Science.gov

Sample records for active margin setting

  1. Comparison of submarine gully morphologies in passive and active margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Shumaker, L.; Johnstone, S.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active tectonic margins have inherently different hypsometry, due to local patterns of deformation and subsequent impacts on the style of sedimentation. One way we can analyze and compare the two settings is through observation of submarine gullies, which are small channel features that form along the continental slope as it descends to the ocean floor. By documenting the geometries of gullies that have formed on passive margins and gullies that have formed on active margins, we attempt to distinguish differences in gully morphologies in these two settings. We manually mapped over 600 gullies and interfluves from shaded relief and contour maps generated from bathymetric data across the globe, including the coast of California, the Beaufort Sea, and the Black Sea. We extrapolated and plotted elevation profiles of the gullies along their downslope distance, and compared a range of gully properties, such as length, spacing, and slope, to look at the correlations among those elements of gullies and their tectonic setting. We find that gullies forming on active margins show the greatest variability in their slopes, exhibiting both the steepest and the shallowest slopes of the dataset. The slopes of the passive margin gullies fall within the range of the active margin gully slopes, but interestingly, we note patterns in the ranges of gully steepness at different localities. These results differ from our our anticipation that active margin gullies are steeper than passive margin gullies, but suggest that gullies in all settings display a variety of morphologies. Additional mapping of active margin gullies will better determine if there are morphological differences between the two settings.

  2. Geochemical discrimination of siliciclastic sediments from active and passive margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Armstrong-Altrin, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Discrimination of active and passive margins is important from both academic and economic aspects. This can only be successfully achieved, however, if there are major compositional differences among sediments derived from different continental margins. A worldwide database of active and passive margin settings was established from published major and trace element geochemical data of Neogene to Quaternary siliciclastic sediments. These data were used to evaluate the performance of existing discrimination diagrams, which were shown to work unsatisfactorily with success values of mostly between 0% and 30%. Because these diagrams were not based on a statistically coherent methodology, we proposed two new discriminant functions from linear discriminant analysis of multinormally distributed isometric log-transformed ratios of major and combined major and trace elements. These new diagrams showed very high percent success values of about 87%-97% and 84%-86% for the active and passive margins, respectively, for the original database. Excellent performance of the multidimensional diagrams and related discriminant functions was confirmed from 11 test studies involving Quaternary to Holocene siliciclastic sediments from known tectonic margins. The expected result of an active or passive margin was obtained, with most samples plotting correctly in the respective field.

  3. Neogene paleoceanographic events recorded in an active-margin setting: Humboldt basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Recognition of North Pacific paleoceanographic events in the marginal Humboldt (Eel River) basin of northern California enables correlation of stratigraphic sections and development of a chronostratigraphy. Paleoclimatically related coiling shifts in Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg) and benthic foraminiferal datums form the basis of the chronostratigraphy. Benthic foraminiferal datums are defined by the occurrence of selected benthic species and abundance maxima of benthic biofacies. The compiled chronostratigraphy is used to refine reconstructions of the depositional history of Humboldt basin. Paleoceanographic events, recognized by the distribution of benthic foraminiferal biofacies, are used to infer paleoceanographic history along the northeastern Pacific margin. The similarity in coiling curves of N. pachyderma from the marine sequence at DSDP Site 173 and the coastal Centerville Beach section of Humboldt basin and at other independently dated sites along the northeastern Pacific margin demonstrates that matching records of climatic oscillations is a reliable method of correlating marine sequences. Benthic fauna from the Centerville Beach section vary in phase with climatically related coiling shifts in N. pachyderma. In particular these data show an increase in displaced neritic fauna during inferred warm intervals and resurgence of deeper bathyal fauna during inferred cool events. Similar data are observed from the inland Eel River section, demonstrating that benthic foraminiferal trends recognized at Centerville Beach can be identified elsewhere in Humboldt basin. This in-phase benthic response to climatic fluctuations probably results from changes in vertical depth range of many benthic species in response to paleoclimatically related vertical changes in water-mass position. Depositional histories reconstructed for two key sites in southern Humboldt basin indicate low rates of sediment accumulation during early basin filling with hemipelagic

  4. New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160426.html New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers 2 ... hope the guideline also translates into peace of mind for women who will know that future surgeries ...

  5. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  6. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  7. Potential Fields Illuminate Earthquake Sources in Subduction-Margin Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Wells, R. E.

    2008-05-01

    Potential-field anomalies can be used to map the geologic structure of earthquake source regions in subduction zones and thus provide promise for assessing future earthquake hazards. Satellite free-air gravity anomalies over subduction zones consist of an offshore trench-parallel gravity low and a subparallel coastal gravity high that reflect the topography and structure of the inner trench slope and coast ranges, respectively. Large coseismic slip in shallow megathrust earthquakes correlates with gravity lows centered on large forearc sedimentary basins along the deep sea terrace offshore. The trench-parallel gravity low, the basins, and the earthquakes are all thought to be related to the resistance to slip along the plate boundary, and basin-centered gravity lows in similar settings may be the likely source of asperities in future earthquakes. Landward of the shallow megathrust, magnetic anomalies provide clues to processes occurring within the subducting slab and overlying mantle wedge. In some subduction zones, water released from the transformation of basalt to eclogite hydrates overlying sub-continental mantle, producing serpentinite, and embrittles the downgoing slab, promoting intraslab earthquakes. The 1970 central Peru earthquake (MW 7.5 to 8.0) and the 1949 Olympia, Washington, earthquake (MW 7.1) are recent examples. Thermal models indicate that the hydrated mantle wedge in most subduction zones is below the Curie temperature of magnetite. If serpentinite is sufficiently abundant, hydrated mantle wedges will produce long-wavelength magnetic anomalies observable at the earth's surface. A crust-mantle model of the Cascadia subduction margin based on magnetic, gravity, and seismic data, is consistent with the presence of significant volumes of hydrated mantle. The advent of new global magnetic databases may allow us to map hydrated mantle worldwide. The World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map and the CHAMP satellite magnetic field, processed to emphasize

  8. Surface analogue outcrops of deep fractured basement reservoirs in extensional geological settings. Examples within active rift system (Uganda) and proximal passive margin (Morocco).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Bastien; Géraud, Yves; Diraison, Marc

    2014-05-01

    structures). Two field cases, located in Morocco and Uganda, allow us to investigate basement complexes at different stages of an extension process and give us analog geological data of similar fractured basement reservoirs. Border faults and associated fracture networks of an active rifting system propagated in Proterozoic basement rocks are analyzed in the Albertine rift system in Uganda. Brittle structures developed along a proximal passive margin of the Atlantic domain are analyzed in Proterozoic basements rocks in Western Anti-Atlas in Morocco.

  9. 17 CFR 1.58 - Gross collection of exchange-set margins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... margins. (a) Each futures commission merchant which carries a commodity futures or commodity option... commodity option position for another futures commission merchant or for a foreign broker on an omnibus...-set margins. 1.58 Section 1.58 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING...

  10. Uncertainty in patient set-up margin analysis in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Junji; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Shima, Katsumi; Yaegashi, Yuji; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Saitoh, Yuichi; Nakata, Akihiro; Abe, Tadanori; Nakazawa, Takuya; Sakata, Kouichi; Hareyama, Masato

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the uncertainty in patient set-up margin analysis with a small dataset consisting of a limited number of clinical cases over a short time period, and propose a method for determining the optimum set-up margin. Patient set-up errors from 555 registration images of 15 patients with prostate cancer were tested for normality using a quantile-quantile (Q-Q) plot and a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test with the hypothesis that the data were not normally distributed. The ranges of set-up errors include the set-up errors within the 95% interval of the entire patient data histogram, and their equivalent normal distributions were compared. The patient set-up error was not normally distributed. When the patient set-up error distribution was assumed to have a normal distribution, an underestimate of the actual set-up error occurred in some patients but an overestimate occurred in others. When using a limited dataset for patient set-up errors, which consists of only a small number of the cases over a short period of time in a clinical practice, the 2.5% and 97.5% intervals of the actual patient data histogram from the percentile method should be used for estimating the set-up margin. Since set-up error data is usually not normally distributed, these intervals should provide a more accurate estimate of set-up margin. In this way, the uncertainty in patient set-up margin analysis in radiation therapy can be reduced.

  11. Transition from a passive continental margin to an active margin documented by time-facies profiles and geohistory diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Kenter, J.A.M.; Reymer, J.J.G.; van der Straaten, H.C.

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous to Neogene sediments in the northern part of the external zone of the Betic Cordilleras (southeast Spain) reflect the evolution of a passive continental margin into an active margin. Time-facies profiles and geohistory diagrams were constructed to identify and date tectonic events and sea level changes in the sedimentary record. During Late Cretaceous to middle Eocene time, parallel-trending shallow marine facies belts at the edge of a slowly subsiding basin evidence a passive continental margin setting. The period from middle Eocene to early Miocene is rather poorly documented. After initial shallowing the whole area emerged and continental conditions prevailed from the late Eocene to early Miocene. The subareal exposure may have been caused by the compound effect of the worldwide Oligocene sea level drop and overall tectonic uplift. Miocene sediments reflect the compressional tectonic regime of an active margin. The parallel facies belts were disrupted and the area was segmented into several tectonic blocks, each displaying an individual sedimentary record due to differential vertical movement. During middle to late Miocene time a major compressional phase generated northeast-trending folds and activated strike-slip and thrust faults. This tectonic phase led to a highly differentiated topography, resulting in the development of local depocenters - each with a unique tectonic and depositional record.

  12. Priority setting in a Canadian surgical department: a case study using program budgeting and marginal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, Craig; Donaldson, Cam; Shellian, Barb; Pagenkopf, Cort

    2003-01-01

    Introduction A key mandate of Canadian regional health authorities is to set priorities and allocate resources within a limited funding envelope. The objective in this study was to determine how resources within a surgical program in a Canadian rural hospital might be reallocated to better meet the needs of the local community. Methods Early in 2001, at the Canmore General Hospital, Canmore, Alta., an expert-panel working group, consisting of a community health service leader, operating-room nurse clinician, acute care head nurse and a general surgeon, assisted by a research assistant and 2 health economists carried out a program budgeting and marginal analysis project to assess multiple data inputs into the decision-making process and to develop recommendations for service expansion and resource release. They considered the cost and benefits of altering the mix of resources used, based on Headwaters Health Authority activity and financial data, and local expert opinion. Results The primary recommendation was to implement an additional surgery day per week (38 days of major surgery and 12 days of minor surgery over a 50-week year). However, the total dollars to fund such an expansion could not be released from within the Canmore budget, and additional dollars were not forthcoming from the health region. A secondary objective of implementing an additional minor surgery day every 3 weeks was pursued and the required resources were obtained. Conclusions Due to resource constraints in health care, efforts by both clinicians and administrators should be made to better spend available resources. The marginal analysis process used in this study served as a useful framework for priority setting, which is generalizable to other surgical and nonsurgical programs in Canada. PMID:12585790

  13. Annotated bibliography on participatory consultations to help aid the inclusion of marginalized perspectives in setting policy agendas.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Faraz Rahim

    2014-12-20

    The purpose of this bibliography is to present studies from peer-reviewed and grey literature that used consultations and other participatory strategies to capture a community's perspective of their health priorities, and of techniques used to elevate participation from the implementation phase to a more upstream phase of prioritization, policymaking and agenda setting. The focus here is of those studies that worked with marginalized populations or sub-populations. This bibliography contains four areas of research. It begins by first offering some philosophical and conceptual frameworks that link participatory interventions with inclusive policy making or agenda setting, and a rationale for prioritizing marginalized populations in such an undertaking. After situating ourselves in this manner, the second section looks at various participatory instruments for participatory consultations, for reaching out to marginalized populations, and for communicating the results to policymakers. Two sets of distinctions are made here: one between external (non-invitation) and internal (stifling of opinions) exclusion, and between mere participation and from active inclusion within consultations and within the policies. In the third section, examples of consultations that created or changed policy in various jurisdictions are shared, followed by a final section on a reflective and evaluative look at the recruitment, instruments and examples. An earlier iteration of this bibliography was created to assist a multi-country research project by the author to inform the UN Post-2015 development framework of the views of several diverse and highly marginalized populations around the world on their health-related priorities.

  14. Hydrogeological structure of a seafloor hydrothermal system related to backarc rifting in a continental margin setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems in the Okinawa Trough backarc basin are considered as related to backarc rifting in a continental margin setting. Since the seafloor is dominantly covered with felsic volcaniclastic material and/or terrigenous sediment, hydrothermal circulation is expected to be distributed within sediment layers of significantly high porosity. Deep drilling through an active hydrothermal field at the Iheya North Knoll in the middle Okinawa Trough during IODP Expedition 331 provided a unique opportunity to directly access the subseafloor. While sedimentation along the slopes of the knoll was dominated by volcanic clasts of tubular pumice, intense hydrothermal alteration was recognized in the vicinity of the hydrothermal center even at very shallow depths. Detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies of hydrothermal clay minerals in the altered sediment suggest that the prevalent alteration is attributed to laterally extensive fluid intrusion and occupation within the sediment layer. Onboard measurements of physical properties of the obtained sediment revealed drastic changes of the porosity caused by hydrothermal interactions. While unaltered sediment showed porosity higher than 70%, the porosity drastically decreased in the layer of anhydrite formation. On the other hand, the porosity remained high (~50%) in the layer of only chlorite alteration. Cap rock formation caused by anhydrite precipitation would inhibit the ascent of high temperature fluids to the seafloor. Moreover, an interbedded nature of pelagic mud units and matrix-free pumice deposits may prompt formation of a tightly layered architecture of aquifers and aquicludes. This sediment architecture should be highly conducive to lateral flow pseudo-parallel to the surface topography. Occurrence of sphalerite-rich sulfides was recognized as associated with detrital and altered sediment, suggesting mineralization related to subsurface chemical processes. Moreover, the vertical profiles of

  15. Oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in an insect model system.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-01

    A mismatch between oxygen availability and metabolic demand may constrain thermal tolerance. While considerable support for this idea has been found in marine organisms, results from insects are equivocal and raise the possibility that mode of gas exchange, oxygen safety margins and the physico-chemical properties of the gas medium influence heat tolerance estimates. Here, we examined critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and aerobic scope under altered oxygen supply and in two life stages that varied in metabolic demand in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). We also systematically examined the influence of changes in gas properties on CTmax. Larvae have a lower oxygen safety margin (higher critical oxygen partial pressure at which metabolism is suppressed relative to metabolic demand) and significantly higher CTmax under normoxia than pupae (53°C vs 50°C). Larvae, but not pupae, were oxygen limited with hypoxia (2.5 kPa) decreasing CTmax significantly from 53 to 51°C. Humidifying hypoxic air relieved the oxygen limitation effect on CTmax in larvae, whereas variation in other gas properties did not affect CTmax. Our data suggest that oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in air-breathing invertebrates and the magnitude of this effect potentially reconciles differences in oxygen limitation effects on thermal tolerance found among diverse taxa to date.

