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Sample records for active magnetic regenerators

  1. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  2. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

    1981-01-27

    An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

  3. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  4. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  5. Active magnetic regenerator method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeGregoria, Anthony J.; Zimm, Carl B.; Janda, Dennis J.; Lubasz, Richard A.; Jastrab, Alexander G.; Johnson, Joseph W.; Ludeman, Evan M.

    1993-01-01

    In an active magnetic regenerator apparatus having a regenerator bed of material exhibiting the magnetocaloric effect, flow of heat transfer fluid through the bed is unbalanced, so that more fluid flows through the bed from the hot side of the bed to the cold side than from the cold side to the hot side. The excess heat transfer fluid is diverted back to the hot side of the bed. The diverted fluid may be passed through a heat exchanger to draw heat from a fluid to be cooled. The apparatus may be operated at cryogenic temperatures, and the heat transfer fluid may be helium gas and the fluid to be cooled may be hydrogen gas, which is liquified by the device. The apparatus can be formed in multiple stages to allow a greater span of cooling temperatures than a single stage, and each stage may be comprised of two bed parts. Where two bed parts are employed in each stage, a portion of the fluid passing from the hot side to the cold side of a first bed part which does not have a magnetic field applied thereto is diverted back to the cold side of the other bed part in the stage, where it is passed through to the hot side. The remainder of the fluid from the cold side of the bed part of the first stage is passed to the hot side of the bed part of the second stage.

  6. Development of an active magnetic regenerator for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weibo

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the design of a micromachined regenerator in an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system for space applications. The AMRR system is designed to provide continuous remote/distributed cooling at about 2 K and reject heat at temperatures of about 15 K. This paper first discusses the general thermal and fluid performance requirements for an AMRR regenerator, a unique structured bed configuration that enables the regenerator to meet these requirements, and its thermal and fluid performance based on numerical analyses. The paper then discusses the general design consideration for the magnetic field driving the regenerator for optimal thermal performance, and the analysis processes to optimize the variation rate of the magnetic field in an actual superconducting magnet during the isothermal processes of the AMRR cycle to enhance the performance of an actual regenerator. The paper finally presents the thermal performance of the regenerator from such iterative design optimization processes.

  7. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low-Temperature Magnetic Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Weibo; Jaeger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A design of an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system has been developed for space applications. It uses an innovative 3He cryogenic circulator to provide continuous remote/distributed cooling at temperatures in the range of 2 K with a heat sink at about 15 K. A critical component technology for this cooling system is a highly efficient active magnetic regenerator, which is a regenerative heat exchanger with its matrix material made of magnetic refrigerant gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). Creare Inc. is developing a microchannel GGG regenerator with an anisotropic structured bed for high system thermal efficiency. The regenerator core consists of a stack of thin, single-crystal GGG disks alternating with thin polymer insulating layers. The insulating layers help minimize the axial conduction heat leak, since GGG has a very high thermal conductivity in the regenerator s operating temperature range. The GGG disks contain micro channels with width near 100 micrometers, which enhance the heat transfer between the circulating flow and the refrigerant bed. The unique flow configuration of the GGG plates ensures a uniform flow distribution across the plates. The main fabrication challenges for the regenerator are the machining of high-aspect-ratio microchannels in fragile, single-crystal GGG disks and fabrication and assembly of the GGG insulation layers. Feasibility demonstrations to date include use of an ultrashort- pulse laser to machine microchannels without producing unacceptable microcracking or deposition of recast material, as shown in the figure, and attachment of a thin insulation layer to a GGG disk without obstructing the flow paths. At the time of this reporting, efforts were focused on improving the laser machining process to increase machining speed and further reduce microcracking.

  8. Performance of magnetic activated carbon composite as peroxymonosulfate activator and regenerable adsorbent via sulfate radical-mediated oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Wen-Da; Lua, Shun-Kuang; Dong, Zhili; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic activated carbon composite (CuFe2O4/AC, MACC) was prepared by a co-precipitation-calcination method. The MACC consisted of porous micro-particle morphology with homogeneously distributed CuFe2O4 and possessed high magnetic saturation moment (8.1 emu g(-1)). The performance of MACC was evaluated as catalyst and regenerable adsorbent via peroxymonosulfate (PMS, Oxone(®)) activation for methylene blue (MB) removal. Optimum CuFe2O4/AC w/w ratio was 1:1.5 giving excellent performance and can be reused for at least 3 cycles. The presence of common inorganic ions, namely Cl(-) and NO3(-) did not exert significant influence on MB degradation but humic acid decreased the MB degradation rate. As a regenerable adsorbent, negligible difference in regeneration efficiency was observed when a higher Oxone(®) dosage was employed but a better efficiency was obtained at a lower MACC loading. The factors hindering complete MACC regeneration are MB adsorption irreversibility and AC surface modification by PMS making it less favorable for subsequent MB adsorption. With an additional mild heat treatment (150 °C) after regeneration, 82% of the active sites were successfully regenerated. A kinetic model incorporating simultaneous first-order desorption, second-order adsorption and pseudo-first order degradation processes was numerically-solved to describe the rate of regeneration. The regeneration rate increased linearly with increasing Oxone(®):MACC ratio. The MACC could potentially serve as a catalyst for PMS activation and regenerable adsorbent. PMID:25463211

  9. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  10. 1-D transient numerical model of a regenerator in a novel sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Miller, Franklin K.

    2016-03-01

    A sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) is being developed at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. This AMRR consists of two circulators, two regenerators, one superleak, one cold heat exchanger, and two warm heat exchangers. The circulators are novel non-moving part pumps that reciprocate a superfluid mixture of 4He-3He in the system. Heat from the mixture is removed within the two regenerators of this tandem system. An accurate model of the regenerators in this AMRR is necessary in order to predict the performance of these components, which in turn helps predicting the overall performance of the AMRR system. This work presents modeling methodology along with results from a 1-D transient numerical model of the regenerators of an AMRR capable of removing 2.5 mW at 850 mK at cyclic steady state.

  11. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  12. Analysis of magnetic refrigeration with external regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Steven R.; Barclay, John A.; Overton, William C., Jr.

    A simplified computer model of a typical magnetic refrigerator using external regeneration is used to investigate different magnetic materials and refrigerator designs. It was found that nonideal temperature-entropy properties of the magnetic material and nonideal regeneration both contribute significantly to reducing the useful range and efficiency of these refrigerators. While the model cannot be used to predict the performance of actual refrigerators, it provides a quick means of evaluating whether inherent limitations, as a result of the choice of the magnetic material or the regenerator design, will make it impossible for a specific design to satisfy the requirements for a given application. Preliminary results from using this model with an approximate model for GdNi as the magnetic material are presented.

  13. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials. PMID:26758898

  14. Analysis of magnetic refrigerators with external regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Barclay, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The central idea of the magnetic refrigeration systems analyzed in this paper is that of a MR having a regenerator composed of an integral number of separate stages but having only a single magnetic stage. In principle, each stage is thermally isolated from the others, but the stages are accessed by a manifold and valve system which allows gas to flow between the MM and the individual stages. The concept therefore is distinctly unlike that of the unusual continuous regenerator of gas refrigerators. Although a small amount of gas in the manifold is responsible for the actual transfer of heat between elements of the REGMR, it is clear from the cycle description in the caption of Fig. 1 that the fixed mass of the MM is analogous to a fixed mass of a working fluid in a gas refrigerator or engine. Both, in effect, are carried thermally through all parts of their respective systems.

  15. Modeling and design aspects of active caloric regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    A cooling device based on a solid caloric material using, for example, the elastocaloric, magnetocaloric, barocaloric or electrocaloric effect has the potential to replace vapor-compression based systems for a variety of applications. Any caloric device using a solid refrigerant may benefit from using a regenerative cycle to increase the operating temperature span. This presentation shows how all active caloric regenerators can be modeled using similar techniques and how they are related to passive regenerator performance. The advantages and disadvantages of using a regenerative cycle are also discussed. The issue of hysteresis in caloric materials is investigated from a system/thermodynamic standpoint and the effects on cooling power and efficiency are quantified using a numerical model of an active regenerator using model caloric materials with assumed properties. The implementation in a working device will be discussed for elastocaloric and magnetocaloric cooling devices. It is shown that demagnetization effects for magnetocaloric systems and stress concentration effects in elastocaloric system reduce the overall effect in the regenerator and care must be taken in regenerator design for both technologies. Other loss mechanisms outside the regenerator such as heat leaks are also discussed. Finally, experimental results for active magnetic regenerative cooler are given for a range of operating conditions. The most recently published device uses a regenerator consisting of Gd and three alloys of GdY and has demonstrated a COP over 3.

  16. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  17. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  18. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  19. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  20. Regenerable magnetic octahedral layer catalyst for gaseous UPOPs removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wang, Siwen; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Bin; Yu, Gang

    2014-09-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCBz), pentachlorobenzene (PeCBz), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (UPOPs) emitted from waste combustion and industrial processes. In this study, Fe3O4 fabricated manganese oxide octahedral layer (Fe/OL) and Cu-doped OL (Fe/Cu-OL) catalysts were synthesized and they exhibited high activity for catalytic destruction of UPOPs, but also suffered from deactivation. The deactivation of Fe/Cu-OL can be assigned to the formation of surface MnClx species. As for Fe/OL, Mn sites are protected from chlorination by tunnel K(+), and the deactivation is ascribed to the blocking of active sites by KCl crystal. Simple water washing can completely regenerate the spent catalysts due to the dissolution of surface MnClx or KCl. With the advantage of magnetism, catalysts can be easily separated from water. Although Fe/Cu-OL has higher catalytic activity than Fe/OL, it is less stable in water washing due to the collapse of Mn framework structure. Considering the protection role of K(+), the spent Fe/Cu-OL was regenerated by KNO3 solution to induce additional K(+) onto the structure. In this way, the activity can be recovered while the unwanted dissolution of Mn is avoided. PMID:25218261

  1. Optimum structure of multilayer regenerator with magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Kuriyama, T.; Nakagome, H.

    We investigated a layered structural regenerator (multilayer regenerator) with magnetic regenerator materials using a two-stage GM refrigerator. In this study we used Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni which was expected to be placed in the high temperature part of the second regenerator. To confirm the effect of Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, the heat-exchange efficiency of the regenerator (regenerator efficiency) with Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio x: (0.5 - x): 0.5 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) was calculated as a function of x by computer simulation. We found that the regenerator efficiency increased when x (i.e. the amount of Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni) was increased and an optimum value of x was ~ 0.25. We then made two kinds of second regenerator: a triple layer regenerator with Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio 0.25:0.25:0.5, and a double layer regenerator with Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio 0.5:0.5. We compared their refrigeration performances experimentally. With the triple layer regenerator, the lowest temperature was 2.60 K at the second stage and the maximum refrigeration capacity at 4.2 K was 1.17 W. These results were superior to those with the double layer regenerator.

  2. A recyclable and regenerable magnetic chitosan absorbent for dye uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weifeng; Huang, Xuelian; Wang, Yilin; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-10-01

    A recyclable and regenerable magnetic polysaccharide absorbent for methylene blue (MB) removal was prepared by coating magnetic polyethyleneimine nanoparticles (PEI@MNPs) with sulfonated chitosan (SCS) and further cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The driving force for coating is the electrostactic interaction between positively charged PEI and negatively charged SCS. Infrared spectra, zeta potential, thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated the successful synthesis of magnetic polysaccharide absorbent. The self-assembly of polysaccharide with magnetic nanopartices did not alter the saturation magnetization value of the absorbent confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer. The nanoparticles showed fast removal (about 30min reached equilibrium) of MB. In particular, the removal ability of MB after desorption did not reduce, demonstrating an excellent regeneration ability. Our study provides new insights into utilizing polysaccharides for environmental remediation and creating advanced magnetic materials for various promising applications. PMID:27312630

  3. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  4. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  5. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  6. Neuronal regeneration: Electric and magnetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sisken, B.F.; Mullins, R.; McLeod, B. Montana State Univ., Bozeman )

    1991-03-11

    Cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) exposed to direct current (DC) and pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) were compared to controls and DRG treated with NGF. The authors objectives were to determine: (1) the effects of all paradigms on neurite growth and (2) whether there is a correlation between the electric field, or the magnetic field using the field geometry in the dish to differentiate between them. Neurite outgrowth scores were obtained on DRG growing in the inner ring and in the outer ring of 50 mm dishes. Significantly higher scores were correlated with: DRG growing in the vicinity of the cathode in the DC group, and DRG growing at the higher current density levels in the PEMF group. For PEMF, this implies that the effect is electric field rather than magnetic field mediated, or, that the magnetic component affects the sensitivity of the cells to the electric fields. These apparent differences in sensitivity of the neurons to the current density in the different exposure groups may be related to the different frequency contents of the two signals. Corollary experiments performed in the presence of cytosine arabinoside resulted in increased sprouting, but eliminated the differential growth in both DC and PEMF groups.

  7. Variable spatial magnetic field influences peripheral nerves regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Suszyński, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wiesław; Szajkowski, Sebastian; Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Aleksander; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Generator of spatial magnetic field is one of most recent achievements among the magnetostimulators. This apparatus allows to obtain the rotating magnetic field. This new method may be more effective than other widely used techniques of magnetostimulation and magnetotherapy. We investigated the influence of alternating, spatial magnetic field on the regeneration of the crushed rat sciatic nerves. Functional and morphological evaluations were used. After crush injury of the right sciatic nerve, Wistar C rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups (control and three experimental). The experimental groups (A, B, C) were exposed (20 min/day, 5 d/week, 4 weeks) to alternating spatial magnetic field of three different intensities. Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and tensometric assessments were performed every week after nerve crush. Forty-eight hours before the sacrificing of animals, DiI (1,1'-di-octadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyloindocarbocyanine perchlorate) was applied 5 mm distally to the crush site. Collected nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical staining. The survival rate of DRG neurons was estimated. Regrowth and myelination of the nerves was examined. The results of SFI and tensometric assessment showed improvement in all experimental groups as compared to control, with best outcome observed in group C, exposed to the strongest magnetic field. In addition, DRG survival rate and nerve regeneration intensity were significantly higher in the C group. Above results indicate that strong spatial alternating magnetic field exerts positive effect on peripheral nerve regeneration and its application could be taken under consideration in the therapy of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:23781984

  8. Regeneration of granular activated carbon using hydrothermal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sufnarski, M.D.

    1999-05-01

    The economic feasibility of using granular activated carbon (GAC) to remove organic contaminants from industrial and municipal wastewater is contingent upon its reuse during multiple adsorption-regeneration cycles. The most common process for the regeneration of GAC is the thermal method. Drawbacks associated with thermal regeneration include a 5--10% loss of carbon due to oxidation and attrition, a decrease in adsorption capacity, and high energy costs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the regeneration of GAC using hydrothermal technology. Phenol contaminated and non-contaminated GAC samples were regenerated using supercritical water (411 deg C and 26.2 MPa) with dissolved oxygen concentrations of 0 mg/L, 5 mg/L, and 100 mg/L. For comparative purposes, GAC was regenerated using subcritical water (300 deg C and 12.4 MPa) with a dissolved oxygen concentration of 5 mg/L. Regenerated GAC samples were evaluated in terms of adsorption capacity, BET surface area, pore volume, and average pore size. After four adsorption-regeneration cycles, using supercritical water (SCW) regeneration, the average adsorption capacity of regenerated GAC was found to be 90% of that of virgin GAC. Although a slightly higher adsorption capacity was achieved for regeneration with degassed water, the overall impact of dissolved oxygen was insignificant. The high adsorption capacity achieved for SCW was not observed for subcritical water regeneration. After four adsorption-regeneration cycles, only 67% of the original adsorption capacity was restored. The better results observed for SCW, as compared to subcritical water, were related to two factors. First, the higher regeneration temperatures of SCW resulted in increased thermal desorption. Second, the increased solubility of organic compounds and enhanced mass transfer rates in SCW resulted in a more efficient extraction process.

  9. The theory of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The adiabatic temperature change with field which is limited to about 2 K/Tesla for ferromagnets near their Curie temperatures by the change of magnetization with temperature and the lattice heat capacity is discussed. Practical magnetic refrigerators operate on a regenerative cycle such as the Brayton cycle. This cycle can be executed through the use of an active magnetic regenerator, i.e., a regenerator composed of magnetic material that is cycled in an out of a magnetic field with appropriate fluid flows. The theory of these devices is predicted by solving the partial differential equations that describe fluid and the magnetic solid. The active magnetic regenerator is described along with the method of calculation. Temperature profiles for a normal regenerator and a magnetic regenerative refrigerator are shown.

  10. Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    1996-07-23

    A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler is disclosed having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Sn, Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Pb, Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}(Sn{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}), and Er{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Sn comprising a mixture of Er{sub 3}Ni and Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Sn in the microstructure. 14 figs.

  11. Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1996-07-23

    A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Pb, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 (Sn.sub.0.75 Ga.sub.0.25), and Er.sub.9 Ni.sub.3 Sn comprising a mixture of Er.sub.3 Ni and Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn in the microstructure.

  12. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  13. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods. PMID:23782426

  14. Proresolving Nanomedicines Activate Bone Regeneration in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, H.; Kantarci, A.; Freire, M.O.; Nguyen, D.; Dalli, J.; Serhan, C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25389003

  15. Potential of Magnetic Nanofiber Scaffolds with Mechanical and Biological Properties Applicable for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajendra K.; Patel, Kapil D.; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were produced, and their effects on physico-chemical, mechanical and biological properties were extensively addressed to find efficacy for bone regeneration purpose. MNPs 12 nm in diameter were citrated and evenly distributed in PCL solutions up to 20% and then were electrospun into nonwoven nanofibrous webs. Incorporation of MNPs greatly improved the hydrophilicity of the nanofibers. Tensile mechanical properties of the nanofibers (tensile strength, yield strength, elastic modulus and elongation) were significantly enhanced with the addition of MNPs up to 15%. In particular, the tensile strength increase was as high as ∼25 MPa at 15% MNPs vs. ∼10 MPa in pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers exhibited magnetic behaviors, with a high saturation point and hysteresis loop area, which increased gradually with MNP content. The incorporation of MNPs substantially increased the degradation of the nanofibers, with a weight loss of ∼20% in pure PCL, ∼45% in 10% MNPs and ∼60% in 20% MNPs. Apatite forming ability of the nanofibers tested in vitro in simulated body fluid confirmed the substantial improvement gained by the addition of MNPs. Osteoblastic cells favored the MNPs-incorporated nanofibers with significantly improved initial cell adhesion and subsequent penetration through the nanofibers, compared to pure PCL. Alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of genes associated with bone (collagen I, osteopontin and bone sialoprotein) were significantly up-regulated in cells cultured on PCL-MNP nanofibers than those on pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers subcutaneously implanted in rats exhibited minimal adverse tissue reactions, while inducing substantial neoblood vessel formation, which however, greatly limited in pure PCL. In vivo study in radial segmental defects also signified the bone regeneration ability of the PCL-MNP nanofibrous scaffolds. The magnetic, bone

  16. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minghong, Wu; Borong, Bao; Ruimin, Zhou; Jinliang, Zhu; Longxin, Hu

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption

  17. Actively controlled vehicle suspension with energy regeneration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar David, Sagiv; Zion Bobrovsky, Ben

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative dual purpose automotive suspension topology, combining for the first time the active damping qualities with mechanical vibrations power regeneration capabilities. The new configuration consists of a linear generator as an actuator, a power processing stage based on a gyrator operating under sliding mode control and dynamics controllers. The researched design is simple and energetically efficient, enables an accurate force-velocity suspension characteristic control as well as energy regeneration control, with no practical implementation constraints imposed over the theoretical design. Active damping is based on Skyhook suspension control scheme, which enables overcoming the passive damping tradeoff between high- and low-frequency performance, improving both body isolation and the tire's road grip. The system-level design includes configuration of three system operation modes: passive, semi-active or fully active damping, all using the same electro-mechanical infrastructure, and each focusing on different objective: dynamics improvement or power regeneration. Conclusively, the innovative hybrid suspension is theoretically researched, practically designed and analysed, and proven to be feasible as well as profitable in the aspects of power regeneration, vehicle dynamics improvement and human health risks reduction.

  18. Pulp Fibroblasts Control Nerve Regeneration through Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, F; About, I; Chung, S-H

    2016-07-01

    Dentin-pulp regeneration is closely linked to the presence of nerve fibers in the pulp and to the healing mechanism by sprouting of the nerve fiber's terminal branches beneath the carious injury site. However, little is known about the initial mechanisms regulating this process in carious teeth. It has been recently demonstrated that the complement system activation, which is one of the first immune responses, contributes to tissue regeneration through the local production of anaphylatoxins such as C5a. While few pulp fibroblasts in intact teeth and in untreated fibroblast cultures express the C5a receptor (C5aR), here we show that all dental pulp fibroblasts, localized beneath the carious injury site, do express this receptor. This observation is consistent with our in vitro results, which showed expression of C5aR in lipoteichoic acid-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The interaction of C5a, produced after complement synthesis and activation from pulp fibroblasts, with the C5aR of these cells mediated the local brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) secretion. Overall, this activation guided the neuronal growth toward the lipoteichoic acid-stimulated fibroblasts. Thus, our findings highlight a new mechanism in one of the initial steps of the dentin-pulp regeneration process, linking pulp fibroblasts to the nerve sprouting through the complement system activation. This may provide a useful future therapeutic tool in targeting the fibroblasts in the dentin-pulp regeneration process. PMID:27053117

  19. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  20. Effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, P.G.; Seckel, B.R.; Miller, C.D.; Gross, P.T.; Wise, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on peripheral nerve regeneration is evaluated in rat sciatic nerve. Forty-four rats underwent sciatic nerve repair using polyethylene nerve guides. Postoperatively, the animals were exposed to a 1-tesla magnetic field for 12 hours per day for 4 weeks with appropriate controls. Our results demonstrate that a 1-tesla static magnetic field has no statistically significant effect on nerve regeneration as determined by myelinated axon counts and electrophysiologic studies. Also, the specific orientation of the sciatic nerve with respect to the magnetic field has no influence on axonal growth or nerve conduction. Periods of restraint of 12 hours per day for 4 weeks significantly inhibit weight gain but have no effect on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  1. Early exposure of rotating magnetic fields promotes central nervous regeneration in planarian Girardia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lin, Gui-Miao; Wu, Nan; Tang, Sheng-Wei; Zheng, Zhi-Jia; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi; Xu, Gai-Xia; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yue-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Si-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Han-Ben

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field exposure is an accepted safe and effective modality for nerve injury. However, it is clinically used only as a supplement or salvage therapy at the later stage of treatment. Here, we used a planarian Girardia sinensis decapitated model to investigate beneficial effects of early rotary non-uniform magnetic fields (RMFs) exposure on central nervous regeneration. Our results clearly indicated that magnetic stimulation induced from early RMFs exposure significantly promoted neural regeneration of planarians. This stimulating effect is frequency and intensity dependent. Optimum effects were obtained when decapitated planarians were cultured at 20 °C, starved for 3 days before head-cutting, and treated with 6 Hz 0.02 T RMFs. At early regeneration stage, RMFs exposure eliminated edema around the wound and facilitated subsequent formation of blastema. It also accelerated cell proliferation and recovery of neuron functionality. Early RMFs exposure up-regulated expression of neural regeneration related proteins, EGR4 and Netrin 2, and mature nerve cell marker proteins, NSE and NPY. These results suggest that RMFs therapy produced early and significant benefit in central nervous regeneration, and should be clinically used at the early stage of neural regeneration, with appropriate optimal frequency and intensity. Bioelectromagnetics. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:244-255, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061713

  2. Comparison Between Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma and Ozone Regenerations of Activated Carbon Exhausted with Pentachlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Qu, Dong; Huang, Yimei; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    In this study, two regeneration methods (dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma and ozone (O3) regeneration) of saturated granular activated carbon (GAC) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) were compared. The results show that the two regeneration methods can eliminate contaminants from GAC and recover its adsorption properties to some extent. Comparing the DBD plasma with O3 regeneration, the adsorption rate and the capacity of the GAC samples after DBD plasma regeneration are greater than those after O3 regeneration. O3 regeneration decreases the specific surface area of GAC and increases the acidic surface oxygen groups on the surface of GAC, which causes a decrease in PCP on GAC uptake. With increasing regeneration cycles, the regeneration efficiencies of the two methods decrease, but the decrease in the regeneration efficiencies of GAC after O3 regeneration is very obvious compared with that after DBD plasma regeneration. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted by the Freundlich and Langmuir models using the non-linear regression technique, and all the adsorption equilibrium isotherms fit the Langmuir model fairly well, which demonstrates that the DBD plasma and ozone regeneration processes do not appear to modify the adsorption process, but to shift the equilibrium towards lower adsorption concentrations. Analyses of the weight loss of GAC show that O3 regeneration has a lower weight loss than DBD plasma regeneration.

  3. Fenton- and Persulfate-driven Regeneration of Contaminant-spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton- or persulfate-driven chemical oxidation regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two treatment technologies: adsorption of organic chemicals onto GAC and chemical oxidation regeneration of the spent-GAC. Environmental...

  4. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1995-06-01

    Extremely-low-frequency (ELF), low-intensity magnetic fields have been shown to influence cell signaling processes in a variety of systems, both in vivo and in vitro. Similar effects have been demonstrated for nervous system development and neurite outgrowth. The authors report that regeneration in planaria, which incorporates many of these processes, is also affected by ELF magnetic fields. The rate of cephalic regeneration, reflected by the mean regeneration time (MRT), for planaria populations regenerating under continuous exposure to combined DC (78.4 {mu}T) and AC (60.0 Hz at 10.0 {mu}T{sub peak}) magnetic fields applied in parallel was found to be significantly delayed (P {much_lt} 0.001) by 48 {+-} 1 h relative to two different types of control populations (MRT {minus}140 {+-} 12 h). One control population was exposed to only the AC component of this field combination, while the other experienced only the ambient geomagnetic field. All measurements were conducted in a low-gradient, low-noise magnetics laboratory under well-maintained temperature conditions. This delay in regeneration was shown to be dependent on the planaria having a fixed orientation with respect to the magnetic field vectors. Results also indicate that this orientation-dependent transduction process does not result from Faraday induction but is consistent with a Ca{sup 2+} cyclotron resonance mechanism. Data interpretation also permits the tentative conclusion that the effect results from an inhibition of events at an early stage in the regeneration process before the onset of proliferation and differentiation.

  5. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in this report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjuntion with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. xcessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed l...

  6. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  7. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. PMID:25556853

  8. Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1990-04-01

    The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This study uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disrupters, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disrupters can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses.

  9. UV-activated persulfate oxidation and regeneration of NOM-Saturated granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Westerhoff, Paul; Zheng, Mengxin; Wu, Mengyuan; Yang, Yu; Chiu, Chao-An

    2015-04-15

    A new method of ultraviolet light (UV) activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated to regenerate granular activated carbon (GAC) in drinking water applications. The improvements in iodine and methylene blue numbers measured in the GAC after ultraviolet- (UV) activated persulfate suggested that the GAC preloaded with natural organic matter (NOM) was chemically regenerated. An experimental matrix for UV-activated persulfate regeneration included a range of persulfate doses and different UV wavelengths. Over 87% of the initial iodine number for GAC was restored under the optimum conditions, perfulfate dosage 60 g/L and UV exposure 1.75 × 10(4) mJ/cm(2). The persulfate dosages had little effect on the recovery of the methylene blue number, which was approximately 65%. Persulfate activation at 185 nm was superior to activation at 254 nm. UV activation of persulfate in the presence of GAC produced acid, lowering the solution pH. Higher persulfate concentrations and UV exposure resulted in greater GAC regeneration. Typical organic and inorganic byproducts (e.g., benzene compounds and sulfate ions) were measured as a component of treated water quality safety. This study provides a proof-of-concept that can be used to optimize pilot-scale and full-scale UV-activated persulfate for regeneration of NOM-saturated GAC. PMID:25697692

  10. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J; Slamon, Dennis J; Chute, John P

    2014-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation-mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  11. Control of tissue growth by locally produced activator: Liver regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2015-03-01

    In general, the tissue development is controlled by growth factors and depends on the biomechanics of cells. The corresponding kinetic models are focused primarily on the early stages of the development. The attempts to construct such models for the later stages are still rare. One of the notable examples here is liver regeneration. Referring to this process, the author proposes and analyzes a generic kinetic model describing the regulation of tissue growth by locally produced activator. The model includes activator diffusion and control of the rate of cell proliferation which is described by using the Hill expression. Although this control may be moderately or strongly non-linear, the qualitative changes in the regeneration kinetics are predicted to be modest. For moderately non-linear control, the evolution of the tissue volume to the steady-state value exhibits an initial relatively short linear stage and then becomes slightly slower so that the whole kinetics is close to exponential. For strongly non-linear control, the linear stage dominates and/or the kinetics may exhibit a S-like shape feature which is, however, rather weak. The identification of such qualitative features in experimentally measured kinetics is shown to be difficult, because the error bars in the experiments are typically too large.

  12. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  13. Activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composite: fabrication, methyl orange removal and regeneration by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Do, Manh Huy; Phan, Ngoc Hoa; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Pham, Thi Thu Suong; Nguyen, Van Khoa; Vu, Thi Thuy Trang; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2011-11-01

    In the water treatment field, activated carbons (ACs) have wide applications in adsorptions. However, the applications are limited by difficulties encountered in separation and regeneration processes. Here, activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composites, which combine the adsorption features of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with the magnetic and excellent catalytic properties of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles, were fabricated by a modified impregnation method using HNO(3) as the carbon modifying agent. The obtained composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and vibrating sample magnetometer. Their performance for methyl orange (MO) removal by adsorption was evaluated. The regeneration of the composite and PAC-HNO(3) (powdered activated carbon modified by HNO(3)) adsorbed MO by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The composites had a high specific surface area and porosity and a superparamagnetic property that shows they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. Adsorption experiments showed that the MO sorption process on the composites followed pseudo-second order kinetic model and the adsorption isotherm date could be simulated with both the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The regeneration indicated that the presence of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles is important for a achieving high regeneration efficiency by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:21840037

  14. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μmregenerated AC, which are benefit for water treatment. These results will provide a theoretical basis for the reuse of biological waste (spent AC) from BAC process. PMID:25203235

  15. Effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field on neural regeneration in rats: functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bervar, Marijan

    2005-07-01

    A study of the effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field (ISMF) stimulation on regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve was carried out. In the experiment, 60 Wistar rats were used: 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve transection injury and immediate surgical nerve repair, 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, and the remaining 12 rats underwent a sham surgery. Half of the animals (n = 12) with either sciatic nerve lesion were randomly chosen and exposed between a pair of Helmholtz coils for 3 weeks post-injury, 4 h/day, to an interrupted (active period to pause ratio = 1.4 s/0.8 s) sinusoidal 50 Hz magnetic field of 0.5 mT. The other half of the animals (n = 12) and six rats with sham surgery were used for two separate controls. Functional recovery was followed for 6 weeks for the crush injuries and 7(1/2) months for the transection injuries by video assisted footprint analysis in static conditions and quantified using a recently revised static sciatic index (SSI) formula. We ascertained that the magnetic field influence was weak, but certainly detectable in both injury models. The accuracy of ISMF influence detection, determined by the one-way repeated measures ANOVA test, was better for the crush injury model: F(1, 198) = 9.0144, P = .003, than for the transection injury model: F(1, 198) = 6.4826, P = .012. The Student-Newman-Keuls range test for each response day yielded significant differences (P < .05) between the exposed and control groups early in the beginning of functional recovery and later on from the points adjacent to the beginning of the plateau, or 95% of functional recovery, and the end of observation. These differences probably reflect the ISMF systemic effect on the neuron cell bodies and increased and more efficient reinnervation of the periphery. PMID:15887258

  16. PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MAGNETIC FILTRATION WITH CONTINUOUS MEDIA REGENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the design and construction of a continuous High Gradient Magnetic Filtration (HGMF) mobile pilot plant, as well as some of the background work in HGMF at Research Triangle Institute. The field start-up and performance characterization of the mobile pilot pla...

  17. Myocardial NF-κB activation is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Ravi; Knecht, Anne K.; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Heart regeneration offers a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Unlike mammals, lower vertebrates such as zebrafish mount a strong regenerative response following cardiac injury. Heart regeneration in zebrafish occurs by cardiomyocyte proliferation and reactivation of a cardiac developmental program, as evidenced by induction of gata4 regulatory sequences in regenerating cardiomyocytes. Although many of the cellular determinants of heart regeneration have been elucidated, how injury triggers a regenerative program through dedifferentiation and epicardial activation is a critical outstanding question. Here, we show that NF-κB signaling is induced in cardiomyocytes following injury. Myocardial inhibition of NF-κB activity blocks heart regeneration with pleiotropic effects, decreasing both cardiomyocyte proliferation and epicardial responses. Activation of gata4 regulatory sequences is also prevented by NF-κB signaling antagonism, suggesting an underlying defect in cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Our results implicate NF-κB signaling as a key node between cardiac injury and tissue regeneration. PMID:26472034

  18. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lucki, Stanley J.; Brennan, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  19. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS UTILIZING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON ADDITION WITH WET AIR REGENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to activated sludge systems is a proven method of wastewater treatment. Of eleven POTWs in the U.S. that were designed for PAC use, ten included wet air regeneration (WAR) for the destruction of secondary sludge solids and recovery ...

  20. Persulfate Oxidation Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon: Reversible Impacts on Sorption Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that can be carried out utilizing thermally-activated persulfate. During chemical regeneration of GAC, aggressive oxidative conditions lead to high acidity (pH < 2) and the accumulation ...

  1. Neural activity promotes long-distance, target-specific regeneration of adult retinal axons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Hwan A; Stafford, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Phong L; Lien, Brian V; Wang, Chen; Zukor, Katherine; He, Zhigang; Huberman, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Axons in the mammalian CNS fail to regenerate after injury. Here we show that if the activity of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is increased by visual stimulation or using chemogenetics, their axons regenerate. We also show that if enhancement of neural activity is combined with elevation of the cell-growth-promoting pathway involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RGC axons regenerate long distances and re-innervate the brain. Analysis of genetically labeled RGCs revealed that this regrowth can be target specific: RGC axons navigated back to their correct visual targets and avoided targets incorrect for their function. Moreover, these regenerated connections were successful in partially rescuing a subset of visual behaviors. Our findings indicate that combining neural activity with activation of mTOR can serve as powerful tool for enhancing axon regeneration, and they highlight the remarkable capacity of CNS neurons to re-establish accurate circuit connections in adulthood. PMID:27399843

  2. Full length talin stimulates integrin activation and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Lik; Kwok, Jessica C.F.; Heller, Janosch P.D.; Zhao, Rongrong; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin function is regulated by activation involving conformational changes that modulate ligand-binding affinity and downstream signaling. Activation is regulated through inside-out signaling which is controlled by many signaling pathways via a final common pathway through kindlin and talin, which bind to the intracellular tail of beta integrins. Previous studies have shown that the axon growth inhibitory molecules NogoA and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inactivate integrins. Overexpressing kindlin-1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons activates integrins, enabling their axons to overcome inhibitory molecules in the environment, and promoting regeneration in vivo following dorsal root crush. Other studies have indicated that expression of the talin head alone or with kindlin can enhance integrin activation. Here, using adult rat DRG neurons, we investigate the effects of overexpressing various forms of talin on axon growth and integrin signaling. We found that overexpression of the talin head activated axonal integrins but inhibited downstream signaling via FAK, and did not promote axon growth. Similarly, co-expression of the talin head and kindlin-1 prevented the growth-promoting effect of kindlin-1, suggesting that the talin head acts as a form of dominant negative for integrin function. Using full-length talin constructs in PC12 cells we observed that neurite growth was enhanced by the expression of wild-type talin and more so by two ‘activated’ forms of talin produced by point mutation (on laminin and aggrecan–laminin substrates). Nevertheless, co-expression of full-length talin with kindlin did not promote neurite growth more than either molecule alone. In vivo, we find that talin is present in PNS axons (sciatic nerve), and also in CNS axons of the corticospinal tract. PMID:25771432

  3. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  4. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  5. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  6. Magnetic resonance lymphography demonstrates spontaneous lymphatic disruption and regeneration in obstructive lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Liu, N-F; Yan, Z-X; Wu, X-F; Luo, Y

    2013-06-01

    The present study was aimed at observing both the damage and change process undergone in lymphatic collectors in obstructive extremity lymphedema. Forty-five patients with obstructive extremity lymphedema who had been examined with magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL) were enrolled in the study. Among this group, 36 were diagnosed with secondary lymphedema of the lower extremity and 9 exhibited upper extremity lymphedema after mastectomy. Morphological damage as a result of obstruction of collecting lymph vessels was recorded and analyzed. Obvious damage to the lymph vessels was found in all of the 36 lower extremity lymphedema cases with different lengths of history, including vessel disruption in 21 and lymphatic regeneration in 15. Lymphatic damage occurred in the anterior tibial area of the lower leg in almost every case. In 9 cases with upper extremity lymphedema, collecting lymphatic disruption and lymph tracer leakage was seen in multiple patterns. Imaging displayed that ruptured lymph collectors healed spontaneously or regenerated into a segment of the lymphatic network. The present study provided real-time images of collecting lymphatic vessels in obstructive lymphedema. These were seen to have undergone disruption, displayed lymphorrhoea, and/or lymphatic regeneration. In addition, the images suggest that the anterior tibial lymphatic is the weak point of the lymphatic pathway in the lower limb. PMID:24354104

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors strongly regulate postsynaptic activity levels during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kolls, Brad J; Meyer, Ronald L

    2013-10-01

    During development, neuronal activity is used as a cue to guide synaptic rearrangements to refine connections. Many studies, especially in the visual system, have shown that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) plays a key role in mediating activity-dependent refinement through long-term potentiation (LTP)-like processes. Adult goldfish can regenerate their optic nerve and utilize neuronal activity to generate precise topography in their projection onto tectum. Although the NMDAr has been implicated in this process, its precise role in regeneration has not been extensively studied. In examining NMDAr function during regeneration, we found salient differences compared with development. By using field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) recordings, the contribution of the NMDAr at the primary optic synapse was measured. In contrast to development, no increase in NMDAr function was detectable during synaptic refinement. Unlike development, LTP could not be reliably elicited during regeneration. Unexpectedly, we found that NMDAr exerted a major effect on regulating ongoing tectal (postsynaptic) activity levels during regeneration. Blocking NMDAr strongly suppressed spontaneous activity during regeneration but had no significant effect in the normal projection. This difference could be attributed to an occlusion effect of strong optic drive in the normal projection, which dominated ongoing tectal activity. During regeneration, this optic drive is largely absent. Optic nerve stimulation further indicated that the NMDAr had little effect on the ability of optic fibers to evoke early postsynaptic impulse activity but was important for late network activity. These results indicate that, during regeneration, the NMDAr may play a critical role in the homeostatic regulation of ongoing activity and network excitability. PMID:23873725

  8. IN-SITU REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON (GAC) USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-dependent regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) initially saturated with one of several chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was studied in batch and continuous-flow reactors. Homogeneous and heterogeneous experiments were designed to investigate the effects of va...

