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Sample records for active magnetic regenerators

  1. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  2. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

    1981-01-27

    An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

  3. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  4. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  5. Active magnetic regenerator method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeGregoria, Anthony J.; Zimm, Carl B.; Janda, Dennis J.; Lubasz, Richard A.; Jastrab, Alexander G.; Johnson, Joseph W.; Ludeman, Evan M.

    1993-01-01

    In an active magnetic regenerator apparatus having a regenerator bed of material exhibiting the magnetocaloric effect, flow of heat transfer fluid through the bed is unbalanced, so that more fluid flows through the bed from the hot side of the bed to the cold side than from the cold side to the hot side. The excess heat transfer fluid is diverted back to the hot side of the bed. The diverted fluid may be passed through a heat exchanger to draw heat from a fluid to be cooled. The apparatus may be operated at cryogenic temperatures, and the heat transfer fluid may be helium gas and the fluid to be cooled may be hydrogen gas, which is liquified by the device. The apparatus can be formed in multiple stages to allow a greater span of cooling temperatures than a single stage, and each stage may be comprised of two bed parts. Where two bed parts are employed in each stage, a portion of the fluid passing from the hot side to the cold side of a first bed part which does not have a magnetic field applied thereto is diverted back to the cold side of the other bed part in the stage, where it is passed through to the hot side. The remainder of the fluid from the cold side of the bed part of the first stage is passed to the hot side of the bed part of the second stage.

  6. Simplified Modeling of Active Magnetic Regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdyny, Thomas

    Active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigeration is an alternative technology to conventional vapor-compression refrigerators that has the potential to operate at higher efficiencies. Based on the magnetocaloric effect, this technology uses the magnetization and demagnetization of environmentally neutral solid refrigerants to produce a cooling effect. To become competitive however, a large amount of research into the optimal device configurations, operating parameters and refrigerants is still needed. To aid in this research, a simplified model for predicting the general trends of AMR devices at a low computational cost is developed. The derivation and implementation of the model for an arbitrary AMR is presented. Simulations from the model are compared to experimental results from two different devices and show good agreement across a wide range of operating parameters. The simplified model is also used to study the impacts of Curie temperature spacing, material weighting and devices on the performance of multilayered regenerators. Future applications of the simplified AMR model include costing and optimization programs where the low computational demand of the model can be fully exploited.

  7. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low-Temperature Magnetic Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Weibo; Jaeger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A design of an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system has been developed for space applications. It uses an innovative 3He cryogenic circulator to provide continuous remote/distributed cooling at temperatures in the range of 2 K with a heat sink at about 15 K. A critical component technology for this cooling system is a highly efficient active magnetic regenerator, which is a regenerative heat exchanger with its matrix material made of magnetic refrigerant gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). Creare Inc. is developing a microchannel GGG regenerator with an anisotropic structured bed for high system thermal efficiency. The regenerator core consists of a stack of thin, single-crystal GGG disks alternating with thin polymer insulating layers. The insulating layers help minimize the axial conduction heat leak, since GGG has a very high thermal conductivity in the regenerator s operating temperature range. The GGG disks contain micro channels with width near 100 micrometers, which enhance the heat transfer between the circulating flow and the refrigerant bed. The unique flow configuration of the GGG plates ensures a uniform flow distribution across the plates. The main fabrication challenges for the regenerator are the machining of high-aspect-ratio microchannels in fragile, single-crystal GGG disks and fabrication and assembly of the GGG insulation layers. Feasibility demonstrations to date include use of an ultrashort- pulse laser to machine microchannels without producing unacceptable microcracking or deposition of recast material, as shown in the figure, and attachment of a thin insulation layer to a GGG disk without obstructing the flow paths. At the time of this reporting, efforts were focused on improving the laser machining process to increase machining speed and further reduce microcracking.

  8. A modeling study on the geometry of active magnetic regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numazawa, Takenori; Mastumoto, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Nakagome, Hideki

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic refrigeration technology needs further development not just by the improvement of magnetocaloric properties but also the optimization of the cooling system design. One of the important problems in the cooling system design is the geometry of regenerator for the efficient heat transfer between magnetic material and fluid which is the major loss mechanism in cooling system. Two kinds of regenerators are widely used. One is flat plate regenerator which can offer the best heat transfer to pressure drop ratio [2] for common regenerator design; another is porous media regenerator which can obtain a large temperature span for the good heat transfer surface. But until now, only a few research papers actually study the regenerator geometry. This paper focuses on the influence of regenerator geometry to the performance of AMR system. The 1 dimension flat plat model and porous media model have been constructed and compared with entropy generation, cooling capacity, coefficient of performance by changing plate thickness and sphere size at frequency 0.25Hz, 0.5Hz, 1, aspect ratio 2, 7, 14. The result shows that the optimized sphere size will be around 0.2mm to 0.3mm. On the other hand, 0.1mm to 0.2mm thickness plate will be more efficient. Compared the 2 models, flat plate model can get a smaller entropy generation and achieve a higher cooling capacity.

  9. Performance of magnetic activated carbon composite as peroxymonosulfate activator and regenerable adsorbent via sulfate radical-mediated oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Wen-Da; Lua, Shun-Kuang; Dong, Zhili; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-03-02

    Magnetic activated carbon composite (CuFe2O4/AC, MACC) was prepared by a co-precipitation-calcination method. The MACC consisted of porous micro-particle morphology with homogeneously distributed CuFe2O4 and possessed high magnetic saturation moment (8.1 emu g(-1)). The performance of MACC was evaluated as catalyst and regenerable adsorbent via peroxymonosulfate (PMS, Oxone(®)) activation for methylene blue (MB) removal. Optimum CuFe2O4/AC w/w ratio was 1:1.5 giving excellent performance and can be reused for at least 3 cycles. The presence of common inorganic ions, namely Cl(-) and NO3(-) did not exert significant influence on MB degradation but humic acid decreased the MB degradation rate. As a regenerable adsorbent, negligible difference in regeneration efficiency was observed when a higher Oxone(®) dosage was employed but a better efficiency was obtained at a lower MACC loading. The factors hindering complete MACC regeneration are MB adsorption irreversibility and AC surface modification by PMS making it less favorable for subsequent MB adsorption. With an additional mild heat treatment (150 °C) after regeneration, 82% of the active sites were successfully regenerated. A kinetic model incorporating simultaneous first-order desorption, second-order adsorption and pseudo-first order degradation processes was numerically-solved to describe the rate of regeneration. The regeneration rate increased linearly with increasing Oxone(®):MACC ratio. The MACC could potentially serve as a catalyst for PMS activation and regenerable adsorbent.

  10. Entropy generation in a parallel-plate active magnetic regenerator with insulator layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugica Guerrero, Ibai; Poncet, Sébastien; Bouchard, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a feasible solution to diminish conduction losses in active magnetic regenerators. Higher performances of these machines are linked to a lower thermal conductivity of the Magneto-Caloric Material (MCM) in the streamwise direction. The concept presented here involves the insertion of insulator layers along the length of a parallel-plate magnetic regenerator in order to reduce the heat conduction within the MCM. This idea is investigated by means of a 1D numerical model. This model solves not only the energy equations for the fluid and solid domains but also the magnetic circuit that conforms the experimental setup of reference. In conclusion, the addition of insulator layers within the MCM increases the temperature span, cooling load, and coefficient of performance by a combination of lower heat conduction losses and an increment of the global Magneto-Caloric Effect. The generated entropy by solid conduction, fluid convection, and conduction and viscous losses are calculated to help understand the implications of introducing insulator layers in magnetic regenerators. Finally, the optimal number of insulator layers is studied.

  11. Material screening metrics and optimal performance of an active magnetic regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknia, I.; Trevizoli, P. V.; Christiaanse, T. V.; Govindappa, P.; Teyber, R.; Rowe, A.

    2017-02-01

    A variety of metrics to rank the magnetocaloric materials can be found in the literature, but a quantitative assessment showing their efficacy has not been reported. A numerical model of an active magnetic regenerator cycle is used to assess the predictive ability of a set of material metrics. The performance of eight cases of known magnetocaloric material (including first order MnFeP1-xAsx and second order materials Gd, GdDy, Tb), and 15 cases of hypothetical materials are considered. Using a fixed regenerator matrix geometry, magnetic field, and flow waveforms, the maximum exergetic cooling power of each material is identified. Several material screening metrics such as relative cooling power (RCP) are tested and a linear correlation is found between maximum RCP and the maximum exergetic cooling power. The sensitivity of performance to variations in the hot side and cold side temperatures from the conditions giving maximum exergetic power are determined.

  12. 1-D transient numerical model of a regenerator in a novel sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Miller, Franklin K.

    2016-03-01

    A sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) is being developed at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. This AMRR consists of two circulators, two regenerators, one superleak, one cold heat exchanger, and two warm heat exchangers. The circulators are novel non-moving part pumps that reciprocate a superfluid mixture of 4He-3He in the system. Heat from the mixture is removed within the two regenerators of this tandem system. An accurate model of the regenerators in this AMRR is necessary in order to predict the performance of these components, which in turn helps predicting the overall performance of the AMRR system. This work presents modeling methodology along with results from a 1-D transient numerical model of the regenerators of an AMRR capable of removing 2.5 mW at 850 mK at cyclic steady state.

  13. The Operating Principle of a Fully Solid State Active Magnetic Regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative refrigeration technology, magnetocaloric refrigeration has the potential to be safer, quieter, more efficient, and more environmentally friendly than the conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology. Most of the reported active magnetic regenerator (AMR) systems that operate based on the magnetocaloric effect use heat transfer fluid to exchange heat, which results in complicated mechanical subsystems and components such as rotating valves and hydraulic pumps. This paper presents an operating principle of a fully solid state AMR, in which an alternative mechanism for heat transfer between the AMR and the heat source/sink is proposed. The operating principle of the fully solid state AMR is based on moving rods/sheets (e.g. copper, brass, iron or aluminum), which are employed to replace the heat transfer fluid. Such fully solid state AMR would provide a significantly higher heat transfer rate than a conventional AMR because the conductivity of moving solid rods/plates is high and it enables the increase in the machine operating frequency hence the cooling capacity. The details of operating principle are presented and discussed here. One of the key enabling features for this technology is the contact between the moving rods/sheets and magnetocaloric material, and heat exchange mechanism at the heat source/sink. This paper provides an overview of the design for a fully solid state magnetocaloric refrigeration system along with guidelines for their optimal design.

  14. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  15. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials.

  16. Magnetocaloric effect in spherical La(FexSi1-x)13 and their hydrides for active magnetic regenerator-type refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, A.; Koiwai, S.; Fujieda, S.; Fukamichi, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Tsuji, H.; Kaji, S.; Saito, A. T.

    2009-04-01

    We have fabricated spherical La(FexSi1-x)13 compounds by a rotating electrode process (REP) to provide suitable refrigerants for active magnetic regenerator (AMR)-type systems. In the as-prepared state, the cross section exhibits a dendritic metallographic structure composed of two phases of α-Fe-based alloy with Si and LaFeSi equiatomic compound. After annealing at 1323 K for 5 days, the spheres become a single phase of La(FexSi1-x)13. From the temperature dependence of magnetic entropy change for the hydrogenated spheres, it has been confirmed that the hydrogen concentration in the spheres is homogeneous. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that the itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition appears in the spheres with the higher Fe concentration. Consequently, the spherical La(FexSi1-x)13 fabricated by the REP are suitable for AMR-type refrigerations.

  17. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, John A.; Oseen-Send, Kathryn; Ferguson, Luke; Pouresfandiary, Jamshid; Cousins, Anand; Ralph, Heather; Hampto, Tom

    2016-01-12

    This final report for the DOE Project entitled Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier (AMRL) funded under Grant DE-FG36-08GO18064 to Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy (Heracles/Prometheus) describes an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) prototype designed and built during the period from July 2008 through May 2011. The primary goal of this project was to make significant technical advances toward highly efficient liquefaction of hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen liquefiers at any scale have a maximum FOM of ~0.35 due primarily to the intrinsic difficulty of rapid, efficient compression of either hydrogen or helium working gases. Numerical simulation modeling of high performance AMRL designs indicates certain designs have promise to increase thermodynamic efficiency from a FOM of ~0.35 toward ~0.5 to ~0.6. The technical approach was the use of solid magnetic working refrigerants cycled in and out of high magnetic fields to build an efficient active regenerative magnetic refrigeration module providing cooling power for AMRL. A single-stage reciprocating AMRR with a design temperature span from ~290 K to ~120 K was built and tested with dual magnetic regenerators moving in and out of the conductively-cooled superconducting magnet subsystem. The heat transfer fluid (helium) was coupled to the process stream (refrigeration/liquefaction load) via high performance heat exchangers. In order to maximize AMRR efficiency a helium bypass loop with adjustable flow was incorporated in the design because the thermal mass of magnetic refrigerants is higher in low magnetic field than in high magnetic field. Heracles/Prometheus designed experiments to measure AMRR performance under a variety of different operational parameters such as cycle frequency, magnetic field strength, heat transfer fluid flow rate, amount of bypass flow of the heat transfer fluid while measuring work input, temperature span, cooling capability as a function of cold temperature

  19. [Effects of weak magnetic fields on different phases of planarian regeneration].

    PubMed

    Tiras, Kh P; Petrova, O N; Miakisheva, S N; Popova, S S; Aslanidi, K B

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of weak combined magnetic fields, tuned to the cyclotron resonance condition for calcium ions, obtained in different phases of planarian regeneration. We showed that the result of regeneration in 72 hours after decapitation depends on the length of exposure, and the time between decapitation and initiation of a half-hour exposure. The experimental dependence can be explained by a multiplicity of enzymatic targets activated in different phases of the regeneration process.

  20. Modeling and design aspects of active caloric regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    A cooling device based on a solid caloric material using, for example, the elastocaloric, magnetocaloric, barocaloric or electrocaloric effect has the potential to replace vapor-compression based systems for a variety of applications. Any caloric device using a solid refrigerant may benefit from using a regenerative cycle to increase the operating temperature span. This presentation shows how all active caloric regenerators can be modeled using similar techniques and how they are related to passive regenerator performance. The advantages and disadvantages of using a regenerative cycle are also discussed. The issue of hysteresis in caloric materials is investigated from a system/thermodynamic standpoint and the effects on cooling power and efficiency are quantified using a numerical model of an active regenerator using model caloric materials with assumed properties. The implementation in a working device will be discussed for elastocaloric and magnetocaloric cooling devices. It is shown that demagnetization effects for magnetocaloric systems and stress concentration effects in elastocaloric system reduce the overall effect in the regenerator and care must be taken in regenerator design for both technologies. Other loss mechanisms outside the regenerator such as heat leaks are also discussed. Finally, experimental results for active magnetic regenerative cooler are given for a range of operating conditions. The most recently published device uses a regenerator consisting of Gd and three alloys of GdY and has demonstrated a COP over 3.

  1. Regenerable magnetic octahedral layer catalyst for gaseous UPOPs removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wang, Siwen; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Bin; Yu, Gang

    2014-09-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCBz), pentachlorobenzene (PeCBz), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (UPOPs) emitted from waste combustion and industrial processes. In this study, Fe3O4 fabricated manganese oxide octahedral layer (Fe/OL) and Cu-doped OL (Fe/Cu-OL) catalysts were synthesized and they exhibited high activity for catalytic destruction of UPOPs, but also suffered from deactivation. The deactivation of Fe/Cu-OL can be assigned to the formation of surface MnClx species. As for Fe/OL, Mn sites are protected from chlorination by tunnel K(+), and the deactivation is ascribed to the blocking of active sites by KCl crystal. Simple water washing can completely regenerate the spent catalysts due to the dissolution of surface MnClx or KCl. With the advantage of magnetism, catalysts can be easily separated from water. Although Fe/Cu-OL has higher catalytic activity than Fe/OL, it is less stable in water washing due to the collapse of Mn framework structure. Considering the protection role of K(+), the spent Fe/Cu-OL was regenerated by KNO3 solution to induce additional K(+) onto the structure. In this way, the activity can be recovered while the unwanted dissolution of Mn is avoided.

  2. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  3. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  4. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  5. A recyclable and regenerable magnetic chitosan absorbent for dye uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weifeng; Huang, Xuelian; Wang, Yilin; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-10-05

    A recyclable and regenerable magnetic polysaccharide absorbent for methylene blue (MB) removal was prepared by coating magnetic polyethyleneimine nanoparticles (PEI@MNPs) with sulfonated chitosan (SCS) and further cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The driving force for coating is the electrostactic interaction between positively charged PEI and negatively charged SCS. Infrared spectra, zeta potential, thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated the successful synthesis of magnetic polysaccharide absorbent. The self-assembly of polysaccharide with magnetic nanopartices did not alter the saturation magnetization value of the absorbent confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer. The nanoparticles showed fast removal (about 30min reached equilibrium) of MB. In particular, the removal ability of MB after desorption did not reduce, demonstrating an excellent regeneration ability. Our study provides new insights into utilizing polysaccharides for environmental remediation and creating advanced magnetic materials for various promising applications.

  6. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  7. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  8. Coupled cellular therapy and magnetic targeting for airway regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ordidge, Katherine L; Gregori, Maria; Kalber, Tammy L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Janes, Sam M; Giangreco, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Airway diseases including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cystic fibrosis and lung cancer are leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality, with annual healthcare costs of billions of pounds. True regeneration of damaged airways offers the possibility of restoring lung function and protecting against airway transformation. Recently, advances in tissue engineering have allowed the development of cadaveric and biosynthetic airway grafts. Although these have produced encouraging results, the ability to achieve long-term functional airway regeneration remains a major challenge. To promote regeneration, exogenously delivered stem and progenitor cells are being trialled as cellular therapies. Unfortunately, current evidence suggests that only small numbers of exogenously delivered stem cells engraft within lungs, thereby limiting their utility for airway repair. In other organ systems, magnetic targeting has shown promise for improving long-term robust cell engraftment. This technique involves in vitro cell expansion, magnetic actuation and magnetically guided cell engraftment to sites of tissue damage. In the present paper, we discuss the utility of coupling stem cell-mediated cellular therapy with magnetic targeting for improving airway regeneration.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesized magnetically separable mesostructured H2Ti3O7/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite for organic dye removal via adsorption and its regeneration/reuse through synergistic non-radiation driven H2O2 activation.

    PubMed

    Narayani, Harsha; Jose, Manu; Sriram, K; Shukla, Satyajit

    2017-02-14

    Hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanotubes/nanosheets (HTN) are emerging class of adsorbent material which possess unique property of activating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to generate the reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide radical ions (O2(.-)) and hydroxyl radicals (·OH), effective in the decomposition of surface-adsorbed dye. However, HTN are non-magnetic which create hurdle in their effective separation from the treated aqueous solution. To overcome this issue, magnetic nanocomposites (HTNF) composed of HTN and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been processed by subjecting the core-shell magnetic photocatalyst consisting of γ-Fe2O3/silica (SiO2)/titania (TiO2), having varying amounts of TiO2 in the shell to the hydrothermal conditions. HTNF-5 magnetic nanocomposite consisting of 31 wt% H2Ti3O7, typically having nanotube morphology with the highest specific surface area (133 m(2) g(-1)) and pore-volume (0.22 cm(3) g(-1)), exhibits the highest capacity (74 mg g(-1)) for the adsorption of cationic methylene blue (MB) dye from an aqueous solution involving the electrostatic attraction mechanism and pseudo-second-order kinetics. Very fast magnetic separation followed by regeneration of HTNF-5 magnetic nanocomposite has been demonstrated via non-radiation driven H2O2 activation. It has been ascertained for the first time that the underlying mechanism of dye decomposition involves the synergy effect between the constituents of HTNF magnetic nanocomposite.

  10. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  11. The theory of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The adiabatic temperature change with field which is limited to about 2 K/Tesla for ferromagnets near their Curie temperatures by the change of magnetization with temperature and the lattice heat capacity is discussed. Practical magnetic refrigerators operate on a regenerative cycle such as the Brayton cycle. This cycle can be executed through the use of an active magnetic regenerator, i.e., a regenerator composed of magnetic material that is cycled in an out of a magnetic field with appropriate fluid flows. The theory of these devices is predicted by solving the partial differential equations that describe fluid and the magnetic solid. The active magnetic regenerator is described along with the method of calculation. Temperature profiles for a normal regenerator and a magnetic regenerative refrigerator are shown.

  12. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  13. Bone Regeneration Using Gene-Activated Matrices.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sheetal; Atluri, Keerthi; Geary, Sean M; Hong, Liu; Elangovan, Satheesh; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is a potential therapeutic strategy for directed, sustained, and regulated protein expression. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration include delivery of proteins, genes (viral and non-viral-mediated delivery), and/or cells to the bone defect site. In addition, biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds incorporating bone anabolic agents greatly enhance the bone repair process. Regional gene therapy has the potential of enhancing bone defect healing and bone regeneration by delivering osteogenic genes locally to the osseous lesions, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and the need for using supraphysiological dosages of therapeutic proteins. By implanting gene-activated matrices (GAMs), sustained gene expression and continuous osteogenic protein production in situ can be achieved in a way that stimulates osteogenesis and bone repair within osseous defects. Critical parameters substantially affecting the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy include the choice of osteogenic transgene(s), selection of non-viral or viral vectors, the wound environment, and the selection of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, such as GAMs. It is critical for gene therapy applications that clinically beneficial amounts of proteins are synthesized endogenously within and around the lesion in a sustained manner. It is therefore necessary that reliable and reproducible methods of gene delivery be developed and tested for their efficacy and safety before translating into clinical practice. Practical considerations such as the age, gender, and systemic health of patients and the nature of the disease process also need to be taken into account in order to personalize the treatments and progress towards developing a clinically applicable gene therapy for healing bone defects. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies to regenerate bone with specific focus on non-viral gene delivery systems.

  14. Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    1996-07-23

    A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler is disclosed having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Sn, Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Pb, Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}(Sn{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}), and Er{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Sn comprising a mixture of Er{sub 3}Ni and Er{sub 6}Ni{sub 2}Sn in the microstructure. 14 figs.

  15. Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1996-07-23

    A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Pb, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 (Sn.sub.0.75 Ga.sub.0.25), and Er.sub.9 Ni.sub.3 Sn comprising a mixture of Er.sub.3 Ni and Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn in the microstructure.

  16. Thermodynamic simulation of a rotating Ericsson-cycle magnetic refrigerator without a regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakuraku, Y.

    1987-09-01

    A magnetic Ericsson cycle, which consists of two isothermal stages and two isofield stages, is generally thought to require regenerators. However, a new concept makes it possible to realize magnetic refrigerators capable of executing an Ericsson-cycle without using regenerators. The basic principle lies in directly linking the two isofield changes by transferring heat between the isofield stages through heat paths rather than through regenerators. A fundamental configuration is proposed for a rotating magnetic refrigerator that operates based on this concept. A simulation of the thermodynamic cycle in this simplified refrigerator model shows that the system is theoretically feasible.

  17. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods.

  18. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  19. Magnetic regenerator material economizing method for 4K Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers using bakelite rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, S.; Nagao, T.; Numazawa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic regenerator materials, such as HoCu2, Er3Ni, Gd2O2S, and so on, are always needed to produce the cooling power at the temperature of 4.2 K using regenerative cryocoolers. The use of a large quantity of magnetic regenerator materials affects directly the fabrication cost of 4K cryocoolers. From this point of view, we introduce a magnetic regenerator material economizing method in this paper. An innovative regenerator structure was adopted for two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler. The structure has a bakelite rod inserted in the co-axial layout of the 2nd stage regenerator in which HoCu2 spheres are filled. The cold temperature side of the 2nd stage regenerator is occupied with 50% by volume of the bakelite rod and HoCu2 spheres, and the warm side is packed with lead (Pb) spheres as a single layer. The bakelite rod is a dummy volume. Two types of conventional GM cryocoolers with power consumption of 1.3 and 7.3 kW, respectively, are tested. The experimental results show that the filling volume of HoCu2 spheres of 1.3 and 7.3 kW models is able to economize by 20% and 10% without deterioration of the cooling power at 4.2 K, respectively. In this paper, the regenerator structure and detailed experimental results will be presented.

  20. Rapid microwave-assisted regeneration of magnetic carbon nanotubes loaded with p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chunyue; Zheng, Qingzhu; Han, Yanhe; Xin, Yanjun

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) adsorbent with good sorption, magnetic separability, and microwave (MW) regeneration properties was prepared successfully using thermal decomposition. The magnetic CNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, nitrogen adsorption (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area), and X-ray diffraction and their magnetic properties were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Magnetic nanoparticles (≈10 nm diameter) were dispersed uniformly on the CNTs with a magnetic CNTs surface area of 146.7 m2 g-1 and a saturation magnetization of 21.11 emu g-1. When the magnetic CNTs were used in the sorption of p-nitrophenol, the equilibrium time was 20 min and the sorption isotherms fit the Freundlich isotherm well. The spent magnetic CNTs could be separated magnetically and be regenerated by MW irradiation. After six adsorption and MW regeneration cycles (at 850 W for 180 s), the adsorption capacity of the magnetic CNTs was higher than that of the virgin magnetic CNTs with a low carbon loss.

  1. Early exposure of rotating magnetic fields promotes central nervous regeneration in planarian Girardia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lin, Gui-miao; Wu, Nan; Tang, Sheng-wei; Zheng, Zhi-jia; Lin, Marie Chia-mi; Xu, Gai-xia; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yue-yue; Zhang, Xiao-yun; Chen, Si-ping; Wang, Xiao-mei; Niu, Han-ben

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field exposure is an accepted safe and effective modality for nerve injury. However, it is clinically used only as a supplement or salvage therapy at the later stage of treatment. Here, we used a planarian Girardia sinensis decapitated model to investigate beneficial effects of early rotary non-uniform magnetic fields (RMFs) exposure on central nervous regeneration. Our results clearly indicated that magnetic stimulation induced from early RMFs exposure significantly promoted neural regeneration of planarians. This stimulating effect is frequency and intensity dependent. Optimum effects were obtained when decapitated planarians were cultured at 20 °C, starved for 3 days before head-cutting, and treated with 6 Hz 0.02 T RMFs. At early regeneration stage, RMFs exposure eliminated edema around the wound and facilitated subsequent formation of blastema. It also accelerated cell proliferation and recovery of neuron functionality. Early RMFs exposure up-regulated expression of neural regeneration related proteins, EGR4 and Netrin 2, and mature nerve cell marker proteins, NSE and NPY. These results suggest that RMFs therapy produced early and significant benefit in central nervous regeneration, and should be clinically used at the early stage of neural regeneration, with appropriate optimal frequency and intensity.

  2. Regeneration of sulfamethoxazole-saturated activated carbon using gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely used for reclamation and reuse of the effluent of wastewater treatment plant to further remove the emerging contaminants, such as PPCPs in recent years. How to regenerate the exhausted AC effectively and economically is still a challenge. In the present study, the regeneration of AC exhausted with SMX was performed by gamma irradiation to simultaneously recover the spent AC and degrade the pollutants. The results showed that the adsorption of SMX onto AC can be described by the Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption capacity was about 417 mg/g. SMX can be removed rapidly when exposed to gamma irradiation, with the initial concentration of 100 mg/L, more than 99% of SMX was removed at 5.0 kGy, while an extremely high dose (150 kGy) was needed to reach 80% mineralization ratio. The regeneration efficiency was about 21-30% at 50-200 kGy. The absorbed SMX and the intermediates formed during gamma irradiation were released into aqueous solution from AC and mineralized, leading to the partial regeneration of the adsorption capacity of AC. Further studies are needed to optimize the experimental conditions to increase the regeneration efficiency.

  3. Actively controlled vehicle suspension with energy regeneration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar David, Sagiv; Zion Bobrovsky, Ben

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative dual purpose automotive suspension topology, combining for the first time the active damping qualities with mechanical vibrations power regeneration capabilities. The new configuration consists of a linear generator as an actuator, a power processing stage based on a gyrator operating under sliding mode control and dynamics controllers. The researched design is simple and energetically efficient, enables an accurate force-velocity suspension characteristic control as well as energy regeneration control, with no practical implementation constraints imposed over the theoretical design. Active damping is based on Skyhook suspension control scheme, which enables overcoming the passive damping tradeoff between high- and low-frequency performance, improving both body isolation and the tire's road grip. The system-level design includes configuration of three system operation modes: passive, semi-active or fully active damping, all using the same electro-mechanical infrastructure, and each focusing on different objective: dynamics improvement or power regeneration. Conclusively, the innovative hybrid suspension is theoretically researched, practically designed and analysed, and proven to be feasible as well as profitable in the aspects of power regeneration, vehicle dynamics improvement and human health risks reduction.

  4. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1995-06-01

    Extremely-low-frequency (ELF), low-intensity magnetic fields have been shown to influence cell signaling processes in a variety of systems, both in vivo and in vitro. Similar effects have been demonstrated for nervous system development and neurite outgrowth. The authors report that regeneration in planaria, which incorporates many of these processes, is also affected by ELF magnetic fields. The rate of cephalic regeneration, reflected by the mean regeneration time (MRT), for planaria populations regenerating under continuous exposure to combined DC (78.4 {mu}T) and AC (60.0 Hz at 10.0 {mu}T{sub peak}) magnetic fields applied in parallel was found to be significantly delayed (P {much_lt} 0.001) by 48 {+-} 1 h relative to two different types of control populations (MRT {minus}140 {+-} 12 h). One control population was exposed to only the AC component of this field combination, while the other experienced only the ambient geomagnetic field. All measurements were conducted in a low-gradient, low-noise magnetics laboratory under well-maintained temperature conditions. This delay in regeneration was shown to be dependent on the planaria having a fixed orientation with respect to the magnetic field vectors. Results also indicate that this orientation-dependent transduction process does not result from Faraday induction but is consistent with a Ca{sup 2+} cyclotron resonance mechanism. Data interpretation also permits the tentative conclusion that the effect results from an inhibition of events at an early stage in the regeneration process before the onset of proliferation and differentiation.

  5. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    15 111-7 GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS THERMALLY REACTIVATED CARBON .............. 16 I IV-1 PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM FOR... PROCESSING COST OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL REGENERATION BY SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS ........................... 25 l IV-4 SENSITIVITY OF GAC...regenerate adsorbents such as granular activated carbon loaded with a broad variety of organic adsorbates. This regeneration process uses a supercritical

  6. Fenton- and Persulfate-driven Regeneration of Contaminant-spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton- or persulfate-driven chemical oxidation regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two treatment technologies: adsorption of organic chemicals onto GAC and chemical oxidation regeneration of the spent-GAC. Environmental...

  7. Comparison Between Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma and Ozone Regenerations of Activated Carbon Exhausted with Pentachlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Qu, Dong; Huang, Yimei; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    In this study, two regeneration methods (dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma and ozone (O3) regeneration) of saturated granular activated carbon (GAC) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) were compared. The results show that the two regeneration methods can eliminate contaminants from GAC and recover its adsorption properties to some extent. Comparing the DBD plasma with O3 regeneration, the adsorption rate and the capacity of the GAC samples after DBD plasma regeneration are greater than those after O3 regeneration. O3 regeneration decreases the specific surface area of GAC and increases the acidic surface oxygen groups on the surface of GAC, which causes a decrease in PCP on GAC uptake. With increasing regeneration cycles, the regeneration efficiencies of the two methods decrease, but the decrease in the regeneration efficiencies of GAC after O3 regeneration is very obvious compared with that after DBD plasma regeneration. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted by the Freundlich and Langmuir models using the non-linear regression technique, and all the adsorption equilibrium isotherms fit the Langmuir model fairly well, which demonstrates that the DBD plasma and ozone regeneration processes do not appear to modify the adsorption process, but to shift the equilibrium towards lower adsorption concentrations. Analyses of the weight loss of GAC show that O3 regeneration has a lower weight loss than DBD plasma regeneration.

  8. Exploring the Potential of Starch/Polycaprolactone Aligned Magnetic Responsive Scaffolds for Tendon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana I; Rodrigues, Márcia T; Carvalho, Pedro P; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Paz, Elvira; Freitas, Paulo; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-01-21

    The application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in tissue engineering (TE) approaches opens several new research possibilities in this field, enabling a new generation of multifunctional constructs for tissue regeneration. This study describes the development of sophisticated magnetic polymer scaffolds with aligned structural features aimed at applications in tendon tissue engineering (TTE). Tissue engineering magnetic scaffolds are prepared by incorporating iron oxide MNPs into a 3D structure of aligned SPCL (starch and polycaprolactone) fibers fabricated by rapid prototyping (RP) technology. The 3D architecture, composition, and magnetic properties are characterized. Furthermore, the effect of an externally applied magnetic field is investigated on the tenogenic differentiation of adipose stem cells (ASCs) cultured onto the developed magnetic scaffolds, demonstrating that ASCs undergo tenogenic differentiation synthesizing a Tenascin C and Collagen type I rich matrix under magneto-stimulation conditions. Finally, the developed magnetic scaffolds were implanted in an ectopic rat model, evidencing good biocompatibility and integration within the surrounding tissues. Together, these results suggest that the effect of the magnetic aligned scaffolds structure combined with magnetic stimulation has a significant potential to impact the field of tendon tissue engineering toward the development of more efficient regeneration therapies.

  9. Chemically modified RNA activated matrices enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Khorsand, Behnoush; Do, Anh-Vu; Hong, Liu; Dewerth, Alexander; Kormann, Michael; Ross, Ryan D; Sumner, D Rick; Allamargot, Chantal; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-11-28

    There exists a dire need for improved therapeutics to achieve predictable bone regeneration. Gene therapy using non-viral vectors that are safe and efficient at transfecting target cells is a promising approach to overcoming the drawbacks of protein delivery of growth factors. Here, we investigated the transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, osteogenic potential and in vivo bone regenerative capacity of chemically modified ribonucleic acid (cmRNA) (encoding BMP-2) complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) and made comparisons with PEI complexed with conventional plasmid DNA (encoding BMP-2). The polyplexes were fabricated at an amine (N) to phosphate (P) ratio of 10 and characterized for transfection efficiency using human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osteogenic potential of BMSCs treated with these polyplexes was validated by determining the expression of bone-specific genes, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase as well as through the detection of bone matrix deposition. Using a calvarial bone defect model in rats, it was shown that PEI-cmRNA (encoding BMP-2)-activated matrices promoted significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to PEI-plasmid DNA (BMP-2)-activated matrices. Our proof of concept study suggests that scaffolds loaded with non-viral vectors harboring cmRNA encoding osteogenic proteins may be a powerful tool for stimulating bone regeneration with significant potential for clinical translation.

  10. Analyzing pERK Activation During Planarian Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fraguas, Susanna; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu; Cebrià, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    Planarians are an ideal model in which to study stem cell-based regeneration. After amputation, planarian pluripotent stem cells surrounding the wound proliferate to produce the regenerative blastema, in which they differentiate into the missing tissues and structures. Recent independent studies in planarians have shown that Smed-egfr-3, a gene encoding a homologue of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors, and DjerkA, which encodes an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), may control cell differentiation and blastema growth. However, because these studies were carried in two different planarian species, the relationship between these two genes remains unclear. We have optimized anti-pERK immunostaining in Schmidtea mediterranea using the original protocol developed in Dugesia japonica. Both protocols are reported here as most laboratories worldwide work with one of these two species. Using this protocol we have determined that Smed-egfr-3 appears to be necessary for pERK activation during planarian regeneration.

  11. Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1990-04-01

    The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This study uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disrupters, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disrupters can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses.

  12. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  13. WIND1 Promotes Shoot Regeneration through Transcriptional Activation of ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION1 in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Mariko; Kurata, Tetsuya; Nakata, Masaru; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Many plant species display remarkable developmental plasticity and regenerate new organs after injury. Local signals produced by wounding are thought to trigger organ regeneration but molecular mechanisms underlying this control remain largely unknown. We previously identified an AP2/ERF transcription factor WOUND INDUCED DEDIFFERENTIATION1 (WIND1) as a central regulator of wound-induced cellular reprogramming in plants. In this study, we demonstrate that WIND1 promotes callus formation and shoot regeneration by upregulating the expression of the ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION1 (ESR1) gene, which encodes another AP2/ERF transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. The esr1 mutants are defective in callus formation and shoot regeneration; conversely, its overexpression promotes both of these processes, indicating that ESR1 functions as a critical driver of cellular reprogramming. Our data show that WIND1 directly binds the vascular system-specific and wound-responsive cis-element-like motifs within the ESR1 promoter and activates its expression. The expression of ESR1 is strongly reduced in WIND1-SRDX dominant repressors, and ectopic overexpression of ESR1 bypasses defects in callus formation and shoot regeneration in WIND1-SRDX plants, supporting the notion that ESR1 acts downstream of WIND1. Together, our findings uncover a key molecular pathway that links wound signaling to shoot regeneration in plants. PMID:28011694

  14. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  15. The transcription factor Sox11 promotes nerve regeneration through activation of the regeneration-associated gene Sprr1a.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaotang; Wang, Ting; Huang, Shaohua; Glorioso, Joseph C; Albers, Kathryn M

    2012-01-01

    Factors that enhance the intrinsic growth potential of adult neurons are key players in the successful repair and regeneration of neurons following injury. Injury-induced activation of transcription factors has a central role in this process because they regulate expression of regeneration-associated genes. Sox11 is a developmentally expressed transcription factor that is significantly induced in adult neurons in response to injury. Its function in injured neurons is however undefined. Here, we report studies that use herpes simplex virus (HSV)-vector-mediated expression of Sox11 in adult sensory neurons to assess the effect of Sox11 overexpression on neuron regeneration. Cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons transfected with HSV-Sox11 exhibited increased neurite elongation and branching relative to naïve and HSV-vector control treated neurons. Neurons from mice injected in foot skin with HSV-Sox11 exhibited accelerated regeneration of crushed saphenous nerves as indicated by faster regrowth of axons and nerve fibers to the skin, increased myelin thickness and faster return of nerve and skin sensitivity. Downstream targets of HSV-Sox11 were examined by analyzing changes in gene expression of known regeneration-associated genes. This analysis in combination with mutational and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicates that the ability of Sox11 to accelerate in vivo nerve regeneration is dependent on its transcriptional activation of the regeneration-associated gene, small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a). This finding reveals a new functional linkage between Sox11 and Sprr1a in adult peripheral neuron regeneration.

  16. Activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composite: fabrication, methyl orange removal and regeneration by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Do, Manh Huy; Phan, Ngoc Hoa; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Pham, Thi Thu Suong; Nguyen, Van Khoa; Vu, Thi Thuy Trang; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2011-11-01

    In the water treatment field, activated carbons (ACs) have wide applications in adsorptions. However, the applications are limited by difficulties encountered in separation and regeneration processes. Here, activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composites, which combine the adsorption features of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with the magnetic and excellent catalytic properties of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles, were fabricated by a modified impregnation method using HNO(3) as the carbon modifying agent. The obtained composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and vibrating sample magnetometer. Their performance for methyl orange (MO) removal by adsorption was evaluated. The regeneration of the composite and PAC-HNO(3) (powdered activated carbon modified by HNO(3)) adsorbed MO by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The composites had a high specific surface area and porosity and a superparamagnetic property that shows they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. Adsorption experiments showed that the MO sorption process on the composites followed pseudo-second order kinetic model and the adsorption isotherm date could be simulated with both the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The regeneration indicated that the presence of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles is important for a achieving high regeneration efficiency by hydrogen peroxide.

  17. UV-activated persulfate oxidation and regeneration of NOM-Saturated granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Westerhoff, Paul; Zheng, Mengxin; Wu, Mengyuan; Yang, Yu; Chiu, Chao-An

    2015-04-15

    A new method of ultraviolet light (UV) activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated to regenerate granular activated carbon (GAC) in drinking water applications. The improvements in iodine and methylene blue numbers measured in the GAC after ultraviolet- (UV) activated persulfate suggested that the GAC preloaded with natural organic matter (NOM) was chemically regenerated. An experimental matrix for UV-activated persulfate regeneration included a range of persulfate doses and different UV wavelengths. Over 87% of the initial iodine number for GAC was restored under the optimum conditions, perfulfate dosage 60 g/L and UV exposure 1.75 × 10(4) mJ/cm(2). The persulfate dosages had little effect on the recovery of the methylene blue number, which was approximately 65%. Persulfate activation at 185 nm was superior to activation at 254 nm. UV activation of persulfate in the presence of GAC produced acid, lowering the solution pH. Higher persulfate concentrations and UV exposure resulted in greater GAC regeneration. Typical organic and inorganic byproducts (e.g., benzene compounds and sulfate ions) were measured as a component of treated water quality safety. This study provides a proof-of-concept that can be used to optimize pilot-scale and full-scale UV-activated persulfate for regeneration of NOM-saturated GAC.

  18. Active Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Modify Forward Computer Models .............................................................................................2 Modify TMGS Simulator...active magnetic gradient measurement system are based upon the existing tensor magnetic gradiometer system ( TMGS ) developed under project MM-1328...Magnetic Gradiometer System ( TMGS ) for UXO Detection, Imaging, and Discrimination.” The TMGS developed under MM-1328 was successfully tested at the

  19. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J; Slamon, Dennis J; Chute, John P

    2014-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation-mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner.