  16. Oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in an insect model system.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-01

    A mismatch between oxygen availability and metabolic demand may constrain thermal tolerance. While considerable support for this idea has been found in marine organisms, results from insects are equivocal and raise the possibility that mode of gas exchange, oxygen safety margins and the physico-chemical properties of the gas medium influence heat tolerance estimates. Here, we examined critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and aerobic scope under altered oxygen supply and in two life stages that varied in metabolic demand in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). We also systematically examined the influence of changes in gas properties on CTmax. Larvae have a lower oxygen safety margin (higher critical oxygen partial pressure at which metabolism is suppressed relative to metabolic demand) and significantly higher CTmax under normoxia than pupae (53°C vs 50°C). Larvae, but not pupae, were oxygen limited with hypoxia (2.5 kPa) decreasing CTmax significantly from 53 to 51°C. Humidifying hypoxic air relieved the oxygen limitation effect on CTmax in larvae, whereas variation in other gas properties did not affect CTmax. Our data suggest that oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in air-breathing invertebrates and the magnitude of this effect potentially reconciles differences in oxygen limitation effects on thermal tolerance found among diverse taxa to date. PMID:26041031

  17. Geodynamic settings of microcontinents, non-volcanic islands and submerged continental marginal plateau formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey; Makushkina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Complex process of continental lithosphere breakup is often accompanied by full or semi isolation of small continental blocks from the parent continent such as microcontinents or submerged marginal plateaus. We present different types of continental blocks formed in various geodynamic settings. The process depends on thermo-mechanical properties of rifting. 1) The continental blocks fully isolated from the parent continent. This kind of blocks exist in submerged form (Elan Bank, the Jan-Mayen Ridge, Zenith Plateau, Gulden Draak Knoll, Batavia Knoll) and in non-submerged form in case of large block size. Most of listed submerged blocks are formed in proximity of hot-spot or plume. 2) The continental blocks semi-isolated from the parent continent. Exmouth Plateau, Vøring, Agulhas, Naturaliste are submerged continental plateaus of the indicated category; Sri Lanka, Tasmania, Socotra are islands adjacent to continent here. Nowadays illustration of this setting is the Sinai block located between the two continental rifts. 3) The submerged linear continental blocks formed by the continental rifting along margin (the Lomonosov Ridge). Suggested evolution of this paragraph is the rift propagation along existing transtensional (or another type) transform fault. Future example of this type might be the California Peninsula block, detached from the North American plate by the rifting within San-Andreas fault. 4) The submerged continental blocks formed by extensional processes as the result of asthenosphere flow and shear deformations. Examples are submerged blocks in the central and southern Scotia Sea (Terror Bank, Protector Basin, Discovery Bank, Bruce Bank etc.). 5) The continental blocks formed in the transform fault systems originated in setting of contradict rifts propagation in presence of structure barriers, rifts are shifted by several hundreds kilometers from each other. Examples of this geodynamic setting are Equatorial Atlantic at the initial development stage

  18. Stratigraphy and depositional settings of Cretaceous organic-rich sequences in the Brazilian marginal basins

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, M.R.; Koutsoukos, E.A.M.; Santos Neto, E.V. )

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive geochemical and paleontological survey of the stratigraphic framework and depositional setting of the organic-rich and most prolific petroleum source rocks sequences in the Brazilian marginal basins has been undertaken. The geochemical analysis of the rocks included organic carbon determinations, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements, porphyrin analysis, and biological markers investigations, using chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) of the saturate and aromatic fractions. The paleontological study involved the assessment of the distribution and diversity patterns of microfossils (foraminifers, radiolarians, diatoms and ostracods), calcareous nannofossils, and palynomorphs in dating and paleoenvironmental assignments. The results demonstrate the importance of the integration of geochemical and paleontological data for both characterization and lateral and vertical correlations of organic-rich sequences. Furthermore, such an approach is a powerful tool in ascertaining types of depositional environment and age constraints within different petroleum stratigraphic frameworks.

  19. Geometry of the neoproterozoic and paleozoic rift margin of western Laurentia: Implications for mineral deposit settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. and Canadian Cordilleran miogeocline evolved during several phases of Cryogenian-Devonian intracontinental rifting that formed the western mangin of Laurentia. Recent field and dating studies across central Idaho and northern Nevada result in identification of two segments of the rift margin. Resulting interpretations of rift geometry in the northern U.S. Cordillera are compatible with interpretations of northwest- striking asymmetric extensional segments subdivided by northeast-striking transform and transfer segments. The new interpretation permits integration of miogeoclinal segments along the length of the western North American Cordillera. For the U.S. Cordillera, miogeoclinal segments include the St. Mary-Moyie transform, eastern Washington- eastern Idaho upper-plate margin, Snake River transfer, Nevada-Utah lower-plate margin, and Mina transfer. The rift is orthogonal to most older basement domains, but the location of the transform-transfer zones suggests control of them by basement domain boundaries. The zigzag geometry of reentrants and promontories along the rift is paralleled by salients and recesses in younger thrust belts and by segmentation of younger extensional domains. Likewise, transform transfer zones localized subsequent transcurrent structures and igneous activity. Sediment-hosted mineral deposits trace the same zigzag geometry along the margin. Sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Zn-Pb-Ag ??Au and barite mineral deposits formed in continental-slope rocks during the Late Devonian-Mississippian and to a lesser degree, during the Cambrian-Early Ordovician. Such deposits formed during episodes of renewed extension along miogeoclinal segments. Carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley- type (MVT) Zn-Pb deposits formed in structurally reactivated continental shelf rocks during the Late Devonian-Mississippian and Mesozoic due to reactivation of preexisting structures. The distribution and abundance of sedex and MVT deposits are controlled by the

  20. Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma in the Setting of Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Saman; Ammar, Ali; Rezvani, Rodd; Petersen, Greti

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 65-year-old Hispanic man with a history of disseminated cutaneous coccidioidomycosis who presented to the emergency room for progressively worsening abdominal pain associated with shortness of breath. The patient was found to have pleural effusion and moderate ascites on physical examination. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography scan were consistent with moderate ascites and portal hypertension but negative for both liver cirrhosis and for venous or arterial thrombosis. Cytology of ascitic fluid was suggestive of portal hypertension and was negative for infection. Subsequent, thoracentesis was suggestive of exudative effusion and also negative for infection. Liver biopsy confirmed the absence of cirrhosis. Complete blood count indicated pancytopenia, whereas bone marrow biopsy and flow cytometry were suggestive of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL). Clinically, the patient's shortness of breath was resolved by thoracentesis and paracentesis; however, his abdominal pain persisted. A diagnosis of idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension in the setting of splenic MZL was made. The patient was transferred to a higher level of care for splenectomy; however, he missed multiple appointments. Since discharge, the patient has been seen in the outpatient setting and states that he is controlling his disease with diet and exercise; however, he continues to complain of intermittent shortness of breath with exertion.

  1. Investigating Continental Margins: An Activity to Help Students Better Understand the Continental Margins of North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Maria-Serena; Capodivacca, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Continental margins are an important part of the ocean floor. They separate the land above sea level from the deep ocean basins below and occupy about 11% of Earth's surface. They are also economically important, as they harbor both mineral resources and some of the most valuable fisheries in the world. In this article students investigate North…

  2. Comparison of marine gas hydrates in sediments of an active and passive continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two sites of the Deep Sea Drilling Project in contrasting geologic settings provide a basis for comparison of the geochemical conditions associated with marine gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. Site 533 is located at 3191 m water depth on a spit-like extension of the continental rise on a passive margin in the Atlantic Ocean. Site 568, at 2031 m water depth, is in upper slope sediment of an active accretionary margin in the Pacific Ocean. Both sites are characterized by high rates of sedimentation, and the organic carbon contents of these sediments generally exceed 0.5%. Anomalous seismic reflections that transgress sedimentary structures and parallel the seafloor, suggested the presence of gas hydrates at both sites, and, during coring, small samples of gas hydrate were recovered at subbottom depths of 238m (Site 533) and 404 m (Site 568). The principal gaseous components of the gas hydrates wer methane, ethane, and CO2. Residual methane in sediments at both sites usually exceeded 10 mll-1 of wet sediment. Carbon isotopic compositions of methane, CO2, and ??CO2 followed parallel trends with depth, suggesting that methane formed mainly as a result of biological reduction of oxidized carbon. Salinity of pore waters decreased with depth, a likely result of gas hydrate formation. These geochemical characteristics define some of the conditions associated with the occurrence of gas hydrates formed by in situ processes in continental margin sediments. ?? 1984.

  3. Promoting Physical Activity through Goal Setting Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Physical educators are used to setting specific goals for students within a given unit. Here, the author emphasizes that they should also encourage students to set their own goals. Goal setting engages students in the learning process and allows them to develop the skills that support an active lifestyle. The author presents goal setting…

  4. Batch Mode Active Sampling based on Marginal Probability Distribution Matching.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Fan, Wei; Davidson, Ian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Active Learning is a machine learning and data mining technique that selects the most informative samples for labeling and uses them as training data; it is especially useful when there are large amount of unlabeled data and labeling them is expensive. Recently, batch-mode active learning, where a set of samples are selected concurrently for labeling, based on their collective merit, has attracted a lot of attention. The objective of batch-mode active learning is to select a set of informative samples so that a classifier learned on these samples has good generalization performance on the unlabeled data. Most of the existing batch-mode active learning methodologies try to achieve this by selecting samples based on varied criteria. In this paper we propose a novel criterion which achieves good generalization performance of a classifier by specifically selecting a set of query samples that minimizes the difference in distribution between the labeled and the unlabeled data, after annotation. We explicitly measure this difference based on all candidate subsets of the unlabeled data and select the best subset. The proposed objective is an NP-hard integer programming optimization problem. We provide two optimization techniques to solve this problem. In the first one, the problem is transformed into a convex quadratic programming problem and in the second method the problem is transformed into a linear programming problem. Our empirical studies using publicly available UCI datasets and a biomedical image dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in comparison with the state-of-the-art batch-mode active learning methods. We also present two extensions of the proposed approach, which incorporate uncertainty of the predicted labels of the unlabeled data and transfer learning in the proposed formulation. Our empirical studies on UCI datasets show that incorporation of uncertainty information improves performance at later iterations while our studies on 20

  5. Civic Education among Historically Marginalized Youth in an Urban Setting: Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burroughs, Greer C.

    2010-01-01

    Many American citizens have remained outside of the political process and therefore have not been able to effectively advocate for the full rights, privileges and responsibilities that American citizenship makes possible. For youth from historically marginalized populations who are growing up in lower-income urban areas, the issue becomes…

  6. [The economic margins of activities of a bovine practitioner on dairy farms].

    PubMed

    van Genugten, A J M; van Haaften, J A; Hogeveen, H

    2011-11-01

    Because of lower margins and market liberalisation veterinarians and farmers are increasingly negotiating rates. Therefore, the margins of veterinarians are under pressure. In addition, the sales if drugs, performance of operations or giving of advice are more and more separated. These developments give veterinarians uncertainty about the profitability of their activities for dairy farmers. Not much is known about margins on veterinary activities on dairy farms. Moreover, it is interesting to see how much margins of the bovine practitioner differ between veterinary practises and dairy farms. In this study, invoices for bovine activities of 14 veterinary practises were combined with milk production registration data of the dairy farms of these practices. This way, the gross margin per bovine practitioner could be studied for the different veterinary practise. Moreover the relation between gross margin and specification of the veterinary practise could be studied. Finally, the gross margin per dairy farm and the factors that influenced this gross margin were studied. The most important result was the observation that the gross margin per bovine practitioner was dependent on the number of dairy farms per practitioner, the margin on drugs and the region of the veterinary practise. The size of the veterinary practise, the share of the dairy farming within the practise and the source of the gross margin (drugs, time or operations) did not influence the gross margin. Variables that explained the gross margin per dairy farm were, amongst others, the number of dairy cows, the milk production level of the farms and participation in PIR-DAP (a system to support the veterinarians herd health and management program). There is no relation of gross margin per dairy farm and the veterinary practise or region. PMID:22164468

  7. Seismo-turbidite Sedimentology: Implications for Active Tectonic Margin Stratigraphy and Sediment Facies Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. H.; Goldfinger, C.; Gutierrez Pastor, J.; Polonia, A.; Van Daele, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes generate mass transport deposits (MTDs); megaturbidites (MTD overlain by coeval turbidite); multi-pulsed, stacked, and mud homogenite seismo-turbidites; tsunamites; and seiche deposits. The strongest (Mw 9) earthquake shaking signatures appear to create multi-pulsed individual turbidites, where the number and character of multiple coarse-grained pulses for correlative turbidites generally remain constant both upstream and downstream in different channel systems. Multiple turbidite pulses, that correlate with multiple ruptures shown in seismograms of historic earthquakes (e.g. Chile 1960, Sumatra 2004 and Japan 2011), support this hypothesis. The weaker (Mw = or < 8) (e.g. northern California San Andreas) earthquakes generate dominantly upstream simple fining-up (uni-pulsed) turbidites in single tributary canyons and channels; however, downstream stacked turbidites result from synchronously triggered multiple turbidity currents that deposit in channels below confluences of the tributaries. Proven tsunamites, which result from tsunami waves sweeping onshore and shallow water debris into deeper water, are a fine-grained turbidite cap over other seismo-turbidites. In contrast, MTDs and seismo-turbidites result from slope failures. Multiple great earthquakes cause seismic strengthening of slope sediment, which results in minor MTDs in basin floor turbidite system deposits (e.g. maximum run-out distances of MTDs across basin floors along active margins are up to an order of magnitude less than on passive margins). In contrast, the MTDs and turbidites are equally intermixed in turbidite systems of passive margins (e.g. Gulf of Mexico). In confined basin settings, earthquake triggering results in a common facies pattern of coeval megaturbidites in proximal settings, thick stacked turbidites downstream, and ponded muddy homogenite turbidites in basin or sub-basin centers, sometimes with a cap of seiche deposits showing bi-directional flow patterns.

  8. Tectonic setting of the North Gondwana margin during the Early Ordovician: A comparison of the Ollo de Sapo and Famatina magmatic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Greco, Kassandra; Johnston, Stephen T.; Shaw, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a comparison of compiled geochronological and geochemical data from the Ollo de Sapo and Famatina magmatic events. The Ollo de Sapo magmatic sequence is located in northwest Iberia and was emplaced during the early-Ordovician from 495 to 474 Ma. The Famatina Complex is a magmatic sequence located in Northern Argentina that was emplaced during the early- to mid-Ordovician from 483 to 463 Ma. These magmatic events are currently interpreted to have been emplaced in different tectonic settings despite both having occurred along the North Gondwana margin. Geochronological data indicates that these magmatic events occurred contemporaneously over at least 9 m.y. and therefore can provide a snapshot of the northern Gondwana margin during the mid-Ordovician. Major element data indicates that both magmatic suites are calc-alkaline to alkali-calcic and trace element and REE data show magmatic signatures that are indistinguishable. This study highlights the similarity between the Ollo de Sapo and the Famatina magmatic suites and discusses alternative models for their emplacement based on paleomagnetic and paleobiogeographical data. These data indicate that the Ollo de Sapo was likely emplaced in a subduction zone setting, while the Famatina magmatic suite may be of parautochthonous origin to Gondwana, implying that the Pampeanan margin may not have been active during the early- to mid-Ordovician.