  9. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  10. Thermally activated persulfate oxidation regeneration of NOM- and MTBE- spent granular activated carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  11. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT. PMID:24645431

  12. Recovery comparisons--hot nitrogen Vs steam regeneration of toxic dichloromethane from activated carbon beds in oil sands process.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Shivaji G; Pré, Pascaline; Giraudet, Sylvain; Le Coq, Laurence; Le Cloirec, Pierre; Baudouin, Olivier; Déchelotte, Stéphane

    2012-02-29

    The regeneration experiments of dichloromethane from activated carbon bed had been carried out by both hot nitrogen and steam to evaluate the regeneration performance and the operating cost of the regeneration step. Factorial Experimental Design (FED) tool had been implemented to optimize the temperature of nitrogen and the superficial velocity of the nitrogen to achieve maximum regeneration at an optimized operating cost. All the experimental results of adsorption step, hot nitrogen and steam regeneration step had been validated by the simulation model PROSIM. The average error percentage between the simulation and experiment based on the mass of adsorption of dichloromethane was 2.6%. The average error percentages between the simulations and experiments based on the mass of dichloromethane regenerated by nitrogen regeneration and steam regeneration were 3 and 12%, respectively. From the experiments, it had been shown that both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration had regenerated 84% of dichloromethane. But the choice of hot nitrogen or steam regeneration depends on the regeneration time, operating costs, and purity of dichloromethane regenerated. A thorough investigation had been made about the advantages and limitations of both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration of dichloromethane. PMID:22244342

  13. NKCC1 Activation Is Required for Myelinated Sensory Neurons Regeneration through JNK-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Santos, Daniel; Cobianchi, Stefano; González-Pérez, Francisco; López-Alvarez, Víctor; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-05-13

    After peripheral nerve injury, axons are able to regenerate, although specific sensory reinnervation and functional recovery are usually worse for large myelinated than for small sensory axons. The mechanisms that mediate the regeneration of different sensory neuron subpopulations are poorly known. The Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) is particularly relevant in setting the intracellular chloride concentration. After axotomy, increased NKCC1 phosphorylation has been reported to be important for neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons; however, the mechanisms underlying its effects are still unknown. In the present study we used in vitro and in vivo models to assess the differential effects of blocking NKCC1 activity on the regeneration of different types of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) neurons after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. We observed that blocking NKCC1 activity by bumetanide administration induces a selective effect on neurite outgrowth and regeneration of myelinated fibers without affecting unmyelinated DRG neurons. To further study the mechanism underlying NKCC1 effects, we also assessed the changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling under NKCC1 modulation. The inhibition of NKCC1 activity in vitro and in vivo modified pJNK1/2/3 expression in DRG neurons. Together, our study identifies a mechanism selectively contributing to myelinated axon regeneration, and point out the role of Cl(-) modulation in DRG neuron regeneration and in the activation of MAPKs, particularly those belonging to the JNK family. PMID:25972170

  14. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  15. A nonventing cooling system for space environment extravehicular activity, using radiation and regenerable thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayes, Stephen A.; Trevino, Luis A.; Dinsmore, Craig E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the selection, design, and testing of a prototype nonventing regenerable astronaut cooling system for extravehicular activity space suit applications, for mission durations of four hours or greater. The selected system consists of the following key elements: a radiator assembly which serves as the exterior shell of the portable life support subsystem backpack; a layer of phase change thermal storage material, n-hexadecane paraffin, which acts as a regenerable thermal capacitor; a thermoelectric heat pump; and an automatic temperature control system. The capability for regeneration of thermal storage capacity with and without the aid of electric power is provided.

  16. dsRNA Released by Tissue Damage Activates TLR3 to Drive Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amanda M; Reddy, Sashank K; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Katseff, Adiya S; Zhu, Amadeus S; Chang, Emily; Resnik, Sydney R; Page, Carly; Kim, Dongwon; Whittam, Alexander J; Miller, Lloyd S; Garza, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Regeneration of skin and hair follicles after wounding--a process known as wound-induced hair neogenesis (WIHN)--is a rare example of adult organogenesis in mammals. As such, WIHN provides a unique model system for deciphering mechanisms underlying mammalian regeneration. Here, we show that dsRNA, which is released from damaged skin, activates Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) and its downstream effectors IL-6 and STAT3 to promote hair follicle regeneration. Conversely, TLR3-deficient animals fail to initiate WIHN. TLR3 activation promotes expression of hair follicle stem cell markers and induces elements of the core hair morphogenetic program, including ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) and the Wnt and Shh pathways. Our results therefore show that dsRNA and TLR3 link the earliest events of mammalian skin wounding to regeneration and suggest potential therapeutic approaches for promoting hair neogenesis. PMID:26253200

  17. Repetitive magnetic stimulation affects the microenvironment of nerve regeneration and evoked potentials after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jin-lan; Guo, Xu-dong; Zhang, Shu-quan; Wang, Xin-gang; Wu, Shi-feng

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation has been shown to alter local blood flow of the brain, excite the corticospinal tract and muscle, and induce motor function recovery. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using the modified Allen's method. After 4 hours of injury, rat models received repetitive magnetic stimulation, with a stimulus intensity of 35% maximum output intensity, 5-Hz frequency, 5 seconds for each sequence, and an interval of 2 minutes. This was repeated for a total of 10 sequences, once a day, 5 days in a week, for 2 consecutive weeks. After repetitive magnetic stimulation, the number of apoptotic cells decreased, matrix metalloproteinase 9/2 gene and protein expression decreased, nestin expression increased, somatosensory and motor-evoked potentials recovered, and motor function recovered in the injured spinal cord. These findings confirm that repetitive magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord improved the microenvironment of neural regeneration, reduced neuronal apoptosis, and induced neuroprotective and repair effects on the injured spinal cord. PMID:27335567

  18. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin; West, David L; Abdelaziz, Omar; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  19. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  20. ADAR-related activation of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Witman, Nevin M; Behm, Mikaela; Ohman, Marie; Morrison, Jamie I

    2013-08-15

    Urodele amphibians possess an amazing regenerative capacity that requires the activation of cellular plasticity in differentiated cells and progenitor/stem cells. Many aspects of regeneration in Urodele amphibians recapitulate development, making it unlikely that gene regulatory pathways which are essential for development are mutually exclusive from those necessary for regeneration. One such post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathway, which has been previously shown to be essential for functional metazoan development, is RNA editing. RNA editing catalyses discrete nucleotide changes in RNA transcripts, creating a molecular diversity that could create an enticing connection to the activated cellular plasticity found in newts during regeneration. To assess whether RNA editing occurs during regeneration, we demonstrated that GABRA3 and ADAR2 mRNA transcripts are edited in uninjured and regenerating tissues. Full open-reading frame sequences for ADAR1 and ADAR2, two enzymes responsible for adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, were cloned from newt brain cDNA and exhibited a strong resemblance to ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific) enzymes discovered in mammals. We demonstrated that ADAR1 and ADAR2 mRNA expression levels are differentially expressed during different phases of regeneration in multiple tissues, whereas protein expression levels remain unaltered. In addition, we have characterized a fascinating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of ADAR1 in a variety of different cell types during regeneration, which could provide a mechanism for controlling RNA editing, without altering translational output of the editing enzyme. The link between RNA editing and regeneration provides further insights into how lower organisms, such as the newt, can activate essential molecular pathways via the discrete alteration of RNA sequences. PMID:23534823

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    de Certaines, J.D.; Moulinoux, J.P.; Benoist, L.; Benard, A.; Rivet, P.

    1982-08-09

    Spin-lattice (T/sub 1/) and spin-spin (T/sub 2/) proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times were measured over a 48-hours period of experimental liver regeneration in Wistar rats, T/sub 2/ showed an early significant increase reaching a plateau 30% above baseline from the 10th hrs onwards. Laparotomized control animals showed no change in T/sub 2/ values. The increase in T/sub 1/ occurred at a later stage but was no different from that in laparotomized controls. T/sub 1/ reached a peak, 20% above baseline, around the 30th hr. The changes observed were far less marked than those previously described for cancer tissue, which showed about a 60% increase in T/sub 1/ fluctuations followed a circadian pattern, with a minimum at night's end and a maximum around mid-day. No circadian rhythm was seen for T/sub 2/. The observed T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ changes are discussed with respect to mitotic and metabolic events known to occur during regeneration of the liver.

  2. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  3. Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carlo O.; McHale, Matthew J.; Wells, Jason T.; Ochoa, Oscar; Michalek, Joel E.; McManus, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2−/− mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1, -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2−/− mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1−/− and CCR2−/− mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1−/− compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2−/− mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1−/− mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1−/− mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1−/− mice, and severely impaired in CCR2−/− mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1−/− mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2−/− mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1−/− mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1−/− mice. PMID:20631294

  4. Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carlo O; McHale, Matthew J; Wells, Jason T; Ochoa, Oscar; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2010-09-01

    Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1, -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice. PMID:20631294

  5. Harnessing Interfacially-Active Nanorods to Regenerate Severed Polymer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin; Kuksenok, Olga; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna

    2014-03-01

    With newly developed computational approaches, we design a nanocomposite that enables self-regeneration of the gel matrix when a significant portion of the material is severed. The cut instigates the dynamic cascade of cooperative events leading to the re-growth. Specifically, functionalized nanorods localize at the new interface and initiate Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with monomers and cross-linkers in the outer solution. The reaction propagates to form a new cross-linked gel, which can be tuned to resemble the uncut material.

  6. Magnetic fluids improving effect in in vitro regenerates in hypogravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butnaru, Gallia; Terteac, Dumitru; Potencz, Iosif

    1999-07-01

    The previous in vitro experiments done with different types of magnetic fluids (MFs) pointed out the favorable effect upon dedifferentiation and redifferentiation. Finally, regeneration of an embryo and of plantlets from a single vegetative plant cell was successfully performed. The two processes are the most spectacular aspects of development involving the formation of different distinct cells and of tissue which increase the potential for variability to new conditions. These advancements generated the idea that the MFs could have a favorable effect on cell morphology and tissue structural organization. This study addressed the question of whether or not Magnetic Fluids could have a protective effect on plants grown under different stress conditions as well as in simulated hypogravity influence. In simulated hypogravity two possible patterns of influence were postulated: reversible and irreversible cell modifications. The presence of the magnetic particles (MPs) in the growth medium improved the cell and the anatomical leaf structure. The favorable effect was the enrichment of the density, due to MPs penetration in cytoplasm, or due to the change in the cell water potential. We presume both.

  7. Effect of retinoic acid on transglutaminase and ornithine decarboxylase activities during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Maruko, Akiko; Ohishi, Nao; Kawaguchi, Masasumi; Satoh, Tetsuharu; Ohkubo, Yasuhito

    2008-04-01

    Liver regeneration is regulated by several factors, including growth factors, cytokines, and post-translational modifications of several proteins. It is suggested that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are involved in liver regeneration. To investigate the role of TG2 and ODC activities in regenerating liver, we used retinoic acid (RA), an inducer of TG2 and a suppressor of ODC. Regenerating rat liver was prepared by 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). Rats were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 days after surgery. RA was intraperitoneally injected immediately after PH. TG2 and ODC activities and products (epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl) lysine isopeptide (Gln-Lys) and polyamines, respectively) were examined at the indicated times. In RA-treated rat, DNA synthesis and ODC activity declined and the peak shifted to 2 days after PH, whereas TG2 activity increased at 1 day after PH. At that time, protein-polyamine, especially the protein-spermidine (SPD) bond, transiently decreased, whereas the formation of the Gln-Lys bond increased after PH. These results suggested that in regenerating liver, enhanced the formation of Gln-Lys bonds catalyzed by TG2 led to reduced DNA synthesis, whereas when ODC produced newly synthesized SPD, the inhibition of Gln-Lys bond production by the preferential formation of protein-SPD bonds led to an increase in DNA synthesis. PMID:18008394

  8. Regeneration of Acid Orange 7 Exhausted Granular Activated Carbon Using Pulsed Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Guo, He; Liu, Yongjie; Yi, Chengwu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrodes geometry was set up to investigate the regeneration of acid orange 7 (AO7) exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC). Regeneration of GAC was studied under different conditions of peak pulse discharge voltage and water pH, as well as the modification effect of GAC by the pulse discharge process, to figure out the regeneration efficiency and the change of the GAC structure by the PDP treatment. The obtained results showed that there was an appropriate peak pulse voltage and an optimal initial pH value of the solution for GAC regeneration. Analyses of scanning electron microscope (SEM), Boehm titration, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Horvath-Kawazoe (HK), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that there were more mesopore and macropore in the regenerated GAC and the structure turned smoother with the increase of discharge voltage; the amount of acidic functional groups on the GAC surface increased while the amount of basic functional groups decreased after the regeneration process. From the result of the XRD analysis, there were no new substances produced on the GAC after PDP treatment. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 20110491353) and Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds, China (No. 1102116C)

  9. Hyaluronic acid production and hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during lens regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyk, W.M.; Zalik, S.E.; Dimitrov, E.

    1987-09-01

    The process of lens regeneration in newts involves the dedifferentiation of pigmented iris epithelial cells and their subsequent conversion into lens fibers. In vivo this cell-type conversion is restricted to the dorsal region of the iris. We have examined the patterns of hyaluronate accumulation and endogenous hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during the course of lens regeneration in vivo. Accumulation of newly synthesized hyaluronate was estimated from the uptake of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine into cetylpyridinium chloride-precipitable material that was sensitive to Streptomyces hyaluronidase. Endogenous hyaluronidase activity was determined from the quantity of reducing N-acetylhexosamine released upon incubation of iris tissue extract with exogenous hyaluronate substrate. We found that incorporation of label into hyaluronate was consistently higher in the regeneration-activated irises of lentectomized eyes than in control irises from sham-operated eyes. Hyaluronate labeling was higher in the dorsal (lens-forming) region of the iris than in ventral (non-lens-forming) iris tissue during the regeneration process. Label accumulation into hyaluronate was maximum between 10 and 15 days after lentectomy, the period of most pronounced dedifferentiation in the dorsal iris epithelium. Both normal and regenerating irises demonstrated a high level of endogenous hyaluronidase activity with a pH optimum of 3.5-4.0. Hyaluronidase activity was 1.7 to 2 times higher in dorsal iris tissue than in ventral irises both prior to lentectomy and throughout the regeneration process. We suggest that enhanced hyaluronate accumulation may facilitate the dedifferentiation of iris epithelial cells in the dorsal iris and prevent precocious withdrawal from the cell cycle. The high level of hyaluronidase activity in the dorsal iris may promote the turnover and remodeling of extracellular matrix components required for cell-type conversion.

  10. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x} Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing. 27 figs.

  11. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing.

  12. UTX demethylase activity is required for satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaochen; Nakka, Kiran; Benyoucef, Aissa; Sebastian, Soji; Zhuang, Lenan; Chu, Alphonse; Palii, Carmen G.; Camellato, Brendan; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    The X chromosome–encoded histone demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to establish transcriptionally permissive chromatin. Loss of UTX in female mice is embryonic lethal. Unexpectedly, male UTX-null mice escape embryonic lethality due to expression of UTY, a paralog that lacks H3K27 demethylase activity, suggesting an enzyme-independent role for UTX in development and thereby challenging the need for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. However, the requirement for active H3K27 demethylation in stem cell–mediated tissue regeneration remains untested. Here, we employed an inducible mouse KO that specifically ablates Utx in satellite cells (SCs) and demonstrated that active H3K27 demethylation is necessary for muscle regeneration. Loss of UTX in SCs blocked myofiber regeneration in both male and female mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that UTX mediates muscle regeneration through its H3K27 demethylase activity, as loss of demethylase activity either by chemical inhibition or knock-in of demethylase-dead UTX resulted in defective muscle repair. Mechanistically, dissection of the muscle regenerative process revealed that the demethylase activity of UTX is required for expression of the transcription factor myogenin, which in turn drives differentiation of muscle progenitors. Thus, we have identified a critical role for the enzymatic activity of UTX in activating muscle-specific gene expression during myofiber regeneration and have revealed a physiological role for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. PMID:26999603

  13. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  14. Particle Size Effects on Fenton Regeneration of MTBE-spent Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that may reduce water treatment costs. In this study, the effect of GAC particle size on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was evaluated. The GAC was...

  15. Fenton-Driven Chemical Regeneration of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon -- A Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) underwent 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Pilot-scale columns were intermittently placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with MTBE, and regenerated with H2O2 under different chemical, physical, and operational...

  16. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  17. Potential Skin Regeneration Activity and Chemical Composition of Absolute from Pueraria thunbergiana Flower.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Won, Kyung-Jong; Hwang, Dae-Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Joo-Hoon; Yoon, Myeong Sik; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2015-11-01

    The flower of Pueraria thunbergiana BENTH (PTBF) contains isoflavonoids and essential oil components. It has many biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-diabetes, anti-oxidant, and weight loss. However, its effect on skin regeneration remains unknown. In the present study, we isolated the absolute from PTBF through solvent extraction and determined the role of the absolute on skin regeneration-associated responses in human epidermal-keratinocytes (HaCats). The PTBF absolute, which contained 10 compounds, stimulated migration and proliferation and increased the phosphorylation of serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinasel/2 in HaCats. It induced type I and IV collagen synthesis in HaCats. In addition, treatment with PTBF absolute resulted in increased sprout outgrowth in HaCats. These findings suggest that PTBF absolute may participate in skin regeneration, probably through promotion of migration, proliferation, and collagen synthesis. PMID:26749850

  18. Expression of an Activated Integrin Promotes Long-Distance Sensory Axon Regeneration in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Menghon; Chew, Daniel J.; Moloney, Elizabeth B.; Verhaagen, Joost; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    After CNS injury, axon regeneration is blocked by an inhibitory environment consisting of the highly upregulated tenascin-C and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Tenascin-C promotes growth of axons if they express a tenascin-binding integrin, particularly α9β1. Additionally, integrins can be inactivated by CSPGs, and this inhibition can be overcome by the presence of a β1-binding integrin activator, kindlin-1. We examined the synergistic effect of α9 integrin and kindlin-1 on sensory axon regeneration in adult rat spinal cord after dorsal root crush and adeno-associated virus transgene expression in dorsal root ganglia. After 12 weeks, axons from C6–C7 dorsal root ganglia regenerated through the tenascin-C-rich dorsal root entry zone into the dorsal column up to C1 level and above (>25 mm axon length) through a normal pathway. Animals also showed anatomical and electrophysiological evidence of reconnection to the dorsal horn and behavioral recovery in mechanical pressure, thermal pain, and ladder-walking tasks. Expression of α9 integrin or kindlin-1 alone promoted much less regeneration and recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The study demonstrates that long-distance sensory axon regeneration over a normal pathway and with sensory and sensory–motor recovery can be achieved. This was achieved by expressing an integrin that recognizes tenascin-C, one of the components of glial scar tissue, and an integrin activator. This enabled extensive long-distance (>25 mm) regeneration of both myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons with topographically correct connections in the spinal cord. The extent of growth and recovery we have seen would probably be clinically significant. Restoration of sensation to hands, perineum, and genitalia would be a significant improvement for a spinal cord-injured patient. PMID:27383601

  19. Multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Kim, Unyoung; Soh, H. Tom

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic selection allows high-throughput sorting of target cells based on surface markers, and it is extensively used in biotechnology for a wide range of applications from in vitro diagnostics to cell-based therapies. However, existing methods can only perform separation based on a single parameter (i.e., the presence or absence of magnetization), and therefore, the simultaneous sorting of multiple targets at high levels of purity, recovery, and throughput remains a challenge. In this work, we present an alternative system, the multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter (MT-MACS), which makes use of microfluidics technology to achieve simultaneous spatially-addressable sorting of multiple target cell types in a continuous-flow manner. We used the MT-MACS device to purify 2 types of target cells, which had been labeled via target-specific affinity reagents with 2 different magnetic tags with distinct saturation magnetization and size. The device was engineered so that the combined effects of the hydrodynamic force produced from the laminar flow and the magnetophoretic force produced from patterned ferromagnetic structures within the microchannel result in the selective purification of the differentially labeled target cells into multiple independent outlets. We demonstrate here the capability to simultaneously sort multiple magnetic tags with >90% purity and >5,000-fold enrichment and multiple bacterial cell types with >90% purity and >500-fold enrichment at a throughput of 109 cells per hour. PMID:19015523

  20. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  1. Cyclic dermal BMP signalling regulates stem cell activation during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Mayer, Julie Ann; de la Cruz, Damon; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K; Maxson, Robert; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2008-01-17

    In the age of stem cell engineering it is critical to understand how stem cell activity is regulated during regeneration. Hairs are mini-organs that undergo cyclic regeneration throughout adult life, and are an important model for organ regeneration. Hair stem cells located in the follicle bulge are regulated by the surrounding microenvironment, or niche. The activation of such stem cells is cyclic, involving periodic beta-catenin activity. In the adult mouse, regeneration occurs in waves in a follicle population, implying coordination among adjacent follicles and the extrafollicular environment. Here we show that unexpected periodic expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) and Bmp4 in the dermis regulates this process. This BMP cycle is out of phase with the WNT/beta-catenin cycle, thus dividing the conventional telogen into new functional phases: one refractory and the other competent for hair regeneration, characterized by high and low BMP signalling, respectively. Overexpression of noggin, a BMP antagonist, in mouse skin resulted in a markedly shortened refractory phase and faster propagation of the regenerative wave. Transplantation of skin from this mutant onto a wild-type host showed that follicles in donor and host can affect their cycling behaviours mutually, with the outcome depending on the equilibrium of BMP activity in the dermis. Administration of BMP4 protein caused the competent region to become refractory. These results show that BMPs may be the long-sought 'chalone' inhibitors of hair growth postulated by classical experiments. Taken together, results presented in this study provide an example of hierarchical regulation of local organ stem cell homeostasis by the inter-organ macroenvironment. The expression of Bmp2 in subcutaneous adipocytes indicates physiological integration between these two thermo-regulatory organs. Our findings have practical importance for studies using mouse skin as a model for carcinogenesis, intra-cutaneous drug

  2. Astrocytes Block Axonal Regeneration in Mammals by Activating the Physiological Stop Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Francis J.; Lasek, Raymond J.

    1987-08-01

    Regenerating sensory axons in the dorsal roots of adult mammals are stopped at the junction between the root and spinal cord by reactive astrocytes. Do these cells stop axonal elongation by activating the physiological mechanisms that normally operate to stop axons during development, or do they physically obstruct the elongating axons? In order to distinguish these possibilities, the cytology of the axon tips of regenerating axons that were stopped by astrocytes was compared with the axon tips that were physically obstructed at a cul-de-sac produced by ligating a peripheral nerve. The terminals of the physically obstructed axon tips were distended with neurofilaments and other axonally transported structures that had accumulated when the axons stopped elongating. By contrast, neurofilaments did not accumulate in the tips of regenerating axons that were stopped by spinal cord astrocytes at the dorsal root transitional zone. These axo-glial terminals resembled the terminals that axons make on target neurons during normal development. On the basis of these observations, astrocytes appear to stop axons from regenerating in the mammalian spinal cord by activating the physiological stop pathway that is built into the axon and that normally operates when axons form stable terminals on target cells.

  3. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general. PMID:17801135

  4. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  5. Novel DLK-independent neuronal regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans shares links with activity-dependent ectopic outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chung, Samuel H; Awal, Mehraj R; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa M; Mazur, Eric; Gabel, Christopher V

    2016-05-17

    During development, a neuron transitions from a state of rapid growth to a stable morphology, and neurons within the adult mammalian CNS lose their ability to effectively regenerate in response to injury. Here, we identify a novel form of neuronal regeneration, which is remarkably independent of DLK-1/DLK, KGB-1/JNK, and other MAPK signaling factors known to mediate regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mammals. This DLK-independent regeneration in C. elegans has direct genetic and molecular links to a well-studied form of endogenous activity-dependent ectopic axon outgrowth in the same neuron type. Both neuron outgrowth types are triggered by physical lesion of the sensory dendrite or mutations disrupting sensory activity, calcium signaling, or genes that restrict outgrowth during neuronal maturation, such as SAX-1/NDR kinase or UNC-43/CaMKII. These connections suggest that ectopic outgrowth represents a powerful platform for gene discovery in neuronal regeneration. Moreover, we note numerous similarities between C. elegans DLK-independent regeneration and lesion conditioning, a phenomenon producing robust regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Both regeneration types are triggered by lesion of a sensory neurite via reduction of neuronal activity and enhanced by disrupting L-type calcium channels or elevating cAMP. Taken as a whole, our study unites disparate forms of neuronal outgrowth to uncover fresh molecular insights into activity-dependent control of the adult nervous system's intrinsic regenerative capacity. PMID:27078101

  6. Fenton-driven regeneration of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon - Effects of particle size and Iron Amendment Procedures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a technology being developed to regenerate organic contaminant-spent GAC. Here, the effect of GAC particle size (>2 mm to <0.35 mm) on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was ev...

  7. Changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities in the regenerating liver of partially irradiated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Yasumasu, I. )

    1989-09-01

    X rays (4.8 Gy) inhibit both DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of histone H1 in the regenerating liver of the rat. To determine the cause of the inhibition of histone H1 phosphorylation, changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities during the prereplicative phase of regeneration were measured. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity was low during regeneration, and the changes in the activity were not statistically significant. The cAMP-independent protein kinase activity increased at 15 h, decreased at 18 h, and increased again at 24 h after partial hepatectomy. X irradiation prior to partial hepatectomy did not inhibit the increase at 15 h, but it did inhibit the increase at 24 h. The activity was not inhibited by isoquinolinesulfonamide inhibitors such as H-7, and it was activated by a commercial preparation of an inhibitor protein of the cAMP-dependent kinase. It was also inhibited by quercetin. The possibility that the radiation-sensitive nuclear protein kinase is a nuclear cAMP-independent protein kinase specific for histone H1 is considered.

  8. The Effects of Weak Combined Magnetic Field on Cell Wall Regeneration and Frequency of Plant Protoplasts Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena

    The major purpose of these experiments was to investigate plant protoplast fusion frequency and regeneration of a cell wall by protoplasts at weak combined magnetic field (CMF) with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The protoplasts were isolated from Nicotiana lumbaginifolia and N. silvestris leaf mesophyll and from callus tissues (Nicotiana tabacum and Glycine max). The special extra apparatus with ferromagnetic shield was used for estimate of CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The fusion of protoplasts is realized by using of parent protoplasts isolated from one plant species, as well as from various plant species. Control samples were situated near the apparatus with CMF. The laser confocal microscopy was used for study of cell wall regeneration by single and fused protoplasts. The cytochemical methods with DAPI and calcofluor dye were also applied as the detectors for protoplast fusion and regeneration of cell wall. We have been established that CMF with frequency adjusted to the cyclotron frequency Mg2+ ions have shown the most positive influence on regeneration of cell wall by protoplasts. CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of K+ ions very weakly affected on the frequency of protoplast fusion. Largest frequency of protoplasts fusion is noted in the CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ in comparison with the control samples.

  9. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  10. Initial stages of neural regeneration in Helisoma trivolvis are dependent upon PLA2 activity.

    PubMed

    Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal regeneration after damage to an axon tract requires the rapid sealing of the injured plasma membrane and the subsequent formation of growth cones that can lead regenerating processes to their appropriate target. Membrane sealing and growth cone formation are Ca(2+)-dependent processes, but the signaling pathways activated by Ca(2+) to bring about these effects remain poorly understood. An in vitro injury model was employed in which neurites from identified snail neurons (Helisoma trivolvis) were transected with a glass microknife, and the formation of new growth cones from the distal portions of transected neurites was recorded at defined times after transection. This study presents three main results. First, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), a calcium-activated enzyme, is necessary for membrane sealing in vitro. Second, PLA(2) activity is also required for the formation of a new growth cone after the membrane has sealed successfully. Thus, PLA(2) plays a dual role by affecting both growth cone formation and membrane sealing. Third, the injury-induced activation of PLA(2) by Ca(2+) controls growth cone formation through the production of leukotrienes, secondary metabolites of PLA(2) activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the injury-induced Ca(2+) influx acts via PLA(2) and leukotriene production to assure growth cone formation. These findings indicate that events that cause an inhibition of PLA(2) or lipoxygenases, enzymes that produce leukotrienes, could result in the inability of neurites to regenerate. PMID:12555268

  11. Removal of methanol from pulp and paper mills using combined activated carbon adsorption and photocatalytic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Wu, Chang-Yu; Mazyck, David W

    2006-09-01

    Methanol is one of the major hazardous air pollutants emitted from chemical pulp mills. Its collection and treatment is required by the Maximum Achievable Control Technology portion of the 1998 Cluster Rule. The objective of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of combined adsorption and photocatalytic regeneration for the removal and destruction of methanol. To facilitate the regeneration, activated carbon (AC) was coated with commercially available photocatalyst by a spray desiccation method. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed reactor equipped with an 8 W black light UV lamp (peak wavelength at 365 nm) at the center. The photocatalyst loaded onto AC had no significant impact on the adsorption capacity of the carbon. High humidity was found to greatly reduce the material's capacity in the adsorption and simultaneous adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The photocatalytic regeneration process is limited by the desorption of the adsorbate. Increasing desorption rate by using purge air greatly increased the regeneration capacity. When the desorption rate was greater than the photocatalytic oxidation rate, however, part of the methanol was directly desorbed without degradation. PMID:16630641

  12. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A MOBILE ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption has become a standard procedure for the cleanup of contaminated water streams. To facilitate such cleanup at hazardous waste and spill sites, mobile carbon adsorption units have been constructed and are now in use. Their primary drawback is the logisti...

  13. The Feasibility Study of Persulfate Oxidation to Regenerating of Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  14. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading. PMID:26652350

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis reveals activation of conserved vertebrate developmental and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D; Markov, Glenn J; Eckalbar, Walter L; George, Rajani M; King, Jesse M; Tokuyama, Minami A; Geiger, Lauren A; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J; Allen, April N; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Fisher, Rebecca E; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F; Rawls, J Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Tail Regeneration in the Lizard Anolis carolinensis Reveals Activation of Conserved Vertebrate Developmental and Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Markov, Glenn J.; Eckalbar, Walter L.; George, Rajani M.; King, Jesse M.; Tokuyama, Minami A.; Geiger, Lauren A.; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J.; Allen, April N.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F.; Rawls, J. Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  17. Inhibition of Notch activity promotes nonmitotic regeneration of hair cells in the adult mouse utricles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vincent; Golub, Justin S; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Hume, Clifford R; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2011-10-26

    The capacity of adult mammals to regenerate sensory hair cells is not well defined. To explore early steps in this process, we examined reactivation of a transiently expressed developmental gene, Atoh1, in adult mouse utricles after neomycin-induced hair cell death in culture. Using an adenoviral reporter for Atoh1 enhancer, we found that Atoh1 transcription is activated in some hair cell progenitors (supporting cells) 3 d after neomycin treatment. By 18 d after neomycin, the number of cells with Atoh1 transcriptional activity increased significantly, but few cells acquired hair cell features (i.e., accumulated ATOH1 or myosin VIIa protein or developed stereocilia). Treatment with DAPT, an inhibitor of γ-secretase, reduced notch pathway activity, enhanced Atoh1 transcriptional activity, and dramatically increased the number of Atoh1-expressing cells with hair cell features, but only in the striolar/juxtastriolar region. Similar effects were seen with TAPI-1, an inhibitor of another enzyme required for notch activity (TACE). Division of supporting cells was rare in any control or DAPT-treated utricles. This study shows that mature mammals have a natural capacity to initiate vestibular hair cell regeneration and suggests that regional notch activity is a significant inhibitor of direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells following damage. PMID:22031879

  18. S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: Exposing the hidden lyase☆

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Julie D.; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves asamuscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C2–3, resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research. PMID:22750505

  19. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patricia J; Jones, Laura N; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C; English, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  20. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Patricia J.; Jones, Laura N.; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  1. β2-Adrenoceptor is involved in connective tissue remodeling in regenerating muscles by decreasing the activity of MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Silva, Meiricris T; Nascimento, Tábata L; Pereira, Marcelo G; Siqueira, Adriane S; Brum, Patrícia C; Jaeger, Ruy G; Miyabara, Elen H

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the role of β2-adrenoceptors in the connective tissue remodeling of regenerating muscles from β2-adrenoceptor knockout (β2KO) mice. Tibialis anterior muscles from β2KO mice were cryolesioned and analyzed after 3, 10, and 21 days. Regenerating muscles from β2KO mice showed a significant increase in the area density of the connective tissue and in the amount of collagen at 10 days compared with wild-type (WT) mice. A greater increase occurred in the expression levels of collagen I, III, and IV in regenerating muscles from β2KO mice evaluated at 10 days compared with WT mice; this increase continued at 21 days, except for collagen III. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) activity increased to a similar extent in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 and 10 days. This was also the case for MMP-9 activity in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 days; however, at 10 days post-cryolesion, this activity returned to baseline levels only in WT mice. MMP-3 activity was unaltered in regenerating muscles at 10 days. mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α increased in regenerating muscles from WT and β2KO mice at 3 days and, at 10 days post-cryolesion, returned to baseline only in WT mice. mRNA levels of interleukin-6 increased in muscles from WT mice at 3 days post-cryolesion and returned to baseline at 10 days post-cryolesion but were unchanged in β2KO mice. Our results suggest that the β2-adrenoceptor contributes to collagen remodeling during muscle regeneration by decreasing MMP-9 activity. PMID:26896238

  2. Enhanced aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by regenerating NAD+ in Klebsiella pneumoniae and implications for the glycerol dissimilation pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Su, Mingyue; Ge, Xizhen; Tian, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3-hydroxypropaldehyde is converted to 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although ALDH overexpression stimulates the formation of 3-HP, it ceases to accumulate when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here we show that NAD(+) regeneration, together with ALDH overexpression, facilitates 3-HP production and benefits cell growth. Three distinct NAD(+)-regenerating enzymes: NADH oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were individually expressed in K. pneumoniae. In vitro assay showed their higher activities than that of the control, indicating their capacities to regenerate NAD(+). When they were respectively co-expressed with ALD4, an ALDH from S. cerevisiae, the activities of ALD4 were significantly elevated compared with that expressing ALD4 alone, suggesting that the regenerated NAD(+) enhanced the activity of ALD4. More interestingly, the growth rates of all NAD(+)-regenerating strains were prolonged in comparison with the control, indicating that NAD(+) regeneration stimulated cell proliferation. This study not only reveals the reliance of ALD4 activity on NAD(+) availability but also provides a method for regulating the dha regulon. PMID:23794046

  3. Room temperature active regenerative magnetic refrigeration: Magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shir, Farhad; Yanik, Levent; Bennett, Lawrence H.; Della Torre, Edward; Shull, Robert D.

    2003-05-01

    Nanocomposites have several advantages as a refrigerant for 100-300 K applications compared to the other common methods of assembling a magnetic refrigeration bed, such as a layered thermal bed, or mixing of different magnetic materials. This article discusses the thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of an ideal and real active magnetic regenerative refrigeration cycle. An algorithm for the choice of optimum parameters is derived.

  4. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  5. Low Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Does Not Induce Cell Survival or Regeneration in a Mouse Optic Nerve Crush Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Alexander D.; Makowiecki, Kalina; Bartlett, Carole; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Low intensity repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (LI-rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has been shown to induce structural and functional brain plasticity, including short distance axonal sprouting. However, the potential for LI-rTMS to promote axonal regeneration following neurotrauma has not been investigated. This study examined the effect of LI-rTMS on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, axon regeneration and levels of BDNF in an optic nerve crush neurotrauma model. Adult C57Bl/6J mice received a unilateral intraorbital optic nerve crush. Mice received 10 minutes of sham (handling control without stimulation) (n=6) or LI-rTMS (n = 8) daily stimulation for 14 days to the operated eye. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess RGC survival (β-3 Tubulin) and axon regeneration across the injury (GAP43). Additionally, BDNF expression was quantified in a separate cohort by ELISA in the retina and optic nerve of injured (optic nerve crush) (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) and non-injured mice (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) that received daily stimulation as above for 7 days. Following 14 days of LI-rTMS there was no significant difference in mean RGC survival between sham and treated animals (p>0.05). Also, neither sham nor LI-rTMS animals showed GAP43 positive labelling in the optic nerve, indicating that regeneration did not occur. At 1 week, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels in the retina or optic nerves between sham and LI-rTMS in injured or non-injured mice (p>0.05). Although LI-rTMS has been shown to induce structural and molecular plasticity in the visual system and cerebellum, our results suggest LI-rTMS does not induce neuroprotection or regeneration following a complete optic nerve crush. These results help define the therapeutic capacity and limitations of LI-rTMS in the treatment of neurotrauma. PMID:25993112

  6. Alterations in the activities of hepatic plasma-membrane and microsomal enzymes during liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Deliconstantinos, G; Ramantanis, G

    1983-01-01

    A marked increase in the activities of rat liver plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and microsomal Ca2+-stimulated ATPase was observed 18h after partial hepatectomy. Lipid analyses for both membrane preparations reveal that in partially hepatectomized rats the cholesterol and sphingomyelin content are decreased with a subsequent decrease in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio compared with those of sham-operated animals. Changes in the allosteric properties of plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase by F- (as reflected by changes in the Hill coefficient) indicated a fluidization of the lipid bilayer of both membrane preparations in 18 h-regenerating liver. The amphipathic dodecyl glucoside incorporated into the hepatic plasma membranes evoked a marked increase in the (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities. The lack of effect of the glucoside on the Lubrol-PX-solubilized 5'-nucleotidase indicates that changes in the activities of the membrane-bound enzymes caused by the glucoside are due to modulation of the membrane fluidity. Dodecyl glucoside appears to increase the membrane fluidity, evaluated through changes in the Hill coefficient for plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase. The biological significance of these data is discussed in terms of the differences and changes in the interaction of membrane-bound enzymes with membrane lipids during liver regeneration. PMID:6309144

  7. A living thick nanofibrous implant bifunctionalized with active growth factor and stem cells for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eap, Sandy; Keller, Laetitia; Schiavi, Jessica; Huck, Olivier; Jacomine, Leandro; Fioretti, Florence; Gauthier, Christian; Sebastian, Victor; Schwinté, Pascale; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    New-generation implants focus on robust, durable, and rapid tissue regeneration to shorten recovery times and decrease risks of postoperative complications for patients. Herein, we describe a new-generation thick nanofibrous implant functionalized with active containers of growth factors and stem cells for regenerative nanomedicine. A thick electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous implant (from 700 μm to 1 cm thick) was functionalized with chitosan and bone morphogenetic protein BMP-7 as growth factor using layer-by-layer technology, producing fish scale-like chitosan/BMP-7 nanoreservoirs. This extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffold enabled in vitro colonization and bone regeneration by human primary osteoblasts, as shown by expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein (BSPII), 21 days after seeding. In vivo implantation in mouse calvaria defects showed significantly more newly mineralized extracellular matrix in the functionalized implant compared to a bare scaffold after 30 days’ implantation, as shown by histological scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray microscopy study and calcein injection. We have as well bifunctionalized our BMP-7 therapeutic implant by adding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The activity of this BMP-7-functionalized implant was again further enhanced by the addition of hMSCs to the implant (living materials), in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of new bone formation and calcification after 30 days’ implantation in mice with calvaria defects. Therefore, implants functionalized with BMP-7 nanocontainers associated with hMSCs can act as an accelerator of in vivo bone mineralization and regeneration. PMID:25709432

  8. Dynamics of Permanent-Magnet Biased Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukata, Satoru; Yutani, Kazuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Active magnetic radial bearings are constructed with a combination of permanent magnets to provide bias forces and electromagnets to generate control forces for the reduction of cost and the operating energy consumption. Ring-shaped permanent magnets with axial magnetization are attached to a shaft and share their magnet stators with the electromagnets. The magnet cores are made of solid iron for simplicity. A simplified magnetic circuit of the combined magnet system is analyzed with linear circuit theory by approximating the characteristics of permanent magnets with a linear relation. A linearized dynamical model of the control force is presented with the first-order approximation of the effects of eddy currents. Frequency responses of the rotor motion to disturbance inputs and the motion for impulsive forces are tested in the non-rotating state. The frequency responses are compared with numerical results. The decay of rotor speed due to magnetic braking is examined. The experimental results and the presented linearized model are similar to those of the all-electromagnetic design.