  20. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS

    PubMed Central

    Himburg, Heather A.; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L.; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation–mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation–induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  1. Mercury removal from flue gases by novel regenerable magnetic nanocomposite sorbents.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Xu, Zhenghe; Kuznicki, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic zeolite composites with supported silver nanoparicles are a new class of multifunctional materials with potential applications as recyclable catalysts, disinfectants, and sorbents. This study evaluated the suitability of the magnetic composites as sorbents for the removal of elemental mercury vapor from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The sorbents were found to completely capture mercury at temperatures up to 200 degrees C, and the mercury capacity of the sorbents was found to be affected by the state, content, and size of the silver particles in the composite. Cumulative or extended thermal treatments at 400 degrees C were found to improve the mercury capture capacity, allowing the sorbent to be regenerated and recycled multiple times without performance degradation. The magnetic sorbent was readily separated from fly ash by magnetic separation, leaving the fly ash essentially free of sorbent contamination. In initial in-plant tests, the sorbents were able to capture mercury from the flue gases of an operational, full-scale, coal-fired power plant The combination of mercury capacity, ease of separation and regeneration, and recyclability makes these multifunctional magnetic composites excellent candidate sorbentsforthe control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants.

  2. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μmregenerated AC, which are benefit for water treatment. These results will provide a theoretical basis for the reuse of biological waste (spent AC) from BAC process.

  3. Wnt activation followed by Notch inhibition promotes mitotic hair cell regeneration in the postnatal mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Shasha; Tang, Mingliang; Sun, Shan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Hair cell (HC) loss is the main cause of permanent hearing loss in mammals. Previous studies have reported that in neonatal mice cochleae, Wnt activation promotes supporting cell (SC) proliferation and Notch inhibition promotes the trans-differentiation of SCs into HCs. However, Wnt activation alone fails to regenerate significant amounts of new HCs, Notch inhibition alone regenerates the HCs at the cost of exhausting the SC population, which leads to the death of the newly regenerated HCs. Mitotic HC regeneration might preserve the SC number while regenerating the HCs, which could be a better approach for long-term HC regeneration. We present a two-step gene manipulation, Wnt activation followed by Notch inhibition, to accomplish mitotic regeneration of HCs while partially preserving the SC number. We show that Wnt activation followed by Notch inhibition strongly promotes the mitotic regeneration of new HCs in both normal and neomycin-damaged cochleae while partially preserving the SC number. Lineage tracing shows that the majority of the mitotically regenerated HCs are derived specifically from the Lgr5+ progenitors with or without HC damage. Our findings suggest that the co-regulation of Wnt and Notch signaling might provide a better approach to mitotically regenerate HCs from Lgr5+ progenitor cells. PMID:27564256

  4. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lucki, Stanley J.; Brennan, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  5. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  6. Persulfate Oxidation Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon: Reversible Impacts on Sorption Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that can be carried out utilizing thermally-activated persulfate. During chemical regeneration of GAC, aggressive oxidative conditions lead to high acidity (pH < 2) and the accumulation ...

  7. Fenton-Driven Regeneration of MTBE-spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two treatment technologies: adsorption of organic chemicals onto activated carbon and Fenton-driven oxidation regeneration of the spent-GAC...

  8. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  9. Electrochemical in situ regeneration of granular activated carbon using a three-dimensional reactor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical in situ regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) saturated with phenol was experimentally investigated using a three-dimensional electrode reactor with titanium filter electrode arrays. The feasibility of the electrochemical regeneration has been assessed by monitoring the regeneration efficiency and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The influence of the applied current, the effluent flow rate, and the effluent path of the electrochemical cell have been systematically studied. Under the optimum conditions, the regeneration efficiency of GAC could reach 94% in 2 hr, and no significant declination was observed after five-time continuous adsorption-regeneration cycles. The adsorption of organic pollutants was almost completely mineralized due to electrochemical oxidation, indicating that this regeneration process is much more potentially cost-effective for application.

  10. Hydrogen production by thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane: Regeneration of active carbons using CO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, J. L.; Suelves, I.; Utrilla, R.; Gálvez, M. E.; Lázaro, M. J.; Moliner, R.

    Thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane using carbons as catalyst is a very attractive process for free CO 2-hydrogen production. One of the main drawbacks for the sustainability of the process is catalyst deactivation. In this work, regeneration of a deactivated active-carbon catalyst has been studied using CO 2 as activating agent under different regeneration conditions. It has been stated that during the regeneration stage, a compromise between the regeneration of the initial properties of the catalyst and the burn-off is needed in order to keep the sustainability of the process. Three deactivation-regeneration cycles have been performed for two sets of regeneration conditions. A progressive decreasing in the burn-off, surface area and surface oxygenated groups after each decomposition/regeneration cycle is observed. It can be explained considering that the carbon removed during the regeneration steps is not the carbon deposited from methane but the remaining initial catalyst, which is less resistant to gasification. The implication is that after three cycles of decomposition/regeneration, most of the carbon sample consists of carbon formed during the process since the initial catalyst has been gasified.

  11. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  12. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  13. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin; West, David L; Abdelaziz, Omar; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  14. Active Nerve Regeneration with Failed Target Reinnervation Drives Persistent Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral nerves can regenerate and, when injured, may cause neuropathic pain. We propose that the active regeneration process plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. In one commonly used rodent neuropathic pain model, pronounced pain behaviors follow ligation and cutting of the L5 spinal nerve. We found that the injured nerve regenerates into the sciatic nerve and functionally reinnervates target tissues: the regenerated nerve conducts electrical signals, mechanical responses, and tracers between the leg/hindpaw and axotomized sensory ganglion. The regenerating nerve is the primary source of abnormal spontaneous activity detected in vivo. Disrupting the regeneration inhibited pain. First, semaphorin 3A, an inhibitory axonal guidance molecule, reduced functional regeneration, spontaneous activity, and pain behaviors when applied to the injury site in vivo. Second, knockdown of the upregulated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) with siRNA injected into the axotomized sensory ganglion reduced pain behaviors. We next examined the spared nerve injury model, in which pain behaviors are essentially permanent. The regeneration resulted in tangled GAP43-positive neuromas at the nerve injury site without target reinnervation. Perfusing the nerve stump with semaphorin 3A, but not removing the tangled fibers, prevented or reversed pain behaviors. This effect far outlasted the semaphorin 3A perfusion. Hence, in this model the long-lasting chronic pain may reflect the anatomical inability of regenerating nerves to successfully reinnervate target tissues, resulting in an ongoing futile regeneration process. We propose that specifically targeting the regeneration process may provide effective long-lasting pain relief in patients when functional reinnervation becomes impossible. PMID:28197545

  15. Electrochemical regeneration of phenol-saturated activated carbon - proposal of a reactor.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Odivan; Bilibio, Denise; Priamo, Wagner Luiz; Tessaro, Isabel Cristina; Féris, Liliana Amaral

    2017-03-01

    An electrochemical process was used to investigate the activated carbon regeneration efficiency (RE) saturated with aromatics. For this purpose, an electrochemical reactor was developed and the operational conditions of this equipment were investigated, which is applied in activated carbon regeneration process. The influence of regeneration parameters such as processing time, the current used, the polarity and the processing fluid (electrolyte) were studied. The performance of electrochemical regeneration was evaluated by adsorption tests, using phenol as adsorbate. The increase in current applied and the process time was found to enhance the RE. Another aspect that indicated a better reactor performance was the type of electrolyte used, showing best results for NaCl. The polarity showed the highest influence on the process, when the cathodic regeneration was more efficient. The electrochemical regeneration process developed in this study presented regeneration capacities greater than 100% when the best process conditions were used, showing that this form of regeneration for activated carbon saturated with aromatics is very promising.

  16. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M; Yeo, Gene W; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2012-09-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration.

  17. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process.

  18. Regeneration of siloxane-exhausted activated carbon by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Codony, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Martín, Maria J

    2015-03-21

    In the context of the biogas upgrading, siloxane exhausted activated carbons need to be regenerated in order to avoid them becoming a residue. In this work, two commercial activate carbons which were proved to be efficient in the removal of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) from biogas, have been regenerated through advanced oxidation processes using both O3 and H2O2. After the treatment with O3, the activated carbon recovered up to 40% of the original adsorption capacity while by the oxidation with H2O2 the regeneration efficiency achieved was up to 45%. In order to enhance the H2O2 oxidation, activated carbon was amended with iron. In this case, the regeneration efficiency increased up to 92%.

  19. IN-SITU REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON (GAC) USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-dependent regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) initially saturated with one of several chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was studied in batch and continuous-flow reactors. Homogeneous and heterogeneous experiments were designed to investigate the effects of va...

  20. Efficient regeneration by activation of neurogenesis in homeostatically quiescent regions of the adult vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Beljajeva, Anna; Knapp, Dunja; Habermann, Bianca; Ryge, Jesper; Tanaka, Elly M; Simon, András

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders and teleost fishes can efficiently repair the adult brain. It has been hypothesised that constitutively active neurogenic niches are a prerequisite for extensive neuronal regeneration capacity. Here, we show that the highly regenerative salamander, the red spotted newt, displays an unexpectedly similar distribution of active germinal niches with mammals under normal physiological conditions. Proliferation zones in the adult newt brain are restricted to the forebrain, whereas all other regions are essentially quiescent. However, ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons in newts induced ependymoglia cells in the normally quiescent midbrain to proliferate and to undertake full dopamine neuron regeneration. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we have catalogued a set of differentially expressed genes in these activated ependymoglia cells. This strategy identified hedgehog signalling as a key component of adult dopamine neuron regeneration. These data show that brain regeneration can occur by activation of neurogenesis in quiescent brain regions.

  1. Thermally activated persulfate oxidation regeneration of NOM- and MTBE- spent granular activated carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  2. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x} Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing. 27 figs.

  3. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing.

  4. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  5. Exercise-induced stem cell activation and its implication for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Brixius, Klara; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    A number of publications have provided evidence that exercise and physical activity are linked to the activation, mobilization, and differentiation of various types of stem cells. Exercise may improve organ regeneration and function. This review summarizes mechanisms by which exercise contributes to stem cell-induced regeneration in the cardiovascular and the skeletal muscle system. In addition, it discusses whether exercise may improve and support stem cell transplantation in situations of cardiovascular disease or muscular dystrophy.

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    de Certaines, J.D.; Moulinoux, J.P.; Benoist, L.; Benard, A.; Rivet, P.

    1982-08-09

    Spin-lattice (T/sub 1/) and spin-spin (T/sub 2/) proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times were measured over a 48-hours period of experimental liver regeneration in Wistar rats, T/sub 2/ showed an early significant increase reaching a plateau 30% above baseline from the 10th hrs onwards. Laparotomized control animals showed no change in T/sub 2/ values. The increase in T/sub 1/ occurred at a later stage but was no different from that in laparotomized controls. T/sub 1/ reached a peak, 20% above baseline, around the 30th hr. The changes observed were far less marked than those previously described for cancer tissue, which showed about a 60% increase in T/sub 1/ fluctuations followed a circadian pattern, with a minimum at night's end and a maximum around mid-day. No circadian rhythm was seen for T/sub 2/. The observed T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ changes are discussed with respect to mitotic and metabolic events known to occur during regeneration of the liver.

  7. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  8. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jamie I; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-30

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation.

  9. Magnetic biodegradable Fe3O4/CS/PVA nanofibrous membranes for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Zhang, Xuehui; Song, Yu; Han, Bing; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Xinzhi; Lin, Yuanhua; Deng, Xuliang

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, interest in magnetic biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering has increased considerably. The aim of this study is to develop magnetic biodegradable fibrous materials with potential use in bone regeneration. Magnetic biodegradable Fe(3)O(4)/chitosan (CS)/poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous membranes were achieved by electrospinning with average fiber diameters ranging from 230 to 380 nm and porosity of 83.9-85.1%. The influences of polymer concentration, applied voltage and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles loading on the fabrication of nanofibers were investigated. The polymer concentration of 4.5 wt%, applied voltage of 20 kV and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles loading of lower than 5 wt% could produce homogeneous, smooth and continuous Fe(3)O(4)/CS/PVA nanofibrous membranes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data confirmed that the crystalline structure of the Fe(3)O(4), CS and PVA were maintained during electrospinning process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) demonstrated that the Fe(3)O(4) loading up to 5 wt% did not change the functional groups of CS/PVA greatly. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed islets of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles evenly distributed in the fibers. Weak ferrimagnetic behaviors of membranes were revealed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) test. Tensile test exhibited Young's modulus of membranes that were gradually enhanced with the increase of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles loading, while ultimate tensile stress and ultimate strain were slightly reduced by Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles loading of 5%. Additionally, MG63 human osteoblast-like cells were seeded on the magnetic nanofibrous membranes to evaluate their bone biocompatibility. Cell growth dynamics according to MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation exhibited good cell adhesion and proliferation, suggesting that this magnetic biodegradable Fe(3)O(4)/CS/PVA nanofibrous membranes can be one of promising biomaterials for facilitation of osteogenesis.

  10. Recovery comparisons--hot nitrogen Vs steam regeneration of toxic dichloromethane from activated carbon beds in oil sands process.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Shivaji G; Pré, Pascaline; Giraudet, Sylvain; Le Coq, Laurence; Le Cloirec, Pierre; Baudouin, Olivier; Déchelotte, Stéphane

    2012-02-29

    The regeneration experiments of dichloromethane from activated carbon bed had been carried out by both hot nitrogen and steam to evaluate the regeneration performance and the operating cost of the regeneration step. Factorial Experimental Design (FED) tool had been implemented to optimize the temperature of nitrogen and the superficial velocity of the nitrogen to achieve maximum regeneration at an optimized operating cost. All the experimental results of adsorption step, hot nitrogen and steam regeneration step had been validated by the simulation model PROSIM. The average error percentage between the simulation and experiment based on the mass of adsorption of dichloromethane was 2.6%. The average error percentages between the simulations and experiments based on the mass of dichloromethane regenerated by nitrogen regeneration and steam regeneration were 3 and 12%, respectively. From the experiments, it had been shown that both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration had regenerated 84% of dichloromethane. But the choice of hot nitrogen or steam regeneration depends on the regeneration time, operating costs, and purity of dichloromethane regenerated. A thorough investigation had been made about the advantages and limitations of both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration of dichloromethane.

  11. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O2) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O2) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

  12. Synergistic interactions between temporal coupling of complex light and magnetic pulses upon melanoma cell proliferation and planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M; Persinger, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Synergisms between a physiologically patterned magnetic field that is known to enhance planarian growth and suppress proliferation of malignant cells in culture and three light emitting diode (LED) generated visible wavelengths (blue, green, red) upon planarian regeneration and melanoma cell numbers were discerned. Five days of hourly exposures to either a physiologically patterned (2.5-5.0 μT) magnetic field, one of three wavelengths (3 kLux) or both treatments simultaneously indicated that red light (680 nm), blue light (470 nm) or the magnetic field significantly facilitated regeneration of planarian compared to sham field exposed planarian. Presentation of both light and magnetic field conditions enhanced the effect. Whereas the blue and red light diminished the growth of malignant (melanoma) cells, the effect was not as large as that produced by the magnetic field. Only the paired presentation of the blue light and magnetic field enhanced the suppression. On the other hand, the changes following green light (540 nm) exposure did not differ from the control condition and green light presented with the magnetic field eliminated its effects for both the planarian and melanoma cells. These results indicate specific colors affect positive adaptation that is similar to weak, physiologically patterned frequency modulated (8-24 Hz) magnetic fields and that the two forms of energy can synergistically summate or cancel.

  13. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  14. V-ATPase proton pumping activity is required for adult zebrafish appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration.

  15. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general.

  16. Low temperature regeneration of activated carbons using microwaves: revising conventional wisdom.

    PubMed

    Calışkan, E; Bermúdez, J M; Parra, J B; Menéndez, J A; Mahramanlıoğlu, M; Ania, C O

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to explore the application of microwaves for the low temperature regeneration of activated carbons saturated with a pharmaceutical compound (promethazine). Contrary to expectations, microwave-assisted regeneration did not lead to better results than those obtained under conventional electric heating. At low temperatures the regeneration was incomplete either under microwave and conventional heating, being this attributed to the insufficient input energy. At mild temperatures, a fall in the adsorption capacity upon cycling was obtained in both devices, although this was much more pronounced for the microwave. These results contrast with previous studies on the benefits of microwaves for the regeneration of carbon materials. The fall in the adsorption capacity after regeneration was due to the thermal cracking of the adsorbed molecules inside the carbon porous network, although this effect applies to both devices. When microwaves are used, along with the thermal heating of the carbon bed, a fraction of the microwave energy seemed to be directly used in the decomposition of promethazine through the excitation of the molecular bonds by microwaves (microwave-lysis). These results point out that the nature of the adsorbate and its ability to interact with microwave are key factors that control the application of microwaves for regeneration of exhausted activated carbons.

  17. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  18. Performance and mechanism of low-frequency ultrasound to regenerate the biological activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Sun, Yakun; Wang, Dongying; Sun, Zhehao; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Zhi; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Biological activated carbon (BAC) filter has been widely used as an effective water treatment but regenerations of BAC are costly. Ultrasound has been successfully applied for regeneration of activated carbon but has been less frequently applied to the regenerate the BAC. In this study, bench-scale and pilot-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the regeneration performance and mechanism of BAC with low-frequency ultrasound. Adsorption indices, microbiological parameters, pore structure and removal efficiencies were further investigated. The results showed that low-frequency ultrasound could regenerate the BAC effectively. The regeneration effects were significantly affected by the frequency, sonication intensity, sonication time, and water temperature, but not the usage time of the BAC. The optimized conditions were identified as 40kHz of frequency, 115×10(-3)W/cm(3) of sonication intensity, 25-30°C of water temperature and 5min of sonication time. The iodine value and methylene blue value increased from 480mg/g and 100mg/g to 680mg/g and 133mg/g respectively, the biomass decreased from 310nmolP/gC to 245nmolP/gC, while the biological activity increased from 0.03mg O2/hgC to 0.0355mg O2/hgC under the optimized condition. After three months of continuous operation, removal efficiencies of regenerated BAC were still high for the removal of organic contaminants, atrazine, and 2-MIB. Analysis of pore structure, BET surface area, and scanning electron microscopy indicated that ultrasound mainly acted on surface and macro-pores of BAC through the high-speed microjets and high-pressure microstreams resulted from the collapse of cavitation bubbles.

  19. Hyaluronic acid production and hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during lens regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyk, W.M.; Zalik, S.E.; Dimitrov, E.

    1987-09-01

    The process of lens regeneration in newts involves the dedifferentiation of pigmented iris epithelial cells and their subsequent conversion into lens fibers. In vivo this cell-type conversion is restricted to the dorsal region of the iris. We have examined the patterns of hyaluronate accumulation and endogenous hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during the course of lens regeneration in vivo. Accumulation of newly synthesized hyaluronate was estimated from the uptake of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine into cetylpyridinium chloride-precipitable material that was sensitive to Streptomyces hyaluronidase. Endogenous hyaluronidase activity was determined from the quantity of reducing N-acetylhexosamine released upon incubation of iris tissue extract with exogenous hyaluronate substrate. We found that incorporation of label into hyaluronate was consistently higher in the regeneration-activated irises of lentectomized eyes than in control irises from sham-operated eyes. Hyaluronate labeling was higher in the dorsal (lens-forming) region of the iris than in ventral (non-lens-forming) iris tissue during the regeneration process. Label accumulation into hyaluronate was maximum between 10 and 15 days after lentectomy, the period of most pronounced dedifferentiation in the dorsal iris epithelium. Both normal and regenerating irises demonstrated a high level of endogenous hyaluronidase activity with a pH optimum of 3.5-4.0. Hyaluronidase activity was 1.7 to 2 times higher in dorsal iris tissue than in ventral irises both prior to lentectomy and throughout the regeneration process. We suggest that enhanced hyaluronate accumulation may facilitate the dedifferentiation of iris epithelial cells in the dorsal iris and prevent precocious withdrawal from the cell cycle. The high level of hyaluronidase activity in the dorsal iris may promote the turnover and remodeling of extracellular matrix components required for cell-type conversion.

  20. UTX demethylase activity is required for satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaochen; Nakka, Kiran; Benyoucef, Aissa; Sebastian, Soji; Zhuang, Lenan; Chu, Alphonse; Palii, Carmen G.; Camellato, Brendan; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    The X chromosome–encoded histone demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to establish transcriptionally permissive chromatin. Loss of UTX in female mice is embryonic lethal. Unexpectedly, male UTX-null mice escape embryonic lethality due to expression of UTY, a paralog that lacks H3K27 demethylase activity, suggesting an enzyme-independent role for UTX in development and thereby challenging the need for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. However, the requirement for active H3K27 demethylation in stem cell–mediated tissue regeneration remains untested. Here, we employed an inducible mouse KO that specifically ablates Utx in satellite cells (SCs) and demonstrated that active H3K27 demethylation is necessary for muscle regeneration. Loss of UTX in SCs blocked myofiber regeneration in both male and female mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that UTX mediates muscle regeneration through its H3K27 demethylase activity, as loss of demethylase activity either by chemical inhibition or knock-in of demethylase-dead UTX resulted in defective muscle repair. Mechanistically, dissection of the muscle regenerative process revealed that the demethylase activity of UTX is required for expression of the transcription factor myogenin, which in turn drives differentiation of muscle progenitors. Thus, we have identified a critical role for the enzymatic activity of UTX in activating muscle-specific gene expression during myofiber regeneration and have revealed a physiological role for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. PMID:26999603

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation impairs extracellular matrix remodeling during zebra fish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Eric A; Mathew, Lijoy K; Löhr, Christiane V; Hasson, Rachelle; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    Adult zebra fish completely regenerate their caudal (tail) fin following partial amputation. Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibits this regenerative process. Proper regulation of transcription, innervation, vascularization, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition is essential for complete fin regeneration. Previous microarray studies suggest that genes involved in ECM regulation are misexpressed following activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. To investigate whether TCDD blocks regeneration by impairing ECM remodeling, male zebra fish were i.p. injected with 50 ng/g TCDD or vehicle, and caudal fins were amputated. By 3 days postamputation (dpa), the vascular network in the regenerating fin of TCDD-exposed fish was disorganized compared to vehicle-exposed animals. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed that axonal outgrowth was impacted by TCDD as early as 3 dpa. Histological analysis demonstrated that TCDD exposure leads to an accumulation of collagen at the end of the fin ray just distal to the amputation site by 3 dpa. Mature lepidotrichial-forming cells (fin ray-forming cells) were not observed in the fins of TCDD-treated fish. The capacity to metabolize ECM was also altered by TCDD exposure. Quantitative real-time PCR studies revealed that the aryl hydrocarbon pathway is active and that matrix-remodeling genes are expressed in the regenerate following TCDD exposure.

  2. Regulation of Injury-Induced Ovarian Regeneration by Activation of Oogonial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Erler, Piril; Sweeney, Alexandra; Monaghan, James R

    2017-01-01

    Some animals have the ability to generate large numbers of oocytes throughout life. This raises the question whether persistent adult germline stem cell populations drive continuous oogenesis and whether they are capable of mounting a regenerative response after injury. Here we demonstrate the presence of adult oogonial stem cells (OSCs) in the adult axolotl salamander ovary and show that ovarian injury induces OSC activation and functional regeneration of the ovaries to reproductive capability. Cells that have morphological similarities to germ cells were identified in the developing and adult ovaries via histological analysis. Genes involved in germ cell maintenance including Vasa, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Bmp15, Piwil1, Piwil2, Dazl, and Lhx8 were expressed in the presumptive OSCs. Colocalization of Vasa protein with H3 mitotic marker showed that both oogonial and spermatogonial adult stem cells were mitotically active. Providing evidence of stemness and viability of adult OSCs, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) adult OSCs grafted into white juvenile host gonads gave rise to EGFP OSCs, and oocytes. Last, the axolotl ovaries completely regenerated after partial ovariectomy injury. During regeneration, OSC activation resulted in rapid differentiation into new oocytes, which was demonstrated by Vasa(+) /BrdU(+) coexpression. Furthermore, follicle cell proliferation promoted follicle maturation during ovarian regeneration. Overall, these results show that adult oogenesis occurs via proliferation of endogenous OSCs in a tetrapod and mediates ovarian regeneration. This study lays the foundations to elucidate mechanisms of ovarian regeneration that will assist regenerative medicine in treating premature ovarian failure and reduced fertility. Stem Cells 2017;35:236-247.

  3. Chemical activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling inhibits innervation and causes skeletal tissue malformations during axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wischin, Sabina; Castañeda-Patlán, Cristina; Robles-Flores, Martha; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2017-02-03

    Limb regeneration involves several interrelated physiological processes in which a particular signalling pathway may play a variety of functions. Blocking the function of Wnt/β-catenin signalling during limb regeneration inhibits regeneration in axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum). Limb development shares many features with limb regeneration, and Wnt/β-catenin activation has different effects depending on the developmental stage. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Wnt/β-catenin signalling activation during axolotl limb regeneration has different effects when activated at different stages of regeneration. To evaluate this hypothesis, we treated amputated axolotls with a Wnt agonist chemical at different stages of limb regeneration. The results showed that limb regeneration was inhibited when the treatment began before blastema formation. Under these conditions, blastema formation was hindered, possibly due to the lack of innervation. On the other hand, when axolotls were treated after blastema formation and immediately before the onset of morphogenesis, we observed structural disorganization in skeletal formation. In conclusion, we found that limb regeneration was differentially affected depending on the stage at which the Wnt signalling pathway was activated.

  4. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  5. Fibronectin is deposited by injury-activated epicardial cells and is necessary for zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhu; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike adult mammals, adult zebrafish vigorously regenerate lost heart muscle in response to injury. The epicardium, a mesothelial cell layer enveloping the myocardium, is activated to proliferate after cardiac injury and can contribute vascular support cells or provide mitogens to regenerating muscle. Here, we applied proteomics to identify secreted proteins that are associated with heart regeneration. We found that Fibronectin, a main component of the extracellular matrix, is induced and deposited after cardiac damage. In situ hybridization and transgenic reporter analyses indicated that expression of two fibronectin paralogues, fn1 and fn1b, are induced by injury in epicardial cells, while the itgb3 receptor is induced in cardiomyocytes near the injury site. fn1, the more dynamic of these paralogs, is induced chamber-wide within one day of injury before localizing epicardial Fn1 synthesis to the injury site. fn1 loss-of-function mutations disrupted zebrafish heart regeneration, as did induced expression of a dominant-negative Fibronectin cassette, defects that were not attributable to direct inhibition of cardiomyocyte proliferation. These findings reveal a new role for the epicardium in establishing an extracellular environment that supports heart regeneration. PMID:23988577

  6. Fenton-Driven Chemical Regeneration of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon -- A Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) underwent 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Pilot-scale columns were intermittently placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with MTBE, and regenerated with H2O2 under different chemical, physical, and operational...

  7. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  8. Potential Skin Regeneration Activity and Chemical Composition of Absolute from Pueraria thunbergiana Flower.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Won, Kyung-Jong; Hwang, Dae-Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Joo-Hoon; Yoon, Myeong Sik; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2015-11-01

    The flower of Pueraria thunbergiana BENTH (PTBF) contains isoflavonoids and essential oil components. It has many biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-diabetes, anti-oxidant, and weight loss. However, its effect on skin regeneration remains unknown. In the present study, we isolated the absolute from PTBF through solvent extraction and determined the role of the absolute on skin regeneration-associated responses in human epidermal-keratinocytes (HaCats). The PTBF absolute, which contained 10 compounds, stimulated migration and proliferation and increased the phosphorylation of serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinasel/2 in HaCats. It induced type I and IV collagen synthesis in HaCats. In addition, treatment with PTBF absolute resulted in increased sprout outgrowth in HaCats. These findings suggest that PTBF absolute may participate in skin regeneration, probably through promotion of migration, proliferation, and collagen synthesis.

  9. Expression of an Activated Integrin Promotes Long-Distance Sensory Axon Regeneration in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Menghon; Chew, Daniel J.; Moloney, Elizabeth B.; Verhaagen, Joost; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    After CNS injury, axon regeneration is blocked by an inhibitory environment consisting of the highly upregulated tenascin-C and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Tenascin-C promotes growth of axons if they express a tenascin-binding integrin, particularly α9β1. Additionally, integrins can be inactivated by CSPGs, and this inhibition can be overcome by the presence of a β1-binding integrin activator, kindlin-1. We examined the synergistic effect of α9 integrin and kindlin-1 on sensory axon regeneration in adult rat spinal cord after dorsal root crush and adeno-associated virus transgene expression in dorsal root ganglia. After 12 weeks, axons from C6–C7 dorsal root ganglia regenerated through the tenascin-C-rich dorsal root entry zone into the dorsal column up to C1 level and above (>25 mm axon length) through a normal pathway. Animals also showed anatomical and electrophysiological evidence of reconnection to the dorsal horn and behavioral recovery in mechanical pressure, thermal pain, and ladder-walking tasks. Expression of α9 integrin or kindlin-1 alone promoted much less regeneration and recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The study demonstrates that long-distance sensory axon regeneration over a normal pathway and with sensory and sensory–motor recovery can be achieved. This was achieved by expressing an integrin that recognizes tenascin-C, one of the components of glial scar tissue, and an integrin activator. This enabled extensive long-distance (>25 mm) regeneration of both myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons with topographically correct connections in the spinal cord. The extent of growth and recovery we have seen would probably be clinically significant. Restoration of sensation to hands, perineum, and genitalia would be a significant improvement for a spinal cord-injured patient. PMID:27383601

  10. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  11. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  12. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  13. Role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in blastema formation during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Junichi; Shibata, Norito; Sakurai, Toshihide; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2011-04-01

    The robust regenerative abilities of planarians absolutely depend on a unique population of pluripotent stem cells called neoblasts, which are the only mitotic somatic cells in adult planarians and are responsible for blastema formation after amputation. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that drive blastema formation during planarian regeneration. Here we found that treatment with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 blocked the entry of neoblasts into the M-phase of the cell cycle, while allowing neoblasts to successfully enter S-phase in the planarian Dugesia japonica. The rapid and efficient blockage of neoblast mitosis by treatment with the JNK inhibitor provided a method to assess whether temporally regulated cell cycle activation drives blastema formation during planarian regeneration. In the early phase of blastema formation, activated JNK was detected prominently in a mitotic region (the "postblastema") proximal to the blastema region. Furthermore, we demonstrated that undifferentiated mitotic neoblasts in the postblastema showed highly activated JNK at the single cell level. JNK inhibition by treatment with SP600125 during this period caused a severe defect of blastema formation, which accorded with a drastic decrease of mitotic neoblasts in regenerating animals. By contrast, these animals still retained many undifferentiated neoblasts near the amputation stump. These findings suggest that JNK signaling plays a crucial role in feeding into the blastema neoblasts for differentiation by regulating the G2/M transition in the cell cycle during planarian regeneration.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows the Evaluation of Tissue Damage and Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zaccagnini, Germana; Palmisano, Anna; Canu, Tamara; Maimone, Biagina; Lo Russo, Francesco M; Ambrogi, Federico; Gaetano, Carlo; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Esposito, Antonio; Martelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides non-invasive, repetitive measures in the same individual, allowing the study of a physio-pathological event over time. In this study, we tested the performance of 7 Tesla multi-parametric MRI to monitor the dynamic changes of mouse skeletal muscle injury and regeneration upon acute ischemia induced by femoral artery dissection. T2-mapping (T2 relaxation time), diffusion-tensor imaging (Fractional Anisotropy) and perfusion by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (K-trans) were measured and imaging results were correlated with histological morphometric analysis in both Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles. We found that tissue damage positively correlated with T2-relaxation time, while myofiber regeneration and capillary density positively correlated with Fractional Anisotropy. Interestingly, K-trans positively correlated with capillary density. Accordingly, repeated MRI measurements between day 1 and day 28 after surgery in ischemic muscles showed that: 1) T2-relaxation time rapidly increased upon ischemia and then gradually declined, returning almost to basal level in the last phases of the regeneration process; 2) Fractional Anisotropy dropped upon ischemic damage induction and then recovered along with muscle regeneration and neoangiogenesis; 3) K-trans reached a minimum upon ischemia, then progressively recovered. Overall, Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles displayed similar patterns of MRI parameters dynamic, with more marked responses and less variability in Tibialis anterior. We conclude that MRI provides quantitative information about both tissue damage after ischemia and the subsequent vascular and muscle regeneration, accounting for the differences between subjects and, within the same individual, between different muscles.

  15. Different solvents for the regeneration of the exhausted activated carbon used in the treatment of coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongsheng; Shi, Qiantao; He, Binbin; Yuan, Xiaoying

    2011-02-28

    The solvents n-pentane, methylene dichloride, ethyl ether and dodecylbenzenesulphonic acid sodium were used to regenerate exhausted activated carbon used in the process of treating coking wastewater, and the efficiency, ability, and optimum conditions of the different solvents on this regeneration were investigated. The results indicate that n-pentane could effectively remove refractory organic compounds in the coking wastewater adsorbed on the surface of activated carbon and could repeatedly regenerate the exhausted activated carbon to recover its adsorption activity. Under the conditions of a regeneration time of 20 min, a regeneration temperature of 25°C, an activated carbon drying time of 300 min, and an activated carbon drying temperature of 150°C, n-pentane had the best regeneration efficiency, at 98.27%, for exhausted activated carbon. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis results show that the nature of the activated carbon regenerated by organic solvents had no remarkable change in adsorption for the main types of organic compounds in coking wastewater. The good regenerative effect of n-pentane on the activated carbon may be due its stronger desorption of esters embedded within the internal structure of activated carbon.

  16. Dynamics of Permanent-Magnet Biased Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukata, Satoru; Yutani, Kazuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Active magnetic radial bearings are constructed with a combination of permanent magnets to provide bias forces and electromagnets to generate control forces for the reduction of cost and the operating energy consumption. Ring-shaped permanent magnets with axial magnetization are attached to a shaft and share their magnet stators with the electromagnets. The magnet cores are made of solid iron for simplicity. A simplified magnetic circuit of the combined magnet system is analyzed with linear circuit theory by approximating the characteristics of permanent magnets with a linear relation. A linearized dynamical model of the control force is presented with the first-order approximation of the effects of eddy currents. Frequency responses of the rotor motion to disturbance inputs and the motion for impulsive forces are tested in the non-rotating state. The frequency responses are compared with numerical results. The decay of rotor speed due to magnetic braking is examined. The experimental results and the presented linearized model are similar to those of the all-electromagnetic design.

  17. Self-powered suspension criterion and energy regeneration implementation scheme of motor-driven active suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shuai; Sun, Weichao

    2017-09-01

    Active suspension systems have advantages on mitigating the effects of vehicle vibration caused by road roughness, which are one of the most important component parts in influencing the performances of vehicles. However, high amount of energy consumption restricts the application of active suspension systems. From the point of energy saving, this paper presents a self-powered criterion of the active suspension system to judge whether a motor-driven suspension can be self-powered or not, and then a motor parameter condition is developed as a reference to design a self-powered suspension. An energy regeneration implementation scheme is subsequently proposed to make the active suspension which has the potential to be self-powered achieve energy-saving target in the real application. In this implementation scheme, operating electric circuits are designed based on different working status of the actuator and power source and it is realizable to accumulate energy from road vibration and supply energy to the actuator by switching corresponding electric circuits. To apply the self-powered suspension criterion and energy regeneration implementation scheme, an active suspension system is designed with a constrained H∞ controller and calculation results indicate that it has the capability to be self-powered. Simulation results show that the performances of the self-powered active suspension are nearly the same as those of the active suspension with an external energy source and can achieve energy regeneration at the same time.

  18. Filamin A is required in injured axons for HDAC5 activity and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yongcheol; Park, Dongeun; Cavalli, Valeria

    2015-09-11

    Microtubule dynamics are important for axon growth during development as well as axon regeneration after injury. We have previously identified HDAC5 as an injury-regulated tubulin deacetylase that functions at the injury site to promote axon regeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in the spatial control of HDAC5 activity remain poorly understood. Here we reveal that HDAC5 interacts with the actin binding protein filamin A via its C-terminal domain. Filamin A plays critical roles in HDAC5-dependent tubulin deacetylation because, in cells lacking filamin A, the levels of acetylated tubulin are elevated markedly. We found that nerve injury increases filamin A axonal expression in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. Reducing filamin A levels or interfering with the interaction between HDAC5 and filamin A prevents injury-induced tubulin deacetylation as well as HDAC5 localization at the injured axon tips. In addition, neurons lacking filamin A display reduced axon regeneration. Our findings suggest a model in which filamin A local translation following axon injury controls localized HDAC5 activity to promote axon regeneration.

  19. Filamin A Is Required in Injured Axons for HDAC5 Activity and Axon Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yongcheol; Park, Dongeun; Cavalli, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics are important for axon growth during development as well as axon regeneration after injury. We have previously identified HDAC5 as an injury-regulated tubulin deacetylase that functions at the injury site to promote axon regeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in the spatial control of HDAC5 activity remain poorly understood. Here we reveal that HDAC5 interacts with the actin binding protein filamin A via its C-terminal domain. Filamin A plays critical roles in HDAC5-dependent tubulin deacetylation because, in cells lacking filamin A, the levels of acetylated tubulin are elevated markedly. We found that nerve injury increases filamin A axonal expression in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. Reducing filamin A levels or interfering with the interaction between HDAC5 and filamin A prevents injury-induced tubulin deacetylation as well as HDAC5 localization at the injured axon tips. In addition, neurons lacking filamin A display reduced axon regeneration. Our findings suggest a model in which filamin A local translation following axon injury controls localized HDAC5 activity to promote axon regeneration. PMID:26157139

  20. Ectopic activity in cutaneous regenerating afferent nerve fibers following nerve lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Constantin, Cristina; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2003-11-01

    Spontaneous activity, and mechanical and thermal sensitivity were investigated in regenerating afferent nerve fibers within 4-21 days post sural nerve lesion (crush or transection and resuturing) in anaesthetized rats. About 33-40% of the myelinated (A) and 22-27% of the unmyelinated (C) fibers excited by electrical nerve stimulation exhibited at least one of these ectopic discharge properties. In total 177 A- and 169 C-fibers with ectopic activity were analysed. Most A-fibers (161/177) were mechanosensitive. Spontaneous activity (median 1 imp/s) was present in 23/177 and thermosensitivity in 14/177 A-fibers (13 of them being activated by heat stimuli). Almost all A-fibers (159/177) exhibited only one type of ectopic discharge property. Most C-fibers (94/169) were thermosensitive responding either to cold (n = 45) or to heat stimuli (n = 33) or to both (n = 16). Eighty-four of 169 C-fibers were spontaneously active (median 0.3 imp/s) and 75/169 C-fibers were mechanosensitive. Both the proportion and the discharge rate of spontaneously active C-fibers were significantly higher after crush than after section and resuturing of the nerve. About 60% of the C-fibers (101/169) had only one ectopic discharge property and 40% two or three. In conclusion, regenerating cutaneous afferent A- and C-fibers may develop mechano- and/or thermosensitivity as well as spontaneous activity. We suggest that spontaneous and evoked ectopic activity in regenerating cutaneous afferents are a function of the intrinsic functional properties of these neurons and of the interaction between the regenerating nerve fibers and non-neural cells during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve distal to the nerve lesion.

  1. Fenton-driven regeneration of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon - Effects of particle size and Iron Amendment Procedures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a technology being developed to regenerate organic contaminant-spent GAC. Here, the effect of GAC particle size (>2 mm to <0.35 mm) on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was ev...

  2. Novel DLK-independent neuronal regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans shares links with activity-dependent ectopic outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Awal, Mehraj R.; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa M.; Mazur, Eric; Gabel, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    During development, a neuron transitions from a state of rapid growth to a stable morphology, and neurons within the adult mammalian CNS lose their ability to effectively regenerate in response to injury. Here, we identify a novel form of neuronal regeneration, which is remarkably independent of DLK-1/DLK, KGB-1/JNK, and other MAPK signaling factors known to mediate regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mammals. This DLK-independent regeneration in C. elegans has direct genetic and molecular links to a well-studied form of endogenous activity-dependent ectopic axon outgrowth in the same neuron type. Both neuron outgrowth types are triggered by physical lesion of the sensory dendrite or mutations disrupting sensory activity, calcium signaling, or genes that restrict outgrowth during neuronal maturation, such as SAX-1/NDR kinase or UNC-43/CaMKII. These connections suggest that ectopic outgrowth represents a powerful platform for gene discovery in neuronal regeneration. Moreover, we note numerous similarities between C. elegans DLK-independent regeneration and lesion conditioning, a phenomenon producing robust regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Both regeneration types are triggered by lesion of a sensory neurite via reduction of neuronal activity and enhanced by disrupting L-type calcium channels or elevating cAMP. Taken as a whole, our study unites disparate forms of neuronal outgrowth to uncover fresh molecular insights into activity-dependent control of the adult nervous system’s intrinsic regenerative capacity. PMID:27078101

  3. Changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities in the regenerating liver of partially irradiated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Yasumasu, I. )

    1989-09-01

    X rays (4.8 Gy) inhibit both DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of histone H1 in the regenerating liver of the rat. To determine the cause of the inhibition of histone H1 phosphorylation, changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities during the prereplicative phase of regeneration were measured. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity was low during regeneration, and the changes in the activity were not statistically significant. The cAMP-independent protein kinase activity increased at 15 h, decreased at 18 h, and increased again at 24 h after partial hepatectomy. X irradiation prior to partial hepatectomy did not inhibit the increase at 15 h, but it did inhibit the increase at 24 h. The activity was not inhibited by isoquinolinesulfonamide inhibitors such as H-7, and it was activated by a commercial preparation of an inhibitor protein of the cAMP-dependent kinase. It was also inhibited by quercetin. The possibility that the radiation-sensitive nuclear protein kinase is a nuclear cAMP-independent protein kinase specific for histone H1 is considered.