  9. Structured Set Intra Prediction With Discriminative Learning in a Max-Margin Markov Network for High Efficiency Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wenrui; Xiong, Hongkai; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Chang Wen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel model on intra coding for High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), which simultaneously predicts blocks of pixels with optimal rate distortion. It utilizes the spatial statistical correlation for the optimal prediction based on 2-D contexts, in addition to formulating the data-driven structural interdependences to make the prediction error coherent with the probability distribution, which is desirable for successful transform and coding. The structured set prediction model incorporates a max-margin Markov network (M3N) to regulate and optimize multiple block predictions. The model parameters are learned by discriminating the actual pixel value from other possible estimates to maximize the margin (i.e., decision boundary bandwidth). Compared to existing methods that focus on minimizing prediction error, the M3N-based model adaptively maintains the coherence for a set of predictions. Specifically, the proposed model concurrently optimizes a set of predictions by associating the loss for individual blocks to the joint distribution of succeeding discrete cosine transform coefficients. When the sample size grows, the prediction error is asymptotically upper bounded by the training error under the decomposable loss function. As an internal step, we optimize the underlying Markov network structure to find states that achieve the maximal energy using expectation propagation. For validation, we integrate the proposed model into HEVC for optimal mode selection on rate-distortion optimization. The proposed prediction model obtains up to 2.85% bit rate reduction and achieves better visual quality in comparison to the HEVC intra coding. PMID:25505829

  10. Boninitic magmatism in a continental margin setting, Yukon- Tanana terrane, southeastern Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercey, Stephen J.; Murphy, Donald C.; Mortensen, James K.; Paradis, Suzanne

    2001-08-01

    Mid-Paleozoic mafic rocks in the Finlayson Lake region of the Yukon-Tanana terrane, southeastern Yukon, Canada, have the diagnostic geochemical signatures of boninites: high MgO, Cr, Ni, and Co contents, intermediate SiO2 contents, high Mg#'s (MgO/ (MgO+FeO*), Al2O3/TiO2, and Zr(Hf)/middle rare earth element (REE) ratios; low TiO2, REE, and high-field-strength element contents; and U-shaped primitive mantle normalized trace element patterns. However, unlike most modern and ancient boninitic rocks that are typically associated with intraoceanic realms, those from the Finlayson Lake region are part of a mid-Paleozoic continental margin arc-backarc magmatic system. We propose a model in which the boninitic rocks from the Finlayson Lake region formed as a result of spreading ridge propagation into an arc built on composite basement of oceanic and continental crust. In the oceanic segment, upwelling asthenosphere induced melting of a subducted-slab metasomatized refractory mantle source to form boninitic magmatism. In the continental sector, upwelling asthenospheric mantle, and/or the melts derived thereof, induced crustal melting, which explains the large volume of temporally equivalent felsic volcanic and intrusive rocks.

  11. Non-Challenging Education and Teacher Control as Factors for Marginalization of Students in Diverse Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedin, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses teachers' attitudes towards immigrant students in poor settings and the effect these attitudes have on organization of education on classroom level. It draws on results from two ethnographic studies where some primary school classes in Sweden were followed with participant observation and interviews as main research methods.…

  12. Internal movement, set-up accuracy and margins for stereotactic body radiotherapy using a stereotactic body frame.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders T; Petersen, Jørgen B; Høyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the uncertainty of patient immobilization within the Elekta body frame (SBF) used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to suggest margins sufficient to ensure dose coverage to the gross target volume (GTV). The study was based on the evaluation of repeated CT-scans of 30 patients treated by SBRT. The overall uncertainty was divided between uncertainty related to internal movement of the tumor and uncertainty in the patient set-up. Standard deviations of the overall tumor displacement were 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm in medial-lateral (m-l), anterior-posterior (a-p), and cranio-caudal (c-c) directions, respectively. In a model based on the data, an ellipsoid planned target volume (PTV) corresponding to the standard deviations in the orthogonal directions and a scaling factor, K defined a 3-dimentional (3-D) probability density. According to the model, a 90% probability of full dose coverage of the GTV was secured using margins of 9 mm (m-l), 9 mm (a-p) and 13 mm (c-c), respectively. The overall uncertainty was dominated by internal tumor movements whereas the set-up uncertainty of the patient in the SBF was less pronounced. It was concluded that the Elekta SBF is useful for immobilisation of patients for SBRT. However, due to internal movement conventional margins of 5 mm in m-l and a-p and 10 mm in the c-c directions may be insufficient for full dose coverage. PMID:16982562

  13. Not gathering dust: Using NSF-MARGINS data sets and samples as components in undergraduate education and research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohut, E. J.; Smith, F. C.

    2007-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS funded Leg 7 of the Cook Expedition (2001) has produced abundant amount of samples and data. While these have been the subject of intended published and ongoing research, they have also been successfully applied to undergraduate education at the University of Delaware. Mineral and whole rock analyses have been incorporated into Earth Materials courses as portions of problem sets. Mineralogy students have used mineral compositional data to calculate solid-solution end-members, while Petrology students have calculated CIPW norms from whole rock and melt inclusion analyses. The large numbers of samples analyzed allow students to observe a variety of data and also be assigned individual data sets for calculations. Furthermore, the Cook 7 data and thin-sections have allowed students to examine a variety of arc and back-arc examples and in some cases observe genetic linkages. Utilization of the Cook 7 materials has not been limited to coursework; examination of basaltic lava dredged from Esmeralda Bank has formed the basis of an undergraduate research project. EPMA analyses of mineral phases were combined with petrographic work to unravel a complex crystallization history that involved co-precipitating phases and magma mingling. These examples reveal that after their use in pure research, data and samples produced from the MARGINS initiative can make significant contributions to the education of the next generation of geologists.

  14. Comparison of Sedimentary Processes on Adjacent Passive and Active Continental Margins Offshore of Southwest Taiwan Based on Echo Character Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Chiu, J.

    2008-12-01

    Echo character recorded on Chirp sub-bottom sonar data from offshore area of southwest Taiwan were analyzed to examine and compare the sedimentary processes of adjacent passive and active continental margin settings. Seafloor echoes in the study area are classified into four types: (1) distinct echoes, (2) indistinct echoes, (3) hyperbolic echoes, and (4) irregular echoes. Based on the mapped distribution of the echo types, the sedimentary processes offshore of southwest Taiwan are different in the two tectonic settings. On the passive South China Sea margin, slope failure is the main process on the upper continental slope, whereas turbidite deposits accumulate in the lower continental slope. In contrast, the submarine Taiwan orogenic wedge is characterized by fill-and-spill processes in the intraslope basins of the upper slope, and mass-transport deposits are observed in the canyons and on the lower Kaoping slope. This difference is largely caused by the huge influx of terrigenous sediments into the submarine Taiwan orogenic wedge province compared to the passive South China Sea continental margin. In the passive South China Sea margin, loading and movement of the Taiwan orogenic wedge has had significant effect on the seafloor morphology, and triggered retrogressive failures. Gas hydrate dissociation may have enhanced the slope failure processes at some locations.

  15. Initiation of Extension in South China Continental Margin during the Active-Passive Margin Transition: Thermochronological and Kinematic Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, X.; Chan, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    The South China continental margin is characterized by a widespread magmatic belt, prominent NE-striking faults and numerous rifted basins filled by Cretaceous-Eocene sediments. The geology denotes a transition from active to passive margin, which led to rapid modifications of crustal stress configuration and reactivation of older faults in this area. Our zircon fission-track data in this region show two episodes of exhumation: The first episode, occurring during 170-120Ma, affected local parts of the Nanling Range. The second episode, a more regional exhumation event, occurred during 115-70Ma, including the Yunkai Terrane and the Nanling Range. Numerical geodynamic modeling was conducted to simulate the subduction between the paleo-Pacific plate and the South China Block. The modeling results could explain the fact that exhumation of the granite-dominant Nanling Range occurred earlier than that of the gneiss-dominant Yunkai Terrane. In addition to the difference in rock types, the heat from Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatism in Nanling may have softened the upper crust, causing the area to exhume more readily than Yunkai. Numerical modeling results also indicate that (1) high lithospheric geothermal gradient, high slab dip angle and low convergence velocity favor the reversal of crustal stress state from compression to extension in the upper continental plate; (2) late Mesozoic magmatism in South China was probably caused by a slab roll-back; and (3) crustal extension could have occurred prior to the cessation of plate subduction. The inversion of stress regime in the continental crust from compression to crustal extension imply that the Late Cretaceous-early Paleogene red-bed basins in South China could have formed during the late stage of the subduction, accounting for the occurrence of volcanic events in some sedimentary basins. We propose that the rifting started as early as Late Cretaceous, probably before the cessation of subduction process.

  16. Variability of Earthquake Stress Drop in a subduction setting, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.; Bannister, Stephen; Ristau, John; Doser, Diane

    2016-10-01

    We calculate stress drops for 176 earthquakes (M2.6-M6.6) from four sequences of earthquakes in New Zealand. Two sequences are within the subducting Pacific plate (Eketahuna, 2014, and Upper Hutt, 2005), one in the over-riding plate (Cook Strait, 2013), and one involved reverse faulting at the subduction interface (Pongaroa, 2015). We focus on obtaining precise and accurate measurements of corner frequency and stress drop for the best-recorded earthquakes. We use an empirical Green's function approach, and require the empirical Green's function earthquakes to be highly-correlated (cross-correlation ≥ 0.8) to their respective mainshocks. In order to improve the quality, we also stack the spectral ratios and source time functions obtained from the best empirical Green's functions. We perform a grid search for each individual ratio, and each stacked ratio to obtain quantitative uncertainty measurements, and restrict our analysis to the well-constrained corner frequency measurements. We are able to analyse both P and S waves independently and the high correlation between these measurements strengthens the reliability of our results. We find that there is significant real variability in corner frequency, and hence stress drop, within each sequence; the range of almost 2 orders of magnitude is larger than the uncertainties. The four sequences have overlapping stress drop ranges, and the variability within a sequence is larger than any between different sequences. There is no clear systematic difference in the populations analysed here with tectonic setting. We see no dependence of the stress drop values on depth nor time, nor on magnitude after taking the frequency bandwidth limitations into consideration. Small scale heterogeneity must therefore exert a more primary influence on earthquake stress drop than these larger scale factors. We confirm that when fitting individual spectral ratios, a corner frequency within a factor of three of the maximum signal frequency is

  17. Active deformation of the Congo intracratonic basin and its eastern margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaerts, Michel; Delvaux, Damien; Beoka, Ateba

    2015-04-01

    The Congo basin, one of the largest intracontinental sedimentary basin in the world, developed in Central Africa since the early Neoproterozoic during successive tectonically controlled stages. It formed over an heterogeneous basement as highlighted by aeromagnetic data, composed of Archean cores welded by Proterozoic mobile belts. It contains an average of 4 km and locally up to 8 km of Neoproterozoic to Mesozoic sediments. Since late Mesozoic (Cenomanian), it was submitted to intraplate stresses due to the action of ridge-push forces related to the spreading of the South Atlantic. As a result, most part of the basin entered in an erosional stage while only a small part is still accumulating sediments. Active deformation of this vast region (5°N-11°S and 12-27°E) is indicated by a certain level of seismic activity, with about 270 earthquakes instrumentally recorded with magnitudes ranging from 2.2 to 5.5 inside the basin and up to up to 6.3 along its NW (Gabon) and NW (Katanga) margins. The dozen available focal mechanisms indicate that the basin is under ENE-WSW horizontal compression, under a compressional regime in its center and strike-slip regime along its northern and western margins. Low-angle slickensided fault planes are observed in the Samba cored well, constraining the onset of the recent compressional setting in the late Albian, at a time when South America was already separated from Africa and the South Atlantic Ridge was already functioning. Although subtle, recent tectonic deformations (faulting and buckling undulations) can also be inferred from the reflection seismic profiles and the topography and river network. The overall neotectonic picture is inferred as reflecting the development of compressional tectonic instabilities in the basin fill and its margins under the action of intraplate stress field and the control of the basement heterogeneity. This is a contribution to preparation of the Seismotectonic Map of Africa by the working group of

  18. Comparison of prostate set-up accuracy and margins with off-line bony anatomy corrections and online implanted fiducial-based corrections.

    PubMed

    Greer, P B; Dahl, K; Ebert, M A; Wratten, C; White, M; Denham, J W

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine prostate set-up accuracy and set-up margins with off-line bony anatomy-based imaging protocols, compared with online implanted fiducial marker-based imaging with daily corrections. Eleven patients were treated with implanted prostate fiducial markers and online set-up corrections. Pretreatment orthogonal electronic portal images were acquired to determine couch shifts and verification images were acquired during treatment to measure residual set-up error. The prostate set-up errors that would result from skin marker set-up, off-line bony anatomy-based protocols and online fiducial marker-based corrections were determined. Set-up margins were calculated for each set-up technique using the percentage of encompassed isocentres and a margin recipe. The prostate systematic set-up errors in the medial-lateral, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions for skin marker set-up were 2.2, 3.6 and 4.5 mm (1 standard deviation). For our bony anatomy-based off-line protocol the prostate systematic set-up errors were 1.6, 2.5 and 4.4 mm. For the online fiducial based set-up the results were 0.5, 1.4 and 1.4 mm. A prostate systematic error of 10.2 mm was uncorrected by the off-line bone protocol in one patient. Set-up margins calculated to encompass 98% of prostate set-up shifts were 11-14 mm with bone off-line set-up and 4-7 mm with online fiducial markers. Margins from the van Herk margin recipe were generally 1-2 mm smaller. Bony anatomy-based set-up protocols improve the group prostate set-up error compared with skin marks; however, large prostate systematic errors can remain undetected or systematic errors increased for individual patients. The margin required for set-up errors was found to be 10-15 mm unless implanted fiducial markers are available for treatment guidance.

  19. No Margin, No Mission: Entrepreneurial Activities at Three Benedictine Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozum, Allan Dural

    2013-01-01

    This research adds to the body of scholarly work by addressing the study's primary research question: "What are the different organizational arrangements that enable entrepreneurial activities to thrive at Catholic Benedictine colleges and universities where teaching is the primary mission?" The research examined: (1) what these…

  20. Breast cancer: agenda setting through activism.

    PubMed

    Brendtro, M J

    1998-01-01

    Breast cancer has long been one of the leading causes of death among women in the United States. The disease did not gain serious attention in the public policy arena, however, until the 1990s. Using Kingdon's agenda-setting model as a framework, this article describes how breast cancer moved to a place of prominence on the national health care agenda. The role of breast cancer activists in this effort is examined. Suggestions are then made concerning why and how advanced practice nurses might effectively influence the health policy agenda through political activism. PMID:9874938

  1. Turbidite paleoseismology along the active continental margin of Chile - Feasible or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Melnick, Daniel; Hebbeln, Dierk; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-07-01

    Much progress has been made in estimating recurrence intervals of great and giant subduction earthquakes using terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine paleoseismic archives. Recent detailed records suggest these earthquakes may have variable recurrence periods and magnitudes forming supercycles. Understanding seismic supercycles requires long paleoseismic archives that record timing and magnitude of such events. Turbidite paleoseismic archives may potentially extend past earthquake records to the Pleistocene and can thus complement commonly shorter-term terrestrial archives. However, in order to unambiguously establish recurring seismicity as a trigger mechanism for turbidity currents, synchronous deposition of turbidites in widely spaced, isolated depocenters has to be ascertained. Furthermore, characteristics that predispose a seismically active continental margin to turbidite paleoseismology and the correct sample site selection have to be taken into account. Here we analyze 8 marine sediment cores along 950 km of the Chile margin to test for the feasibility of compiling detailed and continuous paleoseismic records based on turbidites. Our results suggest that the deposition of areally widespread, synchronous turbidites triggered by seismicity is largely controlled by sediment supply and, hence, the climatic and geomorphic conditions of the adjacent subaerial setting. The feasibility of compiling a turbidite paleoseismic record depends on the delicate balance between sufficient sediment supply providing material to fail frequently during seismic shaking and sufficiently low sedimentation rates to allow for coeval accumulation of planktonic foraminifera for high-resolution radiocarbon dating. We conclude that offshore northern central Chile (29-32.5°S) Holocene turbidite paleoseismology is not feasible, because sediment supply from the semi-arid mainland is low and almost no Holocene turbidity-current deposits are found in the cores. In contrast, in the humid region