  9. Regeneration performance and carbon consumption of semi-coke and activated coke for SO₂ and NO removal.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song; Li, Yuran; Zhu, Tingyu; Guo, Yangyang

    2015-08-01

    To decrease the operating cost of flue gas purification technologies based on carbon-based materials, the adsorption and regeneration performance of low-price semi-coke and activated coke were compared for SO2 and NO removal in a simulated flue gas. The functional groups of the two adsorbents before and after regeneration were characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, and were quantitatively assessed using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) coupled with FTIR and acid-base titration. The results show that semi-coke had higher adsorption capacity (16.2% for SO2 and 38.6% for NO) than activated coke because of its higher content of basic functional groups and lactones. After regeneration, the adsorption performance of semi-coke decreased because the number of active functional groups decreased and the micropores increased. Semi-coke had better regeneration performance than activated coke. Semi-coke had a larger SO2 recovery of 7.2% and smaller carbon consumption of 12% compared to activated coke. The semi-coke carbon-based adsorbent could be regenerated at lower temperatures to depress the carbon consumption, because the SO2 recovery was only reduced a small amount. PMID:26257344

  10. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  11. Thermal activation of regenerated fiber Bragg grating in few mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Man-Hong; Gunawardena, Dinusha S.; Lim, Kok-Sing; Machavaram, Venkata R.; Lee, Say-Hoe; Chong, Wu-Yi; Lee, Yen-Sian; Ahmad, Harith

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrated for the first time, the thermal regeneration of two and four modes graded index fiber Bragg gratings using high temperature tube furnace. During the regeneration process, the seed grating is erased and a new grating with lower index contrast is formed. The thermal calibration shows that the temperature sensitivity of regenerated grating is slightly higher for fiber with larger core. On the other hand, the regeneration temperature is lower for fiber with smaller core. The temperature sustainability up to 900 °C is observed for the produced regenerated gratings in few mode fibers.

  12. Detection of hydroxyl radicals during regeneration of granular activated carbon in dielectric barrier discharge plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shoufeng; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    To understand the reactions taking place in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma system of activated carbon regeneration, the determination of active species is necessary. A method based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography with radical trapping by salicylic acid, has been developed to measure hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the DBD plasma reactor. The effects of applied voltage, treatment time, and gas flow rate and atmosphere were investigated. Experimental results indicated that increasing voltage, treatment time and air flow rate could enhance the formation of •OH. Oxygen atmosphere and a suitable GAC water content were contributed to •OH generation. The results give an insight into plasma chemical processes, and can be helpful to optimize the design and application for the plasma system.

  13. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-12-15

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7-21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  14. [A female infant of mitochondrial myopathy with findings of active necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Nagaura, T; Sumi, K; Nonaka, I

    1990-04-01

    An 8 year-old female infant with the clinical and pathological characteristics of both progressive muscular dystrophy and mitochondrial myopathy was described. Her maternal cousin had clinical and pathological findings of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Since the patient had markedly elevated serum CK and calf muscle hypertrophy, her muscle was biopsied and she was diagnosed as having female DMD at the age of 5 years. She had generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and alternate hemiconvulsions for recent 4 years which brought her our hospital. On admission, she had mild generalized muscle atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limbs. The lactate and pyruvate levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, but with no metabolic acidosis. Serum CK was elevated to 4464 IU/L. Brain CT and MRI showed the expanding arachnoid cyst in the left middle fossa of cranium. In the biopsied left biceps crachii muscle, in addition to numerous ragged-red fibers, there were active muscular fiber necrosis and regeneration and interstitial fibrosis similar to those seen in progressive muscular dystrophy. Biochemically, no decrease or defect in the respiratory chain enzymes was detected. On electron microscopy, a large number of fibers contained aggregates of giant mitochondria with proliferated complicated cristae. Scattered throughout were necrotic muscle fibers filled with phagocytes and regenerating fibers. This patient had the diagnostic features of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. We supposed that the patient provided very interesting evidences to study the relationship between mitochondrial myopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. PMID:2387114

  15. Chemical techniques for pretreating and regenerating active slag filters for improved phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C; Shilton, A; Haverkamp, R G; Pratt, S

    2011-07-01

    Active slag filters are an emerging technology for removing phosphorus (P) from wastewaters. Recent research revealed that adsorption onto Fe oxides/oxyhydroxides at near-neutral pH and oxidizing Eh is the key mechanism of P removal by melter slag filters. Currently, filter lifespan is limited by available adsorption sites. This study examined whether the performance and longevity of active filters could be improved via chemical treatment to create additional reactive sites as well as regenerate exhausted ones. Fresh original melter slag as well as slag from an exhausted full-scale filter was tested. Chemical reagents that could manipulate the pH/Eh of the slag granule surfaces and potentially activate them for further P removal were used, namely hydrochloric acid (HCI), sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4). Waste stabilization pond effluent was then applied to the treated slag to assess the effectiveness of the treatments at improving P removal. Fresh slag treated with Na2S204 and HCl, respectively, retained 1.9 and 1.4 times more P from the effluent than the untreated fresh slag. These reagents were even more effective at regenerating the exhausted slag, increasing total retained P by a factor of 13 and six, respectively, compared with untreated slag. Sodium hydroxide was ineffective at increasing P removal. The higher P retention by the 'treated exhausted slag' compared with the 'treated fresh media' indicates that adsorption sites on melter slag filters become increasingly reactive with time. This research is the first study to provide evidence that P retention by active slag filters can be increased by both (1) chemical pre treatment and (2) chemical post-treatment once their P removal is exhausted, thereby potentially transforming them from a single use system to a more viable, reusable treatment technology. PMID:21882558

  16. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Limits Liver Injury and Facilitates Regeneration after Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D1 gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 limits liver injury and facilitates regeneration after acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-08-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D(1) gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  18. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon; Kim, Youngkwon

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  19. Sustained ERK Activation Underlies Reprogramming in Regeneration-Competent Salamander Cells and Distinguishes Them from Their Mammalian Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Maximina H.; Gates, Phillip B.; Brockes, Jeremy P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In regeneration-competent vertebrates, such as salamanders, regeneration depends on the ability of various differentiated adult cell types to undergo natural reprogramming. This ability is rarely observed in regeneration-incompetent species such as mammals, providing an explanation for their poor regenerative potential. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating natural reprogramming during regeneration. Here, we have identified the extent of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation as a key component of such mechanisms. We show that sustained ERK activation following serum induction is required for re-entry into the cell cycle of postmitotic salamander muscle cells, partially by promoting the downregulation of p53 activity. Moreover, ERK activation induces epigenetic modifications and downregulation of muscle-specific genes such as Sox6. Remarkably, while long-term ERK activation is found in salamander myotubes, only transient activation is seen in their mammalian counterparts, suggesting that the extent of ERK activation could underlie differences in regenerative competence between species. PMID:25068118

  20. Dynamo Activity in Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-01-01

    Strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes have many attractive features that may explain the enigmatic behavior observed from X-ray binaries. The physics and structure of these disks are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability into an ordered toroidal magnetic field. To study dynamo activity, we performed three-dimensional, stratified, isothermal, ideal magnetohydrodynamic shearing box simulations. In our simulations, the strength of this self-sustained toroidal magnetic field depends on the net vertical magnetic flux we impose, which allows us to study weak-to-strong magnetization regimes. We find that the entire disk develops into a magnetic pressure-dominated state for a sufficiently strong net vertical magnetic flux. Over the two orders of magnitude in net vertical magnetic flux that we consider, the effective α-viscosity parameter scales as a power-law. We quantify dynamo properties of toroidal magnetic flux production and its buoyant escape as a function of disk magnetization. Finally, we compare our simulations to an analytic model for the vertical structure of strongly magnetized disks applicable to the high/soft state of X-ray binaries.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle-based approaches to locally target therapy and enhance tissue regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Richard; Sapir, Yulia; MacDonald, Cristin; Cohen, Smadar; Polyak, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-based systems utilizing superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a magnetic field gradient to exert a force on these particles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications. This review is focused on drug targeting applications that require penetration of a cellular barrier as well as strategies to improve the efficacy of targeting in these biomedical applications. Another focus of this review is regenerative applications utilizing tissue engineered scaffolds prepared with the aid of magnetic particles, the use of remote actuation for release of bioactive molecules and magneto–mechanical cell stimulation, cell seeding and cell patterning. PMID:22994959

  2. Evolution of the Perlecan/HSPG2 Gene and Its Activation in Regenerating Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Curtis R.; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene’s conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan’s expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing. PMID:25876075

  3. Evolution of the perlecan/HSPG2 gene and its activation in regenerating Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Curtis R; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene's conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan's expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing. PMID:25876075

  4. Micromagnetic simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal of nanoscale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory; Novotny, M. A.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2000-05-01

    Numerical integration of a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is used to study dynamic processes in single-domain nanoscale magnets at nonzero temperatures. Special attention is given to including thermal fluctuations as a Langevin term, and the fast multipole method is used to calculate dipole-dipole interactions. It is feasible to simulate these dynamics on the nanosecond time scale for spatial discretizations that involve on the order of 104 nodes using a desktop workstation. The nanoscale magnets considered here are single pillars with large aspect ratio. Hysteresis-loop simulations are employed to study the stable and metastable configurations of the magnetization. Each pillar has magnetic end caps. In a time-dependent field the magnetization of the pillars is observed to reverse via nucleation, propagation, and coalescence of the end caps. In particular, the end caps propagate into the magnet and meet near the middle. A relatively long-lived defect is formed when end caps with opposite vorticity meet. Fluctuations are more important in the reversal of the magnetization for fields weaker than the zero-temperature coercive field, where the reversal is thermally activated. In this case, the process must be described by its statistical properties, such as the distribution of switching times, averaged over a large number of independent thermal histories.

  5. Inhibition of TGFβ type I receptor activity facilitates liver regeneration upon acute CCl4 intoxication in mice.

    PubMed

    Karkampouna, Sofia; Goumans, Marie-José; Ten Dijke, Peter; Dooley, Steven; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Liver exhibits a remarkable maintenance of functional homeostasis in the presence of a variety of damaging toxic factors. Tissue regeneration involves cell replenishment and extracellular matrix remodeling. Key regulator of homeostasis is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) cytokine. To understand the role of TGFβ during liver regeneration, we used the single-dose carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment in mice as a model of acute liver damage. We combined this with in vivo inhibition of the TGFβ pathway by a small molecule inhibitor, LY364947, which targets the TGFβ type I receptor kinase [activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5)] in hepatocytes but not in activated stellate cells. Co-administration of LY364947 inhibitor and CCl4 toxic agent resulted in enhanced liver regeneration; cell proliferation (measured by PCNA, phosphorylated histone 3, p21) levels were increased in CCl4 + LY364947 versus CCl4-treated mice. Recovery of CCl4-metabolizing enzyme CYP2E1 expression in hepatocytes is enhanced 7 days after CCl4 intoxication in the mice that received also the TGFβ inhibitor. In summary, a small molecule inhibitor that blocks ALK5 downstream signaling and halts the cytostatic role of TGFβ pathway results in increased cell regeneration and improved liver function during acute liver damage. Thus, in vivo ALK5 modulation offers insight into the role of TGFβ, not only in matrix remodeling and fibrosis, but also in cell regeneration. PMID:25566828

  6. Real and simulated microgravity can activate signals stimulating cells to enter the S phase during lens regeneration in urodelean amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    The model of Wolffian lens regeneration was used to study the effect of microgravity on the proliferative activity of cell giving rise to the regenerating lens. In vivo experiments were performed aboard Russian biosatellites and under laboratory conditions, using clinorotation to simulate microgravity. The data of autoradiographic analysis and BrdU assay showed that exposure to micro-g resulted in a 1.2- to 2-fold increase in the number of cells entering the S phase, compared to that in the on-ground control (1g). This increase was observed both in the zone of regeneration (the dorsal iris) and in the eye growth zone (the pars ciliaris ora serrata complex). In the regenerating lens proper, the number of cells entering the S phase was also greater under experimental conditions. This often resulted in an increased size of the lens (compared to the control) and disturbances in its morphogenesis. Along with in vivo experiments, we developed a quasi-in vivo system of iris/lens culturing in vitro in a high-speed miniroller, which allows us now to compare the direct effects of low g and the effects mediated by various body systems on proliferation in the same eye tissues. Probable mechanisms of the influence of newt body systems on lens regeneration upon exposure to microgravity are discussed. A hypothesis is proposed that the key role in this influence may belong to early events in the responses of blood circulatory and immune systems to microgravity.

  7. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  8. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  9. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  10. L-Dopa production and antioxidant activity in Hybanthus enneaspermus (L.) F. Muell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Vasudevan, Venkatachalam; Selvaraj, Natesan; Lim, Yong Pyo; Ganapathi, Andy

    2015-07-01

    Hybanthus enneaspermus is an ethanobotanical plant extensively used in Indian traditional medicine. Quick and efficient in vitro mass propagation of this plant species was established for commercial utilization from leaf and node explants using various concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators and polyamines. The maximum number of multiple shoots per leaf explant (40 shoots) was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 20 mg/l spermidine in combination with 4 mg/l BA+1.5 mg/l IAA after 8 weeks of culture. The elongated shoots were rooted (16 roots/shoot) on MS medium with the best concentration of IBA (1.5 mg/l) and in combination with 20 mg/l putrescine after 5 weeks of culture. The plants were successfully acclimatized (98 %) in the sand: soil: vermiculite mixture (1:1:1 v/v/v) in the greenhouse. An increased antioxidant activity was recorded in vitro regenerated shoots when compared to in vitro-induced roots. L-Dopa content was recorded higher in leaves (8.31 mg/g DW) followed by stem (6.22 mg/g DW) and root (3.22 mg/g DW) of leaf-derived plants than the field-grown parent plant after 5 weeks. By adopting this protocol, the regenerated-plants could be used for drug production and pharmacology work with as an alternative to field-grown plants. PMID:26261404

  11. Myocardial regeneration by activation of multipotent cardiac stem cells in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Konrad; Torella, Daniele; Sheikh, Farooq; de Angelis, Antonella; Nurzynska, Daria; Silvestri, Furio; Beltrami, C. Alberto; Bussani, Rossana; Beltrami, Antonio P.; Quaini, Federico; Bolli, Roberto; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we tested whether the human heart possesses a cardiac stem cell (CSC) pool that promotes regeneration after infarction. For this purpose, CSC growth and senescence were measured in 20 hearts with acute infarcts, 20 hearts with end-stage postinfarction cardiomyopathy, and 12 control hearts. CSC number increased markedly in acute and, to a lesser extent, in chronic infarcts. CSC growth correlated with the increase in telomerase-competent dividing CSCs from 1.5% in controls to 28% in acute infarcts and 14% in chronic infarcts. The CSC mitotic index increased 29-fold in acute and 14-fold in chronic infarcts. CSCs committed to the myocyte, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell lineages increased 85-fold in acute infarcts and 25-fold in chronic infarcts. However, p16INK4a-p53-positive senescent CSCs also increased and were 10%, 18%, and 40% in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. Old CSCs had short telomeres and apoptosis involved 0.3%, 3.8%, and 9.6% of CSCs in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. These variables reduced the number of functionally competent CSCs from 26,000/cm3 of viable myocardium in acute to 7,000/cm3 in chronic infarcts, respectively. In seven acute infarcts, foci of spontaneous myocardial regeneration that did not involve cell fusion were identified. In conclusion, the human heart possesses a CSC compartment, and CSC activation occurs in response to ischemic injury. The loss of functionally competent CSCs in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy may underlie the progressive functional deterioration and the onset of terminal failure. cardiac progenitor cells | human heart | myocardial infarction

  12. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite.

    PubMed

    David, Jan; Smejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Sárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified hydroponic method was applied to determine the effects of their potassium salts on Zea mays seedlings roots with respect to the plant weight, root length, root division, and starch and protein content. The relations between the determined parameters were evaluated through Principal Component Analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The results indicated that the most important factor determining the biological activity of South-Moravian lignite potassium humates is related to the nature of self-assemblies, while the chemical composition had no direct connection with the root growth of Zea mays seedlings. It was demonstrated a controlled processing that provided humic substances with different chemical and physicochemical properties and variable biological activity. PMID:24790812

  13. Activation of Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Dorresteijn, Adriaan W C; Fröbius, Andreas C

    2012-05-01

    The capability of regenerating posterior segments and pygidial structures is ancestral for annelids and has been lost only a few times within this phylum. As one of the three major segmented taxa, annelids enable us to monitor reconstruction of lost tissues and organs. During regeneration, regional identities have to be imprinted onto the newly formed segments. In this study, we show spatial and temporal localization of expression of nine Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii. Hox genes are homeodomain genes encoding transcriptional regulators of axial patterning in bilaterian animals during development. We demonstrate that five Platynereis Hox genes belonging to paralog groups (PG) 1, 4, 5, 6, and 9-14 are expressed in domains of the regenerating nervous system consistent with providing positional information along the anteroposterior axis of the regenerate. We report that expression in regenerating neuromeres is limited to varying subsets of perikarya, called gangliosomes. Four of nine genes analyzed do not appear to be involved in axial patterning. Two genes, Pdu-Hox2 and Pdu-Hox3, are predominantly expressed in the growth zone region. For some Hox genes expression in newly formed coelomic epithelia can be observed. Platynereis Hox genes do not exhibit temporal or spatial colinearity. Although there are some similarities to previously reported expression patterns during larval and postlarval development in Nereididae (Kulakova et al. 2007), expression patterns observed during caudal regeneration also show unique patterns. PMID:22569931

  14. Localized epigenetic silencing of a damage-activated WNT enhancer limits regeneration in mature Drosophila imaginal discs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robin E; Setiawan, Linda; Saul, Josh; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms lose the capacity to regenerate damaged tissues as they mature. Damaged Drosophila imaginal discs regenerate efficiently early in the third larval instar (L3) but progressively lose this ability. This correlates with reduced damage-responsive expression of multiple genes, including the WNT genes wingless (wg) and Wnt6. We demonstrate that damage-responsive expression of both genes requires a bipartite enhancer whose activity declines during L3. Within this enhancer, a damage-responsive module stays active throughout L3, while an adjacent silencing element nucleates increasing levels of epigenetic silencing restricted to this enhancer. Cas9-mediated deletion of the silencing element alleviates WNT repression, but is, in itself, insufficient to promote regeneration. However, directing Myc expression to the blastema overcomes repression of multiple genes, including wg, and restores cellular responses necessary for regeneration. Localized epigenetic silencing of damage-responsive enhancers can therefore restrict regenerative capacity in maturing organisms without compromising gene functions regulated by developmental signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11588.001 PMID:26840050

  15. Bioactive bilayered dressing for compromised epidermal tissue regeneration with sequential activity of complementary agents.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Cifuentes, Alberto; Rodríguez, Gema; Aguilar, María Rosa; González-Gómez, Álvaro; Solis, Raul; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Buján, Julia; García-Sanmartin, Josune; Martínez, Alfredo; Román, Julio San

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with the design, preparation, and evaluation of a new bilayered dressing for application in the healing of compromised wounds. The system is based on the sequential release of two complementary bioactive components to enhance the activation of the regeneration of dermal tissue. The internal layer is a highly hydrophilic and biodegradable film of gelatin and hyaluronic acid (HG), crosslinked with the natural compound genipin, which reacts with the amine groups of gelatin. This film is loaded with the proangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial peptide, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), that is released slowly in the wound site. The external layer, more stable and less hydrophilic, is constituted by a biodegradable polyurethane derived from poly(caprolactone) and pluronic L61. This layer is loaded with resorbable nanoparticles of bemiparin (a fractionated low molecular weight heparin), which promotes the activation of growth factors, FGF and VEGF, and provides a good biomechanical stability and controlled permeability of the bilayered dressing. Experiments carried out in mice demonstrate the excellent angiogenic effect of the HG film in the dermal tissue. Application of the bilayered dressing in the wound healing rabbit ear model shows an improved cicatrization of the wound in both ischemic and non-ischemic defects, favoring epithelialization and reducing noticeably the contraction and the inflammation. PMID:26022967

  16. Active magnetic bearings for optimum turbomachinery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustak, J.; Kirk, R. G.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high speed eight stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the rotor dynamics analysis is presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofit of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four stage centrifugal compressor. Recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  17. A novel peptide-modified and gene-activated biomimetic bone matrix accelerating bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haitao; Zheng, Qixin; Yang, Shuhua; Guo, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zou, Zhenwei; Duan, Zhixia

    2014-08-01

    The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be regulated by systemic or local growth factor, especially by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). However, how to maintain the bioactivity of exogenous TGF-β1 is a great challenge due to its short half-life time. The most promising solution is to transfer TGF-β1 gene into seed cells through transgenic technology and then transgenic cells to continuously secret endogenous TGF-β1 protein via gene expression. In this study, a novel non-viral vector (K)16GRGDSPC was chemically linked to bioactive bone matrices PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n using cross-linker to construct a novel non-viral gene transfer system. TGF-β1 gene was incubated with this system and subsequently rabbit-derived BMSCs were co-cultured with this gene-activated PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n, while co-cultured with PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n modified with (K)16GRGDSPC only and original PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n as control. Thus we fabricated three kinds of composites: Group A (BMSCs-TGF-β1DNA-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite); Group B (BMSCs-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite); and Group C (BMSCs-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite). TGF-β1 and other osteogenic phenotype markers of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and type I collagen in Group A were all significantly higher than the other two groups ex vivo. In vivo, 15-mm long segmental rabbit bone defects were created and randomly implanted the aforementioned composites separately, and then fixed with plate-screws. The results demonstrated that the implants in Group A significantly accelerated bone regeneration compared with the other implants based on X-rays, histological and biomechanical examinations. Therefore, we conclude this novel peptide-modified and gene-activated biomimetic bone matrix of TGF-β1DNA-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n is a very promising scaffold biomaterial for accelerating bone regeneration. PMID:24115366

  18. Cytoskeletal disruption activates the DLK/JNK pathway, which promotes axonal regeneration and mimics a preconditioning injury

    PubMed Central

    Valakh, Vera; Frey, Erin; Babetto, Elisabetta; Walker, Lauren J; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Nerve injury can lead to axonal regeneration, axonal degeneration, and/or neuronal cell death. Remarkably, the MAP3K dual leucine zipper kinase, DLK, promotes each of these responses, suggesting that DLK is a sensor of axon injury. In Drosophila, mutations in proteins that stabilize the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons activate the DLK pathway, suggesting that DLK may be activated by cytoskeletal disruption. Here we test this model in mammalian sensory neurons. We find that pharmacological agents designed to disrupt either the actin or microtubule cytoskeleton activate the DLK pathway, and that activation is independent of calcium influx or induction of the axon degeneration program. Moreover, activation of the DLK pathway by targeting the cytoskeleton induces a pro-regenerative state, enhancing axon regeneration in response to a subsequent injury in a process akin to preconditioning. This highlights the potential utility of activating the DLK pathway as a method to improve axon regeneration. Moreover, DLK is required for these responses to cytoskeletal perturbations, suggesting that DLK functions as a key neuronal sensor of cytoskeletal damage. PMID:25726747

  19. Procyanidins Negatively Affect the Activity of the Phosphatases of Regenerating Liver

    PubMed Central

    Stadlbauer, Sven; Rios, Pablo; Ohmori, Ken; Suzuki, Keisuke; Köhn, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Natural polyphenols like oligomeric catechins (procyanidins) derived from green tea and herbal medicines are interesting compounds for pharmaceutical research due to their ability to protect against carcinogenesis in animal models. It is nevertheless still unclear how intracellular pathways are modulated by polyphenols. Monomeric polyphenols were shown to affect the activity of some protein phosphatases (PPs). The three phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs) are close relatives and promising therapeutic targets in cancer. In the present study we show that several procyanidins inhibit the activity of all three members of the PRL family in the low micromolar range, whereas monomeric epicatechins show weak inhibitory activity. Increasing the number of catechin units in procyanidins to more than three does not further enhance the potency. Remarkably, the tested procyanidins showed selectivity in vitro when compared to other PPs, and over 10-fold selectivity toward PRL-1 over PRL-2 and PRL-3. As PRL overexpression induces cell migration compared to control cells, the effect of procyanidins on this phenotype was studied. Treatment with procyanidin C2 led to a decrease in cell migration of PRL-1- and PRL-3-overexpressing cells, suggesting the compound-dependent inhibition of PRL-promoted cell migration. Treatment with procyanidin B3 led to selective suppression of PRL-1 overexpressing cells, thereby corroborating the selectivity toward PRL-1- over PRL-3 in vitro. Together, our results show that procyanidins negatively affect PRL activity, suggesting that PRLs could be targets in the polypharmacology of natural polyphenols. Furthermore, they are interesting candidates for the development of PRL-1 inhibitors due to their low cellular toxicity and the selectivity within the PRL family. PMID:26226290

  20. Embedding of magnetic nanoparticles in polycaprolactone nanofiber scaffolds to facilitate bone healing and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannarkat, Jacob T.; Battogtokh, Jugdersuren; Philip, John; Wilson, Otto C.; Mehl, Patrick M.

    2010-05-01

    Scaffolds used for tissue engineering are made to mimic natural surroundings of tissues, the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a large part in maintaining the structural integrity of the connective tissue. When producing a tissue in the laboratory, structural integrity of the cells is ensured only when a biomimetic ECM is present. Nanofibrous polymer fibers have been chosen for their resemblance to natural fibers of the ECM and their capability to provide the support necessary for cells to grow and differentiate into tissue. Polycaprolactone based nanofibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering have been fabricated through the electrospinning process. Electrospinning is a simple and cost-effective method for producing nanofibers which involves applying a high voltage to a falling polymer solution to form a fluid jet producing nanofibers. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been incorporated within the nanofibers by addition of MNPs to the polymer solution to increase the rate of bone cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Studies by Nomura and Takano-Yamamoto, [Matrix Biol. 19, 91 (2000)] demonstrated an increase in the expression levels of multiple genes in bone tissue including growth factors when shear stress was applied at the cellular level. MNPs are around 1-100 nm and exhibit superparamagnetism. These properties of MNPs allow for high noninvasive control over them using an external magnetic field. While under an ac (15 Hz, 1-6 Gauss) or pulsed magnetic fields, MNPs will induce low level mechanical stresses within the scaffold causing shear stresses at the cellular level of the preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells to stimulate their growth, proliferation, and differentiation.

  1. NT-3 promotes proprioceptive axon regeneration when combined with activation of the mTor intrinsic growth pathway but not with reduction of myelin extrinsic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingpeng; Kelamangalath, Lakshmi; Kim, Hyukmin; Han, Seung Baek; Tang, Xiaoqing; Zhai, Jinbin; Hong, Jee W; Lin, Shen; Son, Young-Jin; Smith, George M

    2016-09-01

    Although previous studies have identified several strategies to stimulate regeneration of CNS axons, extensive regeneration and functional recovery have remained a major challenge, particularly for large diameter myelinated axons. Within the CNS, myelin is thought to inhibit axon regeneration, while modulating activity of the mTOR pathway promotes regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we examined NT-3 mediated regeneration of sensory axons through the dorsal root entry zone in a triple knockout of myelin inhibitory proteins or after activation of mTOR using a constitutively active (ca) Rheb in DRG neurons to determine the influence of environmental inhibitory or activation of intrinsic growth pathways could enhance NT-3-mediate regeneration. Loss of myelin inhibitory proteins showed modest enhancement of sensory axon regeneration. In mTOR studies, we found a dramatic age related decrease in the mTOR activation as determined by phosphorylation of the downstream marker S6 ribosomal subunit. Expression of caRheb within adult DRG neurons in vitro increased S6 phosphorylation and doubled the overall length of neurite outgrowth, which was reversed in the presence of rapamycin. In adult female rats, combined expression of caRheb in DRG neurons and NT-3 within the spinal cord increased regeneration of sensory axons almost 3 fold when compared to NT-3 alone. Proprioceptive assessment using a grid runway indicates functionally significant regeneration of large-diameter myelinated sensory afferents. Our results indicate that caRheb-induced increase in mTOR activation enhances neurotrophin-3 induced regeneration of large-diameter myelinated axons. PMID:27264357

  2. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  3. Solar regeneration of powdered activated carbon impregnated with visible-light responsive photocatalyst: factors affecting performances and predictive model.

    PubMed

    Yap, Pow-Seng; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2012-06-01

    This study demonstrated a green technique to regenerate spent powdered activated carbon (AC) using solar photocatalysis. The AC was impregnated with a photocatalyst photoexcitable under visible-light irradiation to yield a solar regenerable composite, namely nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO(2)/AC). This composite exhibited bifunctional adsorptive-photocatalytic characteristics. Contaminants of emerging environmental concern, i.e. bisphenol-A (BPA), sulfamethazine (SMZ) and clofibric acid (CFA) which exhibited varying affinities for AC were chosen as target pollutants. The adsorption of BPA and SMZ by the N-TiO(2)/AC was significantly higher than that of CFA. The performance of solar photocatalytic regeneration (SPR) of the spent N-TiO(2)/AC composite generally increased with light intensity, N-TiO(2) loading and temperature. The regeneration efficiency (RE) for CFA-loaded spent composite was the highest compared to the other pollutant-loaded spent composites, achieving 77% within 8h of solar irradiation (765 W m(-2)). The rate-limiting process was pollutant desorption from the interior AC sorption sites. A kinetic model was developed to predict the transient concentration of the sorbate remaining in the spent composite during SPR. Comparison studies using solvent extraction technique indicated a different order of RE for the three pollutants, attributable to their varying solubilities in the aqueous and organic solvents. PMID:22464146

  4. A dynamic epicardial injury response supports progenitor cell activity during zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lepilina, Alexandra; Coon, Ashley N; Kikuchi, Kazu; Holdway, Jennifer E; Roberts, Richard W; Burns, C Geoffrey; Poss, Kenneth D

    2006-11-01

    Zebrafish possess a unique yet poorly understood capacity for cardiac regeneration. Here, we show that regeneration proceeds through two coordinated stages following resection of the ventricular apex. First a blastema is formed, comprised of progenitor cells that express precardiac markers, undergo differentiation, and proliferate. Second, epicardial tissue surrounding both cardiac chambers induces developmental markers and rapidly expands, creating a new epithelial cover for the exposed myocardium. A subpopulation of these epicardial cells undergoes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invades the wound, and provides new vasculature to regenerating muscle. During regeneration, the ligand fgf17b is induced in myocardium, while receptors fgfr2 and fgfr4 are induced in adjacent epicardial-derived cells. When fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) signaling is experimentally blocked by expression of a dominant-negative Fgf receptor, epicardial EMT and coronary neovascularization fail, prematurely arresting regeneration. Our findings reveal injury responses by myocardial and epicardial tissues that collaborate in an Fgf-dependent manner to achieve cardiac regeneration. PMID:17081981

  5. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  6. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of regeneration/degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sig Hwang, Min; Perrin, George; Muir, David; Mareci, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging was performed to investigate myelination and demyelination spatiotemporally in cut or crushed excised rat sciatic nerves in a 17.6 T magnet with a solenoid RF coil. Orientation independent measures of water diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and averaged diffusivity (), were examined as MR parameters for the quantification of the myelin within the major peripheral nerve. Crushed nerves initially demonstrated decreased FA, followed by increase to FA of normal nerve with time. At 14 days post injury, FA of the nerve is high, 0.85, at the site proximal to the injury then FA decreases in a proximodistal gradient because the nerve remains more demyelinated toward the distal area. Cut sciatic nerves displayed a prolonged decrease of FA with time after injury. Also FA correlates with in these nerves. Therefore FA or may be a good indicator of myelination and demyelination in rat sciatic nerves and FA appears to be a more sensitive indicator of myelin.

  7. The Magnetic Origins of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The defining physical property of the Sun's corona is that the magnetic field dominates the plasma. This property is the genesis for all solar activity ranging from quasi-steady coronal loops to the giant magnetic explosions observed as coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares. The coronal magnetic field is also the fundamental driver of all space weather; consequently, understanding the structure and dynamics of the field, especially its free energy, has long been a central objective in Heliophysics. The main obstacle to achieving this understanding has been the lack of accurate direct measurements of the coronal field. Most attempts to determine the magnetic free energy have relied on extrapolation of photospheric measurements, a notoriously unreliable procedure. In this presentation I will discuss what measurements of the coronal field would be most effective for understanding solar activity. Not surprisingly, the key process for driving solar activity is magnetic reconnection. I will discuss, therefore, how next-generation measurements of the coronal field will allow us to understand not only the origins of space weather, but also one of the most important fundamental processes in cosmic and laboratory plasmas.

  8. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  9. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  10. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  11. Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2012-02-28

    A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

  12. Silicon Promotes Adventitious Shoot Regeneration and Enhances Salinity Tolerance of Ajuga multiflora Bunge by Altering Activity of Antioxidant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Si concentration on shoot regeneration and salinity tolerance of Ajuga multiflora. Addition of Si to the shoot induction medium significantly increased the frequency of shoot induction. The average number of shoots regenerated per explant decreased on the medium containing NaCl alone, while there was less decrease when the shoot induction medium was supplemented with both NaCl and Si. The shoot induction percentage increased linearly with increasing concentration of Si in the NaCl containing medium. Addition of Si to the shoot induction medium significantly increased SOD, POD, APX, and CAT activity in regenerated shoot buds as compared with the control. The inclusion of Si to the NaCl containing medium significantly increased the SOD activity in leaves and roots, while it decreased POD, APX, and CAT activity in both organs. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed that there are no distinct differences in the structure of stomata between the control and Si-treated plants. However, NaCl treatment significantly affected the structure and number of stomata as compared to the control. Wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the high Si deposition in trichomes of plants grown in the Si containing medium but not in plants grown in the medium without Si. PMID:24526904

  13. MICROFLARE ACTIVITY DRIVEN BY FORCED MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Crockett, P. J.; Keenan, F. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2010-03-20

    High cadence, multiwavelength, optical observations of a solar active region, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Two magnetic bright points are seen to separate in opposite directions at a constant velocity of 2.8 km s{sup -1}. After a separation distance of {approx}4400 km is reached, multiple Ellerman bombs are observed in both H{alpha} and Ca-K images. As a result of the Ellerman bombs, periodic velocity perturbations in the vicinity of the magnetic neutral line, derived from simultaneous Michelson Doppler Imager data, are generated with amplitude {+-}6 km s{sup -1} and wavelength {approx}1000 km. The velocity oscillations are followed by an impulsive brightening visible in H{alpha} and Ca-K, with a peak intensity enhancement of 63%. We interpret these velocity perturbations as the magnetic field deformation necessary to trigger forced reconnection. A time delay of {approx}3 minutes between the H{alpha}-wing and Ca-K observations indicates that the observed magnetic reconnection occurs at a height of {approx}200 km above the solar surface. These observations are consistent with theoretical predictions and provide the first observational evidence of microflare activity driven by forced magnetic reconnection.

  14. Magnetic Hydroxyapatite Bone Substitutes to Enhance Tissue Regeneration: Evaluation In Vitro Using Osteoblast-Like Cells and In Vivo in a Bone Defect

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Cunha, Carla; D'Alessandro, Teresa; Sandri, Monica; Russo, Alessandro; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Marcacci, Maurilio; Hung, Clark T.; Tampieri, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In case of degenerative disease or lesion, bone tissue replacement and regeneration is an important clinical goal. In particular, nowadays, critical size defects rely on the engineering of scaffolds that are 3D structural supports, allowing cellular infiltration and subsequent integration with the native tissue. Several ceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds with high porosity and good osteointegration have been developed in the past few decades but they have not solved completely the problems related to bone defects. In the present study we have developed a novel porous ceramic composite made of HA that incorporates magnetite at three different ratios: HA/Mgn 95/5, HA/Mgn 90/10 and HA/Mgn 50/50. The scaffolds, consolidated by sintering at high temperature in a controlled atmosphere, have been analysed in vitro using human osteoblast-like cells. Results indicate high biocompatibility, similar to a commercially available HA bone graft, with no negative effects arising from the presence of magnetite or by the use of a static magnetic field. HA/Mgn 90/10 was shown to enhance cell proliferation at the early stage. Moreover, it has been implanted in vivo in a critical size lesion of the rabbit condyle and a good level of histocompatibility was observed. Such results identify this scaffold as particularly relevant for bone tissue regeneration and open new perspectives for the application of a magnetic field in a clinical setting of bone replacement, either for magnetic scaffold fixation or magnetic drug delivery. PMID:22685602

  15. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration. PMID:25609845

  16. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  17. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  18. Activation of the unfolded protein response promotes axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Maritza; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Martínez, Gabriela; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Kerr, Bredford; Hetz, Claudio; Court, Felipe A

    2016-01-01

    Although protein-folding stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a driver of neuronal dysfunction in models of spinal cord injury and neurodegeneration, the contribution of this pathway to peripheral nerve damage remains poorly explored. Here we targeted the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction against ER stress, in mouse models of sciatic nerve injury and found that ablation of the transcription factor XBP1, but not ATF4, significantly delay locomotor recovery. XBP1 deficiency led to decreased macrophage recruitment, a reduction in myelin removal and axonal regeneration. Conversely, overexpression of XBP1s in the nervous system in transgenic mice enhanced locomotor recovery after sciatic nerve crush, associated to an improvement in key pro-regenerative events. To assess the therapeutic potential of UPR manipulation to axonal regeneration, we locally delivered XBP1s or an shRNA targeting this transcription factor to sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia using a gene therapy approach and found an enhancement or reduction of axonal regeneration in vivo, respectively. Our results demonstrate a functional role of specific components of the ER proteostasis network in the cellular changes associated to regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26906090

  19. Transit-Amplifying Cells Orchestrate Stem Cell Activity and Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Li, Lishi; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transit-amplifying cells (TACs) are an early intermediate in tissue regeneration. Here, using hair follicles (HFs) as paradigm, we show that emerging TACs constitute a signaling center that orchestrates tissue growth. While primed stem cells (SCs) generate TACs, quiescent-SCs only proliferate after TACs form and begin expressing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). TAC generation is independent of autocrine SHH, but their pool wanes if they can’t produce it. We trace this paradox to two direct actions of SHH: promoting quiescent-SC proliferation and regulating dermal factors that stoke TAC expansion. Ingrained within quiescent-SC’s special sensitivity to SHH signaling is their high expression of GAS1. Without sufficient input from quiescent-SCs, replenishment of primed-SCs for the next hair cycle is compromised, delaying regeneration and eventually leading to regeneration failure. Our findings unveil TACs as transient but indispensable integrator of SC niche components and reveal an intriguing interdependency of primed and quiescent SC populations on tissue regeneration. PMID:24813615

  20. Activation of the unfolded protein response promotes axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Oñate, Maritza; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Martínez, Gabriela; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Kerr, Bredford; Hetz, Claudio; Court, Felipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Although protein-folding stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a driver of neuronal dysfunction in models of spinal cord injury and neurodegeneration, the contribution of this pathway to peripheral nerve damage remains poorly explored. Here we targeted the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction against ER stress, in mouse models of sciatic nerve injury and found that ablation of the transcription factor XBP1, but not ATF4, significantly delay locomotor recovery. XBP1 deficiency led to decreased macrophage recruitment, a reduction in myelin removal and axonal regeneration. Conversely, overexpression of XBP1s in the nervous system in transgenic mice enhanced locomotor recovery after sciatic nerve crush, associated to an improvement in key pro-regenerative events. To assess the therapeutic potential of UPR manipulation to axonal regeneration, we locally delivered XBP1s or an shRNA targeting this transcription factor to sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia using a gene therapy approach and found an enhancement or reduction of axonal regeneration in vivo, respectively. Our results demonstrate a functional role of specific components of the ER proteostasis network in the cellular changes associated to regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26906090

  1. Plant Thioredoxin CDSP32 Regenerates 1-Cys Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B Activity through the Direct Reduction of Sulfenic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Tarrago, Lionel; Laugier, Edith; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H.; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Rey, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous enzymes catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds, thanks to a CXXC active site. Among their substrates, 2-Cys methionine sulfoxide reductases B (2-Cys MSRBs) reduce the R diastereoisomer of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) and possess two redox-active Cys as follows: a catalytic Cys reducing MetSO and a resolving one, involved in disulfide bridge formation. The other MSRB type, 1-Cys MSRBs, possesses only the catalytic Cys, and their regeneration mechanisms by Trxs remain unclear. The plant plastidial Trx CDSP32 is able to provide 1-Cys MSRB with electrons. CDSP32 includes two Trx modules with one potential active site 219CGPC222 and three extra Cys. Here, we investigated the redox properties of recombinant Arabidopsis CDSP32 and delineated the biochemical mechanisms of MSRB regeneration by CDSP32. Free thiol titration and 4-acetamido-4′-maleimidyldistilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid alkylation assays indicated that the Trx possesses only two redox-active Cys, very likely the Cys219 and Cys222. Protein electrophoresis analyses coupled to mass spectrometry revealed that CDSP32 forms a heterodimeric complex with MSRB1 via reduction of the sulfenic acid formed on MSRB1 catalytic Cys after MetSO reduction. MSR activity assays using variable CDSP32 amounts revealed that MSRB1 reduction proceeds with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and redox titrations indicated that CDSP32 and MSRB1 possess midpoints potentials of −337 and −328 mV at pH 7.9, respectively, indicating that regeneration of MSRB1 activity by the Trx through sulfenic acid reduction is thermodynamically feasible in physiological conditions. PMID:20236937

  2. MASC: Magnetic Activity of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Fineschi, Silvano; Gan, Weiqun; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Zhukov, Andrei; Parenti, Susanna; Li, Hui; Romoli, Marco

    We present MASC, an innovative payload designed to explore the magnetic activity of the solar corona. It is composed of three complementary instruments: a Hard-X-ray spectrometer, a UV / EUV imager, and a Visible Light / UV polarimetric coronagraph able to measure the coronal magnetic field. The solar corona is structured in magnetically closed and open structures from which slow and fast solar winds are respectively released. In spite of much progress brought by two decades of almost uninterrupted observations from several space missions, the sources and acceleration mechanisms of both types are still not understood. This continuous expansion of the solar atmosphere is disturbed by sporadic but frequent and violent events. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale massive eruptions of magnetic structures out of the corona, while solar flares trace the sudden heating of coronal plasma and the acceleration of electrons and ions to high, sometimes relativistic, energies. Both phenomena are most probably driven by instabilities of the magnetic field in the corona. The relations between flares and CMEs are still not understood in terms of initiation and energy partition between large-scale motions, small-scale heating and particle acceleration. The initiation is probably related to magnetic reconnection which itself results magnetic topological changes due to e.g. flux emergence, footpoints motions, etc. Acceleration and heating are also strongly coupled since the atmospheric heating is thought to result from the impact of accelerated particles. The measurement of both physical processes and their outputs is consequently of major importance. However, despite its fundamental importance as a driver for the physics of the Sun and of the heliosphere, the magnetic field of our star’s outer atmosphere remains poorly understood. This is due in large part to the fact that the magnetic field is a very difficult quantity to measure. Our knowledge of its strength and

  3. Magnetic field associated with active electrochemical corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Afshin

    The purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the underlying sources of the magnetic field associated with ongoing electrochemical corrosion, to investigate the spatio-temporal information content of the corrosion magnetic field, and to evaluate its potential utility in non-invasive quantification of hidden corrosion. The importance of this work lies in the fact that conventional electrochemical instruments and techniques are not well suited for non-invasive measurements of the rate and dynamics of corrosion in occluded regions such as in aircraft lap joints. With the increase in the number of aging engineered systems there is an increasing demand for more accurate corrosion predictive models that can improve the probability of detection of corrosion induced flaws in structures, and hence reduce the risk of catastrophic failures. Therefore, such rate information is of great importance to the corrosion community. At the present time, there are no other techniques capable of providing such information. This work is the first successful attempt at quantification of the rate of corrosion through non- invasive measurements of its associated magnetic field. It includes the development of appropriate experimental techniques and associated models. Herein we have reviewed previous experiments, explored various exposure conditions and sample geometries, and discussed appropriate experimental procedures. We have defined quantitative magnetic parameters and, in conjunction with mass loss calibration measurements, have used them to determine non-invasively the rate and dynamics of ongoing hidden corrosion. We conclude that the corrosion magnetic field contains spatial and temporal information that correlate with the distribution, magnitude, and time course of currents associated with electrochemical corrosion. In conjunction with appropriate calibration experiments, sample geometry, and experimental topology, the magnetic activity of a corroding sample can be

  4. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  5. [Dynamics of terminal plaque structure during changes in the impulse activity of sensory endings in the process of their regeneration].