  4. Adsorption of nitrate from aqueous solution by magnetic amine-crosslinked biopolymer based corn stalk and its chemical regeneration property.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Gao, Baoyu; Xu, Xing; Wang, Fang; Xue, Nan; Sun, Shenglei; Song, Wuchang; Jia, Ruibao

    2016-03-05

    A novel adsorbent of magnetic amine-crosslinked biopolymer based corn stalk (MAB-CS) was synthesized and used for nitrate removal from aqueous solution. The characters and adsorption mechanisms of this bio-adsorbent were determined by using VSM, TGA, XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR and XPS, respectively. The results revealed that the saturated magnetization of MAB-CS reached 6.25 emu/g. Meanwhile, the studies of various factors indicated that this novel magnetic bio-adsorbent performed well over a considerable wide pH range of 6.0 ∼ 9.0, and the presence of PO4(3-) and SO4(2-) would markedly decrease the nitrate removal efficiency. Furthermore, the nitrate adsorption by MAB-CS perfectly fitted the Langmuir isotherm model (R(2)=0.997-0.999) and pseudo second order kinetic model (R(2)=0.953-0.995). The calculated nitrate adsorption capacity of MAB-CS was 102.04 mg/g at 318 K by Langmuir model, and thermodynamic study showed that nitrate adsorption is an spontaneous endothermic process. The regeneration experiments indicated its merit of regeneration and stability with the recovery efficient of 118 ∼ 147%. By integrating the experimental results, it was found that the removal of nitrate was mainly via electrostatic attraction and ion exchange. And this novel bio-adsorbent prepared in this work could achieve effective removal of nitrate and rapid separation from effluents simultaneously.

  5. [Liver regeneration after its mechanical injury in rats receiving biologically active substances "Trepel" and "Suvar"].

    PubMed

    Romanova, L P; Malysheva, I I

    2011-01-01

    The effect of biologically active substances (BAS) "Trepel" and "Suvar" on liver regeneration 1-30 days after its mechanical injury was studied using histological and morphometric methods in 110 rat pups aged 18 days. The control group comprised 90 animals that received no treatment following liver injury. It was shown that both BAS studied inhibited the inflammatory reaction around the injury focus, suppressed collagenogenesis and activated hepatocyte proliferation.This resulted in the significant substitution of the damaged area by the hepatocytes, that was absent in the control animals. In animals treated with BAS, the numbers of binucleated and mitotically dividing hepatocytes was increased, while the amount of hepatocytes with dystrophic changes was reduced. Authors associate the positive effect of BAS on liver structure regeneration with their growth-promoting activity, resulting in the hypertrophy of different organs, including the thyroid and the adrenal glands, that is accompanied by an excessive production of the respective hormones displaying their physiological actions.

  6. Axonal regeneration in severed peripheral facial nerve of the rabbit: relation of the number of axonal regenerates to behavioral and evoked muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Spector, J G; Lee, P

    1998-02-01

    The minimum number of regenerating facial nerve myelinated motor axons that are required to innervate and activate the mimetic musculature is not known. We compare rabbit facial nerve regeneration following complete transectional injuries of the buccal division to the evoked and behavioral muscle activities of the quadratus labii superioris muscle of the rabbit in three experimental models: end-to-end direct anastomosis (N = 4), 8-mm autologous nerve grafts (N = 8), and 10-mm silicone chamber implants (N = 40). Data are presented as total numbers of regenerating myelinated axons that traverse the surgical repair and innervate the fascicles of the transected distal nerve stump, as well as the percentage of regenerating neurites, as compared to the preoperative normal controls. Five weeks after neural repair, direct end-to-end anastomosis regained more myelinated axons across the reconstructed defect (2,632 +/- 1,232; 67%) than silicone tube implants (2,006 +/- 445; 51%) or autologous cable graft repairs (1,660 +/- 1,169; 42%). However, only a small percentage of myelinated fibers innervated the intrafascicular region of the distal transected neural stump in direct anastomosis (948 +/- 168; 24%), silicone tube implants (670 +/- 275; 17%), or autologous nerve grafts (445 +/- 120; 12%) in rabbits that regained evoked and behavioral mimetic muscle activity. All rabbits with direct anastomosis and neural cable grafts regained motor activity, despite the fact that 66% of regenerating motor neurites in cable graft repairs and 54% in direct anastomosis were collateral sprouts that did not contribute to effective muscle activity. In 17 rabbits with neural regenerates within the silicone tube implants that did not regain mimetic activity, the mean number of regenerating myelinated motor axons across the defect was 504 +/- 419 (13%), and the mean number of axons that innervated the distal transected nerve stump fascicles was 277 +/- 128 (7%). Therefore, the minimal number of

  7. [Effect of the extremely weak alternating magnetic fields on the regeneration of planarians and the gravitropic response of plants].

    PubMed

    Belova, N A; Ermakov, A M; Znobishcheva, A V; Skrebnitskaia, L K; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The influence of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields (EW AMF) directed colinearly to the static Earth magnetic field on the rate of regeneration of planarians and the rate of gravitropic response in the stem segments of flax has been studied. The value of bioeffects of EW AMF is determined by the parameter gamma B(AC)/f, where y is the gyromagnetic ratio of the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms, and B(AC) and f correspond to magnetic induction and frequency of the alternating magnetic component. It was shown that the magnitude of bioeffects depends on the amplitude (at fixed 1000 Hz - frequency) and frequency (at fixed 192 nT - amplitude) of the alternating component. Maxima of bioeffects are observed at gamma B(AC)/f = 0.9; 2.75, and minor maxima gamma B(AC)/f = 4.5; 6.1. The bioeffects are absent at gamma B(AC)/f = 1.8, 3.8, 5.3, 6.7. The positions of the maxima and minima of bioeffects correspond to the theoretical prediction (at gamma = 14000 Hz/microT). Primary targets for the EW AMF of this type are the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms.

  8. Active magnetic bearings give systems a lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Leo

    1992-07-01

    While the active magnetic bearings currently being used in such specialized applications as centrifugal compressors for natural gas pumps are more expensive than conventional bearings, they furnish improved machine service life, controlled damping of high-speed rotors to eliminate critical-speed vibrations, and the obviation of lubrication systems. Attention is presently given to magnetic bearings used by the electric power industry, homopolar magnetic radial and thrust bearings, weapon-system and gas turbine engine applications of magnetic bearings, and the benefits of magnetic bearings for energy-storage flywheels.

  9. Temperature control during regeneration of activated carbon fiber cloth with resistance-feedback.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2012-10-16

    Electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) of organic compounds from gas streams with activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) reduces emissions to the atmosphere and recovers feedstock for reuse. Local temperature measurement (e.g., with a thermocouple) is typically used to monitor/control adsorbent regeneration cycles. Remote electrical resistance measurement is evaluated here as an alternative to local temperature measurement. ACFC resistance that was modeled based on its physical properties was within 10.5% of the measured resistance values during electrothermal heating. Resistance control was developed based on this measured relationship and used to control temperature to within 2.3% of regeneration set-point temperatures. Isobutane-laden adsorbent was then heated with resistance control. After 2 min of heating, the temperature of the adsorbent with isobutane was 13% less than the adsorbent without isobutane. This difference decreased to 2.1% after 9 min of heating, showing desorption of isobutane. An ACFC cartridge was also heated to 175 °C for 900 cycles with its resistance and adsorption capacity values remaining within 3% and 2%, respectively. This new method to control regeneration power application based on rapid sensing of the adsorbent's resistance removes the need for direct-contact temperature sensors providing a simple, cost-efficient, and long-term regeneration technique for ESA systems.

  10. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  11. The Feasibility Study of Persulfate Oxidation to Regenerating of Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidation is a developing technology used to regenerate contaminant-spent GAC. Chemical regeneration of GAC represents a viable option to thermal regeneration methods that are energy intensive resulting in significant consumption of fossil fuels and production of greenho...

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates Warburg-like glycolysis and activation of satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xing; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Dodson, Mike V; Du, Min

    2015-10-30

    Satellite cells are the major myogenic stem cells residing inside skeletal muscle and are indispensable for muscle regeneration. Satellite cells remain largely quiescent but are rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, and the derived myogenic cells then fuse to repair damaged muscle fibers or form new muscle fibers. However, mechanisms eliciting metabolic activation, an inseparable step for satellite cell activation following muscle injury, have not been defined. We found that a noncanonical Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, which activates AMPK and induces a Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells. AMPKα1 is the dominant AMPKα isoform expressed in satellite cells, and AMPKα1 deficiency in satellite cells impairs their activation and myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration. Drugs activating noncanonical Shh promote proliferation of satellite cells, which is abolished because of satellite cell-specific AMPKα1 knock-out. Taken together, AMPKα1 is a critical mediator linking noncanonical Shh pathway to Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells, which is required for satellite activation and muscle regeneration.

  13. Satellite cell activity in muscle regeneration after contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Pholpramool, Chumpol; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Yimlamai, Tossaporn

    2010-11-01

    1. The role of satellite cells in muscle growth during development is well documented, but the involvement of these cells in muscle repair after contusion is less well known. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of satellite cell activity (from 3h to 7days) after contusion of rat gastrocnemius muscle using specific molecular markers for immunofluorescence and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 2. Inflammation of the injured muscle occurred within 6h, followed by disintegration of the damaged myofibres within 12h. Newly formed myofibres appeared by Day 7. 3. The number of MyoD-positive nuclei (activated satellite cells) in the injured muscle was significantly increased by 6h, reaching a maximum by 12h after contusion. However, the number of MyoD-positive nuclei decreased towards control levels by Day 7. Changes in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labelled nuclei (proliferating satellite cells) paralleled the changes seen in the number of MyoD-positive nuclei. Conversely, expression of myogenin protein was not apparent until Day 3 and increased further by Day 7. Colabelling of MyoD and myogenin was seen in only a few cells. 4. The time-course of MyoD mRNA expression corresponded with MyoD protein expression. However, there were two peaks in myogenin mRNA expression: 6h and Day 7 after contusion. The second peak coincided with upregulation of myostatin mRNA levels. 5. The results of the present study suggest that contusion activates a homogeneous population of satellite cells to proliferate within 3days, followed by differentiation to form new myofibres. The latter may be regulated, in part, by myostatin.

  14. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon; Kim, Youngkwon

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  15. Sequential and Opposing Activities of Wnt and BMP Coordinate Zebrafish Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Scott; Gomez, Alan W.; Armstrong, Benjamin E.; Henner, Astra; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Zebrafish fully regenerate lost bone, including after fin amputation, through a process mediated by dedifferentiated, lineage-restricted osteoblasts. Mechanisms controlling the osteoblast regenerative program from its initiation through reossification are poorly understood. We show that fin amputation induces a Wnt/β-catenin-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) of osteoblasts in order to generate proliferative Runx2+ preosteoblasts. Localized Wnt/β-catenin signaling maintains this progenitor population toward the distal tip of the regenerative blastema. As they become proximally displaced, preosteoblasts upregulate sp7 and subsequently mature into re-epithelialized Runx2−/sp7+ osteoblasts that extend preexisting bone. Auto-crine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling promotes osteoblast differentiation by activating sp7 expression and counters Wnt by inducing Dickkopf-related Wnt antagonists. As such, opposing activities of Wnt and BMP coordinate the simultaneous demand for growth and differentiation during bone regeneration. This hierarchical signaling network model provides a conceptual framework for understanding innate bone repair and regeneration mechanisms and rationally designing regenerative therapeutics. PMID:24485659

  16. The CXCR4/SDF1 Axis Improves Muscle Regeneration Through MMP-10 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bobadilla, Miriam; Sainz, Neira; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Páramo, José Antonio; Prósper, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The CXCR4/SDF1 axis participates in various cellular processes, including cell migration, which is essential for skeletal muscle repair. Although increasing evidence has confirmed the role of CXCR4/SDF1 in embryonic muscle development, the function of this pathway during adult myogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, a role for CXCR4 signaling in muscle maintenance and repair has only recently emerged. Here, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) are up-regulated in injured muscle, suggesting their involvement in the repair process. In addition, we found that notexin-damaged muscles showed delayed muscle regeneration on treatment with CXCR4 agonist (AMD3100). Accordingly, small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of SDF1 or CXCR4 in injured muscles impaired muscle regeneration, whereas the addition of SDF1 ligand accelerated repair. Furthermore, we identified that CXCR4/SDF1-regulated muscle repair was dependent on matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) activity. Thus, our findings support a model in which MMP-10 activity modulates CXCR4/SDF1 signaling, which is essential for efficient skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24548137

  17. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading.

  18. Self-sensing active magnetic levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vischer, D.; Bleuler, H. )

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic bearing technology is now rapidly being introduced to industrial applications. The most popular configuration applied is the classical' one of gap sensor, current control, current-amplifier and magnetic coil. Here the authors present a magnetic levitation method which combines all the known advantages of active magnetic bearing in a self-sensing configuration. The novel method realizes stable and well damped levitation without any sensor hardware at the rotor. This is achieved by using the coil voltage of the magnetic bearing as system input (voltage instead of current amplifiers) and the current as system output. It is demonstrated that the resulting system is observable and controllable in the sense of control theory, allowing a magnetic bearing to be stabilized with a simple linear controller using current measurements alone. Several self-sensing bearings have been constructed. Their performance is comparable to systems with sensors, but hardware requirements and costs are substantially reduced. Experimental results are included.

  19. [A role of some intracellular signaling cascades in planarian regeneration activated under irradiation with low-temperature argon plasma].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Maevskiĭ, E I

    2014-01-01

    Using inhibitory analysis the role of some intracellular signaling pathways in activation of planarian regeneration under the influence of low-temperature argon plasma (LTAP) has been investigated. Inactivation of specific inhibitors of intracellular signaling enzymes such as the receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR), TGF β receptor, calmodulin, adenylate cyclase, phospholipase A2, phospholipase C, cyclin-dependent protein kinase, JAK2-protein kinase, JNK-protein kinase MEK-protein kinase led to inhibition of the head growth during its regeneration in planarians. Pretreatment with LTAP irradiation provided no inhibitory action of some cascades regulating proliferation. However, the inhibitors of the key regulators of regeneration: TGF β receptor, calmodulin and MEK-protein kinase completely suppressed the activating effect of plasma. Thus, by the example of regenerating planarians it is shown, that biological activity of low-temperature argon plasma LTAP is caused by modulation of a plurality of cellular signaling systems.

  20. Transcriptomic Analysis of Tail Regeneration in the Lizard Anolis carolinensis Reveals Activation of Conserved Vertebrate Developmental and Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Markov, Glenn J.; Eckalbar, Walter L.; George, Rajani M.; King, Jesse M.; Tokuyama, Minami A.; Geiger, Lauren A.; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J.; Allen, April N.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F.; Rawls, J. Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis reveals activation of conserved vertebrate developmental and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D; Markov, Glenn J; Eckalbar, Walter L; George, Rajani M; King, Jesse M; Tokuyama, Minami A; Geiger, Lauren A; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J; Allen, April N; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Fisher, Rebecca E; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F; Rawls, J Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies.

  2. Automated Assistance for Designing Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    MagBear12 is a computer code that assists in the design of radial, heteropolar active magnetic bearings (AMBs). MagBear12 was developed to help in designing the system described in "Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System". Beyond this initial application, MagBear12 is expected to be useful for designing AMBs for a variety of rotating machinery. This program incorporates design rules and governing equations that are also implemented in other, proprietary design software used by AMB manufacturers. In addition, this program incorporates an advanced unpublished fringing-magnetic-field model that increases accuracy beyond that offered by the other AMB-design software.

  3. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  4. S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: exposing the hidden lyase.

    PubMed

    Saba, Julie D; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves as a muscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C(2-3), resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research.

  5. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Patricia J.; Jones, Laura N.; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Beta (PPARβ) activity increases the immune response and shortens the early phases of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Piquet, Jessica; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Grimaldi, Paul A; Neels, Jaap G; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie

    2016-12-07

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta (PPARβ) is a transcription factor playing an important role in both muscle myogenesis and remodeling, and in inflammation. However, its role in the coordination of the transient muscle inflammation and reparation process following muscle injury has not yet been fully determined. We postulated that activation of the PPARβ pathway alters the early phase of the muscle regeneration process, i.e. when immune cells infiltrate in injured muscle. Tibialis anteriors of C57BL6/J mice treated or not with the PPARβ agonist GW0742 were injected with cardiotoxin (or with physiological serum for the contralateral muscle). Muscle regeneration was monitored on days 4, 7, and 14 post-injury. We found that treatment of mice with GW0742 increased, at day 4 post-damage, the recruitment of immune cells (M1 and M2 macrophages) and upregulated the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β mRNA. Those effects were accompanied by a significant increase at day 4 of myogenic regulatory factors (Pax7, MyoD, Myf5, Myogenin) mRNA in GW0742-treated mice. However, we showed an earlier return (7 days vs 14 days) of Myf5 and Myogenin to basal levels in GW0742- compared to DMSO-treated mice. Differential effects of GW0742 observed during the regeneration were associated with variations of PPARβ pathway activity. Collectively, our findings indicate that PPARβ pathway activity shortens the early phases of skeletal muscle regeneration by increasing the immune response.

  7. Localized epigenetic silencing of a damage-activated WNT enhancer limits regeneration in mature Drosophila imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robin E; Setiawan, Linda; Saul, Josh; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-02-03

    Many organisms lose the capacity to regenerate damaged tissues as they mature. Damaged Drosophila imaginal discs regenerate efficiently early in the third larval instar (L3) but progressively lose this ability. This correlates with reduced damage-responsive expression of multiple genes, including the WNT genes wingless (wg) and Wnt6. We demonstrate that damage-responsive expression of both genes requires a bipartite enhancer whose activity declines during L3. Within this enhancer, a damage-responsive module stays active throughout L3, while an adjacent silencing element nucleates increasing levels of epigenetic silencing restricted to this enhancer. Cas9-mediated deletion of the silencing element alleviates WNT repression, but is, in itself, insufficient to promote regeneration. However, directing Myc expression to the blastema overcomes repression of multiple genes, including wg, and restores cellular responses necessary for regeneration. Localized epigenetic silencing of damage-responsive enhancers can therefore restrict regenerative capacity in maturing organisms without compromising gene functions regulated by developmental signals.

  8. Skeletal muscle regeneration is delayed by reduction in Xin expression: consequence of impaired satellite cell activation?

    PubMed

    Nissar, Aliyah A; Zemanek, Bart; Labatia, Rita; Atkinson, Daniel J; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O; Hawke, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Xin is a striated muscle-specific actin-binding protein whose mRNA expression has been observed in damaged skeletal muscle. Here we demonstrate increased Xin protein expression early postinjury (≤ 12 h) and localization primarily to the periphery of damaged myofibers. At 1 day postinjury, Xin is colocalized with MyoD, confirming expression in activated satellite cells (SCs). By 5 days postinjury, Xin is evident in newly regenerated myofibers, with a return to preinjury levels by 14 days of regeneration. To determine whether the increased Xin expression is functionally relevant, tibialis anterior muscles of wild-type mice were infected with Xin-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) adenovirus, whereas the contralateral tibialis anterior received control adenovirus (Control). Four days postinfection, muscles were harvested or injured with cardiotoxin and collected at 3, 5, or 14 days thereafter. When compared with Control, Xin-shRNA infection attenuated muscle regeneration as demonstrated by Myh3 expression and fiber areas. Given the colocalization of Xin and MyoD, we isolated single myofibers from infected muscles to investigate the effect of silencing Xin on SC function. Relative to Control, SC activation, but not proliferation, was significantly impaired in Xin-shRNA-infected muscles. To determine whether Xin affects the G0-G1 transition, cell cycle reentry was assessed on infected C2C12 myoblasts using a methylcellulose assay. No difference in reentry was noted between groups, suggesting that Xin contributes to SC activation by means other than affecting G0-G1 transition. Together these data demonstrate a critical role for Xin in SC activation and reduction in Xin expression results in attenuated skeletal muscle repair.

  9. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neurons. Notch signaling suppresses regeneration by acting autonomously in the injured cell to prevent growth cone formation. The metalloprotease and gamma-secretase cleavage events that lead to Notch activation during development are also required for its activity in regeneration. Furthermore, blocking Notch activation immediately after injury improves regeneration. Our results define a novel, post-developmental role for the Notch pathway as a repressor of axon regeneration in vivo. PMID:22284182

  10. Magnetic targeting of human peripheral blood CD133+ cells for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Naosuke; Kamei, Goki; Shi, Ming; Adachi, Nobuo; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-08-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries often leave lasting functional damage or pain. Muscle injuries are routinely treated conservatively, but the most effective treatment to promote the repair of injured muscles has not yet been established. Our previous report demonstrated that human peripheral blood-derived CD133(+) cell transplantation to rat skeletal muscle injury models inhibited fibrosis and enhanced myogenesis after injury. However, the acquisition of a sufficient number of cells remains the limitation for clinical application, as the CD133(+) population is rare in human blood. In this study, we applied a magnetic cell targeting system to accumulate transplanted cells in the muscle injury site and to enhance the regenerative effects of CD133(+) cell transplantation, focusing on the fact that CD133(+) cells are labeled with a magnetic bead for isolation. For the magnetic cell targeting, the magnet field generator was set up to adjust the peak of the magnetic gradient to the injury site of the tibialis anterior muscle, and 1×10(4) human peripheral blood CD133(+) cells were locally injected into the injury site. This cell number is 10% of that used in the previous study. In another group, the same number of CD133(+) cells was injected without magnetic force. The CD133(+) cells transplanted with the magnetic force were more accumulated in the muscle injury site compared with the CD133(+) cells transplanted without the magnetic force. In addition, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells under the magnetic control inhibited fibrous scar formation and promoted angiogenesis and myogenesis, and also upregulated the mRNA expression of myogenic transcription factors, including Pax7, MyoD1 and Myogenin. However, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells without the magnetic force failed to demonstrate these effects. Thus, our magnetic cell targeting system enables transplantation of a limited number of CD133(+) cells to promote the repair of skeletal muscle injury.

  11. Active magnetic bearings for optimum turbomachinery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustak, J.; Kirk, R. G.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high speed eight stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the rotor dynamics analysis is presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofit of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four stage centrifugal compressor. Recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  12. Malat1 regulates myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration through modulating MyoD transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaona; He, Liangqiang; Zhao, Yu; Li, Yuying; Zhang, Suyang; Sun, Kun; So, Karl; Chen, Fengyuan; Zhou, Liang; Lu, Leina; Wang, Lijun; Zhu, Xihua; Bao, Xichen; Esteban, Miguel A; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Wu, Zhenguo; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2017-01-01

    Malat1 is one of the most abundant long non-coding RNAs in various cell types; its exact cellular function is still a matter of intense investigation. In this study we characterized the function of Malat1 in skeletal muscle cells and muscle regeneration. Utilizing both in vitro and in vivo assays, we demonstrate that Malat1 has a role in regulating gene expression during myogenic differentiation of myoblast cells. Specifically, we found that knockdown of Malat1 accelerates the myogenic differentiation in cultured cells. Consistently, Malat1 knockout mice display enhanced muscle regeneration after injury and deletion of Malat1 in dystrophic mdx mice also improves the muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, in the proliferating myoblasts, Malat1 recruits Suv39h1 to MyoD-binding loci, causing trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3), which suppresses the target gene expression. Upon differentiation, the pro-myogenic miR-181a is increased and targets the nuclear Malat1 transcripts for degradation through Ago2-dependent nuclear RNA-induced silencing complex machinery; the Malat1 decrease subsequently leads to the destabilization of Suv39h1/HP1β/HDAC1-repressive complex and displacement by a Set7-containing activating complex, which allows MyoD trans-activation to occur. Together, our findings identify a regulatory axis of miR-181a-Malat1-MyoD/Suv39h1 in myogenesis and uncover a previously unknown molecular mechanism of Malat1 action in gene regulation. PMID:28326190

  13. Magnetic nanoparticle-based approaches to locally target therapy and enhance tissue regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Richard; Sapir, Yulia; MacDonald, Cristin; Cohen, Smadar; Polyak, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-based systems utilizing superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a magnetic field gradient to exert a force on these particles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications. This review is focused on drug targeting applications that require penetration of a cellular barrier as well as strategies to improve the efficacy of targeting in these biomedical applications. Another focus of this review is regenerative applications utilizing tissue engineered scaffolds prepared with the aid of magnetic particles, the use of remote actuation for release of bioactive molecules and magneto–mechanical cell stimulation, cell seeding and cell patterning. PMID:22994959

  14. Regeneration performance and carbon consumption of semi-coke and activated coke for SO₂ and NO removal.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song; Li, Yuran; Zhu, Tingyu; Guo, Yangyang

    2015-08-01

    To decrease the operating cost of flue gas purification technologies based on carbon-based materials, the adsorption and regeneration performance of low-price semi-coke and activated coke were compared for SO2 and NO removal in a simulated flue gas. The functional groups of the two adsorbents before and after regeneration were characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, and were quantitatively assessed using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) coupled with FTIR and acid-base titration. The results show that semi-coke had higher adsorption capacity (16.2% for SO2 and 38.6% for NO) than activated coke because of its higher content of basic functional groups and lactones. After regeneration, the adsorption performance of semi-coke decreased because the number of active functional groups decreased and the micropores increased. Semi-coke had better regeneration performance than activated coke. Semi-coke had a larger SO2 recovery of 7.2% and smaller carbon consumption of 12% compared to activated coke. The semi-coke carbon-based adsorbent could be regenerated at lower temperatures to depress the carbon consumption, because the SO2 recovery was only reduced a small amount.

  15. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  16. [The effect of space flight factors on the cellular proliferative activity of different eye tissues during lens regeneration in the Spanish newt Pleurodeles waltlii].

    PubMed

    Brushlinskaia, N V

    1995-01-01

    The proliferative activity of the cells of various eye tissues was studied during lens regeneration in Pleurodeles waltlii under the influence of space-flight factors. After space-flight termination, the index of 3H-thymidine labelled nuclei increased reliably in the lens regenerate, in the ciliary zone of the iris, and in the growth zone of the retina, i.e., in the eye tissues that are not directly involved in formation of the regenerate cell population. The rate of increase in regenerate size was higher in the flight group than in the control. Enhancement of the proliferative activity of eye tissues, acceleration of lens regeneration, and the larger size of the regenerates are related to hormonal changes arising under the effect of space-flight factors. We propose that changes in calcium metabolism under the conditions of microgravity (in particular, increased prolactin production) accelerates the regeneration of both lens and limb in P. waltlii.

  17. Magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present our latest results on the solar-stellar connection by studying 18 solar analogs that we identified among the Kepler seismic sample tep{salabert16a}. We measured their magnetic activity properties using observations collected by the Kepler satellite and the ground-based, high-resolution HERMES spectrograph. The photospheric (S{_ph}) and chromospheric (S) magnetic activity proxies of these seismic solar analogs are compared in relation to solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is actually comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs. Furthermore, we report on the discovery of temporal variability in the acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years, which agrees with the derived photospheric activity tep{salabert16b}. It could actually be the signature of the short-period modulation, or quasi-biennal oscillation, of its magnetic activity as observed in the Sun and the 1-Gyr-old solar analog HD 30495. In addition, the lithium abundance and the chromospheric activity estimated from HERMES confirms that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.

  18. Complexes of Magnetic Nanoparticles with Cellulose Nanocrystals as Regenerable, Highly Efficient, and Selective Platform for Protein Separation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiaqi; Filpponen, Ilari; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Mohammadi, Pezhman; Latikka, Mika; Linder, Markus B; Ras, Robin H A; Rojas, Orlando J

    2017-03-13

    We present an efficient approach to develop cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) hybrids with magnetically responsive Fe3O4 nanoparticles that were synthesized using the (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) coprecipitation. After 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-catalyzed oxidation of CNC, carbodiimide (EDC/NHS) was used for coupling amine-containing iron oxide nanoparticles that were achieved by dopamine ligand exchange (NH2-Fe3O4 NPs). The as-prepared hybrids (Fe3O4@CNC) were further complexed with Cu(II) ions to produce specific protein binding sites. The performance of magnetically responsive Cu-Fe3O4@CNC hybrids was assessed by selectively separating lysozyme from aqueous media. The hybrid system displayed a remarkable binding capacity with lysozyme of 860.6 ± 14.6 mg/g while near full protein recovery (∼98%) was achieved by simple elution. Moreover, the regeneration of Fe3O4@CNC hybrids and efficient reutilization for protein separation was demonstrated. Finally, lysozyme separation from matrices containing egg white was achieved, thus revealing the specificity and potential of the presented method.

  19. The Magnetic Origins of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The defining physical property of the Sun's corona is that the magnetic field dominates the plasma. This property is the genesis for all solar activity ranging from quasi-steady coronal loops to the giant magnetic explosions observed as coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares. The coronal magnetic field is also the fundamental driver of all space weather; consequently, understanding the structure and dynamics of the field, especially its free energy, has long been a central objective in Heliophysics. The main obstacle to achieving this understanding has been the lack of accurate direct measurements of the coronal field. Most attempts to determine the magnetic free energy have relied on extrapolation of photospheric measurements, a notoriously unreliable procedure. In this presentation I will discuss what measurements of the coronal field would be most effective for understanding solar activity. Not surprisingly, the key process for driving solar activity is magnetic reconnection. I will discuss, therefore, how next-generation measurements of the coronal field will allow us to understand not only the origins of space weather, but also one of the most important fundamental processes in cosmic and laboratory plasmas.

  20. Polarized notum activation at wounds inhibits Wnt function to promote planarian head regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Christian P; Reddien, Peter W

    2011-05-13

    Regeneration requires initiation of programs tailored to the identity of missing parts. Head-versus-tail regeneration in planarians presents a paradigm for study of this phenomenon. After injury, Wnt signaling promotes tail regeneration. We report that wounding elicits expression of the Wnt inhibitor notum preferentially at anterior-facing wounds. This expression asymmetry occurs at essentially any wound, even if the anterior pole is intact. Inhibition of notum with RNA interference (RNAi) causes regeneration of an anterior-facing tail instead of a head, and double-RNAi experiments indicate that notum inhibits Wnt signaling to promote head regeneration. notum expression is itself controlled by Wnt signaling, suggesting that regulation of feedback inhibition controls the binary head-tail regeneration outcome. We conclude that local detection of wound orientation with respect to tissue axes results in distinct signaling environments that initiate appropriate regeneration responses.

  1. Detection of hydroxyl radicals during regeneration of granular activated carbon in dielectric barrier discharge plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shoufeng; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    To understand the reactions taking place in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma system of activated carbon regeneration, the determination of active species is necessary. A method based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography with radical trapping by salicylic acid, has been developed to measure hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the DBD plasma reactor. The effects of applied voltage, treatment time, and gas flow rate and atmosphere were investigated. Experimental results indicated that increasing voltage, treatment time and air flow rate could enhance the formation of •OH. Oxygen atmosphere and a suitable GAC water content were contributed to •OH generation. The results give an insight into plasma chemical processes, and can be helpful to optimize the design and application for the plasma system.

  2. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  3. Fenton-driven chemical regeneration of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Huling, Scott G; Kan, Eunsung; Caldwell, Caleb; Park, Saehan

    2012-02-29

    Three columns containing granular activated carbon (GAC) were placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and regenerated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under different chemical, physical, and operational conditions for 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Supplemental iron was immobilized in the GAC (≈6 g/kg) through the amendment of a ferrous iron solution. GAC regeneration occurred under ambient thermal conditions (21-27 °C), or enhanced thermal conditions (50 °C). Semi-continuous H2O2 loading resulted in saw tooth-like H2O2 concentrations, whereas continuous H2O2 loading resulted in sustained H2O2 levels and was more time efficient. Significant removal of MTBE was measured in all three columns using $(USD) 0.6 H2O2/lb GAC. Elevated temperature played a significant role in oxidative treatment, given the lower MTBE removal at ambient temperature (62-80%) relative to MTBE removal measured under thermally enhanced (78-95%), and thermally enhanced, acid pre-treated (92-97%) conditions. Greater MTBE removal was attributed to increased intraparticle MTBE desorption and diffusion and higher aqueous MTBE concentrations. No loss in the MTBE sorption capacity of the GAC was measured, and the reaction byproducts, tert-butyl alcohol and acetone were also degraded.

  4. Continuous sorption cooling in activated carbon-nitrogen system using metal foam as regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Indranil

    2017-02-01

    In compressor driven solid sorption process, cooling obtained from a desorbing bed (equivalent to an evaporator), is intermittent in nature. Intermittency can be avoided using multiple adsorbent columns. However, connecting a desorbing bed to heat source and adsorbing beds to heat sink in alternate cycles enhances operational complexity and constructional disadvantages. In a recent development, it has been seen that rapid and successive pressurization and depressurization of an adsorbent (solid) bed with adsorbate (gas) creates temperature differential across the column length. The presence of an orifice at the end opposite to gas entrance enhances the temperature gradient. By connecting the hot end to heat sink and the cold end to heat source permanently, one can substantially reduce the operational hazards associated with the intermittent sorption cooling processes. More recently, it has seen that the introduction of a regenerator in the process makes the cooling process more effective. Though the proposed sorption cooling process apparently looks similar to orifice type ‘pulse tube’ cooler, the former is intrinsically different than the other. In the present manuscript, experimental sorption cooling studies using of metal foam as regenerator has been discussed. Tests have been conducted near room temperature in activated carbon-nitrogen system.

  5. Sustained ERK activation underlies reprogramming in regeneration-competent salamander cells and distinguishes them from their mammalian counterparts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2014-07-08

    In regeneration-competent vertebrates, such as salamanders, regeneration depends on the ability of various differentiated adult cell types to undergo natural reprogramming. This ability is rarely observed in regeneration-incompetent species such as mammals, providing an explanation for their poor regenerative potential. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating natural reprogramming during regeneration. Here, we have identified the extent of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation as a key component of such mechanisms. We show that sustained ERK activation following serum induction is required for re-entry into the cell cycle of postmitotic salamander muscle cells, partially by promoting the downregulation of p53 activity. Moreover, ERK activation induces epigenetic modifications and downregulation of muscle-specific genes such as Sox6. Remarkably, while long-term ERK activation is found in salamander myotubes, only transient activation is seen in their mammalian counterparts, suggesting that the extent of ERK activation could underlie differences in regenerative competence between species.

  6. Active magnetic suspension in main magnetic field of electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, I. D.; Galkin, V. I.; Likhoshvay, I. P.

    1985-10-01

    An active magnetic suspension for the rotor of an electric motor is considered, especially in small or miniature high-speed devices such as gyros, microturbomachines, and machine-tool spindle drives where it would eliminate the need for extra bearings and contribute to size and weight reduction. A disk-type rotor made of a ferromagnetic material is located horizontally inside the bore of a vertical stator so that weight and external loads compensate the magnetic pull upward. This pull is generated by the magnetic field in the air gap and can be automatically controlled by an electronic feedback circuit which regulates the stator input voltage depending on the rotor position along the stator bore, with a displacement transducer on the rotor indicating the position. The performance of such a suspension with automatic control in a 3-phase induction motor is analyzed on the basis of the system of differential equations describing the behavior of the electromechanical system during axial oscillations of the rotor, assuming a constant rotor speed during the transient periods.

  7. Activation of germline-specific genes is required for limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Pao, Gerald M; Satoh, Akira; Cummings, Gillian; Monaghan, James R; Harkins, Timothy T; Bryant, Susan V; Randal Voss, S; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2012-10-01

    The capacity for tissue and organ regeneration in humans is dwarfed by comparison to that of salamanders. Emerging evidence suggests that mechanisms learned from the early phase of salamander limb regeneration-wound healing, cellular dedifferentiation and blastemal formation-will reveal therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration in humans. Here we describe a unique transcriptional fingerprint of regenerating limb tissue in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells to a germline-like state. Two genes that are required for self-renewal of germ cells in mice and flies, Piwi-like 1 (PL1) and Piwi-like 2 (PL2), are expressed in limb blastemal cells, the basal layer keratinocytes and the thickened apical epithelial cap in the wound epidermis in the regenerating limb. Depletion of PL1 and PL2 by morpholino oligonucleotides decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death in the blastema leading to a significant retardation of regeneration. Examination of key molecules that are known to be required for limb development or regeneration further revealed that FGF8 is transcriptionally downregulated in the presence of the morpholino oligos, indicating PL1 and PL2 might participate in FGF signaling during limb regeneration. Given the requirement for FGF signaling in limb development and regeneration, the results suggest that PL1 and PL2 function to establish a unique germline-like state that is associated with successful regeneration.

  8. Inhibition of H3K27me3 Histone Demethylase Activity Prevents the Proliferative Regeneration of Zebrafish Lateral Line Neuromasts

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Beier; He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Li, Wenyan; Li, Huawei

    2017-01-01

    The H3K27 demethylases are involved in a variety of biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell death by regulating transcriptional activity. However, the function of H3K27 demethylation in the field of hearing research is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity in hair cell regeneration using an in vivo animal model. Our data showed that pharmacologic inhibition of H3K27 demethylase activity with the specific small-molecule inhibitor GSK-J4 decreased the number of regenerated hair cells in response to neomycin damage. Furthermore, inhibition of H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and activated caspase-3 levels in the regenerating neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line. GSK-J4 administration also increased the expression of p21 and p27 in neuromast cells and inhibited the ERK signaling pathway. Collectively, our findings indicate that H3K27me3 demethylation is a key epigenetic regulator in the process of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish and suggest that H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity might be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:28348517

  9. Magnetism and activity of planet hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.; Miller, Brendan P.

    The magnetic activity levels of planet host stars may differ from that of stars not known to host planets in several ways. Hot Jupiters may induce activity in their hosts through magnetic interactions, or through tidal interactions by affecting their host's rotation or convection. Measurements of photospheric, chromospheric, or coronal activity might then be abnormally high or low compared to control stars that do not host hot Jupiters, or might be modulated at the planet's orbital period. Such detections are complicated by the small amplitude of the expected signal, by the fact that the signals may be transient, and by the difficulty of constructing control samples due to exoplanet detection biases and the uncertainty of field star ages. We review these issues, and discuss avenues for future progress in the field.

  10. Evolution of the perlecan/HSPG2 gene and its activation in regenerating Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Curtis R; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene's conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan's expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing.

  11. MASC: Magnetic Activity of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Fineschi, Silvano; Gan, Weiqun; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Zhukov, Andrei; Parenti, Susanna; Li, Hui; Romoli, Marco

    We present MASC, an innovative payload designed to explore the magnetic activity of the solar corona. It is composed of three complementary instruments: a Hard-X-ray spectrometer, a UV / EUV imager, and a Visible Light / UV polarimetric coronagraph able to measure the coronal magnetic field. The solar corona is structured in magnetically closed and open structures from which slow and fast solar winds are respectively released. In spite of much progress brought by two decades of almost uninterrupted observations from several space missions, the sources and acceleration mechanisms of both types are still not understood. This continuous expansion of the solar atmosphere is disturbed by sporadic but frequent and violent events. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale massive eruptions of magnetic structures out of the corona, while solar flares trace the sudden heating of coronal plasma and the acceleration of electrons and ions to high, sometimes relativistic, energies. Both phenomena are most probably driven by instabilities of the magnetic field in the corona. The relations between flares and CMEs are still not understood in terms of initiation and energy partition between large-scale motions, small-scale heating and particle acceleration. The initiation is probably related to magnetic reconnection which itself results magnetic topological changes due to e.g. flux emergence, footpoints motions, etc. Acceleration and heating are also strongly coupled since the atmospheric heating is thought to result from the impact of accelerated particles. The measurement of both physical processes and their outputs is consequently of major importance. However, despite its fundamental importance as a driver for the physics of the Sun and of the heliosphere, the magnetic field of our star’s outer atmosphere remains poorly understood. This is due in large part to the fact that the magnetic field is a very difficult quantity to measure. Our knowledge of its strength and

  12. Embedding of magnetic nanoparticles in polycaprolactone nanofiber scaffolds to facilitate bone healing and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannarkat, Jacob T.; Battogtokh, Jugdersuren; Philip, John; Wilson, Otto C.; Mehl, Patrick M.

    2010-05-01

    Scaffolds used for tissue engineering are made to mimic natural surroundings of tissues, the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a large part in maintaining the structural integrity of the connective tissue. When producing a tissue in the laboratory, structural integrity of the cells is ensured only when a biomimetic ECM is present. Nanofibrous polymer fibers have been chosen for their resemblance to natural fibers of the ECM and their capability to provide the support necessary for cells to grow and differentiate into tissue. Polycaprolactone based nanofibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering have been fabricated through the electrospinning process. Electrospinning is a simple and cost-effective method for producing nanofibers which involves applying a high voltage to a falling polymer solution to form a fluid jet producing nanofibers. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been incorporated within the nanofibers by addition of MNPs to the polymer solution to increase the rate of bone cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Studies by Nomura and Takano-Yamamoto, [Matrix Biol. 19, 91 (2000)] demonstrated an increase in the expression levels of multiple genes in bone tissue including growth factors when shear stress was applied at the cellular level. MNPs are around 1-100 nm and exhibit superparamagnetism. These properties of MNPs allow for high noninvasive control over them using an external magnetic field. While under an ac (15 Hz, 1-6 Gauss) or pulsed magnetic fields, MNPs will induce low level mechanical stresses within the scaffold causing shear stresses at the cellular level of the preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells to stimulate their growth, proliferation, and differentiation.