  2. Real-Time GNSS Positioning Along Canada's Active Coastal Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henton, J. A.; Dragert, H.; Lu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High-rate, low-latency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data are being refined for real-time applications to monitor and report motions related to large earthquakes in coastal British Columbia. Given the tectonic setting of Canada's west coast, specific goals for real-time regional geodetic monitoring are: (1) the collection of GNSS data with adequate station density to identify the deformation field for regional earthquakes with M>7.3; (2) the robust, continuous real-time analyses of GNSS data with a precision of 1-2 cm and a latency of less than 10s; and (3) the display of results with attending automated alarms and estimations of earthquake parameters. Megathrust earthquakes (M>8) are the primary targets for immediate identification, since the tsunamis they generate will strike the coast within 15 to 20 min. However, large (6.0

  3. Sedimentology of seismo-turbidites off the Cascadia and northern California active tectonic continental margins, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez Pastor, Julia; Nelson, Hans; Goldfinger, Chris; Escutia, Carlota

    2013-04-01

    Holocene turbidites from turbidite channel systems along the active tectonic continental margins of the Cascadia subduction zone (offshore Vancouver Island to Mendocino Triple Junction) and the northern San Andreas Transform Fault (the Triple Junction to San Francisco Bay), have been analyzed for sedimentologic features related to their seismic origin. Centimeter thick silt/sand beds (turbidite base) capped by mud layers (turbidite tail) and interbedded with hemipelagic silty clay intervals with high biogenic content have been characterized by visual core descriptions, grain-size analysis, X-ray radiographs and physical properties. Along the northern California margin in upstream single tributary canyons and channels, most turbidites are uni-pulsed (classic fining up) whereas downstream below multiple tributary canyon and channel confluences, most deposits are stacked turbidites. Because each set of stacked turbidites has no hemipelagic sediment between each turbidite unit and each unit has a distinct mineralogy from a different tributary canyon, we interpret that a stacked turbidite is deposited by several coeval turbidity currents fed by multiple tributary canyons and channels with synchronous triggering from a single San Andreas Fault earthquake. The Cascadia margin is characterized by individual multi-pulsed turbidites that contain multiple coarse-grained sub-units without hemipelagic sediment between pulses. Because the number and character of multiple coarse-grained pulses for each correlative multi-pulsed turbidite is almost always constant both upstream and downstream in different channel systems for 600 km along the margin,we interpret that the earthquake shaking or aftershock signature is usually preserved, for the much stronger Cascadia (≥9 Mw) compared to weaker California (≥8Mw) earthquakes, which result in upstream uni-pulsed turbidites and downstream stacked turbidites. Consequently, both the strongest (≥9 Mw) great earthquakes and downstream

  4. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  5. Cenozoic uplift on the West Greenland margin: active sedimentary basins in quiet Archean terranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Scott; Stephenson, Randell; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonically induced uplift within the Cenozoic. Examination of evidence, onshore and offshore, has been interpreted to imply the presence of kilometre scale uplift across the margins of the Barents Sea, North Sea, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea. Development of topography on the West Greenland margin (Baffin Bay), in particular, has been subject to much discussion and dispute. A series of low temperature thermochronological (AFT and AHe) studies onshore and interpretation of seismic architecture offshore have suggested uplift of the entire margin totalling ~3km. However, challenges to this work and recent analysis on the opposing margin (Baffin Island) have raised questions about the validity of this interpretation. The present work reviews and remodels the thermochronological data from onshore West Greenland with the aim of re-evaluating our understanding of the margin's history. New concepts within the discipline, such as effect of radiation damage on Helium diffusivity, contemporary modelling approaches and denudational mapping are all utilised to investigate alternative interpretations to this margins complex post rift evolution. In contrast to earlier studies our new approach indicates slow protracted cooling across much of the region; however, reworked sedimentary samples taken from the Cretaceous Nuussuaq Basin display periods of rapid reheating and cooling. These new models suggest the Nuussuaq Basin experienced a tectonically active Cenozoic, while the surrounding Archean basement remained quiet. Faults located within the basin appear to have been reactivated during the Palaeocene and Eocene, a period of well-documented inversion events throughout the North Atlantic, and may have resulted in subaerial kilometre scale uplift. This interpretation of the margin's evolution has wider implications for the treatment of low temperature thermochronological data and the geological history of the North

  6. Transdental photo-activation technique: hardness and marginal adaptation of composite restorations using different light sources.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eliane Bemerguy; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Correr, Gisele Maria; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different light sources associated with a transdental photoactivation technique on the marginal adaptation and hardness of composite restorations. Cavities (3 mm wide x 3 mm long x 1.5 mm in deep) were prepared on flattened bovine dentin and filled with Z250 composite (3M ESPE). Nine groups (n=10) were defined according to the curing technique (direct; transdental--photo-activation through 1 mm of enamel and 2 mm of dentin; mixed--transdental + direct) and light source (QTH XL2500, 3M ESPE; PAC Apollo 95E, DMD; LED Ultrablue Is, DMC) combination. Marginal adaptation was evaluated using a dye staining method, and the percentage of stained margins was recorded. Knoop Hardness readings were made across the transversal section of the fillings. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p< or =0.05). For margin analysis, although none of the curing conditions provided perfect adaptation, the mixed technique showed lower gap formation. No significant differences were detected between the transdental and other techniques, and no significant differences were detected among the light sources. For hardness, the direct technique showed slightly greater hardness than the mixed technique. Also, the mixed technique yielded greater hardness than the transdental technique. Among the light sources, the LED showed greater hardness than the PAC; whereas, no significant differences between the QTH and other sources were detected. The mixed technique might improve the marginal adaptation of restorations, while not being detrimental to composite hardness.

  7. The eastern Gulf of Aden: A case study for the setting up of the deep-sea gravity sedimentation on a young continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurion, Celine; Zaragosi, Sebastien; Leroy, Sylvie; Gorini, Christian; Lucazeau, Francis; Migeon, Sebastien; Garlan, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    The study of sedimentary processes across a young and segmented passive margin under the influence of the Asian monsoon-climate, provide a potential record of tectonic, climatic and high-resolution eustatic events. The northern margin of the eastern Gulf of Aden is one of the world rare examples to study the setting up of gravity sedimentation in a deep basin and the related control parameters. Using multibeam data, Chirp profiles, and sediment cores, we show that this gravity sedimentation highlights the importance of flooding of wadis on the sediment transfer from onshore to the deep basin. The drainage network is not mature on this starved margin, which is affected by post-rift uplift. The main channelized turbidite systems are localized in the western part of the margin, while mass-transport deposits and sheet turbidite deposits are concentrated along the eastern part of the margin affected by a late post-rift uplift. The deep-basin sedimentation is composed of many coarse-grained carbonate turbidites that are related to the lithology of the onshore sedimentary cover. The central part of the uplifted margin does not exhibit coarse-grained turbidites since about 70 ka BP, while the eastern part displays turbidites until recently. This monsoon-influenced margin is characterized by strong along-strike variability in tectonics and fluvial input distribution that might directly influence and segment the gravity sedimentation: (i) the western channelized turbidite system formation depend mainly of the wide catchment area onshore in combination with the geometry of the deep basin; (ii) the starved part of the margin, characterized by mass-transport deposits is mainly controlled by the post-rift uplift; (iii) along the eastern part of the uplifted margin, the unchannelized turbidite deposits seem to be primarily controlled by the presence of a well-developed continental shelf combined to the late uplift impact on the sedimentary supply.

  8. The Kongsfjorden Channel System offshore NW Spitsbergen, European Arctic: evidence of down-slope processes in a contour-current dominated setting on the continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, Matthias; Sverre Laberg, Jan; Hass, H. Christian; Osti, Giacomo

    2016-04-01

    The Kongsfjorden Channel System (KCS) is located on the continental slope in the eastern Fram Strait, off northwest Spitsbergen. It provides evidence that the influence of down-slope sedimentary processes locally exceeds regional along-slope sedimentation. Compared to other submarine channel systems on and off glaciated continental margins, it is a relatively short system (~120 km) occurring at a large range of water depths (~250-4000 m). It originates with multiple gullies on the Kongsfjorden Trough Mouth Fan merging to small channels that further downslope merge to a main channel. The overall location of the channel system is controlled by variations in slope gradients (0-20°) and the ambient regional bathymetry: widest and deepest incisions occur in areas of steepest slope gradients. The KCS has probably been active since ~1 Ma when glacial activity on Svalbard increased and grounded ice expanded to the shelf break off Kongsfjorden repeatedly. Activity within the system was probably highest during glacials. However, reduced activity presumably took place also during interglacials. The presentation summarizes the work of Forwick et al. (2015). Reference: Forwick, M., Laberg, J.S., Hass, H.C. & Osti, C., 2015. The Kongsfjorden Channel System offshore NW Svalbard: downslope sedimentary processes in a contour-current-dominated setting. Arktos 1, DOI: 10.1007/s41063-015-0018-4.

  9. Transition from island-arc to passive setting on the continental margin of Gondwana: U Pb zircon dating of Neoproterozoic metaconglomerates from the SE margin of the Teplá Barrandian Unit, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sláma, Jiří; Dunkley, Daniel J.; Kachlík, Václav; Kusiak, Monika A.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentological, petrological and geochemical data combined with SHRIMP and LA ICP-MS U-Pb ages of pebbles of granitic rocks and detrital zircons from Neoproterozoic Vletice metaconglomerates of the SE margin of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit were used to characterize the regional geotectonic setting at the Proterozoic/Paleozoic boundary. The metaconglomerates form several-metres thick intercalations in metasediments of the Svrchnice Formation (roof pendants of Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex), which is considered to have been deposited in Neoproterozoic/Cambrian times. A sedimentological study indicates that the metaconglomerates are products of debris flows deposited in submarine canyons or proximal parts of submarine fans. Geochemistry of metaconglomerate matrix and petrography of pebbles revealed an obvious difference from the western and central part of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit Proterozoic where pebbles eroded from uplifted parts of the basin and island arc sources are most common. The abundance of quartz, quartzite, granite and crystalline limestone in pebbles together with the more mature composition of host metagreywackes indicate the presence of relatively evolved continental crust in the source area for the Vletice metaconglomerates, and shallowing of the Neoproterozoic basin to the SE (in the present geographic co-ordinate system). The Neoproterozoic to lowermost Cambrian age of the Svrchnice Formation, suggested by its comparison with similar rocks in the central part of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit, was confirmed by U-Pb dating. Ages of detrital zircons from the metaconglomerate matrix cluster around two values: Archaean to Paleoproterozoic U/Pb ages between ca. 2580 and 1780 Ma and Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian ages between 660 and 520 Ma with a significant peaks at 600 and 544 Ma suggesting local volcanic activity extending shortly beyond the Proterozoic/Paleozoic boundary. Zircons separated from two trondhjemite pebbles from the metaconglomerate

  10. A new model for the development of the active Afar volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphaël; Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic passive margins, that represent more than the three quarters of continental margins worldwide, are privileged witnesses of the lithospheric extension processes thatform new oceanic basins. They are characterized by voluminous amounts of underplated, intruded and extruded magmas, under the form of massive lavas prisms (seaward-dipping reflectors, or SDR) during the course of thinning and stretching of the lithosphere, that eventually form the ocean-continent transition. The origin and mechanisms of formation of these objects are still largely debated today. We have focussed our attention in the last few years on the Afar volcanic province which represents an active analogue of such volcanic margins. We explored the structural and temporal relationships that exist between the development of the major thinning and stretching structures and the magmatic production in Central Afar. Conjugate precise fieldwork analysis along with lavas geochronology allowed us to revisit the timing and style of the rift formation, since the early syn-rift period of time in the W-Afar marginal area to present days. Extension is primarily accommodated over a wide area at the surface since the very initial periods of extension (~ 25 Ma) following the emplacement of Oligocene CFBs. We propose in our reconstruction of central Afar margin history that extension has been associated with important volumes of underplated mafic material that compensate crustal thinning. This has been facilitated by major crustal-scale detachments that help localize the thinning and underplating at depth. In line with this 'magmatic wide-rift' mode of extension, we demonstrate that episodic extension steps alternate with more protracted magmatic phases. The production of syn-rift massive flood basalts (~ 4 Ma) occurs after early thinning of both the crust and the lithosphere, which suggests that SDR formation, is controlled by previous tectonic event. We determined how the melting regime evolved in

  11. Carbonate sedimentation in an extensional active margin: Cretaceous history of the Haymana region, Pontides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, Aral I.; Altiner, Demir

    2016-10-01

    The Haymana region in Central Anatolia is located in the southern part of the Pontides close to the İzmir-Ankara suture. During the Cretaceous, the region formed part of the south-facing active margin of the Eurasia. The area preserves a nearly complete record of the Cretaceous system. Shallow marine carbonates of earliest Cretaceous age are overlain by a 700-m-thick Cretaceous sequence, dominated by deep marine limestones. Three unconformity-bounded pelagic carbonate sequences of Berriasian, Albian-Cenomanian and Turonian-Santonian ages are recognized: Each depositional sequence is preceded by a period of tilting and submarine erosion during the Berriasian, early Albian and late Cenomanian, which corresponds to phases of local extension in the active continental margin. Carbonate breccias mark the base of the sequences and each carbonate sequence steps down on older units. The deep marine carbonate deposition ended in the late Santonian followed by tilting, erosion and folding during the Campanian. Deposition of thick siliciclastic turbidites started in the late Campanian and continued into the Tertiary. Unlike most forearc basins, the Haymana region was a site of deep marine carbonate deposition until the Campanian. This was because the Pontide arc was extensional and the volcanic detritus was trapped in the intra-arc basins and did not reach the forearc or the trench. The extensional nature of the arc is also shown by the opening of the Black Sea as a backarc basin in the Turonian-Santonian. The carbonate sedimentation in an active margin is characterized by synsedimentary vertical displacements, which results in submarine erosion, carbonate breccias and in the lateral discontinuity of the sequences, and differs from blanket like carbonate deposition in the passive margins.

  12. Carbonate sedimentation in an extensional active margin: Cretaceous history of the Haymana region, Pontides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, Aral I.; Altiner, Demir

    2016-03-01

    The Haymana region in Central Anatolia is located in the southern part of the Pontides close to the İzmir-Ankara suture. During the Cretaceous, the region formed part of the south-facing active margin of the Eurasia. The area preserves a nearly complete record of the Cretaceous system. Shallow marine carbonates of earliest Cretaceous age are overlain by a 700-m-thick Cretaceous sequence, dominated by deep marine limestones. Three unconformity-bounded pelagic carbonate sequences of Berriasian, Albian-Cenomanian and Turonian-Santonian ages are recognized: Each depositional sequence is preceded by a period of tilting and submarine erosion during the Berriasian, early Albian and late Cenomanian, which corresponds to phases of local extension in the active continental margin. Carbonate breccias mark the base of the sequences and each carbonate sequence steps down on older units. The deep marine carbonate deposition ended in the late Santonian followed by tilting, erosion and folding during the Campanian. Deposition of thick siliciclastic turbidites started in the late Campanian and continued into the Tertiary. Unlike most forearc basins, the Haymana region was a site of deep marine carbonate deposition until the Campanian. This was because the Pontide arc was extensional and the volcanic detritus was trapped in the intra-arc basins and did not reach the forearc or the trench. The extensional nature of the arc is also shown by the opening of the Black Sea as a backarc basin in the Turonian-Santonian. The carbonate sedimentation in an active margin is characterized by synsedimentary vertical displacements, which results in submarine erosion, carbonate breccias and in the lateral discontinuity of the sequences, and differs from blanket like carbonate deposition in the passive margins.