    PubMed

    Zamuraev, I N; Khonny, O A

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in terminal plates of frog's urinary bladder sensory free visceroceptors during their posttraumatic regeneration was studied. It was shown that during the time period from two months to one year the terminal plate number in receptor bush increased, while their average dimensions decreased and their shape changed. No correlations between the changes of afferent impulse activity and these morphological transformations were found. The data obtained suggest that terminal plates do not seem to participate in the generation of bioelectric activity, but rather appear to be the growth cones of non-myelinated terminal and thus are involved in repair processes. PMID:12108103

  6. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  7. Activation of two distinct Sox9-EGFP-expressing intestinal stem cell populations during crypt regeneration after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M. Agostina; Krebs, Adrienne E.; Mah, Amanda T.; Dehmer, Jeffrey J.; Gracz, Adam D.; Scull, Brooks P.; McNaughton, Kirk; Magness, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent identification of intestinal epithelial stem cell (ISC) markers and development of ISC reporter mice permit visualization and isolation of regenerating ISCs after radiation to define their functional and molecular phenotypes. Previous studies in uninjured intestine of Sox9-EGFP reporter mice demonstrate that ISCs express low levels of Sox9-EGFP (Sox9-EGFP Low), whereas enteroendocrine cells (EEC) express high levels of Sox9-EGFP (Sox9-EGFP High). We hypothesized that Sox9-EGFP Low ISCs would expand after radiation, exhibit enhanced proliferative capacities, and adopt a distinct gene expression profile associated with rapid proliferation. Sox9-EGFP mice were given 14 Gy abdominal radiation and studied between days 3 and 9 postradiation. Radiation-induced changes in number, growth, and transcriptome of the different Sox9-EGFP cell populations were determined by histology, flow cytometry, in vitro culture assays, and microarray. Microarray confirmed that nonirradiated Sox9-EGFP Low cells are enriched for Lgr5 mRNA and mRNAs enriched in Lgr5-ISCs and identified additional putative ISC markers. Sox9-EGFP High cells were enriched for EEC markers, as well as Bmi1 and Hopx, which are putative markers of quiescent ISCs. Irradiation caused complete crypt loss, followed by expansion and hyperproliferation of Sox9-EGFP Low cells. From nonirradiated intestine, only Sox9-EGFP Low cells exhibited ISC characteristics of forming organoids in culture, whereas during regeneration both Sox9-EGFP Low and High cells formed organoids. Microarray demonstrated that regenerating Sox9-EGFP High cells exhibited transcriptomic changes linked to p53-signaling and ISC-like functions including DNA repair and reduced oxidative metabolism. These findings support a model in which Sox9-EGFP Low cells represent active ISCs, Sox9-EGFP High cells contain radiation-activatable cells with ISC characteristics, and both participate in crypt regeneration. PMID:22361729

  8. Promotion of axon regeneration and inhibition of astrocyte activation by alpha A-crystallin on crushed optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei-Yang; Liu, Xiao; Gu, Xian-Liang; Ying, Xi; Wu, Nan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effects of αA-crystallin in astrocyte gliosis after optic nerve crush (ONC) and the mechanism of α-crystallin in neuroprotection and axon regeneration. METHODS ONC was established on the Sprague-Dawley rat model and αA-crystallin (10−4 g/L, 4 µL) was intravitreously injected into the rat model. Flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) was examined 14d after ONC, and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the retina and crush site were analyzed 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14d after ONC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot respectively. The levels of beta Tubulin (TUJ1), growth-associated membrane phosphoprotein-43 (GAP-43), chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and neurocan were also determined by IHC 14d after ONC. RESULTS GFAP level in the retina and the optic nerve significantly increased 1d after ONC, and reached the peak level 7d post-ONC. Injection of αA-crystallin significantly decreased GFAP level in both the retina and the crush site 3d after ONC, and induced astrocytes architecture remodeling at the crush site. Quantification of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons indicated αA-crystallin markedly promoted axon regeneration in ONC rats and enhanced the regenerated axons penetrated into the glial scar. CSPGs and neurocan expression also decreased 14d after αA-crystallin injection. The amplitude (N1-P1) and latency (P1) of F-VEP were also restored. CONCLUSION Our results suggest α-crystallin promotes the axon regeneration of RGCs and suppresses the activation of astrocytes. PMID:27500100

  9. Gastric activity studies using a magnetic tracer.

    PubMed

    Cordova-Fraga, T; Bernal-Alvarado, J J; Gutierrez-Juarez, G; Sosa, M; Vargas-Luna, M

    2004-10-01

    A magnetic pulse generator has been set up in order to study gastric activity. Two coils 1.05 m in diameter, arranged in a Helmholtz configuration, were used. The system generated magnetic field pulses higher than 15 mT, of duration 17.3+/-1.2 ms. Measurements were performed in 11 male volunteers, with average age 29.3+/-6.4 years and body mass index 26.0+/-4.8 kg m(-2). Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with diameters from 75 to 125 microm were used as magnetic tracers, which were mixed in 250 ml of yogurt in concentrations from 2 to 5 g. Signals were registered by using a high speed 3 axis fluxgate digital magnetometer and processed to determine the relaxation of the magnetic tracers by fitting a first-order exponential function to the data, a mean relaxation constant K = 116+/-40 s(-1) was obtained. Also, an average gastric peristaltic frequency was measured; a value of 3.2+/-0.3 cpm was determined. PMID:15535190

  10. Transiently Active Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Is Not Required but Must Be Silenced for Stem Cell Function during Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Malea M.; Keefe, Alexandra C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Flygare, Steven D.; Yandell, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adult muscle’s exceptional capacity for regeneration is mediated by muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. As with many stem cells, Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been proposed to be critical in satellite cells during regeneration. Using new genetic reagents, we explicitly test in vivo whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary and sufficient within satellite cells and their derivatives for regeneration. We find that signaling is transiently active in transit-amplifying myoblasts, but is not required for regeneration or satellite cell self-renewal. Instead, downregulation of transiently activated β-catenin is important to limit the regenerative response, as continuous regeneration is deleterious. Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult satellite cells may simply be a vestige of their developmental lineage, in which β-catenin signaling is critical for fetal myogenesis. In the adult, surprisingly, we show that it is not activation but rather silencing of Wnt/β-catenin signaling that is important for muscle regeneration. PMID:25241745

  11. Magnetic field calculation and measurement of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Bearings are typical devices in which electric energy and mechanical energy convert mutually. Magnetic Field indicates the relationship between 2 of the most important parameters in a magnetic bearing - current and force. This paper presents calculation and measurement of the magnetic field distribution of a self-designed magnetic bearing. Firstly, the static Maxwell's equations of the magnetic bearing are presented and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is found to solve the equations and get post-process results by means of ANSYS software. Secondly, to confirm the calculation results a Lakeshore460 3-channel Gaussmeter is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic bearing in X, Y, Z directions accurately. According to the measurement data the author constructs a 3D magnetic field distribution digital model by means of MATLAB software. Thirdly, the calculation results and the measurement data are compared and analyzed; the comparing result indicates that the calculation results are consistent with the measurement data in allowable dimension variation, which means that the FEA calculation method of the magnetic bearing has high precision. Finally, it is concluded that the magnetic field calculation and measurement can accurately reflect the real magnetic distribution in the magnetic bearing and the result can guide the design and analysis of the magnetic bearing effectively.

  12. Electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for regeneration of a spent activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Drouiche, N; Grib, H; Abdi, N; Lounici, H; Pauss, A; Mameri, N

    2009-10-15

    The main purpose of the present work was to develop a treatment method to regenerate granular adsorbent beds saturated with H(2)S by utilizing three electrodialysis compartments equipped with a cation or an anion exchange membrane or a bipolar membrane. Three electrodialysis compartments were utilized under various experimental parameters to determine the optimum conditions for the recovery of column particles saturated by H(2)S. The desulphurization operation is achieved with the extent of extraction close to 90% and an electric current density of about 30%. Use of the bipolar membrane makes it possible to regenerate the saturated adsorbent granules without adding chemical products. Since the only reagent was electricity, the projected economics are very attractive. PMID:19473766

  13. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  14. Incorporation of human growth hormone-2 into proteoliposome enhances tissue regeneration with anti-oxidant and anti-senescence activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Hee; Lee, Eun-Young; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Human growth hormone-2 (GH-2) is a 191-amino-acid protein also known as human placental hormone. During pregnancy, continuous secretion of GH-2 appears to have important implications for physiological adjustment to gestation, especially in controlling levels of maternal insulin-like growth factor 1. To compare the physiological activity of GH-2 between lipid-free and lipid-bound states, GH-2 was expressed and incorporated into proteoliposome. GH-2 was expressed and purified using a pET28(a)-GH-2 vector in an Escherichia coli system. Purified GH-2 was then characterized and synthesized into reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL). The expression yield of GH-2 was 20-30 mg by BL21 (DE3) cells in 1 liter of Luria-Bertani broth. Purified GH-2 of at least 98% purity (23 kDa) was incorporated into rHDL with human apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) and palmitoyloleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) at a 1:1:95 (GH-2:ApoA-I:POPC) molar ratio. Structural analysis revealed that GH-2 had a 44% α-helix content and a wavelength maximum fluorescence (WMF) of 349 nm in a lipid-free state. In a lipid-bound state, the WMF of GH-2 was ∼4 nm blue-shifted (345 nm), with 50% of α-helix content. The lipid-bound GH-2 showed enhanced anti-atherosclerotic activity and anti-senescence activity with inhibition of fructose-mediated glycation. A fin regeneration experiment using zebrafish (17 weeks old, n=9) showed that lipid-bound GH-2 enhanced regeneration efficiency by 44% compared to native GH-2 (in the lipid-free state) without any notable side effects. GH-2 has anti-oxidant activity to enhance tissue regeneration as well as to exert anti-diabetic activity. Incorporation of GH-2 into rHDL can enhance structural stability and tissue regeneration efficiency in vertebrate models, indicating a synergetic effect between GH-2 and ApoA-I in rHDL. PMID:25400020

  15. Destruction of problematic airborne contaminants by hydrogen reduction using a Catalytically Active, Regenerable Sorbent (CARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, John O.; Akse, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermally regenerable sorbent beds were demonstrated to be a highly efficient means for removal of toxic airborne trace organic contaminants aboard spacecraft. The utilization of the intrinsic weight savings available through this technology was not realized since many of the contaminants desorbed during thermal regeneration are poisons to the catalytic oxidizer or form highly toxic oxidation by-products in the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS). Included in this class of compounds are nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and halogen containing organics. The catalytic reduction of these problematic contaminants using hydrogen at low temperatures (200-300 C) offers an attractive route for their destruction since the by-products of such reactions, hydrocarbons and inorganic gases, are easily removed by existing technology. In addition, the catalytic oxidizer can be operated more efficiently due to the absence of potential poisons, and any posttreatment beds can be reduced in size. The incorporation of the catalyst within the sorbent bed further improves the system's efficiency. The demonstration of this technology provides the basis for an efficient regenerable TCCS for future NASA missions and can be used in more conventional settings to efficiently remove environmental pollutants.

  16. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Kevin R.; Nozu, Kandai; Lanier, Stephen M.; Blumer, Joe B.; Avner, Ellis D.; Sweeney, William E.; Park, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms underlying renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and tubular repair following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remain poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an unconventional receptor-independent regulator of heterotrimeric G-protein function, influences renal tubular regeneration following IRI. In rat kidneys exposed to IRI, there was a temporal induction in renal AGS3 protein expression that peaked 72 h after reperfusion and corresponded to the repair and recovery phase following ischemic injury. Renal AGS3 expression was localized predominantly to the recovering outer medullary proximal tubular cells and was highly coexpressed with Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Kidneys from mice deficient in the expression of AGS3 exhibited impaired renal tubular recovery 7 d following IRI compared to wild-type AGS3-expressing mice. Mechanistically, genetic knockdown of endogenous AGS3 mRNA and protein in renal tubular epithelial cells reduced cell proliferation in vitro. Similar reductions in renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation were observed following incubation with gallein, a selective inhibitor of Gβγ subunit activity, and lentiviral overexpression of the carboxyl-terminus of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2ct), a scavenger of Gβγ subunits. In summary, these data suggest that AGS3 acts through a novel receptor-independent mechanism to facilitate renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and renal tubular regeneration.—Regner, K. R., Nozu, K., Lanier, S. M., Blumer, J. B., Avner, E. D., Sweeney, Jr., W. E., Park, F. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents. PMID:21343176

  17. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  18. Activation of Pax7-positive cells in a non-contractile tissue contributes to regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christopher M; Martindale, Mark Q; Tapscott, Stephen J; Unguez, Graciela A

    2012-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues is shared across many metazoan taxa, yet the type and extent to which multiple cellular mechanisms come into play can differ across species. For example, urodele amphibians can completely regenerate all lost tissues, including skeletal muscles after limb amputation. This remarkable ability of urodeles to restore entire limbs has been largely linked to a dedifferentiation-dependent mechanism of regeneration. However, whether cell dedifferentiation is the fundamental factor that triggers a robust regeneration capacity, and whether the loss or inhibition of this process explains the limited regeneration potential in other vertebrates is not known. Here, we studied the cellular mechanisms underlying the repetitive regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus. Our in vivo microinjection studies of high molecular weight cell lineage tracers into single identified adult myogenic cells (muscle or noncontractile muscle-derived electrocytes) revealed no fragmentation or cellularization proximal to the amputation plane. In contrast, ultrastructural and immunolabeling studies verified the presence of myogenic stem cells that express the satellite cell marker Pax7 in mature muscle fibers and electrocytes of S. macrurus. These data provide the first example of Pax-7 positive muscle stem cells localized within a non-contractile electrogenic tissue. Moreover, upon amputation, Pax-7 positive cells underwent a robust replication and were detected exclusively in regions that give rise to myogenic cells and dorsal spinal cord components revealing a regeneration process in S. macrurus that is dependent on the activation of myogenic stem cells for the renewal of both skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. These data are consistent with the emergent concept in vertebrate regeneration that different tissues provide a distinct progenitor cell population to the regeneration blastema, and these progenitor cells

  19. Involvement of nitric oxide through endocannabinoids release in microglia activation during the course of CNS regeneration in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Arafah, Karim; Croix, Dominique; Vizioli, Jacopo; Desmons, Annie; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The medicinal leech is notable for its capacity to regenerate its central nervous system (CNS) following mechanical trauma. Using an electrochemical nitric oxide (NO)-selective electrode to measure NO levels, we found that the time course of NO release in the injured leech CNS is partially under the control of endocannabinoids, namely, N-arachidonyl ethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG). Relative quantification of these endocannabinoids was performed by stable isotope dilution (2AGd8 and AAEd8) coupled to mass spectrometry in course of regeneration process or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) treatment. Data show that 2-AG levels rose to a maximum about 30 min after injury or ATP treatment, and returned to baseline levels 4 h after injury. In same conditions, AEA levels also rapidly (within 5 min) dropped after injury or ATP treatment to the nerve cord, but did not fully return to baseline levels within 4 h of injury. In correlation with these data, chemoattraction activities of endocannabinoids on isolated leech microglial cells have been shown in vitro and in vivo reflecting that control over NO production is accompanied by the controlled chemoattraction of microglia directed from the periphery to the lesion site for neuronal repair purposes. Taken together, our results show that in the leech, after injury concurrent with ATP production, purinergic receptor activation, NO production, microglia recruitment, and accumulation to lesion site, a fine imbalance occurs in the endocannabinoid system. These events can bring explanations about the ability of the leech CNS to regenerate after a trauma and the key role of endocannabinoids in this phenomenon. PMID:23355252

  20. Magnetically-controllable optical multi-stability in magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings with potential applications to multi-level all-optical regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qing-Yao; Wu, Bao-Jian; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Starting with the nonlinear coupled-mode equations of guided optical waves in the magneto-optic fiber Bragg grating (MFBG), the amplitude transfer curve of the transmitted light is numerically calculated for the incident right-circularly polarized wave, and the multi-stability is analyzed by introducing the parameter of jitter suppression. It is shown that, (i) the performance of amplitude jitter suppression in the stable states of high level is better than that of low level; (ii) the jitter suppression in the multi-stable regions can be enhanced when the magnetic field is applied to the MFBG in the opposite direction of the incident wave; and (iii) by adjusting the applied magnetic field, the multi-stable levels can be tuned flexibly, which is helpful for developing the intelligent all-optical devices for multilevel regeneration.

  1. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  2. Towards the Design of 3D Fiber-Deposited Poly(ε-caprolactone)/lron-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposite Magnetic Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberta; Russo, Alessandro; Gloria, Antonio; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Panseri, Silvia; Sandri, Monica; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio; Dediu, Valentin A; Wilde, Colin J; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    In the past few years, researchers have focused on the design and development of three-dimensional (3D) advanced scaffolds, which offer significant advantages in terms of cell performance. The introduction of magnetic features into scaffold technology could offer innovative opportunities to control cell populations within 3D microenvironments, with the potential to enhance their use in tissue regeneration or in cell-based analysis. In the present study, 3D fully biodegradable and magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, consisting of a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) matrix reinforced with iron-doped hydroxyapatite (FeHA) nanoparticles, were designed and manufactured using a rapid prototyping technique. The performances of these novel 3D PCL/FeHA scaffolds were assessed through a combination of theoretical evaluation, experimental in vitro analyses and in vivo testing in a rabbit animal model. The results from mechanical com- pression tests were consistent with FEM simulations. The in vitro results showed that the cell growth in the magnetized scaffolds was 2.2-fold greater than that in non-magnetized ones. In vivo experiments further suggested that, after only 4 weeks, the PCL/FeHA scaffolds were completely filled with newly formed bone, proving a good level of histocompatibility. All of the results suggest that the introduction of magnetic features into biocompatible materials may confer significant advantages in terms of 3D cell assembly. PMID:26307846

  3. Molybdenum carbides, active and in situ regenerable catalysts in hydroprocessing of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Zacher, Alan; Wang, Huamin; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Schwartz, Viviane; Soykal, I. Ilgaz

    2016-05-19

    This paper describes properties of molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60 h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oilsmore » below 2 wt % and 0.01 mg KOH g–1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60 h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are a good catalyst candidate which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. Furthermore, we highlight areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure–function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.« less

  4. Changing Paradigms in Cranio-Facial Regeneration: Current and New Strategies for the Activation of Endogenous Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mele, Luigi; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Tirino, Virginia; Paino, Francesca; De Rosa, Alfredo; Liccardo, Davide; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Desiderio, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial area represent a unique district of human body characterized by a very high complexity of tissues, innervation and vascularization, and being deputed to many fundamental function such as eating, speech, expression of emotions, delivery of sensations such as taste, sight, and earing. For this reasons, tissue loss in this area following trauma or for example oncologic resection, have a tremendous impact on patients' quality of life. In the last 20 years regenerative medicine has emerged as one of the most promising approach to solve problem related to trauma, tissue loss, organ failure etc. One of the most powerful tools to be used for tissue regeneration is represented by stem cells, which have been successfully implanted in different tissue/organs with exciting results. Nevertheless, both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation raise many practical and ethical concerns that make this approach very difficult to apply in clinical practice. For this reason different cell free approaches have been developed aiming to the mobilization, recruitment, and activation of endogenous stem cells into the injury site avoiding exogenous cells implant but instead stimulating patients' own stem cells to repair the lesion. To this aim many strategies have been used including functionalized bioscaffold, controlled release of stem cell chemoattractants, growth factors, BMPs, Platelet-Rich-Plasma, and other new strategies such as ultrasound wave and laser are just being proposed. Here we review all the current and new strategies used for activation and mobilization of endogenous stem cells in the regeneration of craniofacial tissue. PMID:26941656

  5. Changing Paradigms in Cranio-Facial Regeneration: Current and New Strategies for the Activation of Endogenous Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Luigi; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Tirino, Virginia; Paino, Francesca; De Rosa, Alfredo; Liccardo, Davide; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Desiderio, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial area represent a unique district of human body characterized by a very high complexity of tissues, innervation and vascularization, and being deputed to many fundamental function such as eating, speech, expression of emotions, delivery of sensations such as taste, sight, and earing. For this reasons, tissue loss in this area following trauma or for example oncologic resection, have a tremendous impact on patients' quality of life. In the last 20 years regenerative medicine has emerged as one of the most promising approach to solve problem related to trauma, tissue loss, organ failure etc. One of the most powerful tools to be used for tissue regeneration is represented by stem cells, which have been successfully implanted in different tissue/organs with exciting results. Nevertheless, both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation raise many practical and ethical concerns that make this approach very difficult to apply in clinical practice. For this reason different cell free approaches have been developed aiming to the mobilization, recruitment, and activation of endogenous stem cells into the injury site avoiding exogenous cells implant but instead stimulating patients' own stem cells to repair the lesion. To this aim many strategies have been used including functionalized bioscaffold, controlled release of stem cell chemoattractants, growth factors, BMPs, Platelet–Rich-Plasma, and other new strategies such as ultrasound wave and laser are just being proposed. Here we review all the current and new strategies used for activation and mobilization of endogenous stem cells in the regeneration of craniofacial tissue. PMID:26941656

  6. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous

  7. Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity: On Grand Minima in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcintosh, Scott; Leamon, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magnetism, perhaps even indicators of a significant downward trend, over recent decades. Are we entering a minimum in solar activity that is deeper and longer than a typical solar minimum, a "grand minimum"? How could we tell if we are? What is a grand minimum and how does the Sun recover? These are very pertinent questions for modern civilization. In this paper we present a hypothetical demonstration of entry and exit from grand minimum conditions based on a recent analysis of solar features over the past 20 years and their possible connection to the origins of the 11(-ish) year solar activity cycle.

  8. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  9. Activity estimation in radioimmunotherapy using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hossein; Johari Daha, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of activity accumulated in tumor and organs is very important in predicting the response of radiopharmaceuticals treatment. In this study, we synthesized 177Lutetium (177Lu)-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles as a double radiopharmaceutical agent for treatment and better estimation of organ activity in a new way by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and all the quality control tests such as labeling yield, nanoparticle size determination, stability in buffer and blood serum up to 4 d, immunoreactivity and biodistribution in normal mice were determined. In mice bearing breast tumor, liver and tumor activities were calculated with three methods: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI and organ extraction, which were compared with each other. Results The good results of quality control tests (labeling yield: 61%±2%, mean nanoparticle hydrodynamic size: 41±15 nm, stability in buffer: 86%±5%, stability in blood serum: 80%±3%, immunoreactivity: 80%±2%) indicated that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles could be used as a double radiopharmaceutical agent in mice bearing tumor. Results showed that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles with MRI had the ability to measure organ activities more accurate than SPECT. Conclusions Co-conjugating radiopharmaceutical to MRI contrast agents such as iron oxide nanoparticles may be a good way for better dosimetry in nuclear medicine treatment. PMID:25937783

  10. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  11. Regeneration-associated WNT Signaling Is Activated in Long-term Reconstituting AC133bright Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Beghini, Alessandro; Corlazzoli, Francesca; Del Giacco, Luca; Re, Matteo; Lazzaroni, Francesca; Brioschi, Matteo; Valentini, Giorgio; Ferrazzi, Fulvia; Ghilardi, Anna; Righi, Marco; Turrini, Mauro; Mignardi, Marco; Cesana, Clara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Nilsson, Mats; Morra, Enrica; Cairoli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by two molecularly distinct self-renewing leukemic stem cell (LSC) populations most closely related to normal progenitors and organized as a hierarchy. A requirement for WNT/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of AML has recently been suggested by a mouse model. However, its relationship to a specific molecular function promoting retention of self-renewing leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in human remains elusive. To identify transcriptional programs involved in the maintenance of a self-renewing state in LICs, we performed the expression profiling in normal (n = 10) and leukemic (n = 33) human long-term reconstituting AC133+ cells, which represent an expanded cell population in most AML patients. This study reveals the ligand-dependent WNT pathway activation in AC133bright AML cells and shows a diffuse expression and release of WNT10B, a hematopoietic stem cell regenerative-associated molecule. The establishment of a primary AC133+ AML cell culture (A46) demonstrated that leukemia cells synthesize and secrete WNT ligands, increasing the levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin in vivo. We tested the LSC functional activity in AC133+ cells and found significant levels of engraftment upon transplantation of A46 cells into irradiated Rag2-/-γc-/- mice. Owing to the link between hematopoietic regeneration and developmental signaling, we transplanted A46 cells into developing zebrafish. This system revealed the formation of ectopic structures by activating dorsal organizer markers that act downstream of the WNT pathway. In conclusion, our findings suggest that AC133bright LSCs are promoted by misappropriating homeostatic WNT programs that control hematopoietic regeneration. PMID:23308055

  12. Longitudinal Cell Tracking and Simultaneous Monitoring of Tissue Regeneration after Cell Treatment of Natural Tendon Disease by Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Dagmar; Brehm, Walter; Gerlach, Kerstin; Gittel, Claudia; Offhaus, Julia; Paebst, Felicitas; Scharner, Doreen; Burk, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of tendon disease with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is a promising option to improve tissue regeneration. To elucidate the mechanisms by which MSC support regeneration, longitudinal tracking of MSC labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could provide important insight. Nine equine patients suffering from tendon disease were treated with SPIO-labelled or nonlabelled allogeneic umbilical cord-derived MSC by local injection. Labelling of MSC was confirmed by microscopy and MRI. All animals were subjected to clinical, ultrasonographical, and low-field MRI examinations before and directly after MSC application as well as 2, 4, and 8 weeks after MSC application. Hypointense artefacts with characteristically low signal intensity were identified at the site of injection of SPIO-MSC in T1- and T2∗-weighted gradient echo MRI sequences. They were visible in all 7 cases treated with SPIO-MSC directly after injection, but not in the control cases treated with nonlabelled MSC. Furthermore, hypointense artefacts remained traceable within the damaged tendon tissue during the whole follow-up period in 5 out of 7 cases. Tendon healing could be monitored at the same time. Clinical and ultrasonographical findings as well as T2-weighted MRI series indicated a gradual improvement of tendon function and structure. PMID:26880932

  13. Physical activity and the rejuvenation of Connswater (PARC study): protocol for a natural experiment investigating the impact of urban regeneration on public health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of evidence regarding the impact of urban regeneration projects on public health, particularly the nature and degree to which urban regeneration impacts upon health-related behaviour change. Natural experiment methodology enables comprehensive large-scale evaluations of such interventions. The Connswater Community Greenway in Belfast is a major urban regeneration project involving the development of a 9 km linear park, including the provision of new cycle paths and walkways. In addition to the environmental improvements, this complex intervention involves a number of programmes to promote physical activity in the regenerated area. The project affords a unique opportunity to investigate the public health impact of urban regeneration. Methods/Design The evaluation framework was informed by the socio-ecological model and guided by the RE-AIM Framework. Key components include: (1) a quasi-experimental before-and-after survey of the Greenway population (repeated cross-sectional design), in tandem with data from a parallel Northern Ireland-wide survey for comparison; (2) an assessment of changes in the local built environment and of walkability using geographic information systems; (3) semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of survey respondents, and a range of community stakeholders, before and after the regeneration project; and (4) a cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary outcome is change in proportion of individuals identified as being regularly physically active, according to the current UK recommendations. The RE-AIM Framework will be used to make an overall assessment of the impact of the Greenway on the physical activity behaviour of local residents. Discussion The Connswater Community Greenway provides a significant opportunity to achieve long-term, population level behaviour change. We argue that urban regeneration may be conceptualised meaningfully as a complex intervention comprising multiple components with the

  14. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  15. Murine and Human Myogenic Cells Identified by Elevated Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for Muscle Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Joseph B.; Thompson, Seth D.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Song, Minjung; Huard, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the initial promise of myoblast transfer therapy to restore dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, clinical efficacy has been limited, primarily by poor cell survival post-transplantation. Murine muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from slowly adhering cells (SACs) via the preplate technique, induce greater muscle regeneration than murine myoblasts, primarily due to improved post-transplantation survival, which is conferred by their increased stress resistance capacity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents a family of enzymes with important morphogenic as well as oxidative damage mitigating roles and has been found to be a marker of stem cells in both normal and malignant tissue. In this study, we hypothesized that elevated ALDH levels could identify murine and human muscle derived cell (hMDC) progenitors, endowed with enhanced stress resistance and muscle regeneration capacity. Methodology/Principal Findings Skeletal muscle progenitors were isolated from murine and human skeletal muscle by a modified preplate technique and unfractionated enzymatic digestion, respectively. ALDHhi subpopulations isolated by fluorescence activate cell sorting demonstrated increased proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacities compared to their ALDHlo counterparts when cultivated in oxidative and inflammatory stress media conditions. This behavior correlated with increased intracellular levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase. ALDHhi murine myoblasts were observed to exhibit an increased muscle regenerative potential compared to ALDHlo myoblasts, undergo multipotent differentiation (osteogenic and chondrogenic), and were found predominately in the SAC fraction, characteristics that are also observed in murine MDSCs. Likewise, human ALDHhi hMDCs demonstrated superior muscle regenerative capacity compared to ALDHlo hMDCs. Conclusions The methodology of isolating myogenic cells on the basis of elevated ALDH activity

  16. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  17. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets–C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-01-01

    The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+–p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration. PMID:26484536

  18. Regenerating islet-derived protein 1 inhibits the activation of islet stellate cells isolated from diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Wei; Wang, Ying; Zha, Min; Yao, Honghong; Jones, Peter M; Sun, Zilin

    2015-11-10

    Emerging evidence indicates that the islet fibrosis is attributable to activation of islet stellate cells (ISCs). In the present study, we compared the differences in biological activity of ISCs isolated from diabetic db/db and non-diabetic db/m mice, and the effects of the regenerating islet-derived protein 1 (Reg1) on ISC function. We showed that ISCs isolated from db/db mice were activated more rapidly than those from db/m mice during culture. Both Reg1 and its putative receptor exostosin-like glycosyltransferase 3 (EXTL3) were highly expressed by diabetic ISCs. Treatment with Reg1 inhibited migration, viability, and synthesis and secretion of Type I Collagen(Col-I), Type III Collagen(Col-III) and Fibronectin(FN) by diabetic ISCs, and this was associated with deactivation of the PI3K/Akt, MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathway in an EXTL3-dependent manner. In conclusion, our observations (i) confirmed the presence of fibrogenic stellate cells within pancreatic islets, which are prone to be activated in Type 2 diabetes, and (ii) revealed a potential role for Reg1 in preventing ISC activation. PMID:26496027

  19. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Neurons after a Complete Spinal Cord Injury Enhances Axonal Regeneration beyond a Chondroitinase-Treated Glial Scar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Connors, Theresa; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI), CNS axons fail to regenerate, resulting in permanent deficits. This is due to: (1) the presence of inhibitory molecules, e.g., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG), in the glial scar at the lesion; and (2) the diminished growth capacity of adult neurons. We sought to determine whether expressing a constitutively active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) in adult neurons after a complete SCI in rats improves intrinsic growth potential to result in axon regeneration out of a growth-supportive peripheral nerve grafted (PNG) into the SCI cavity. We also hypothesized that treating the glial scar with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), which digests CSPG, would further allow caRheb-transduced neurons to extend axons across the distal graft interface. We found that targeting this pathway at a clinically relevant post-SCI time point improves both sprouting and regeneration of axons. CaRheb increased the number of axons, but not the number of neurons, that projected into the PNG, indicative of augmented sprouting. We also saw that caRheb enhanced sprouting far rostral to the injury. CaRheb not only increased growth rostral and into the graft, it also resulted in significantly more regrowth of axons across a ChABC-treated scar into caudal spinal cord. CaRheb+ neurons had higher levels of growth-associated-43, suggestive of a newly identified mechanism for mTOR-mediated enhancement of regeneration. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that simultaneously addressing intrinsic and scar-associated, extrinsic impediments to regeneration results in significant regrowth beyond an extremely challenging, complete SCI site. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After spinal cord injury (SCI), CNS axons fail to regenerate, resulting in permanent deficits. This is due to the diminished growth capacity of adult neurons and the presence of inhibitory molecules in the scar at the lesion. We sought to simultaneously counter both of these obstacles to achieve more robust

  20. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  1. Granular activated carbon adsorption and microwave regeneration for the treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl in simulated soil-washing solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Yu, Gang; Han, Wenya

    2007-08-25

    The treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB29) in simulated soil-washing solution by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and microwave (MW) regeneration was investigated in this study. The PCB29 adsorption process was carried out in a continuous flow adsorption column. After adsorption, the PCB29-loaded GAC was dried at 103 degrees C, and regenerated in a quartz reactor by 2450MHz MW irradiation at 700W for 5min. The efficacy of this procedure was analyzed by determining the rates and amounts of PCB29 adsorbed in successive adsorption/MW regeneration cycles. Effects of the regeneration on the textural properties and the PCB29 adsorption capacity of GAC were examined. It was found that after several adsorption/MW regeneration cycles, the adsorption rate of GAC increased, whereas, the adsorption capacity decreased, which could be explained according to the change of textural properties. Most of the PCB29 adsorbed on GAC was degraded within 3min under MW irradiation, and the analysis of degradation products by GC-MS demonstrated that PCB29 experienced dechlorination during this treatment. PMID:17368933

  2. Chloroplast ultra structure, photosynthesis and enzyme activities in regenerated plants of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni as influenced by copper sulphate in the medium.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pourvi; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2014-09-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni is an important medicinal plant used as noncaloric commercial sweetener. Plants regenerated with higher levels of copper sulphate in the medium exhibited enhanced activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) enzymes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed increase in size and number of electron dense inclusions in the chloroplasts of plants regenerated at optimised level of copper sulphate (0.5 microM) in the medium. There was decrease in chlorogenic acid (CGA) content. Chl-a-fluorescence transient pattern (OJIP) showed that the photosynthesis process was more efficient at 0.5 microM CuSO4 in the medium. PMID:25241590

  3. Dimethyloxaloylglycine Promotes the Angiogenic Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from iPSCs via Activation of the PI3K/Akt Pathway for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jieyuan; Guan, Junjie; Qi, Xin; Ding, Hao; Yuan, Hong; Xie, Zongping; Chen, Chunyuan; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Changqing; Huang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue-engineered bone is a prerequisite step for the successful repair of bone defects. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an essential role in angiogenesis-osteogenesis coupling during bone regeneration and can activate the expression of angiogenic factors in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) is an angiogenic small molecule that can inhibit prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes and thus regulate the stability of HIF-1α in cells at normal oxygen tension. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (hiPSC-MSCs) are promising alternatives for stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluated the effect of DMOG on promoting hiPSC-MSCs angiogenesis in tissue-engineered bone and simultaneously explored the underlying mechanisms in vitro. The effectiveness of DMOG in improving the expression of HIF-1α and its downstream angiogenic genes in hiPSC-MSCs demonstrated that DMOG significantly enhanced the gene and protein expression profiles of angiogenic-related factors in hiPSC-MSCs by sustaining the expression of HIF-1α. Further analysis showed that DMOG-stimulated hiPSC-MSCs angiogenesis was associated with the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and with an increase in VEGF production. The effects could be blocked by the addition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. In a critical-sized calvarial defect model in rats, DMOG-treated hiPSC-MSCs showed markedly improved angiogenic capacity in the tissue-engineered bone, leading to bone regeneration. Collectively, the results indicate that DMOG, via activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, promotes the angiogenesis of hiPSC-MSCs in tissue-engineered bone for bone defect repair and that DMOG-treated hiPSC-MSCs can be exploited as a potential therapeutic tool in bone regeneration. PMID:27194942

  4. Iron Impregnated Activated Carbon as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Removal of Methylene Blue: Regeneration and Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, iron impregnated activated carbon (FeAC) was synthesized following an oxidation and iron impregnation of activated carbon (AC). Both the AC and FeAC were characterized by pHZPC and FTIR spectroscopy. The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) by AC and FeAC was examined under various experimental conditions. The FeAC showed up to 95% (higher than AC) MB removal in the pH range of 7–10. Although the reaction kinetics was pseudo–second order, the overall rate was controlled by a number of processes such as film diffusion, pore diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The activation energy values for the MB uptake by AC and FeAC (21.79 and 14.82 kJ/mol, respectively) revealed a physisorption process. In the regeneration study, FeAC has shown consistently ≥ 90% MB removal even up to 10 repeated cycles. The reusable characteristic of the spent FeAC improved the practical use of activated carbon and can be a breakthrough for continuous flow system applications where it can work effectively without any significant reduction in its performance. PMID:25849291

  5. Constitutive Activation of the Nlrc4 Inflammasome Prevents Hepatic Fibrosis and Promotes Hepatic Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, David A.; Ko, Chih-Wei; Wang, Lan; Lee, Peter; Croniger, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    TThe molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of hepatic fibrosis are not fully understood. The Nlrc4 inflammasome detects cytosolic presence of bacterial components, activating inflammatory cytokines to facilitate clearance of pathogens and infected cells. We hypothesized that low-grade constitutive activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome may lead to induced hepatocyte proliferation and prevent the development of hepatic fibrosis. The gene of Nlrc4 contains two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), one located within the Nlrc4 promoter and one contained within exon 5. These SNPs regulate Nlrc4 gene transcription and activation as measured through gene reporter assays and IL-1β secretion. The 17C-6 mice have increased IL-1β in plasma after chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration compared to B6 mice. After two-thirds partial hepatectomy (2/3PH) 17C-6 mice have earlier restoration of liver mass with greater cyclin D1 protein and BrdU incorporation compared to B6 mice at several time points. These data reveal mild constitutive activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome as the results of two SNPs, which leads to the stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation. The increased liver regeneration induces rapid liver mass recovery after hepatectomy and may prevent the development of hepatotoxin-induced liver fibrosis. PMID:26635450

  6. Atlas Regeneration, Inc.

    PubMed

    Makarev, Eugene; Isayev, Olexandr; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Atlas Regeneration is dedicated to the development of novel data-driven solutions for regenerative medicine, adapting proven technologies, and analysis strategies to take a multiomics-wide view of stem cell quality and cell fate design. Our core offering is a global comprehensive map of stem cell differentiation, Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine, reflecting the pathway activation states across all characterized stem cells and their differentiated products. Key applications of Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine will include quality assurance for engineered cell products, and directed regeneration pharmacology, where we will screen and identify compounds that can efficiently convert pluripotent cells into desired subtypes. Another marketable piece of IP is development of specialized signaling pathway analysis systems Regeneration Intelligence which supposed to target the unmet needs of determination and prediction of stem cell signaling pathway activation to govern cell differentiation in specific directions. PMID:26925598

  7. Magnetic activity of surface plasmon resonance using dielectric magnetic materials fabricated on quartz glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuki; Ashizawa, Yoshito; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius; Nakagawa, Katsuji

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic activity of surface plasmons in Au/MFe2O4 (M = Ni, Co, and Zn) polycrystalline bilayer films fabricated on a quartz glass substrate was studied for future magnetic sensor applications using surface plasmon resonance. The excitation of surface plasmons and their magnetic activity were observed in all investigated Au/MFe2O4 films. The magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline Au/NiFe2O4 film was larger than those of the other polycrystalline Au/MFe2O4 films, the epitaxial NiFe2O4 film, and metallic films. The large magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline film is controlled by manipulating surface plasmon excitation conditions and magnetic properties.