  13. Real and simulated microgravity can activate signals stimulating cells to enter the S phase during lens regeneration in urodelean amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    The model of Wolffian lens regeneration was used to study the effect of microgravity on the proliferative activity of cell giving rise to the regenerating lens. In vivo experiments were performed aboard Russian biosatellites and under laboratory conditions, using clinorotation to simulate microgravity. The data of autoradiographic analysis and BrdU assay showed that exposure to micro-g resulted in a 1.2- to 2-fold increase in the number of cells entering the S phase, compared to that in the on-ground control (1g). This increase was observed both in the zone of regeneration (the dorsal iris) and in the eye growth zone (the pars ciliaris ora serrata complex). In the regenerating lens proper, the number of cells entering the S phase was also greater under experimental conditions. This often resulted in an increased size of the lens (compared to the control) and disturbances in its morphogenesis. Along with in vivo experiments, we developed a quasi-in vivo system of iris/lens culturing in vitro in a high-speed miniroller, which allows us now to compare the direct effects of low g and the effects mediated by various body systems on proliferation in the same eye tissues. Probable mechanisms of the influence of newt body systems on lens regeneration upon exposure to microgravity are discussed. A hypothesis is proposed that the key role in this influence may belong to early events in the responses of blood circulatory and immune systems to microgravity.

  14. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  15. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  16. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert E. Burke, MD...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System...has been that the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike the peripheral nervous system (PNS), is incapable of axon regeneration. There

  17. Myocardial regeneration by activation of multipotent cardiac stem cells in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Konrad; Torella, Daniele; Sheikh, Farooq; de Angelis, Antonella; Nurzynska, Daria; Silvestri, Furio; Beltrami, C. Alberto; Bussani, Rossana; Beltrami, Antonio P.; Quaini, Federico; Bolli, Roberto; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we tested whether the human heart possesses a cardiac stem cell (CSC) pool that promotes regeneration after infarction. For this purpose, CSC growth and senescence were measured in 20 hearts with acute infarcts, 20 hearts with end-stage postinfarction cardiomyopathy, and 12 control hearts. CSC number increased markedly in acute and, to a lesser extent, in chronic infarcts. CSC growth correlated with the increase in telomerase-competent dividing CSCs from 1.5% in controls to 28% in acute infarcts and 14% in chronic infarcts. The CSC mitotic index increased 29-fold in acute and 14-fold in chronic infarcts. CSCs committed to the myocyte, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell lineages increased 85-fold in acute infarcts and 25-fold in chronic infarcts. However, p16INK4a-p53-positive senescent CSCs also increased and were 10%, 18%, and 40% in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. Old CSCs had short telomeres and apoptosis involved 0.3%, 3.8%, and 9.6% of CSCs in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. These variables reduced the number of functionally competent CSCs from 26,000/cm3 of viable myocardium in acute to 7,000/cm3 in chronic infarcts, respectively. In seven acute infarcts, foci of spontaneous myocardial regeneration that did not involve cell fusion were identified. In conclusion, the human heart possesses a CSC compartment, and CSC activation occurs in response to ischemic injury. The loss of functionally competent CSCs in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy may underlie the progressive functional deterioration and the onset of terminal failure. cardiac progenitor cells | human heart | myocardial infarction

  18. L-Dopa production and antioxidant activity in Hybanthus enneaspermus (L.) F. Muell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Vasudevan, Venkatachalam; Selvaraj, Natesan; Lim, Yong Pyo; Ganapathi, Andy

    2015-07-01

    Hybanthus enneaspermus is an ethanobotanical plant extensively used in Indian traditional medicine. Quick and efficient in vitro mass propagation of this plant species was established for commercial utilization from leaf and node explants using various concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators and polyamines. The maximum number of multiple shoots per leaf explant (40 shoots) was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 20 mg/l spermidine in combination with 4 mg/l BA+1.5 mg/l IAA after 8 weeks of culture. The elongated shoots were rooted (16 roots/shoot) on MS medium with the best concentration of IBA (1.5 mg/l) and in combination with 20 mg/l putrescine after 5 weeks of culture. The plants were successfully acclimatized (98 %) in the sand: soil: vermiculite mixture (1:1:1 v/v/v) in the greenhouse. An increased antioxidant activity was recorded in vitro regenerated shoots when compared to in vitro-induced roots. L-Dopa content was recorded higher in leaves (8.31 mg/g DW) followed by stem (6.22 mg/g DW) and root (3.22 mg/g DW) of leaf-derived plants than the field-grown parent plant after 5 weeks. By adopting this protocol, the regenerated-plants could be used for drug production and pharmacology work with as an alternative to field-grown plants.

  19. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  20. Red-cell GSH regeneration and glutathione reductase activity in G6PD variants in the Ferrara area.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Carandina, G; Lucci, M; Perry, G M; Vullo, C

    1987-12-01

    Red-cell studies were carried out on three groups of G6PD-deficient subjects with different G6PD variants from the Ferrara area of Northern Italy. Red-cell GSH and activities of G6PD, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. A method was developed to measure red-cell GSH regeneration after oxidation of endogenous GSH in whole blood by diamide and only this clearly distinguished the variants from each other and from normal. Regeneration by 1 h was lowest in the Mediterranean variant, 0-10.2% in contrast to 93-98% in normal. A predisposition to a haemolytic crisis after ingestion of fava beans was not clearcut, but subjects appeared to be at risk if GSH regeneration at 1 h was less than 30% of the endogenous level, and red-cell FAD+ was very high indicated by high in vitro GR activity and inhibition by added FAD+. It is suggested that the most informative tests in G6PD deficiency are measurements of GSH regeneration in intact red cells plus GR activity and/or red-cell flavin compounds.

  1. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite.

    PubMed

    David, Jan; Smejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Sárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified hydroponic method was applied to determine the effects of their potassium salts on Zea mays seedlings roots with respect to the plant weight, root length, root division, and starch and protein content. The relations between the determined parameters were evaluated through Principal Component Analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The results indicated that the most important factor determining the biological activity of South-Moravian lignite potassium humates is related to the nature of self-assemblies, while the chemical composition had no direct connection with the root growth of Zea mays seedlings. It was demonstrated a controlled processing that provided humic substances with different chemical and physicochemical properties and variable biological activity.

  2. Fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis on magnetically-active days. [statistical correlation to magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    On magnetically-active days, activation of fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis is observed. The increase in fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis begins on the day of the onset of a magnetic storm, reaching a maximum in 24 hours. Activation is higher on days with magnetic storms with a sudden onset and a C index of 1.5-2.0.

  3. Activated carbon adsorptive removal of azo dye and peroxydisulfate regeneration: from a batch study to continuous column operation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Du, Yue; Deng, Bin; Zhu, Kangmeng; Zhang, Hui

    2016-12-17

    The performance of activated carbon (AC) for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) was investigated in both batch and column studies. The optimal conditions for adsorption process in batch study were found to be a stirring speed of 500 rpm, AC dosage of 5 g/L, and initial AO7 concentration of 100 mg/L. The spent AC was then treated with peroxydisulfate (PDS), and the regenerated AC was used again to adsorb AO7. Both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order rate models for adsorption kinetics were investigated, and the results showed that the latter model was more appropriate. The effects of regeneration time, PDS concentration, and stirring speed on AO7-spent AC regeneration were investigated in batch studies, and the optimal conditions were time 2 h, stirring speed 700 rpm, and PDS concentration 10 g/L. Under the same adsorption conditions, 89% AO7 could be decolorized by adsorption using regenerated AC. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated and the adsorption capacity was nearly the same when the flow rate rose from 7.9 to 11.4 mL/min, but it decreased significantly when the flow rate was increased to 15.2 mL/min. The performance of regenerated AC in the column was also investigated, and a slight increase in the adsorption capacity was observed in the second adsorption cycle. However, the adsorption capacity decreased to some extent in the third cycle due to the consumption of C-OH group on the AC surface during PDS regeneration.

  4. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  5. Extracellular Vesicle-functionalized Decalcified Bone Matrix Scaffolds with Enhanced Pro-angiogenic and Pro-bone Regeneration Activities

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hui; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Liming; Lei, Qian; Zhao, Aiqi; Wang, Hongxiang; Li, Qiubai; Cao, Yilin; Jie Zhang, Wen; Chen, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for bone regeneration after the transplantation of tissue-engineered bone grafts in the clinical setting. Growing evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are potently pro-angiogenic both in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we fabricated a novel EV-functionalized scaffold with enhanced pro-angiogenic and pro-bone regeneration activities by coating decalcified bone matrix (DBM) with MSC-derived EVs. EVs were harvested from rat bone marrow-derived MSCs and the pro-angiogenic potential of EVs was investigated in vitro. DBM scaffolds were then coated with EVs, and the modification was verified by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Next, the pro-angiogenic and pro-bone regeneration activities of EV-modified scaffolds were evaluated in a subcutaneous bone formation model in nude mice. Micro-computed tomography scanning analysis showed that EV-modified scaffolds with seeded cells enhanced bone formation. Enhanced bone formation was confirmed by histological analysis. Immunohistochemical staining for CD31 proved that EV-modified scaffolds promoted vascularization in the grafts, thereby enhancing bone regeneration. This novel scaffold modification method provides a promising way to promote vascularization, which is essential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:28367979

  6. Localized epigenetic silencing of a damage-activated WNT enhancer limits regeneration in mature Drosophila imaginal discs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robin E; Setiawan, Linda; Saul, Josh; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms lose the capacity to regenerate damaged tissues as they mature. Damaged Drosophila imaginal discs regenerate efficiently early in the third larval instar (L3) but progressively lose this ability. This correlates with reduced damage-responsive expression of multiple genes, including the WNT genes wingless (wg) and Wnt6. We demonstrate that damage-responsive expression of both genes requires a bipartite enhancer whose activity declines during L3. Within this enhancer, a damage-responsive module stays active throughout L3, while an adjacent silencing element nucleates increasing levels of epigenetic silencing restricted to this enhancer. Cas9-mediated deletion of the silencing element alleviates WNT repression, but is, in itself, insufficient to promote regeneration. However, directing Myc expression to the blastema overcomes repression of multiple genes, including wg, and restores cellular responses necessary for regeneration. Localized epigenetic silencing of damage-responsive enhancers can therefore restrict regenerative capacity in maturing organisms without compromising gene functions regulated by developmental signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11588.001 PMID:26840050

  7. Activation of Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Dorresteijn, Adriaan W C; Fröbius, Andreas C

    2012-05-01

    The capability of regenerating posterior segments and pygidial structures is ancestral for annelids and has been lost only a few times within this phylum. As one of the three major segmented taxa, annelids enable us to monitor reconstruction of lost tissues and organs. During regeneration, regional identities have to be imprinted onto the newly formed segments. In this study, we show spatial and temporal localization of expression of nine Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii. Hox genes are homeodomain genes encoding transcriptional regulators of axial patterning in bilaterian animals during development. We demonstrate that five Platynereis Hox genes belonging to paralog groups (PG) 1, 4, 5, 6, and 9-14 are expressed in domains of the regenerating nervous system consistent with providing positional information along the anteroposterior axis of the regenerate. We report that expression in regenerating neuromeres is limited to varying subsets of perikarya, called gangliosomes. Four of nine genes analyzed do not appear to be involved in axial patterning. Two genes, Pdu-Hox2 and Pdu-Hox3, are predominantly expressed in the growth zone region. For some Hox genes expression in newly formed coelomic epithelia can be observed. Platynereis Hox genes do not exhibit temporal or spatial colinearity. Although there are some similarities to previously reported expression patterns during larval and postlarval development in Nereididae (Kulakova et al. 2007), expression patterns observed during caudal regeneration also show unique patterns.

  8. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-12-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions (one of them recurrent) inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with other available differently defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in Active Regions NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. The quantity 1/4π{B}n\\cdot{B}p is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear to the difference between the potential (Bp) and the non-potential magnetic field (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density shows clear changes before the powerful solar flares in Active Region NOAA 11158, which is consistent with the change in magnetic fields in the flaring lower atmosphere.

  9. Bioactive bilayered dressing for compromised epidermal tissue regeneration with sequential activity of complementary agents.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Cifuentes, Alberto; Rodríguez, Gema; Aguilar, María Rosa; González-Gómez, Álvaro; Solis, Raul; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Buján, Julia; García-Sanmartin, Josune; Martínez, Alfredo; Román, Julio San

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with the design, preparation, and evaluation of a new bilayered dressing for application in the healing of compromised wounds. The system is based on the sequential release of two complementary bioactive components to enhance the activation of the regeneration of dermal tissue. The internal layer is a highly hydrophilic and biodegradable film of gelatin and hyaluronic acid (HG), crosslinked with the natural compound genipin, which reacts with the amine groups of gelatin. This film is loaded with the proangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial peptide, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), that is released slowly in the wound site. The external layer, more stable and less hydrophilic, is constituted by a biodegradable polyurethane derived from poly(caprolactone) and pluronic L61. This layer is loaded with resorbable nanoparticles of bemiparin (a fractionated low molecular weight heparin), which promotes the activation of growth factors, FGF and VEGF, and provides a good biomechanical stability and controlled permeability of the bilayered dressing. Experiments carried out in mice demonstrate the excellent angiogenic effect of the HG film in the dermal tissue. Application of the bilayered dressing in the wound healing rabbit ear model shows an improved cicatrization of the wound in both ischemic and non-ischemic defects, favoring epithelialization and reducing noticeably the contraction and the inflammation.

  10. Cytoskeletal disruption activates the DLK/JNK pathway, which promotes axonal regeneration and mimics a preconditioning injury

    PubMed Central

    Valakh, Vera; Frey, Erin; Babetto, Elisabetta; Walker, Lauren J; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Nerve injury can lead to axonal regeneration, axonal degeneration, and/or neuronal cell death. Remarkably, the MAP3K dual leucine zipper kinase, DLK, promotes each of these responses, suggesting that DLK is a sensor of axon injury. In Drosophila, mutations in proteins that stabilize the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons activate the DLK pathway, suggesting that DLK may be activated by cytoskeletal disruption. Here we test this model in mammalian sensory neurons. We find that pharmacological agents designed to disrupt either the actin or microtubule cytoskeleton activate the DLK pathway, and that activation is independent of calcium influx or induction of the axon degeneration program. Moreover, activation of the DLK pathway by targeting the cytoskeleton induces a pro-regenerative state, enhancing axon regeneration in response to a subsequent injury in a process akin to preconditioning. This highlights the potential utility of activating the DLK pathway as a method to improve axon regeneration. Moreover, DLK is required for these responses to cytoskeletal perturbations, suggesting that DLK functions as a key neuronal sensor of cytoskeletal damage. PMID:25726747

  11. Highly regenerable carbon-Fe3O4 core-satellite nanospheres as oxygen reduction electrocatalyst and magnetic adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenqiang; Liu, Minmin; Cai, Chao; Zhou, Haijun; Liu, Rui

    2017-02-01

    We present the synthesis and multifunctional utilization of core-satellite carbon-Fe3O4 nanoparticles to serve as the enabling platform for a range of applications including oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and magnetic adsorbent. Starting from polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles and Fe(NO3)3, carbon-Fe3O4 core-satellite nanospheres are synthesized through successive steps of impregnation, ammoniation and carbonization. The synergistic combination of Fe3O4 and N-doped carbon endows the nanocomposite with high electrochemical activity in ORR and mainly four electrons transferred in reaction process. Furthermore, carbon-Fe3O4 nanoparticles used as magnetic adsorbent exhibit the efficient removal of Rhodamine B from an aqueous solution. The recovery and reuse of the adsorbent is demonstrated 5 times without any detectible loss in activity.

  12. HDAC4 promotes Pax7-dependent satellite cell activation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Moon-Chang; Ryu, Soyoung; Hao, Rui; Wang, Bin; Kapur, Meghan; Fan, Chen-Ming; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2014-01-01

    During muscle regeneration, the transcription factor Pax7 stimulates the differentiation of satellite cells (SCs) toward the muscle lineage but restricts adipogenesis. Here, we identify HDAC4 as a regulator of Pax7-dependent muscle regeneration. In HDAC4-deficient SCs, the expression of Pax7 and its target genes is reduced. We identify HDAC4-regulated Lix1 as a Pax7 target gene required for SC proliferation. HDAC4 inactivation leads to defective SC proliferation, muscle regeneration, and aberrant lipid accumulation. Further, expression of the brown adipose master regulator Prdm16 and its inhibitory microRNA-133 are also deregulated. Thus, HDAC4 is a novel regulator of Pax7-dependent SC proliferation and potentially fate determination in regenerating muscle. PMID:25205686

  13. Regenerable adsorbents for removal of arsenic from contaminated waters and synthesis and characterization of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for environmental and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo Gonzalez, Brenda

    The present work is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the synthesis of regenerable adsorbents for the removal of arsenic from contaminated waters. An adsorbent based on carboxymethylated polyethylenimine grafted agarose gels was synthesized and characterized as a regenerable synthetic ferric oxide adsorbent with high capacity for arsenate ions at pH 3.0. Similarly, four metal ion chelating adsorbents based on dipicolylamine were synthesized and characterized with respect to their Cu(II), Fe(III) and As(V) adsorption capacities. The most efficient adsorbents were Nov-PEI-DPA and Nov-TREN-DPA. Additionally, a commercial ion exchange resin was modified with permanganate to oxidize arsenite into arsenate. A complete oxidation-adsorption system was proposed in which a column packed with the oxidation resin was connected in series with an adsorbent column composed of the polyethylenimine grafted agarose gels. The second section involved work with magnetic nanoparticles. First, composite adsorbents consisting of magnetic particles encapsulated within agarose beads with and without grafted iminodiacetic acid (IDA) chelating groups were synthesized. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents for Cu(II), Fe(III) and As(V) at different concentrations was investigated. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the Fe(III) and As(V) adsorption isotherms for the magnetic Novarose-IDA. Regenerability of the adsorbent was achieved with a pH change of the inlet solution, without affecting its magnetic or adsorption properties. Magnetic composite particles were synthesized for biomedical applications. First, magnetic nanoparticles were coated with silica and then used for gold nanoshell production. These nanoshells were functionalized with a Brij S10 derivative, containing carboxylic groups, using dodecanethiol as a bridging agent to incorporate a fluorescent biomolecule. Finally, magnetic and gold particles were encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles

  14. [Effect of weak and superweak combined permanent and low-frequency alternating magnetic fields and low-intensity millimeter waves on regeneration of planaria Dugesia tigrina].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Kliubin, A V; Fesenko, E E

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that exposure to weak combined collinear magnetic fields (permanent component 42 mT; amplitude of alternating component 40 nT, frequency 3.7 Hz) or millimeter waves with a frequency of 36 GHz and power density of 100 mT/cm2 substantially stimulates the growth of the regeneration blastema in the tail fragment of planaria when the exposure to fields precedes the cutting of the planaria body. This effect is more clearly pronounced during the treatment of planaria with magnetic field. If the treatment with weak physical factors is carried out after the cutting of planaria, the effect of the field is two times less pronounced (exposure to magnetic waves) or is not evident at all (exposure to electromagnetic radiation).

  15. Commissioning activities of the initial magnetic diagnostics for KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Gon; Gyo Bak, Jun; Mie Ka, Eun

    2007-11-01

    The initial magnetic diagnostics for the KSTAR superconducting tokamak including three Rogowski coils, five flux/voltage loops, and sixty-four magnetic field probes have been successfully installed. The Rogowski coils, flux/voltage loops, and magnetic field probes measure the total plasma current, poloidal flux and loop voltage, and local poloidal magnetic field for the plasma position control and equilibrium studies, respectively. Accurate position measurements after installation for all of these initial magnetic diagnostics and in situ calibration for the Rogowski coils were finished. Data acquisition systems for these initial magnetic diagnostics are currently under preparation. Detail commissioning activities before the first plasma from these initial magnetic diagnostics will be presented.

  16. Rapamycin-Resistant mTOR Activity Is Required for Sensory Axon Regeneration Induced by a Conditioning Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Ding, Yue; Chan, Leung Ting; Wang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Jiang, Songshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuronal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity is a critical determinant of the intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, whether its action also applies to peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons after injury remains elusive. To address this issue unambiguously, we used genetic approaches to determine the role of mTOR signaling in sensory axon regeneration in mice. We showed that deleting mTOR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons suppressed the axon regeneration induced by conditioning lesions. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on axon regeneration results from functions of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) or 2 (mTORC2), two distinct kinase complexes, we ablated either Raptor or Rictor in DRG neurons. We found that suppressing mTORC1 signaling dramatically decreased the conditioning lesion effect. In addition, an injury to the peripheral branch boosts mTOR activity in DRG neurons that cannot be completely inhibited by rapamycin, a widely used mTOR-specific inhibitor. Unexpectedly, examining several conditioning lesion–induced pro-regenerative pathways revealed that Raptor deletion but not rapamycin suppressed Stat3 activity in neurons. Therefore, our results demonstrate that crosstalk between mTOR and Stat3 signaling mediates the conditioning lesion effect and provide genetic evidence that rapamycin-resistant mTOR activity contributes to the intrinsic axon growth capacity in adult sensory neurons after injury. PMID:28101526

  17. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  18. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  19. Silicon Promotes Adventitious Shoot Regeneration and Enhances Salinity Tolerance of Ajuga multiflora Bunge by Altering Activity of Antioxidant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Si concentration on shoot regeneration and salinity tolerance of Ajuga multiflora. Addition of Si to the shoot induction medium significantly increased the frequency of shoot induction. The average number of shoots regenerated per explant decreased on the medium containing NaCl alone, while there was less decrease when the shoot induction medium was supplemented with both NaCl and Si. The shoot induction percentage increased linearly with increasing concentration of Si in the NaCl containing medium. Addition of Si to the shoot induction medium significantly increased SOD, POD, APX, and CAT activity in regenerated shoot buds as compared with the control. The inclusion of Si to the NaCl containing medium significantly increased the SOD activity in leaves and roots, while it decreased POD, APX, and CAT activity in both organs. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed that there are no distinct differences in the structure of stomata between the control and Si-treated plants. However, NaCl treatment significantly affected the structure and number of stomata as compared to the control. Wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the high Si deposition in trichomes of plants grown in the Si containing medium but not in plants grown in the medium without Si. PMID:24526904

  20. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  1. [Study of possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in planarian regeneration processes using pharmacological inhibition analysis].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Ermolaeva, S A

    2014-01-01

    Possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in the processes of regeneration and morphogenesis in freshwater planarian flatworms Schmidtea mediterranea was studied using a pharmacological inhibitor analysis. It was found that pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases significantly inhibit the regeneration of the head end of the animals and that this effect is realized due to inhibition of proliferative activity of neoblasts, planarian stem cells. It is shown that that the inhibition of the studied protein kinases in regenerating planarians markedly disturbs stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis.

  2. A Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field with Dependence on Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to characterize the planet's internal field and the structure of the magnetosphere. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that includes a dependence on magnetic activity. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The magnetic field is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft and dependent on magnetic activity. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current, which also depends on magnetic activity, is fit to minimize the root-mean-square residual between the model magnetic field and the field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER. The model was fit separately for magnetic field observations within distinct levels of magnetic activity. Linear fits of model parameters versus magnetic activity allows continuous scaling of the model to magnetic activity. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function, which was fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model reproduces the dependence of the magnetospheric size and tail current intensity on magnetic activity, and allows more accurate characterization of the internal field.

  3. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  4. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration.

  5. Enhancing the tumor discrimination using antibody-activated magnetic nanoparticles in ultra-low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. C.; Huang, K. W.; Liao, S. H.; Horng, H. E.; Chieh, J. J.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, K. L.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report an enhanced liver tumor discrimination for rats using antibody-activated magnetic nanoparticles (MNs) and ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging ex vivo. It was found that the intensity ratio between the magnetic resonance image of tumor and normal liver tissues is 2-3 absence of antibody-activated MNs in rats. The intensity ratio rises to ˜100 when antibody-activated MNs are expressed in liver tumors through vein injection. Enhancing tumor discrimination using antibody-activated MNs is demonstrated using T1-weighted contrast imaging in ultra-low magnetic fields.

  6. Magnetically-controllable optical multi-stability in magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings with potential applications to multi-level all-optical regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qing-Yao; Wu, Bao-Jian; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Starting with the nonlinear coupled-mode equations of guided optical waves in the magneto-optic fiber Bragg grating (MFBG), the amplitude transfer curve of the transmitted light is numerically calculated for the incident right-circularly polarized wave, and the multi-stability is analyzed by introducing the parameter of jitter suppression. It is shown that, (i) the performance of amplitude jitter suppression in the stable states of high level is better than that of low level; (ii) the jitter suppression in the multi-stable regions can be enhanced when the magnetic field is applied to the MFBG in the opposite direction of the incident wave; and (iii) by adjusting the applied magnetic field, the multi-stable levels can be tuned flexibly, which is helpful for developing the intelligent all-optical devices for multilevel regeneration.

  7. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7(CreER) and Mtor(flox/flox) mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes.

  8. Transit-Amplifying Cells Orchestrate Stem Cell Activity and Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Li, Lishi; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transit-amplifying cells (TACs) are an early intermediate in tissue regeneration. Here, using hair follicles (HFs) as paradigm, we show that emerging TACs constitute a signaling center that orchestrates tissue growth. While primed stem cells (SCs) generate TACs, quiescent-SCs only proliferate after TACs form and begin expressing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). TAC generation is independent of autocrine SHH, but their pool wanes if they can’t produce it. We trace this paradox to two direct actions of SHH: promoting quiescent-SC proliferation and regulating dermal factors that stoke TAC expansion. Ingrained within quiescent-SC’s special sensitivity to SHH signaling is their high expression of GAS1. Without sufficient input from quiescent-SCs, replenishment of primed-SCs for the next hair cycle is compromised, delaying regeneration and eventually leading to regeneration failure. Our findings unveil TACs as transient but indispensable integrator of SC niche components and reveal an intriguing interdependency of primed and quiescent SC populations on tissue regeneration. PMID:24813615

  9. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species.

  10. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  11. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  12. Macrophages induce AKT/β-catenin-dependent Lgr5+ stem cell activation and hair follicle regeneration through TNF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xusheng; Chen, Haiyan; Tian, Ruiyun; Zhang, Yiling; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Wang, Chengmei; Ge, Jianfeng; Fan, Zhimeng; Kong, Deqiang; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Ting; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Jinmei; Wang, Shan; Qin, Zhihai; Jia, Huanhuan; Wu, Yue; Liu, Jia; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Tredget, Edward E.; Lin, Mei; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Yuyang; Wu, Yaojiong

    2017-01-01

    Skin stem cells can regenerate epidermal appendages; however, hair follicles (HF) lost as a result of injury are barely regenerated. Here we show that macrophages in wounds activate HF stem cells, leading to telogen–anagen transition (TAT) around the wound and de novo HF regeneration, mostly through TNF signalling. Both TNF knockout and overexpression attenuate HF neogenesis in wounds, suggesting dose-dependent induction of HF neogenesis by TNF, which is consistent with TNF-induced AKT signalling in epidermal stem cells in vitro. TNF-induced β-catenin accumulation is dependent on AKT but not Wnt signalling. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT blocks depilation-induced HF TAT. Notably, Pten loss in Lgr5+ HF stem cells results in HF TAT independent of injury and promotes HF neogenesis after wounding. Thus, our results suggest that macrophage-TNF-induced AKT/β-catenin signalling in Lgr5+ HF stem cells has a crucial role in promoting HF cycling and neogenesis after wounding. PMID:28345588

  13. Mdivi-1 Inhibits Astrocyte Activation and Astroglial Scar Formation and Enhances Axonal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cao, Yang; Shen, Feifei; Wang, Yangsong; Bai, Liangjie; Guo, Weidong; Bi, Yunlong; Lv, Gang; Fan, Zhongkai

    2016-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), astrocytes become hypertrophic, and proliferative, forming a dense network of astroglial processes at the site of the lesion. This constitutes a physical and biochemical barrier to axonal regeneration. Mitochondrial fission regulates cell cycle progression; inhibiting the cell cycle of astrocytes can reduce expression levels of axon growth-inhibitory molecules as well as astroglial scar formation after SCI. We therefore investigated how an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission, Mdivi-1, would affect astrocyte proliferation, astroglial scar formation, and axonal regeneration following SCI in rats. Western blot and immunofluorescent double-labeling showed that Mdivi-1 markedly reduced the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and a cell proliferation marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, in astrocytes 3 days after SCI. Moreover, Mdivi-1 decreased the expression of GFAP and neurocan, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. Notably, immunofluorescent labeling and Nissl staining showed that Mdivi-1 elevated the production of growth-associated protein-43 and increased neuronal survival at 4 weeks after SCI. Finally, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and behavioral evaluation of motor function indicated that Mdivi-1 also reduced cavity formation and improved motor function 4 weeks after SCI. Our results confirm that Mdivi-1 promotes motor function after SCI, and indicate that inhibiting mitochondrial fission using Mdivi-1 can inhibit astrocyte activation and astroglial scar formation and contribute to axonal regeneration after SCI in rats. PMID:27807407

  14. LIM-only protein FHL2 activates NF-κB signaling in the control of liver regeneration and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Jennifer; Nouët, Yann; Jouvion, Grégory; Levillayer, Florence; Adib-Conquy, Minou; Cassard-Doulcier, Anne-Marie; Tebbi, Ali; Blanc, Fany; Remy, Lauriane; Chen, Ju; Cairo, Stefano; Werts, Catherine; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Tordjmann, Thierry; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Wei, Yu

    2013-08-01

    Four-and-a-half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2) is an important mediator in many signaling pathways. In this study, we analyzed the functions of FHL2 in nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling in the liver. We show that FHL2 enhanced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) activity in transcriptional activation of NF-κB targets by stabilizing the protein. TRAF6 is a binding partner of FHL2 and an important component of the Toll-like receptor-NF-κB pathway. Knockdown of FHL2 in 293-hTLR4/MD2-CD14 cells impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-κB activity, which regulates expression of inflammatory cytokines. Indeed, FHL2(-/-) macrophages showed significantly reduced production of TNF and interleukin 6 (IL-6) following LPS stimulation. TNF and IL-6 are the key cytokines that prime liver regeneration after hepatic injury. Following partial hepatectomy, FHL2(-/-) mice exhibited diminished induction of TNF and IL-6 and delayed hepatocyte regeneration. In the liver, NF-κB signaling orchestrates inflammatory cross talk between hepatocytes and hepatic immune cells that promote chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. We found that deficiency of FHL2 reduced susceptibility to diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, correlating with the activator function of FHL2 in NF-κB signaling. Our findings demonstrate FHL2 as a positive regulator of NF-κB activity in liver regeneration and carcinogenesis and highlight the importance of FHL2 in both hepatocytes and hepatic immune cells.

  15. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  16. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology. PMID:22022453

  17. Repression of inactive motor nerve terminals in partially denervated rat muscle after regeneration of active motor axons.

    PubMed Central

    Ribchester, R R; Taxt, T

    1984-01-01

    The fourth deep lumbrical muscle in the hind foot of adult rats was partially denervated by crushing the sural nerve (s.n.). The denervated muscle fibres became completely reinnervated by sprouts from lateral plantar nerve (l.p.n.) motor axons. By about 20 days after the nerve crush, s.n. motor axons started to reinnervate the muscle. In control muscles, a small proportion of the muscle fibres--about 2.5% of the muscle per motor unit--was reinnervated by s.n. motor axons over the following 20 days. Hence the regenerating terminals were able to re-establish functional synapses, despite the fact that all the muscle fibres were functionally innervated by l.p.n. terminals. When nerve impulse conduction in the l.p.n. was blocked with tetrodotoxin for up to 2 weeks, starting from the time when s.n. axons returned to the muscle, s.n. motor axons retrieved a much larger proportion of the muscle fibres--about 6.5% of the muscle per motor unit. There was a concomitant decrease in the tension produced by the sprouted l.p.n. motor axons. Intracellular recordings showed that many muscle fibres became innervated exclusively by regenerated s.n. motor nerve terminals. Measurements of end-plate potentials suggested that l.p.n. sprouts and the original nerve terminals were eliminated non-selectively. These results suggest that regenerating, active motor nerve terminals have an additional competitive advantage in reinnervating innervated muscles, if the intact terminals are inactive. When the l.p.n. was cut, rather than blocked, extensive reinnervation by the s.n. occurred-about 30% of the muscle per motor unit. This suggests that the absence of an intact nerve terminal in the motor end-plate provides a stronger stimulus than inactivity for synapse formation by regenerating motor axons. PMID:6707966

  18. Promotion of axon regeneration and inhibition of astrocyte activation by alpha A-crystallin on crushed optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei-Yang; Liu, Xiao; Gu, Xian-Liang; Ying, Xi; Wu, Nan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effects of αA-crystallin in astrocyte gliosis after optic nerve crush (ONC) and the mechanism of α-crystallin in neuroprotection and axon regeneration. METHODS ONC was established on the Sprague-Dawley rat model and αA-crystallin (10−4 g/L, 4 µL) was intravitreously injected into the rat model. Flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) was examined 14d after ONC, and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the retina and crush site were analyzed 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14d after ONC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot respectively. The levels of beta Tubulin (TUJ1), growth-associated membrane phosphoprotein-43 (GAP-43), chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and neurocan were also determined by IHC 14d after ONC. RESULTS GFAP level in the retina and the optic nerve significantly increased 1d after ONC, and reached the peak level 7d post-ONC. Injection of αA-crystallin significantly decreased GFAP level in both the retina and the crush site 3d after ONC, and induced astrocytes architecture remodeling at the crush site. Quantification of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons indicated αA-crystallin markedly promoted axon regeneration in ONC rats and enhanced the regenerated axons penetrated into the glial scar. CSPGs and neurocan expression also decreased 14d after αA-crystallin injection. The amplitude (N1-P1) and latency (P1) of F-VEP were also restored. CONCLUSION Our results suggest α-crystallin promotes the axon regeneration of RGCs and suppresses the activation of astrocytes. PMID:27500100

  19. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  20. [Pharynx regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Kreshchenko, N D

    2009-01-01

    The obtained and published data on pharynx regeneration in planarians have been reviewed. Planarians can regenerate from a small body fragment and restore all missing organs including the pharynx. The pharynx is a relatively autonomous organ with a differentiated structure and specialized function. Pharynx regeneration has specific features, and its studies are of considerable theoretical interest. Pharynx regeneration can also be a convenient model to study the molecular mechanisms of regeneration that remain undisclosed. In addition, this model can be used to test biologically active compounds in order to elucidate their effect on morphogenesis. This subject of investigation benefits by a simpler and more adequate analysis as well as a possibility to use large numbers of animals and small quantities of analyzed substances.

  1. Light-Activated Magnetic Compass in Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Greiner, Walter

    Migrating birds fly thousand miles without having a map, or a GPS unit. But they may carry their own sensitive navigational tool, which allows them "see" the Earth's magnetic field. Here we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible compass sensor and discuss the suggestion that radical pairs in a photoreceptor cryptochrome might provide a biological realization for a magnetic compass. Finally, we review the current evidence supporting a role for radical pair reactions in the magnetic compass of birds.

  2. Active muscle regeneration following eccentric contraction-induced injury is similar between healthy young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, R. Gavin; Clough, Launa G.; Dirain, Marvin; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Repair of skeletal muscle after injury is a key aspect of maintaining proper musculoskeletal function. Studies have suggested that regenerative processes, including myogenesis and angiogenesis, are impaired during advanced age, but evidence from humans is limited. This study aimed to compare active muscle regeneration between healthy young and older adults. We evaluated changes in clinical, biochemical, and immunohistochemical indices of muscle regeneration at precisely 2 (T2) and 7 (T3) days following acute muscle injury. Men and women, aged 18-30 and ≥70 years, matched for gender and body mass index, performed 150 unilateral, eccentric contractions of the plantar flexors at 110% of one repetition maximum. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusted for gender, habitual physical activity, and baseline level of the outcome. A total of 30 young (n = 15; 22.5 ± 3.7 yr) and older (n = 15; 75.8 ± 5.0 yr) adults completed the study. Following muscle injury, force production declined 16% and 14% in young and older adults, respectively, by T2 and in each group, returned to 93% of baseline strength by T3. Despite modest differences in the pattern of response, postinjury changes in intramuscular concentrations of myogenic growth factors and number of myonuclear (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole+ and paired box 7+) cells were largely similar between groups. Likewise, postinjury changes in serum and intramuscular indices of inflammation (e.g., TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and angiogenesis (e.g., VEGF and kinase insert domain receptor) did not differ significantly between groups. These findings suggest that declines in physical activity and increased co-morbidity may contribute to age-related impairments in active muscle regeneration rather than aging per se. PMID:23493365

  3. Active muscle regeneration following eccentric contraction-induced injury is similar between healthy young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Buford, Thomas W; MacNeil, R Gavin; Clough, Launa G; Dirain, Marvin; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2014-06-01

    Repair of skeletal muscle after injury is a key aspect of maintaining proper musculoskeletal function. Studies have suggested that regenerative processes, including myogenesis and angiogenesis, are impaired during advanced age, but evidence from humans is limited. This study aimed to compare active muscle regeneration between healthy young and older adults. We evaluated changes in clinical, biochemical, and immunohistochemical indices of muscle regeneration at precisely 2 (T2) and 7 (T3) days following acute muscle injury. Men and women, aged 18-30 and ≥70 years, matched for gender and body mass index, performed 150 unilateral, eccentric contractions of the plantar flexors at 110% of one repetition maximum. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusted for gender, habitual physical activity, and baseline level of the outcome. A total of 30 young (n = 15; 22.5 ± 3.7 yr) and older (n = 15; 75.8 ± 5.0 yr) adults completed the study. Following muscle injury, force production declined 16% and 14% in young and older adults, respectively, by T2 and in each group, returned to 93% of baseline strength by T3. Despite modest differences in the pattern of response, postinjury changes in intramuscular concentrations of myogenic growth factors and number of myonuclear (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole+ and paired box 7+) cells were largely similar between groups. Likewise, postinjury changes in serum and intramuscular indices of inflammation (e.g., TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and angiogenesis (e.g., VEGF and kinase insert domain receptor) did not differ significantly between groups. These findings suggest that declines in physical activity and increased co-morbidity may contribute to age-related impairments in active muscle regeneration rather than aging per se.

  4. Electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for regeneration of a spent activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Drouiche, N; Grib, H; Abdi, N; Lounici, H; Pauss, A; Mameri, N

    2009-10-15

    The main purpose of the present work was to develop a treatment method to regenerate granular adsorbent beds saturated with H(2)S by utilizing three electrodialysis compartments equipped with a cation or an anion exchange membrane or a bipolar membrane. Three electrodialysis compartments were utilized under various experimental parameters to determine the optimum conditions for the recovery of column particles saturated by H(2)S. The desulphurization operation is achieved with the extent of extraction close to 90% and an electric current density of about 30%. Use of the bipolar membrane makes it possible to regenerate the saturated adsorbent granules without adding chemical products. Since the only reagent was electricity, the projected economics are very attractive.

  5. Fueling active galactic nuclei by magnetic braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Meiksin, Avery

    1990-01-01

    Recent detections of massive concentrations of molecular gas near the centers of galaxies hosting active nuclei suggest that these concentrations may be the source of accretion fuel for the nucleus. However, for that to be true, an angular momentum barrier must be overcome before the material in such a cloud can reach the nucleus. It is suggested that magnetic braking of the cloud may remove sufficient angular momentum to permit its material to draw considerably closer to the central object. The mechanism is particularly effective in the limit that the gas becomes self-gravitating because removal of a fraction of the initial angular momentum can lead to dynamical instability and collapse. Any small misalignment between the initial rotation axis of the cloud and the rotation axis of the galaxy can be substantially amplified as a result of the braking. It is argued that mass accretion onto the central object may occur in episodes, in some cases with a constant mass accretion rate during each episode.

  6. Destruction of problematic airborne contaminants by hydrogen reduction using a Catalytically Active, Regenerable Sorbent (CARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, John O.; Akse, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermally regenerable sorbent beds were demonstrated to be a highly efficient means for removal of toxic airborne trace organic contaminants aboard spacecraft. The utilization of the intrinsic weight savings available through this technology was not realized since many of the contaminants desorbed during thermal regeneration are poisons to the catalytic oxidizer or form highly toxic oxidation by-products in the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS). Included in this class of compounds are nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and halogen containing organics. The catalytic reduction of these problematic contaminants using hydrogen at low temperatures (200-300 C) offers an attractive route for their destruction since the by-products of such reactions, hydrocarbons and inorganic gases, are easily removed by existing technology. In addition, the catalytic oxidizer can be operated more efficiently due to the absence of potential poisons, and any posttreatment beds can be reduced in size. The incorporation of the catalyst within the sorbent bed further improves the system's efficiency. The demonstration of this technology provides the basis for an efficient regenerable TCCS for future NASA missions and can be used in more conventional settings to efficiently remove environmental pollutants.