  13. Evidence of Active Methanogen Communities in Shallow Sediments of the Sonora Margin Cold Seeps

    PubMed Central

    L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G.; Cragg, Barry A.; Parkes, R. John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. PMID:25769831

  14. Effect of software version and parameter settings on the marginal and internal adaptation of crowns fabricated with the CAD/CAM system

    PubMed Central

    SHIM, Ji Suk; Jin Sook, LEE; Jeong Yol, LEE; CHOI, Yeon Jo; SHIN, Sang Wan; Jae Jun, RYU

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the marginal and internal adaptation of individual dental crowns fabricated using a CAD/CAM system (Sirona’s BlueCam), also evaluating the effect of the software version used, and the specific parameter settings in the adaptation of crowns. Material and Methods Forty digital impressions of a master model previously prepared were acquired using an intraoral scanner and divided into four groups based on the software version and on the spacer settings used. The versions 3.8 and 4.2 of the software were used, and the spacer parameter was set at either 40 μm or 80 μm. The marginal and internal fit of the crowns were measured using the replica technique, which uses a low viscosity silicone material that simulates the thickness of the cement layer. The data were analyzed using a Friedman two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests with significance level set at p<0.05. Results The two-way ANOVA analysis showed the software version (p<0.05) and the spacer parameter (p<0.05) significantly affected the crown adaptation. The crowns designed with the version 4.2 of the software showed a better fit than those designed with the version 3.8, particularly in the axial wall and in the inner margin. The spacer parameter was more accurately represented in the version 4.2 of the software than in the version 3.8. In addition, the use of the version 4.2 of the software combined with the spacer parameter set at 80 μm showed the least variation. On the other hand, the outer margin was not affected by the variables. Conclusion Compared to the version 3.8 of the software, the version 4.2 can be recommended for the fabrication of well-fitting crown restorations, and for the appropriate regulation of the spacer parameter. PMID:26537722

  15. Using programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) to set priorities: reflections from a qualitative assessment in an English Primary Care Trust.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Elizabeth; Frew, Emma J

    2013-12-01

    In England from 2002 to 2013, Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) were responsible for commissioning healthcare for their local populations. The NHS has recently undergone rapid organisational change whereby clinicians have assumed responsibility for local commissioning decisions. This change in commissioning arrangements alongside the current financial pressures facing the NHS provides an impetus for considering the use of technical prioritisation methods to enable the identification of savings without having a detrimental effect on the health of the population. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a technical prioritisation method termed PBMA applied within NHS Plymouth, an English PCT responsible for commissioning services for a population of approximately 270,000. We evaluated the effectiveness of the process, the extent to which it was appropriate for local healthcare commissioning and whether it identified budget savings. Using qualitative research methodology, we found the process produced clear strategic and operational priorities for 2010/11, providing staff with focus and structure, and delivered a substantial planned reduction in hospital activity levels. Participants expressed satisfaction with the process. NHS Plymouth adhered to the PBMA process, although concerns were raised about the evidence for some priorities, decibel rationing, and a lack of robust challenge at priority-setting meetings. Further work is required to enhance participants' understanding of marginal analysis. Participants highlighted several external benefits, particularly in terms of cultural change, and felt the process should encompass the whole local health and social care community. This evaluation indicates that the prioritisation method was effective in producing priorities for NHS Plymouth, and that PBMA provides an appropriate method for allocating resources at a local level. In order for PBMA to identify savings, cultural and structural barriers to disinvestment

  16. Motor-driven marginal band coiling promotes cell shape change during platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Diagouraga, Boubou; Grichine, Alexei; Fertin, Arnold; Wang, Jin; Khochbin, Saadi

    2014-01-01

    Platelets float in the blood as discoid particles. Their shape is maintained by microtubules organized in a ring structure, the so-called marginal band (MB), in the periphery of resting platelets. Platelets are activated after vessel injury and undergo a major shape change known as disc to sphere transition. It has been suggested that actomyosin tension induces the contraction of the MB to a smaller ring. In this paper, we show that antagonistic microtubule motors keep the MB in its resting state. During platelet activation, dynein slides microtubules apart, leading to MB extension rather than contraction. The MB then starts to coil, thereby inducing the spherical shape of activating platelets. Newly polymerizing microtubules within the coiled MB will then take a new path to form the smaller microtubule ring, in concerted action with actomyosin tension. These results present a new view of the platelet activation mechanism and reveal principal mechanistic features underlying cellular shape changes. PMID:24421335

  17. Evaluating Active Methane Hydrate Dissociation Along the Washington Margin in Response to Bottom Water Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whorley, T. L.; Solomon, E. A.; Torres, M. E.; Johnson, H. P.; Berg, R. D.; Philip, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Water column temperature data acquired on the upper continental slope (UCS) of the Washington (WA) section of the Cascadia margin shows gradual warming of bottom water at the upper limit of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) over the last 4 decades. Thermal models based on these records predict downslope retreat of the MHSZ by ~1-2 km (~40 m in depth), potentially destabilizing methane hydrate and releasing CH4into the sediment and water column. To test for contemporaneous methane hydrate dissociation along the UCS of the WA margin, we conducted a comprehensive geophysical and geochemical survey of active seep sites at the upper limit of the MHSZ from 48° to 46°N on the R/V Thompson in October 2014. We identified 9 active seep sites within this corridor and imaged 22 bubble plumes that commonly rise to ~300 m water depth with some reaching to near the sea surface. Some seep sites appear to be controlled by local margin structure, mainly extensional faults and ridges. We collected 22 gravity cores and 20 CTD/hydrocasts from the 9 seeps and processed ~350 sediment samples for pore water chemistry. Hydrocarbons heavier than CH4were not detected in bottom water samples, suggesting any gas hydrate present is Structure I. Preliminary pore water data show decreasing salinity downcore at each site with measured values as low as 10 psu and the sulfate-methane transition zone occurs between 50-80 cm below the sea floor. Pore water solute, noble gas, and isotope ratio data indicate freshening from at least one site is not the result of hydrate dissociation, but rather is due to clay dehydration at depths where temperatures exceed 60°C. Very few of the sites show pore water profiles that are in steady state, suggesting a dynamic biogeochemical system at the UCS along the entire WA margin. Further analyses and modeling are underway to constrain the nature and timing of these transient profiles and whether they are the result of recent methane hydrate dissociation.

  18. The southern margin of the Caribbean Plate in Venezuela: tectono-magmatic setting of the ophiolitic units and kinematic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Giuseppe; Beccaluva, Luigi; Coltorti, Massimo; Siena, Franca; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2002-07-01

    The southern Caribbean Plate margin in Venezuela consists of a W-E elongated deformed belt, composed of several tectonic units dismembered along the northern part of the South America continental Plate since the Late Cretaceous. The present review, based on petrology and tectono-magmatic significance of each unit, makes it possible to define the main geotectonic elements and to reconstruct the paleogeographic domains from Late Jurassic to Tertiary: (a) Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) proto-Caribbean oceanic basin (Loma de Hierro Unit); (b) oceanic plateau (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands basement); (c) rifted continental margin (Cordillera de La Costa and Caucagua-El Tinaco Units) with Within Plate Tholeiitic (WPTh) magmatism; (d) an intra-oceanic subduction zone represented by Island Arc Tholeiitic (IAT) magmatism (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units) of Early Cretaceous age; (e) an Early Cretaceous ocean-continent subduction trench filled by melange (Franja Costera); (f) a new intra-oceanic subduction zone, represented by the tonalitic arc magmatism of Late Cretaceous age (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands). Regional tectonic constraints and coherent kinematic reconstruction suggest an original "near-Mid America" location of the Jurassic-Cretaceous "proto-Caribbean" oceanic realm. From Early to Late Cretaceous one sub-continental subduction with melanges (Franja Costera Unit) and two main stages of intra-oceanic arc magmatism are recorded in the so-called "eo-Caribbean" phases. The first consists of generally metamorphosed and deformed volcano-plutonic sequences with IAT affinity (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units), probably in relation to a southeastward-dipping subduction. The second is mainly represented by generally unmetamorphosed tonalitic intrusives cutting the oceanic plateau in the Dutch and Venezuelan Islands, and related to the new intra-oceanic subduction with reverse lithospheric sinking. The latter probably marked the onset of the Aves/Lesser Antilles arc

  19. Crustal recycling at active convergent margins and growth of the continents

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC ); Zheng, S.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Subduction of continental materials at active convergent margins provides an opportunity to evaluate mechanisms and magnitude of subduction-driven crustal recycling and its potential role in continental growth. Continental materials, in the form of detrital sediments and elements adsorbed out of seawater onto settling sediment particles, are continuously supplied to subduction trenches. The sediments may be accreted and re-attached to the continental crust through collisional processes subducted to depth and subsequently involved in arc magma generation (magmatic recycling) or subducted past the arc into the deep mantle. Cosmogenic 10Be, which is strongly adsorbed onto settling sediment particles, may be used to investigate all aspects of sediment recycling. Because of its atmospheric source and short half-life, the high 10Be concentrations observed in many volcanic arc magmas require that the uppermost part of the sediment column be subducted to depth and some part of it returned to the surface in arc magmas within the measurable 10Be lifetime, effectively a few million years. In the Aleutians, Middle America and Marianas, 10Be is present only in the upper 12m, 100m and 25m, respectively of the subducting oceanic sediment column. Using von Huene and Scholl's 1991 estimate of oceanic sediment supply to trenches, the authors evidence for sediment bypassing of accretionary margins, and the limited recycling of most major elements in arc volcanism, estimates of sediment subduction are nearly equal to those required in a steady-state, recycling model for growth of the continents through time.

  20. Analysis of methanogenic and methanotrophic activity at the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broemsen, E. L.; Webster, K. D.; Dieser, M.; Pratt, L. M.; Christner, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Anoxic conditions in environments beneath the world's glaciers and ice sheets provide plausible habitats supporting the microbial production of methane. Recent reports of potential methane sources beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) suggest in situ production by an active community of methanogens. Beneath the GrIS, microbially derived methane can be dissolved in subglacial water, and during periods of melting, can exchange with the atmosphere at sites of subglacial discharge. Transfer of methane from subglacial fluids to the atmosphere could be a significant climate factor, but few data are available to make such assessments. The specific aim of this study was to characterize the composition and activity of methanogens and methanotrophs present in samples of subglacial outflow at the ice sheet margin near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Subglaical water was collected twice-weekly over a nine week period (mid July to mid September of 2012) and the dissolved methane concentration in the samples was determined via gas chromatography. Extracted RNA and DNA from the subglacial water was analyzed by analysis of 16s rRNA and rRNA genes present in the subglacial assemblages. From the molecular results we infer the presence of active methanogens related to the order Methanosarcinales. Further, locally elevated concentrations of atmospheric methane as high as 1.92 ± 0.03 ppmv, were detected in the ice tunnel of the subglacial outflow using open-path laser spectrometry. From these data we estimate rates of methane release at the ice sheet margin during the summer melt months at this geographical location. The results provide a context for addressing the impact that deglaciation will have on the release of greenhouse gases from ice sheets on a warming Earth.

  1. New explanations for old observations: marginal band coiling during platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sadoul, K

    2015-03-01

    Blood platelets are tiny cell fragments derived from megakaryocytes. Their primary function is to control blood vessel integrity and ensure hemostasis if a vessel wall is damaged. Circulating quiescent platelets have a flat, discoid shape maintained by a circumferential microtubule bundle, called the marginal band (MB). In the case of injury platelets are activated and rapidly adopt a spherical shape due to microtubule motor-induced elongation and subsequent coiling of the MB. Platelet activation and shape change can be transient or become irreversible. This depends on the strength of the activation stimulus, which is translated into a cytoskeletal crosstalk between microtubules, their motors and the actomyosin cortex, ensuring stimulus-response coupling. Following microtubule motor-driven disc-to-sphere transition, a strong stimulus will lead to compression of the sphere through actomyosin cortex contraction. This will concentrate the granules in the center of the platelet and accelerate their exocytosis. Once granules are released, platelets have crossed the point of no return to irreversible activation. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular mechanism leading to platelet shape change, with a special emphasis on microtubules, and refers to previously published observations, which have been essential for generating an integrated view of cytoskeletal rearrangements during platelet activation.

  2. Anthropogenic activities have contributed moderately to increased inputs of organic materials in marginal seas off China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Wei, Gao-Ling; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Guan, Yu-Feng; Wong, Charles S; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2013-10-15

    Sediment has been recognized as a gigantic sink of organic materials and therefore can record temporal input trends. To examine the impact of anthropogenic activities on the marginal seas off China, sediment cores were collected from the Yellow Sea, the inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS), and the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the sources and spatial and temporal variations of organic materials, i.e., total organic carbon (TOC) and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The concentration ranges of TOC were 0.5-1.29, 0.63-0.83, and 0.33-0.85%, while those of Σn-C14-35 (sum of n-alkanes with carbon numbers of 14-35) were 0.08-1.5, 0.13-1.97, and 0.35-0.96 μg/g dry weight in sediment cores from the Yellow Sea, ECS inner shelf, and the SCS, respectively. Terrestrial higher plants were an important source of aliphatic hydrocarbons in marine sediments off China. The spatial distribution of Σn-C14-35 concentrations and source diagnostic ratios suggested a greater load of terrestrial organic materials in the Yellow Sea than in the ECS and SCS. Temporally, TOC and Σn-C14-35 concentrations increased with time and peaked at either the surface or immediate subsurface layers. This increase was probably reflective of elevated inputs of organic materials to marginal seas off China in recent years, and attributed partly to the impacts of intensified anthropogenic activities in mainland China. Source diagnostics also suggested that aliphatic hydrocarbons were mainly derived from biogenic sources, with a minority in surface sediment layers from petroleum sources, consistent with the above-mentioned postulation.

  3. Shelfal sediment transport by undercurrents forces turbidity current activity during high sea level, Chile continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Hebbeln, Dierk; Regenberg, Marcus; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the links between terrigenous sediment supply and marine transport and depositional processes along tectonically active margins is essential to decipher turbidite successions as potential archives of climatic and seismic forcings and to comprehend timing and quantity of marine clastic deposition. Sequence stratigraphic models predict coarse-grained terrigenous sediment delivery to deep-marine sites mainly during sea-level fall and lowstand. Marine clastic deposition during periods of transgression and highstand has been attributed to the continued geomorphic connectivity between terrestrial sediment sources and marine sinks (e.g., rivers connected to submarine canyons) often facilitated by narrow shelves, high sediment supply causing delta migration to the shelf edge, and/or abrupt increases in sediment supply due to climatic variability or catastrophic events. To decipher the controls on Holocene highstand turbidite deposition, we analyzed twelve sediment cores of spatially disparate, coeval Holocene turbidite systems along the Chile margin (29-40°S) with changing climatic and geomorphic characteristics but uniform changes of sea level. Intraslope basins in north-central Chile (29-33°S) offshore a narrow to absent shelf record a shut-off of turbidite activity during the Holocene. In contrast, core sites in south-central Chile (36-40°S) offshore a wide continental shelf have repeatedly experienced turbidite deposition during sea-level highstand conditions, even though most of the depocenters are not connected via canyons to sediment sources. The interplay of stable high sediment supply related to strong onshore precipitation in combination with a wide shelf, over which undercurrents move sediment towards the shelf edge, appears to control Holocene turbidite sedimentation and sediment export to the deep sea.

  4. Goal setting: Eating, Physical activity & Weight loss | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    No matter what your weight loss goal is, the key to reaching your goals is to make changes to your lifestyle like eating and physical activity. This involves setting realistic expectations and making a plan. 

  5. New evidence for active deformation off the Annaba region (easternmost Algerian margin): Estimates of Quaternary shortening and slip rates from folding analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherroubi, A.; Deverchere, J.; Yelles, A.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Domzig, A.; Graindorge, D.; Bracene, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Gaullier, V.