  8. Microgravity can activate signals urging cells to S-phase entry during tissue and organ regeneration in Urodele amphibians exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Anton, H.-J.; Mitashov, V.

    Regenerative response following local injury or tissue removal in urodele amphibians is dependent on cell cycle entry of cells sources for regeneration in the remaining tissue. In a number of our experiments performed aboard biosatellites in orbital flights and fast rotated clinostat we found enhanced proliferative activity and, as a result, regeneration quicker than that in controls. In each investigated case an activity of cell proliferation evaluated by 3H-thymidine radioautography and BrdU assay at the early stages of lens, retina, forelimb and tail regeneration in newts was about 1,2-1,7 fold higher both under conditions of real and physiological weightlessness as compared with controls. Faster S-phase entry under conditions of micro- g was demonstrated by cycling multipotent cells as well as by differentiated postmitotic cells both participated in regeneration. Important, that cycling cells outside areas of regeneration were also found as displayed faster cellular growth. In our papers (1,2,3,4) we offered some hypothesis that could explain mechanisms of low g stimulating effect upon cell growth in regeneration in Urodela. In particular, changes in expression of some growth factors and their receptors, as well as the synthesis of specific range of generalized stress proteins (AGSPs) were proposed. However, in fact, molecular mechanisms of micro- g effect upon cell proliferation are mediated by changes on organismic level induced by micro- g environment. Some of them which are able to trigger off signaling changes on the cellular level that, in turn, evoke cells to grow faster would be represented in our report. 1. Mitashov V. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 241-255 2. Anton H.-J. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 55-65 3. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1998. 22 (2): 293-301 4. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 2002. 30 (4): 757-764

  9. Novel ebullated bed catalyst regeneration technology improves regenerated catalyst quality

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Regeneration of spent hydroprocessing catalysts has long been practiced by the refining industry. With increased pressures on refiners to reduce catalyst expenditures and waste generation, refiners are more frequently reusing spent hydroprocessing catalysts after ex-situ regeneration to restore catalytic activity. By reusing regenerated catalyst for at least two cycles, the refiner reduces catalyst waste by at least one-half. As environmental laws become more restrictive, spent hydroprocessing catalyst is more likely to be classified as hazardous waste. Disposal of spent catalyst, which was previously accomplished by landfilling, now requires more expensive reclamation techniques. TRICAT has introduced the TRICAT Regeneration Process (TRP), a novel ebullated bed regeneration plant, to improve the catalyst regeneration process. The ebullated bed design allows for better control of heat release during the regeneration process. As a result, the regeneration can be accomplished in a single-pass, with improved catalyst activity retention. Catalyst losses are also minimized due to reduced catalyst handling. Commercial results from the TRP have demonstrated successful scale-up of the technology from pilot scale. The plant has achieved complete recovery of the available catalyst activity with little or no losses in catalyst yield or extrudate length. The flexibility of the TRP to process a variety of catalysts is also discussed.

  10. Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a very complex and well-orchestrated phenomenon. It is carried out by the participation of all mature liver cell types. The process is associated with signaling cascades involving growth factors, cytokines, matrix remodeling, and several feedbacks of stimulation and inhibition of growth related signals. Liver manages to restore any lost mass and adjust its size to that of the organism, while at the same time providing full support for body homeostasis during the entire regenerative process. In situations when hepatocytes or biliary cells are blocked from regeneration, these cell types can function as facultative stem cells for each other. PMID:17559071

  11. Magnetically Active Carbon Nanotubes at Work.

    PubMed

    Stopin, Antoine; Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-06-22

    Endohedral and exohedral assembly of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) recently gave birth to a large body of new hybrid nanomaterials (MNPs-CNTs) featuring properties that are otherwise not in reach with only the graphitic or metallic cores themselves. These materials feature enhanced magnetically guided motions (rotation and translation), magnetic saturation and coercivity, large surface area, and thermal stability. By guiding the reader through the most significant examples in this Concept paper, we describe how researchers in the field engineered and exploited the synergistic combination of these two types of nanoparticles in a large variety of current and potential applications, such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia therapeutics and in magnetic resonance imaging to name a few. PMID:26017389

  12. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  13. Activation during ventricular defibrillation in open-chest dogs. Evidence of complete cessation and regeneration of ventricular fibrillation after unsuccessful shocks.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P S; Shibata, N; Dixon, E G; Wolf, P D; Danieley, N D; Sweeney, M B; Smith, W M; Ideker, R E

    1986-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a defibrillation shock is unsuccessful because it fails to annihilate activation fronts within a critical mass of myocardium, we recorded epicardial and transmural activation in 11 open-chest dogs during electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF). Shocks of 1-30 J were delivered through defibrillation electrodes on the left ventricular apex and right atrium. Simultaneous recordings were made from septal, intramural, and epicardial electrodes in various combinations. Immediately after all 104 unsuccessful and 116 successful defibrillation shocks, an isoelectric interval much longer than that observed during preshock VF occurred. During this time no epicardial, septal, or intramural activations were observed. This isoelectric window averaged 64 +/- 22 ms after unsuccessful defibrillation and 339 +/- 292 ms after successful defibrillation (P less than 0.02). After the isoelectric window of unsuccessful shocks, earliest activation was recorded from the base of the ventricles, which was the area farthest from the apical defibrillation electrode. Activation was synchronized for one or two cycles following unsuccessful shocks, after which VF regenerated. Thus, after both successful and unsuccessful defibrillation with epicardial shocks of greater than or equal to 1 J, an isoelectric window occurs during which no activation fronts are present; the postshock isoelectric window is shorter for unsuccessful than for successful defibrillation; unsuccessful shocks transiently synchronize activation before fibrillation regenerates; activation leading to the regeneration of VF after the isoelectric window for unsuccessful shocks originates in areas away from the defibrillation electrodes. The isoelectric window does not support the hypothesis that defibrillation fails solely because activation fronts are not halted within a critical mass of myocardium. Rather, unsuccessful epicardial shocks of greater than or equal to 1 J halt all activation

  14. Studies of the regeneration of activated bauxite used as granular sorbent for the control of alkali vapors from hot flue gas of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S H.D.; Smith, S D; Swift, W M; Johnson, I

    1981-05-01

    Regeneration of activated bauxite was studied by water-leaching and thermal swing (high-temperature desorption) methods. Granular activated bauxite has been identified to be very effective when used as a filter medium (i.e., sorbent) in granular-bed filters to remove gaseous alkali metal compounds from simulated hot flue gas of PFBC. Activated bauxite that had captured alkali chloride vapors was demonstrated to be easily and effectively regenerated for reuse by a simple water-leaching method. Data were obtained on (1) the leaching rate of the adsorbed NaCl, (2) effects on the leaching rate of adsorbed NaCl loading, leaching temperature, and the amount of water, and (3) water retention in activated bauxite after leaching. Observed physical changes and particle attrition of activated bauxite as a result of regeneration are discussed. The sorption mechanisms of activated bauxite toward alkali chloride vapors are interpreted on the basis of (1) the chemical compositions of the leachates from alkali chloride-sorbed activated bauxite and (2) the desorption of adsorbed NaCl vapor from activated bauxite at high temperature.

  15. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  16. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Volitional Quadriceps Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher E.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Quadriceps-activation deficits have been reported after meniscectomy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with maximal contractions affects quadriceps activation in patients after meniscectomy. Objective: To determine the effect of single-pulsed TMS on quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) in patients after meniscectomy. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants who had partial meniscectomy and who had a CAR less than 85% were assigned randomly to the TMS group (7 men, 4 women; age  =  38.1 ± 16.2 years, height  =  176.8 ± 11.5 cm, mass  =  91.8 ± 27.5 kg, postoperative time  =  36.7 ± 34.9 weeks) or the control group (7 men, 2 women; age  =  38.2 ± 17.5 years, height  =  176.5 ± 7.9 cm, mass  =  86.2 ± 15.3 kg, postoperative time  =  36.6 ± 37.4 weeks). Intervention(s): Participants in the experimental group received TMS over the motor cortex that was contralateral to the involved leg and performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions with the involved leg. The control group performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions without the TMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): Quadriceps activation was assessed using the CAR, which was measured in 70° of knee flexion at baseline and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes posttest. The CAR was expressed as a percentage of full activation. Results: Differences in CAR were detected over time (F4,72  =  3.025, P  = .02). No interaction (F4,72  =  1.457, P  =  .22) or between-groups differences (F1,18  =  0.096, P  =  .76) were found for CAR. Moderate CAR effect sizes were found at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  −0.33, 1.37) and 60 (Cohen d  =  0.50, 95% CI  =  −0.37, 1.33) minutes in the TMS group compared with CAR at baseline. Strong effect sizes were found for CAR at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.82, 95% CI

  17. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices. PMID:27144475

  18. Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Antonia F.; Klatt, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage damaged by trauma has a limited capacity to regenerate. Current methods for treating small chondral defects include palliative treatment with arthroscopic debridement and lavage, reparative treatment with marrow stimulation techniques (e.g. microfracture), and restorative treatment, including osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. Larger defects are treated by osteochondral allografting or total joint replacements. However, the future of treating cartilage defects lies in providing biologic solutions through cartilage regeneration. Laboratory and clinical studies have examined the treatment of larger lesions using tissue engineered cartilage. Regenerated cartilage can be derived from various cell types, including chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Common scaffolding materials include proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic materials, and composite polymers. Scaffolds may be woven, spun into nanofibers, or configured as hydrogels. Chondrogenesis may be enhanced with the application of chondroinductive growth factors. Finally, bioreactors are being developed to enhance nutrient delivery and provide mechanical stimulation to tissue-engineered cartilage ex vivo. The multi-disciplinary approaches currently being developed to produce cartilage promise to bring the dream of cartilage regeneration in clinical use to reality. PMID:23637149

  19. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  20. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  1. Modulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in the normal and regenerating rat liver by various doses of the peptide morphogen of Hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Kazimirskii, A.N.; Kositskii, G.I.; Rubina, A.Yu.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Pylaev, A.S.

    1986-11-01

    In this investigation, changes in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in the normal and regenerating liver of rats receiving injections of various doses of Hydra peptide morphogen (HPM). Activity of ODC was determined by a radioisotope method based on liberation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)-ornithine. The results indicate in the author's opinion that HPM may have a role in the regulation of anabolic processes and, in particular, of regenerative processes in mammals.

  2. Magnetic flux transport of decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network. [of solar supergranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Zirin, Harold; Ai, Guoxiang

    1991-01-01

    Several series of coordinated observations on decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network regions on the sun were carried out jointly at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of the Bejing Astronomical Observatory in China. The magnetic field evolution in several regions was followed closely for three to seven days. The magnetic flux transport from the remnants of decayed active regions was studied, along with the evolution and lifetime of the magnetic network which defines the boundaries of supergranules. The magnetic flux transport in an enhanced network region was studied in detail and found to be negative. Also briefly described are some properties of moving magnetic features around a sunspot. Results of all of the above studies are presented.

  3. Activation and suppression of cellular immunity during reparative liver regeneration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmilevich, A.L.; Sidorenko, O.N.

    1986-10-01

    The authors study the effect of partial hepatectomy (PHE) on the functional activity of various lymphocyte populations in vitro and in vivo, namely its effect on proliferative, effector and killer activity. A mixture of 50 microliters of reacting spleen cells and 100 microliters of stimulating spleen cells from mice, irradiated in a dose of 2000 rads, was incubated as described. /sup 3/H-thymidine was added to the medium before the end of incubation. The radioactivity of the samples was measured in a beta-spectrometer. Activity of immune and normal killer cells was determined in the membrane-toxic test with /sup 3/H-uridine. Depression of killer activity and of the graft versus host reaction after PHE is evidently due to the action of suppressor cells as is shown by the example of lowering of the helper function in mixed lymphocyte culture.

  4. Resonantly-enhanced axion-photon regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, David B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2010-08-30

    A resonantly-enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axion-like particles is discussed. Photons enter a strong magnetic field and some are converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and some may convert back to photons in a second high-field region. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon regeneration magnet. The optics for this experiment are discussed, with emphasis on the alignment of the two cavities.

  5. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  6. Development of a He3-He4 sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, A. E.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-01-01

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He3-He4 through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  7. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  8. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26911789

  9. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26911789

  10. C3-induced release of neurotrophic factors from Schwann cells - potential mechanism behind its regeneration promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Stahl, Frank; Höltje, Markus; Hettwer, Timo; Lindner, Patrick; Hagemann, Sandra; Pich, Andreas; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies revealed a peripheral nerve regeneration (PNR)(1) promoting activity of Clostridium botulinum C3(2) exoenzyme or a 26(mer) C-terminal peptide fragment covering amino acids 156-181 (C3(156-181)),(3) when delivered as one-time injection at the lesion site. The current study was performed to 1) investigate if prolonged availability of C3 and C3(156-181) at the lesion site can further enhance PNR in vivo and to 2) elucidate effects of C3 and C3(156-181) on Schwann cells (SCs)(4)in vitro. For in vivo studies, 10 mm adult rat sciatic nerve gaps were reconstructed with the epineurial pouch technique or autologous nerve grafts. Epineurial pouches were filled with a hydrogel containing i) vehicle, ii) 40 μM C3 or iii) 40 μM C3(156-181). Sensory and motor functional recovery was monitored over 12 weeks and the outcome of PNR further analyzed by nerve morphometry. In vitro, we compared gene expression profiles (microarray analysis) and neurotrophic factor expression (western blot analysis) of untreated rat neonatal SCs with those treated with C3 or C3(156-181) for 72 h. Effects on neurotrophic factor expression levels were proven in adult human SCs. Unexpectedly, prolonged delivery of C3 and C3(156-181) at the lesion site did not increase the outcome of PNR. Regarding the potential mechanism underlying their previously detected PNR promoting action, however, 6 genes were found to be commonly altered in SCs upon treatment with C3 or C3(156-181). We demonstrate significant down-regulation of genes involved in glutamate uptake (Eaac1,(5)Grin2a(6)) and changes in neurotrophic factor expression (increase of FGF-2(7) and decrease of NGF(8)). Our microarray-based expression profiling revealed novel C3-regulated genes in SCs possibly involved in the axonotrophic (regeneration promoting) effects of C3 and C3(156-181). Detection of altered neurotrophic factor expression by C3 or C3(156-181) treated primary neonatal rat SCs and primary adult human SCs supports

  11. Pathogenic shifts in endogenous microbiota impede tissue regeneration via distinct activation of TAK1/MKK/p38

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christopher P; Merryman, M Shane; Harris-Arnold, Aleishia; McKinney, Sean A; Seidel, Chris W; Loethen, Sydney; Proctor, Kylie N; Guo, Longhua; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The interrelationship between endogenous microbiota, the immune system, and tissue regeneration is an area of intense research due to its potential therapeutic applications. We investigated this relationship in Schmidtea mediterranea, a model organism capable of regenerating any and all of its adult tissues. Microbiome characterization revealed a high Bacteroidetes to Proteobacteria ratio in healthy animals. Perturbations eliciting an expansion of Proteobacteria coincided with ectopic lesions and tissue degeneration. The culture of these bacteria yielded a strain of Pseudomonas capable of inducing progressive tissue degeneration. RNAi screening uncovered a TAK1 innate immune signaling module underlying compromised tissue homeostasis and regeneration during infection. TAK1/MKK/p38 signaling mediated opposing regulation of apoptosis during infection versus normal tissue regeneration. Given the complex role of inflammation in either hindering or supporting reparative wound healing and regeneration, this invertebrate model provides a basis for dissecting the duality of evolutionarily conserved inflammatory signaling in complex, multi-organ adult tissue regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16793.001 PMID:27441386

  12. Electrically Activated Primary Human Fibroblasts Improve In Vitro and In Vivo Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Park, Hyun Jin; Zhang, Ze

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) changes cellular behaviors and thus constitutes a potential strategy to promote wound healing. However, well-controlled in vitro findings have yet to be translated to in vivo trials. This study was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of transplanting electrically activated cells (E-Cells) to help wound healing. Primary human skin fibroblasts were activated through well defined ES and cultured with keratinocytes to generate engineered human skin (EHS), which were transplanted to nu/nu mice. The electrically activated EHS grafts were analyzed at 20 and 30 days post-grafting, showing faster wound closure, thick epidermis, vasculature, and functional basement membrane containing laminin and type IV collagen that were totally produced by the implanted human cells. Because a variety of cells can be electrically activated, E-Cells may become a new cell source and the transplantation of E-Cells may represent a new strategy in wound healing and tissue engineering. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1814-1821, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661681

  13. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  14. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  15. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-01-01

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented. PMID:16012640

  16. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  17. The Role of Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    The central challenge in solar/heliospheric physics is to understand how the emergence and transport of magnetic flux at the photosphere drives the structure and dynamics that we observe in the corona and heliosphere. This presentation focuses on the role of magnetic reconnection in determining solar/heliospheric activity. We demonstrate that two generic properties of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields are responsible for the ubiquitous reconnection in the corona. First, the photospheric velocities are complex, which leads to the injection of energy and helicity into the coronal magnetic fields and to the efficient, formation of small-scale structure. Second, the flux distribution at the photosphere is multi-polar, which implies that topological discontinuities and, consequently, current sheets, must be present in the coronal magnetic field. We: present numerical simulations showing that photospherically-driven reconnection is responsible for the heating and dynamics of coronal plasma, and for the topology of the coronal/heliospheric magnetic field.

  18. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-KitTgD814Y receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-KitTgD814Y mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit+ cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-KitTgD814Y mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit+CD31+ endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45−c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-KitTgD814Y mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  19. Active fluid mixing with magnetic microactuators for capture of salmonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, S.; Owen, D.; Ballard, M.; Mills, Z.; Xu, J.; Erickson, M.; Hesketh, P. J.; Alexeev, A.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of low concentrations of bacteria in food samples is a challenging process. Key to this process is the separation of the target from the food matrix. We demonstrate magnetic beads and magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture, which are particularly useful for pre-concentrating the target. The first method we demonstrate makes use of magnetic microbeads held on to NiFe discs on the surface of the substrate. These beads are rotated around the magnetic discs by rotating the external magnetic field. The second method we demonstrate shows the use of cilia which extends into the fluid and is manipulated by a rotating external field. Magnetic micro-features were fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The high magnetic permeability of NiFe allows for maximum magnetic force on the features. The magnetic features were actuated using an external rotating magnet up to frequencies of 50Hz. We demonstrate active mixing produced by the microbeads and the cilia in a microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using microbeads.

  20. A conventional point of view on active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Dill, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings used in rotating machinery should be designed as locally controlled, independent devices similar to other types of bearings. The functions of control electronics and power amplifiers can be simply and explicitly related to general bearing properties such as load capacity, stiffness, and damping. The dynamics of a rotor and its supporting active magnetic bearings are analyzed in a modified conventional method with an extended state vector containing the bearing state variables.

  1. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  2. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  3. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  4. Magnetic resonance functional nano-hydroxyapatite incorporated poly(caprolactone) composite scaffolds for in situ monitoring of bone tissue regeneration by MRI.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Nitya; Ashokan, Anusha; Rajeshkannan, Ramiah; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we have reported the incorporation of a multi-modal contrast agent based on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, within a poly(caprolactone)(PCL) nanofibrous scaffold by electrospinning. The multifunctional hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (MF-nHAp) showed simultaneous contrast enhancement for three major molecular imaging techniques. In this article, the magnetic resonance (MR) contrast enhancement ability of the MF-nHAp was exploited for the purpose of potentially monitoring as well as for influencing tissue regeneration. These MF-nHAp containing PCL scaffolds were engineered in order to enhance the osteogenic potential as well as its MR functionality for their application in bone tissue engineering. The nano-composite scaffolds along with pristine PCL were evaluated physico-chemically and biologically in vitro, in the presence of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The incorporation of 30-40 nm sized MF-nHAp within the nanofibers showed a substantial increase in scaffold strength, protein adsorption, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs along with enhanced MR functionality. This preliminary study was performed to eventually exploit the MR contrast imaging capability of MF-nHAp in nanofibrous scaffolds for real-time imaging of the changes in the tissue engineered construct. PMID:24785187

  5. Magnetic Resonance Functional Nano-Hydroxyapatite Incorporated Poly(Caprolactone) Composite Scaffolds for In Situ Monitoring of Bone Tissue Regeneration by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Nitya; Ashokan, Anusha; Rajeshkannan, Ramiah; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have reported the incorporation of a multi-modal contrast agent based on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, within a poly(caprolactone)(PCL) nanofibrous scaffold by electrospinning. The multifunctional hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (MF-nHAp) showed simultaneous contrast enhancement for three major molecular imaging techniques. In this article, the magnetic resonance (MR) contrast enhancement ability of the MF-nHAp was exploited for the purpose of potentially monitoring as well as for influencing tissue regeneration. These MF-nHAp containing PCL scaffolds were engineered in order to enhance the osteogenic potential as well as its MR functionality for their application in bone tissue engineering. The nano-composite scaffolds along with pristine PCL were evaluated physico-chemically and biologically in vitro, in the presence of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The incorporation of 30–40 nm sized MF-nHAp within the nanofibers showed a substantial increase in scaffold strength, protein adsorption, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs along with enhanced MR functionality. This preliminary study was performed to eventually exploit the MR contrast imaging capability of MF-nHAp in nanofibrous scaffolds for real-time imaging of the changes in the tissue engineered construct. PMID:24785187

  6. An active role for magnetic fields in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of photospheric magnetic fields are reviewed to determine whether changes in such fields can be related to flare activity, assuming that magnetic fields play an active role in providing flare energy. An intimate relation between emerging fields and bright flare knots is noted, and it is shown that the activation and eruption of an H-alpha filament is indicative of a major disruption of a magnetic field just prior to a flare. Observations of twisting motions in a filament just before a flare are discussed, erupting untwisting filaments are taken as unambiguous evidence for restructuring of the magnetic fields associated with flares, and it is argued that magnetic-field changes in the midst of most flares are obvious. It is concluded that successive brightenings in a family of loops may be evidence for the spread of a magnetic-field reconnection point from one field concentration to another and that flares may well take place in regions of field-line reconnection. This latter conclusion is illustrated using an empirical flare model that involves field-line reconnection, filament activation, and emerging magnetic flux.

  7. Polyphosphate: A Morphogenetically Active Implant Material Serving as Metabolic Fuel for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The initial mineralization centers during human bone formation onto osteoblasts are composed of CaCO3 . Those bioseeds are enzymatically formed via carbonic anhydrase(s) in close association with the cell surface of the osteoblasts. Subsequently, the bicarbonate/carbonate anions are exchanged non-enzymatically by inorganic phosphate [Pi ]. One source for the supply of Pi is polyphosphate [polyP] which is a physiological polymer, formed in the osteoblasts as well as in the platelets. The energy-rich acid anhydride bonds within the polyP chain are cleaved by phosphatase(s); during this reaction free-energy might be released that could be re-used, as metabolic fuel, for the maintenance of the steady-state concentrations of the substrates/products during mineralization. Finally it is outlined that polyP, as a morphogenetically active scaffold, is even suitable for 3D cell printing. PMID:25982003

  8. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active-magnetic

  9. Neuronal RARβ Signaling Modulates PTEN Activity Directly in Neurons and via Exosome Transfer in Astrocytes to Prevent Glial Scar Formation and Induce Spinal Cord Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Maria B.; Malmqvist, Tony; Clarke, Earl; Hubens, Chantal J.; Grist, John; Hobbs, Carl; Trigo, Diogo; Risling, Mårten; Angeria, Maria; Damberg, Peter; Carlstedt, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is mainly attributed to a lack of intrinsic neuronal growth programs and an inhibitory environment from a glial scar. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a major negative regulator of neuronal regeneration and, as such, inhibiting its activity has been considered a therapeutic target for spinal cord (SC) injuries (SCIs). Using a novel model of rat cervical avulsion, we show that treatment with a retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) agonist results in locomotor and sensory recovery. Axonal regeneration from the severed roots into the SC could be seen by biotinylated dextran amine labeling. Light micrographs of the dorsal root entry zone show the peripheral nervous system (PNS)–CNS transition of regrown axons. RARβ agonist treatment also resulted in the absence of scar formation. Mechanism studies revealed that, in RARβ-agonist-treated neurons, PTEN activity is decreased by cytoplasmic phosphorylation and increased secretion in exosomes. These are taken up by astrocytes, resulting in hampered proliferation and causing them to arrange in a normal-appearing scaffold around the regenerating axons. Attribution of the glial modulation to neuronal PTEN in exosomes was demonstrated by the use of an exosome inhibitor in vivo and PTEN siRNA in vitro assays. The dual effect of RARβ signaling, both neuronal and neuronal–glial, results in axonal regeneration into the SC after dorsal root neurotmesis. Targeting this pathway may open new avenues for the treatment of SCIs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often result in permanent damage in the adult due to the very limited capacity of axonal regeneration. Intrinsic neuronal programs and the formation of a glial scar are the main obstacles. Here, we identify a single target, neuronal retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ), which modulates these two aspects of the postinjury physiological response. Activation of RARβ in the neuron inactivates

  10. Distal regeneration involves the age dependent activity of branchial sac stem cells in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tunicates have high capacities for regeneration but the underlying mechanisms and their relationship to life cycle progression are not well understood. Here we investigate the regeneration of distal structures in the ascidian tunicate Ciona intestinalis. Analysis of regenerative potential along the proximal−distal body axis indicated that distal organs, such as the siphons, their pigmented sensory organs, and the neural complex, could only be replaced from body fragments containing the branchial sac. Distal regeneration involves the formation of a blastema composed of cells that undergo cell proliferation prior to differentiation and cells that differentiate without cell proliferation. Both cell types originate in the branchial sac and appear in the blastema at different times after distal injury. Whereas the branchial sac stem cells are present in young animals, they are depleted in old animals that have lost their regeneration capacity. Thus Ciona adults contain a population of age‐related stem cells located in the branchial sac that are a source of precursors for distal body regeneration. PMID:25893097

  11. Ionospheric Electron Density during Magnetically Active Times over Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz Erbaş, Bute; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyze electron density variations over Istanbul using Dynasonde observations during the magnetically active times. In order to perform statistical analyses, we first determined magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorm intervals from October 2012 to October 2015 using Kyoto's magnetic index data. Corresponding ionospheric parameters, such as critical frequency of F2 region (foF2), maximum electron density height (hmF2), total electron density (TEC) etc. were retrieved from Dynasonde data base at Istanbul Technical University's Space Weather Laboratory. To understand the behavior of electron density during the magnetically active times, we remove the background quiet time variations first and then quantify the anomalies. In this presentation, we will report results from our preliminary analyses from the selected cases corresponding to the strong magnetic storms. Initial results show lower electron densities at noon times and higher electron densities in the late afternoon toward sunset times when compared to the electron densities of magnetically quiet times. We also compare the results with IRI and TIEGCM ionospheric models in order to understand the physical and dynamical causes of these variations. During the presentation we will also discuss the role of these changes during the magnetically active times on the GPS communications through ionosphere.

  12. Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Abigail L; Rasmussen, Lotte K; Kadi, Fawzi; Schjerling, Peter; Helmark, Ida C; Ponsot, Elodie; Aagaard, Per; Durigan, João Luiz Q; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    With this study we investigated the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human skeletal muscle regeneration. Young men ingested NSAID [1200 mg/d ibuprofen (IBU)] or placebo (PLA) daily for 2 wk before and 4 wk after an electrical stimulation-induced injury to the leg extensor muscles of one leg. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscles before and after stimulation (2.5 h and 2, 7, and 30 d) and were assessed for satellite cells and regeneration by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, and we also measured telomere length. After injury, and compared with PLA, IBU was found to augment the proportion of ActiveNotch1(+) satellite cells at 2 d [IBU, 29 ± 3% vs. PLA, 19 ± 2% (means ± sem)], satellite cell content at 7 d [IBU, 0.16 ± 0.01 vs. PLA, 0.12 ± 0.01 (Pax7(+) cells/fiber)], and to expedite muscle repair at 30 d. The PLA group displayed a greater proportion of embryonic myosin(+) fibers and a residual ∼2-fold increase in mRNA levels of matrix proteins (all P < 0.05). Endomysial collagen was also elevated with PLA at 30 d. Minimum telomere length shortening was not observed. In conclusion, ingestion of NSAID has a potentiating effect on Notch activation of satellite cells and muscle remodeling during large-scale regeneration of injured human skeletal muscle.-Mackey, A. L., Rasmussen, L. K., Kadi, F., Schjerling, P., Helmark, I. C., Ponsot, E., Aagaard, P., Durigan, J. L. Q., Kjaer, M. Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. PMID:26936358

  13. Biocomposite macroporous cryogels as potential carrier scaffolds for bone active agents augmenting bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Raina, Deepak Bushan; Isaksson, Hanna; Teotia, Arun Kumar; Lidgren, Lars; Tägil, Magnus; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-08-10

    Osteoinduction can be enhanced by combining scaffolds with bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). However, BMP's are known to also cause bone resorption. This can be controlled using bisphosphonates like zoledronic acid (ZA). In this study, we produced two different scaffolds containing silk-fibroin, chitosan, agarose and hydroxyapatite (HA) with and without bioactive glass. The aims of the study were to fabricate, physico-chemically characterize and evaluate the carrier properties of the scaffolds for recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) and ZA. Scaffolds were characterized using various methods to confirm their composition. During cell-material interactions, both scaffolds exhibited gradual but sustained proliferation of both C2C12 and MSCs for a period of 6weeks with augmentative effects on their phenotype indicated by elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) cuing towards osteogenic differentiation. In-vitro effects of rhBMP-2 and ZA contained within both the scaffolds was assessed on MC3T3 preosteoblast cells and the results show a significant increase in the ALP activity of the cells seeded on scaffolds with rhBMP-2. Further, the scaffold with both HA and bioactive glass was considered for the animal study. In-vitro, this scaffold released nearly 25% rhBMP-2 in 21-days and the addition of ZA did not affect the release. In the animal study, the scaffolds were combined with rhBMP-2 and ZA, rhBMP-2 or implanted alone in an ectopic muscle pouch model. Significantly higher bone formation was observed in the scaffold loaded with both rhBMP-2 and ZA as seen from micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27252151

  14. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K. K.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Smith, A.; Wulff, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoid with a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration. Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type of magnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the regenerator and desired internal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in the regenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area of superconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoid is shown to be a small fraction of the cost of the SC tape. Assuming a cost of the SC tape of 6000 /m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 /kg, the superconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive than the permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspect ratio of the regenerator. This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicating that the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large cooling power applications.

  15. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: Effect of spacer arm length and ligand density

    PubMed Central

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5–25 nmoles per cm2). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi- component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14- atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmole of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in monocomponent system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0 nmoles per cm2) in mono- and multi- component systems for 7- as well as 14- atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use. PMID:23703544

  16. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Zeeman Doppler imaging has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained form ZDI and activity cycles.

  17. In vitro callus and in vivo leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre stimulate β-cells regeneration and anti-diabetic activity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A Bakrudeen Ali; Rao, A S; Rao, M V

    2010-11-01

    A methanol extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaf and callus showed anti-diabetic activities through regenerating β-cells. Optimum callus was developed under stress conditions of blue light with 2,4-D (1.5 mg/l) and KN (0.5 mg/l), which induced maximum biomass of green compact callus at 45 days, as determined by growth curve analysis. Leaf and optimum callus extracts contains gymnemic acid, which was analyzed using TLC, HPTLC and HPLC methods. The research reported here deals with leaf and callus extracts of G. sylvestre, which significantly increase the weight of the whole body, liver, pancreas and liver glycogen content in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (Wistar rats). The gymnemic acid of leaf and callus extracts significantly increases the regeneration of β-cells in treated rats, when compared with the standard diabetic rats. It could have potential as a pharmaceutical drug for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). PMID:20537514

  18. Regenerator seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Leonard C. (Inventor); Pacala, Theodore (Inventor); Sippel, George R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  19. Enhancement of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Heintz, C

    1994-09-01

    We have studied the effect of adding extra satellite cells or soluble factors from crushed muscle on regeneration of minced fragments from rat tibialis muscle. The muscle mince was wrapped in an artificial epimysium to prevent adhesions and cell immigration from adjacent muscles. Regeneration was quantitatively assessed by electrophoretic determination of the muscle-specific form of creatine kinase. Control minces exhibited three periods of change in creatine kinase activity during a 7-week regeneration period. Activity fell rapidly during the first week, then rose gradually from 1-3 weeks and increased more rapidly from 3-7 weeks. To augment the original complement of myogenic cells, satellite cells were isolated from the contralateral muscle, purified by density gradient centrifugation, and expanded in culture for 3 days before adding to the muscle mince. The added cells resulted in a 3-fold enhancement of creatine kinase activity throughout the regeneration period. Soluble muscle extract incorporated into a collagen matrix also stimulated regeneration when added to muscle mince. The extract accelerated the rate of creatine kinase increase during the 1-3 week period beyond that observed in the control or cell augmented mince, suggesting that factors in the extract may facilitate revascularization or reinnervation. The specific activity of creatine kinase was increased in regenerates augmented with both cells and extract, indicating that the effects enhance primarily myogenic processes. PMID:7803846

  20. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  1. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  2. Formation of active region and quiescent prominence magnetic field configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.; Bao, J. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the formation of prominences, researchers studied chromospheric mass injection into an overlying coronal dipole magnetic field using a 2-D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model. Researchers propose that active region prominences are formed by chromospheric plasmas injected directly into the overlying coronal magnetic field and that quiescent prominences are formed by plasmas evaporated at the interface between spicules and corona. Hence, for the simulation of an active region prominence magnetic field we inject the mass from one side, but use a symmetric mass injection to form a quiescent prominence field configuration. Researchers try to find optimum conditions for the formation of Kippenhahn-Schuluter(K-S)type field configuration for stable support of the injection plasmas. They find that the formation of K-S type field configuration by mass injection requires a delicate balance between injection velocity, density, and overlying magnetic fields. These results may explain why a prominence does not form on every neutral line.

  3. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  4. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited. PMID:26177618

  5. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  6. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  7. Whirling Dervish Dynamos: Magnetic Activity in CV Secondaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    2003-07-01

    The mass-losing secondary stars of cataclysmic variables {CVs} are the most rapidly rotating cool dwarfs observable. Other rapid rotators show a maximal, "saturated" level of magnetic activity {e.g., X-ray emission}, but there are hints from contact binaries and young clusters that activity may be suppressed at the highest rotation rates. CV secondaries are thus important probes of magnetic dynamos at rotational extremes. Implications for CV evolution {e.g., the ``period gap", accretion variability} may also be profound. Unfortunately, study of CV secondaries is hampered by pesky accretion-related phenomena and reflection effects. As a result, little systematic work has been done. To explore activity in these stars, we therefore propose to study far-UV spectra of AM Her-type systems {which have no accretion disks} in deep photometric minima in which accretion is shut off. Magnetic-related emission from the secondary will be separated {in velocity} from residual accretion emission by observations near quadratures. Lower chromospheric irradiation due to the white dwarf primary will be removed by modeling, yielding the true level of magnetic activity on the secondary. We will compare the results to other dMe stars and draw implications for magnetic dynamos and activity at rotational extremes, and for CV evolution and behavior.

