production of autoantibodies in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:8765010

  10. Psgl-1 Deficiency is Protective against Stroke in a Murine Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Knight, Jason S.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Wang, Jintao; Guo, Chiao; Kleiman, Kyle; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with an elevated risk of vascular complications, including premature stroke. Therapies targeting leukocyte recruitment may be beneficial in reducing vascular complications associated with SLE. Lupus was induced in female wild-type (WT) and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 deficient (Psgl-1−/−) mice with pristane. Stroke was induced following photochemical injury to the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Stroke size was increased in pristane-treated WT mice compared to non-pristane-treated WT controls. However, stroke size was not increased in pristane-treated Psgl-1−/− mice compared to controls, despite evidence of increased nephritis in Psgl-1−/− mice. Pristane-treated WT mice showed elevated anti-dsDNA, anti-snRNP, CXCL1, and MCP-1 levels compared to untreated mice; however levels of anti-snRNP, MCP-1, and CXCL1 were reduced in pristane-treated Psgl-1−/− mice compared to pristane-treated WT mice. Infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages at the cerebral infarction site were reduced in pristane-treated Psgl-1−/− mice compared to pristane-treated WT mice. In conclusion, the increase in stroke size associated with lupus is prevented by Psgl-1 deficiency while nephritis is exacerbated. Therapies targeting Psgl-1 may be useful in the management of SLE patients at high risk of acute vascular complications although elucidation of downstream pathways will be necessary to identify targets that do not promote nephritis. PMID:27357136

  11. Renal expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in lupus autoimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Zoja, C; Liu, X H; Donadelli, R; Abbate, M; Testa, D; Corna, D; Taraboletti, G; Vecchi, A; Dong, Q G; Rollins, B J; Bertani, T; Remuzzi, G

    1997-05-01

    Mononuclear cell infiltration in glomeruli and renal interstitium is a prominent feature of some types of glomerulonephritis, including lupus nephritis. The mechanism(s) underlying monocyte influx into the kidney is not fully understood. Recently, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) has been identified as a chemotactic factor involved in the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages in the glomeruli of rats with mesangioproliferative as well as anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis. In the study presented here, renal MCP-1 mRNA expression in New Zealand Black x New Zealand White (NZB/W) F1 mice, a model of genetically determined immune complex disease that mimics systemic lupus in humans, was investigated. Northern blot analysis revealed a single 0.7 kb MCP-1 transcript of very low intensity in kidneys from 2-month-old NZB/W mice that had not yet developed proteinuria nor renal damage. Message levels, which increased markedly with the progression of nephritis and in association with mononuclear cell infiltration, were 10- and 15- fold higher in 8-10-month-old mice than in 2-month-old mice. By in situ hybridization, increased expression of MCP-1 mRNA was demonstrated in glomeruli and, even more striking, in tubular epithelial cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated increased expression of MCP-1 protein in kidneys of 10-month-old NZB/W mice, consistent with MCP-1 mRNA data. When NZB/W mice were treated with cyclophosphamide up to 12 months of age, expression of MCP-1 in the renal tissue remained low, the influx of inflammatory cells did not appear, and glomerular and tubular structures remained well preserved. These data suggest that elevated MCP-1 might act as a signal for inflammatory cells to infiltrate the kidney in lupus nephritis.

  12. Role of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in Egyptian female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Emerah, Ahmed A; El-Shal, Amal S

    2013-11-01

    Recently, several studies have demonstrated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to evaluate VDR (ApaI, BsmI, and FokI) gene polymorphisms and haplotypes as a risk factors and/or activity markers for SLE, and whether they influence 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH) D) level. One hundred and seven SLE patients and 129 controls were enrolled in this study. Disease activity in SLE patients was assessed using Disease Activity Index. Polymorphisms of VDR gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum 25(OH) D levels were measured using ELISA. We found that ApaI AA genotype, BsmI B allele, Bb, BB genotypes, FokI F allele and FF genotype frequencies of VDR were increased in SLE group. There were significant associations of VDR ApaI AA, BsmI BB, and FokI FF genotypes with lupus nephritis and higher SLE activity scores. Moreover, serum 25(OH) D levels were increased in SLE patients carrying FokI ff genotype compared with patients carrying FF genotype. VDR haplotypes aBF and ABF were associated with SLE risk. The ABF haplotype was associated with higher SLE activity scores and lower serum 25(OH) D concentrations. We observed that the presence of leuko/lymphopenia, renal disorders, higher SLE activity scores and higher anti-dsDNA levels were accompanied by a significant decrease of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. We concluded that The VDR genes polymorphisms, haplotypes, and decreased 25(OH) D levels were associated with risk and more activity scores of SLE.

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, S J; Friedlander, A H; Swerdloff, M

    1980-04-01

    A case of osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus is described. Both the disease process and the treatment modalities must be understood for correct management. PMID:6928895

  14. Decreased B cell activating factor receptor expression on peripheral lymphocytes associated with increased disease activity in primary Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sellam, Jérémie; Miceli‐Richard, Corinne; Gottenberg, Jacques‐Eric; Ittah, Marc; Lavie, Frédéric; Lacabaratz, Christine; Gestermann, Nicolas; Proust, Alexis; Lambotte, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyse B cell activating factor (BAFF) receptor (BAFF‐R) expression on peripheral lymphocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients and methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 patients with pSS, 19 patients with SLE and 15 controls were examined by flow cytometry to investigate BAFF‐R mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) on lymphocytes. BAFF‐R mRNA level from isolated blood B cells of nine patients with pSS and eight controls was assessed by real‐time quantitative reverse transcription‐PCR. BAFF serum level was determined by ELISA. Results In all subjects, BAFF‐R was expressed on all naïve CD27− and memory CD27+ B‐cells and was present on <0.5% of T cells. The expression of BAFF‐R on B cells was significantly decreased in patients with pSS as compared with controls (MFI = 7.8 vs 10.6, p = 0.001), and was intermediate in patients with SLE (MFI = 9.5). Serum BAFF level was inversely correlated with BAFF‐R MFI (p = 0.007), but not because of competition between endogenous BAFF (at observed concentrations in patients) and the monoclonal antibody (11C1) detecting BAFF‐R. BAFF‐R mRNA levels did not differ between patients with pSS and controls (p = 0.48). BAFF‐R MFI decreased after overnight culture with recombinant human BAFF (from 32.5 to 25.4, p = 0.03). Contrary to the serum BAFF level, BAFF‐R expression was correlated with extraglandular involvement in pSS and SLE Disease Activity Index. Conclusions BAFF‐R expression is reduced on peripheral B cells of patients with pSS and SLE. This down‐regulation occurs through a post‐transcriptional mechanism and could be the consequence of chronic increase in BAFF. BAFF‐R levels on B cells could be a novel activity biomarker in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17185325

  15. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: How to manage pregnancy?].