    2007-12-01

    From the first marine investigations off the region of Annaba (easternmost part of Algeria) made after the MARADJA2 survey in November 2005, a set of large active faults and folds was discovered near the foot of the margin. This active thrust system resumes a previous passive margin and creates growth strata deposition on the backlimbs of large Quaternary folds, resulting in the development of perched basins at the foot of the margin since less than 1 Ma. The system forms a set of overlapping fault segments verging towards the Algerian basin. From the seismic line analysis (high-resolution and Chirp data), and using sedimentation rates obtained from coring and extrapolated, a shortening rate of about 0.9 mm/yr is estimated. If we consider a single fault dipping at about 45° (hypothesized from the Boumerdès 2003 rupture zone), a fault slip rate of about 1.3 mm/yr can be postulated. Considering recent kinematic studies, this fault-related fold system could accommodate a significant part of the present-day submarine shortening rate between the European and African plates, predicted by Stich et al. (2006) to be 1.5 mm/yr from GPS modelling. This faulting is apparently active at a faster rate than the similar faulting observed at the foot of the margin NW of Algiers. This system of faults off Annaba represents a major threat for the region. Indeed, the location of this system changes drastically the seismic hazard assessment of the region, since no large historical earthquake is reported there since 3 centuries at least.

  6. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Crustal Growth at Active Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Active margins are important sites of new continental crust formation by magmatic processes related to the subduction of oceanic plates. We investigate these phenomena using a three-dimensional coupled petrological-geochemical-thermomechanical numerical model, which combines a finite-difference flow solver with a non-diffusive marker-in-cell technique for advection (I3ELVIS code, Gerya and Yuen, PEPI,2007). The model includes mantle flow associated with the subducting plate, water release from the slab, fluid propagation that triggers partial melting at the slab surface, melt extraction and the resulting volcanic crustal growth at the surface. The model also accounts for variations in physical properties (mainly density and viscosity) of both fluids and rocks as a function of local conditions in temperature, pressure, deformation, nature of the rocks, and chemical exchanges. Our results show different patterns of crustal growth and surface topography, which are comparable to nature, during subduction at active continental margins. Often, two trench-parallel lines of magmatic activity, which reflect two maxima of melt production atop the slab, are formed on the surface. The melt extraction rate controls the patterns of new crust at different ages. Moving free water reflects the path of fluids, and the velocity of free water shows the trend of two parallel lines of magmatic activity. The formation of new crust in particular time intervals is distributed in finger-like shapes, corresponding to finger-like and ridge-like cold plumes developed atop the subducting slabs (Zhu et al., G-cubed,2009; PEPI,2011). Most of the new crust is basaltic, formed from peridotitic mantle. Granitic crust extracted from melted sediment and upper crust forms in a line closer to the trench, and its distribution reflects the finger-like cold plumes. Dacitic crust extracted from the melted lower crust forms in a line farther away from the trench, and its distribution is anticorrelated with

  7. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    originated as an extensional structure at the continental margin of Gondwana. Independent lines of evidence imply that basin evolution was not connected to subduction. Thus, the basin could not have been in a fore-arc position as previously postulated. Above the folded Devonian-Early Carboniferous strata, a continental volcanic arc developed from the Late Carboniferous to the Middle Triassic. It represents the link between the Choiyoi Province in central Chile and Argentina, and the Mitu Group rift in southern Peru. The volcanic arc succession is characterized by the prevalence of silicic lavas and tuffs and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks. During the latest Carboniferous, a thick ostracod-bearing lacustrine unit formed in an extended lake in the area of the Depresión Preandina. This lake basin originated in an intra-arc tensional setting. During the Early Permian, marine limestones were deposited on a marine platform west and east of the volcanic arc, connected to the depositional area of the Copacabana Formation in southern Peru.

  8. Provenance, volcanic record, and tectonic setting of the Paleozoic Ventania Fold Belt and the Claromecó Foreland Basin: Implications on sedimentation and volcanism along the southwestern Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandretti, Luciano; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Chemale, Farid; Brückmann, Matheus Philipe; Zvirtes, Gustavo; Matté, Vinícius; Ramos, Victor A.

    2013-11-01

    This study focuses on the provenance, volcanic record, and tectonic setting of the Paleozoic Ventania System, a geologic province which comprises the Cambro-Devonian Ventania Fold Belt and the adjoining Permo-Carboniferous Claromecó Foreland Basin, located inboard the deformation front. The Ventania Fold Belt is formed of the Curamalal and Ventana groups, which are composed mainly of mature quartzites that were unconformably deposited on igneous and metamorphic basement. The Pillahuincó Group is exposed as part of the Claromecó Basin and it has lithological and structural features totally distinct from the lowermost groups. This group is composed of immature arkoses and subarkoses with intercalated tuff horizons, unconformably overlaying the quartzites and associated with glacial-marine deposits of the lower Late Carboniferous to Early Permian section. The petrography, as well as major and trace elements (including rare earth elements) support that the Ventania quartzites were derived from cratonic sources and deposited in a passive margin environment. For the Pillahuincó Group, we suggest a transition between rocks derived from and deposited in a passive margin environment to those with geochemical and petrographical signatures indicative of an active continental margin provenance. LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis performed on euhedral and prismatic zircon grains of the tuffs revealed an age of 284 ± 15 Ma. The geochemical fingerprints and geochronological data of the tuffs found in the Claromecó Basin support the presence of an active and widespread Lower Permian pyroclastic activity in southwestern Gondwana, which is interpreted as part of the Choiyoi Volcanic Province in Argentina and Chile.

  9. Mass transport deposits as witness of Holocene seismic activity on the Ligurian margin, Western Mediterranean (ASTARTE project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalens, Kevin; Cattaneo, Antonio; Migeon, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The Ligurian Margin (Western Mediterranean) is at the transition between the Southern Alpes and the Liguro-Provençal margin and it is one of the most seismic areas of France. Several historic earthquakes have been indexed; the strongest, on February 23rd, 1887, occurred offshore Menton and Imperia and also caused a tsunami wave. Its equivalent magnitude has been estimated between 6 and 6.5. In addition, a moderate recurrent seismicity shakes the margin. The aim of this study is to understand the link between seismic activity and slope destabilization, and to identify the sedimentary deposits resulting from mass transport or turbidity currents. During Malisar (Geoazur laboratory), Prisme 2 and Prisme 3 (Ifremer) cruises, bathymetry, seafloor imagery (SAR), geophysics data (CHIRP SYSIF and high resolution seismics), and sediment cores have been acquired on the continental slope, focussing on canyons and submarine landslides, and in the basin. These data record numerous mass transport deposits (slump, debrites) in the different physiographic areas of the margin. To search for evidences of past Ligurian margin seismicity during the Holocene, we focused on the northeast part of the margin, the Finale area. We identified and sampled acoustically transparent Mass Transport Deposits up to 20-m thick in the bottom of three coaleshing canyons: Noli, Pora and Centa canyons from W to E in the area offshore Finale Ligure. We also recovered an MTD in the collecting deeper canyon system. MTDs in cores appear as sediment with different degrees of deformation (tilted blocks, slump, debrites) and are topped by hemipelagites. The radiocarbon age of the top of MTDs can be considered synchronous and centered around 4900 yr BP. Mass wasting occurring over more than 50 km of the Ligurian margin could indicate that an earthquake stroke the Finale area sector at that time.

  10. Active processes on a mixed clastic carbonate Brazilian shelf margin: Importance for hydrocarbon exploration in turbidites

    SciTech Connect

    Cainelli, C. )

    1991-03-01

    The search for subtle hydrocarbon accumulations in turbidite systems requires additional approaches for more successful exploration, particularly when direct recognition on seismic lines is difficult. This includes the determination and understanding of processes controlling sand distribution on the shelf and the mapping of sand pathways from the shelf to the slop/basin that can guide efforts to look for more favorable sites for turbidite sandstone deposition. The approach can be exemplified in the Sergipe-Alagoas basin, on the Brazillian Atlantic passive margin. The section analyzed is the Piacabucu Formation, a thick seaward prograding wedge composed of coastal sandstones and shelf edge carbonates on a narrow shelf and slope-basin shales with turbidite lenses. Waves and currents control the redistribution of sediments transported to the shelf by rivers. More wave energy is expended in ten hours in the San Francisco delta than in an entire year in the Mississippi delta. Such environment precludes deposition of mud on the shelf, but it stimulates the development of shelf edge carbonates. Rimed carbonates along the shelf break serve as a barrier for downslope movements of coarse-grained sediment, where turbidites are oil targets. The search for gaps in the carbonate barrier which can tap the behind-barrier sands is critical for sand-rich turbidite development. It is believed that canyons create these gaps and act as active turbidity current routes.

  11. Tectonic setting of the pebble and other copper-gold-molybdenum porphyry deposits within the evolving middle cretaceous continental margin of Northwestern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Anderson, Eric; Hart, Craig J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The Pebble Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska, containing the largest gold resource of any known porphyry in the world, developed in a tectonic setting significantly different from that of the present-day. It is one of a series of metalliferous middle Cretaceous porphyritic granodiorite, quartz monzonite, and diorite bodies, evolved from lower crust and metasomatized lithospheric mantle melts, which formed along much of the length of the North American craton suture with the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia arc. The porphyry deposits were emplaced within the northernmost two of a series of ca. 130 to 80 Ma flysch basins that define the suture, as well as into arc rocks immediately seaward of the two basins. Deposits include the ca. 100 to 90 Ma Pebble, Neacola, and other porphyry prospects along the Kahiltna basin-Peninsula terrane boundary, and the ca. 115 to 105 Ma Baultoff, Carl Creek, Horsfeld, Orange Hill, Bond Creek, and Chisna porphyries along the Nutzotin basin-Wrangellia terrane boundary.The porphyry deposits probably formed along the craton margin more than 1,000 km to the south of their present latitude. Palinspastic reconstructions of plate kinematics from this period are particularly difficult because magmatism overlaps the 119 to 83 Ma Cretaceous Normal Superchron, a period when sea-floor magnetic data are lacking. Our favored scenario is that ore formation broadly overlaps the cessation of sedimentation and contraction and the transition to a transpressional continental margin regime, such that the remnant ocean basins were converted to strike-slip basins. The basins and outboard Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia composite superterrane, which are all located seaward of the deep crustal Denali-Farewell fault system, were subjected to northerly dextral transpression for as long as perhaps 50 m.y., beginning at ca. 95 ± 10 Ma. The onset of this transpression was marked by development of the mineralized bodies along fault segments on the seaward side

  12. Paleomagnetic Rotations in the Northwest U.S. - Setting the Stage for Contemporary Deformation Models of the Cascadia Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    In 1957 Allan Cox reported in Nature that the paleopole for the Eocene Siletz River Volcanics (SRV) of the Oregon Coast Range lay far to the east of the geocentric axial dipole, an oddity that defied adequate explanation for nearly two decades. Subsequent paleomagnetic studies by Myrl Beck, Allan Cox, their armies of students, and colleagues from the USGS, GSC, UCSC, and other institutions demonstrated that much of the central Cascadia forearc and arc had undergone large clockwise rotations during Cenozoic time. Between 1976 and 1989, paleomagnetists assembled a remarkable data set from more than 30 studies comprising approximately 1500 sites, that showed that rotation was largest in the Oregon Coast Range (OCR), and decreased northward into Canada, southward into California, and eastward into the backarc. Three competing models were proposed to explain the rotations, in part influenced by the oceanic basaltic origin of the SRV: 1) rotation during accretion of an allochthonous oceanic terrane; 2) rotation during Basin and Range extension; and 3) rotation due to dextral shear between N. America (NA) and northward-moving oceanic plates to the west. Onlap relations determined from geologic mapping of the rotated terranes showed that rotation during accretion was insignificant, and that the argument between those preferring microplate rotation (e.g., Willamette plate of Magill et al.) and those preferring distributed shear (e.g., Columbia River area, S. Sheriff) depended on the presence or absence of accommodating strike slip faults. In 1988, members of the Northwest paleomagnetic community attended the NATO meeting on Paleomagnetic Rotations and Continental Deformation, where McKenzie, Kiessel, Laj, and others argued that in the Aegean region, block rotations could be linked to contemporary deformation and seismicity. Subsequently England and Wells successfully modeled Cascadia's westward increase in rotation along the Columbia River as due to deformation of a thin

  13. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  14. Case Studies of Massive Gravity Slides Imaged in 3D Seismic Volumes: Passive Margin and Basinal Settings (West Africa and Northwest Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, U. K.; Le, A. N.; Oluboyo, A. P.; Irving, D. H.; Huuse, M.

    2010-12-01

    Regionally extensive scour surfaces on continental margins and in epeiric basins develop due to two major processes: submarine landslides, mainly affecting slopes in excess of 1 degree and subglacial scour beneath ice streams draining alpine or continental ice sheets. Both types of surfaces can extend for tens to hundreds of kilometres in the dip and strike directions, with tens of metres relief across tens of kilometres long scours and ridges. Correct interpretation within a sediment system tract enlightens models of synchronous glacial, marine and climatic conditions. We present four megaslides imaged in, and interpreted from 3D seismic volumes acquired in diverse settings: 1: On the passive margin shelf of Cameroon, large-scale, downslope-oriented striations extend 40 km from the upper slope to the deep basin area. Individual striations are 20-50 m wide, 8 km long, 5-10 ms TWT deep, and broadly arcuate. The striations present in two sets and mark the base of a chaotic-to-discontinuous, high-amplitude package with chaotic, low amplitude reflections in the unstriated area. The facies is interpreted as a zone of repeated gravity sliding during the early Pleistocene in response to tectono-climatic forcing. 2: A basal surface from the Moray Firth, UK Central North Sea, tentatively dated as Paleocene in age. It is 20 km in width, over 40 km long and displays parallel grooves measuring typically 100-1000 m wide, 10-20 km long, of sinuous form along the section imaged in the dataset and with evidence of post-slump failure along the margins of the slide zone. It is interpreted as scour caused by a single sliding event. 3: An areally extensive scoured surface measuring 45x45 km that is part of a larger Pliocene system on the Angolan margin. The basal shear surface is marked by divergent scours. The geometry and spatial location of this flow are confined by listric faults and salt-cored folds with compressional thrusts within the distal toe of deposits on the flanks of

  15. Dissolution of bedded rock salt: A seismic profile across the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member, central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, N.L.; Hopkins, J.; Martinez, A.; Knapp, R.W.; Macfarlane, P.A.; Watney, W.L.; Black, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since late Tertiary, bedded rock salt of the Permian Hutchinson Salt Member has been dissolved more-or-less continuously along its active eastern margin in central Kansas as a result of sustained contact with unconfined, undersaturated groundwater. The associated westward migration of the eastern margin has resulted in surface subsidence and the contemporaneous sedimentation of predominantly valley-filling Quarternary alluvium. In places, these alluvium deposits extend more than 25 km to the east of the present-day edge of the main body of contiguous rock salt. The margin could have receded this distance during the past several million years. From an environmental perspective, the continued leaching of the Hutchinson Salt is a major concern. This predominantly natural dissolution occurs in a broad zone across the central part of the State and adversely affects groundwater and surface-water quality as nonpoint source pollution. Significant surface subsidence occurs as well. Most of these subsidence features have formed gradually; others developed in a more catastrophic manner. The latter in particular pose real threats to roadways, railways, and buried oil and gas pipelines. In an effort to further clarify the process of natural salt dissolution in central Kansas and with the long-term goal of mitigating the adverse environmental affects of such leaching, the Kansas Geological Survey acquired a 4-km seismic profile across the eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt in the Punkin Center area of central Kansas. The interpretation of these seismic data (and supporting surficial and borehole geologic control) is consistent with several hypotheses regarding the process and mechanisms of dissolution. More specifically these data support the theses that: 1. (1) Dissolution along the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member was initiated during late Tertiary. Leaching has resulted in the steady westward migration of the eastern margin, surface subsidence, and the