  8. Activity of glucose oxidase functionalized onto magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Gilles K; Irudayaraj, Joseph; McCarty, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles have been significantly used for coupling with biomolecules, due to their unique properties. Methods Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal co-precipitation of ferric and ferrous chloride using two different base solutions. Glucose oxidase was bound to the particles by direct attachment via carbodiimide activation or by thiophene acetylation of magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the size and structure of the particles while the binding of glucose oxidase to the particles was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The direct binding of glucose oxidase via carbodiimide activity was found to be more effective, resulting in bound enzyme efficiencies between 94–100% while thiophene acetylation was 66–72% efficient. Kinetic and stability studies showed that the enzyme activity was more preserved upon binding onto the nanoparticles when subjected to thermal and various pH conditions. The overall activity of glucose oxidase was improved when bound to magnetic nanoparticles Conclusion Binding of enzyme onto magnetic nanoparticles via carbodiimide activation is a very efficient method for developing bioconjugates for biological applications PMID:15762994

  9. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26597703

  10. Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's window into development.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of regeneration studies by looking in depth at Regeneration and evaluating Morgan's contribution. Although famous for his work with fruit fly genetics, studying Regeneration illuminates Morgan's earlier scientific approach which emphasized the importance of studying a diversity of organisms. Surveying a broad range of regenerative phenomena allowed Morgan to institute a standard scientific terminology that continues to inform regeneration studies today. Most importantly, Morgan argued that regeneration was a fundamental aspect of the growth process and therefore should be accounted for within developmental theory. Establishing important similarities between regeneration and development allowed Morgan to make the case that regeneration could act as a model of development. The nature of the relationship between embryogenesis and regeneration remains an active area of research. PMID:20665231

  11. The evaluation of the activity of medicinal remedies of plant and animal origin on the regeneration of the earthworms’ tail segments

    PubMed Central

    Bybin, Viktor Alexandrovich; Stom, Daevard Iosifovich

    2015-01-01

    Now, in the global community there is enough hard recommendation to replace the vertebrate test animals into simpler organisms at the development, testing, and evaluation of the quality pharmaceuticals. The feature of planarian to regenerate in new individual planarian from a piece, which is only 1/7 of the original animal, allowed to create the alternative methods of testing of drugs, dietary supplements, water quality, influence of electromagnetic fields, and other radiations. The tests on planarian can replace the ones that are held today on mammals. However, the lacks of the bioassays based on the planarian regeneration are the need for complex and expensive video equipment for recording the regrowth of worms’ body, the difficulties of culturing of flatworms and fairly long period of response. These difficulties can be avoided by using another group of the worms of type Annelida. The new individual can be fully recovered only from the front half of the body in many species of earthworms. Thus, the influence of the pharmaceuticals from earthworms, mummy, and Orthilia secunda on the ability of earthworms to regenerate lost tail segments has been investigated. The relations of the activity of preparations tested with doses and the time of the storage have been revealed. The principal possibility of applicability of the test reaction studied as a way to evaluate the effects and quality of remedies based on medicinal plants and earthworms has been shown. PMID:26692755

  12. The evaluation of the activity of medicinal remedies of plant and animal origin on the regeneration of the earthworms' tail segments.

    PubMed

    Bybin, Viktor Alexandrovich; Stom, Daevard Iosifovich

    2014-01-01

    Now, in the global community there is enough hard recommendation to replace the vertebrate test animals into simpler organisms at the development, testing, and evaluation of the quality pharmaceuticals. The feature of planarian to regenerate in new individual planarian from a piece, which is only 1/7 of the original animal, allowed to create the alternative methods of testing of drugs, dietary supplements, water quality, influence of electromagnetic fields, and other radiations. The tests on planarian can replace the ones that are held today on mammals. However, the lacks of the bioassays based on the planarian regeneration are the need for complex and expensive video equipment for recording the regrowth of worms' body, the difficulties of culturing of flatworms and fairly long period of response. These difficulties can be avoided by using another group of the worms of type Annelida. The new individual can be fully recovered only from the front half of the body in many species of earthworms. Thus, the influence of the pharmaceuticals from earthworms, mummy, and Orthilia secunda on the ability of earthworms to regenerate lost tail segments has been investigated. The relations of the activity of preparations tested with doses and the time of the storage have been revealed. The principal possibility of applicability of the test reaction studied as a way to evaluate the effects and quality of remedies based on medicinal plants and earthworms has been shown. PMID:26692755

  13. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  14. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physicochemical characteristics of magnetic microspheres containing tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yumei; Kaminski, Michael D.; Torno, Michael D.; Finck, Martha R.; Liu, Xianqiao; Rosengart, Axel J.

    2007-04-01

    As a first step toward improving the treatment of stroke, we are developing a magnetic carrier system to target tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to a thrombosis. We report the characterization of biodegradable microspheres containing tPA and magnetic iron oxide. The resultant microspheres were superparamagnetic with a magnetization of 6.9-8.7 emu/g. We encapsulated 5% tPA by mass which eluted from the microspheres to produce a solution concentration of 5.3- 19.6 μg/mL in tPA, which exceeds the theoretical thrombolysis concentration. Although smaller microspheres will be necessary for in vivo experiments, we have shown that sufficient tPA can be encapsulated and released in a magnetic matrix.

  16. High flare activity and redistribution of solar global magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Hejna, L.; Gesztelyi, L.

    It is demonstrated that, both on the global scale and on the scale of large and complex active regions, high flare activity is closely related to changes in the whole background magnetic-field distribution. It is found that the disturbances of the normal course of magnetic active longitudes (MAL) during the years 1965-1980 correlated with the maxima of flare activity, while the mode of the MAL distribution correlated with the mean level of solar flare numbers. The development of activity during the last two submaxima of the 21st cycle, especially the formation of the white-light flare region of April 1984, were parts of global processes in the solar atmosphere. They were accompanied by a complete reorganization of the MAL patterns, background field sector structure, and coronal holes.

  17. Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeider, B.; DeMoulin, P.; Aulanier, G.; Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional extrapolation of magnetic field lines from a magnetogram obtained at Kitt Peak allows us to understand the global structure of the NOAA active region 6718, as observed in X-rays with the Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) and in Ha with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph (MSDP) in Meudon on 1991 July 11. This active region was in a quiet stage. Bright X-ray loops connect plages having field strengths of approx. 300 G, while H-alpha fibriles connect penumbrae having strong spot fields to the surrounding network. Small, intense X-ray features in the moat region around a large spot, which could be called X-ray-bright points, are due mainly to the emergence of magnetic flux and merging of these fields with surrounding ones. A set of large-scale, sheared X-ray loops is observed in the central part of the active region. Based on the fit between the observed coronal structure and the field configurations (and assuming a linear force-free field), we propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing shear in outer portions of the active region may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field to a lower energy state in the progressively older portions of the AR.

  18. Reduced BACE1 activity enhances clearance of myelin debris and regeneration of axons in the injured peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Mohamed H.; Pan, Bao Han; Hoffman, Paul N.; Ferraris, Dana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nguyen, Thien; Wong, Philip C.; Price, Donald L.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Griffin, John W.

    2012-01-01

    β- site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease best known for its role in generating the amyloid β peptides that are present in plaques of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 has been an attractive target for drug development. In cultured embryonic neurons BACE1-cleaved N-terminal APP is further processed to generate a fragment that can trigger axonal degeneration, suggesting a vital role for BACE1 in axonal health. In addition, BACE1 cleaves neuregulin 1 type III, a protein critical for myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells during development. Here, we asked if axonal degeneration or axonal regeneration in adult nerves might be affected by inhibition or elimination of BACE1. We report that BACE1 knockout and wild-type nerves degenerated at a similar rate after axotomy and to a similar extent in the experimental neuropathies produced by administration of paclitaxel and acrylamide. These data indicate N-APP is not the sole culprit in axonal degeneration in adult nerves. Unexpectedly, however, we observed that BACE1 knockout mice had markedly enhanced clearance of axonal and myelin debris from degenerated fibers, accelerated axonal regeneration, and earlier reinnervation of neuromuscular junctions, compared to littermate controls. These observations were reproduced in part by pharmacological inhibition of BACE1. These data suggest BACE1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to accelerate regeneration and recovery after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:21490216

  19. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  20. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  1. Accretion, Disks, and Magnetic Activity in the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.; Frasca, A.; Alcalà, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present new photometric and spectroscopic data for the M-type members of the TW Hya association with the aim of a comprehensive study of accretion, disks and magnetic activity at the critical age of ~ 10 Myr where circumstellar matter disappears.

  2. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  3. Dynamics of an active magnetic particle in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cēbers, A; Ozols, M

    2006-02-01

    The motion of an active (self-propelling) particle with a permanent magnetic moment under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. We show that below a critical frequency of the external field the trajectory of a particle is a circle. For frequencies slightly above the critical point the particle moves on an approximately circular trajectory and from time to time jumps to another region of space. Symmetry of the particle trajectory depends on the commensurability of the field period and the period of the orientational motion of the particle. We also show how our results can be used to study the properties of naturally occurring active magnetic particles, so-called magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:16605340

  4. Unraveling tissue regeneration pathways using chemical genetics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lijoy K; Sengupta, Sumitra; Kawakami, Atsushi; Andreasen, Eric A; Löhr, Christiane V; Loynes, Catherine A; Renshaw, Stephen A; Peterson, Randall T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-11-30

    Identifying the molecular pathways that are required for regeneration remains one of the great challenges of regenerative medicine. Although genetic mutations have been useful for identifying some molecular pathways, small molecule probes of regenerative pathways might offer some advantages, including the ability to disrupt pathway function with precise temporal control. However, a vertebrate regeneration model amenable to rapid throughput small molecule screening is not currently available. We report here the development of a zebrafish early life stage fin regeneration model and its use in screening for small molecules that modulate tissue regeneration. By screening 2000 biologically active small molecules, we identified 17 that specifically inhibited regeneration. These compounds include a cluster of glucocorticoids, and we demonstrate that transient activation of the glucocorticoid receptor is sufficient to block regeneration, but only if activation occurs during wound healing/blastema formation. In addition, knockdown of the glucocorticoid receptor restores regenerative capability to nonregenerative, glucocorticoid-exposed zebrafish. To test whether the classical anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids is responsible for blocking regeneration, we prevented acute inflammation following amputation by antisense repression of the Pu.1 gene. Although loss of Pu.1 prevents the inflammatory response, regeneration is not affected. Collectively, these results indicate that signaling from exogenous glucocorticoids impairs blastema formation and limits regenerative capacity through an acute inflammation-independent mechanism. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting chemical genetics to define the pathways that govern vertebrate regeneration. PMID:17848559

  5. Disruption of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2 antioxidant signaling: a mechanism for impaired activation of stem cells and delayed regeneration of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Shelar, Sandeep Balu; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Shanmugam, Gobinath; Litovsky, Silvio Hector; Gounder, Sellamuthu S; Karan, Goutam; Arulvasu, Cinnasamy; Kensler, Thomas W; Hoidal, John R; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S

    2016-05-01

    Recently we have reported that age-dependent decline in antioxidant levels accelerated apoptosis and skeletal muscle degeneration. Here, we demonstrate genetic ablation of the master cytoprotective transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2 (Nrf2), aggravates cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced tibialis anterior (TA) muscle damage. Disruption of Nrf2 signaling sustained the CTX-induced burden of reactive oxygen species together with compromised expression of antioxidant genes and proteins. Transcript/protein expression of phenotypic markers of muscle differentiation, namely paired box 7 (satellite cell) and early myogenic differentiation and terminal differentiation (myogenin and myosin heavy chain 2) were increased on d 2 and 4 postinjury but later returned to baseline levels on d 8 and 15 in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, these responses were persistently augmented in Nrf2-null mice suggesting that regulation of the regeneration-related signaling mechanisms require Nrf2 for normal functioning. Furthermore, Nrf2-null mice displayed slower regeneration marked by dysregulation of embryonic myosin heavy chain temporal expression. Histologic observations illustrated that Nrf2-null mice displayed smaller, immature TA muscle fibers compared with WT counterparts on d 15 after CTX injury. Improvement in TA muscle morphology and gain in muscle mass evident in the WT mice was not noticeable in the Nrf2-null animals. Taken together these data show that the satellite cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation requires a functional Nrf2 system for effective healing following injury.-Shelar, S. B., Narasimhan, M., Shanmugam, G., Litovsky, S. H., Gounder, S. S., Karan, G., Arulvasu, C., Kensler, T. W., Hoidal, J. R., Darley-Usmar, V. M., Rajasekaran, N. S. Disruption of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2 antioxidant signaling: a mechanism for impaired activation of stem cells and delayed regeneration of skeletal muscle. PMID:26839378

  6. FENTON-DRIVEN CHEMICAL REGENERATION OF MTBE-SPENT GAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was chemically regenerated utilizing the Fenton mechanism. Two successive GAC regeneration cycles were performed involving iterative adsorption and oxidation processes: MTBE was adsorbed to the GAC, oxidized, r...

  7. Facile fabrication of magnetic carbon composites from hydrochar via simultaneous activation and magnetization for triclosan adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Liu, Yuchen; Luo, Gang; Qian, Feng; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2014-05-20

    Advanced magnetic carbon composites with high specific surface area and high microporosity are required for both environmentally and agriculturally related applications. However, more research is needed for the development of a facile and highly efficient synthesis process. In the present work, a novel approach of simultaneous activation and magnetization is proposed for the fabrication of magnetic carbon composites via the thermal pyrolysis of hydrochar (i.e., a solid residue from a hydrothermal carbonization process) that has been pretreated with mixtures of ferric chloride (FeCl3) and zinc chloride (ZnCl2). The main objective of this study is the investigation of the variation of characteristics of magnetic carbon composites produced at various conditions, as well as triclosan (TCS) adsorption behavior on such composites. This presented simple one-step synthesis method has the following advantages: (a) the hydrochar is activated with high surface area and pore volume (up to 1351 m(2)/g and 0.549 cm(3)/g, respectively), (b) activation and magnetization are simultaneously achieved without further modification, (c) the magnetic particles (γ-Fe2O3) are stable under an acidic medium (pH of 3.0 and 4.0), and (d) the products have the potential to remove TCS from aqueous solutions with a maximum adsorption capacity of 892.9 mg/g. The results indicate the effectiveness of this facile synthesis strategy in converting low-value biowaste into a functional material with high performance for pollutant removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:24738924

  8. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression, steroid-hormone secretion and proliferative activity of adrenocortical cells in the presence of proteasome inhibitors: in vivo studies on the regenerating rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Nowak, Magdalena; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibitors promote the accumulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Unexpectedly, this response was associated with a moderate lowering in the corticosterone secretion and proliferation rate of cultured cells. Hence, we studied the effects of proteasome inhibitors MG115 and MG132 on the secretion and proliferative activity of the regenerating adrenal cortex in rats 5 days after surgery. Animals were given two subcutaneous injections of 0.15 or 1.5 nmol/100 g of inhibitors 24 and 12 h before decapitation. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that StAR expression, both mRNA and protein, was markedly lower in regenerating adrenals than in the intact gland of sham-operated rats. Neither MG115 nor MG132 affected StAR expression in regenerating gland. Inhibitors induced a slight decrease in the plasma concentrations of aldosterone and corticosterone, but did not significantly alter metaphase index of the regenerating adrenal cortex. Our findings provide the first evidence that down-regulation of StAR occurs during the early stages of adrenal regeneration. Moreover, this suggests that the steroidogenic pathway is more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than that regulating proliferative activity of regenerating adrenal cortex in the rat. PMID:18425351

  9. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  10. Plant regeneration: cellular origins and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Momoko; Ogawa, Yoichi; Iwase, Akira; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    Compared with animals, plants generally possess a high degree of developmental plasticity and display various types of tissue or organ regeneration. This regenerative capacity can be enhanced by exogenously supplied plant hormones in vitro, wherein the balance between auxin and cytokinin determines the developmental fate of regenerating organs. Accumulating evidence suggests that some forms of plant regeneration involve reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells, whereas others are induced through the activation of relatively undifferentiated cells in somatic tissues. We summarize the current understanding of how plants control various types of regeneration and discuss how developmental and environmental constraints influence these regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27143753

  11. MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2014-04-01

    We compute for the first time the magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 2011 February 11-15 at 20° southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of the magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The magnetic helicity normalized to its theoretical maximum value, here referred to as relative helicity, is around 4% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ≈ 0.4 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to a scale of 2π/k ≈ 16 Mm. The same sign and a similar value are also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The modulus of the magnetic helicity spectrum shows a k {sup –11/3} power law at large wavenumbers, which implies a k {sup –5/3} spectrum for the modulus of the current helicity. A k {sup –5/3} spectrum is also obtained for the magnetic energy. The energy spectra evaluated separately from the horizontal and vertical fields agree for wavenumbers below 3 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to scales above 2 Mm. This gives some justification to our assumption of isotropy and places limits resulting from possible instrumental artifacts at small scales.

  12. Effect of liver regeneration on malignant hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ji-Hua; Line, Pål-Dag

    2014-01-01

    Liver regeneration after major surgery may activate occult micrometastases and facilitate tumor growth, leading to liver tumor recurrence. Molecular changes during liver regeneration can provide a microenvironment that stimulates intrahepatic tumor propagation through alterations in cellular signaling pathways, where activation and proliferation of mature hepatocytes, hepatic progenitor cells, non-parenchymal liver cells might favor both liver regeneration and tumor growth. This review highlights recent advances of tumor growth and development in the regenerating liver, possible mechanisms and clinical implications. PMID:25473170

  13. Detailed design of a resonantly enhanced axion-photon regeneration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, D. B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2009-10-01

    A resonantly enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axionlike particles is described. This experiment is a shining light through walls study, where photons traveling through a strong magnetic field are (in part) converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and convert (in part) back to photons in a second region of strong magnetic field. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon-regeneration magnet. Compared to simple single-pass photon regeneration, this technique would result in a gain of (F/{pi}){sup 2}, where F is the finesse of each cavity. This gain could feasibly be as high as 10{sup 10}, corresponding to an improvement in the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, of order (F/{pi}){sup 1/2}{approx}300. This improvement would enable, for the first time, a purely laboratory experiment to probe axion-photon couplings at a level competitive with, or superior to, limits from stellar evolution or solar axion searches. This report gives a detailed discussion of the scheme for actively controlling the two Fabry-Perot cavities and the laser frequencies, and describes the heterodyne signal detection system, with limits ultimately imposed by shot noise.

  14. Dissociation and regeneration kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vesnov, I G

    2010-06-23

    An improved mathematical model describing the dissociation and regenerations kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers is presented. It is shown that the calculation of the active medium composition of such lasers requires the equations of the gas-mixture kinetics to take into account the diffuse flow of oxygen atoms on metal electrodes and on the surface of heterogeneous catalysts used to reduce the degree of the carbon dioxide dissociation. The rate constants of the heterogeneous recombination reaction CO + O {yields} CO{sub 2} on the surface of alumina ceramics and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are determined. (active media)

  15. Synchronization analysis of the uterine magnetic activity during contractions

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Ceon; Preissl, Hubert; Murphy, Pam; Wilson, James D; Lowery, Curtis; Eswaran, Hari

    2005-01-01

    Background Our objective was to quantify and compare the extent of synchronization of the spatial-temporal myometrial activity over the human uterus before and during a contraction using transabdominal magnetomyographic (MMG) recordings. Synchronization can be an important indicator for the quantification of uterine contractions. Methods The spatialtermporal myometrial activity recordings were performed using a 151-channel noninvasive magnetic sensor system called SARA. This device covers the entire pregnant abdomen and records the magnetic field corresponding to the electrical activity generated in the uterine myometrium. The data was collected at 250 samples/sec and was resampled with 25 samples/sec and then filtered in the band of 0.1–0.2 Hz to study the primary magnetic activity of the uterus related to contractions. The synchronization between a channel pair was computed. It was inferred from a statistical tendency to maintain a nearly constant phase difference over a given period of time even though the analytic phase of each channel may change markedly during that time frame. The analytic phase was computed after taking Hilbert transform of the magnetic field data. The process was applied on the pairs of magnetic field traces (240 sec length) with a stepping window of 20 sec duration which is long enough to cover two cycle of the lowest frequency of interest (0.1 Hz). The analysis was repeated by stepping the window at 10 sec intervals. The spatial patterns of the synchronization indices covering the anterior transabdominal area were computed. For this, regional coil-pairs were used. For a given coil, the coil pairs were constructed with the surrounding six coils. The synchronization indices were computed for each coil pair, averaged over the 21 coil-pairs and then assigned as the synchronization index to that particular coil. This procedure was tested on six pregnant subjects at the gestational age between 29 and 40 weeks admitted to the hospital for

  16. Phenyl-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon for the effective removal of selected pharmaceutical and endocrine-disruptive compounds.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kien Tiek; Yoon, Yeomin; Snyder, Shane A; Jang, Min

    2016-06-01

    Triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS)-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon (MPPAC-TEPS) was prepared and characterized using various spectroscopic methods, and then tested for the removal of bisphenol A, carbamazepine, ibuprofen and clofibric acid. Magnetite film on MPPAC-TEPS was homogeneously coated on the outer surface of palm-based powdered activated carbon (PPAC) through a hydrothermal co-precipitation technique. Followed by silanization of phenyl-functionalized organosilane on MPPAC's magnetic film. As results, micro/mesopore surface area and volume increased without significant pore clogging and iron (Fe) dissolution under the acidic conditions was greatly decreased. The unique structural and chemical features of MPPAC-TEPS were found to be the main reasons for the enhanced adsorption rates and removal capacities of POPs. The presence of electrolytes and different pH values greatly affected the sorption efficiencies. The dominant sorption mechanism of POPs by MPPAC-TEPS was determined to be π-π interaction (physisorption), based on thermodynamic (ΔG°) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal regeneration at a low temperature (350 °C) was an effective method to desorb the retained POPs and enabled to reactivate MPPAC-TEPS with sustained sorption rates and capacities, whereas PPAC was largely exhausted. As a new type of sorbent for POPs, MPPAC-TEPS has operational advantages, such as magnetic separation and stable regeneration. PMID:26963238

  17. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration. PMID:25590808

  18. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration. PMID:25590808

  19. Towards age/rotation/magnetic activity relation with seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Savita

    2015-09-01

    The knowledge of stellar ages directly impacts the characterization of a planetary system as it puts strong constraints on the moment when the system was born. Unfortunately, the determination of precise stellar ages is a very difficult task. Different methods can be used to do so (based on isochrones or chemical element abundances) but they usually provide large uncertainties. During its evolution a star goes through processes leading to loss of angular momentum but also changes in its magnetic activity. Building rotation, magnetic, age relations would be an asset to infer stellar ages model independently. Several attempts to build empirical relations between rotation and age (namely gyrochronology) were made with a focus on cluster stars where the age determination is easier and for young stars on the main sequence. For field stars, we can now take advantage of high-precision photometric observations where we can perform asteroseismic analyses to improve the accuracy of stellar ages. Furthermore, the variability in the light curves allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar rotation and magnetic activity. By combining these precise measurements, we are on the way of understanding and improving relations between magnetic activity, rotation, and age, in particular at different stages of stellar evolution. I will review the status on gyrochronology relationships based on observations of young cluster stars. Then I will focus on solar-like stars and describe the inferences on stellar ages, rotation, and magnetism that can be provided by high-quality photometric observations such as the ones of the Kepler mission, in particular through asteroseismic analyses.

  20. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  1. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  2. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  3. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development. PMID:27367063

  4. Solar flare activity changes and global magnetic field disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Hejna, L.

    1988-01-01

    Published observational data on solar-flare activity in the period 1965-1980 are analyzed statistically and related to changes in the magnetic active longitudes (MALs) identified and studied by Bumba and Hejna (1986). MALs are long strips of single-polarity fields which may persist for about 8-30 rotations and display internal structure. The data sets employed are briefly characterized, and the results are presented graphically. Flare maxima are found to correlate well with MAL disturbances, especially during the ascending phase of the solar cycle and with MALs of negative polarity. The possible implications of these findings for the interplanetary magnetic field and for theoretical models of flare generation are indicated.

  5. Fine structure of the magnetic field in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Lev; Beskrovnaya, Nina; Ikhsanov, Nazar

    High-resolution observations with SOHO, SDO, TRACE, HINODE suggest that the solar magnetic field in active regions has a complicated fine structure. There is a large number of thin magnetic arcs extended from the photosphere to corona with almost constant cross-section. We explore a possibility to model the complex of interacting arcs in terms of a dynamical percolating network. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the flute instability of prominences and/or coronal condensations. We speculate around an assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenario as dynamical current percolation through a random resistors network in which the saltatory conduction is controlled by a local current level.

  6. Graphene Oxide-Copper Nanocomposite-Coated Porous CaP Scaffold for Vascularized Bone Regeneration via Activation of Hif-1α.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Chang, Qing; Xu, Ling; Li, Guanglong; Yang, Guangzheng; Ding, Xun; Wang, Xiansong; Cui, Daxiang; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-06-01

    Graphene has been studied for its in vitro osteoinductive capacity. However, the in vivo bone repair effects of graphene-based scaffolds remain unknown. The aqueous soluble graphene oxide-copper nanocomposites (GO-Cu) are fabricated, which are used to coat porous calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds for vascularized bone regeneration. The GO-Cu nanocomposites, containing crystallized CuO/Cu2 O nanoparticles of ≈30 nm diameters, distribute uniformly on the surfaces of the porous scaffolds and maintain a long-term release of Cu ions. In vitro, the GO-Cu coating enhances the adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). It is also found that by activating the Erk1/2 signaling pathway, the GO-Cu nanocomposites upregulate the expression of Hif-1α in BMSCs, resulting in the secretion of VEGF and BMP-2 proteins. When transplanted into rat with critical-sized calvarial defects, the GO-Cu-coated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds (CPC/GO-Cu) significantly promote angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Moreover, it is observed via histological sections that the GO-Cu nanocomposites are phagocytosed by multinucleated giant cells. The results suggest that GO-Cu nanocomposite coatings can be utilized as an attractive strategy for vascularized bone regeneration. PMID:26945787

  7. Development of a He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    SciTech Connect

    Jahromi, A. E.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-01-29

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  8. Loss of Dnmt1 catalytic activity reveals multiple roles for DNA methylation during pancreas development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan M.; Bosch, Justin A.; Goll, Mary G.; Hesselson, Daniel; Dong, P. Duc Si; Shin, Donghun; Chi, Neil C.; Shin, Chong Hyun; Schlegel, Amnon; Halpern, Marnie; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental mechanisms regulating gene expression and the stable acquisition of cell fate direct cytodifferentiation during organogenesis. Moreover, it is likely that such mechanisms could be exploited to repair or regenerate damaged organs. DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) are enzymes critical for epigenetic regulation, and are used in concert with histone methylation and acetylation to regulate gene expression and maintain genomic integrity and chromosome structure. We carried out two forward genetic screens for regulators of endodermal organ development. In the first, we screened for altered morphology of developing digestive organs, while in the second we screed for the lack of terminally differentiated cell types in the pancreas and liver. From these screens, we identified two mutant alleles of zebrafish dnmt1. Both lesions are predicted to eliminate dnmt1 function; one is a missense mutation in the catalytic domain and the other is a nonsense mutation that eliminates the catalytic domain. In zebrafish dnmt1 mutants, the pancreas and liver form normally, but begin to degenerate after 84 hours post fertilization (hpf). Acinar cells are nearly abolished through apoptosis by 100 hpf, though neither DNA replication, nor entry into mitosis are halted in the absence of detectable Dnmt1. However, endocrine cells and ducts are largely spared. Surprisingly, dnmt1 mutants and dnmt1 morpholino-injected larvae show increased capacity for pancreatic beta cell regeneration in an inducible model of pancreatic beta cell ablation. Thus, our data suggest that Dnmt1 is dispensable for pancreatic duct or endocrine cell formation, but not for acinar cell survival. In addition, Dnmt1 may influence the differentiation of pancreatic beta cell progenitors or the reprogramming of cells toward the pancreatic beta cell fate. PMID:19631206

  9. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  10. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  11. On the Predictability Limit of a Chaotic Flux Transport Solar Dynamo Model and its implications for Solar Magnetic Activity Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, S. M.; Fournier, A.; Aubert, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Sun's magnetic activity cycle undoubtedly plays a major role on space weather, having a strong impact not only in satellite operation but also probably on the long-term variability of the Earth's climate. It is therefore of great importance to better understand the mechanism underlying the magnetic activity cycle - the solar dynamo. Looking into the past, historical data points both to amplitude and frequency fluctuations of the solar magnetic cycles, displaying even episodes of no sunspot observations such as the Maunder Minimum. This observational constraint together with the intrinsic non-linear turbulent regime in which the solar dynamo operates suggests the chaotic nature of the system, and predictions of solar dynamo activity based on the comprehensive set of equations describing its evolution is currently out of reach. On the other hand, solar dynamo models based on the axisymmetric approximation of the Sun's large-scale magnetic field are able to reproduce some of the fundamental features of the solar magnetic field dynamics. These models often include two main processes to transform poloidal into toroidal fields and vice-versa: first the shearing action of solar differential rotation on an initial poloidal field generates the toroidal field; secondly helical motions due to the Coriolis force on toroidal fields acts as to regenerate the poloidal field. Assuming different strategies for the latter process, these models are currently being used in magnetic activity forecasting for cycle 24. For this purpose, it is of great importance to access the predictability limit of such kind of models and what this information will imply for solar magnetic activity forecasting. In this work we consider the case of an axisymmetric flux-transport dynamo in the kinematic regime, using both Babcock-Leighton effect at the surface and alpha-effect at the base of the convection zone as the mechanisms for poloidal field regeneration in a full meridional plane. Admitting

  12. Magnetization Reversal and Thermal Activation in Co/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrim, J. Mark; Kirby, Roger; Sellmyer, David

    2000-03-01

    Co/Pt multilayers not only display interesting intrinsic magnetic properties such as perpendicular anisotropy but also have technological applications. As grain sizes become smaller and smaller, the role of thermal activation becomes important in understanding magnetization reversal [1,2]. We have prepared [Co 3 Å/Pt 9 Å] x N thin films where N ranges from 6 to 24 by DC magnetron sputtering at various Ar pressures. As the sputtering gas pressure is changed, we find the lateral grain size changes from 20 nm to 45 nm. At the same time, the hysteresis loops become less square and the coercivity increases from a few hundred Oe to above 5 kOe. Activation volumes were determined for the samples both by the field sweep rate method and viscosity measurements. These results will be discussed in terms of simple models of thermally assisted magnetization reversal. This work is supported by NFS grant DMR 9623992 and CMRA. [1] J. S. Shen, R. D. Kirby, K. Wierman, Z. S. Shan, and D. J. Sellmyer, J. App. Phys. 73, 6418 (1993). [2] X. Chen and M. H. Kryder. J. App. Phys. 85, 5006 (1999).

  13. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  14. Radiative and magnetic properties of solar active regions. I. Global magnetic field and EUV line intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, A.; Ireland, J.

    2008-05-01

    Context: The relationships between the photospheric magnetic flux and either the X-ray or extreme ultraviolet emission from the solar atmosphere have been studied by several authors. Power-law relations have been found between the total magnetic flux and X-ray flux or intensities of the chromospheric, transition region, and coronal emission lines in solar active regions. These relations were then used to infer the mechanism of the coronal heating. Aims: We derive accurate power laws between EUV line intensities and the total magnetic flux in solar active regions and discuss their applications. We examine whether these global power laws are capable of providing the diagnostics of the coronal heating mechanism. Methods: This analysis is based on EUV lines recorded by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO for 48 solar active regions, as they crossed the central meridian in years 1996-1998. Four spectral lines are used: He I 584.3 Å (3×104 K), O V 629.7 Å (2.2×105 K), Mg IX 368.06 Å (9.5×105 K), and Fe XVI 360.76 Å (2.0×106 K). In particular, the Fe XVI 360.76 Å line, seen only in areas of enhanced heating in active regions or bright points, has not been used before for this analysis. Results: Empirical power laws are established between the total active region intensity in the lines listed above and the total magnetic flux. We demonstrate the usefulness of some spatially integrated EUV line intensities, I_T, as a proxy for the total magnetic flux, Φ, in active regions. We point out the approximate, empirical nature of the I_T-Φ relationships and discuss the interpretation of the global power index. Different power index values for transition region and coronal lines are explained by their different dependence on pressure under the assumption of hydrostatic loop models. However, the global power laws are dominated by the size of the active regions, and we demonstrate for the first time the difficulties in uniquely relating the power index in the

  15. Optimisation Of An Integrated Planar Magnetic For Active Antenna Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strixner, E.; Godzik, S.; Drechsler, E., , Dr.

    2011-10-01

    The envisaged German Space Missions HRWS and TerraSAR-X follow-on have triggered the development of a new generation of low voltage DC power supplies for active antennas at Astrium GmbH. The basic approachis tointegrate all power, digital, RF electronics and RF radiators required for one antenna tile into one common unit. Due to the high number of electronic boxes needed for one antenna it is essential to optimise cost, volume, efficiency and weight. The development of an integrated planar magnetic for power conversion is one contribution to this overall optimisation process. The focus of this presentation is the development of an integrated planar magnetic used for a half-bridge forward converter with secondary side synchronous current doubler. The converter is supplied from a 100 V power bus and delivers a total average output power of 280W for the drain supply of the pulsed RF power stages.

  16. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities. PMID:10790082

  17. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery.

    PubMed

    Faulconer, Emily K; von Reitzenstein, Natalia V Hoogesteijn; Mazyck, David W

    2012-01-15

    Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 μg/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N(2) (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 μg/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% (± 8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% (± 9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately ± 15%. PMID:22104766

  18. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  19. Effects of interplanetary magnetic field azimuth on auroral zone and polar cap magnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    During relatively quiet times in the period 1964-1968, AE is found to be greater when the interplanetary magnetic field (b sub IMF) is directed toward the sun in Jan., Feb., and Apr., and when B sub IMF is directed away from the sun in Oct. to Dec. Using Murmansk hourly H values and the AE components, AU and AL, it is shown that this sector dependence is present only in the negative H deviations. This observation supports the idea that negative bay magnitudes are determined chiefly by particle-produced ionization, while positive bay magnitudes are rather insensitive to increases in particle precipitation. The ratio of DP2-type magnetic activity in the southern polar cap to that in the northern polar cap is found to be greater by a factor of about 1.75 for B sub IMF toward the sun.

  20. Methylcobalamin increases Erk1/2 and Akt activities through the methylation cycle and promotes nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve injury model.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Temporin, Ko; Okamoto, Michio; Kuroda, Yusuke; Moritomo, Hisao; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2010-04-01

    Methylcobalamin is a vitamin B12 analog and is necessary for the maintenance of the nervous system. Although some previous studies have referred to the effects of methylcobalamin on neurons, the precise mechanism of this effect remains obscure. Here we show that methylcobalamin at concentrations above 100 nM promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival and that these effects are mediated by the methylation cycle, a metabolic pathway involving methylation reactions. We also demonstrate that methylcobalamin increases Erk1/2 and Akt activities through the methylation cycle. In a rat sciatic nerve injury model, continuous administration of high doses of methylcobalamin improves nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Therefore, methylcobalamin may provide the basis for better treatments of nervous disorders through effective systemic or local delivery of high doses of methylcobalamin to target organs. PMID:20045411

  1. Regeneration of neural crest derivatives in the Xenopus tadpole tail

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gufa; Chen, Ying; Slack, Jonathan MW

    2007-01-01

    Background After amputation of the Xenopus tadpole tail, a functionally competent new tail is regenerated. It contains spinal cord, notochord and muscle, each of which has previously been shown to derive from the corresponding tissue in the stump. The regeneration of the neural crest derivatives has not previously been examined and is described in this paper. Results Labelling of the spinal cord by electroporation, or by orthotopic grafting of transgenic tissue expressing GFP, shows that no cells emigrate from the spinal cord in the course of regeneration. There is very limited regeneration of the spinal ganglia, but new neurons as well as fibre tracts do appear in the regenerated spinal cord and the regenerated tail also contains abundant peripheral innervation. The regenerated tail contains a normal density of melanophores. Cell labelling experiments show that melanophores do not arise from the spinal cord during regeneration, nor from the mesenchymal tissues of the skin, but they do arise by activation and proliferation of pre-existing melanophore precursors. If tails are prepared lacking melanophores, then the regenerates also lack them. Conclusion On regeneration there is no induction of a new neural crest similar to that seen in embryonic development. However there is some regeneration of neural crest derivatives. Abundant melanophores are regenerated from unpigmented precursors, and, although spinal ganglia are not regenerated, sufficient sensory systems are produced to enable essential functions to continue. PMID:17521450

  2. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-05-17

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix. PMID:27140604

  3. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  4. Cosmic rays, solar activity, magnetic coupling, and lightning incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, J. T. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented and described that unifies the complex influence of several factors on spatial and temporal variation of lightning incidence. These factors include the cosmic radiation, solar activity, and coupling between geomagnetic and interplanetary (solar wind) magnetic fields. Atmospheric electrical conductivity in the 10 km region was shown to be the crucial parameter altered by these factors. The theory reconciles several large scale studies of lightning incidence previously misinterpreted or considered contradictory. The model predicts additional strong effects on variations in lightning incidence, but only small effects on the morphology and rate of thunderstorm development.

  5. Three-axis active magnetic attitude control asymptotical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Active magnetic attitude control system providing given inertial attitude is considered. Control algorithm is constructed on the basis of a planar motion model. It decreases attitude discrepancy. Alternative approach is based on the PD-controller design. System behavior is analyzed for specific motion cases and sometimes for specific inertia tensor (axisymmetrical satellite) using averaging technique. Overall satellite angular motion is covered. Necessary attitude is found to be accessible for some control parameters. Stability is proven and optimal algorithm parameters are obtained. Floquet-based analysis is performed to verify and broaden analytical results.

  6. Unbalance vibratory displacement compensation for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Xu, Longxiang; Zhu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    As the dynamic stiffness of radial magnetic bearings is not big enough, when the rotor spins at high speed, unbalance displacement vibration phenomenon will be produced. The most effective way for reducing the displacement vibration is to enhance the radial magnetic bearing stiffness through increasing the control currents, but the suitable control currents are not easy to be provided, especially, to be provided in real time. To implement real time unbalance displacement vibration compensation, through analyzing active magnetic bearings (AMB) mathematical model, the existence of radial displacement runout is demonstrated. To restrain the runout, a new control scheme-adaptive iterative learning control (AILC) is proposed in view of rotor frequency periodic uncertainties during the startup process. The previous error signal is added into AILC learning law to enhance the convergence speed, and an impacting factor β influenced by the rotor rotating frequency is introduced as learning output coefficient to improve the rotor control effects. As a feed-forward compensation controller, AILC can provide one unknown and perfect compensatory signal to make the rotor rotate around its geometric axis through power amplifier and radial magnetic bearings. To improve AMB closed-loop control system robust stability, one kind of incomplete differential PID feedback controller is adopted. The correctness of the AILC algorithm is validated by the simulation of AMB mathematical model adding AILC compensation algorithm through MATLAB soft. And the compensation for fixed rotational frequency is implemented in the actual AMB system. The simulation and experiment results show that the compensation scheme based on AILC algorithm as feed-forward compensation and PID algorithm as close-loop control can realize AMB system displacement minimum compensation at one fixed frequency, and improve the stability of the control system. The proposed research provides a new adaptive iterative learning

  7. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  8. Embryonic myogenesis pathways in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P

    2004-02-01

    Embryonic myogenesis involves the staged induction of myogenic regulatory factors and positional cues that dictate cell determination, proliferation, and differentiation into adult muscle. Muscle is able to regenerate after damage, and muscle regeneration is generally thought to recapitulate myogenesis during embryogenesis. There has been considerable progress in the delineation of myogenesis pathways during embryogenesis, but it is not known whether the same signaling pathways are relevant to muscle regeneration in adults. Here, we defined the subset of embryogenesis pathways induced in muscle regeneration using a 27 time-point in vivo muscle regeneration series. The embryonic Wnt (Wnt1, 3a, 7a, 11), Shh pathway, and the BMP (BMP2, 4, 7) pathway were not induced during muscle regeneration. Moreover, antagonists of Wnt signaling, sFRP1, sFRP2, and sFRP4 (secreted frizzled-related proteins) were significantly up-regulated, suggesting active inhibition of the Wnt pathway. The pro-differentiation FGFR4 pathway was transiently expressed at day 3, commensurate with expression of MyoD, Myogenin, Myf5, and Pax7. Protein verification studies showed fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) protein to be strongly expressed in differentiating myoblasts and newly formed myotubes. We present evidence that FGF6 is likely the key ligand for FGFR4 during muscle regeneration, and further suggest that FGF6 is released from necrotic myofibers where it is then sequestered by basal laminae. We also confirmed activation of Notch1 in the regenerating muscle. Finally, known MyoD coactivators (MEF2A, p/CIP, TCF12) and repressors (Twist, Id2) were strongly induced at appropriate time points. Taken together, our results suggest that embryonic positional signals (Wnt, Shh, and BMP) are not induced in postnatal muscle regeneration, whereas cell-autonomous factors (Pax7, MRFs, FGFR4) involving muscle precursor proliferation and differentiation are recapitulated by muscle regeneration. PMID

  9. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. PMID:26513754

  10. Analysis of Solar Magnetic Activity with the Wavelet Coherence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, V. M.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.; Mendoza, B. E.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Sosa, O.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.