  7. Efficient removal of antibiotics in a fluidized bed reactor by facile fabricated magnetic powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianqing; Yang, Qunfeng; Xu, Dongmei; Zeng, Xiaomei; Wen, Yuezhong; Liu, Weiping

    2017-02-01

    Powdered activated carbons (PACs) with micrometer size are showing great potential for enabling and improving technologies in water treatment. The critical problem in achieving practical application of PAC involves simple, effective fabrication of magnetic PAC and the design of a feasible reactor that can remove pollutants and recover the adsorbent efficiently. Herein, we show that such materials can be fabricated by the combination of PAC and magnetic Fe3O4 with chitosan-Fe hydrogel through a simple co-precipitation method. According to the characterization results, CS-Fe/Fe3O4/PAC with different micrometers in size exhibited excellent magnetic properties. The adsorption of tetracycline was fast and efficient, and 99.9% removal was achieved in 30 min. It also possesses good usability and stability to co-existing ions, organics, and different pH values due to its dispersive interaction nature. Finally, the prepared CS-Fe/Fe3O4/PAC also performed well in the fluidized bed reactor with electromagnetic separation function. It could be easily separated by applying a magnetic field and was effectively in situ regenerated, indicating a potential of practical application for the removal of pollutants from water.

  8. Magnetic and electric field alignments of cellulose chains for electro-active paper actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Chen, Yi; Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Heung Soo

    2008-03-01

    To improve the piezoelectricity of cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap), electrical field and magnetic field alignments were investigated. EAPap is made with cellulose by dissolving cotton pulp and regenerating cellulose with aligned cellulose fibers. EAPap made with cellulose has piezoelectric property due to its structural crystallinity. Noncentro-symmetric crystal structure of EAPap, which is mostly cellulose II, can exhibit piezoelectricity. However, EAPap has ordered crystal parts as well as disordered parts of cellulose. Thus, well alignment of cellulose chains in EAPap is important to improve its piezoelectricity. In this paper, uniaxial alignments of cellulose chains were investigated by applying electric field and magnetic field. As exposing different fields to EAPap samples, the changed characteristics were analyzed by X-Ray diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, the piezoelectricity of EAPap samples was evaluated by comparing their piezoelectric charge constant [d 31]. As increasing applied electric field up to 40V/mm, d 31 value was gradually improved due to increased cellulose crystallinity as well as alignment of cellulose chains. Also the alignment of cellulose chains was improved with increasing the exposing time to magnetic field (5.3T) and well alignment was achieved by exposing EAPap sample on the magnetic field for 180min.

  9. Activation of Pax7-positive cells in a non-contractile tissue contributes to regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christopher M; Martindale, Mark Q; Tapscott, Stephen J; Unguez, Graciela A

    2012-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues is shared across many metazoan taxa, yet the type and extent to which multiple cellular mechanisms come into play can differ across species. For example, urodele amphibians can completely regenerate all lost tissues, including skeletal muscles after limb amputation. This remarkable ability of urodeles to restore entire limbs has been largely linked to a dedifferentiation-dependent mechanism of regeneration. However, whether cell dedifferentiation is the fundamental factor that triggers a robust regeneration capacity, and whether the loss or inhibition of this process explains the limited regeneration potential in other vertebrates is not known. Here, we studied the cellular mechanisms underlying the repetitive regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus. Our in vivo microinjection studies of high molecular weight cell lineage tracers into single identified adult myogenic cells (muscle or noncontractile muscle-derived electrocytes) revealed no fragmentation or cellularization proximal to the amputation plane. In contrast, ultrastructural and immunolabeling studies verified the presence of myogenic stem cells that express the satellite cell marker Pax7 in mature muscle fibers and electrocytes of S. macrurus. These data provide the first example of Pax-7 positive muscle stem cells localized within a non-contractile electrogenic tissue. Moreover, upon amputation, Pax-7 positive cells underwent a robust replication and were detected exclusively in regions that give rise to myogenic cells and dorsal spinal cord components revealing a regeneration process in S. macrurus that is dependent on the activation of myogenic stem cells for the renewal of both skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. These data are consistent with the emergent concept in vertebrate regeneration that different tissues provide a distinct progenitor cell population to the regeneration blastema, and these progenitor cells

  10. Comparison of magnetic activity in Greenland and Nordic countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitso, P.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Stolle, C.; Berthou Lauritsen, N.; Matzka, J.

    2014-04-01

    We will examine geomagnetic activity from Greenland and IMAGE magnetic observations. Geomagnetic activity maps for the Greenland and IMAGE magnetic field measurements will be produced. The maps will be produced separately for the different months where the seasonal variation will be examined. We will compare geomagnetic conditions during winter and summer separately to examine in detail the differences and similarities. The Greenland magnetic field measurements will be used to estimate the geomagnetic field variation between Svalbard and northernmost tip of Norway, where we lack magnetic measurements due to the Arctic Ocean.

  11. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  12. Activation of the Transcription Factor GLI1 by WNT Signaling Underlies the Role of SULFATASE 2 as a Regulator of Tissue Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ikuo; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Ortiz-Ruiz, Maria C.; Almada, Luciana L.; Hu, Chunling; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Mills, Lisa D.; Romecin, Paola A.; Gulaid, Kadra H.; Moser, Catherine D.; Han, Jing-Jing; Vrabel, Anne; Hanse, Eric A.; Akogyeram, Nicholas A.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.; Sanderson, Schuyler O.; Prieto, Jesus; Roberts, Lewis R.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue regeneration requires the activation of a set of specific growth signaling pathways. The identity of these cascades and their biological roles are known; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the interplay between these pathways remain poorly understood. Here, we define a new role for SULFATASE 2 (SULF2) in regulating tissue regeneration and define the WNT-GLI1 axis as a novel downstream effector for this sulfatase in a liver model of tissue regeneration. SULF2 is a heparan sulfate 6-O-endosulfatase, which releases growth factors from extracellular storage sites turning active multiple signaling pathways. We demonstrate that SULF2-KO mice display delayed regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). Mechanistic analysis of the SULF2-KO phenotype showed a decrease in WNT signaling pathway activity in vivo. In isolated hepatocytes, SULF2 deficiency blocked WNT-induced β-CATENIN nuclear translocation, TCF activation, and proliferation. Furthermore, we identified the transcription factor GLI1 as a novel target of the SULF2-WNT cascade. WNT induces GLI1 expression in a SULF2- and β-CATENIN-dependent manner. GLI1-KO mice phenocopied the SULF2-KO, showing delayed regeneration and decreased hepatocyte proliferation. Moreover, we identified CYCLIN D1, a key mediator of cell growth during tissue regeneration, as a GLI1 transcriptional target. GLI1 binds to the cyclin d1 promoter and regulates its activity and expression. Finally, restoring GLI1 expression in the liver of SULF2-KO mice after PH rescues CYCLIN D1 expression and hepatocyte proliferation to wild-type levels. Thus, together these findings define a novel pathway in which SULF2 regulates tissue regeneration in part via the activation of a novel WNT-GLI1-CYCLIN D1 pathway. PMID:23740243

  13. Activation of the transcription factor GLI1 by WNT signaling underlies the role of SULFATASE 2 as a regulator of tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ikuo; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G; Ortiz-Ruiz, Maria C; Almada, Luciana L; Hu, Chunling; Elsawa, Sherine F; Mills, Lisa D; Romecin, Paola A; Gulaid, Kadra H; Moser, Catherine D; Han, Jing-Jing; Vrabel, Anne; Hanse, Eric A; Akogyeram, Nicholas A; Albrecht, Jeffrey H; Monga, Satdarshan P S; Sanderson, Schuyler O; Prieto, Jesus; Roberts, Lewis R; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E

    2013-07-19

    Tissue regeneration requires the activation of a set of specific growth signaling pathways. The identity of these cascades and their biological roles are known; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the interplay between these pathways remain poorly understood. Here, we define a new role for SULFATASE 2 (SULF2) in regulating tissue regeneration and define the WNT-GLI1 axis as a novel downstream effector for this sulfatase in a liver model of tissue regeneration. SULF2 is a heparan sulfate 6-O-endosulfatase, which releases growth factors from extracellular storage sites turning active multiple signaling pathways. We demonstrate that SULF2-KO mice display delayed regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). Mechanistic analysis of the SULF2-KO phenotype showed a decrease in WNT signaling pathway activity in vivo. In isolated hepatocytes, SULF2 deficiency blocked WNT-induced β-CATENIN nuclear translocation, TCF activation, and proliferation. Furthermore, we identified the transcription factor GLI1 as a novel target of the SULF2-WNT cascade. WNT induces GLI1 expression in a SULF2- and β-CATENIN-dependent manner. GLI1-KO mice phenocopied the SULF2-KO, showing delayed regeneration and decreased hepatocyte proliferation. Moreover, we identified CYCLIN D1, a key mediator of cell growth during tissue regeneration, as a GLI1 transcriptional target. GLI1 binds to the cyclin d1 promoter and regulates its activity and expression. Finally, restoring GLI1 expression in the liver of SULF2-KO mice after PH rescues CYCLIN D1 expression and hepatocyte proliferation to wild-type levels. Thus, together these findings define a novel pathway in which SULF2 regulates tissue regeneration in part via the activation of a novel WNT-GLI1-CYCLIN D1 pathway.

  14. Resveratrol activates endogenous cardiac stem cells and improves myocardial regeneration following acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Lin; Gu, Shaohua; Cheng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1-positive (Sca-1+) cardiac stem cells (CSCs) therapy for myocardial regeneration following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is limited by insufficient cell viability and a high rate of apoptosis, due to the poor regional microenvironment. Resveratrol, which is a compound extracted from red wine, has been reported to protect myocardial tissue post-AMI by increasing the expression of angiogenic and chemotactic factors. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on Sca-1+ CSCs, and to optimize Sca-1+ CSCs therapy for myocardial regeneration post-AMI. C57/BL6 mice (age, 6 weeks) were divided into two groups, which received intragastric administration of PBS or 2.5 mg/kg.d resveratrol. The endogenous expression of Sca-1+ CSCs in the heart was assessed on day 7. Furthermore, C57/BL6 mice underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for the construction of an AMI model, and received an injection of 1×106 CSCs into the peri-ischemic area (n=8/group). Mice received intragastric administration of PBS or resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg.d) for 4 weeks after cell transplantation. Echocardiography was used to evaluate cardiac function 4 weeks after cell transplantation. Capillary density and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the peri-ischemic myocardium were assessed by cluster of differentiation 31 immunofluorescent staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was conducted to detect the protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α in the myocardium. Treatment with resveratrol increased the number of endogenous Sca-1+ CSCs in heart tissue after 7 days (PBS vs. Res, 1.85±0.41/field vs. 3.14±0.26/field, P<0.05). Furthermore, intragastric administration of resveratrol significantly increased left ventricle (LV) function 4 weeks after AMI, as determined by an increase in LV fractional

  15. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Volitional Quadriceps Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher E.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Quadriceps-activation deficits have been reported after meniscectomy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with maximal contractions affects quadriceps activation in patients after meniscectomy. Objective: To determine the effect of single-pulsed TMS on quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) in patients after meniscectomy. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants who had partial meniscectomy and who had a CAR less than 85% were assigned randomly to the TMS group (7 men, 4 women; age  =  38.1 ± 16.2 years, height  =  176.8 ± 11.5 cm, mass  =  91.8 ± 27.5 kg, postoperative time  =  36.7 ± 34.9 weeks) or the control group (7 men, 2 women; age  =  38.2 ± 17.5 years, height  =  176.5 ± 7.9 cm, mass  =  86.2 ± 15.3 kg, postoperative time  =  36.6 ± 37.4 weeks). Intervention(s): Participants in the experimental group received TMS over the motor cortex that was contralateral to the involved leg and performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions with the involved leg. The control group performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions without the TMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): Quadriceps activation was assessed using the CAR, which was measured in 70° of knee flexion at baseline and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes posttest. The CAR was expressed as a percentage of full activation. Results: Differences in CAR were detected over time (F4,72  =  3.025, P  = .02). No interaction (F4,72  =  1.457, P  =  .22) or between-groups differences (F1,18  =  0.096, P  =  .76) were found for CAR. Moderate CAR effect sizes were found at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  −0.33, 1.37) and 60 (Cohen d  =  0.50, 95% CI  =  −0.37, 1.33) minutes in the TMS group compared with CAR at baseline. Strong effect sizes were found for CAR at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.82, 95% CI

  16. HDL activation of endothelial sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) promotes regeneration and suppresses fibrosis in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Chen, Yutian; Swendeman, Steven L.; Jung, Bongnam; Chavez, Deebly; Cao, Zhongwei; Christoffersen, Christina; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Schwab, Susan R.; Rafii, Shahin; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of hepatic sinusoidal vasculature is essential for non-fibrotic liver regrowth and restoration of its metabolic capacity. However, little is known about how this specialized vascular niche is regenerated. Here we show that activation of endothelial sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) by its natural ligand bound to HDL (HDL-S1P) induces liver regeneration and curtails fibrosis. In mice lacking HDL-S1P, liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy was impeded and associated with aberrant vascular remodeling, thrombosis and peri-sinusoidal fibrosis. Notably, this “maladaptive repair” phenotype was recapitulated in mice that lack S1P1 in the endothelium. Reciprocally, enhanced plasma levels of HDL-S1P or administration of SEW2871, a pharmacological agonist specific for S1P1 enhanced regeneration of metabolically functional vasculature and alleviated fibrosis in mouse chronic injury and cholestasis models. This study shows that natural and pharmacological ligands modulate endothelial S1P1 to stimulate liver regeneration and inhibit fibrosis, suggesting that activation of this pathway may be a novel therapeutic strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:28018969

  17. Stellar magnetic structure and activity /theory/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, N. O.

    Both the overall behavior of the solar cycle and the underlying fine structure of magnetic fields in the sun have been studied mathematically in some detail. These theories are summarized and different phenomenological models of the solar cycle are reviewed. In order to provide a description of the magnetic fields in late-type stars it is necessary to extrapolate boldly from what is known about the sun. In this way field strengths and configurations can be estimated.

  18. Longitudinal Cell Tracking and Simultaneous Monitoring of Tissue Regeneration after Cell Treatment of Natural Tendon Disease by Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Dagmar; Brehm, Walter; Gerlach, Kerstin; Gittel, Claudia; Offhaus, Julia; Paebst, Felicitas; Scharner, Doreen; Burk, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of tendon disease with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is a promising option to improve tissue regeneration. To elucidate the mechanisms by which MSC support regeneration, longitudinal tracking of MSC labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could provide important insight. Nine equine patients suffering from tendon disease were treated with SPIO-labelled or nonlabelled allogeneic umbilical cord-derived MSC by local injection. Labelling of MSC was confirmed by microscopy and MRI. All animals were subjected to clinical, ultrasonographical, and low-field MRI examinations before and directly after MSC application as well as 2, 4, and 8 weeks after MSC application. Hypointense artefacts with characteristically low signal intensity were identified at the site of injection of SPIO-MSC in T1- and T2∗-weighted gradient echo MRI sequences. They were visible in all 7 cases treated with SPIO-MSC directly after injection, but not in the control cases treated with nonlabelled MSC. Furthermore, hypointense artefacts remained traceable within the damaged tendon tissue during the whole follow-up period in 5 out of 7 cases. Tendon healing could be monitored at the same time. Clinical and ultrasonographical findings as well as T2-weighted MRI series indicated a gradual improvement of tendon function and structure. PMID:26880932

  19. Longitudinal Cell Tracking and Simultaneous Monitoring of Tissue Regeneration after Cell Treatment of Natural Tendon Disease by Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Berner, Dagmar; Brehm, Walter; Gerlach, Kerstin; Gittel, Claudia; Offhaus, Julia; Paebst, Felicitas; Scharner, Doreen; Burk, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of tendon disease with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is a promising option to improve tissue regeneration. To elucidate the mechanisms by which MSC support regeneration, longitudinal tracking of MSC labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could provide important insight. Nine equine patients suffering from tendon disease were treated with SPIO-labelled or nonlabelled allogeneic umbilical cord-derived MSC by local injection. Labelling of MSC was confirmed by microscopy and MRI. All animals were subjected to clinical, ultrasonographical, and low-field MRI examinations before and directly after MSC application as well as 2, 4, and 8 weeks after MSC application. Hypointense artefacts with characteristically low signal intensity were identified at the site of injection of SPIO-MSC in T1- and T2 (∗) -weighted gradient echo MRI sequences. They were visible in all 7 cases treated with SPIO-MSC directly after injection, but not in the control cases treated with nonlabelled MSC. Furthermore, hypointense artefacts remained traceable within the damaged tendon tissue during the whole follow-up period in 5 out of 7 cases. Tendon healing could be monitored at the same time. Clinical and ultrasonographical findings as well as T2-weighted MRI series indicated a gradual improvement of tendon function and structure.

  20. Molybdenum carbides, active and in situ regenerable catalysts in hydroprocessing of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Zacher, Alan; Wang, Huamin; ...

    2016-05-19

    This paper describes properties of molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60 h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oilsmore » below 2 wt % and 0.01 mg KOH g–1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60 h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are a good catalyst candidate which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. Furthermore, we highlight areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure–function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.« less

  1. A two-dimensional investigation about magnetocaloric regenerator design: parallel plates or packed bed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, C.; Greco, A.; Maiorino, A.; Masselli, C.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Refrigeration (MR) is a novel refrigeration technique based on eco-friendly solid materials as refrigerants, whom react to the application of magnetic fields, with warming and cooling by magnetocaloric effect. The thermodynamical cycle which best suits the magnetic refrigeration is Active Magnetic Regenerator cycle (AMR). Regenerator is the core of a magnetic refrigerator, since that it plays a dual-role: it operates both as refrigerant and regenerator in an AMR cycle. An AMR cycle consists of two adiabatic stages and two isofield stage. In this paper an investigation is conducted about the magnetocaloric refrigerator design through two-dimensional multiphysics numerical models of two different magnetocaloric regenerators: (1) a packed bed and (2) a parallel plates magnetic regenerators made of gadolinium, operating at room temperature under a 1.5T magnetic field induction. Both models employ water as secondary fluid. The tests were performed with variable fluid flow rate at fixed AMR cycle frequency. The results obtained are presented in terms of temperature span, cooling power, coefficient of performance and mechanical power of the circulation pump, and they indicate under which operating conditions packed bed configuration is to be preferred to parallel plates and vice versa.

  2. Laser-induced activation of regeneration processes in spine disc cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Vorobjeva, Natalia N.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Baskov, Andrey V.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Baskov, Vladimir A.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Kuranov, Roman V.

    2000-05-01

    The effect of laser radiation on the regeneration processes in spine disk cartilage has been studied in-vivo. We used rabbits as a model and a Holmium (2.09 micrometer) and an Erbium fiber (1.56 micrometer) lasers for irradiation the discs which were preliminary opened to remove annulus fibrosus and the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. The irradiated zone has been examined using an optical coherent tomography in one month after the operation and conventional histological technique in two months after the laser operation. It has been shown that laser radiation promotes the growth of the new cartilaginous tissue of fibrous and hyaline types.

  3. Changing Paradigms in Cranio-Facial Regeneration: Current and New Strategies for the Activation of Endogenous Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Luigi; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Tirino, Virginia; Paino, Francesca; De Rosa, Alfredo; Liccardo, Davide; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Desiderio, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial area represent a unique district of human body characterized by a very high complexity of tissues, innervation and vascularization, and being deputed to many fundamental function such as eating, speech, expression of emotions, delivery of sensations such as taste, sight, and earing. For this reasons, tissue loss in this area following trauma or for example oncologic resection, have a tremendous impact on patients' quality of life. In the last 20 years regenerative medicine has emerged as one of the most promising approach to solve problem related to trauma, tissue loss, organ failure etc. One of the most powerful tools to be used for tissue regeneration is represented by stem cells, which have been successfully implanted in different tissue/organs with exciting results. Nevertheless, both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation raise many practical and ethical concerns that make this approach very difficult to apply in clinical practice. For this reason different cell free approaches have been developed aiming to the mobilization, recruitment, and activation of endogenous stem cells into the injury site avoiding exogenous cells implant but instead stimulating patients' own stem cells to repair the lesion. To this aim many strategies have been used including functionalized bioscaffold, controlled release of stem cell chemoattractants, growth factors, BMPs, Platelet–Rich-Plasma, and other new strategies such as ultrasound wave and laser are just being proposed. Here we review all the current and new strategies used for activation and mobilization of endogenous stem cells in the regeneration of craniofacial tissue. PMID:26941656

  4. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions and Diethylenetriamine Species from Solutions by Magnetic Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaiwen

    Even though activated carbon is widely used in the removal of contaminants from effluents, it is difficult to be completely recovered by screening or classification. In this project, we prepared a magnetic form of activated carbon (M-AC) by co-precipitation of iron oxides onto activated carbon surface. M-AC can be separated from solutions by applying an external magnetic field and regenerated for reuse. The synthesized M-AC was characterized by X-ray diffraction, specific surface area measurement, and scanning electron microscope. Characterization results show that the major phase of coated iron oxides is magnetite (Fe 3O4). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for single-component and multi-component solutions. M-AC shows a better adsorption capacity for singlecomponent of Cu (II), Ni (II), or diethylenetriamine (DETA) and for multiple-components of Cu-DETA and Ni-DETA complexes in deionized water than activated carbon. M-AC also shows the potential application in carbon-in-pulp process for gold recovery.

  5. Deposition of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Activated Carbons and Preparation of Magnetic Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahani, S. A.; Hamadanian, M.; Vandadi, O.

    2007-08-01

    Magnetic activated carbons (MACs) for gold recovery from alkaline cyanide solutions have been developed by mixing a magnetic precursor with a carbon source, and treating the mixture under controlled conditions. As would be expected, these activated carbons have high specific surface areas due to their microporous structure. In addition, the small particle size of the MACs produced allows rapid adsorption of gold in solution, and the magnetic character of these MACs enables recovery from suspension by magnetic separation.

  6. G-CSF prevents caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells after sciatic nerve transection, but does not improve nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frost, Hanna K; Kodama, Akira; Ekström, Per; Dahlin, Lars B

    2016-10-15

    Exogenous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has emerged as a drug candidate for improving the outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. We raised the question if exogenous G-CSF can improve nerve regeneration following a clinically relevant model - nerve transection and repair - in healthy and diabetic rats. In short-term experiments, distance of axonal regeneration and extent of injury-induced Schwann cell death was quantified by staining for neurofilaments and cleaved caspase 3, respectively, seven days after repair. There was no difference in axonal outgrowth between G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats, regardless if healthy Wistar or diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were examined. However, G-CSF treatment caused a significant 13% decrease of cleaved caspase 3-positive Schwann cells at the lesion site in healthy rats, but only a trend in diabetic rats. In the distal nerve segments of healthy rats a similar trend was observed. In long-term experiments of healthy rats, regeneration outcome was evaluated at 90days after repair by presence of neurofilaments, wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle, and perception of touch (von Frey monofilament testing weekly). The presence of neurofilaments distal to the suture line was similar in G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats. The weight ratio of ipsi-over contralateral gastrocnemius muscles, and perception of touch at any time point, were likewise not affected by G-CSF treatment. In addition, the inflammatory response in short- and long-term experiments was studied by analyzing ED1 stainable macrophages in healthy rats, but in neither case was any attenuation seen at the injury site or distal to it. G-CSF can prevent caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells in the short-term, but does not detectably affect the inflammatory response, nor improve early or late axonal outgrowth or functional recovery.

  7. Magnetic fields, radicals and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ryan D

    2017-01-01

    Some effects of low-intensity magnetic fields on the concentration of radicals and their influence on cellular functions are reviewed. These fields have been implicated as a potential modulator of radical recombination rates. Experimental evidence has revealed a tight coupling between cellular function and radical pair chemistry from signaling pathways to damaging oxidative processes. The effects of externally applied magnetic fields on biological systems have been extensively studied, and the observed effects lack sufficient mechanistic understanding. Radical pair chemistry offers a reasonable explanation for some of the molecular effects of low-intensity magnetic fields, and changes in radical concentrations have been observed to modulate specific cellular functions. Applied external magnetic fields have been shown to induce observable cellular changes such as both inhibiting and accelerating cell growth. These and other mechanisms, such as cell membrane potential modulation, are of great interest in cancer research due to the variations between healthy and deleterious cells. Radical concentrations demonstrate similar variations and are indicative of a possible causal relationship. Radicals, therefore, present a possible mechanism for the modulation of cellular functions such as growth or regression by means of applied external magnetic fields.

  8. Development of a He3-He4 sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, A. E.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-01-01

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He3-He4 through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  9. Thermal activation in statistical clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, O.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a kinetic Monte-Carlo study of thermally activated magnetisation dynamics in clusters of statistically distributed magnetic nanoparticles. The structure of clusters is assumed to be of fractal nature, consistently with recent observations of magnetic particle aggregation in cellular environments. The computed magnetisation relaxation decay and frequency-dependent hysteresis loops are seen to significantly depend on the fractal dimension of aggregates, leading to accelerated magnetisation relaxation and reduction in the size of hysteresis loops as the fractal dimension increases from one-dimensional-like to three-dimensional-like clusters. Discussed are implications for applications in nanomedicine, such as magnetic hyperthermia or magnetic particle imaging.

  10. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous

  11. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  12. Centella asiatica accelerates nerve regeneration upon oral administration and contains multiple active fractions increasing neurite elongation in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Soumyanath, Amala; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Gold, Sandra A; Yu, Xiaolin; Koop, Dennis R; Bourdette, Dennis; Gold, Bruce G

    2005-09-01

    Axonal regeneration is important for functional recovery following nerve damage. Centella asiatica Urban herb, also known as Hydrocotyle asiatica L., has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries as a nerve tonic. Here, we show that Centella asiatica ethanolic extract (100 microg mL-1) elicits a marked increase in neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). However, a water extract of Centella was ineffective at 100 microg mL-1. Sub-fractions of Centella ethanolic extract, obtained through silica-gel chromatography, were tested (100 microg mL-1) for neurite elongation in the presence of NGF. Greatest activity was found with a non-polar fraction (GKF4). Relatively polar fractions (GKF10 to GKF13) also showed activity, albeit less than GKF4. Thus, Centella contains more than one active component. Asiatic acid (AA), a triterpenoid compound found in Centella ethanolic extract and GKF4, showed marked activity at 1 microM (microg mL-1). AA was not present in GKF10 to GKF13, further indicating that other active components must be present. Neurite elongation by AA was completely blocked by the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway inhibitor PD 098059 (10 microM). Male Sprague-Dawley rats given Centella ethanolic extract in their drinking water (300-330 mg kg-1 daily) demonstrated more rapid functional recovery and increased axonal regeneration (larger calibre axons and greater numbers of myelinated axons) compared with controls, indicating that the axons grew at a faster rate. Taken together, our findings indicate that components in Centella ethanolic extract may be useful for accelerating repair of damaged neurons.

  13. The Role of Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    The central challenge in solar/heliospheric physics is to understand how the emergence and transport of magnetic flux at the photosphere drives the structure and dynamics that we observe in the corona and heliosphere. This presentation focuses on the role of magnetic reconnection in determining solar/heliospheric activity. We demonstrate that two generic properties of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields are responsible for the ubiquitous reconnection in the corona. First, the photospheric velocities are complex, which leads to the injection of energy and helicity into the coronal magnetic fields and to the efficient, formation of small-scale structure. Second, the flux distribution at the photosphere is multi-polar, which implies that topological discontinuities and, consequently, current sheets, must be present in the coronal magnetic field. We: present numerical simulations showing that photospherically-driven reconnection is responsible for the heating and dynamics of coronal plasma, and for the topology of the coronal/heliospheric magnetic field.

  14. Active fluid mixing with magnetic microactuators for capture of salmonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, S.; Owen, D.; Ballard, M.; Mills, Z.; Xu, J.; Erickson, M.; Hesketh, P. J.; Alexeev, A.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of low concentrations of bacteria in food samples is a challenging process. Key to this process is the separation of the target from the food matrix. We demonstrate magnetic beads and magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture, which are particularly useful for pre-concentrating the target. The first method we demonstrate makes use of magnetic microbeads held on to NiFe discs on the surface of the substrate. These beads are rotated around the magnetic discs by rotating the external magnetic field. The second method we demonstrate shows the use of cilia which extends into the fluid and is manipulated by a rotating external field. Magnetic micro-features were fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The high magnetic permeability of NiFe allows for maximum magnetic force on the features. The magnetic features were actuated using an external rotating magnet up to frequencies of 50Hz. We demonstrate active mixing produced by the microbeads and the cilia in a microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using microbeads.

  15. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-11-30

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation.

  17. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  18. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  19. A conventional point of view on active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Dill, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings used in rotating machinery should be designed as locally controlled, independent devices similar to other types of bearings. The functions of control electronics and power amplifiers can be simply and explicitly related to general bearing properties such as load capacity, stiffness, and damping. The dynamics of a rotor and its supporting active magnetic bearings are analyzed in a modified conventional method with an extended state vector containing the bearing state variables.

  20. Optimization of active magnetic bearings for automotive flywheel energy storage systems based on soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, M.; Schweighofer, B.; Fulmek, P.; Wegleiter, H.

    2013-01-01

    For active magnetically suspended rotors in mobile flywheel energy storage systems the lowest possible weight, smallest size and a low price is required. Since the flywheel is operated in vacuum and very little heat can be dissipated from the rotor, the bearing's magnetic losses have to be as minimal as well. This paper compares the design and optimization of homopolar radial active magnetic bearings with 3 different types of laminated steel. The first type is a standard transformer steel, the second one is high flux cobalt steel and the third one is high flux cobalt steel with high tensile strength.

  1. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active-magnetic

  2. Drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Damien; Sandre, Olivier; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie

    2017-02-24

    The use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to generate non-invasively and spatially a localized heating from a magnetic nano-mediator has become very popular these last years to develop magnetic hyperthermia (MH) as a promising therapeutic modality already used in the clinics. AMF has become highly attractive this last decade over others radiations, as AMF allows a deeper penetration in the body and a less harmful ionizing effect. In addition to pure MH which induces tumor cell death through local T elevation, this AMF-generated magneto-thermal effect can also be exploited as a relevant external stimulus to trigger a drug release from drug-loaded magnetic nanocarriers, temporally and spatially. This review article is focused especially on this concept of AMF induced drug release, possibly combined with MH. The design of such magnetically responsive drug delivery nanoplatforms requires two key and complementary components: a magnetic mediator which collects and turns the magnetic energy into local heat, and a thermoresponsive carrier ensuring thermo-induced drug release, as a consequence of magnetic stimulus. A wide panel of magnetic nanomaterials/chemistries and processes are currently developed to achieve such nanoplatforms. This review article presents a broad overview about the fundamental concepts of drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by AMF, their formulations, and their efficiency in vitro and in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editors: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  3. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  4. Physical activity and the rejuvenation of Connswater (PARC study): protocol for a natural experiment investigating the impact of urban regeneration on public health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of evidence regarding the impact of urban regeneration projects on public health, particularly the nature and degree to which urban regeneration impacts upon health-related behaviour change. Natural experiment methodology enables comprehensive large-scale evaluations of such interventions. The Connswater Community Greenway in Belfast is a major urban regeneration project involving the development of a 9 km linear park, including the provision of new cycle paths and walkways. In addition to the environmental improvements, this complex intervention involves a number of programmes to promote physical activity in the regenerated area. The project affords a unique opportunity to investigate the public health impact of urban regeneration. Methods/Design The evaluation framework was informed by the socio-ecological model and guided by the RE-AIM Framework. Key components include: (1) a quasi-experimental before-and-after survey of the Greenway population (repeated cross-sectional design), in tandem with data from a parallel Northern Ireland-wide survey for comparison; (2) an assessment of changes in the local built environment and of walkability using geographic information systems; (3) semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of survey respondents, and a range of community stakeholders, before and after the regeneration project; and (4) a cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary outcome is change in proportion of individuals identified as being regularly physically active, according to the current UK recommendations. The RE-AIM Framework will be used to make an overall assessment of the impact of the Greenway on the physical activity behaviour of local residents. Discussion The Connswater Community Greenway provides a significant opportunity to achieve long-term, population level behaviour change. We argue that urban regeneration may be conceptualised meaningfully as a complex intervention comprising multiple components with the

  5. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  6. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan-glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  7. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  8. The adult pituitary shows stem/progenitor cell activation in response to injury and is capable of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuli; Gremeaux, Lies; Luque, Raul M; Liekens, Daisy; Chen, Jianghai; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Kineman, Rhonda; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The pituitary gland constitutes, together with the hypothalamus, the regulatory core of the endocrine system. Whether the gland is capable of cell regeneration after injury, in particular when suffered at adult age, is unknown. To investigate the adult pituitary's regenerative capacity and the response of its stem/progenitor cell compartment to damage, we constructed a transgenic mouse model to conditionally destroy pituitary cells. GHCre/iDTR mice express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor after transcriptional activation by Cre recombinase, which is driven by the GH promoter. Treatment with DT for 3 d leads to gradual GH(+) (somatotrope) cell obliteration with a final ablation grade of 80-90% 1 wk later. The stem/progenitor cell-clustering side population promptly expands after injury, concordant with the immediate increase in Sox2(+) stem/progenitor cells. In addition, folliculo-stellate cells, previously designated as pituitary stem/progenitor cells and significantly overlapping with Sox2(+) cells, also increase in abundance. In situ examination reveals expansion of the Sox2(+) marginal-zone niche and appearance of remarkable Sox2(+) cells that contain GH. When mice are left after the DT-provoked lesion, GH(+) cells considerably regenerate during the following months. Double Sox2(+)/GH(+) cells are observed throughout the regenerative period, suggesting recovery of somatotropes from stem/progenitor cells, as further supported by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulse-chase lineage tracing. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the adult pituitary gland holds regenerative competence and that tissue repair follows prompt activation and plausible involvement of the stem/progenitor cells.

  9. Interplanetary planar magnetic structures associated with expanding active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Uchida, Yutaka

    1995-01-01

    Planar magnetic structures are interplanetary objects whose magnetic field cannot be explained by Parker's solar wind model. They are characterized by two-dimensional structure of magnetic field that are highly variable and parallel to a plane which is inclined to the ecliptic plane. They appeared independently of interplanetary compression, solar flares, active prominences nor filament disappearances, but the sources often coincided with active regions. On the other hand, it has been discovered by the Yohkoh Soft X-ray telescope that active-region corona expand outwards at speeds of a few to a few tens of km/s near the Sun. The expansions occurred repeatedly, almost continually, even in the absence of any sizable flares. In the Yohkoh Soft X-ray images, the active-region corona seems to expand out into interplanetary space. Solar sources of interplanetary planar magnetic structures observed by Sakigake were examined by Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope. During a quiet period of the Sun from January 6 to November 11, 1993, there found 5 planar magnetic structures according to the criteria (absolute value of Bn)/(absolute value of B) less than 0.1 for planarity and (dB)/(absolute value of B) greater than 0.7 for variability of magnetic field, where Bn, dB, and the absolute value of B are field component normal to a plane, standard deviation, and average of the magnitude of the magnetic field, respectively. Sources of 4 events were on low-latitude (less than 5 degrees) active regions from which loop-like structures were expanding. The coincidence, 80%, is extremely high with respect to accidental coincidence, 7%, of Sakigake windows of solar wind observation with active regions. The last source was on loop-like features which seemed to be related with a mid-latitude (20 degrees) active region.

  10. Magnetically active biosorbent for chromium species removal from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Osmam, Maher M; Ahmed, Somia B

    2014-01-01

    A magnetically active composite as adsorbent was synthesized via a facile in situ one-pot impregnation of magnetic nano-iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) on the surface of activated carbon (AC) for the formation of AC-Fe₃O₄. Baker(')s yeast was physically loaded on the resultant adsorbent AC-Fe₃O₄ to form a novel yeast coated magnetic composite AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as biosorbent. The two synthesized adsorbents were characterized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and assessed using Langmuir, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The validity and applicability of these two sorbents in adsorptive removal of chromium species, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), from aqueous solutions under the effect of a magnetic field were studied and evaluated in the presence of various controlling parameters in order to identify the optimal pH, contact time, mass dose and chromium concentrations for such adsorption process. Also, single and multi-stage micro-column techniques were used to study the potential applications of AC-Fe₃O₄ as magnetically active adsorbents and AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as magnetically active biosorbents, for the removal of chromium species from various real water samples.

  11. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI) has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained from ZDI and activity cycles.

  12. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  13. Fingernails Yield Clues to Limb Regeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... embryonic development, as well as limb regeneration in amphibians. They found that the Wnt pathway was active ... nerve cells was crucial for limb regeneration in amphibians, so they wanted to examine their role in ...

  14. Combined chemical and structural signals of biomaterials synergistically activate cell-cell communications for improving tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yachen; Peng, Jinliang; Dong, Xin; Xu, Yuhong; Li, Haiyan; Chang, Jiang

    2017-04-02

    Biomaterials are only used as carriers of cells in the conventional tissue engineering. Considering the multi-cell environment and active cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue regeneration process, in this study, structural signals of aligned electrospun nanofibers and chemical signals of bioglass (BG) ionic products in cell culture medium are simultaneously applied to activate fibroblast-endothelial co-cultured cells in order to obtain an improved skin tissue engineering construct. Results demonstrate that the combined biomaterial signals synergistically activate fibroblast-endothelial co-culture skin tissue engineering constructs through promotion of paracrine effects and stimulation of gap junctional communication between cells, which results in enhanced vascularization and extracellular matrix protein synthesis in the constructs. Structural signals of aligned electrospun nanofibers play an important role in stimulating both of paracrine and gap junctional communication while chemical signals of BG ionic products mainly enhance paracrine effects. In vivo experiments reveal that the activated skin tissue engineering constructs significantly enhance wound healing as compared to control. This study indicates the advantages of synergistic effects between different bioactive signals of biomaterials can be taken to activate communication between different types of cells for obtaining tissue engineering constructs with improved functions.

  15. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K. K.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Smith, A.; Wulff, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoid with a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration. Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type of magnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the regenerator and desired internal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in the regenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area of superconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoid is shown to be a small fraction of the cost of the SC tape. Assuming a cost of the SC tape of 6000 /m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 /kg, the superconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive than the permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspect ratio of the regenerator. This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicating that the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large cooling power applications.

  16. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  17. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  18. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  19. Chloroplast ultra structure, photosynthesis and enzyme activities in regenerated plants of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni as influenced by copper sulphate in the medium.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pourvi; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2014-09-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni is an important medicinal plant used as noncaloric commercial sweetener. Plants regenerated with higher levels of copper sulphate in the medium exhibited enhanced activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) enzymes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed increase in size and number of electron dense inclusions in the chloroplasts of plants regenerated at optimised level of copper sulphate (0.5 microM) in the medium. There was decrease in chlorogenic acid (CGA) content. Chl-a-fluorescence transient pattern (OJIP) showed that the photosynthesis process was more efficient at 0.5 microM CuSO4 in the medium.

  20. Enzyme Activity of Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL-1) Is Controlled by Redox Environment and Its C-terminal Residues†

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andria L.; Vartia, Anthony A.; Williams, Todd D.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-1 (PRL-1) belongs to a unique subfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) associated with oncogenic and metastatic phenotypes. While considerable evidence exists to supports a role for PRL-1 in promoting proliferation, the biological regulators and effectors of PRL-1 activity remain unknown. PRL-1 activity is inhibited by disulfide bond formation at the active site in vitro, suggesting PRL-1 may be susceptible to redox regulation in vivo. Because PRL-1 has been observed to localize to several different subcellular locations and cellular redox conditions vary with tissue type, age, stage of cell cycle and subcellular location, we determined the reduction potential of the active site disulfide bond that controls phosphatase activity to better understand the function of PRL-1 in various cellular environments. We used high-resolution solution NMR spectroscopy to measure the potential and found it to be −364.3 ± 1.5 mV. Because normal cellular environments range from −170 to −320 mV, we concluded that nascent PRL-1 would be primarily oxidized inside cells. Our studies show that a significant conformational change accompanies activation, suggesting a post-translational modification may alter the reduction potential, conferring activity. We further demonstrate that alteration of the C-terminus renders the protein reduced and active in vitro, implying the C-terminus is an important regulator of PRL-1 function. These data provide a basis for understanding how subcellular localization regulates the activity of PRL-1 and, with further investigation, may help reveal how PRL-1 promotes unique outcomes in different cellular systems, including proliferation in both normal and diseased states. PMID:19341304

  1. Iron Impregnated Activated Carbon as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Removal of Methylene Blue: Regeneration and Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, iron impregnated activated carbon (FeAC) was synthesized following an oxidation and iron impregnation of activated carbon (AC). Both the AC and FeAC were characterized by pHZPC and FTIR spectroscopy. The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) by AC and FeAC was examined under various experimental conditions. The FeAC showed up to 95% (higher than AC) MB removal in the pH range of 7–10. Although the reaction kinetics was pseudo–second order, the overall rate was controlled by a number of processes such as film diffusion, pore diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The activation energy values for the MB uptake by AC and FeAC (21.79 and 14.82 kJ/mol, respectively) revealed a physisorption process. In the regeneration study, FeAC has shown consistently ≥ 90% MB removal even up to 10 repeated cycles. The reusable characteristic of the spent FeAC improved the practical use of activated carbon and can be a breakthrough for continuous flow system applications where it can work effectively without any significant reduction in its performance. PMID:25849291

  2. Bioceramics: from bone regeneration to cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo

    2011-11-23

    Research on biomaterials has been growing in the last few years due to the clinical needs in organs and tissues replacement and regeneration. In addition, cancer nanomedicine has recently appeared as an effective means to combine nanotechnology developments towards a clinical application. Ceramic materials are suitable candidates to be used in the manufacturing of bone-like scaffolds. Bioceramic materials may also be designed to deliver biologically active substances aimed at repairing, maintaining, restoring or improving the function of organs and tissues in the organism. Several materials such as calcium phosphates, glasses and glass ceramics able to load and subsequently release in a controlled fashion drugs, hormones, growth factors, peptides or nucleic acids have been developed. In particular, to prevent post surgical infections bioceramics may be surface modified and loaded with certain antibiotics, thus preventing the formation of bacterial biofilms. Remarkably, mesoporous bioactive glasses have shown excellent characteristics as drug carrying bone regeneration materials. These bioceramics are not only osteoconductive and osteoproductive, but also osteoinductive, and have therefore been proposed as ideal components for the fabrication of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. A recent promising development of bioceramic materials is related to the design of magnetic mediators against tumors. Magnetic composites are suitable thermoseeds for cancer treatment by hyperthermia. Moreover, magnetic nanomaterials offer a wide range of possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. These nanoparticles may be conjugated with therapeutic agents and heat the surrounding tissue under the action of alternating magnetic fields, enabling hyperthermia of cancer as an effective adjunct to chemotherapy regimens.