  16. Dissolution of bedded rock salt: A seismic profile across the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member, central Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Neil L.; Hopkins, John; Martinez, Alex; Knapp, Ralph W.; Macfarlane, P. Allan; Watney, W. Lynn; Black, Ross

    1994-06-01

    Since late Tertiary, bedded rock salt of the Permian Hutchinson Salt Member has been dissolved more-or-less continuously along its active eastern margin in central Kansas as a result of sustained contact with unconfined, undersaturated groundwater. The associated westward migration of the eastern margin has resulted in surface subsidence and the contemporaneous sedimentation of predominantly valley-filling Quarternary alluvium. In places, these alluvium deposits extend more than 25 km to the east of the present-day edge of the main body of contiguous rock salt. The margin could have receded this distance during the past several million years. From an environmental perspective, the continued leaching of the Hutchinson Salt is a major concern. This predominantly natural dissolution occurs in a broad zone across the central part of the State and adversely affects groundwater and surface-water quality as nonpoint source pollution. Significant surface subsidence occurs as well. Most of these subsidence features have formed gradually; others developed in a more catastrophic manner. The latter in particular pose real threats to roadways, railways, and buried oil and gas pipelines. In an effort to further clarify the process of natural salt dissolution in central Kansas and with the long-term goal of mitigating the adverse environmental affects of such leaching, the Kansas Geological Survey acquired a 4-km seismic profile across the eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt in the Punkin Center area of central Kansas. The interpretation of these seismic data (and supporting surficial and borehole geologic control) is consistent with several hypotheses regarding the process and mechanisms of dissolution. More specifically these data support the theses that: (1) Dissolution along the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member was initiated during late Tertiary. Leaching has resulted in the steady westward migration of the eastern margin, surface subsidence, and the

  17. Different bulk and active bacterial communities in cryoconite from the margin and interior of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Cameron, Karen A; Hansen, Lars H; Chandler, David M; Wadham, Jemma L; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2015-04-01

    Biological processes in the supraglacial ecosystem, including cryoconite, contribute to nutrient cycling within the cryosphere and may affect surface melting, yet little is known of the diversity of the active microbes in these environments. We examined the bacterial abundance and community composition of cryoconite over a melt season at two contrasting sites at the margin and in the interior of the Greenland ice sheet, using sequence analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of coextracted 16S rDNA and rRNA. Significant differences were found between bulk (rDNA) and potentially active (rRNA) communities, and between communities sampled from the two sites. Higher concentrations of rRNA than rDNA were detected at the interior site, whereas at the margin several orders of magnitude less rRNA was found compared with rDNA, which may be explained by a lower proportion of active bacteria at the margin site. The rRNA communities at both sites were dominated by a few taxa of Cyanobacteria and Alpha- and/or Betaproteobacteria. The bulk alpha diversity was higher in the margin site community, suggesting that local sources may be contributing towards the gene pool in addition to long distance transport.

  18. Project ACE Activity Sets. Book III: Grades 8 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden City Schools, NC.

    Eleven activity sets for students in grades 8 through 12 are designed to supplement courses in citizenship and U.S. history and government. "The Civil War That Could Have Been" creates a hypothetical situation which requires the participant to analyze the causes of the Civil War. In "History on TV -- Enemy or Ally of the Social Studies Program,"…

  19. Setting the Stage for Lifetime Physical Activity in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Holly; Lounsbery, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale and suggestions for emphasizing health-related physical education in preschool settings. In order to accomplish this, it will examine what is currently known about early childhood physical activity, as well as the existing professional preparation and accreditation standards for early childhood…

  20. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  1. Pre-collisional accretionary growth of the southern Laurasian active margin, Central Pontides, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygül, Mesut; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Sudo, Masafumi

    2016-03-01

    Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes crop out over wide areas in the central part of the Pontides, northern Turkey. To the north, the wedge consists of a low-grade metaflysch sequence with blocks of marble, Na-amphibole-bearing metabasite (PT = 7-12 kbar; 400 ± 70 °C) and serpentinite. 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from the phyllites of the metaflysch are ca. 100 Ma. The metaflysch sequence is underlain by oceanic crust-derived HP/LT metabasites and micaschists along a major detachment fault. The metabasites are epidote-blueschists consisting of glaucophane, epidote, titanite, and phengite locally with garnet. Fresh lawsonite-blueschists are exposed as blocks along the detachment fault. Peak metamorphic conditions of a garnet-blueschist are constrained to 17 ± 1 kbar and 500 ± 40 °C and of a lawsonite-blueschist to 14 ± 2 kbar and 370-440 °C. 40Ar/39Ar phengite dating on the micaschists constrains the HP/LT metamorphism as 101-92 Ma, younging southward. Middle Jurassic (ca. 160 Ma) accretionary complexes consisting of blueschist to lower greenschist facies metabasites, marble and volcanogenic metasediment intercalations are exposed at the southern part of the Cretaceous wedge. In the studied area, the North Anatolian Fault forms the contact between Cretaceous and Middle Jurassic HP/LT metamorphic rocks. Wide distribution of Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes implies accretionary tectonic continental growth along the Laurasian active margin. High amount of clastic sediment flux into the trench has a major effect on enlarging the wedge during the Albian. Tectonic thickening of the oceanic HP/LT metamorphic sequence, however, was possibly achieved by propagation of the décollement along the retreating slab which can create the space necessary for progressive deep level basal underplating and extension of the wedge for subsequent syn-subduction exhumation.

  2. Active Tectonics along the Carboneras Fault (SE Iberian Margin): Onshore-Offshore Paleoseismological Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, X.; Masana, E.; Gràcia, E.; Pallàs, R.; Santanach, P.; Dañobeitia, J. J.; Party, I.

    2006-12-01

    The southern margin of the Iberian Peninsula hosts the convergent boundary between the European and African Plates. At the eastern Betic Cordillera, the Neogene and Quaternary shortening has mainly been absorbed by left-lateral strike-slip faults, which in the Iberian Peninsula is represented by the Eastern Betics Shear Zone (EBSZ). One of the longest structures in the EBSZ is the Carboneras Fault, with almost 50 km onshore and more than 100 km offshore. The low record seismicity along its trace, suggest either non seismic behaviour or long recurrence intervals (104 years). The aim of this work is an integrated onshore-offshore neotectonic and paleoseismological study of the Carboneras Fault Zone to characterize its seismic potential. The onshore study was made through regional geological and geomorphological analysis, geophysical prospecting, microtopography, trenching, and dating (14 C, U/Th, TL). Onshore macro and microstructures as beheaded and offset alluvial fans and S-C microstructures in the fault zone reveals a Quaternary left-lateral strike-slip motion combined with a vertical component along the fault. Trenching reveals this fault is seismogenic, with at least four late Quaternary events. The oldest occurred between 54.9 and 32.2 ka BP, the second one between 40.9 and 27.1 ka BP, and the two most recent events occurred between 30.8 and 0.875 ka BP. The thickness of the colluvial wedges suggest a Mw=7 for the first and Mw=6.6 for the second event. The mean recurrence rate is 14 ka, and the minimum elapsed time is 875 years. The offshore portion, studied by high-resolution marine geophysical methods, shows very similar strike-slip structures. The marine paleoseismic data will be integrated with the onland results in order to accurately determine the recent activity and seismic parameters of the entire Carboneras Fault.

  3. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  4. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  5. Topography, river network and recent fault activity at the margins of the Central Main Ethiopian Rift (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Paola; Corti, Giacomo; Sembroni, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Along its length, the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in East Africa records a transition from early fault-dominated morphology in the South to axial magma assisted-rifting typical of continental break-up in the North. It is one of the few locations on Earth offering a complete picture of the evolution of continental rifting and thus provides a unique opportunity to directly analyze how the drainage network reorganize under extensional tectonic forcing. In this paper we present a new analysis of the river network and relative landforms - complemented with a summary of recent geological data - at both rift margins of the Central MER, a key sector of the rift capturing the phase of drainage reorganization between incipient and mature rifting. This analysis shows that hydrography is strongly influenced by recent tectonics. Rectangular drainage patterns, windgaps, and lacustrine/swampy areas formed by structural dams document that the rivers are in continuous competition with fault activity. The irregular longitudinal profiles (with knickpoints/knickzones in correspondence with faults) also suggest that rivers are in a transient state of disequilibrium related to recent tectonic activity at rift margins, in agreement with previous geological and seismological data. A more regional analysis extended to the adjoining Northern and Southern MER indicates that rifting evolves from initial stages characterized by margins poorly incised by rivers with gentle channel gradients (except in correspondence with faults), to mature phases in which rift margins are highly incised by a well organized fluvial network composed by concave and steep rivers. Our regional analysis also indicates a stronger and/or more recent tectonic activity at the rift margins proceeding to the south, in line with previous models of rift development.

  6. Topography, river network and recent fault activity at the margins of the Central Main Ethiopian Rift (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Paola; Corti, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    Along its length, the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in East Africa records a transition from early fault-dominated morphology in the South to axial magma assisted-rifting typical of continental break-up in the North. It is one of the few locations on Earth offering a complete picture of the evolution of continental rifting and thus provides a unique opportunity to directly analyze how the drainage network reorganizes under extensional tectonic forcing. In this paper we present a new analysis of the river network and relative landforms-complemented with a summary of recent geological data-at both rift margins of the Central MER, a key sector of the rift capturing the phase of drainage reorganization between incipient and mature rifting. This analysis shows that hydrography is strongly influenced by recent tectonics. Rectangular drainage patterns, windgaps, and lacustrine/swampy areas formed by structural dams document that the rivers are in continuous competition with fault activity. The irregular longitudinal profiles (with knickpoints/knickzones in correspondence with faults) also suggest that rivers are in a transient state of disequilibrium related to recent tectonic activity at rift margins, in agreement with previous geological and seismological data. A more regional analysis extended to the adjoining Northern and Southern MER indicates that rifting evolves from initial stages characterized by margins poorly incised by rivers with gentle channel gradients (except in correspondence with faults), to mature phases in which rift margins are highly incised by a well organized fluvial network composed by concave and steep rivers. Our regional analysis also indicates a stronger and/or more recent tectonic activity at the rift margins proceeding to the south, in line with previous models of rift development.

  7. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  8. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    PubMed

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

  9. U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes of zircons from newly identified Permian-Early Triassic plutons in western Liaoning province along the northern margin of the North China Craton: constraints on petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiang; Liu, Shuwen; Wang, Wei; Yang, Pengtao; Li, Qiugen

    2013-04-01

    Mafic to felsic gneisses along the northern margin of the North China Craton (NMNCC), in western Liaoning province, China, were previously assumed to be part of Archean metamorphic basement but are here identified as younger (Permian-Early Triassic) intrusions. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb isotopic dating reveals that the magmatic precursors of the mafic gneisses were emplaced from 295 ± 3 to 259 ± 2 Ma and that the magmatic precursors of the dioritic and monzogranitic gneisses were emplaced at 267 ± 1 and 251 ± 2 Ma, respectively, thus recording a continuum of Permian to Early Triassic magmatism. The mafic and dioritic rocks exhibit zircon ɛHf( t) values from -20.7 to -3.3, suggesting they were mainly derived from a metasomatized lithospheric mantle source, possibly involving some crustal contamination. The monzogranitic rocks display their zircon ɛHf( t) values of +0.9 to +4.7, indicating the acidic magma was derived from partial melting of juvenile crustal materials from the depleted mantle source. Crustal model ages ( T {DM/C}) obtained from zircon Hf isotopes of these monzogranitic rocks range from 976 to 1,215 Ma, with an average of 1,074 ± 32 Ma, possibly implying an episode of Grenvillian crustal growth in western Liaoning province. These new lines of evidence show that the NMNCC witnessed abundant magmatic activity and interaction of the crust and mantle during the Permian and Early Triassic and that the mafic magmatism was earlier than the monzogranitic activity. These findings indicate that the monzogranitic activity was the result of underplating of mafic magma with an enriched mantle source. In the context of regional Late Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic magmatic activity, the Permian magmatism occurred in an Andean-style continental margin setting when the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate was subducted beneath the NMNCC, and in this context, the Late Permian to Early Triassic magmatism may have been linked to post-collisional extension and asthenospheric

  10. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  11. 16 Years, 16 Cruises, 1.6 Billion Soundings: a Compilation of High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry of the Active Plate Boundary Along the Chilean Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrebe, W.; Flueh, E. R.; Hasert, M.; Behrmann, J. H.; Voelker, D.; Geersen, J.; Ranero, C. R.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Chile, a country stranding the active plate boundary between the South-American and the Nazca Plate is afflicted by recurrent earthquakes and hazardous volcanic eruptions. The strongest earthquake ever recorded occurred here, and volcanic hazards are frequent. Consequently, this area has been studied by geoscientists for many years to improve the understanding of subduction zone processes. Swath bathymetry mapping of the ocean floor has proven to bear a large potential for the interpretation of subduction-related processes, such as tectonic deformation of the marine forearc, release and migration of fluids as well as earthquake-triggered mass wasting. Multibeam bathymetry data of 16 major cruises of German, British, and Chilean research vessels recorded between 1995 and December 2010, in total more than 10,000 data files comprising about 1.6 billion soundings, have now been carefully reprocessed, compiled and merged into a unifying set of high-resolution bathymetric maps of the Chilean continental margin from latitude 40°S to 20°S. The imprint of subsurface processes on the surface morphology is well displayed in the case of the Chilean continental margin. The 3,500 km long Chilean convergent margin is not uniform, as various segments with different tectonic characteristics can be distinguished. Major factors that control margin morphology and thus the style of subduction are (1) relief and structure of the incoming oceanic plate, (2) supply of trench sediment, (3) turbidite transport within the trench, and (4) the input of terrigeneous sediments down the continental slope. A major segment boundary occurs at latitude 32°-33° S where the hotspot-related volcanic chain of Juan Fernandez is presently subducting. South of the area of ridge subduction the trench is filled with turbidites, and accretionary ridges develop across the base of the slope along most of the segment, whereas north of this boundary the turbiditic infill is reduced and subduction erosion is

  12. Crustal structure at the Gulf of Guayaquil active margin (Ecuador), from multichannel seismic reflection data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano, A.; Collot, J.-Y.; Sage, F.; Ranero, C.