    2007-05-01

    The origin, behavior and evolution of the solar magnetic field is one of the main challenges of observational and theoretical solar physics. Up to now the Dynamo theory gives us the best approach to the problem. However, it is not yet able to predict many features of the solar activity, which seems not to be strictly a periodical phenomenon. Among the indicators of solar magnetic variability there is the 11-years cycle of sunspots, as well as the solar magnetic cycle of 22 years (the Hale cycle). In order to provide more elements to the Dynamo theory that could help it in the predicting task, we analyze here the plausible existence of other periodicities associated with the solar magnetic field. In this preliminary work we use historical data (sunspots and aurora borealis), proxies (Be10 and C14) and modern instrumental data (Coronal Holes, Cosmic Rays, sunspots, flare indexes and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm). To find relationships between different time-frequency series we have employed the t Wavelet Coherence technique: this technique indicates if two time-series of solar activity have the same periodicities in a given time interval. If so, it determines whether such relation is a linear one or not. Such a powerful tool indicates that, if some periodicity at a given frequency has a confidence level below 95%, it appears very lessened or does not appear in the Wavelet Spectral Analysis, such periodicity does not exist . Our results show that the so called Glaisberg cycle of 80-90 years and the periodicity of 205 years (the Suess cycle) do not exist . It can be speculated that such fictitious periodicities hav been the result of using the Fourier transform with series with are not of stationary nature, as it is the case of the Be10 and C14 series. In contrast we confirm the presence of periodicities of 1.3, 1.7, 3.5, 5.5, 7, 60, 120 and 240 years. The concept of a Glaisberg cycle falls between those of 60 and 120 years. We conclude that the periodicity of 120 years

  11. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  12. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  13. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    PubMed Central

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  14. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  15. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  16. Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Boeder, A; Zimm, C

    2006-09-30

    Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate

  17. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  18. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  19. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs. PMID:27049946

  20. Recent advances in magnetic heat pump technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherka, Kenneth L.; Hull, John R.; Scheihing, Paul E.

    Magnetic heat pump (MHP)/refrigeration systems, incorporating state-of-the-art superconducting magnet technology, were assessed for industrial applications ranging from the liquefaction of gases (20 K to 100 K range) to cold storage refrigeration for food preservation (250 K to 320 K range). Initial market penetration of MHP technology is anticipated to occur in the gas liquefaction sector, since the performance advantages of magnetic refrigeration cycles relative to gas compression cycles and other conventional systems are more pronounced in the lower temperature ranges. Design options for rotary MHP devices include alternative regeneration schemes to obtain the temperature spans necessary for industrial applications. The results of preliminary design assessment studies indicate that active magnetic regenerator concepts, in which the magnetic working material also serves as the regenerative medium, offer advantages over alternative MHP designs for industrial applications.

  1. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  2. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  3. Magnetic Cloud Polarity and Geomagnetic Activities over Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J.

    2006-12-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that show fluxrope magnetic structures are named magnetic clouds (MCs). Majority of the MCs exhibit bipolar signature in their north-south component (Bz) in IMF measurements. The Bz component of a bipolar cloud is either NS (north first then turning south as the MC traverses the spacecraft) or SN. Studies show that the occurrence of these two types of MCs has some solar cycle dependence. However it appears to be a complex relationship as the switch between the two types of MCs is not concurrent with either the solar polar reversal or the time of the sunspot minimum when the new cycle sunspots start to appear. In this paper, we use ACE solar wind and IMF observations to obtain the most updated MC signatures and their temporal variation. In combination with our previously published results, we analyze MC polarity variations over the three solar cycles of 21, 22 and 23. Interpretations in terms of their solar sources will be attempted. On the other hand, the geomagnetic activities over the same solar cycles will be studied using geomagnetic indices. The geoeffectiveness of the MC will be evaluated in the aid of Dst indices.

  4. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  5. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.; Detloff, Megan R.; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  6. Fgf regulates dedifferentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) regulate critical biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In zebrafish, Fgf signaling plays an important role in the regeneration of the spinal cord, liver, heart, fin, and photoreceptors, although its exact mechanism of action is not fully understood. Utilizing an adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration model, we demonstrate that blocking Fgf receptor function using either a chemical inhibitor (SU5402) or a dominant-negative transgenic construct (dnFGFR1a:EGFP) impairs muscle regeneration. Adult zebrafish EOMs regenerate through a myocyte dedifferentiation process, which involves a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition and cell cycle reentry by differentiated myocytes. Blocking Fgf signaling reduced cell proliferation and active caspase 3 levels in the regenerating muscle with no detectable levels of apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Fgf signaling is involved in the early steps of dedifferentiation. Fgf signaling in regenerating myocytes involves the MAPK/ERK pathway: inhibition of MEK activity with U0126 mimicked the phenotype of the Fgf receptor inhibition on both muscle regeneration and cell proliferation, and activated ERK (p-ERK) was detected in injured muscles by immunofluorescence and western blot. Interestingly, following injury, ERK2 expression is specifically induced and activated by phosphorylation, suggesting a key role in muscle regeneration. We conclude that the critical early steps of myocyte dedifferentiation in EOM regeneration are dependent on Fgf signaling. PMID:27267062

  7. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Markel, Robert S.; Thompson, Michael J.; Leamon, Robert J.; Malanushenko, Anna V.; Davey, Alisdair R.; Howe, Rachel; Krista, Larisza D.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Gurman, Joseph B.; Pesnell, William D.

    2014-09-01

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  8. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  9. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  10. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  11. Specialized progenitors and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells. PMID:23404104

  12. Vertebrate-like regeneration in the invertebrate chordate amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Ildikó M. L.; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Escrivà, Hector

    2012-01-01

    An important question in biology is why some animals are able to regenerate, whereas others are not. The basal chordate amphioxus is uniquely positioned to address the evolution of regeneration. We report here the high regeneration potential of the European amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Adults regenerate both anterior and posterior structures, including neural tube, notochord, fin, and muscle. Development of a classifier based on tail regeneration profiles predicts the assignment of young and old adults to their own class with >94% accuracy. The process involves loss of differentiated characteristics, formation of an msx-expressing blastema, and neurogenesis. Moreover, regeneration is linked to the activation of satellite-like Pax3/7 progenitor cells, the extent of which declines with size and age. Our results provide a framework for understanding the evolution and diversity of regeneration mechanisms in vertebrates. PMID:22203957

  13. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  14. A 2-Tesla active shield magnet for whole body imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, F.J.; Elliott, R.T.; Hawksworth, D.G. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the development and testing of a 2T superconducting Active Shield magnet, with a 0.99m diameter warm bore for whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The magnet and cryostat were designed to meet the same performance standards as existing MRI magnets, but with the volume of the stray field region reduced to less than 4% of that for an unshielded magnet. The 0.5 mT stray field contour is within 5m axially and 3m radially of the magnet center. The system weight is only 14 tonnes.

  15. Pulp Regeneration: Current Approaches and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Yuan, Guohua; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), stem cell factor (SCF), and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) were used to achieve pulp-like tissue formation via a cell homing strategy. Studies on the cell sources of pulp regeneration might give some indications on the signaling molecular selection. The active recruitment of endogenous cells into root canals to regenerate pulp-like tissues is a novel concept that may offer an unprecedented opportunity for the near-term clinical translation of current biology-based therapies for dental pulp regeneration. PMID:27014076

  16. Detection of starquakes on magnetically active red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2015-07-01

    The scientific team of the Stephanion Observatory, University of Thessaloniki contributed to the research of high frequency optical oscillations on red dwarfs by participating in international programs for Multiwavelength observation of strong Flares of selected flare stars ([12]). These joined research shed plenty of light on the phenomenon of high frequency optical oscillations. Nevertheless a better understanding of the high-frequency oscillations demand a unified analysis of the flare light-curve for a wider time window covering pre-flare, flare and post flare and a broader band of frequencies. Thus in addition to the international campaign research the Stephanion Observatory group observe and analysis one colour (B, or U) observations of the Stephanion Observatory of different red dwarfs: EV Lac([1], [2] and [7]), AD Leo ([4] and [5]),YZ CMin ([3],[9]), V 390 Auri ([6],[10]), UV Cet([8]), at any stage of their activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flare! s).In this paper we present the analysis of the quiet state observations of the stars EV Lac, BY Drac , AD Leo, YZ Cmin in order to realize if starquakes appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star.

  17. Ilexonin A Promotes Neuronal Proliferation and Regeneration via Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway after Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bi-Qin; Zheng, Guan-Yi; Han, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Ilexonin A (IA), a component of the Chinese medicine Ilex pubescens, has been shown to be neuroprotective during ischemic injury. However, the specific mechanism underlying this neuroprotective effect remains unclear. Methods. In this study, we employed a combination of immunofluorescence staining, western blotting, RT-PCR, and behavioral tests, to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in IA regulation of neuronal proliferation and regeneration after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rodents. Results. Increases in β-catenin protein and LEF1 mRNA and decreases in GSK3β protein and Axin mRNA observed in IA-treated compared to control rodents implicated the canonical Wnt pathway as a key signaling mechanism activated by IA treatment. Furthermore, rodents in the IA treatment group showed less neurologic impairment and a corresponding increase in the number of Brdu/nestin and Brdu/NeuN double positive neurons in the parenchymal ischemia tissue following middle cerebral artery occlusion compared to matched controls. Conclusion. Altogether, our data indicate that IA can significantly diminish neurological deficits associated with cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats as a result of increased neuronal survival via modulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. PMID:27057202

  18. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats - A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn; Dutz, Silvio; Ko, Frank K.; Häfeli, Urs O.

    2015-04-01

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  19. De Novo Kidney Regeneration with Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported on techniques to mobilize and activate endogenous stem-cells in injured kidneys or to introduce exogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Despite many recent advantages in renal regenerative therapy, chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality and the number of CKD patients has been increasing. When the sophisticated structure of the kidneys is totally disrupted by end stage renal disease (ESRD), traditional stem cell-based therapy is unable to completely regenerate the damaged tissue. This suggests that whole organ regeneration may be a promising therapeutic approach to alleviate patients with uncured CKD. We summarize here the potential of stem-cell-based therapy for injured tissue repair and de novo whole kidney regeneration. In addition, we describe the hurdles that must be overcome and possible applications of this approach in kidney regeneration. PMID:23251079

  20. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  1. Modulation of cortical oscillatory activity during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brignani, Debora; Manganotti, Paolo; Rossini, Paolo M; Miniussi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (< or =1 Hz inhibition vs. > or =5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics. PMID:17557296

  2. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    A 3-axis active attitude control system with only one rotating part was developed using a momentum wheel with magnetic gimballing capability as a torque actuator for all three body axes. A brief description of magnetic bearing technology is given. It is concluded that based on this technology an integrated energy storage/attitude control system with one air of counterrotating rings could reduce the complexity and weight of conventional systems.

  3. A robust transcriptional program in newts undergoing multiple events of lens regeneration throughout their lifespan.

    PubMed

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Qi, Feng; Yadav, Manisha C; Millán, José Luis; Toyama, Fubito; Chiba, Chikafumi; Eguchi, Yukiko; Eguchi, Goro; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2015-01-01

    Newts have the ability to repeatedly regenerate their lens even during ageing. However, it is unclear whether this regeneration reflects an undisturbed genetic activity. To answer this question, we compared the transcriptomes of lenses, irises and tails from aged newts that had undergone lens regeneration 19 times with the equivalent tissues from young newts that had never experienced lens regeneration. Our analysis indicates that repeatedly regenerated lenses showed a robust transcriptional program comparable to young never-regenerated lenses. In contrast, the tail, which was never regenerated, showed gene expression signatures of ageing. Our analysis strongly suggests that, with respect to gene expression, the regenerated lenses have not deviated from a robust transcriptional program even after multiple events of regeneration throughout the life of the newt. In addition, our study provides a new paradigm in biology, and establishes the newt as a key model for the study of regeneration in relation to ageing. PMID:26523389

  4. Activity of Lipase and Chitinase Immobilized on Superparamagnetic Particles in a Rotational Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Toru; Sawai, Miyuki; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    We immobilize hydrolases such as lipase and chitinase on superparamagnetic particles, which are subjected to a rotational magnetic field, and measure the activities of the enzymes. We find that the activities of lipase and chitinase increase in the rotational magnetic field compared to those in the absence of a magnetic field and reach maximum at certain frequencies. The present methodology may well be utilized for the design and development of efficient micro reactors and micro total analysis systems (μ-TASs). PMID:23799111

  5. Novel ferroferric oxide/polystyrene/silver core-shell magnetic nanocomposite microspheres as regenerable substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Chong; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Wei-Liang; Ren, Man-Man; Liu, Qin-Ze; Yang, Zhi-Zhou; Wang, Xin-Qiang; Duan, Xiu-Lan

    2016-02-01

    A novel Ag-coated Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell microsphere has been designed via fabrication of Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell magnetic microsphere through a seed emulsion polymerization, followed by deposition of Ag nanoparticles using in-situ reduction method. Such magnetic microspheres can be utilized as sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates, using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a probe molecule, with both stable and reproducible performances. The SERS detection limit of R6G decreased to 1 × 10-10 M and the enhancement factor of this substrate on the order of 106 was obtained. In addition, owing to possessing excellent magnetic properties, the resultant microspheres could be separated rapidly by an external magnetic field and utilized repeatedly for three times at least. Therefore, the unique renewable property suggests a new route to eliminate the single-use problem of traditional SERS substrates and will be promising for the practical application.

  6. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules against neoplastic cell lines under AC magnetic field activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqueiro, A. M.; Siqueira-Moura, M. P.; Jardim, D. R.; Primo, F. L.; Morais, P. C.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Suchocki, P.; Tedesco, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The goals of this study are to evaluate invitro compatibility of magnetic nanomaterials and their therapeutic potential against cancer cells. Highly stable ionic magnetic fluid sample (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) and Selol were incorporated into polymeric nanocapsules by nanoprecipitation method. The cytotoxic effect of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules was assessed on murine melanoma (B16-F10) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines following AC magnetic field application. The influence of different nanocapsules on cell viability was investigated by colorimetric MTT 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. In the absence of AC magnetic field Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules, containing 100 µg/mL Selol plus 5 × 1012 particle/mL, showed antitumoral activity of about 50% on B16-F10 melanoma cells while OSCC carcinoma cells demonstrated drug resistance at all concentrations of Selol and magnetic fluid (range of 100-500 µg/mL Selol and 5 × 1012-2.5 × 1013 particle/mL). On the other hand, under AC applied fields (1 MHz and 40 Oe amplitude) B16-F10 cell viability was reduced down to 40.5% (±3.33) at the highest concentration of nanoencapsulated Selol. The major effect, however, was observed on OSCC cells since the cell viability drops down to about 33.3% (±0.38) under application of AC magnetic field. These findings clearly indicate that the Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules present different toxic effects on neoplastic cell lines. Further, the cytotoxic effect was maximized under AC magnetic field application on OSCC, which emphasizes the effectiveness of the magnetohyperthermia approach.

  8. Optimization of Regenerators for AMRR Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, Gregory; Klein, Sanford; Brey, William; Moine, Alexandra; Nielson, Kaspar

    2015-06-18

    Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) systems have no direct global warming potential or ozone depletion potential and hold the potential for providing refrigeration with efficiencies that are equal to or greater than the vapor compression systems used today. The work carried out in this project has developed and improved modeling tools that can be used to optimize and evaluate the magnetocaloric materials and geometric structure of the regenerator beds required for AMRR Systems. There has been an explosion in the development of magnetocaloric materials for AMRR systems over the past few decades. The most attractive materials, based on the magnitude of the measured magnetocaloric effect, tend to also have large amounts of hysteresis. This project has provided for the first time a thermodynamically consistent method for evaluating these hysteretic materials in the context of an AMRR cycle. An additional, practical challenge that has been identified for AMRR systems is related to the participation of the regenerator wall in the cyclic process. The impact of housing heat capacity on both passive and active regenerative systems has been studied and clarified within this project. This report is divided into two parts corresponding to these two efforts. Part 1 describes the work related to modeling magnetic hysteresis while Part 2 discusses the modeling of the heat capacity of the housing. A key outcome of this project is the development of a publically available modeling tool that allows researchers to identify a truly optimal magnetocaloric refrigerant. Typically, the refrigeration potential of a magnetocaloric material is judged entirely based on the magnitude of the magnetocaloric effect and other properties of the material that are deemed unimportant. This project has shown that a material with a large magnetocaloric effect (as evidenced, for example, by a large adiabatic temperature change) may not be optimal when it is accompanied by a large hysteresis

  9. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  10. Magnetic graphene oxide-polystyrene and magnetic activated carbon-polystyrene nanocomposites as sorbents for bisphenol A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekos, Kyriazis; Kampouraki, Zoi Christina; Samanidou, Victoria; Deliyanni, Eleni

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic graphene oxide-polystyrene and magnetic activated carbon-polystyrene nanocomposites as sorbents for bisphenol A. Kyriazis Rekos1, Zoi Christina Kampouraki1, Victoria Samanidou2, Eleni Deliyanni1 1 Laboratory of General and Inorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece 2 Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece The aim of this work was to prepare and characterize novel composites of magnetic activated carbon or magnetic graphene oxide with polystyrene (GO/PSm), through one step simple and effective route. Μagnetite nanoparticles, prepared in the laboratory, were dispersed in the presence of activated carbon (C) or graphene oxide (GO) in a polystyrene (PS) solution in dimethylformamide, at elevated temperature, for the fabrication of the magnetite-Carbon-PS (C-PSm) and magnetite- Graphene Oxide-PS (GO-PSm) hybrid-nanoparticles. For comparison, C-PS and GO-PS composites were also prepared in the same route. The nanocomposites were tested for their sorption ability for an endocrine disruptor, bisphenol A. The effect of solution pH, initial concentration, contact time and temperature were examined. The magnetic graphite oxide-polystyrene presented higher adsorption capacity (100 mg/g) than the non magnetic composites (70 mg/g), as well as than initial graphite oxide (20 mg/g). FTIR, XRD, BET, TGA, VSM and SEM were performed in order to investigate the role of the PS on the better adsorption performance of the mGO-PS nanocomposites. The characterization with these techniques revealed the possible interactions of the surface functional groups of activated carbon and/or graphite oxide with polystyrene that resulted in the better performance of the magnetic nanocomposites for bisphenol A adsorption.

  11. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: SHARPs - Space-Weather HMI Active Region Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Turmon, M.; Liu, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2014-09-01

    A new data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches ( SHARPs) is now available. SDO/HMI is the first space-based instrument to map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field with high cadence and continuity. The SHARP data series provide maps in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations for their entire lifetime; map quantities include the photospheric vector magnetic field and its uncertainty, along with Doppler velocity, continuum intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic field. Furthermore, keywords in the SHARP data series provide several parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic-field distribution and its deviation from a potential-field configuration. These indices may be useful for active-region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. The indices are calculated per patch and are available on a twelve-minute cadence. Quick-look data are available within approximately three hours of observation; definitive science products are produced approximately five weeks later. SHARP data are available at jsoc.stanford.edu and maps are available in either of two different coordinate systems. This article describes the SHARP data products and presents examples of SHARP data and parameters.

  12. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings used for the suspension of momentum wheels provide conclusive advantages: the low friction torques and the absence of abrasion allow the realization of lightweight high speed wheels with high angular momentum and energy storage capacity and virtually unlimited lifetime. The use of actively controlled bearings provides a magnetic gimballing capability by applying the external signals to the two servo loops controlling the rotational degrees of freedom. Thus, an attitude control system can be realized by using only one rotating mass for 3-axis active satellite stabilization.

  13. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme‐derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self‐renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap‐junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research. PMID:27499869

  14. Silymarin Accelerates Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ping; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Lin, Chien-Chung; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Padma, V. Vijaya; Pan, Lung-Fa; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Partial hepatectomy (PHx) is a liver regeneration physiological response induced to maintain homeostasis. Liver regeneration evolved presumably to protect wild animals from catastrophic liver loss caused by toxins or tissue injury. Silymarin (Sm) ability to stimulate liver regeneration has been an object of curiosity for many years. Silymarin has been investigated for use as an antioxidant and anticarcinogen. However, its use as a supportive treatment for liver damage is elusive. In this study, we fed silymarin (Sm, 25 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 weeks. Surgical 2/3 PHx was then conducted on the rats at 6 hrs, 24 hrs, and 72 hrs. Western blot and RT-PCR were conducted to detect the cell cycle activities and silymarin effects on hepatic regeneration. The results showed that silymarin enhanced liver regeneration by accelerating the cell cycle in PHx liver. Silymarin led to increased G1 phase (cyclin D1/pRb), S phase (cyclin E/E2F), G2 phase (cyclin B), and M phase (cyclin A) protein and mRNA at 6 hrs, 24 hrs, and 72 hrs PHx. HGF, TGFα, and TGFβ1 growth factor expressions were also enhanced. We suggest that silymarin plays a crucial role in accelerated liver regeneration after PHx. PMID:26339266

  15. Reorganization of Photospheric Magnetic Fields in Active Regions During Energetic Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. C.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The reorganization of the photospheric magnetic field may be important for flaring activity. In this work we use the time evolution of the magnetic power spectra to identify for which length scales the reorganization of the active region magnetic field is most closely related to energetic flares. Our results show that the reorganization occurs mainly for length scales larger than 12.6 Mm and may start much before the time of the flare, but the time evolution of magnetic power spectra does not show regular patterns. An analysis of the dissipation spectra suggests that the dissipation takes place at all spatial scales, including small wavenumbers in which more energy is available.

  16. Expression and localization of regenerating gene I in a rat liver regeneration model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingshu; Koyota, Souichi; Zhou, Xiaoping; Ueno, Yasuharu; Ma Li; Kawagoe, Masami; Koizumi, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2009-03-13

    Regenerating gene (Reg) I has been identified as a regenerative/proliferative factor for pancreatic islet cells. We examined Reg I expression in the regenerating liver of a rat model that had been administered 2-acetylaminofluorene and treated with 70% partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH model), where hepatocyte and cholangiocyte proliferation was suppressed and the hepatic stem cells and/or hepatic progenitor cells were activated. In a detailed time course study of activation of hepatic stem cells in the 2-AAF/PH model, utilizing immunofluorescence staining with antibodies of Reg I and other cell-type-specific markers, we found that Reg I-expressing cells are present in the bile ductules and increased during regeneration. Reg I-expressing cells were colocalized with CK19, OV6, and AFP. These results demonstrate that Reg I is significantly upregulated in the liver of the 2-AAF/PH rat model, accompanied by the formation of bile ductules during liver regeneration.

  17. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

  18. Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity Cycles on Rotational Period in a Nonlinear Solar-type Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account nonlinear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation from either magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  19. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  20. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  1. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  2. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  3. Flare activity, sunspot motions, and the evolution of vector magnetic fields in Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Machado, Marcos E.; Smith, Jesse B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic and dynamical circumstances leading to the 1B/M4 flare of November 5, 1980 are studied, and a strong association is found between the buildup of magnetic shear and the onset of flare activity within the active region. The development of shear, as observed directly in vector magnetograms, is consistent in detail with the dynamical history of the active region and identifies the precise location of the optical and hard-X-ray kernels of the flare emission.

  4. Regeneration of guinea PIG facial nerve: the effect of hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, E.; Horodiceanu, E.; Ishay, J. S.

    Exposure to moderate hypergravity improves the regenerative capacity of sectioned guinea-pig facial nerve. The improvement in regeneration is tri-directional as follows: a) an average 1.7 fold increase in rate of regeneration in guinea pigs subjected to hypergravity; b) a 25% enhancement of facial muscle activity following the exposure to hypergravity; and c) improvement in the quality of regeneration from an esthetic standpoint. A good correlation was recorded between the histological structure of the severed nerve at the end of the regeneration and the clinical results.

  5. Conceptual design of large-bore superconducting quadrupoles with active magnetic shielding for the AHF

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Kashikhin et al.

    2003-06-09

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility, under study by LANL, uses large-bore superconducting quadrupole magnets. In the paper we discuss the conceptual design of such quadrupoles using active shielding. The magnets are specified to achieve gradients of up to 24 T/m with a 28-cm warm bore and to have 0.01% field quality. Concepts for quench protection and the magnet cryosystems are also briefly discussed to confirm the viability of the proposed design.

  6. Microwave mode shifting antenna system for regenerating particulate filters

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

    2011-04-26

    A regeneration system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter including a microwave energy absorbing surface, and an antenna system comprising N antennas and an antenna driver module that sequentially drives the antenna system in a plurality of transverse modes of the antenna system to heat selected portions of the microwave absorbing surface to regenerate the PM filter, where N is an integer greater than one. The transverse modes may include transverse electric (TE) and/or transverse magnetic (TM) modes.

  7. Magnetic fields and activity of the sun and stars - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    Recent work on the observation and theory of solar and stellar magnetic field activity and its relation to stellar activity is reviewed, emphasizing those aspects relevant to the problem of activity of red dwarf stars. New observational facts relevant to understanding the root cause of stellar surface activity are summarized and theoretical questions concerning the underlying physical basis for the observed correlations between stellar activity, rotation, and magnetic fields are addressed. These include dyanamo theory and the rotation-activity connection as well as flux tube dynamics and plasma heating.

  8. Toward Modelling Topsoil Magnetic Susceptibility for Demining Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, J. A.; Dearing, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Landmine Monitor estimates that landmines cause up to 20,000 fatalities and casualties worldwide every year, in over 100 countries affected by landmine contamination. Although detection technologies have become more sophisticated, the metal detector still remains the most widely employed detection system in landmine affected regions. With increased use of minimum metal mines, the performance and sensitivity of metal detectors are increasingly challenged. In addition to mine constituents, depth of burial and orientation, soil properties significantly affect metal detection capabilities. Soils with high magnetic susceptibility, in particular those dominated by viscous components, interfere with the response signal in both frequency and time domain metal detection systems. Using Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) as a pilot region, we created an expert system to predict topsoil susceptibility from environmental information within a SOTER data base. Initially, the knowledge base is constructed from published relationships of environmental parameters and magnetic susceptibility and knowledge of experts in the field of soil magnetism. The knowledge base is underpinned by environmental conditions that are known to enhance or reduce magnetic susceptibility in topsoils. Where semi-quantitative data exists, transfer-functions are used to provide first approximations of susceptibility classes and offer a basis for a probability score for the susceptibility class. As a first approximation, susceptibility values are categorized into five continuous classes delimited by published magnetic susceptibility ranges in topsoils. The predicted susceptibility maps result in regional contrasts, delineated by the spatial scale of the environmental information. Further development of the model using a Baysean rule-based system with fuzzy boundaries is anticipated. Validation of the model is proposed using archived soil survey samples from BiH. In addition to providing essential data for

  9. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  10. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  11. Nanomechanical control of the activity of enzymes immobilized on single-domain magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Gribanovskii, S. L.; Klyachko, N. L.; Kabanov, A. V.

    2014-06-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are used to analyze the main regularities of deformation of biologically active molecules caused by the nonthermal effect of low-frequency magnetic field on single-domain magnetic nanoparticles to the surfaces of which the macromolecules are chemically bound.

  12. Active versus passive transformations in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Del Castillo, G. F.; Rosete-Álvarez, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that, when there is a magnetic field present, in the framework of classical or quantum mechanics, the active translations differ from the passive ones and that the canonical momentum is not the generator of them. It is also shown that an infinitesimal generator of passive translations or rotations exists only if the magnetic field is invariant under these transformations.

  13. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C–H activation of amines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of ...

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Coene, A. Dupré, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  16. Videomagnetograph studies of solar magnetic fields. II - Field changes in an active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoolman, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Using the Caltech videomagnetograph, we obtained a 6.5-hr movie of the magnetic fields in a young active region. The major contribution to the short term magnetic evolution of the region was provided by many discrete magnetic points which move in apparently random directions with typical velocities of 0.4 - 1.0 km/sec. The majority of these features appear to be footpoints of new EFR's, which emerge at an observed rate of one to two per hour. The pattern of the motions suggests that the magnetic evolution of a growing region cannot be principally due to photospheric convective cells.

  17. Proteases from the Regenerating Gut of the Holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix

    PubMed Central

    Lamash, Nina E.; Dolmatov, Igor Yu

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2–4 of regeneration), the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed. PMID:23505505

  18. Development of a satellite flywheel family operating on one active axis magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poubeau, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings with radial passive centering and axial active control of the rotor position are described in terms of optimization for satellite flywheel applications and kinetic storage of energy for satellites.

  19. Leach-proof magnetic thrombolytic nanoparticles and coatings of enhanced activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Andrey S.; Vinogradov, Vasiliy V.; Dudanov, Ivan P.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that magnetic thrombolytic composites is an emerging area, all known so far systems are based on the similar mechanism of action: thrombolytic enzyme releases from the magnetic carrier leaving non-active matrix, thus making the whole system active only for a limited period of time. Such systems often have very complex structure organization and composition, consisting of materials not approved for parenteral injection, making them poor candidates for real clinical trials and implementation. Here we report, for the first time, the production of thrombolytic magnetic composite material with non-releasing behavior and prolonged action. Obtained composite shows good thrombolytic activity, consists of fully biocompatible materials and could be applied as infinitely active thrombolytic coatings or magnetically-targetable thrombolytic agents.

  20. Leach-proof magnetic thrombolytic nanoparticles and coatings of enhanced activity

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Andrey S.; Vinogradov, Vasiliy V.; Dudanov, Ivan P.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that magnetic thrombolytic composites is an emerging area, all known so far systems are based on the similar mechanism of action: thrombolytic enzyme releases from the magnetic carrier leaving non-active matrix, thus making the whole system active only for a limited period of time. Such systems often have very complex structure organization and composition, consisting of materials not approved for parenteral injection, making them poor candidates for real clinical trials and implementation. Here we report, for the first time, the production of thrombolytic magnetic composite material with non-releasing behavior and prolonged action. Obtained composite shows good thrombolytic activity, consists of fully biocompatible materials and could be applied as infinitely active thrombolytic coatings or magnetically-targetable thrombolytic agents. PMID:27321930

  1. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  2. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, H. M.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-06-20

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both nonlinear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with the ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation (<60%) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to the total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  3. Dependence of Sunspot Properties on Flare Productivity in Different Magnetic Types of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Yu, Hsiu-Shan; Tsai, Tsung-Che

    2016-05-01

    There is a general trend that intense flares preferentially originate from the large-size active regions (ARs) with strong magnetic fields and complex magnetic configurations. Based on two categories of daily sunspot and flare information, GOES soft X-ray measurements, and HMI vector magnetograms, we attempt to address the dependence of flare activity on AR properties and to clarify the significance of magnetic parameters on flare productivity statistically. Our results show that the long-duration and short-duration βγδ-type ARs have different behaviors of flare activity, indicating that the evolution profiles of ARs should be considered. In addition, a significant difference in source field strength, which can be regarded as the proxy of photospheric magnetic free energy, between flaring and flare-quiet βγδ-type ARs is found in this study. We also notice that the large flares from flaring βγδ-type ARs tend to occur at the regions of strong source field together with small field-weighted shear angle. It implies that the magnetic free energy provided by a complex AR is high enough to trigger a flare event even with weak magnetic shear on the photosphere. We thus propose that the magnetic free energy represented by the source field strength rather than the photospheric magnetic complexity would be a better quantity to characterize the flare productivity of an AR, especially for the occurrence of intense flares.

  4. Study of magnetic field expansion using a plasma generator for space radiation active protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiang-Hong; Jia, Shao-Xia; Xu, Feng; Bai, Yan-Qiang; Wan, Jun; Liu, Hong-Tao; Jiang, Rui; Ma, Hong-Bo; Wang, Shou-Guo

    2013-09-01

    There are many active protecting methods including Electrostatic Fields, Confined Magnetic Field, Unconfined Magnetic Field and Plasma Shielding etc. for defending the high-energy solar particle events (SPE) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) in deep space exploration. The concept of using cold plasma to expand a magnetic field is the best one of all possible methods so far. The magnetic field expansion caused by plasma can improve its protective efficiency of space particles. One kind of plasma generator has been developed and installed into the cylindrical permanent magnet in the eccentric. A plasma stream is produced using a helical-shaped antenna driven by a radio-frequency (RF) power supply of 13.56 MHz, which exits from both sides of the magnet and makes the magnetic field expand on one side. The discharging belts phenomenon is similar to the Earth's radiation belt, but the mechanism has yet to be understood. A magnetic probe is used to measure the magnetic field expansion distributions, and the results indicate that the magnetic field intensity increases under higher increments of the discharge power.

  5. The response of the mid-latitude thermospheric wind to magnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, T.; Dyson, P. L.

    1985-04-01

    Observations of the thermospheric wind at mid-latitude have been carried out using a Febry-Perot interferometer to measure the Doppler shift of the night-time OI emission at a wavelength of 630 nm. Results are presented for 12 different summer nights which show that the zonal wind has a distinct feature associated with magnetic activity. The influence of magnetic activity on the maximum strength, and duration of both the eastward and westward versions of the thermospheric wind, is discussed.

  6. The cell biology of regeneration

    PubMed Central

    King, Ryan S.

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of complex structures after injury requires dramatic changes in cellular behavior. Regenerating tissues initiate a program that includes diverse processes such as wound healing, cell death, dedifferentiation, and stem (or progenitor) cell proliferation; furthermore, newly regenerated tissues must integrate polarity and positional identity cues with preexisting body structures. Gene knockdown approaches and transgenesis-based lineage and functional analyses have been instrumental in deciphering various aspects of regenerative processes in diverse animal models for studying regeneration. PMID:22391035

  7. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-05-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  8. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  9. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  10. From Compass to Hard Drive--Integrated Activities for Studying Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a range of practical activities that allows students to investigate the properties and applications of magnets. The activities can be used in isolation or used together to build a rounded understanding of the subject area. The activities include simple demonstrations using common or inexpensive equipment, hands-on experiments for small…

  11. Young Scientists Explore Electricity & Magnetism. Book 7--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of electricity and magnetism. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for…

  12. Regeneration: rewarding, but potentially risky.

    PubMed

    Egger, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    Some bilaterally symmetric animals, such as flatworms, annelids, and nemerteans, are renowned for their outstanding regeneration capacity-even a fraction of the body can give rise to a complete new animal. However, not all species of these taxa can regenerate equally well-some cannot regenerate at all. If regeneration was purely beneficial, why cannot all of members of the flat, round, and ribbon worms regenerate? At that, why cannot all other bilaterians, including humans, regenerate as well? Regeneration capacity is an obvious advantage in accidental, predatory, and parasitic loss of body parts and is also closely intertwined with asexual reproduction strategies. Regeneration is suspected to play a role in life span extension or even rejuvenation. An answer for reduced or missing regeneration capacity in many species may be found in limitations of the body plan, high costs, and inherent dangers of regeneration. Defects in adults and juveniles are shown, and similarities between development and regeneration are pointed out. With a focus on some worms, but also highlighting comparisons with other animal taxa, putative reasons for a limited and an advanced regeneration capacity are discussed in this article. PMID:19067421

  13. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; Leamon, Robert J; Krista, Larisza D; Title, Alan M; Hudson, Hugh S; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N; Kasper, Justin C; Stevens, Michael L; Ulrich, Roger K

    2015-01-01

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the 'Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales. PMID:25849045

  14. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Krista, Larisza D.; Title, Alan M.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W.; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N.; Kasper, Justin C.; Stevens, Michael L.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2015-01-01

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the ‘Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales. PMID:25849045

  15. Magnetic plasmonic metamaterials in actively pumped host medium and plasmonic nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Andrey K.; Tartakovsky, Gennady

    2006-08-01

    We consider plasmonic nanoantennas immersed in active host medium. Specifically shaped metal nanoantennas can exhibit strong magnetic properties in the optical spectral range due to the excitation of Magnetic Resonance Plasmons (MRP). A case when a metamaterial comprising such nanoantennas can demonstrate both "left-handiness" and negative permeability in the optical range is considered. We show that high losses predicted for optical "left-handed" materials can be compensated in the gain medium. Gains required to achieve local generation in such magnetic active metamaterials are calculated for real metals

  16. Spin-wave activation by spin-polarized current pulse in magnetic nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoncello, Federico; Giovannini, Loris; Nizzoli, Fabrizio; Zivieri, Roberto; Consolo, Giancarlo; Gubbiotti, Gianluca

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the role of spin-polarized current pulse in activating only a subset of spin-wave normal modes in laterally confined magnetic systems. In order to derive selection rules based on geometrical considerations, the study was carried out by comparing the results of two different micromagnetic frameworks (a classical finite-difference time-domain scheme and the dynamical matrix method) and considering nanopillar devices of elliptical and circular cross-sections in different magnetic ground states (onion, S, and vortex states). The analogies and the differences existing between the mode activation process driven by spin-torque and that obtained by a magnetic field pulse are also addressed.

  17. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  18. Latent regeneration abilities persist following recent evolutionary loss in asexual annelids.

    PubMed

    Bely, Alexandra E; Sikes, James M

    2010-01-26

    Regeneration abilities have been repeatedly lost in many animal phyla. However, because regeneration research has focused almost exclusively on highly regenerative taxa or on comparisons between regenerating and nonregenerating taxa that are deeply diverged, virtually nothing is known about how regeneration loss occurs. Here, we show that, following a recent evolutionary loss of regeneration, regenerative abilities can remain latent and still be elicited. Using comparative regeneration experiments and a molecular phylogeny, we show that ancestral head regeneration abilities have been lost three times among naidine annelids, a group of small aquatic worms that typically reproduce asexually by fission. In all three lineages incapable of head regeneration, worms consistently seal the wound but fail to progress to the first stage of tissue replacement. However, despite this coarse-level convergence in regeneration loss, further investigation of two of these lineages reveals marked differences in how much of the regeneration machinery has been abolished. Most notably, in a species representing one of these two lineages, but not in a representative of the other, amputation within a narrow proliferative region that forms during fission can still elicit regeneration of an essentially normal head. Thus, the presence at the wound site of elements characteristic of actively growing tissues, such as activated stem cells or growth factors, may permit blocks to regeneration to be circumvented, allowing latent regeneration abilities to be manifested. PMID:19966282

  19. Latent regeneration abilities persist following recent evolutionary loss in asexual annelids

    PubMed Central

    Bely, Alexandra E.; Sikes, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration abilities have been repeatedly lost in many animal phyla. However, because regeneration research has focused almost exclusively on highly regenerative taxa or on comparisons between regenerating and nonregenerating taxa that are deeply diverged, virtually nothing is known about how regeneration loss occurs. Here, we show that, following a recent evolutionary loss of regeneration, regenerative abilities can remain latent and still be elicited. Using comparative regeneration experiments and a molecular phylogeny, we show that ancestral head regeneration abilities have been lost three times among naidine annelids, a group of small aquatic worms that typically reproduce asexually by fission. In all three lineages incapable of head regeneration, worms consistently seal the wound but fail to progress to the first stage of tissue replacement. However, despite this coarse-level convergence in regeneration loss, further investigation of two of these lineages reveals marked differences in how much of the regeneration machinery has been abolished. Most notably, in a species representing one of these two lineages, but not in a representative of the other, amputation within a narrow proliferative region that forms during fission can still elicit regeneration of an essentially normal head. Thus, the presence at the wound site of elements characteristic of actively growing tissues, such as activated stem cells or growth factors, may permit blocks to regeneration to be circumvented, allowing latent regeneration abilities to be manifested. PMID:19966282

  20. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Overton, W.C. Jr.; Stewart, W.F.