  3. Microgravity can activate signals urging cells to S-phase entry during tissue and organ regeneration in Urodele amphibians exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Anton, H.-J.; Mitashov, V.

    Regenerative response following local injury or tissue removal in urodele amphibians is dependent on cell cycle entry of cells sources for regeneration in the remaining tissue. In a number of our experiments performed aboard biosatellites in orbital flights and fast rotated clinostat we found enhanced proliferative activity and, as a result, regeneration quicker than that in controls. In each investigated case an activity of cell proliferation evaluated by 3H-thymidine radioautography and BrdU assay at the early stages of lens, retina, forelimb and tail regeneration in newts was about 1,2-1,7 fold higher both under conditions of real and physiological weightlessness as compared with controls. Faster S-phase entry under conditions of micro- g was demonstrated by cycling multipotent cells as well as by differentiated postmitotic cells both participated in regeneration. Important, that cycling cells outside areas of regeneration were also found as displayed faster cellular growth. In our papers (1,2,3,4) we offered some hypothesis that could explain mechanisms of low g stimulating effect upon cell growth in regeneration in Urodela. In particular, changes in expression of some growth factors and their receptors, as well as the synthesis of specific range of generalized stress proteins (AGSPs) were proposed. However, in fact, molecular mechanisms of micro- g effect upon cell proliferation are mediated by changes on organismic level induced by micro- g environment. Some of them which are able to trigger off signaling changes on the cellular level that, in turn, evoke cells to grow faster would be represented in our report. 1. Mitashov V. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 241-255 2. Anton H.-J. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 55-65 3. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1998. 22 (2): 293-301 4. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 2002. 30 (4): 757-764

  4. Dynamic characteristics of the rotor in a magnetically suspended control moment gyroscope with active magnetic bearing and passive magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiqiang; Xiang, Biao; Zhang, Yongbin

    2014-07-01

    For a magnetically suspended control moment gyroscope, stiffness and damping of magnetic bearing will influence modal frequency of a rotor. In this paper the relationship between modal frequency and stiffness and damping has been investigated. The mathematic calculation model of axial passive magnetic bearing (PMB) stiffness is developed. And PID control based on internal model control is introduced into control of radial active magnetic bearing (AMB), considering the radial coupling of axial PMB, a mathematic calculation model of stiffness and damping of radial AMB is established. According to modal analysis, the relationship between modal frequency and modal shapes is achieved. Radial vibration frequency is mainly influenced by stiffness of radial AMB; however, when stiffness increases, radial vibration will disappear and a high frequency bending modal will appear. Stiffness of axial PMB mainly affects the axial vibration mode, which will turn into high-order bending modal. Axial PMB causes bigger influence on torsion modal of the rotor.

  5. Comparing the Effect of Nonactivated Platelet-Rich Plasma, Activated Platelet-Rich Plasma, and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Calvarial Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yeo Reum; Jung, Bok Ki; Roh, Tai Suk; Kang, Eun Hye; Lee, Won Jai; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lew, Dae Hyun; Yun, In Sik

    2016-03-01

    Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used to enhance bone graft survival, the effect of PRP itself on bone regeneration is unclear. Because activated PRP releases many growth factors in a bolus, there are controversies regarding the effect of activation of the PRP on bone regeneration. Thus, we studied the effect of activated versus nonactivated PRP on bone regeneration and compared the effect with that of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in a critical-sized cranial defect model. Forty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups. Defect sizing 15 × 15 mm(2) was created on the cranium of each rabbit, and then a collagen sponge soaked with normal saline, rhBMP-2, nonactivated PRP, or PRP activated with CaCl2 solution was immediately placed on the defect. After 16 weeks, using three-dimensional computed tomography and digital photography, the volume and new bone surface area were measured. The newly created bone was histologically analyzed. The experimental groups showed a significantly increased volume and surface area of new bone compared with the control group (P < 0.05), but no significant differences were found among the experimental groups. Histologic examination in the experimental groups showed newly created bone that had emerged in the center as well as the margin of the defect. Overall, these results indicate that PRP enhanced bony regeneration regardless of activation with an effect that was comparable to that of rhBMP-2. Thus, PRP has therapeutic effects on bone regeneration and may replace rhBMP-2, which is costly.

  6. Magnetic avalanches in granular ferromagnets: thermal activated collective behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Gia-Wei

    2017-02-01

    We present a numerical study on the thermal activated avalanche dynamics in granular materials composed of ferromagnetic clusters embedded in a non-magnetic matrix. A microscopic dynamical simulation based on the reaction-diffusion process is developed to model the magnetization process of such systems. The large-scale simulations presented here explicitly demonstrate inter-granular collective behavior induced by thermal activation of spin tunneling. In particular, we observe an intriguing criticality controlled by the rate of energy dissipation. We show that thermal activated avalanches can be understood in the framework of continuum percolation and the emergent dissipation induced criticality is in the universality class of 3D percolation transition. Implications of these results to the phase-separated states of colossal magnetoresistance materials and other artificial granular magnetic systems are also discussed.

  7. Magnetic avalanches in granular ferromagnets: thermal activated collective behavior.

    PubMed

    Chern, Gia-Wei

    2017-02-01

    We present a numerical study on the thermal activated avalanche dynamics in granular materials composed of ferromagnetic clusters embedded in a non-magnetic matrix. A microscopic dynamical simulation based on the reaction-diffusion process is developed to model the magnetization process of such systems. The large-scale simulations presented here explicitly demonstrate inter-granular collective behavior induced by thermal activation of spin tunneling. In particular, we observe an intriguing criticality controlled by the rate of energy dissipation. We show that thermal activated avalanches can be understood in the framework of continuum percolation and the emergent dissipation induced criticality is in the universality class of 3D percolation transition. Implications of these results to the phase-separated states of colossal magnetoresistance materials and other artificial granular magnetic systems are also discussed.

  8. Nerve–muscle activation by rotating permanent magnet configurations

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Graham M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The standard method of magnetic nerve activation using pulses of high current in coils has drawbacks of high cost, high electrical power (of order 1 kW), and limited repetition rate without liquid cooling.Here we report a new technique for nerve activation using high speed rotation of permanent magnet configurations, generating a sustained sinusoidal electric field using very low power (of order 10 W).A high ratio of the electric field gradient divided by frequency is shown to be the key indicator for nerve activation at high frequencies.Activation of the cane toad sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle was observed at frequencies as low as 180 Hz for activation of the muscle directly and 230 Hz for curved nerves, but probably not in straight sections of nerve.These results, employing the first prototype device, suggest the opportunity for a new class of small low‐cost magnetic nerve and/or muscle stimulators. Abstract Conventional pulsed current systems for magnetic neurostimulation are large and expensive and have limited repetition rate because of overheating. Here we report a new technique for nerve activation, namely high‐speed rotation of a configuration of permanent magnets. Analytical solutions of the cable equation are derived for the oscillating electric field generated, which has amplitude proportional to the rotation speed. The prototype device built comprised a configuration of two cylindrical magnets with antiparallel magnetisations, made to rotate by interaction between the magnets’ own magnetic field and three‐phase currents in coils mounted on one side of the device. The electric field in a rectangular bath placed on top of the device was both numerically evaluated and measured. The ratio of the electric field gradient on frequency was approximately 1 V m−2 Hz−1 near the device. An exploratory series of physiological tests was conducted on the sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle of the cane toad

  9. Flare Activity and Magnetic Helicity Injection By Photospheric Horizontal Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Y.-J.; Chae, J.; Choe, G.; Wang, H.; Park, Y. D.; Yun, H. S.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Goode, P. R.

    2002-05-01

    We present observational evidence that the occurrence of homologous flares in an active region is physically related to the injection of magnetic helicity by horizontal photospheric motions. We have analyzed a set of 1 minute cadence magnetograms of NOAA AR 8100 taken over a period of 6.5 hours by Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). During this observing time span, seven homologous flares took place in the active region. We have computed the magnetic helicity injection rate into the solar atmosphere by photospheric shearing motions, and found that a significant amount of magnetic helicity was injected during the observing period. In a strong M4.1 flare, the magnetic helicity injection rate impulsively increased and peaked at the same time as the X-ray flux did. The flare X-ray flux integrated over the X-ray emission time strongly correlates with the magnetic helicity injected during the flaring interval. The integrated X-ray flux is found to be a logarithmically increasing function of the injected magnetic helicity. Our results suggest that injection of helicity and abrupt increase of helicity magnitude play a significant role in flare triggering. This work has been supported by NASA grants NAG5-10894 and NAG5-7837, by MURI grant of AFOSR, by the US-Korea Cooperative Science Program (NSF INT-98-16267), by NRL M10104000059-01J000002500 of the Korean government, and by the BK 21 project of the Korean government.

  10. Studies of the regeneration of activated bauxite used as granular sorbent for the control of alkali vapors from hot flue gas of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S H.D.; Smith, S D; Swift, W M; Johnson, I

    1981-05-01

    Regeneration of activated bauxite was studied by water-leaching and thermal swing (high-temperature desorption) methods. Granular activated bauxite has been identified to be very effective when used as a filter medium (i.e., sorbent) in granular-bed filters to remove gaseous alkali metal compounds from simulated hot flue gas of PFBC. Activated bauxite that had captured alkali chloride vapors was demonstrated to be easily and effectively regenerated for reuse by a simple water-leaching method. Data were obtained on (1) the leaching rate of the adsorbed NaCl, (2) effects on the leaching rate of adsorbed NaCl loading, leaching temperature, and the amount of water, and (3) water retention in activated bauxite after leaching. Observed physical changes and particle attrition of activated bauxite as a result of regeneration are discussed. The sorption mechanisms of activated bauxite toward alkali chloride vapors are interpreted on the basis of (1) the chemical compositions of the leachates from alkali chloride-sorbed activated bauxite and (2) the desorption of adsorbed NaCl vapor from activated bauxite at high temperature.

  11. Background magnetic fields during last three cycles of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andryeyeva, O. A.; Stepanian, N. N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes our studies of evolution of the solar magnetic field with different sign and field strength in the range from -100 G to 100 G. The structure and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields on the Sun during the last 3 cycles of solar activity is investigated using magnetograph data from the Kitt Peak Solar Observatory. This analysis reveals two groups of the large-scale magnetic fields evolving differently during the cycles. The first group is represented by relatively weak background fields, and is best observed in the range of 3-10 Gauss. The second group is represented by stronger fields of 75-100 Gauss. The spatial and temporal properties of these groups are described and compared with the total magnetic flux. It is shown that the anomalous behaviour of the total flux during the last cycle can be found only in the second group

  12. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic Resonance-guided Active Catheter Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Several advantages of MR imaging compared with other imaging modalities have provided the rationale for increased attention to MR-guided interventions, including its excellent soft tissue contrast, its capability to show both anatomic and functional information, and no use of ionizing radiation. An important aspect of MR-guided intervention is to provide visualization and navigation of interventional devices relative to the surrounding tissues. This article focuses on the methods for MR-guided active tracking in catheter-based interventions. Practical issues about implementation of active catheter tracking in a clinical setting are discussed and several current application examples are highlighted.

  14. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  15. Magnetic-field variations and solar flare activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'eva, I. Yu.; Shakhovskaya, A. N.; Livshits, M. A.; Knyazeva, I. S.

    2012-11-01

    Solar filtergrams obtained at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory at the center and wings of the H α line are used to study variations in filaments, in particular, in arch filament systems (AFSs). These are considered as an indicator of emerging new magnetic flux, providing information about the spatial locations of magnetic-field elements. Magnetic-field maps for the active region NOAA 10030 are analyzed as an example. A method developed earlier for detecting elements of emerging flux using SOHO/MDI magnetograms indicates a close link between the increase in flare activity in theNOAA 10030 group during July 14-18, 2002 and variations in the topological disconnectedness of the magnetograms. Moreover, variations in the flare activity one day before a flare event are correlated with variations in the topological complexity of the field (the Euler characteristic) in regions with high field strengths (more than 700 G). Analysis of multi-wavelength polarization observations on the RATAN-600 radio telescope during July 13-17, 2002 indicate dominance of the radio emission above the central spot associated with the increase in flare activity. In addition to the flare site near the large spot in the group, numerous weak flares developed along an extended local neutral line, far from the central line of the large-scale field. The statistical characteristics of the magnetic-field maps analyzed were determined, and show flare activity of both types, i.e., localized in spot penumbras and above the neutral line of the field.

  16. Modulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in the normal and regenerating rat liver by various doses of the peptide morphogen of Hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Kazimirskii, A.N.; Kositskii, G.I.; Rubina, A.Yu.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Pylaev, A.S.

    1986-11-01

    In this investigation, changes in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in the normal and regenerating liver of rats receiving injections of various doses of Hydra peptide morphogen (HPM). Activity of ODC was determined by a radioisotope method based on liberation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)-ornithine. The results indicate in the author's opinion that HPM may have a role in the regulation of anabolic processes and, in particular, of regenerative processes in mammals.

  17. Site-specific bioconjugation of an organometallic electron mediator to an enzyme with retained photocatalytic cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Yoon, Sungho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-04-07

    Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM) has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(P)H being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(P)H concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH). A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  18. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  19. Dynamo action and magnetic activity of the giant star Pollux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Palacios, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of the giant star Pollux have revealed that it possesses a weak global magnetic field of the order of a Gauss. Using 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the ASH code we study the source of this global magnetic field in this slowly rotating giant star (Omega*=Omega_sun/20). We find that the extended convective envelope is able to generate a multi-scales magnetic field reaching of the order of 10% of the kinetic energy contained in the envelope. This global field acts such as to suppress the strong differential rotation present in the purely hydrodynamical progenitor simulation. When filtering the large scale magnetic field components (dipole, quadrupole) we find magnetic field of the order of a few Gauss, hence in qualitative agreeement with observations. Our study confirms that such slowly rotating convective giants are likely to possess global magnetic field maintained through contemporaneous dynamo action and not as the vestige of their past main sequence activity.

  20. The classification of microglial activation phenotypes on neurodegeneration and regeneration in Alzheimer’s disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Megan M.; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline of cognitive function and memory formation. There is no therapeutic that can halt or reverse its progression. Contemporary research suggests that age-dependent neuroinflammatory changes may play a significant role in the decreased neurogenesis and cognitive impairments in AD. The innate immune response is characterized by pro-inflammatory (M1) activation of macrophages and subsequent production of specific cytokines, chemokines, and reactive intermediates, followed by resolution and alternative activation for anti-inflammatory signaling (M2a) and wound healing (M2c). We propose that microglial activation phenotypes are analogous to those of macrophages and that their activation plays a significant role in regulating neurogenesis in the brain. Microglia undergo a switch from an M2- to an M1-skewed activation phenotype during aging. This review will assess the neuroimmunological studies that led to characterization of the different microglial activation states using AD mouse models. It will also discuss the roles of microglial activation on neurogenesis in AD and propose anti-inflammatory molecules as exciting therapeutic targets for research. Molecules like interleukin-4 and CD200 have proven to be important anti-inflammatory molecules in the regulation of neuroinflammation in the brain, and they will be discussed in detail for their therapeutic potential. PMID:22710659

  1. The classification of microglial activation phenotypes on neurodegeneration and regeneration in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Varnum, Megan M; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2012-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline of cognitive function. There is no therapy that can halt or reverse its progression. Contemporary research suggests that age-dependent neuroinflammatory changes may play a significant role in the decreased neurogenesis and cognitive impairments in AD. The innate immune response is characterized by pro-inflammatory (M1) activation of macrophages and subsequent production of specific cytokines, chemokines, and reactive intermediates, followed by resolution and alternative activation for anti-inflammatory signaling (M2a) and wound healing (M2c). We propose that microglial activation phenotypes are analogous to those of macrophages and that their activation plays a significant role in regulating neurogenesis in the brain. Microglia undergo a switch from an M2- to an M1-skewed activation phenotype during aging. This review will assess the neuroimmunological studies that led to characterization of the different microglial activation states in AD mouse models. It will also discuss the roles of microglial activation on neurogenesis in AD and propose anti-inflammatory molecules as exciting therapeutic targets for research. Molecules such as interleukin-4 and CD200 have proven to be important anti-inflammatory mediators in the regulation of neuroinflammation in the brain, which will be discussed in detail for their therapeutic potential.

  2. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  3. Magnetic Braking Revisited: An Activity for "How Science Works"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    The National Curriculum for 14-16 year old students in England contains a mandatory element called "How science works". Included in this material is interpretation of data, collecting data from primary sources, using ICT tools, and developing an argument and drawing conclusions. What follows is an activity, based on magnetic braking,…

  4. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  5. Mercury's Magnetic Field: Active, Thermoelectric, or Decaying Dynamo or Crustal Remanence? - The MESSENGER Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, D. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field in 1974 by Mariner 10 was a surprise because the planet's size, thermal state, and angular momentum seemed to rule out the possibility of an active dynamo. Additional encounters of Mercury by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1975 confirmed the initial results and allowed the estimation of the planetary magnetic dipole moment to within perhaps a factor of two. This discovery prompted a variety of suggestions for the source of the intrinsic field. The presence of sufficient sulfur in the outer core would allow a thin fluid outer core to persist to the present and perhaps serve as host to a thin-shell dynamo. Recent dynamo simulations under conditions appropriate to Mercury support this possibility and point to aspects of the external field that may be observable from an orbiting spacecraft. Remanent magnetization of the crust and mantle by a now-dead core dynamo field was proposed as an alternative explanation of the Mariner 10 observations in 1976, but this suggestion has been questioned on the grounds that the characteristic time between polarity reversals of a core dynamo field is likely much less than the timescale for acquisition of thermoremanence by the cooling crust and upper mantle. The discovery by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in 1997 of an intensely magnetized Martian crust added fuel to this debate, because the Mariner 10 measurements can be reproduced if Mercury's crust is approximated by a magnetized shell having an intrinsic magnetization of the same order of magnitude as that suggested for Mars by the MGS measurements. The MESSENGER magnetic field investigation is designed to address this and other fundamental questions regarding the nature and origin of Mercury's internal field as well as the planet's thermal history. We present here a summary of the MESSENGER magnetic field investigation goals and an assessment of observations acquired during the spacecraft's Earth flyby on 2 August 2005.

  6. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-02-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration.

  7. Passive immunization with myelin basic protein activated T cells suppresses axonal dieback but does not promote axonal regeneration following spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ju; Hu, Jian-Guo; Shen, Lin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Qi-Yi; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Lü, He-Zuo

    2012-08-01

    The previous studies suggested that some subpopulations of T lymphocytes against central nervous system (CNS) antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), are neuroprotective. But there were few reports about the effect of these T cells on axon regeneration. In this study, the neonatally thymectomied (Tx) adult rats which contain few T lymphocytes were subjected to spinal cord hemisection and then passively immunized with MBP-activated T cells (MBP-T). The regeneration and dieback of transected axons of cortico-spinal tract (CST) were detected by biotin dextran amine (BDA) tracing. The behavioral assessments were performed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale. We found that passive transferring of MBP-T could attenuate axonal dieback. However, no significant axon regeneration and behavioral differences were observed among the normal, Tx and sham-Tx (sTx) rats with or without MBP-T passive immunization. These results indicate that passive transferring of MBP-T cells can attenuate axonal dieback and promote neuroprotection following spinal cord injury (SCI), but may not promote axon regeneration.

  8. Activation of Smad2 but not Smad3 is required to mediate TGF-β signaling during axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Gatien, Samuel; Villiard, Éric; Philip, Anie; Roy, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    Axolotls are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate tissues, such as limbs, tail and skin. The axolotl limb is the most studied regenerating structure. The process is well characterized morphologically; however, it is not well understood at the molecular level. We demonstrate that TGF-β1 is highly upregulated during regeneration and that TGF-β signaling is necessary for the regenerative process. We show that the basement membrane is not prematurely formed in animals treated with the TGF-β antagonist SB-431542. More importantly, Smad2 and Smad3 are differentially regulated post-translationally during the preparation phase of limb regeneration. Using specific antagonists for Smad2 and Smad3 we demonstrate that Smad2 is responsible for the action of TGF-β during regeneration, whereas Smad3 is not required. Smad2 target genes (Mmp2 and Mmp9) are inhibited in SB-431542-treated limbs, whereas non-canonical TGF-β targets (e.g. Mmp13) are unaffected. This is the first study to show that Smad2 and Smad3 are differentially regulated during regeneration and places Smad2 at the heart of TGF-β signaling supporting the regenerative process.

  9. Pathogenic shifts in endogenous microbiota impede tissue regeneration via distinct activation of TAK1/MKK/p38

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christopher P; Merryman, M Shane; Harris-Arnold, Aleishia; McKinney, Sean A; Seidel, Chris W; Loethen, Sydney; Proctor, Kylie N; Guo, Longhua; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The interrelationship between endogenous microbiota, the immune system, and tissue regeneration is an area of intense research due to its potential therapeutic applications. We investigated this relationship in Schmidtea mediterranea, a model organism capable of regenerating any and all of its adult tissues. Microbiome characterization revealed a high Bacteroidetes to Proteobacteria ratio in healthy animals. Perturbations eliciting an expansion of Proteobacteria coincided with ectopic lesions and tissue degeneration. The culture of these bacteria yielded a strain of Pseudomonas capable of inducing progressive tissue degeneration. RNAi screening uncovered a TAK1 innate immune signaling module underlying compromised tissue homeostasis and regeneration during infection. TAK1/MKK/p38 signaling mediated opposing regulation of apoptosis during infection versus normal tissue regeneration. Given the complex role of inflammation in either hindering or supporting reparative wound healing and regeneration, this invertebrate model provides a basis for dissecting the duality of evolutionarily conserved inflammatory signaling in complex, multi-organ adult tissue regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16793.001 PMID:27441386

  10. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  11. Design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Lee, Un-Ho; Choi, Jang-Young; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2008-04-01

    This paper deals with the design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing (AMB). Using the analytical solutions for thrust, resistance, and inductance obtained from equivalent magnetic circuits method, we determine initial design parameters such as the size of magnetic circuit, coil diameter, and the number of turns by investigating the variation of thrust according to design parameters. Then, using nonlinear finite element analysis, a detailed design considering saturation is performed in order to meet required thrust under restricted conditions. Finally, by confirming that the design result is shown in good agreement with experimental results, the validity of design procedures for thrust AMB used in this paper is proved. In particular, the dynamic test results of the thrust AMB are also given to confirm the validity of the design.

  12. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  13. Magnetic modulation of solar luminosity by photospheric activity

    SciTech Connect

    Foukal, P.; Lean, J.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of slow changes in solar irradiance S is studied using measurements obtained with radiometers on the SMM and Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The general downtrend in the radiometer readings is examined by removing the influence of sunspot blocking and comparing the residual irradiance variations with changes in facular and network radiation as indicated by the He I 10830 and CaK indices. The time-integrated sunspot and facular contributions to irradiance variation and its implications for active region energetics are considered. The magnetic activity modulation of S over solar cycle 21 from daily data on sunspot blocking and the He I index are simulated, and this simulated irradiance variation is compared to radiometry since 1978. Other recent evidence for an irradiance modulation by magnetic activity is discussed. 38 references.

  14. Magnetism and Activity of Planet-Hosting Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason Thomas; Miller, Brendan

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic activity levels of planet host stars may differ from that of stars not known to host planets in several ways. Hot jupiters may induce activity in their hosts through magnetic interactions, or through tidal interactions by affecting their host's rotation or convection. Measurements of photospheric, chromospheric, or coronal activity might then be abnormally abnormally high or low compared to control stars that do not host hot Jupiters, or might be modulated at the planet's orbital period. Such detections are complicated by the small amplitude of the expected signal, by the fact that the signals may be transient, and by the difficulty of constructing control samples due to exoplanet deteciton biases and the uncertainty of field star ages. I will review these issues, and discuss avenues for future progress in the field.

  15. Magnetic modulation of solar luminosity by photospheric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.; Lean, J.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of slow changes in solar irradiance S is studied using measurements obtained with radiometers on the SMM and Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The general downtrend in the radiometer readings is examined by removing the influence of sunspot blocking and comparing the residual irradiance variations with changes in facular and network radiation as indicated by the He I 10830 and CaK indices. The time-integrated sunspot and facular contributions to irradiance variation and its implications for active region energetics are considered. The magnetic activity modulation of S over solar cycle 21 from daily data on sunspot blocking and the He I index are simulated, and this simulated irradiance variation is compared to radiometry since 1978. Other recent evidence for an irradiance modulation by magnetic activity is discussed.

  16. Preparation of magnetic porous carbon from waste hydrochar by simultaneous activation and magnetization for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Liu, Yuchen; Qian, Feng; Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, a novel magnetic porous carbon (MPC) with maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) particles is facilely prepared from hydrochar (a solid residue of hydrothermal carbonization of biomass) in one step through simultaneous activation and magnetization. The resultant MPC is characterized and utilized as an adsorbent for tetracycline (TC) removal from aqueous solutions. The BET surface area and micropore volume of the MPC are found to be 349 m(2)g(-1) and 0.16 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. The adsorption kinetics data could be well described by the pseudo-second-order model, and the TC adsorption onto MPC is an endothermic and spontaneous process. The enhanced surface area of the MPC, as well as its graphite-like structure, may contribute to the adsorption capacity of TC. After adsorption, MPC could be effectively separated by applying a magnetic field.

  17. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-KitTgD814Y receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-KitTgD814Y mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit+ cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-KitTgD814Y mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit+CD31+ endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45−c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-KitTgD814Y mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  18. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  19. Active Region Magnetic Structure Observed in the Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic flux above sunspots and plage in NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Active Region 8299 has been measured in the photosphere and the chromosphere. We investigate the vertical magnetic structure above the umbrae, penumbrae and plage regions using quantitative statistical comparisons of the photospheric and chromospheric vector magnetic flux data. The results include: (1) a decrease in flux with height, (2) the direct detection of the superpenumbral canopy in the chromosphere, (3) values for dB/dz which are consistent with earlier investigations when derived from a straight difference between the two datasets but quite low when derived from the delta x B = 0 condition, (4) a monolithic structure in the umbra which extends well into the upper chromosphere with a very complex and varied structure in the penumbra and plage, as evidenced by (5) a uniform magnetic scale height in the umbrae with an abrupt jump to widely varying scale heights in the penumbral and plage regions. Further, we find (6) evidence for a very large (delta z approximately equals 3Mm) height difference between the atmospheric layers sampled in the two magnetograms, almost a factor of three larger than that implied by atmospheric models. We additionally test the apropriateness of using photospheric magnetic flux as a boundary for field-line extrapolations, and find a better agreement with observed coronal structure when the chromospheric flux is used as a boundary.

  20. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Untreated periodontal disease leads to tooth loss through destruction of the attachment apparatus and tooth-supporting structures. The goals of periodontal therapy include not only the arrest of periodontal disease progression,but also the regeneration of structures lost to disease where appropriate. Conventional surgical approaches (e.g., flap debridement) continue to offer time-tested and reliable methods to access root surfaces,reduce periodontal pockets, and attain improved periodontal form/architecture. However, these techniques offer only limited potential towards recovering tissues destroyed during earlier disease phases. Recently, surgical procedures aimed at greater and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues and functional attachment close to their original level have been developed, analyzed, and employed in clinical practice. This paper provides a review of the current understanding of the mechanisms, cells, and factors required for regeneration of the periodontium and of procedures used to restore periodontal tissues around natural teeth. Targeted audiences for this paper are periodontists and/or researchers with an interest in improving the predictability of regenerative procedures. This paper replaces the version published in 1993.

  1. Sprouting, regeneration and circuit formation in the injured spinal cord: factors and activity

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Irin C; Schwab, Martin E

    2006-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries are particularly traumatic, owing to the limited capabilities of the mammalian CNS for repair. Nevertheless, functional recovery is observed in patients and experimental animals, but the degree of recovery is variable. We review the crucial characteristics of mammalian spinal cord function, tract development, injury and the current experimental therapeutic approaches for repair. Regenerative or compensatory growth of neurites and the formation of new, functional circuits require spontaneous and experimental reactivation of developmental mechanisms, suppression of the growth-inhibitory properties of the adult CNS tissue and specific targeted activation of new connections by rehabilitative training. PMID:16939978

  2. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  3. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  4. Neuronal RARβ Signaling Modulates PTEN Activity Directly in Neurons and via Exosome Transfer in Astrocytes to Prevent Glial Scar Formation and Induce Spinal Cord Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Maria B.; Malmqvist, Tony; Clarke, Earl; Hubens, Chantal J.; Grist, John; Hobbs, Carl; Trigo, Diogo; Risling, Mårten; Angeria, Maria; Damberg, Peter; Carlstedt, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is mainly attributed to a lack of intrinsic neuronal growth programs and an inhibitory environment from a glial scar. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a major negative regulator of neuronal regeneration and, as such, inhibiting its activity has been considered a therapeutic target for spinal cord (SC) injuries (SCIs). Using a novel model of rat cervical avulsion, we show that treatment with a retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) agonist results in locomotor and sensory recovery. Axonal regeneration from the severed roots into the SC could be seen by biotinylated dextran amine labeling. Light micrographs of the dorsal root entry zone show the peripheral nervous system (PNS)–CNS transition of regrown axons. RARβ agonist treatment also resulted in the absence of scar formation. Mechanism studies revealed that, in RARβ-agonist-treated neurons, PTEN activity is decreased by cytoplasmic phosphorylation and increased secretion in exosomes. These are taken up by astrocytes, resulting in hampered proliferation and causing them to arrange in a normal-appearing scaffold around the regenerating axons. Attribution of the glial modulation to neuronal PTEN in exosomes was demonstrated by the use of an exosome inhibitor in vivo and PTEN siRNA in vitro assays. The dual effect of RARβ signaling, both neuronal and neuronal–glial, results in axonal regeneration into the SC after dorsal root neurotmesis. Targeting this pathway may open new avenues for the treatment of SCIs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often result in permanent damage in the adult due to the very limited capacity of axonal regeneration. Intrinsic neuronal programs and the formation of a glial scar are the main obstacles. Here, we identify a single target, neuronal retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ), which modulates these two aspects of the postinjury physiological response. Activation of RARβ in the neuron inactivates

  5. Polyphosphate: A Morphogenetically Active Implant Material Serving as Metabolic Fuel for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The initial mineralization centers during human bone formation onto osteoblasts are composed of CaCO3 . Those bioseeds are enzymatically formed via carbonic anhydrase(s) in close association with the cell surface of the osteoblasts. Subsequently, the bicarbonate/carbonate anions are exchanged non-enzymatically by inorganic phosphate [Pi ]. One source for the supply of Pi is polyphosphate [polyP] which is a physiological polymer, formed in the osteoblasts as well as in the platelets. The energy-rich acid anhydride bonds within the polyP chain are cleaved by phosphatase(s); during this reaction free-energy might be released that could be re-used, as metabolic fuel, for the maintenance of the steady-state concentrations of the substrates/products during mineralization. Finally it is outlined that polyP, as a morphogenetically active scaffold, is even suitable for 3D cell printing.

  6. Distal Regeneration Involves the Age Dependent Activity of Branchial Sac Stem Cells in the Ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2015-02-01

    Tunicates have high capacities for regeneration but the underlying mechanisms and their relationship to life cycle progression are not well understood. Here we investigate the regeneration of distal structures in the ascidian tunicate Ciona intestinalis. Analysis of regenerative potential along the proximal-distal body axis indicated that distal organs, such as the siphons, their pigmented sensory organs, and the neural complex, could only be replaced from body fragments containing the branchial sac. Distal regeneration involves the formation of a blastema composed of cells that undergo cell proliferation prior to differentiation and cells that differentiate without cell proliferation. Both cell types originate in the branchial sac and appear in the blastema at different times after distal injury. Whereas the branchial sac stem cells are present in young animals, they are depleted in old animals that have lost their regeneration capacity. Thus Ciona adults contain a population of age-related stem cells located in the branchial sac that are a source of precursors for distal body regeneration.

  7. The magnetic field of gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Alan; Ladipo, Jk; Richards, William; Wikswo, John

    1997-11-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract controls the absorption and transport of ingested materials. Its function is determined largely by the electrical activity of the smooth muscle that lines the GI tract. GI electrical activity consists of an omnipresent slowly oscillating wave known as the basic electrical rhythm (BER) that modulates a higher-frequency spiking activity associated with muscle contraction. The BER has been shown to be a reliable indicator of intestinal viability, and thus, recording of smooth muscle activity may have clinical value. The BER is difficult to measure with cutaneous electrodes because layers of low-conductivity fat between the GI tract and the abdominal surface attenuate the potential. On the other hand, the magnetic field associated with GI electrical activity is mostly unaffected by intervening fat layers. We recorded the magnetic fields from GI activity in 12 volunteers using a multichannel Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Characteristics typical of gastric and intestinal BER were apparent in the data. Channels near the epigastrium recorded gastric BER, and channels in intestinal areas recorded small bowel BER. These results suggest that a single multichannel SQUID magnetometer is able to measure gastrointestinal electrical activity from multiple locations around the abdomen simultaneously.

  8. Differential regulation of the mitogen-activated protein and stress-activated protein kinase cascades by adrenergic agonists in quiescent and regenerating adult rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, M S; Auer, K L; Jarvis, W D; Ishac, E J; Gao, B; Kunos, G; Dent, P

    1997-01-01

    To study the mechanisms by which catecholamines regulate hepatocyte proliferation after partial hepatectomy (PHX), hepatocytes were isolated from adult male rats 24 h after sham operation or two-thirds PHX and treated with catecholamines and other agonists. In freshly isolated sham cells, p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity was stimulated by the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Activation of p42 MAP kinase by growth factors was blunted by pretreatment of sham hepatocytes with glucagon but not by that with the beta2-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO). In PHX cells, the ability of PHE to activate p42 MAP kinase was dramatically reduced, whereas ISO became competent to inhibit p42 MAP kinase activation. PHE treatment of sham but not PHX and ISO treatment of PHX but not sham hepatocytes also activated the stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases p46/54 SAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase. These data demonstrate that an alpha1- to beta2-adrenergic receptor switch occurs upon PHX and results in an increase in SAP kinase versus MAP kinase signaling by catecholamines. In primary cultures of hepatocytes, ISO treatment of PHX but not sham cells inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation. In contrast, PHE treatment of sham but not PHX cells stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation, which was reduced by approximately 25 and approximately 95% with specific inhibitors of p42 MAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase function, respectively. Inhibition of the p38 SAP kinase also dramatically reduced basal [3H]thymidine incorporation. These data suggest that p38 SAP kinase plays a permissive role in liver regeneration. Alterations in the abilities of catecholamines to modulate the activities of protein kinase A and the MAP and SAP kinase pathways may represent one physiological mechanism by which these agonists can regulate hepatocyte proliferation after PHX. PMID:9199291

  9. Deer antler regeneration: cells, concepts, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Szuwart, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    The periodic replacement of antlers is an exceptional regenerative process in mammals, which in general are unable to regenerate complete body appendages. Antler regeneration has traditionally been viewed as an epimorphic process closely resembling limb regeneration in urodele amphibians, and the terminology of the latter process has also been applied to antler regeneration. More recent studies, however, showed that, unlike urodele limb regeneration, antler regeneration does not involve cell dedifferentiation and the formation of a blastema from these dedifferentiated cells. Rather, these studies suggest that antler regeneration is a stem-cell-based process that depends on the periodic activation of, presumably neural-crest-derived, periosteal stem cells of the distal pedicle. The evidence for this hypothesis is reviewed and as a result, a new concept of antler regeneration as a process of stem-cell-based epimorphic regeneration is proposed that does not involve cell dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation. Antler regeneration illustrates that extensive appendage regeneration in a postnatal mammal can be achieved by a developmental process that differs in several fundamental aspects from limb regeneration in urodeles.

  10. Full regeneration of the tribasal Polypterus fin.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Rodrigo; Hernández-Martínez, Rocío; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Covarrubias, Luis

    2012-03-06

    Full limb regeneration is a property that seems to be restricted to urodele amphibians. Here we found that Polypterus, the most basal living ray-finned fish, regenerates its pectoral lobed fins with a remarkable accuracy. Pectoral Polypterus fins are complex, formed by a well-organized endoskeleton to which the exoskeleton rays are connected. Regeneration initiates with the formation of a blastema similar to that observed in regenerating amphibian limbs. Retinoic acid induces dose-dependent phenotypes ranging from inhibition of regeneration to apparent anterior-posterior duplications. As in all developing tetrapod limbs and regenerating amphibian blastema, Sonic hedgehog is expressed in the posterior mesenchyme during fin regeneration. Hedgehog signaling plays a role in the regeneration and patterning processes: an increase or reduction of fin bony elements results when this signaling is activated or disrupted, respectively. The tail fin also regenerates but, in contrast with pectoral fins, regeneration can resume after release from the arrest caused by hedgehog inhibition. A comparative analysis of fin phenotypes obtained after retinoic acid treatment or altering the hedgehog signaling levels during regeneration allowed us to assign a limb tetrapod equivalent segment to Polypterus fin skeletal structures, thus providing clues to the origin of the autopod. We propose that appendage regeneration was a common property of vertebrates during the fin to limb transition.

  11. The role of proteasome beta subunits in gastrin-mediated transcription of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 and regenerating protein1.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Adrian; Howarth, Alice; Varro, Andrea; Dimaline, Rod

    2013-01-01

    The hormone gastrin physiologically regulates gastric acid secretion and also contributes to maintaining gastric epithelial architecture by regulating expression of genes such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2) and regenerating protein 1 (Reg1). Here we examine the role of proteasome subunit PSMB1 in the transcriptional regulation of PAI-2 and Reg1 by gastrin, and its subcellular distribution during gastrin stimulation. We used the gastric cancer cell line AGS, permanently transfected with the CCK2 receptor (AGS-GR) to study gastrin stimulated expression of PAI-2 and Reg1 reporter constructs when PSMB1 was knocked down by siRNA. Binding of PSMB1 to the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Subcellular distribution of PSMB1 was determined by immunocytochemistry and Western Blot. Gastrin robustly increased expression of PAI-2 and Reg1 in AGS-GR cells, but when PSMB1 was knocked down the responses were dramatically reduced. In ChIP assays, following immunoprecipitation of chromatin with a PSMB1 antibody there was a substantial enrichment of DNA from the gastrin responsive regions of the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters compared with chromatin precipitated with control IgG. In AGS-GR cells stimulated with gastrin there was a significant increase in the ratio of nuclear:cytoplasmic PSMB1 over the same timescale as recruitment of PSMB1 to the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters seen in ChIP assays. We conclude that PSMB1 is part of the transcriptional machinery required for gastrin stimulated expression of PAI-2 and Reg1, and that its change in subcellular distribution in response to gastrin is consistent with this role.

  12. Phenyl-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon for the effective removal of selected pharmaceutical and endocrine-disruptive compounds.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kien Tiek; Yoon, Yeomin; Snyder, Shane A; Jang, Min

    2016-06-01

    Triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS)-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon (MPPAC-TEPS) was prepared and characterized using various spectroscopic methods, and then tested for the removal of bisphenol A, carbamazepine, ibuprofen and clofibric acid. Magnetite film on MPPAC-TEPS was homogeneously coated on the outer surface of palm-based powdered activated carbon (PPAC) through a hydrothermal co-precipitation technique. Followed by silanization of phenyl-functionalized organosilane on MPPAC's magnetic film. As results, micro/mesopore surface area and volume increased without significant pore clogging and iron (Fe) dissolution under the acidic conditions was greatly decreased. The unique structural and chemical features of MPPAC-TEPS were found to be the main reasons for the enhanced adsorption rates and removal capacities of POPs. The presence of electrolytes and different pH values greatly affected the sorption efficiencies. The dominant sorption mechanism of POPs by MPPAC-TEPS was determined to be π-π interaction (physisorption), based on thermodynamic (ΔG°) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal regeneration at a low temperature (350 °C) was an effective method to desorb the retained POPs and enabled to reactivate MPPAC-TEPS with sustained sorption rates and capacities, whereas PPAC was largely exhausted. As a new type of sorbent for POPs, MPPAC-TEPS has operational advantages, such as magnetic separation and stable regeneration.

  13. In vitro callus and in vivo leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre stimulate β-cells regeneration and anti-diabetic activity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A Bakrudeen Ali; Rao, A S; Rao, M V

    2010-11-01

    A methanol extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaf and callus showed anti-diabetic activities through regenerating β-cells. Optimum callus was developed under stress conditions of blue light with 2,4-D (1.5 mg/l) and KN (0.5 mg/l), which induced maximum biomass of green compact callus at 45 days, as determined by growth curve analysis. Leaf and optimum callus extracts contains gymnemic acid, which was analyzed using TLC, HPTLC and HPLC methods. The research reported here deals with leaf and callus extracts of G. sylvestre, which significantly increase the weight of the whole body, liver, pancreas and liver glycogen content in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (Wistar rats). The gymnemic acid of leaf and callus extracts significantly increases the regeneration of β-cells in treated rats, when compared with the standard diabetic rats. It could have potential as a pharmaceutical drug for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).

  14. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases efficiently disrupt the target gene in Iberian ribbed newts (Pleurodeles waltl), an experimental model animal for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Kousuke; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yokotani, Naoki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Eri; Agata, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of a lost tissue in an animal is an important issue. Although regenerative studies have a history of research spanning more than a century, the gene functions underlying regulation of the regeneration are mostly unclear. Analysis of knockout animals is a very powerful tool with which to elucidate gene function. Recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been developed as an effective technique for genome editing. This technique enables gene targeting in amphibians such as newts that were previously impossible. Here we show that newts microinjected with TALEN mRNAs designed for targeting the tyrosinase gene in single-cell stage embryos revealed an albino phenotype. Sequence analysis revealed that the tyrosinase genes were effectively disrupted in these albino newts. Moreover, precise genome alteration was achieved using TALENs and single strand oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Our results suggest that TALENs are powerful tools for genome editing for regenerative research in newts.

  15. Intermittency of the Solar Magnetic Field and Solar Magnetic Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibalova, A. S.; Obridko, V. N.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale solar magnetic fields demonstrate features of fractal intermittent behavior, which requires quantification. For this purpose we investigate how the observational estimate of the solar magnetic flux density B depends on resolution D in order to obtain the scaling ln BD = - k ln D +a in a reasonably wide range. The quantity k demonstrates cyclic variations typical of a solar activity cycle. In addition, k depends on the magnetic flux density, i.e. the ratio of the magnetic flux to the area over which the flux is calculated, at a given instant. The quantity a demonstrates some cyclic variation, but it is much weaker than in the case of k. The scaling obtained generalizes previous scalings found for the particular cycle phases. The scaling is typical of fractal structures. In our opinion, the results obtained trace small-scale action in the solar convective zone and its coexistence with the conventional large-scale solar dynamo based on differential rotation and mirror-asymmetric convection.

  16. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  17. Development of a He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    SciTech Connect

    Jahromi, A. E.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-01-29

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  18. Increased hepatic Na,K-ATPase activity during hepatic regeneration is associated with induction of the beta1-subunit and expression on the bile canalicular domain.

    PubMed

    Simon, F R; Fortune, J; Alexander, A; Iwahashi, M; Dahl, R; Sutherland, E

    1996-10-04

    Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of the sodium pump or Na,K-ATPase during proliferation of hepatocytes following 70% liver resection have not been defined. Na,K-ATPase may be regulated by synthesis of its alpha- and beta-subunits, by sorting to either the sinusoidal or apical plasma membrane domains, or by increasing membrane lipid fluidity. This study investigated the time course of changes during hepatic regeneration for Na, K-ATPase activity, lipid composition and fluidity, and protein content of liver plasma membrane subfractions. As early as 4 h after hepatic resection, Na,K-ATPase activity was increased selectively in the bile canalicular fraction. It reached a new steady state at 12 h and remained elevated for 2 days. Although hepatic regeneration was associated with a reduced cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio and increased fluidity, measured with two different probes, these changes in lipid metabolism were in the sinusoidal membrane domain. The Na,K-ATPase beta1-subunit, but not the alpha1-subunit, was increased selectively at the bile canalicular surface as shown by immunoblotting of liver plasma membrane subfractions and the morphological demonstration at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Furthermore, cycloheximide blocked the rise in beta1-subunit mRNA levels. Since the time course for beta1-subunit accumulation was similar to that for activation of Na,K-ATPase activity, this change implicated the beta1-subunit in activating sodium pump activity.

  19. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  20. Erythropoietin promotes regeneration of adult CNS neurons via Jak2/Stat3 and PI3K/AKT pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Kretz, Alexandra; Happold, Caroline J; Marticke, Julia K; Isenmann, Stefan

    2005-08-01

    The cytokine hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has proved neuroprotective in CNS injury, and clinical trials for ischemic stroke are ongoing. The capability of EPO to restore postmitotic CNS architecture and function by fibre regeneration has not been examined. Here, we compared in vitro outgrowth capacity of adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following optic nerve (ON) lesion in the presence and absence of EPO. Immediate EPO conditioning in vivo, or delayed EPO treatment of cultures with 10--10,000 IU rhEPO significantly increased numbers (2.66-fold) and length (8.31-fold) of newly generated neurites, without evoking rheological complications. EPO induced Stat3 phosphorylation in RGCs, and inhibition of Jak2/Stat3 abolished EPO-induced growth. EPO-facilitated neuritogenesis was paralleled by upregulation of Bcl-X(L), a Bcl-2 homologue capable of promoting RGC regeneration. The PI3K/Akt pathway was also involved in antiapoptotic and regeneration-enhancing EPO actions. In conclusion, EPO treatment may offer a unique dual-function strategy for neuroprotection and regeneration.

  1. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  2. Light-activation of the Archaerhodopsin H(+)-pump reverses age-dependent loss of vertebrate regeneration: sparking system-level controls in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dany Spencer; Tseng, Ai-Sun; Levin, Michael

    2013-03-15

    Optogenetics, the regulation of proteins by light, has revolutionized the study of excitable cells, and generated strong interest in the therapeutic potential of this technology for regulating action potentials in neural and muscle cells. However, it is currently unknown whether light-activated channels and pumps will allow control of resting potential in embryonic or regenerating cells in vivo. Abnormalities in ion currents of non-excitable cells are known to play key roles in the etiology of birth defects and cancer. Moreover, changes in transmembrane resting potential initiate Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration, including regrowth of a functioning spinal cord, in tails that have been inhibited by natural inactivity of the endogenous H(+)-V-ATPase pump. However, existing pharmacological and genetic methods allow neither non-invasive control of bioelectric parameters in vivo nor the ability to abrogate signaling at defined time points. Here, we show that light activation of a H(+)-pump can prevent developmental defects and induce regeneration by hyperpolarizing transmembrane potentials. Specifically, light-dependent, Archaerhodopsin-based, H(+)-flux hyperpolarized cells in vivo and thus rescued Xenopus embryos from the craniofacial and patterning abnormalities caused by molecular blockade of endogenous H(+)-flux. Furthermore, light stimulation of Arch for only 2 days after amputation restored regenerative capacity to inhibited tails, inducing cell proliferation, tissue innervation, and upregulation of notch1 and msx1, essential genes in two well-known endogenous regenerative pathways. Electroneutral pH change, induced by expression of the sodium proton exchanger, NHE3, did not rescue regeneration, implicating the hyperpolarizing activity of Archaerhodopsin as the causal factor. The data reveal that hyperpolarization is required only during the first 48 hours post-injury, and that expression in the spinal cord is not necessary for the effect to occur. Our study

  3. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities.

  4. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  5. The evaluation of the activity of medicinal remedies of plant and animal origin on the regeneration of the earthworms’ tail segments

    PubMed Central

    Bybin, Viktor Alexandrovich; Stom, Daevard Iosifovich

    2015-01-01

    Now, in the global community there is enough hard recommendation to replace the vertebrate test animals into simpler organisms at the development, testing, and evaluation of the quality pharmaceuticals. The feature of planarian to regenerate in new individual planarian from a piece, which is only 1/7 of the original animal, allowed to create the alternative methods of testing of drugs, dietary supplements, water quality, influence of electromagnetic fields, and other radiations. The tests on planarian can replace the ones that are held today on mammals. However, the lacks of the bioassays based on the planarian regeneration are the need for complex and expensive video equipment for recording the regrowth of worms’ body, the difficulties of culturing of flatworms and fairly long period of response. These difficulties can be avoided by using another group of the worms of type Annelida. The new individual can be fully recovered only from the front half of the body in many species of earthworms. Thus, the influence of the pharmaceuticals from earthworms, mummy, and Orthilia secunda on the ability of earthworms to regenerate lost tail segments has been investigated. The relations of the activity of preparations tested with doses and the time of the storage have been revealed. The principal possibility of applicability of the test reaction studied as a way to evaluate the effects and quality of remedies based on medicinal plants and earthworms has been shown. PMID:26692755

  6. Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's window into development.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of regeneration studies by looking in depth at Regeneration and evaluating Morgan's contribution. Although famous for his work with fruit fly genetics, studying Regeneration illuminates Morgan's earlier scientific approach which emphasized the importance of studying a diversity of organisms. Surveying a broad range of regenerative phenomena allowed Morgan to institute a standard scientific terminology that continues to inform regeneration studies today. Most importantly, Morgan argued that regeneration was a fundamental aspect of the growth process and therefore should be accounted for within developmental theory. Establishing important similarities between regeneration and development allowed Morgan to make the case that regeneration could act as a model of development. The nature of the relationship between embryogenesis and regeneration remains an active area of research.

  7. Twist of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi; Bao, Shudong; Kuzanyan, Kirill M.

    2002-05-01

    We study the twist properties of photospheric magnetic fields in solar active regions using magnetographic data on 422 active regions obtained at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in 1988 1997. We calculate the mean twist (force-free field αf) of the active regions and compare it with the mean current-helicity density of these same active regions, h c =B ∥·(∇×B)∥. The latitude and longitude distributions and time dependence of these quantities is analyzed. These parameters represent two different tracers of the α effect in dynamo theory, so we might expect them to possess similar properties. However, apart from differences in their definitions, they also display differences associated with the technique used to recalculate the magnetographic data and with their different physical meanings. The distributions of the mean αf and h c both show hemispherical asymmetry—negative (positive) values in the northern (southern) hemisphere—although this tendency is stronger for h c. One reason for these differences may be the averaging procedure, when twists of opposite sign in regions with weak fields make a small contribution to the mean current-helicity density. Such transequatorial regularity is in agreement with the expectations of dynamo theory. In some active regions, the average αf and h c do not obey this transequatorial rule. As a whole, the mean twist of the magnetic fields αf of active regions does not vary significantly with the solar cycle. Active regions that do not follow the general behavior for αf do not show any appreciable tendency to cluster at certain longitudes, in contrast to results for h c noted in previous studies. We analyze similarities and differences in the distributions of these two quantities. We conclude that using only one of these tracers, such as αf, to search for signatures of the α effect can have disadvantages, which should be taken into account in future studies.

  8. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: effect of spacer arm length and ligand density.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-07-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: (i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; (ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5-25nmol/cm(2)). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi-component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14-atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmoles of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in mono-component system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0nmol/cm(2)) in mono- and multi-component systems for 7- as well as 14-atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use.

  9. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  10. Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanopowders: Synthesis, photoactivity and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkanen, J.-P.; Heinonen, S.; Huttunen Saarivirta, E.; Honkanen, M.; Levänen, E.

    2013-12-01

    Two approaches were used to obtain nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders. Firstly, low-temperature synthesis method and secondly liquid flame spraying. The structural properties of the produced powders were determined with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption tests. The photocatalytic properties of the powders were studied with methylene blue (MB) discoloration tests. After discolorations tests, TiO2 was coagulated with magnetite particles using FeCl3·6 H2O at a fixed pH value. Magnetic separation of coagulated TiO2 and magnetite was carried out by a permanent magnet. The obtained results showed that the particle size of the powders synthesized at low-temperature was very small and the specific surface area high. The phase content of the powder was also shown to depend greatly on the acidity of the synthesis solution. Powder synthesized by liquid flame spraying was mixture of anatase and rutile phases with essentially larger particle size and lower specific surface area than those of low-temperature synthesized powders. The MB discoloration test showed that photocatalytic activity depends on the phase structure as well as the specific surface area of the synthesized TiO2 powder. The magnetic separation of TiO2-magnetite coagulate from solution proved to be efficient around pH:8.

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  12. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy.

  13. Cosmic rays, solar activity, magnetic coupling, and lightning incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, J. T. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented and described that unifies the complex influence of several factors on spatial and temporal variation of lightning incidence. These factors include the cosmic radiation, solar activity, and coupling between geomagnetic and interplanetary (solar wind) magnetic fields. Atmospheric electrical conductivity in the 10 km region was shown to be the crucial parameter altered by these factors. The theory reconciles several large scale studies of lightning incidence previously misinterpreted or considered contradictory. The model predicts additional strong effects on variations in lightning incidence, but only small effects on the morphology and rate of thunderstorm development.

  14. Boundaries in gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G H

    1991-06-01

    Standard deviations in the distribution of radii of cells and particles are considered to arrive at realistic limits in the use of gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting. Using a specific fractionation design, it is shown that the radius of particles (or cells) may be fractionated down to a precision of +/- 0.76%. Although higher precisions could be obtained with other designs, the number of particles available per fraction is inversely proportional to the precision desired. Thus, one would prefer to keep the precision as moderate as permissible by the experiments.

  15. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Guillamat, Pau; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix. PMID:27140604

  16. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-05-17

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix.

  17. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  18. Detailed design of a resonantly enhanced axion-photon regeneration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, D. B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2009-10-01

    A resonantly enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axionlike particles is described. This experiment is a shining light through walls study, where photons traveling through a strong magnetic field are (in part) converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and convert (in part) back to photons in a second region of strong magnetic field. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon-regeneration magnet. Compared to simple single-pass photon regeneration, this technique would result in a gain of (F/{pi}){sup 2}, where F is the finesse of each cavity. This gain could feasibly be as high as 10{sup 10}, corresponding to an improvement in the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, of order (F/{pi}){sup 1/2}{approx}300. This improvement would enable, for the first time, a purely laboratory experiment to probe axion-photon couplings at a level competitive with, or superior to, limits from stellar evolution or solar axion searches. This report gives a detailed discussion of the scheme for actively controlling the two Fabry-Perot cavities and the laser frequencies, and describes the heterodyne signal detection system, with limits ultimately imposed by shot noise.

  19. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  20. Plant regeneration, genetic fidelity, and active ingredient content of encapsulated hairy roots of Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Janhvi Mishra; Rawat, Balwant; Mehrotra, Shakti

    2013-06-01

    Among five hairy root lines of Picrorhiza kurrooa that were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes, one (H7) was selected for encapsulation due to high accumulation of picrotin and picrotoxinin (8.3 and 47.6 μg/g DW, respectively). Re-grown encapsulated roots induced adventitious shoots with 73 % frequency on MS medium supplemented with 0.1 μM 6-benzylaminopurine, following 6 months of storage at 25 °C. Regenerated plantlets had 85 % survival after 2 months. Regenerants were of similar morphotype having increased leaf number and branched root system as compared to non-transformed plants. The transformed nature of the plants was confirmed through PCR and Southern blot analysis. Genetic fidelity analysis of transformed plants using RAPD and ISSR showed 5.2 and 3.6 % polymorphism, respectively. Phytochemical analysis also showed that picrotin and picrotoxinin content were similar in hairy root line and its regenerants.

  1. Reduced BACE1 activity enhances clearance of myelin debris and regeneration of axons in the injured peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Mohamed H.; Pan, Bao Han; Hoffman, Paul N.; Ferraris, Dana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nguyen, Thien; Wong, Philip C.; Price, Donald L.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Griffin, John W.

    2012-01-01

    β- site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease best known for its role in generating the amyloid β peptides that are present in plaques of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 has been an attractive target for drug development. In cultured embryonic neurons BACE1-cleaved N-terminal APP is further processed to generate a fragment that can trigger axonal degeneration, suggesting a vital role for BACE1 in axonal health. In addition, BACE1 cleaves neuregulin 1 type III, a protein critical for myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells during development. Here, we asked if axonal degeneration or axonal regeneration in adult nerves might be affected by inhibition or elimination of BACE1. We report that BACE1 knockout and wild-type nerves degenerated at a similar rate after axotomy and to a similar extent in the experimental neuropathies produced by administration of paclitaxel and acrylamide. These data indicate N-APP is not the sole culprit in axonal degeneration in adult nerves. Unexpectedly, however, we observed that BACE1 knockout mice had markedly enhanced clearance of axonal and myelin debris from degenerated fibers, accelerated axonal regeneration, and earlier reinnervation of neuromuscular junctions, compared to littermate controls. These observations were reproduced in part by pharmacological inhibition of BACE1. These data suggest BACE1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to accelerate regeneration and recovery after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:21490216

  2. Analysis of Solar Magnetic Activity with the Wavelet Coherence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, V. M.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.; Mendoza, B. E.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Sosa, O.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.

    2007-05-01

    The origin, behavior and evolution of the solar magnetic field is one of the main challenges of observational and theoretical solar physics. Up to now the Dynamo theory gives us the best approach to the problem. However, it is not yet able to predict many features of the solar activity, which seems not to be strictly a periodical phenomenon. Among the indicators of solar magnetic variability there is the 11-years cycle of sunspots, as well as the solar magnetic cycle of 22 years (the Hale cycle). In order to provide more elements to the Dynamo theory that could help it in the predicting task, we analyze here the plausible existence of other periodicities associated with the solar magnetic field. In this preliminary work we use historical data (sunspots and aurora borealis), proxies (Be10 and C14) and modern instrumental data (Coronal Holes, Cosmic Rays, sunspots, flare indexes and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm). To find relationships between different time-frequency series we have employed the t Wavelet Coherence technique: this technique indicates if two time-series of solar activity have the same periodicities in a given time interval. If so, it determines whether such relation is a linear one or not. Such a powerful tool indicates that, if some periodicity at a given frequency has a confidence level below 95%, it appears very lessened or does not appear in the Wavelet Spectral Analysis, such periodicity does not exist . Our results show that the so called Glaisberg cycle of 80-90 years and the periodicity of 205 years (the Suess cycle) do not exist . It can be speculated that such fictitious periodicities hav been the result of using the Fourier transform with series with are not of stationary nature, as it is the case of the Be10 and C14 series. In contrast we confirm the presence of periodicities of 1.3, 1.7, 3.5, 5.5, 7, 60, 120 and 240 years. The concept of a Glaisberg cycle falls between those of 60 and 120 years. We conclude that the periodicity of 120 years

  3. Thermal switching of the magnetization in an iron film on a magnetically active template MnAs/GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, Maurizio; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Spezzani, Carlo; Breitwieser, Romain; Popescu, Horia; Dealaunay, Renaud; Rache Salles, Benjamin; Eddrief, Mahmoud; Etgens, Victor H.

    2010-06-01

    We show that the magnetization direction of a thin Fe film can be fully reversed in a thermal cycle of a few degrees close to room temperature, without making use of an external magnetic field. This result is obtained by depositing the Fe film on MnAs/GaAs(001), which displays a temperature-controlled self-organized pattern of submicron-wide stripes, alternating ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic phases. The temperature-dependent dipolar fields generated by this magnetically active template can be used to control the magnetization of the Fe overlayer.

  4. THE MAGNETIC CLASSIFICATION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS 1992–2015

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-03-20

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity; however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  5. Magnetocardiography of animals in magnetically shielded environment with active compensation.

    PubMed

    Horng, H E; Liao, S H; Hsu, S J; Yang, H C; Wu, J Y; Chen, C C; Wu, C H; Wu, C C

    2004-11-30

    A high-Tc 1st-order electronic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer system is constructed to study the magnetocardiogram (MCG) of rabbits in a moderately magnetically shielded environment with active compensation. In the noisy hospital environment, the noise cannot be completely reduced with the 1st-order gradiometer, therefore, a reference SQUID with active compensation was used to further reduce the noise level leaking into the room. The MCG system was equipped with a x-y translation bed. We used a low-pass filter with the cut off frequency at 44 Hz, a high-pass filter with the cut off frequency at 0.1 Hz and the 60 Hz notch filter to reduce the power line interference. The noise level of the 1st order gradiometer MCG system in this moderately magnetically shielded room was about 1 pT/square root of Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. The MCG of a normal rabbits was measured with this system and a MCG contour map and a current density distribution was constructed.

  6. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  7. Active Magnetic Shielding for Long Duration Manned Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, R.; Burger, W. J.; Cavelli, V.; Musenich, R.; Datskov, V. I.; Della Torre, A.; Venditti, F.; Hovland, S.; Meinke, R. B.; Van Sciver, S.; Westover, S. C.; Spillantini, P.

    2013-09-01

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study, and continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. The aim of the effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on the current technological level. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency.

  8. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-24

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  9. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    PubMed Central

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  10. ApoER2 and Reelin are expressed in regenerating peripheral nerve and regulate Schwann cell migration by activating the Rac1 GEF protein, Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Pasten, Consuelo; Cerda, Joaquín; Jausoro, Ignacio; Court, Felipe A; Cáceres, Alfredo; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2015-11-01

    ApoER2 and its ligand Reelin participate in neuronal migration during development. Upon receptor binding, Reelin induces the proteolytic processing of ApoER2 as well as the activation of signaling pathway, including small Rho GTPases. Besides its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), Reelin is also secreted by Schwann cells (SCs), the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Reelin deficient mice (reeler) show decreased axonal regeneration in the PNS; however neither the presence of ApoER2 nor the role of the Reelin signaling pathway in the PNS have been evaluated. Interestingly SC migration occurs during PNS development and during injury-induced regeneration and involves activation of small Rho GTPases. Thus, Reelin-ApoER2 might regulate SC migration during axon regeneration in the PNS. Here we demonstrate the presence of ApoER2 in PNS. After sciatic nerve injury Reelin was induced and its receptor ApoER2 was proteolytically processed. In vitro, SCs express both Reelin and ApoER2 and Reelin induces SC migration. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying Reelin-dependent SC migration, we examined the involvement of Rac1, a conspicuous small GTPase family member. FRET experiments revealed that Reelin activates Rac1 at the leading edge of SCs. In addition, Tiam1, a major Rac1-specific GEF was required for Reelin-induced SC migration. Moreover, Reelin-induced SC migration was decreased after suppression of the polarity protein PAR3, consistent with its association to Tiam1. Even more interesting, we demonstrated that PAR3 binds preferentially to the full-length cytoplasmic tail of ApoER2 corresponding to the splice-variant containing the exon 19 that encodes a proline-rich insert and that ApoER2 was required for SC migration. Our study reveals a novel function for Reelin/ApoER2 in PNS, inducing cell migration of SCs, a process relevant for PNS development and regeneration.

  11. FENTON-DRIVEN CHEMICAL REGENERATION OF MTBE-SPENT GAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was chemically regenerated utilizing the Fenton mechanism. Two successive GAC regeneration cycles were performed involving iterative adsorption and oxidation processes: MTBE was adsorbed to the GAC, oxidized, r...

  12. Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Boeder, A; Zimm, C

    2006-09-30

    Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate

  13. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  14. Molybdenum Carbides, Active and In Situ Regenerable Catalysts in Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Zacher, Alan H.; Wang, Huamin; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Meyer, Harry M.; Soykal, I. Ilgaz; Schwartz, Viviane

    2016-06-16

    We assessed molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60-h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oils below 2 wt% and 0.01 mg KOH g-1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60-h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are promising catalytic materials which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. This paper highlights areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure-function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.

  15. Molybdenum carbides, active and in situ regenerable catalysts in hydroprocessing of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Zacher, Alan; Wang, Huamin; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Schwartz, Viviane; Soykal, I. Ilgaz

    2016-05-19

    This paper describes properties of molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60 h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oils below 2 wt % and 0.01 mg KOH g–1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60 h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are a good catalyst candidate which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. Furthermore, we highlight areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure–function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.

  16. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  17. ACTIVITY ANALYSES FOR SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED WITH KEPLER. I. PROXIES OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning; Yun, Duo

    2015-11-15

    Light curves of solar-type stars often show gradual fluctuations due to rotational modulation by magnetic features (starspots and faculae) on stellar surfaces. Two quantitative measures of modulated light curves are employed as the proxies of magnetic activity for solar-type stars observed with Kepler telescope. The first is named autocorrelation index i{sub AC}, which describes the degree of periodicity of the light curve; the second is the effective fluctuation range of the light curve R{sub eff}, which reflects the depth of rotational modulation. The two measures are complementary and depict different aspects of magnetic activities on solar-type stars. By using the two proxies i{sub AC} and R{sub eff}, we analyzed activity properties of two carefully selected solar-type stars observed with Kepler (Kepler ID: 9766237 and 10864581), which have distinct rotational periods (14.7 versus 6.0 days). We also applied the two measures to the Sun for a comparative study. The result shows that both the measures can reveal cyclic activity variations (referred to as i{sub AC}-cycle and R{sub eff}-cycle) on the two Kepler stars and the Sun. For the Kepler star with the faster rotation rate, i{sub AC}-cycle and R{sub eff}-cycle are in the same phase, while for the Sun (slower rotator), they are in the opposite phase. By comparing the solar light curve with simultaneous photospheric magnetograms, it is identified that the magnetic feature that causes the periodic light curve during solar minima is the faculae of the enhanced network region, which can also be a candidate of magnetic features that dominate the periodic light curves on the two Kepler stars.

  18. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Millay, Douglas P; Sutherland, Lillian B; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-08-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts.

  19. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts. PMID:25085416

  20. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  1. Roles of superconducting magnetic bearings and active magnetic bearings in attitude control and energy storage flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiqiang; Fang, Jiancheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    2012-12-01

    Compared with conventional energy storage flywheel, the rotor of attitude control and energy storage flywheel (ACESF) used in space not only has high speed, but also is required to have precise and stable direction. For the presented superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and active magnetic bearing (AMB) suspended ACESF, the rotor model including gyroscopic couples is established originally by taking the properties of SMB and AMB into account, the forces of SMB and AMB are simplified by linearization within their own neighbors of equilibrium points. For the high-speed rigid discal rotor with large inertia, the negative effect of gyroscopic effect of rotor is prominent, the radial translation and tilting movement of rotor suspended by only SMB, SMB with equivalent PMB, or SMB together with PD controlled AMB are researched individually. These analysis results proved originally that SMB together with AMB can make the rotor be stable and make the radial amplitude of the vibration of rotor be small while the translation of rotor suspended by only SMB or SMB and PM is not stable and the amplitude of this vibration is large. For the stability of the high-speed rotor in superconducting ACESF, the AMB can suppress the nutation and precession of rotor effectively by cross-feedback control based on the separated PD type control or by other modern control methods.

  2. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Markel, Robert S.; Thompson, Michael J.; Leamon, Robert J.; Malanushenko, Anna V.; Davey, Alisdair R.; Howe, Rachel; Krista, Larisza D.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Gurman, Joseph B.; Pesnell, William D.

    2014-09-01

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  3. p53 on the crossroad between regeneration and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charni, Meital; Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Molchadsky, Alina; Rotter, Varda

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration and tumorigenesis share common molecular pathways, nevertheless the outcome of regeneration is life, whereas tumorigenesis leads to death. Although the process of regeneration is strictly controlled, malignant transformation is unrestrained. In this review, we discuss the involvement of TP53, the major tumor-suppressor gene, in the regeneration process. We point to the role of p53 as coordinator assuring that regeneration will not shift to carcinogenesis. The fluctuation in p53 activity during the regeneration process permits a tight control. On one hand, its inhibition at the initial stages allows massive proliferation, on the other its induction at advanced steps of regeneration is essential for preservation of robustness and fidelity of the regeneration process. A better understanding of the role of p53 in regulation of regeneration may open new opportunities for implementation of TP53-based therapies, currently available for cancer patients, in regenerative medicine. PMID:27768121

  4. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS): utility in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2008-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have now been extensively incorporated in the management of infertile couples. But even after rapid methodological and technological advances the success rates of these procedures have been below expectations. This has led to development of many sperm preparation protocols to obtain an ideal semen sample for artificial reproduction. Sperm apoptosis has been heavily linked to failures in reproductive techniques. One of the earliest changes shown by apoptotic spermatozoa is externalization of phosphatidyl serine. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) is a novel sperm preparation technique that separates apoptotic and non-apoptotic spermatozoa based on the expression of phosphatidylserine. This has led to the incorporation of MACS as a sperm preparation technique. The review highlights the principle and mechanism of this novel technique and enumerates its advantages as a sperm preparation technique. Its utility in ART as an efficient tool for sperm recovery and its application in cryopreservation of semen samples is also explained.

  5. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  6. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats - A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn; Dutz, Silvio; Ko, Frank K.; Häfeli, Urs O.

    2015-04-01

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  7. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    A 3-axis active attitude control system with only one rotating part was developed using a momentum wheel with magnetic gimballing capability as a torque actuator for all three body axes. A brief description of magnetic bearing technology is given. It is concluded that based on this technology an integrated energy storage/attitude control system with one air of counterrotating rings could reduce the complexity and weight of conventional systems.

  8. Correlation between the Structure and Catalytic Activity of [Cp*Rh(Substituted Bipyridine)] Complexes for NADH Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vinothkumar; Sivanesan, Dharmalingam; Yoon, Sungho

    2017-02-06

    A series of water-soluble half-sandwich [Cp*Rh(III)(N^N)Cl](+) (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadiene, N^N-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine) complexes containing electron-donating substituents around the 2,2'-bipyridyl ligand were synthesized and fully characterized for the regioselective reduction of nicotinamide coenzyme (NAD(+)). The influence of the positional effect of the substituents on the structural, electrochemical, and catalytic properties of the catalyst was systematically studied in detail. The catalytic efficiency of the substituted bipyridine Cp*Rh(III) complexes are inversely correlated with their redox potentials. The 5,5'-substituted bipyridine Cp*Rh(III) complex, which had the lowest reduction potential, most effectively regenerated NADH with a turnover frequency of 1100 h(-1). Detailed kinetic studies on the generation of intermediate(s) provide valuable mechanistic insight into this catalytic cycle and help to direct the future design strategy of corresponding catalysts.

  9. Chitosan nanoparticles enhance the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine in collagen membranes used for periapical guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barreras, Uriel Soto; Méndez, Fernando Torres; Martínez, Rita Elizabeth Martínez; Valencia, Carolina Samano; Rodríguez, Panfilo Raymundo Martinez; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo Loyola

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic failure is mainly associated with the persistence of microbial infection in the root canal system and/or the periradicular area. Microorganisms and their toxins located in the root canal system may trigger apical periodontitis and tissue destruction. Tissue regeneration in periapical surgery by using membrane barriers has shown an improved healing and bone closure. However, bacterial membrane contamination is a main reason of failure. In this in vitro study, different brands of chlorhexidine, a combination of chitosan nanoparticles containing chlorhexidine were tested against Enterococcus faecalis on agar plate's cultures and infected collagen membranes. Our results indicated that chitosan nanoparticles acted synergistically with chlorhexidine, inhibiting and eliminating significantly a greater amount of colony former units in both BHI-agar cultures and infected collagen membranes. These results suggested that chitosan nanoparticles could be used to improve regenerative procedures in periapical surgery.

  10. Detection of starquakes on magnetically active red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2015-07-01

    The scientific team of the Stephanion Observatory, University of Thessaloniki contributed to the research of high frequency optical oscillations on red dwarfs by participating in international programs for Multiwavelength observation of strong Flares of selected flare stars ([12]). These joined research shed plenty of light on the phenomenon of high frequency optical oscillations. Nevertheless a better understanding of the high-frequency oscillations demand a unified analysis of the flare light-curve for a wider time window covering pre-flare, flare and post flare and a broader band of frequencies. Thus in addition to the international campaign research the Stephanion Observatory group observe and analysis one colour (B, or U) observations of the Stephanion Observatory of different red dwarfs: EV Lac([1], [2] and [7]), AD Leo ([4] and [5]),YZ CMin ([3],[9]), V 390 Auri ([6],[10]), UV Cet([8]), at any stage of their activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flare! s).In this paper we present the analysis of the quiet state observations of the stars EV Lac, BY Drac , AD Leo, YZ Cmin in order to realize if starquakes appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star.

  11. Planarian activity differences when maintained in water pre-treated with magnetic fields: a nonlinear effect.

    PubMed

    Gang, Noa; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    There have been multiple claims that exposing water to a static magnetic field affects its properties which influence living systems. To test this hypothesis, planarian subsequent to dissection were maintained in spring water that had been previously exposed for only one day to one of three (16, 160, or 1,600 G) intensity static magnetic fields or to a reference condition. Although there was no significant difference in regeneration rates over the subsequent seven-day period, there was a statistically significant nonlinear effect for planarian mobility and diffusion rates. Both mobility rates and diffusion velocity of a liquid within the water that had been exposed to the 16 G field was about twice that for water exposed to the other intensities. These results imply that nonlinear biophysical effects may emerge under specific conditions of intensity ranges for particular volumes of water.

  12. Local inhibition of nitrergic activity in tenotomized rats accelerates muscle regeneration by increasing fiber area and decreasing central core lesions.

    PubMed

    Seabra, A D; Moraes, S A S; Batista, E J O; Garcia, T B; Souza, M C; Oliveira, K R M; Herculano, A M

    2017-02-20

    Muscular atrophy is a progressive degeneration characterized by muscular proteolysis, loss of mass and decrease in fiber area. Tendon rupture induces muscular atrophy due to an intrinsic functional connection. Local inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) accelerates tendon histological recovery and induces functional improvement. Here we evaluate the effects of such local nitrergic inhibition on the pattern of soleus muscle regeneration after tenotomy. Adult male Wistar rats (240 to 280 g) were divided into four experimental groups: control (n=4), tenotomized (n=6), vehicle (n=6), and L-NAME (n=6). Muscular atrophy was induced by calcaneal tendon rupture in rats. Changes in muscle wet weight and total protein levels were determined by the Bradford method, and muscle fiber area and central core lesion (CCL) occurrence were evaluated by histochemical assays. Compared to tenotomized (69.3±22%) and vehicle groups (68.1%±17%), L-NAME treatment induced an increase in total protein level (108.3±21%) after 21 days post-injury. A reduction in fiber areas was observed in tenotomized (56.3±1.3%) and vehicle groups (53.9±3.9%). However, L-NAME treatment caused an increase in this parameter (69.3±1.6%). Such events were preceded by a remarkable reduction in the number of fibers with CCL in L-NAME-treated animals (12±2%), but not in tenotomized (21±2.5%) and vehicle groups (19.6±2.8%). Altogether, our data reveal that inhibition of tendon NOS contributed to the attenuation of atrophy and acceleration of muscle regeneration.

  13. Loss of Dnmt1 catalytic activity reveals multiple roles for DNA methylation during pancreas development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan M.; Bosch, Justin A.; Goll, Mary G.; Hesselson, Daniel; Dong, P. Duc Si; Shin, Donghun; Chi, Neil C.; Shin, Chong Hyun; Schlegel, Amnon; Halpern, Marnie; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental mechanisms regulating gene expression and the stable acquisition of cell fate direct cytodifferentiation during organogenesis. Moreover, it is likely that such mechanisms could be exploited to repair or regenerate damaged organs. DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) are enzymes critical for epigenetic regulation, and are used in concert with histone methylation and acetylation to regulate gene expression and maintain genomic integrity and chromosome structure. We carried out two forward genetic screens for regulators of endodermal organ development. In the first, we screened for altered morphology of developing digestive organs, while in the second we screed for the lack of terminally differentiated cell types in the pancreas and liver. From these screens, we identified two mutant alleles of zebrafish dnmt1. Both lesions are predicted to eliminate dnmt1 function; one is a missense mutation in the catalytic domain and the other is a nonsense mutation that eliminates the catalytic domain. In zebrafish dnmt1 mutants, the pancreas and liver form normally, but begin to degenerate after 84 hours post fertilization (hpf). Acinar cells are nearly abolished through apoptosis by 100 hpf, though neither DNA replication, nor entry into mitosis are halted in the absence of detectable Dnmt1. However, endocrine cells and ducts are largely spared. Surprisingly, dnmt1 mutants and dnmt1 morpholino-injected larvae show increased capacity for pancreatic beta cell regeneration in an inducible model of pancreatic beta cell ablation. Thus, our data suggest that Dnmt1 is dispensable for pancreatic duct or endocrine cell formation, but not for acinar cell survival. In addition, Dnmt1 may influence the differentiation of pancreatic beta cell progenitors or the reprogramming of cells toward the pancreatic beta cell fate. PMID:19631206

  14. Local inhibition of nitrergic activity in tenotomized rats accelerates muscle regeneration by increasing fiber area and decreasing central core lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seabra, A.D.; Moraes, S.A.S.; Batista, E.J.O.; Garcia, T.B.; Souza, M.C.; Oliveira, K.R.M.; Herculano, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Muscular atrophy is a progressive degeneration characterized by muscular proteolysis, loss of mass and decrease in fiber area. Tendon rupture induces muscular atrophy due to an intrinsic functional connection. Local inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) accelerates tendon histological recovery and induces functional improvement. Here we evaluate the effects of such local nitrergic inhibition on the pattern of soleus muscle regeneration after tenotomy. Adult male Wistar rats (240 to 280 g) were divided into four experimental groups: control (n=4), tenotomized (n=6), vehicle (n=6), and L-NAME (n=6). Muscular atrophy was induced by calcaneal tendon rupture in rats. Changes in muscle wet weight and total protein levels were determined by the Bradford method, and muscle fiber area and central core lesion (CCL) occurrence were evaluated by histochemical assays. Compared to tenotomized (69.3±22%) and vehicle groups (68.1%±17%), L-NAME treatment induced an increase in total protein level (108.3±21%) after 21 days post-injury. A reduction in fiber areas was observed in tenotomized (56.3±1.3%) and vehicle groups (53.9±3.9%). However, L-NAME treatment caused an increase in this parameter (69.3±1.6%). Such events were preceded by a remarkable reduction in the number of fibers with CCL in L-NAME-treated animals (12±2%), but not in tenotomized (21±2.5%) and vehicle groups (19.6±2.8%). Altogether, our data reveal that inhibition of tendon NOS contributed to the attenuation of atrophy and acceleration of muscle regeneration. PMID:28225888

  15. Distinct Wnt signaling pathways have opposing roles in appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L; Weidinger, Gilbert; Riehle, Kimberly J; Hubbert, Charlotte; Major, Michael B; Fausto, Nelson; Moon, Randall T

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, lower vertebrates have a remarkable capacity to regenerate complex structures damaged by injury or disease. This process, termed epimorphic regeneration, involves progenitor cells created through the reprogramming of differentiated cells or through the activation of resident stem cells. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates progenitor cell fate and proliferation during embryonic development and stem cell function in adults, but its functional involvement in epimorphic regeneration has not been addressed. Using transgenic fish lines, we show that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in the regenerating zebrafish tail fin and is required for formation and subsequent proliferation of the progenitor cells of the blastema. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling appears to act upstream of FGF signaling, which has recently been found to be essential for fin regeneration. Intriguingly, increased Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is sufficient to augment regeneration, as tail fins regenerate faster in fish heterozygous for a loss-of-function mutation in axin1, a negative regulator of the pathway. Likewise, activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling by overexpression of wnt8 increases proliferation of progenitor cells in the regenerating fin. By contrast, overexpression of wnt5b (pipetail) reduces expression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, impairs proliferation of progenitors and inhibits fin regeneration. Importantly, fin regeneration is accelerated in wnt5b mutant fish. These data suggest that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes regeneration, whereas a distinct pathway activated by wnt5b acts in a negative-feedback loop to limit regeneration.

  16. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramaniam M; Ugale, Gauri M; Warad, Shivaraj B

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search). All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP. PMID:23626951

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules against neoplastic cell lines under AC magnetic field activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqueiro, A. M.; Siqueira-Moura, M. P.; Jardim, D. R.; Primo, F. L.; Morais, P. C.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Suchocki, P.; Tedesco, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The goals of this study are to evaluate invitro compatibility of magnetic nanomaterials and their therapeutic potential against cancer cells. Highly stable ionic magnetic fluid sample (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) and Selol were incorporated into polymeric nanocapsules by nanoprecipitation method. The cytotoxic effect of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules was assessed on murine melanoma (B16-F10) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines following AC magnetic field application. The influence of different nanocapsules on cell viability was investigated by colorimetric MTT 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. In the absence of AC magnetic field Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules, containing 100 µg/mL Selol plus 5 × 1012 particle/mL, showed antitumoral activity of about 50% on B16-F10 melanoma cells while OSCC carcinoma cells demonstrated drug resistance at all concentrations of Selol and magnetic fluid (range of 100-500 µg/mL Selol and 5 × 1012-2.5 × 1013 particle/mL). On the other hand, under AC applied fields (1 MHz and 40 Oe amplitude) B16-F10 cell viability was reduced down to 40.5% (±3.33) at the highest concentration of nanoencapsulated Selol. The major effect, however, was observed on OSCC cells since the cell viability drops down to about 33.3% (±0.38) under application of AC magnetic field. These findings clearly indicate that the Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules present different toxic effects on neoplastic cell lines. Further, the cytotoxic effect was maximized under AC magnetic field application on OSCC, which emphasizes the effectiveness of the magnetohyperthermia approach.

  18. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amir, Lisa R; Everts, Vincent; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2009-07-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connective tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical attention as a way to correct congenital growth retardation of bone tissue or to generate bone to fill skeletal defects. The process of bone regeneration involves a complex system of biological changes whereby mechanical stress is converted into a cascade of signals that activate cellular behavior resulting in (enhanced) formation of bone. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the bone regeneration process during distraction osteogenesis. The mechanical and biological factors that are important for the success of the distraction treatment have been partially characterized and are discussed in this review.

  19. Using magnets and magnetic beads to dissect signaling pathways activated by mechanical tension applied to cells.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, R J; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K

    2016-02-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers.