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  1. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Overton, Jr., William C.; Stewart, Walter F.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  2. A Tale of Two Super-Active Active Regions: On the Magnetic Origin of Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Dhakal, Suman; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    From a comparative study of two super-active active regions, we find that the magnetic origin of CMEs is different from that of flares. NOAA AR 12192 is one of the largest active regions in the recorded history with a sunspot number of 66 and area of 2410 millonths. During its passage through the front disk from Oct. 14-30, 2014, the active region produced 93 C-class, 30 M-class and 6 X-class flares. However, all six X-class flares are confined; in other words, none of them are associated with CMEs; most other flares are also confined. This behavior of low-CME production rate for such as a super active region is rather peculiar, given the usual hand-on-hand occurrence of CMEs with flares. To further strengthen this point, we also investigated the super-active NOAA AR 11429, which had a sunspot number of 28 and area of 1270 millionths. During its passage from March 02-17, 2012, the active region produced 47 C-class, 15 M-class and 3 X-class flares. In this active region, all three X-class flares were accompanied by CMEs, and the same for most M-class flares. Given the relative sizes of the two active regions, the production rates of flares are comparable. But the CME production rates are not. Through a careful study of the magnetic configuration on the surface and the extrapolated magnetic field in the corona, we argue that the generation of flares largely depends on the amount of free energy in the active region. On the other hand, the generation of CMEs largely depends on the complexity, such as measured by magnetic helicity. In particular, we argue that the high CME generation rate in the smaller active region is caused by the emergence and continuous generation of magnetic flux ropes in the region.

  3. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailability of nutrients is an essential factor controlling primary productivity in the ocean. In addition to macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, availability of the trace element iron unequivocally affects growth rates and community structure of phytoplankton and thereby primary productivity in many ocean regions. External sources of iron such as Aeolian dust, upwelling of Fe-rich waters, and hydrothermal are reduced in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, and most Fe used by phytoplankton has been regenerated by zooplankton. While zooplankton regeneration of Fe was first shown two decades ago, major factors controlling this process such as chemical composition of prey and grazer taxonomy are not well constrained. As pH varies significantly in digestive systems between protozoa and mesozooplankton, we hypothesize that the extent and the bioavailability of regenerated Fe is a function of the digestive physiology. Furthermore, major element components such as silica for diatoms and calcium carbonate for cocolithophores may be able to buffer the pH of digestive systems of different grazer taxa. Such effects may further influence the magnitude and bioavailability of regenerated Fe. In order to constrain the effect of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on Fe bioavailability, 55Fe-labeled phytoplankton were fed to different grazers and unlabeled phytoplankton were subsequently inoculated to the filtrate of the grazing experiment in the regrowth phase of the experiment, and the uptake of 55Fe into the phytoplankton biomass was monitored over time. A parallel uptake experiment using inorganic 55Fe was used to compare the bioavailability of regenerated and inorganic Fe to the same phytoplankton species. Furthermore, some samples of the inorganic and the regenerated uptake experiments were treated with an oxalate rinse to remove any adsorbed Fe. This allowed us to estimate the adsorption of 55Fe from either source to the cell walls of

  4. Magnetic flux cancellation and Doppler shifts in flaring active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Flux cancellation plays an important role in some theories of solar eruptions. The mechanism of flux cancellation is suggested by many models to be a necessary condition of flare initiation as a part of slow reconnection processes in the lower atmosphere. In our earlier work we analyzed flux cancellation events during major flares using GONG line-of-sight magnetograms. In this work we use vector magnetic field data from SDO/HMI for better interpretation of the longitudinal field changes. We also compute Doppler velocity shifts at the cancellation sites in attempt to distinguish between the three physical processes that could stand behind flux removal from the photosphere: submergence of U-shaped loops, emergence of Ω-shaped loops and magnetic reconnection.

  5. ENERGETIC PROTONS, RADIONUCLIDES, AND MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an 'undead zone' where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm{sup -2}.

  6. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  7. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mediators of Ligand-Free Activation of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Cornelia; Klaver, Arjen; Kanger, Johannes S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of particular interest in biomedical research, and have been exploited for molecular separation, gene/drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermic cancer therapy. In the case of cultured cells, magnetic manipulation of NPs provides the means for studying processes induced by mechanotransduction or by local clustering of targeted macromolecules, e.g. cell surface receptors. The latter are normally activated by binding of their natural ligands mediating key signaling pathways such as those associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGFR). However, it has been reported that EGFR may be dimerized and activated even in the absence of ligands. The present study assessed whether receptor clustering induced by physical means alone suffices for activating EGFR in quiescent cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The EGFR on A431 cells was specifically targeted by superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) carrying either a ligand-blocking monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody or a streptavidin molecule for targeting a chimeric EGFR incorporating a biotinylated amino-terminal acyl carrier peptide moiety. Application of a magnetic field led to SPION magnetization and clustering, resulting in activation of the EGFR, a process manifested by auto and transphosphorylation and downstream signaling. The magnetically-induced early signaling events were similar to those inherent to the ligand dependent EGFR pathways. Magnetization studies indicated that the NPs exerted magnetic dipolar forces in the sub-piconewton range with clustering dependent on Brownian motion of the receptor-SPION complex and magnetic field strength. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that EGFR on the cell surface that have their ligand binding-pocket blocked by an antibody are still capable of transphosphorylation and initiation of signaling cascades if they are clustered by SPIONs either attached locally or targeted to another site of the receptor

  8. Langevin simulation of thermally activated magnetization reversal in nanoscale pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gregory; Novotny, M. A.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2001-10-01

    Numerical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert micromagnetic model incorporating thermal fluctuations and dipole-dipole interactions (calculated by the fast multipole method) are presented for systems composed of nanoscale iron pillars of dimension 9nm x 9nm x 150nm. Hysteresis loops generated under sinusoidally varying fields are obtained, while the coercive field is estimated to be 1979{+-}14 Oe using linear field sweeps at T=0 K. Thermal effects are essential to the relaxation of magnetization trapped in a metastable orientation, such as happens after a rapid reversal of an external magnetic field less than the coercive value. The distribution of switching times is compared to a simple analytic theory that describes reversal with nucleation at the ends of the nanomagnets. Results are also presented for arrays of nanomagnets oriented perpendicular to a flat substrate. Even at a separation of 300 nm, where the field from neighboring pillars is only {approx}1 Oe, the interactions have a significant effect on the switching of the magnets.

  9. Highly active antibody-modified magnetic polyelectrolyte capsules.

    PubMed

    Valdepérez, Daniel; Del Pino, Pablo; Sánchez, Lourdes; Parak, Wolfgang J; Pelaz, Beatriz

    2016-07-15

    Polyelectrolyte hollow capsules are versatile platforms typically used for encapsulation of a wide variety of macromolecules in their cavity. The polymer shell of these capsules as composed by alternating layers of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes also allows for adding additional functionalities. The properties of the shell can be for example engineered by trapping different nanoparticles in-between the shell layers and/or by attaching bioactive molecules such as antibodies to the outermost layer. Herein, iron oxide NPs were inmobilized into the shell of polyelectrolyte capsules and the outermost layer of the shell was covalently modified with anti peroxidase antibodies. These capsules act as prototype model system, aiming to obtain a microstructure with the potential capability to specifically recognize and separate macromolecules. Due to the magnetic nanoparticles in the capsule shell, the capsules together with the attached target might be extracted by magnetic field gradients. Here we verified this approach by extracting horseradish peroxidase from a solution through magnetic separation with capsules bearing antibodies against horseradish peroxidase. The bioactivity of the capsules and the high degree of specific antibody functionalization were confirmed and quantified through an enzymatic reaction mediated by the extracted horseradish peroxidase. PMID:27089014

  10. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the performance of activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Ni, Jianyuan; Yang, Ning; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) on activated sludge. The short-term presence of 50-200 mg/L of NPs decreased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies, resulted from the acute toxicity of a shock load of NPs. However, long-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs were observed to significantly improve TN removal efficiency, partially due to the self-repair function of activated sludge and magnetic-induced bio-effect. Sludge properties and extracellular polymer substrates secretion were affected. Additional investigations with enzyme and FISH assays indicated that short-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs led to the abatement of nitrifying bacteria. However, the activities of the enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase and key denitrifying enzymes were increased after long-term exposure. PMID:23835260

  11. Manufacture of magnetically active fiber-reinforced composites for use in power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Phil

    2004-07-01

    A major issue yet to be resolved for embedding sensors, actuators and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in 'smart' structures is that of providing power. Work is ongoing in the field with examples of micro battery technology, use of solar power and micro fuel cells. The work presented here considers a technology to enable the development of integrated power generation and actuation. Magnetic fibre reinforced composite material has been developed which utilises hollow glass fibres filled with active magnetic material. The resulting material maintains structural integrity as well as providing a possible means of electrical power generation from a dynamically loaded structure. The hollow glass fibres were manufactured in-house using a bespoke fibre drawing facility. Hard magnetic powder materials were introduced into the hollow fibre cores to provide an active electromagnetic function. This paper will discuss the manufacture, characterization and optimisation of active magnetic fibre reinforced composite materials.

  12. Evolution of sunspot activity and inversion of the Sun's polar magnetic field in the current cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordvinov, A. V.; Grigoryev, V. M.; Erofeev, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    A spatiotemporal analysis of the Sun's magnetic field was carried out to study the polar-field inversion in the current cycle in relation to sunspot activity. The causal relationship between these phenomena was demonstrated in a time-latitude aspect. After decay of long-lived activity complexes their magnetic fields were redistributed into the surrounding photosphere and formed unipolar magnetic regions which were transported to high latitudes. Zones of intense sunspot activity during 2011/2012 produced unipolar magnetic regions of the following polarities, whose poleward drift led to the inversion of the Sun's polar fields at the North and South Poles. At the North Pole the polar field reversal was completed by May 2013. It was demonstrated that mixed magnetic polarities near the North Pole resulted from violations of Joy's law at lower latitudes. Later sunspot activity in the southern hemisphere has led to a delay in magnetic polarity reversal at the South Pole. Thus, the north-south asymmetry of sunspot activity resulted in asynchronous polar field reversal in the current cycle.

  13. Could a change in magnetic field geometry cause the break in the wind-activity relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Jardine, M.; See, V.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; Boro Saikia, S.; Hébrard, E.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Wood et al. suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux (dot{M}∝ F_x^{1.34}) for dwarf stars with Fx ≲ Fx,6 ≡ 106 erg cm-2 s-1. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at Fx,6 could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al. sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the dot{M} - Fx relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at Fx,6. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exist for stars with Fx ≳ Fx,6. This strengthens the importance of multi-epoch ZDI observations. Finally, we show that there is a correlation between Fx and magnetic energy, which implies that dot{M} - magnetic energy relation has the same qualitative behaviour as the original dot{M} - Fx relation. No break is seen in any of the Fx - magnetic energy relations.

  14. Model for the Coupled Evolution of Subsurface and Coronal Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2007-04-01

    According to Babcock's theory of the solar dynamo, bipolar active regions are Ω-shaped loops emerging from a toroidal field located near the base of the convection zone. In this paper, a mean field model for the evolution of a twisted Ω-loop is developed. The model describes the coupled evolution of the magnetic field in the convection zone and the corona after the loop has fully emerged into the solar atmosphere. Such a coupled evolution is required to fully understand what happens to the coronal and subsurface fields as magnetic flux cancels at polarity inversion lines on the photosphere. The jump conditions for the magnetic field at the photosphere are derived from the magnetic stress balance between the convection zone and corona. The model reproduces the observed spreading of active region magnetic flux over the solar surface. At polarity inversion lines, magnetic flux submerges below the photosphere, but the component of magnetic field along the inversion line cannot submerge, because the field in the upper convection zone is nearly radial. Therefore, magnetic shear builds up in the corona above the inversion line, which eventually leads to a loss of equilibrium of the coronal fields and the ``lift-off'' of a coronal flux rope. Fields that submerge are transported back to the base of the convection zone, leading to the repair of the toroidal flux rope. Following Martens and Zwaan, interactions between bipoles are also considered.

  15. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  16. Relation between Thermal and Magnetic Properties of Active Regions as a Probe of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Seiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2001-03-01

    We study the relation between thermal and magnetic properties of active regions in the corona observed with the soft X-ray telescope aboard Yohkoh. We derive the mean temperature and pressure of 64 mature active regions using the filter ratio technique, and examine the relationship of region size with temperature and pressure. We find that the temperature T of active regions increases with increasing region size L as T~L0.28, while the pressure P slightly decreases with the region size as P~L-0.16. We confirm the scaling law T~(PL)1/3 for mature active regions found by R. Rosner, W. H. Tucker, & G. S. Vaiana. We examined the magnetic properties of active regions by analyzing 31 active regions observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager and find the following empirical scaling law between thermal and magnetic properties,Uth~Φ1.33,P~B0.78,where Uth, Φ, and B are the total thermal energy content, total magnetic flux, and average magnetic flux density of active regions, respectively. The former is consistent with the results of L. Golub et al., but the latter is not. Implications of our findings for coronal heating mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign. II - Magnetic and plasma properties of a solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Holman, G. D.; Brosius, J. W.; Gonzalez, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous soft X-ray, microwave, and photospheric magnetic field observations were taken during the Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign. The plasma electron temperatures and emission measures determined from the X-ray data are used to predict the intensity and structure of the thermal bremsstrahlung emission at 20 and 6 cm. Comparing these predictions with the microwave observations, it is found that the 20 cm structure is very similar to that expected from the X-rays, but a substantial amount of the 6 cm emission was resolved out. The predicted 20 cm brightness temperatures are higher than the observed, requiring cool absorbing material (not greater than 500,000 K) between the hot X-ray plasma and the observer. The absorption mechanism in the cool plasma at 20 cm is most likely thermal bremsstrahlung, requiring coronal magnetic fields as high as 150 G. 'Coronal Magnetograms', made by extrapolating the photospheric longitudinal field using the Sakurai code, show that appropriate values of the total field are reached at heights of 6000-10,000 km above the photosphere (at many but not all locations).

  18. Radio wavelength observations of magnetic fields on active dwarf M, RS CVn and magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1986-01-01

    The dwarf M stars, YZ Canis Minoris and AD Leonis, exhibit narrow-band, slowly varying (hours) microwave emission that cannot be explained by conventional thermal radiation mechanisms. The dwarf M stars, AD Leonis and Wolf 424, emit rapid spikes whose high brightness temperatures similarly require a nonthermal radiation process. They are attributed to coherent mechanisms such as an electron-cyclotron maser or coherent plasma radiation. If the electron-cyclotron maser emits at the second or third harmonic gyrofrequency, the coronal magnetic field strength equals 250 G or 167 G, and constraints on the plasma frequency imply an electron density of 6 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm. Radio spikes from AD Leonis and Wolf 424 have rise times less than or equal to 5 ms, indicating a linear size of less than or equal to 1.5 x 10 to the 8th cm, or less than 0.005 of the stellar radius. Although Ap magnetic stars have strong dipole magnetic fields, they exhibit no detectable gyroresonant radiation, suggesting that these stars do not have hot, dense coronae. The binary RS CVn star UX Arietis exhibits variable emission at 6 cm wavelength on time scales ranging from 30 s to more than one hour.

  19. Quantifying the Topology and Evolution of a Magnetic Flux Rope Associated with Multi-flare Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Yang; Ding, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) play an important role in solar activities. The quantitative assessment of the topology of an MFR and its evolution is crucial for a better understanding of the relationship between the MFR and associated activities. In this paper, we investigate the magnetic field of active region (AR) 12017 from 2014 March 28–29, during which time 12 flares were triggered by intermittent eruptions of a filament (either successful or confined). Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we calculate the magnetic energy and helicity injection in the AR, and extrapolate the 3D magnetic field with a nonlinear force-free field model. From the extrapolations, we find an MFR that is cospatial with the filament. We further determine the configuration of this MFR from the closed quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) around it. Then, we calculate the twist number and the magnetic helicity for the field lines composing the MFR. The results show that the closed QSL structure surrounding the MFR becomes smaller as a consequence of flare occurrence. We also find that the flares in our sample are mainly triggered by kink instability. Moreover, the twist number varies more sensitively than other parameters with the occurrence of flares.

  20. Hepatoprotective Effects of Schisandra sphenanthera Extract against Lithocholic Acid-Induced Cholestasis in Male Mice Are Associated with Activation of the Pregnane X Receptor Pathway and Promotion of Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hang; Li, Dongshun; Qin, Xiaoling; Chen, Pan; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Xuezhen; Li, Xi; Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Zhou, Yawen; Chen, Yixin; Wang, Ying; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that the ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera [Wuzhi (WZ) tablet] significantly protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatoxicity. However, whether WZ exerts a protective effect against cholestasis remains unclear. In this study, the protective effect of WZ on lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced intrahepatic cholestasis in mice was characterized and the involved mechanisms were investigated. WZ pretreatment (350 mg/kg) with LCA significantly reversed liver necrosis and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activity. More importantly, serum total bile acids and total bilirubin were also remarkably reduced. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that hepatic expression of pregnane X receptor (PXR) target genes such as CYP3A11 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 were significantly increased by WZ treatment. Luciferase assays performed in LS174T cells illustrated that WZ extract and its six bioactive lignans could all activate human PXR. In addition, WZ treatment significantly promoted liver regeneration via inhibition of p53/p21 to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins such as cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In conclusion, WZ has a protective effect against LCA-induced intrahepatic cholestasis, partially owing to activation of the PXR pathway and promotion of liver regeneration. PMID:26658429

  1. Coupling of the solar wind to measures of magnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Fay, R. A.; Garrity, C. R.; Bargatze, L. F.; Clauer, C. R.; Searls, C.; Baker, D. N.

    1984-01-01

    Linear prediction filtering was used to generate empirical response functions relating the solar wind electric field to the magnetic indices, AL, AU, Dst and ASYM. The empirical response functions were convolved with solar wind observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study to predict the indices. The predictions are compared with the observed indices during two, 3-day intervals. Differences between the observed and predicted indices are discussed in terms of the linear assumption and in terms of physical processes other than direct solar wind-magnetosphere interaction.

  2. Dependence of Quiet Time Geomagnetic Activity Seasonal Variation on the Solar Magnetic Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon

    2013-03-01

    The geomagnetic activity shows the semiannual variation stronger in vernal and autumnal equinoxes than in summer and winter solstices. The semiannual variation has been explained by three main hypotheses such as Axial hypothesis, Equinoctial hypothesis, and Russell-McPherron Effect. Many studies using the various geomagnetic indices have done to support three main hypotheses. In recent, Oh & Yi (2011) examined the solar magnetic polarity dependency of the geomagnetic storm occurrence defined by Dst index. They reported that there is no dependency of the semiannual variation on the sign of the solar polar fields. This study examines the solar magnetic polarity dependency of quiet time geomagnetic activity. Using Dxt index (Karinen & Mursula 2005) and Dcx index (Mursula & Karinen 2005) which are recently suggested, in addition to Dst index, we analyze the data of three-year at each solar minimum for eight solar cycles since 1932. As a result, the geomagnetic activity is stronger in the period that the solar magnetic polarity is anti-parallel with the Earth's magnetic polarity. There exists the difference between vernal and autumnal equinoxes regarding the solar magnetic polarity dependency. However, the difference is not statistically significant. Thus, we conclude that there is no solar magnetic polarity dependency of the semiannual variation for quiet time geomagnetic activity.

  3. Active tensor magnetic gradiometer system final report for Project MM–1514

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David V.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Hutton, S. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    An interactive computer simulation program, based on physical models of system sensors, platform geometry, Earth environment, and spheroidal magnetically-permeable targets, was developed to generate synthetic magnetic field data from a conceptual tensor magnetic gradiometer system equipped with an active primary field generator. The system sensors emulate the prototype tensor magnetic gradiometer system (TMGS) developed under a separate contract for unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and classification. Time-series data from different simulation scenarios were analyzed to recover physical dimensions of the target source. Helbig-Euler simulations were run with rectangular and rod-like source bodies to determine whether such a system could separate the induced component of the magnetization from the remanent component for each target. This report concludes with an engineering assessment of a practical system design.

  4. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  5. Candidates Cell Sources to Regenerate Alveolar Bone from Oral Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Takase, Kazuma; Suehiro, Fumio; Murata, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Most of the cases of dental implant surgery, especially the bone defect extensively, are essential for alveolar ridge augmentation. As known as cell therapy exerts valuable effects on bone regeneration, numerous reports using various cells from body to regenerate bone have been published, including clinical reports. Mesenchymal cells that have osteogenic activity and have potential to be harvested from intra oral site might be a candidate cells to regenerate alveolar bone, even dentists have not been harvested the cells outside of mouth. This paper presents a summary of somatic cells in edentulous tissues which could subserve alveolar bone regeneration. The candidate tissues that might have differentiation potential as mesenchymal cells for bone regeneration are alveolar bone chip, bone marrow from alveolar bone, periosteal tissue, and gingival tissue. Understanding their phenotype consecutively will provide a rational approach for alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:22505911

  6. Delayed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in adiponectin knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ezaki, Hisao; Yoshida, Yuichi; Saji, Yukiko; Takemura, Takayo; Fukushima, Juichi; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Wada, Akira; Igura, Takumi; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Tamura, Shinji; Kiso, Shinichi Hayashi, Norio

    2009-01-02

    We previously demonstrated that adiponectin has anti-fibrogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in the liver of mouse models of various liver diseases. However, its role in liver regeneration remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of adiponectin in liver regeneration. We assessed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in wild-type (WT) and adiponectin knockout (KO) mice. We analyzed DNA replication and various signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. Adiponectin KO mice exhibited delayed DNA replication and increased lipid accumulation in the regenerating liver. The expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), a key enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, were decreased in adiponectin KO mice, suggesting possible contribution of altered fat metabolism to these phenomena. Collectively, the present results highlight a new role for adiponectin in the process of liver regeneration.

  7. Reprogramming for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Christophe Michel; Ahmad, Faizzan Syed; Allouba, Mona; Abou-Saleh, Haissam; Lui, Kathy O.; Yacoub, Magdi

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of cardiovascular diseases remains challenging considering the limited regeneration capacity of the heart muscle. Developments of reprogramming strategies to create in vitro and in vivo cardiomyocytes have been the focus point of a considerable amount of research in the past decades. The choice of cells to employ, the state-of-the-art methods for different reprogramming strategies, and their promises and future challenges before clinical entry, are all discussed here. PMID:25763379

  8. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  9. Magnetic activity of the star Corot-Exo-2a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2010-05-01

    Continuous photometric observations of the young active solar-type star Corot-Exo-2a using the “Corot” space telescope obtained over 142 days were used to analyze the star’s surface temperature inhomogeneities and to monitor their continuous evolution. This analysis was based on the iPH code, which reconstructs the distribution of temperature inhomogeneities on the surface of a star based on its light curve in a two-temperature approximation. We identified five time intervals in the positions of active areas, with corresponding flip-flop events, interpreted as activity periods. Their durations were between 55 and 15 days. The time scale for the active-longitude flip-flops of Corot-Exo-2a is a few tens of days, rather than years, as for other stars studied earlier. We detected motions of the active longitudes, possibly indicating differential rotation of the star. The phenomenon of flip-flops in the positions of active longitudes has a complex character. This is the first case apart fromthe Sun where we are able to follow the appearance and development of temperature inhomogeneities on a stellar surface in such detail. We determined typical timescales for variations of the activity parameter of the star in the ranges 17-20, 28-32, 33-38, and 51-55 days, which characterize changes of the brightness variation amplitude, the spotted surface area, positions of active areas, and brightness variations.

  10. Abnormal fusiform activation during emotional-face encoding assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Adleman, Nancy E; Kayser, Reilly R; Olsavsky, Aviva K; Bones, Brian L; Muhrer, Eli J; Fromm, Stephen J; Pine, Daniel S; Zarate, Carlos; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A

    2013-05-30

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study shows that children and adults with bipolar disorder (BD), compared with healthy subjects, exhibit impaired memory for emotional faces and abnormal fusiform activation during encoding. Fusiform activation abnormalities in BD were correlated with mania severity and may therefore represent a trait and state BD biomarker. PMID:23541333

  11. Redox Switches for Single-Molecule Magnet Activity: An Ab Initio Insight.

    PubMed

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-04-01

    A dinuclear Co(II) complex (1) featuring unprecedented anodic and cathodic switches for single-molecule magnet (SMM) activity has been recently investigated (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 14670). The presence of sandwiched radicals in different oxidation states of this compound mediates magnetic coupling between the high-spin (S=3/2) cobalt ions, which gives rise to SMM activity in both the oxidized ([1(OEt2 )](+) ) and reduced ([1](-) ) states. This feature represents the first example of a SMM exhibiting fully reversible, dual ON/OFF switchability. Here we apply ab initio and broken-symmetry DFT calculations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for magnetic properties and magnetization blocking in these compounds. It is found that due to the strong delocalization of the magnetic molecular orbital, there is a strong antiferromagnetic interaction between the radical and cobalt ions. The lack of high axiality of the cobalt centres explains why these compounds possess slow relaxation of magnetization only in an applied dc magnetic field. PMID:26918833

  12. Theoretical study of thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance: Switching paths and barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, H.; Kudo, K.; Nagasawa, T.; Kanao, T.; Mizushima, K.; Sato, R.; Okamoto, S.; Kikuchi, N.; Kitakami, O.

    2015-03-01

    Energy barrier height for magnetization switching is theoretically studied for a system with uniaxial anisotropy in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field. A formulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a rotating frame introduces an effective energy that includes the effects of both the microwave field and static field. This allows the effective-energy profiles to rigorously describe the switching paths and corresponding barrier height, which govern thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance. We show that fixed points and limit cycles in the rotating frame lead to various switching paths and that under certain conditions, switching becomes a two-step process with an intermediate state.

  13. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. • Atomic size optically detectable spin probe. • High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution. • Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  14. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  15. Magnetic Measurements of Bacterial Activity in Mid Oceanic Ridge Basalt Samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, J.; Horen, H.; Brunet, F.; Janots, D.; Pozzi, J.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic properties of the young oceanic crust gives insights on the 3D structure at ridges axis and on variations of the Earth's magnetic field. Accurate interpretations depend on our understanding of the magnetic stability of titanomagnetite crystals carrying the magnetic signal. The mean remanent intensity of young ocean basalts shows significant variations with age and it has been suggested that rapid chemical alteration of titanomagnetite could be responsible. Ubiquitous presence of bacteria in deep marine environment and their ability to interact with iron oxides suggest a possible important impact of these life forms on the stability of titanomagnetites. In vivo experiments have been conducted on more than 15 fresh lava macro samples with a batch of selected sulfate reducing bacteria of the desulfovibrio genus, relevant to the deep biosphere. Remanent magnetization of samples was measured at regular time interval, in addition to more complete magnetic and chemical characterization at beginning and end of experiments. After a few months results show a significant contribution of bacterial activity on magnetic properties of samples, in particular a well defined drop in remanence. Our results suggest a strong impact of bacteria on the alteration rate of iron oxides carrying the magnetic signal within the oceanic crust.

  16. Relationship between magnetic field properties and an X-class flare in active region NOAA 9077

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Liu, D.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic field plays a key role in producing solar flares, so that the investigation on the relationship between the magnetic field properties and flares is significant. In this paper, based on the magnetic field extrapolated from the photospheric vector magnetograms of the active region NOAA 9077 obtained at Huairou Solar Observing Station, the magnetic field parameters including the height of field lines, force-free factor, free magnetic energy and inclination angle were studied with respect to an X-class flare in this region. We found that the magnetic field lines became lower and the ratio of number of closed field lines to those of open field lines increased after the flare. The force-free factor (α) attained a large value before the flare and then decreased after the flare for the closed field lines, while the open field lines showed the opposite tendency. Free energy reach to maximum before flare, then decrease after flare. The magnetic inclination angles showed opposite change trends after the flare for closed and open field lines. Therefore, we may conclude that non-potential energy released by flare mostly contained in the closed magnetic field lines.

  17. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity and Energy Spectra of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2016-03-01

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field to estimate the magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of two individual active regions (NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11515) and the change of the spectral indices during their development as well as during the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral indices of magnetic energy and current helicity from 5/3 are analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than the spectral index of the magnetic energy spectrum. Furthermore, the fractional magnetic helicity tends to increase when the scale of the energy-carrying magnetic structures increases. The magnetic helicity of NOAA 11515 violates the expected hemispheric sign rule, which is interpreted as an effect of enhanced field strengths at scales larger than 30-60 Mm with opposite signs of helicity. This is consistent with the general cycle dependence, which shows that around the solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper, emphasizing the large-scale field.

  18. A Comprehensive Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Hydra Head Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hendrik O.; Höger, Stefanie K.; Looso, Mario; Lengfeld, Tobias; Kuhn, Anne; Warnken, Uwe; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Schnölzer, Martina; Krüger, Marcus; Özbek, Suat; Simakov, Oleg; Holstein, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The cnidarian freshwater polyp Hydra sp. exhibits an unparalleled regeneration capacity in the animal kingdom. Using an integrative transcriptomic and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture proteomic/phosphoproteomic approach, we studied stem cell-based regeneration in Hydra polyps. As major contributors to head regeneration, we identified diverse signaling pathways adopted for the regeneration response as well as enriched novel genes. Our global analysis reveals two distinct molecular cascades: an early injury response and a subsequent, signaling driven patterning of the regenerating tissue. A key factor of the initial injury response is a general stabilization of proteins and a net upregulation of transcripts, which is followed by a subsequent activation cascade of signaling molecules including Wnts and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-related factors. We observed moderate overlap between the factors contributing to proteomic and transcriptomic responses suggesting a decoupled regulation between the transcriptional and translational levels. Our data also indicate that interstitial stem cells and their derivatives (e.g., neurons) have no major role in Hydra head regeneration. Remarkably, we found an enrichment of evolutionarily more recent genes in the early regeneration response, whereas conserved genes are more enriched in the late phase. In addition, genes specific to the early injury response were enriched in transposon insertions. Genetic dynamicity and taxon-specific factors might therefore play a hitherto underestimated role in Hydra regeneration. PMID:25841488

  19. A Comprehensive Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Hydra Head Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Hendrik O; Höger, Stefanie K; Looso, Mario; Lengfeld, Tobias; Kuhn, Anne; Warnken, Uwe; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Schnölzer, Martina; Krüger, Marcus; Özbek, Suat; Simakov, Oleg; Holstein, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    The cnidarian freshwater polyp Hydra sp. exhibits an unparalleled regeneration capacity in the animal kingdom. Using an integrative transcriptomic and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture proteomic/phosphoproteomic approach, we studied stem cell-based regeneration in Hydra polyps. As major contributors to head regeneration, we identified diverse signaling pathways adopted for the regeneration response as well as enriched novel genes. Our global analysis reveals two distinct molecular cascades: an early injury response and a subsequent, signaling driven patterning of the regenerating tissue. A key factor of the initial injury response is a general stabilization of proteins and a net upregulation of transcripts, which is followed by a subsequent activation cascade of signaling molecules including Wnts and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-related factors. We observed moderate overlap between the factors contributing to proteomic and transcriptomic responses suggesting a decoupled regulation between the transcriptional and translational levels. Our data also indicate that interstitial stem cells and their derivatives (e.g., neurons) have no major role in Hydra head regeneration. Remarkably, we found an enrichment of evolutionarily more recent genes in the early regeneration response, whereas conserved genes are more enriched in the late phase. In addition, genes specific to the early injury response were enriched in transposon insertions. Genetic dynamicity and taxon-specific factors might therefore play a hitherto underestimated role in Hydra regeneration. PMID:25841488

  20. Skeletal muscle regeneration and impact of aging and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Domingues-Faria, Carla; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Boirie, Yves; Walrand, Stephane

    2016-03-01

    After skeletal muscle injury a regeneration process takes place to repair muscle. Skeletal muscle recovery is a highly coordinated process involving cross-talk between immune and muscle cells. It is well known that the physiological activities of both immune cells and muscle stem cells decline with advancing age, thereby blunting the capacity of skeletal muscle to regenerate. The age-related reduction in muscle repair efficiency contributes to the development of sarcopenia, one of the most important factors of disability in elderly people. Preserving muscle regeneration capacity may slow the development of this syndrome. In this context, nutrition has drawn much attention: studies have demonstrated that nutrients such as amino acids, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polyphenols and vitamin D can improve skeletal muscle regeneration by targeting key functions of immune cells, muscle cells or both. Here we review the process of skeletal muscle regeneration with a special focus on the cross-talk between immune and muscle cells. We address the effect of aging on immune and skeletal muscle cells involved in muscle regeneration. Finally, the mechanisms of nutrient action on muscle regeneration are described, showing that quality of nutrition may help to preserve the capacity for skeletal muscle regeneration with age. PMID:26690801

  1. Magnetic activation of bipolar plasmas in HgTe-CdTe superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. R.; Hoffman, C. A.; Bartoli, F. J.; Wojtowicz, T.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K.; Chu, X.; Faurie, J. P.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    1991-08-01

    It is shown theoretically that in semimetallic HgTe-CdTe superlattices, there is a critical magnetic field above which minority carriers with density proportional to B-Bcrit are expected to coexist with majority carriers in the zero-temperature limit. Experimental confirmation of the magnetically activated bipolar plasma is provided by low-temperature magneto-optical data showing the emergence of minority holes in an n-type superlattice whenever B>Bcrit.

  2. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  3. Cartilage regeneration for treatment of osteoarthritis: a paradigm for nonsurgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with articular cartilage abnormalities and affects people of older age: preventative or therapeutic treatment measures for OA and related articular cartilage disorders remain challenging. In this perspective review, we have integrated multiple biological, morphological, developmental, stem cell and homeostasis concepts of articular cartilage to develop a paradigm for cartilage regeneration. OA is conceptually defined as an injury of cartilage that initiates chondrocyte activation, expression of proteases and growth factor release from the matrix. This regenerative process results in the local activation of inflammatory response genes in cartilage without migration of inflammatory cells or angiogenesis. The end results are catabolic and anabolic responses, and it is the balance between these two outcomes that controls remodelling of the matrix and regeneration. A tantalizing clinical clue for cartilage regrowth in OA joints has been observed in surgically created joint distraction. We hypothesize that cartilage growth in these distracted joints may have a biological connection with the size of organs and regeneration. Therefore we propose a novel, practical and nonsurgical intervention to validate the role of distraction in cartilage regeneration in OA. The approach permits normal wake-up activity while during sleep; the index knee is subjected to distraction with a pull traction device. Comparison of follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 and 6 months of therapy to those taken before therapy will provide much-needed objective evidence for the use of this mode of therapy for OA. We suggest that the paradigm presented here merits investigation for treatment of OA in knee joints. PMID:26029269

  4. Pharmacological mobilization of endogenous stem cells significantly promotes skin regeneration after full-thickness excision: the synergistic activity of AMD3100 and tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Wesson, Russell N; Maeda, Hiromichi; Wang, Yongchun; Cui, Zhu; Liu, Jun O; Cameron, Andrew M; Gao, Bin; Montgomery, Robert A; Williams, George M; Sun, Zhaoli

    2014-09-01

    Stem cell therapy has shown promise in treating a variety of pathologies including skin wounds, but practical applications remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous stem cell mobilization produced by AMD3100 and low-dose tacrolimus is able to reduce by 25% the time of complete healing of full-thickness wounds created by surgical excision. Equally important, healing was accompanied by reduced scar formation and regeneration of hair follicles. Searching for mechanisms, we found that AMD3100 combined with low-dose tacrolimus mobilized increased number of lineage-negative c-Kit+, CD34+, and CD133+ stem cells. Low-dose tacrolimus also increased the number of SDF-1-bearing macrophages in the wound sites amplifying the "pull" of mobilized stem cells into the wound. Lineage tracing demonstrated the critical role of CD133 stem cells in enhanced capillary and hair follicle neogenesis, contributing to more rapid and perfect healing. Our findings offer a significant therapeutic approach to wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:24682043

  5. Pharmacological Mobilization of Endogenous Stem Cells Significantly Promotes Skin Regeneration after Full Thickness Excision: The Synergistic Activity of AMD3100 and Tacrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Wesson, Russell N.; Maeda, Hiromichi; Wang, Yongchun; Cui, Zhu; Liu, Jun O.; Cameron, Andrew M; Gao, Bin; Montgomery, Robert A; Williams, George Melville; Sun, Zhaoli

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has shown promise in treating a variety of pathologies including skin wounds, but practical applications remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that endogenous stem cell mobilization produced by AMD3100 and low-dose Tacrolimus is able to reduce by 25% the time of complete healing of full-thickness wounds created by surgical excision. Equally important, healing was accompanied by reduced scar and regeneration of hair follicles. Searching for mechanisms, we found that AMD3100 combined with low-dose Tacrolimus mobilized increased number of lineage-negative c-Kit+, CD34+ and CD133+ stem cells. Low-dose Tacrolimus also increased the number of SDF-1 bearing macrophages in the wounds sites amplifying the “pull” of mobilized stem cells into the wound. Lineage tracing demonstrated the critical role of CD133 stem cells in enhanced capillary and hair follicle neogenesis contributing to more rapid and perfect healing. Our findings offer a significant therapeutic approach to wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:24682043

  6. Using Magnetic Helicity Diagnostics to Determine the Nature of Solar Active-Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    Employing a novel nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method that self-consistently infers instantaneous free magnetic-energy and relative magnetic-helicity budgets from single photospheric vector magnetograms, we recently constructed the magnetic energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions. The EH diagram implies dominant relative helicities of left-handed or right-handed chiralities for the great majority of active regions. The amplitude (budget) of these helicities scales monotonically with the free magnetic energy. This constructive, strongly preferential accumulation of a certain sense of magnetic helicity seems to disqualify recently proposed mechanisms relying on a largely random near-surface convection for the formation of the great majority of active regions. The existing qualitative formation mechanism for these regions remains the conventional Omega-loop emergence following a buoyant ascension from the bottom of the convection zone. However, exceptions to this rule include even eruptive active regions: NOAA AR 11283 is an obvious outlier to the EH diagram, involving significant free magnetic energy with a small relative magnetic helicity. Relying on a timeseries of vector magnetograms of this region, our methodology shows nearly canceling amounts of both senses of helicity and an overall course from a weakly left-handed to a weakly right-handed structure, in the course of which a major eruption occurs. For this and similarly behaving active regions the latest near-surface formation scenario might conceivably be employed successfully. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  7. Calculating Non-Potentiality in Solar Active Regions Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Non-potential magnetic fields in solar active regions are thought to be associated with flare occurrence. In this study, we parametrize the non-potentiality of several active regions, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and correlate these parameters with flare occurrence. In particular, we focus on a parameter that we call the Gradient-Weighted Inversion Line Length (GWILL). Using data from SOHO/MDI, Mason et al. found that GWILL generally tends to increase before a solar flare. We investigate whether extending the analysis of Mason et. al. to a three-dimensional field enables us to derive better near real-time indicators of flare occurrence. Before HMI, the availability of vector magnetograms was sparse at best. HMI provides continuous vector magnetogram data at a 12-minute cadence. As such, this study represents the first parametrization of non-potentiality in solar active regions using continuous vector magnetic field data.

  8. From compass to hard drive—integrated activities for studying magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a range of practical activities that allows students to investigate the properties and applications of magnets. The activities can be used in isolation or used together to build a rounded understanding of the subject area. The activities include simple demonstrations using common or inexpensive equipment, hands-on experiments for small groups, and interactive problem solving suitable for whole classes. These can be tailored for students in either primary or secondary education.

  9. Effect of the active damper coil system on the lateral displacement of the magnetically levitated bogie

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Masada, E.

    1999-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the superconducting magnetically levitated bogie (JR Maglev) has been studied. The active damper coil system is introduced. In this levitation system, the interaction between levitation and guidance is strong. This active damper coil system is designed for reducing the vertical vibration of the bogie. Using the numerical simulation, its effect on the lateral displacement of the bogie is assessed. The active damper coil system for the vertical vibration is shown to works as a passive damper for the lateral vibration.

  10. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Phys