  20. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  1. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  2. Magnetic graphene oxide-polystyrene and magnetic activated carbon-polystyrene nanocomposites as sorbents for bisphenol A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekos, Kyriazis; Kampouraki, Zoi Christina; Samanidou, Victoria; Deliyanni, Eleni

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic graphene oxide-polystyrene and magnetic activated carbon-polystyrene nanocomposites as sorbents for bisphenol A. Kyriazis Rekos1, Zoi Christina Kampouraki1, Victoria Samanidou2, Eleni Deliyanni1 1 Laboratory of General and Inorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece 2 Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece The aim of this work was to prepare and characterize novel composites of magnetic activated carbon or magnetic graphene oxide with polystyrene (GO/PSm), through one step simple and effective route. Μagnetite nanoparticles, prepared in the laboratory, were dispersed in the presence of activated carbon (C) or graphene oxide (GO) in a polystyrene (PS) solution in dimethylformamide, at elevated temperature, for the fabrication of the magnetite-Carbon-PS (C-PSm) and magnetite- Graphene Oxide-PS (GO-PSm) hybrid-nanoparticles. For comparison, C-PS and GO-PS composites were also prepared in the same route. The nanocomposites were tested for their sorption ability for an endocrine disruptor, bisphenol A. The effect of solution pH, initial concentration, contact time and temperature were examined. The magnetic graphite oxide-polystyrene presented higher adsorption capacity (100 mg/g) than the non magnetic composites (70 mg/g), as well as than initial graphite oxide (20 mg/g). FTIR, XRD, BET, TGA, VSM and SEM were performed in order to investigate the role of the PS on the better adsorption performance of the mGO-PS nanocomposites. The characterization with these techniques revealed the possible interactions of the surface functional groups of activated carbon and/or graphite oxide with polystyrene that resulted in the better performance of the magnetic nanocomposites for bisphenol A adsorption.

  3. Brain activity associated with skilled finger movements: multichannel magnetic recordings.

    PubMed

    Chiarenza, G A; Hari, R K; Karhu, J J; Tessore, S

    1991-01-01

    We recorded with a 24-channel SQUID magnetometer cerebral activity preceding and following self-paced voluntary 'skilled' movements in four healthy adults. The subject pressed buttons successively with the right index and middle fingers aiming at a time difference of 40-60 ms; on-line feedback on performance was given after each movement. Slow magnetic readiness fields (RFs) preceded the movements by 0.5 s and culminated about 20 ms after the electromyogram (EMG) onset. Movement-evoked fields, MEFs, opposite in polarity to RFs, were observed 90-120 ms after the EMG onset. They were followed by an additional 'skilled-performance field', SPF, 400-500 ms after the EMG onset. The source locations of RF, MEF, and SPF were within 2 cm from sources of the somatosensory evoked responses, which were situated in the posterior wall of the Rolandic fissure; the sources of MEF were closest to the midline. Neural generators of these deflections and of the corresponding electric potentials are discussed.

  4. Bifurcation Behavior of a Rotor Supported by Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, J. C.; YU, L.; LEUNG, A. Y. T.

    2000-08-01

    The non-linear dynamics of a rigid rotor levitated by active magnetic bearings is investigated. The vibrations in the horizontal and vertical directions are analyzed on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using normal-form method. The resulting normal forms in the horizontal and vertical directions are different due to the effect of rotor weight. It is shown that the vibratory behavior in the vertical direction can be reduced on the center manifold to the Bogdanov-Takens form. For the autonomous case, there exist saddle-node bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation for local analysis, and a saddle-connection bifurcation for global analysis. For non-autonomous case, the Melnikov technique is used to determine the critical parameter at which the homoclinic orbits intersect transversally. For the vibrations in the horizontal direction, the essential non-linear terms of the truncated normal form are third order. The behaviors of zero solutions are given. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical predictions.

  5. Crack-free polydimethylsiloxane-bioactive glass-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid monoliths with controlled biomineralization activity and mechanical property for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Du, Yuzhang; Que, Wenxiu; Xing, Yonglei; Chen, Xiaofeng; Lei, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Crack-free organic-inorganic hybrid monoliths with controlled biomineralization activity and mechanical property have an important role for highly efficient bone tissue regeneration. Here, biomimetic and crack-free polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-modified bioactive glass (BG)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (PDMS-BG-PEG) hybrids monoliths were prepared by a facile sol-gel technique. Results indicate that under the assist of co-solvents, BG sol and PDMS and PEG could be hybridized at a molecular level, and effects of the PEG molecular weight on the structure, biomineralization activity, and mechanical property of the as-prepared hybrid monoliths were also investigated in detail. It is found that an addition of low molecular weight PEG can significantly prevent the formation of cracks and speed up the gelation of the hybrid monoliths, and the surface microstructure of the hybrid monoliths can be changed from the porous to the smooth as the PEG molecular weight increases. Additionally, the hybrid monoliths with low molecular weight PEG show the high formation of the biological apatite layer, while the hybrids with high molecular weight PEG exhibit negligible biomineralization ability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Furthermore, the PDMS-BG-PEG 600 hybrid monolith has significantly high compressive strength (32 ± 3 MPa) and modulus (153 ± 11 MPa), as well as good cell biocompatibility by supporting osteoblast (MC3T3-E1) attachment and proliferation. These results indicate that the as-prepared PDMS-BG-PEG hybrid monoliths may have promising applications for bone tissue regeneration.

  6. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings used for the suspension of momentum wheels provide conclusive advantages: the low friction torques and the absence of abrasion allow the realization of lightweight high speed wheels with high angular momentum and energy storage capacity and virtually unlimited lifetime. The use of actively controlled bearings provides a magnetic gimballing capability by applying the external signals to the two servo loops controlling the rotational degrees of freedom. Thus, an attitude control system can be realized by using only one rotating mass for 3-axis active satellite stabilization.

  7. Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  8. Biochemical evaluation of virtual screening methods reveals a cell-active inhibitor of the cancer-promoting phosphatases of regenerating liver.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, Birgit; Diether, Maren; Ballester, Pedro J; Köhn, Maja

    2014-12-17

    Computationally supported development of small molecule inhibitors has successfully been applied to protein tyrosine phosphatases in the past, revealing a number of cell-active compounds. Similar approaches have also been used to screen for small molecule inhibitors for the cancer-related phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRL) family. Still, selective and cell-active compounds are of limited availability. Since especially PRL-3 remains an attractive drug target due to its clear role in cancer metastasis, such compounds are highly demanded. In this study, we investigated various virtual screening approaches for their applicability to identify novel small molecule entities for PRL-3 as target. Biochemical evaluation of purchasable compounds revealed ligand-based approaches as well suited for this target, compared to docking-based techniques that did not perform well in this context. The best hit of this study, a 2-cyano-2-ene-ester and hence a novel chemotype targeting the PRLs, was further optimized by a structure-activity-relationship (SAR) study, leading to a low micromolar PRL inhibitor with acceptable selectivity over other protein tyrosine phosphatases. The compound is active in cells, as shown by its ability to specifically revert PRL-3 induced cell migration, and exhibits similar effects on PRL-1 and PRL-2. It is furthermore suitable for fluorescence microscopy applications, and it is commercially available. These features make it the only purchasable, cell-active and acceptably selective PRL inhibitor to date that can be used in various cellular applications.

  9. Magnetic fluid poly(ethylene glycol) with moderate anticancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Múčková, Marta; Lazová, Jana; Juríková, Alena; Lancz, Gábor; Tomašovičová, Natália; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Jozef; Vávra, Ivo; Fabián, Martin; Feoktystov, Artem V.; Garamus, Vasil M.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Kopčanský, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing magnetic fluids - magnetite (Fe 3O 4) stabilized by sodium oleate - were prepared. Magnetic measurements confirmed superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. The structure of that kind of magnetic fluid was characterized using different techniques, including electron microscopy, photon cross correlation spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering, while the adsorption of PEG on magnetic particles was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From the in vitro toxicity tests it was found that a magnetic fluid containing PEG (MFPEG) partially inhibited the growth of cancerous B16 cells at the highest tested dose (2.1 mg/ml of Fe 3O 4 in MFPEG).

  10. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  11. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yoon, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Byung Gon

    2016-09-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  12. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yoon, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Byung Gon

    2016-01-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries. PMID:27857723

  13. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  14. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950–1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters. PMID:28217547

  15. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  16. The balance of NMDA- and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity in normal adult goldfish and during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew L; Rodger, Jennifer; Stirling, R Victoria; Beazley, Lyn D; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2005-10-01

    Retinotectal topography is established during development and relies on the sequential recruitment of glutamate receptors within postsynaptic tectal cells. NMDA receptors underpin plastic changes at early stages when retinal ganglion cell (RGC) terminal arbors are widespread and topography is coarse; AMPA/kainate receptors mediate fast secure neurotransmission characteristic of mature circuits once topography is refined. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of these receptors to visually evoked activity in normal adult goldfish, in which retinotectal topography is constantly adjusted to compensate for the continual neurogenesis and the addition of new RGC arbors. Furthermore, we examined animals at two stages of optic nerve regeneration. In the first, RGC arbors are widespread and receptive fields large resulting in coarse topography; in the second, RGC arbors are pruned to reduce receptive fields leading to refined topography. Antagonists were applied to the tectum during multiunit recording of postsynaptic responses. Normal goldfish have low levels of NMDA receptor-mediated activity and high levels of AMPA/kainate. When coarse topography has been restored, NMDA receptor-mediated activity is increased and that of AMPA/kainate decreased. Once topography has been refined, the balance of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity returns to normal. The data suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission in normal adult goldfish is dual with NMDA receptors fine-tuning topography and AMPA receptors allowing stable synaptic function. Furthermore, the normal operation of both receptors allows a response to injury in which the balance can be transiently reversed to restore topography and vision.

  17. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) promotes cell migration through Arf-activity-dependent stimulation of integrin α5 recycling.

    PubMed

    Krndija, Denis; Münzberg, Christin; Maass, Ulrike; Hafner, Margit; Adler, Guido; Kestler, Hans A; Seufferlein, Thomas; Oswald, Franz; von Wichert, Götz

    2012-08-15

    The formation of metastasis is one of the most critical problems in oncology. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) is a new target in colorectal cancer, mediating metastatic behavior through a promigratory function. However, detailed explanations for this effect have remained elusive. Here we show that PRL-3 interacts with the ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1). PRL-3 colocalizes with Arf1 in an endosomal compartment and associates with transmembrane proteins such as the transferrin receptor and α5 integrins. PRL-3 interacts with Arf1 through a distinct motif and regulates activation of Arf1. PRL-3-mediated migration depends on expression and activation of Arf1 and is sensitive to treatment with Brefeldin A. We also demonstrate that PRL-3 modulates recycling of α5 integrins and that its phosphatase activity as well as Arf activation and compartmentalization with Arf1 are required for this effect. In summary our data identify a new function for PRL-3 and show that Arf1 is a new PRL-3-dependent mediator of enhanced migration of cancer cells through enhanced recycling of matrix receptors.

  18. Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2012-01-18

    We have experimentally studied micrometer-scale domain wall (DW) motion driven by a magnetic field and an electric current in a Co/Pt multilayer strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The thermal activation energy for DW motion, along with its scaling with the driving field and current, has been extracted directly from the temperature dependence of the DW velocity. The injection of DC current resulted in an enhancement of the DW velocity independent of the current polarity, but produced no measurable change in the activation energy barrier. Through this analysis, the observed current-induced DW velocity enhancement can be entirely and unambiguously attributed to Joule heating.

  19. Thermally activated magnetization reversal in monatomic magnetic chains on surfaces studied by classical atomistic spin-dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David S G; Mavropoulos, Phivos; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan

    2011-10-05

    We analyse the spontaneous magnetization reversal of supported monatomic chains of finite length due to thermal fluctuations via atomistic spin-dynamics simulations. Our approach is based on the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion of a classical spin Hamiltonian in the presence of stochastic forces. The associated magnetization lifetime is found to obey an Arrhenius law with an activation barrier equal to the domain wall energy in the chain. For chains longer than one domain wall width, the reversal is initiated by nucleation of a reversed magnetization domain primarily at the chain edge followed by a subsequent propagation of the domain wall to the other edge in a random-walk fashion. This results in a linear dependence of the lifetime on the chain length, if the magnetization correlation length is not exceeded. We studied chains of uniaxial and triaxial anisotropy and found that a triaxial anisotropy leads to a reduction of the magnetization lifetime due to a higher reversal attempt rate, even though the activation barrier is not changed.

  20. Active Control of Fan Noise in Ducts Using Magnetic Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency...magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency as well...systems typically have fans that will move air from the heating or cooling system to any desired space. Fan noise is characterized first by tonal

  1. Precision Geolocation of Active Electromagnetic Sensors Using Stationary Magnetic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    techniques based on magnetic gradiometry. In a series of field trials, a full tensor magnetic gradiometer, constructed from four 3-axis vector...averaged to generate pulse peak estimates. In the case of the SQUID system, the gradient is built up from a series of 24 measurements taken with...location, GPS measured location, Wilson inversion and LSQ optimized inversion is shown, with the inversion data shown as a scatter plot of a series of

  2. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p < 0.05). When biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p < 0.05). The exposure of P. aeruginosa biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  3. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  4. Catalytic activity of catalase under strong magnetic fields of up to 8 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Iwasaka, M.

    1996-04-01

    The question of whether or not magnetic fields affect enzymatic activity is of considerable interest in biomagnetics and biochemistry. This study focuses on whether magnetically related enzymatic activities can be affected by magnetic fields. We examined the effect of magnetic fields of up to 8 T on catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We observed changes in absorbance of reaction mixture of hydrogen peroxide and catalase at 240 nm, during and after magnetic field exposures. When the reaction mixture was not treated with nitrogen-gas bubbling, it was observed that the initial reaction rate of the reaction which was exposed to magnetic fields of up to 8 T was 50%-85% lower than the control data. This magnetic field effect was not observed, however, when the reaction mixture was bubbled with nitrogen gas to remove the dissolved oxygen molecules which were produced in the solution. We also measured concentration of dissolved oxygen which was produced by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the reaction mixture which was exposed to magnetic fields increased 20%-25% compared to the control solution. The results of the present study indicate that magnetic fields affect dynamic movement of oxygen bubbles which are produced in the reaction mixture by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, but not the catalytic activity of catalase itself.

  5. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation in axons and Schwann cells in experimental sciatic nerve injury and its role in modulating axon regeneration: studies with etanercept.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darrell; Tweed, Christopher; Fernyhough, Paul; Glazner, Gordon W

    2009-06-01

    Early inflammatory events may inhibit functional recovery after injury in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. We investigated the role of the inflammatory tumor necrosis factor/nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) axis on events subsequent to sciatic nerve crush injury in adult rats. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that within 6 hours after crush, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity increased significantly in a 1-cm section around the crush site. By immunofluorescence staining, there was increased nuclear localization of the NF-kappaB subunits p50 but not p65 or c-Rel in Schwann cells but no obvious inflammatory cell infiltration. In rats injected subcutaneously with etanercept, a tumor necrosis factor receptor chimera that binds free cytokine, the injury-induced rise in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity was inhibited, and nuclear localization of p50 in Schwann cells was lowered after the injury. Axonal growth 3 days after nerve crush assessed with immunofluorescence for GAP43 demonstrated that the regeneration distance of leading axons from the site of nerve crush was greater in etanercept-treated animals than in saline-treated controls. These data indicate that tumor necrosis factor mediates rapid activation of injury-induced NF-kappaB DNA binding in Schwann cells and that these events are associated with inhibition of postinjury axonal sprouting.

  6. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs.

  7. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  8. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C-H activation of amines.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanny; Nasir Baig, R B; Han, Changseok; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Varma, Rajender S

    2015-11-04

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning a graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for the expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of amines.

  9. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  10. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C–H activation of amines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of ...

  11. Magnetic field configuration in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Vieira, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides continuous monitoring of the Sun's vector magnetic field through full-disk photospheric data with both high cadence and high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the evolution of AR 11249 from March 6 to March 7, 2012. We make use of HMI Stokes imaging, SDO/SHARPs, the HMI magnetic field line-of-sight (LOS) maps and the transverse components of the magnetic field as well as LOS velocity maps in order to detect regions with significant flux emergence and/or cancellation. In addition, we apply the Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) technique to the total and signed magnetic flux data and derive maps of horizontal velocity. From this analysis, we were able to pinpoint localized shear regions (and a shear channel) where penumbrae and pore formation areas, with strong linear polarization signals, are stretched and squeezed, showing also important downflows and upflows. We have also utilized Hinode/SP data and compared them to the HMI-SHARPs and the HMI-Stokes spectrograms. The aforementioned shear channel seems to correspond well with the X-class flare main channel of March 7 2012, as observed in AIA/SDO 171, 304 and 1600 Å.

  12. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-05-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  13. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Coene, A. Dupré, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR.

  15. Novel ferroferric oxide/polystyrene/silver core-shell magnetic nanocomposite microspheres as regenerable substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Chong; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Wei-Liang; Ren, Man-Man; Liu, Qin-Ze; Yang, Zhi-Zhou; Wang, Xin-Qiang; Duan, Xiu-Lan

    2016-02-01

    A novel Ag-coated Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell microsphere has been designed via fabrication of Fe3O4@Polystyrene core-shell magnetic microsphere through a seed emulsion polymerization, followed by deposition of Ag nanoparticles using in-situ reduction method. Such magnetic microspheres can be utilized as sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates, using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a probe molecule, with both stable and reproducible performances. The SERS detection limit of R6G decreased to 1 × 10-10 M and the enhancement factor of this substrate on the order of 106 was obtained. In addition, owing to possessing excellent magnetic properties, the resultant microspheres could be separated rapidly by an external magnetic field and utilized repeatedly for three times at least. Therefore, the unique renewable property suggests a new route to eliminate the single-use problem of traditional SERS substrates and will be promising for the practical application.

  16. Robust stabilization of rotor-active magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxin

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) are emerging as a beneficial technology for high-speed and high-performance suspensions in rotating machinery applications. A fundamental feedback control problem is robust stabilization in the presence of uncertain destabilizing mechanisms in aeroelastic, hydroelastic dynamics, and AMB feedback. As rotating machines are evolving in achieving high speed, high energy density, and high performance, the rotor and the support structure become increasingly flexible, and highly coupled. This makes rotor-AMB system more challenging to stabilize. The primary objective of this research is to develop a systematic control synthesis procedure for achieving highly robust stabilization of rotor-AMB systems. Of special interest is the stabilization of multivariable systems such as the AMB supported flexible rotors and gyroscopic rotors, where the classical control design may encounter difficulties. To this end, we first developed a systematic modeling procedure. This modeling procedure exploited the best advantages of technology developed in rotordynamics and the unique system identification tool provided by the AMBs. A systematic uncertainty model for rotor-AMB systems was developed, eliminating the iterative process of selecting uncertainty structures. The consequences of overestimation or underestimation of uncertainties were made transparent to control engineers. To achieve high robustness, we explored the fundamental performance/robustness limitations due to rotor-AMB system unstable poles. We examined the mixed sensitivity performance that is closely related to the unstructured uncertainty. To enhance transparency of the synthesis, we analyzed multivariable controllers from classical control perspectives. Based on these results, a systematic robust control synthesis procedure was established. For a strong gyroscopic rotor over a wide speed range, we applied the advanced gain-scheduled synthesis, and compared two synthesis frameworks in

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  18. Visible frequency magnetic activity in silver nanocluster metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Wu, Qi; Park, Wounjhang

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally observe magnetic resonance in the visible frequency region from self-assembled silver nanocluster metamaterials. Extensive numerical modeling studies were conducted to find the optimal nanocluster dimensions. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles coated with nanoscale silica coating was then performed on polymer templates fabricated by laser interference lithography. The nanoclusters supported magnetic resonance in the visible region, and the extracted effective permeability exhibited Lorentz-like resonance. The experimentally observed lowest value for the real part of permeability was 0.06. The nanocluster metamaterial represents a practical metamaterial architecture that is compatible with the scalable bottom-up manufacturing process.

  19. Acceleration of bone regeneration by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway via lithium released from lithium chloride/calcium phosphate cement in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qin, Yongbao; Wang, Renchong; Tang, Jingli; Cui, Xu; Wang, Ting; Liu, Wenlong; Pan, Haobo; Li, Bing

    2017-03-24

    By virtue of its excellent bioactivity and osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been applied extensively in bone engineering. Doping a trace element into CPC can change physical characteristics and enhance osteogenesis. The trace element lithium has been demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. We investigated the fracture-healing effect of osteoporotic defects with lithium-doped calcium phosphate cement (Li/CPC) and the underlying mechanism. Li/CPC bodies immersed in simulated body fluid converted gradually to hydroxyapatite. Li/CPC extracts stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts upon release of lithium ions (Li(+)) at 25.35 ± 0.12 to 50.74 ± 0.13 mg/l through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vitro. We also examined the effect of locally administered Li(+) on defects in rat tibia between CPC and Li/CPC in vivo. Micro-computed tomography and histological staining showed that Li/CPC had better osteogenesis by increasing bone mass and promoting repair in defects compared with CPC (P < 0.05). Li/CPC also showed better osteoconductivity and osseointegration. These findings suggest that local release of Li(+) from Li/CPC may accelerate bone regeneration from injury through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoporosis.

  20. Acceleration of bone regeneration by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway via lithium released from lithium chloride/calcium phosphate cement in osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qin, Yongbao; Wang, Renchong; Tang, Jingli; Cui, Xu; Wang, Ting; Liu, Wenlong; Pan, Haobo; Li, Bing

    2017-03-01

    By virtue of its excellent bioactivity and osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been applied extensively in bone engineering. Doping a trace element into CPC can change physical characteristics and enhance osteogenesis. The trace element lithium has been demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. We investigated the fracture-healing effect of osteoporotic defects with lithium-doped calcium phosphate cement (Li/CPC) and the underlying mechanism. Li/CPC bodies immersed in simulated body fluid converted gradually to hydroxyapatite. Li/CPC extracts stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts upon release of lithium ions (Li+) at 25.35 ± 0.12 to 50.74 ± 0.13 mg/l through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vitro. We also examined the effect of locally administered Li+ on defects in rat tibia between CPC and Li/CPC in vivo. Micro-computed tomography and histological staining showed that Li/CPC had better osteogenesis by increasing bone mass and promoting repair in defects compared with CPC (P < 0.05). Li/CPC also showed better osteoconductivity and osseointegration. These findings suggest that local release of Li+ from Li/CPC may accelerate bone regeneration from injury through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoporosis.

  1. Acceleration of bone regeneration by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway via lithium released from lithium chloride/calcium phosphate cement in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qin, Yongbao; Wang, Renchong; Tang, Jingli; Cui, Xu; Wang, Ting; Liu, Wenlong; Pan, Haobo; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    By virtue of its excellent bioactivity and osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been applied extensively in bone engineering. Doping a trace element into CPC can change physical characteristics and enhance osteogenesis. The trace element lithium has been demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. We investigated the fracture-healing effect of osteoporotic defects with lithium-doped calcium phosphate cement (Li/CPC) and the underlying mechanism. Li/CPC bodies immersed in simulated body fluid converted gradually to hydroxyapatite. Li/CPC extracts stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts upon release of lithium ions (Li+) at 25.35 ± 0.12 to 50.74 ± 0.13 mg/l through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vitro. We also examined the effect of locally administered Li+ on defects in rat tibia between CPC and Li/CPC in vivo. Micro-computed tomography and histological staining showed that Li/CPC had better osteogenesis by increasing bone mass and promoting repair in defects compared with CPC (P < 0.05). Li/CPC also showed better osteoconductivity and osseointegration. These findings suggest that local release of Li+ from Li/CPC may accelerate bone regeneration from injury through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoporosis. PMID:28338064

  2. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  3. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, H. M.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-06-20

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both nonlinear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with the ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation (<60%) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to the total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  4. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  5. Leach-proof magnetic thrombolytic nanoparticles and coatings of enhanced activity.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, Andrey S; Vinogradov, Vasiliy V; Dudanov, Ivan P; Vinogradov, Vladimir V

    2016-06-20

    Despite the fact that magnetic thrombolytic composites is an emerging area, all known so far systems are based on the similar mechanism of action: thrombolytic enzyme releases from the magnetic carrier leaving non-active matrix, thus making the whole system active only for a limited period of time. Such systems often have very complex structure organization and composition, consisting of materials not approved for parenteral injection, making them poor candidates for real clinical trials and implementation. Here we report, for the first time, the production of thrombolytic magnetic composite material with non-releasing behavior and prolonged action. Obtained composite shows good thrombolytic activity, consists of fully biocompatible materials and could be applied as infinitely active thrombolytic coatings or magnetically-targetable thrombolytic agents.

  6. Leach-proof magnetic thrombolytic nanoparticles and coatings of enhanced activity

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Andrey S.; Vinogradov, Vasiliy V.; Dudanov, Ivan P.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that magnetic thrombolytic composites is an emerging area, all known so far systems are based on the similar mechanism of action: thrombolytic enzyme releases from the magnetic carrier leaving non-active matrix, thus making the whole system active only for a limited period of time. Such systems often have very complex structure organization and composition, consisting of materials not approved for parenteral injection, making them poor candidates for real clinical trials and implementation. Here we report, for the first time, the production of thrombolytic magnetic composite material with non-releasing behavior and prolonged action. Obtained composite shows good thrombolytic activity, consists of fully biocompatible materials and could be applied as infinitely active thrombolytic coatings or magnetically-targetable thrombolytic agents. PMID:27321930

  7. Leach-proof magnetic thrombolytic nanoparticles and coatings of enhanced activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Andrey S.; Vinogradov, Vasiliy V.; Dudanov, Ivan P.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that magnetic thrombolytic composites is an emerging area, all known so far systems are based on the similar mechanism of action: thrombolytic enzyme releases from the magnetic carrier leaving non-active matrix, thus making the whole system active only for a limited period of time. Such systems often have very complex structure organization and composition, consisting of materials not approved for parenteral injection, making them poor candidates for real clinical trials and implementation. Here we report, for the first time, the production of thrombolytic magnetic composite material with non-releasing behavior and prolonged action. Obtained composite shows good thrombolytic activity, consists of fully biocompatible materials and could be applied as infinitely active thrombolytic coatings or magnetically-targetable thrombolytic agents.

  8. Development of a satellite flywheel family operating on one active axis magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poubeau, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings with radial passive centering and axial active control of the rotor position are described in terms of optimization for satellite flywheel applications and kinetic storage of energy for satellites.

  9. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  10. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.; Detloff, Megan R.; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  11. Developing of a test procedure to evaluate FCC catalyst regenerability

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, V.L.N.; Debnath, S.; Bao, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    FCC catalyst comprises various active ingredients e.g. Y Zeolites, ZSM-5 and other medium pore Zeolites, active, matrix etc. with wide variation in Zeolite/matrix ratio and pore size distribution. The effect of pore size distribution on the accessibility of the active sites is a subject for intensive research at present. The accessibility of these active sites has a major effect on the overall reaction and regeneration kinetics. Catalyst regenerability is a very important factor particularly for moderate and low temperature regenerators, since it directly effects the CRC (Coke on-Regenerated Catalyst) value. The regenerability of catalyst is critical to minimize the overall catalyst inventory. Unfortunately, till date, there is no suitable laboratory equipment available to test catalyst regenerability.

  12. Longitudinal Distribution of Solar Magnetic Fields and Activity During the Ending and Starting Periods of Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Garcia, A.; Klvaňa, M.

    2000-10-01

    Studying the appearance of active regions during periods of solar activity minima, we observed that the magnetic fields of active regions belonging to the old and new cycle were mutually related. This was the reason we decided to investigate the relation of the old and new cycle activity during the two last minima in more detail. We examined the distribution of both activities in heliographic longitude, because the patterns of such distribution change substantially during the time of the minimum, and we studied their relation to the distribution and development of the global (background) magnetic field. We observed that the active regions of the old and new cycles tended to concentrate in the same active longitudes. The sources of their magnetic fluxes seem to have the same heliographic longitude. The beginning of the new cycle activity, occurring at the very beginning to a very weak degree in the equatorial zone, and then proceeding to higher latitudes, occurs in the magnetic field remnants of the old cycle activity. During the transition phase, a relatively large number of small active regions is produced by both cycles.

  13. Control of flexible rotor systems with active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuliang; Palazzolo, Alan

    2008-07-01

    An approach is presented for the analysis and design of magnetic suspension systems with large flexible rotordynamics models including dynamics, control, and simulation. The objective is to formulate and synthesize a large-order, flexible shaft rotordynamics model for a flywheel supported with magnetic bearings. A finite element model of the rotor system is assembled and then employed to develop a magnetic suspension compensator to provide good reliability and disturbance rejection. Stable operation over the complete speed range and optimization of the closed-loop rotordynamic properties are obtained via synthesis of eigenvalue analysis, Campbell plots, waterfall plots, and mode shapes. The large order of the rotor model and high spin speed of the rotor present a challenge for magnetic suspension control. A flywheel system is studied as an example for realizing a physical controller that provides stable rotor suspension and good disturbance rejection in all operating states. The baseline flywheel system control is determined from extensive rotordynamics synthesis and analysis for rotor critical speeds, mode shapes, frequency responses, and time responses.

  14. Fgf regulates dedifferentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) regulate critical biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In zebrafish, Fgf signaling plays an important role in the regeneration of the spinal cord, liver, heart, fin, and photoreceptors, although its exact mechanism of action is not fully understood. Utilizing an adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration model, we demonstrate that blocking Fgf receptor function using either a chemical inhibitor (SU5402) or a dominant-negative transgenic construct (dnFGFR1a:EGFP) impairs muscle regeneration. Adult zebrafish EOMs regenerate through a myocyte dedifferentiation process, which involves a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition and cell cycle reentry by differentiated myocytes. Blocking Fgf signaling reduced cell proliferation and active caspase 3 levels in the regenerating muscle with no detectable levels of apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Fgf signaling is involved in the early steps of dedifferentiation. Fgf signaling in regenerating myocytes involves the MAPK/ERK pathway: inhibition of MEK activity with U0126 mimicked the phenotype of the Fgf receptor inhibition on both muscle regeneration and cell proliferation, and activated ERK (p-ERK) was detected in injured muscles by immunofluorescence and western blot. Interestingly, following injury, ERK2 expression is specifically induced and activated by phosphorylation, suggesting a key role in muscle regeneration. We conclude that the critical early steps of myocyte dedifferentiation in EOM regeneration are dependent on Fgf signaling.

  15. Magnetic plasmonic metamaterials in actively pumped host medium and plasmonic nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Andrey K.; Tartakovsky, Gennady

    2006-08-01

    We consider plasmonic nanoantennas immersed in active host medium. Specifically shaped metal nanoantennas can exhibit strong magnetic properties in the optical spectral range due to the excitation of Magnetic Resonance Plasmons (MRP). A case when a metamaterial comprising such nanoantennas can demonstrate both "left-handiness" and negative permeability in the optical range is considered. We show that high losses predicted for optical "left-handed" materials can be compensated in the gain medium. Gains required to achieve local generation in such magnetic active metamaterials are calculated for real metals

  16. Epoxyeicosanoids promote organ and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Kalish, Brian T; Huang, Sui; Bielenberg, Diane R; Le, Hau D; Yang, Jun; Edin, Matthew L; Lee, Craig R; Benny, Ofra; Mudge, Dayna K; Butterfield, Catherine E; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Inceoglu, Bora; Jenkins, Roger L; Simpson, Mary A; Akino, Tomoshige; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Ingber, Donald E; Hammock, Bruce D; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Kaipainen, Arja; D'Amore, Patricia A; Puder, Mark; Zeldin, Darryl C; Kieran, Mark W

    2013-08-13

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases, regulate inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular tone. Despite pleiotropic effects on cells, the role of these epoxyeicosanoids in normal organ and tissue regeneration remains unknown. EETs are produced predominantly in the endothelium. Normal organ and tissue regeneration require an active paracrine role of the microvascular endothelium, which in turn depends on angiogenic growth factors. Thus, we hypothesize that endothelial cells stimulate organ and tissue regeneration via production of bioactive EETs. To determine whether endothelial-derived EETs affect physiologic tissue growth in vivo, we used genetic and pharmacological tools to manipulate endogenous EET levels. We show that endothelial-derived EETs play a critical role in accelerating tissue growth in vivo, including liver regeneration, kidney compensatory growth, lung compensatory growth, wound healing, corneal neovascularization, and retinal vascularization. Administration of synthetic EETs recapitulated these results, whereas lowering EET levels, either genetically or pharmacologically, delayed tissue regeneration, demonstrating that pharmacological modulation of EETs can affect normal organ and tissue growth. We also show that soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous EET levels, promote liver and lung regeneration. Thus, our observations indicate a central role for EETs in organ and tissue regeneration and their contribution to tissue homeostasis.

  17. Vertebrate-like regeneration in the invertebrate chordate amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Ildikó M. L.; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Escrivà, Hector

    2012-01-01

    An important question in biology is why some animals are able to regenerate, whereas others are not. The basal chordate amphioxus is uniquely positioned to address the evolution of regeneration. We report here the high regeneration potential of the European amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Adults regenerate both anterior and posterior structures, including neural tube, notochord, fin, and muscle. Development of a classifier based on tail regeneration profiles predicts the assignment of young and old adults to their own class with >94% accuracy. The process involves loss of differentiated characteristics, formation of an msx-expressing blastema, and neurogenesis. Moreover, regeneration is linked to the activation of satellite-like Pax3/7 progenitor cells, the extent of which declines with size and age. Our results provide a framework for understanding the evolution and diversity of regeneration mechanisms in vertebrates. PMID:22203957

  18. A histone demethylase is necessary for regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott; Tsun, Zhi-Yang; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2009-11-24

    Urodele amphibians and teleost fish regenerate amputated body parts via a process called epimorphic regeneration. A hallmark of this phenomenon is the reactivation of silenced developmental regulatory genes that previously functioned during embryonic patterning. We demonstrate that histone modifications silence promoters of numerous genes involved in zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Silenced developmental regulatory genes contain bivalent me(3)K4/me(3)K27 H3 histone modifications created by the concerted action of Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax histone methyltransferases. During regeneration, this silent, bivalent chromatin is converted to an active state by loss of repressive me(3)K27 H3 modifications, occurring at numerous genes that appear to function during regeneration. Loss-of-function studies demonstrate a requirement for a me(3)K27 H3 demethylase during fin regeneration. These results indicate that histone modifications at discreet genomic positions may serve as a crucial regulatory event in the initiation of fin regeneration.

  19. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  20. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  1. Young Scientists Explore Electricity & Magnetism. Book 7--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of electricity and magnetism. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for…

  2. From Compass to Hard Drive--Integrated Activities for Studying Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a range of practical activities that allows students to investigate the properties and applications of magnets. The activities can be used in isolation or used together to build a rounded understanding of the subject area. The activities include simple demonstrations using common or inexpensive equipment, hands-on experiments for small…

  3. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Krista, Larisza D.; Title, Alan M.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W.; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N.; Kasper, Justin C.; Stevens, Michael L.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2015-01-01

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the ‘Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales. PMID:25849045

  4. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; Leamon, Robert J; Krista, Larisza D; Title, Alan M; Hudson, Hugh S; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N; Kasper, Justin C; Stevens, Michael L; Ulrich, Roger K

    2015-04-07

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the 'Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales.

  5. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Overton, W.C. Jr.; Stewart, W.F.

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  6. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Overton, Jr., William C.; Stewart, Walter F.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  7. Effect of different growth factors on human osteoblasts activities: a possible application in bone regeneration for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Michela; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Cannas, Mario F

    2007-12-01

    Cultured human primary osteoblasts reproduce the phenotypic differentiation and maturation of cells in vivo. We have investigated the influence of three isoforms of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3), three fibroblast growth factors (FGF-2, FGF-4 and FGF-6) and the active metabolite of Vitamin D [1,25-(OH)(2)D3] on proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of human osteoblasts during a period of 24 days of culture. TGF-beta isoforms and three FGFs examined have been proved to be inducers of osteoblasts proliferation (higher extent for TGF-beta and FGF-2) and inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblasts mineralization. Combination of these growth factors with the active form of Vitamin D induced osteodifferentiation. In fact Vitamin D showed an additive effect on alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content, induced by FGF-2 and TGF-beta in human osteoblast. These results highlight the potential of proliferating cytokines' combination with mineralizing agents for in vitro bone growth induction in bone tissue engineering.

  8. [Resources of regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Sedel'nikov, Z V; Kreshchenko, N D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the intensity of blastema growth in operated planarians at an early stage of regeneration as a function of the following factors: area of regenerate and its function and number of regeneration foci (volume of regeneration). There was no direct dependence between the intensity of regeneration and the size of regenerating fragment, as well as the volume of regeneration. Some specific features of the early stage of regeneration have been described, which suggest its determinate character. The behavior of neoblasts during formation of blastemas with different localization is discussed.

  9. Specialized progenitors and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells.

  10. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  11. Model for the Coupled Evolution of Subsurface and Coronal Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2007-04-01

    According to Babcock's theory of the solar dynamo, bipolar active regions are Ω-shaped loops emerging from a toroidal field located near the base of the convection zone. In this paper, a mean field model for the evolution of a twisted Ω-loop is developed. The model describes the coupled evolution of the magnetic field in the convection zone and the corona after the loop has fully emerged into the solar atmosphere. Such a coupled evolution is required to fully understand what happens to the coronal and subsurface fields as magnetic flux cancels at polarity inversion lines on the photosphere. The jump conditions for the magnetic field at the photosphere are derived from the magnetic stress balance between the convection zone and corona. The model reproduces the observed spreading of active region magnetic flux over the solar surface. At polarity inversion lines, magnetic flux submerges below the photosphere, but the component of magnetic field along the inversion line cannot submerge, because the field in the upper convection zone is nearly radial. Therefore, magnetic shear builds up in the corona above the inversion line, which eventually leads to a loss of equilibrium of the coronal fields and the ``lift-off'' of a coronal flux rope. Fields that submerge are transported back to the base of the convection zone, leading to the repair of the toroidal flux rope. Following Martens and Zwaan, interactions between bipoles are also considered.

  12. Could a change in magnetic field geometry cause the break in the wind-activity relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Jardine, M.; See, V.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; Boro Saikia, S.; Hébrard, E.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Wood et al. suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux (dot{M}∝ F_x^{1.34}) for dwarf stars with Fx ≲ Fx,6 ≡ 106 erg cm-2 s-1. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at Fx,6 could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al. sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the dot{M} - Fx relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at Fx,6. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exist for stars with Fx ≳ Fx,6. This strengthens the importance of multi-epoch ZDI observations. Finally, we show that there is a correlation between Fx and magnetic energy, which implies that dot{M} - magnetic energy relation has the same qualitative behaviour as the original dot{M} - Fx relation. No break is seen in any of the Fx - magnetic energy relations.

  13. ENERGETIC PROTONS, RADIONUCLIDES, AND MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an 'undead zone' where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm{sup -2}.

  14. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the performance of activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Ni, Jianyuan; Yang, Ning; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) on activated sludge. The short-term presence of 50-200 mg/L of NPs decreased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies, resulted from the acute toxicity of a shock load of NPs. However, long-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs were observed to significantly improve TN removal efficiency, partially due to the self-repair function of activated sludge and magnetic-induced bio-effect. Sludge properties and extracellular polymer substrates secretion were affected. Additional investigations with enzyme and FISH assays indicated that short-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs led to the abatement of nitrifying bacteria. However, the activities of the enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase and key denitrifying enzymes were increased after long-term exposure.

  15. A visual pathway links brain structures active during magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Heyers, Dominik; Manns, Martina; Luksch, Harald; Güntürkün, Onur; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-09-26

    The magnetic compass of migratory birds has been suggested to be light-dependent. Retinal cryptochrome-expressing neurons and a forebrain region, "Cluster N", show high neuronal activity when night-migratory songbirds perform magnetic compass orientation. By combining neuronal tracing with behavioral experiments leading to sensory-driven gene expression of the neuronal activity marker ZENK during magnetic compass orientation, we demonstrate a functional neuronal connection between the retinal neurons and Cluster N via the visual thalamus. Thus, the two areas of the central nervous system being most active during magnetic compass orientation are part of an ascending visual processing stream, the thalamofugal pathway. Furthermore, Cluster N seems to be a specialized part of the visual wulst. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that migratory birds use their visual system to perceive the reference compass direction of the geomagnetic field and that migratory birds "see" the reference compass direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  16. Ilexonin A Promotes Neuronal Proliferation and Regeneration via Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway after Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bi-Qin; Zheng, Guan-Yi; Han, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Ilexonin A (IA), a component of the Chinese medicine Ilex pubescens, has been shown to be neuroprotective during ischemic injury. However, the specific mechanism underlying this neuroprotective effect remains unclear. Methods. In this study, we employed a combination of immunofluorescence staining, western blotting, RT-PCR, and behavioral tests, to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in IA regulation of neuronal proliferation and regeneration after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rodents. Results. Increases in β-catenin protein and LEF1 mRNA and decreases in GSK3β protein and Axin mRNA observed in IA-treated compared to control rodents implicated the canonical Wnt pathway as a key signaling mechanism activated by IA treatment. Furthermore, rodents in the IA treatment group showed less neurologic impairment and a corresponding increase in the number of Brdu/nestin and Brdu/NeuN double positive neurons in the parenchymal ischemia tissue following middle cerebral artery occlusion compared to matched controls. Conclusion. Altogether, our data indicate that IA can significantly diminish neurological deficits associated with cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats as a result of increased neuronal survival via modulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. PMID:27057202

  17. Pulp Regeneration: Current Approaches and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Yuan, Guohua; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α)