    2003-04-01

    During the SISTEUR cruise, multichannel seismic reflection lines were shot across the Ecuador trench-margin system, off the Gulf of Guayaquil. Line SIS-72, which cuts through the margin, immediately north of the Ecuador-Peru border, has been fully processed through pre-stack depth migration to reveal the inter-plate contact geometry, sediment subduction/underplating processes, and a thick fore-arc basin. Strong reflectors allow to identify the top of the Nazca plate oceanic crust (TOC), the inter-plate décollement (ID) and the top of the margin basement (TB). The TOC is imaged by a continuous, low frequency reflector, and shows a rough surface that dips ~4° landward for 24 km from the trench axis. Further to the East, the TOC reflector becomes discontinuous and shows a slope break from 4° to 10°, at a 10-km-depth. West of the trench, the TOC is overlain by a 200-m-thick, transparent unit of pelagic deposits, and 600 m of horizontally stratified trench turbidites. The ID reflector is relatively continuous and roughly reflects the TOC geometry. ID and TOC reflectors define a ~600-m-thick subduction channel, which terminates some 24 km landward from the trench, where the ID reflector steps down to join the TOC. Some reflections from the subduction channel appear to be shaped as the casing reflectors, while others have sigmoid shapes with landward dips associated with small oceanic highs of TOC. The ID crops out at the front of a 8-km-wide accretionary wedge, which encompasses ~4 trusts. The accretionary wedge has developed recently against a sharp-pointed buttress formed by the margin's rock framework as indicated by its reflection characteristics. The TB reflector is discontinuous and separates the basement from overlaying stratified sequences. The TB reflector extends from the toe of the margin to ~75 km landward, where it abruptly drops from a depth of 4 to 11 km, at the base of a 10-km-thick forearc basin. This basin, bounded by doming structures interpreted

  13. An Expanded Set of Fluorogenic Sulfatase Activity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth L.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorogenic probes that are activated by an enzymatic transformation are ideally suited for profiling enzyme activities in biological systems. Here, we describe two fluorogenic enzyme probes, 3-O-methylfluorescein-sulfate and resorufin-sulfate, that can be used to detect sulfatases in mycobacterial lysates. Both probes were validated with a set of commercial sulfatases and used to reveal species specific sulfatase banding patterns in a gel-resolved assay of mycobacterial lysates. The fluorogenic probes described here are suitable for various assays, and provide a starting point for creating new sulfatase probes with improved selectivity for mycobacterial sulfatases. PMID:24764280

  14. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  15. Late Pleistocene and Holocene uplift history of Cyprus: implications for active tectonics along the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, R.W.; Tsiolakis, E.; Stone, B.D.; Lord, A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Chirico, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate during the Neogene is complex, controversial and fundamental in understanding active plate-margin tectonics and natural hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our investigation provides new insights into the Late Pleistocene uplift history of Cyprus and the Troodos Ophiolite. We provide isotopic (14C) and radiogenic (luminescence) dates of outcropping marine sediments in eastern Cyprus that identify periods of deposition during marine isotope stages (MIS) 3, 4, 5 and 6. Past sea-levels indicated by these deposits are c. 95±25 m higher in elevation than estimates of worldwide eustatic sea-level. An uplift rate of c. 1.8 mm/year and possibly as much as c. 4.1 mm/year in the past c. 26–40 ka is indicated. Holocene marine deposits also occur at elevations higher than those expected for past SL and suggest uplift rates of c. 1.2–2.1 mm/year. MIS-3 marine deposits that crop out in southern and western Cyprus indicate uniform island-wide uplift. We propose a model of tectonic wedging at a plate-bounding restraining bend as a mechanism for Late Pleistocene to Holocene uplift of Cyprus; uplift is accommodated by deformation and seismicity along the margins of the Troodos Ophiolite and re-activation of its low-angle, basal shear zone.

  16. Role of local to regional-scale collisions in the closure history of the Southern Neotethys, exemplified by tectonic development of the Kyrenia Range active margin/collisional lineament, N Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Kinnaird, Tim; McCay, Gillian; Palamakumbura, Romesh; Chen, Guohui

    2016-04-01

    Active margin processes including subduction, accretion, arc magmatism and back-arc extension play a key role in the diachronous, and still incomplete closure of the S Neotethys. The S Neotethys rifted along the present-day Africa-Eurasia continental margin during the Late Triassic and, after sea-floor spreading, began to close related to northward subduction during the Late Cretaceous. The northern, active continental margin of the S Neotethys was bordered by several of the originally rifted continental fragments (e.g. Taurides). The present-day convergent lineament ranges from subaqueous (e.g. Mediterranean Ridge), to subaerial (e.g. SE Turkey). The active margin development is partially obscured by microcontinent-continent collision and post-collisional strike-slip deformation (e.g. Tauride-Arabian suture). However, the Kyrenia Range, N Cyprus provides an outstanding record of convergent margin to early stage collisional processes. It owes its existence to strong localised uplift during the Pleistocene, which probably resulted from the collision of a continental promontory of N Africa (Eratosthenes Seamount) with the long-lived S Neotethyan active margin to the north. A multi-stage convergence history is revealed, mainly from a combination of field structural, sedimentological and igneous geochemical studies. Initial Late Cretaceous convergence resulted in greenschist facies burial metamorphism that is likely to have been related to the collision, then rapid exhumation, of a continental fragment (stage 1). During the latest Cretaceous-Palaeogene, the Kyrenia lineament was characterised by subduction-influenced magmatism and syn-tectonic sediment deposition. Early to Mid-Eocene, S-directed thrusting and folding (stage 2) is likely to have been influenced by the suturing of the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean to the north ('N Neotethys'). Convergence continued during the Neogene, dominated by deep-water terrigenous gravity-flow accumulation in a foredeep setting

  17. Active Venting Sites On The Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Hikurangi Margin, Off New Zealand: ROV Measurements And Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudts, L.; Poort, J.; Boone, D.; Linke, P.; Greinert, J.; de Batist, M.; Henriet, J.

    2007-12-01

    During R.V. Sonne cruise SO191-3, part of the "New (Zealand Cold) Vents" expedition, RCMG deployed a CHEROKEE ROV "Genesis" on the Hikurangi Margin. This accretionary margin, on the east coast of New Zealand, is related to the subduction of the Pacific Plate under the Australian Plate. Several cold vent locations as well as an extensive BSR, indicating the presence of gas hydrates, have been found at this margin. The aims of the ROV-work were to precisely localize active methane vents, to conduct detailed visual observations of the vent structures and activity, and to perform measurements of physical properties and collect samples at and around the vent locations. The three investigated areas generally have a flat to moderate undulating sea floor with soft sediments alternating with carbonate platforms. The different sites were sometimes covered with dense fields of live clams or shell debris, often in association with tube worms, sponges and/or soft tissue corals. Active bubble- releasing seeps were observed at Faure's site and LM-3 site. Bubble-releasing activity was very variable in time, with periods of almost non-activity alternating with periods of violent outbursts. Bubble release occurred mainly from prominent depressions in soft-sediment sea floor. Bottom-water sampling revealed sometimes high concentrations of methane. Sediment-temperature measurements were largely comparable with the bottom- water temperature except for a "raindrop site" (with dense populations of polychaetes), where anomalous low sediment-temperature was measured. Further analysis of the ROV data together with the integration of other datasets will enable us to produce a model characterizing seep structure and environment.

  18. Online Classroom Research and Analysis Activities Using MARGINS-Related Resources for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Students today have online access to nearly unlimited scientific information in an entirely unfiltered state. As such, they need guidance and training in identifying and assessing high-quality information resources for educational and research use. The extensive research data resources available online for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) subduction system that have been developed with MARGINS Program and related NSF funding are an ideal venue for focused Web research exercises that can be tailored to a range of undergraduate geoscience courses. This presentation highlights student web research activities examining: a) The 2003-2005 eruptions of Anatahan Volcano in the Mariana volcanic arc. MARGINS-supported geophysical research teams were in the region when the eruption initiated, permitting a unique "event response" data collection and analysis process, with preliminary results presented online at websites linked to the MARGINS homepage, and ultimately published in a special issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. In this activity, students will conduct a directed Web surf/search effort for information on and datasets from the Anatahan arc volcano, which they will use in an interpretive study of recent magmatic activity in the Mariana arc. This activity is designed as a homework exercise for use in a junior-senior level Petrology course, but could easily be taken into greater depth for the benefit of graduate-level volcanology or geochemistry offerings. b) Geochemical and mineralogical results from ODP Legs 125 and 195 focused on diapiric serpentinite mud volcanoes, which erupt cold, high pH fluids, serpentine muds, and serpentinized ultramafic clasts at a number of sites in the forearc region of the Mariana subduction zone. The focus of this activity is an examination of the trace element chemistry of the forearc serpentines and their associated upwelling porefluids as a means of understanding the roles of ionic radius, valence, and system

  19. Ice marginal dynamics during surge activity, Kuannersuit Glacier, Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Yde, Jacob C.; Knudsen, N. Tvis; Long, Antony J.; Lloyd, Jerry M.

    2009-02-01

    The Kuannersuit Glacier surged 11 km between 1995 and 1998. The surge resulted in the formation of an ice cored thrust moraine complex constructed by subglacial and proglacial glaciotectonic processes. Four main thrust zones are evident in the glacier snout area with phases of compressional folding and thrusting followed by hydrofracture in response to the build-up of compressional stresses and the aquicludal nature of submarginal permafrost and naled. Various types of stratified debris-rich ice facies occur within the marginal zone: The first (Facies I) comprises laterally continuous strata of ice with sorted sediment accumulations, and is reworked and thrust naled ice. The second is laterally discontinuous stratified debris-rich ice with distinct tectonic structures, and is derived through subglacial extensional deformation and localised regelation (Facies II), whilst the third type is characterised by reworked and brecciated ice associated with the reworking and entrainment of meteoric ice (Facies III). Hydrofracture dykes and sills (Facies IV) cross-cut the marginal ice cored thrust moraines, with their sub-vertically frozen internal contact boundaries and sedimentary structures, suggesting supercooling operated as high-pressure evacuation of water occurred during thrusting, but this is not related to the formation of basal stratified debris-rich ice. Linear distributions of sorted fines transverse to ice flow, and small stratified sediment ridges that vertically cross-cut the ice surface up-ice of the thrust zone relate to sediment migration along crevasse traces and fluvial infilling of crevasses. From a palaeoglaciological viewpoint, marginal glacier tectonics, ice sediment content and sediment delivery mechanisms combine to control the development of this polythermal surge valley landsystem. The bulldozing of proglacial sediments and the folding and thrusting of naled leads to the initial development of the outer zone of the moraine complex. This becomes

  20. Is earthquake activity along the French Atlantic margin favoured by local rheological contrasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazabraud, Yves; Béthoux, Nicole; Delouis, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The seismological study of recent seismic crises near Oleron Island confirms the coexistence of an extensional deformation and a transtensive regime in the Atlantic margin of France, which is different from the general western European stress field corresponding to a strike-slip regime. We argue that the switch of the principal stress axes σ1/σ2 in a NW-SE vertical plane is linked with the existence of crustal heterogeneities. Events of magnitude larger than 5 sometimes occur along the Atlantic margin of France, such as the 7 September 1972 (ML = 5.2) earthquake near Oleron island and the 30 September 2002 (ML = 5.7) Hennebont event in Brittany. To test the mechanism of local strain localization, we model the deformation of the hypocentral area of the Hennebont earthquake using a 3D thermo-mechanical finite element code. We conclude that the occurrence of moderate earthquakes located in limited parts of the Hercynian shear zones (as the often reactivated swarms near Oleron) could be due to local reactivation of pre-existing faults. These sporadic seismic ruptures are favoured by stress concentration due to rheological heterogeneities.

  1. Late cretaceous extensional tectonics and associated igneous activity on the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, R. L.; Sundeen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Major, dominantly compressional, orogenic episodes (Taconic, Acadian, Alleghenian) affected eastern North America during the Paleozoic. During the Mesozoic, in contrast, this same region was principally affected by epeirogenic and extensional tectonism; one episode of comparatively more intense tectonic activity involving extensive faulting, uplift, sedimentation, intrusion and effusion produced the Newark Series of eposits and fault block phenomena. This event, termed the Palisades Disturbance, took place during the Late Triassic - Earliest Jurassic. The authors document a comparable extensional tectonic-igneous event occurring during the Late Cretaceous (Early Gulfian; Cenomanian-Santonian) along the southern margin of the cratonic platform from Arkansas to Georgia.

  2. Repeated remobilisation of submarine landslide debris on an active subduction margin interpreted from multibeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, J. J.; Barnes, P. M.; McKean, J.; Pettinga, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    EM300 multibeam and multichannel seismic data reveal a 230 square kilometre submarine landslide complex which exhibits many of the characteristic features of equivalent terrestrial creeping earthflow complexes. Slope failures are sourced from the shelf edge/upper slope of the Poverty Bay reentrant on the active Hikurangi subduction margin of New Zealand where tectonic deformation, via major thrust faults with slip rates of c. 3-4 mm/yr, exerts a controlling influence on seafloor physiography. Individual landslides within this submarine complex are up to 14 km long over a vertical elevation drop of 700 m. Debris streams are in excess of 2 km wide with a debris thickness of 100 m. While multibeam data is limited to c. 10 m resolution, the scale of submarine landslide features allows us to resolve internal debris detail equivalent to terrestrial landslide examples using terrestrial techniques (e.g. airborne lidar). DEM derivative surface roughness techniques are employed to delineate the geomorphic expression of features including active and abandoned lateral shears, and contractional and extensional deformation of the landslide debris. From these interpretations multiple internal failures are recognised along the length of the landslide debris. Debris deformation is also imaged in high fold multichannel seismic data and correlated to the imaged surface geomorphic features, providing insight into the failure mechanics of the landslides. Failures initiate and evolve within the quasi-stable prograding sediment wedge built onto the upper slope during lowstand sealevels. Landslides within the greater complex are at different stages of development providing information on their spatial and temporal evolution headward and laterally along the transition from shelf to upper slope margin. We infer that failures are triggered and evolve in response to sealevel rise, and/or the frequent occurrence large earthquakes along the margin.

  3. Sonic images of submarine landscape evolution on an active convergent margin, Poverty re-entrant, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Orpin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Seabed bathymetric and backscatter images were collected using a Simrad EM300 multibeam from the Poverty indentation off Gisborne, on the active convergent margin of the New Zealand East Coast. The 1,500 km square Poverty indentation is a major depression of continental margin extending from a re-entrant in the deformation front at the Hikurangi Trough, which coincides with the mouth of the Poverty Canyon. The indentation outlines a triangular, enclosed depression, bounded along its landward flank by a high scarp incised by more than a dozen regularly-spaced, V-shaped, upper slope gullies that cut into the shelf break. The indentation has been partly in-filled by debris flow and avalanche deposits, which range from a few hundred metres to more than 25 km down-slope. At some places, cracks and scarps in the slopes indicate incipient avalanches. The indentation has been simultaneously eroded by a canyon system that exhibits many of the complexities of incised river systems onshore, including offset, capture and slump dams. At the mouth of the Poverty Canyon, scour holes are visible where hydraulic jumps have eroded the sea floor. A new canyon system appears to be in the process of forming a separate northern route to the Hikurangi Trough. On the lower slope, slumping seaward of a bulge indicates collapse in the wake of a small, subducting seamount. There is little evidence of sediment escaping the slope to form fan deposits along the Hikurangi Trough. These data are currently being used to assist in the structural and stratigraphic analysis of the margin. The high-resolution maps produced prompt a thorough re-interpretation of the Late Pleistocene "landscape evolution" of the Poverty indentation and highlight the complex interaction of tectonics and deformation with sea floor morphology along active plate boundaries in general.

  4. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Francois; Proust, Jean-Noël; Dano, Alexandre; Collot, Jean-Yves; Guiyeligou, Grâce Daniella; Hernández Salazar, María José; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Martillo, Carlos; Pouderoux, Hugo; Schenini, Laure; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Loayza, Glenda

    2016-10-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  5. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Michaud; Noël, Proust Jean; Alexandre, Dano; Yves, Collot Jean; Daniella, Guiyeligou Grâce; José, Hernández Salazar María; Gueorgui, Ratzov; Carlos, Martillo; Hugo, Pouderoux; Laure, Schenini; Frederic, Lebrun Jean; Glenda, Loayza

    2016-01-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  6. Glacial-interglacial cycles of erosion and sediment transport along the western North American margin constrained by reconciling geologic and climate model data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlaningham, S.; Pisias, N. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Hostetler, S. W.; Wilson, K. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether observed shifts in sediment source (indicated by bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar and Nd isotopic tracers) at a northeast Pacific core site are in response to variations in river basin erosion or transport pathways of terrigenous sediment once it reaches the ocean. We synthesize geologic and climate model data sets to evaluate whether climate model (REGCM2) outputs of precipitation-evaporation (P-E) can be linked to observed changes in erosion and landscape evolution along the western North American margin (core site EW9504-17PC, offshore southern Oregon) over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This site is ideally located to test this new approach as it captures the combined sediment fluxes from coastal N. California/S. Oregon and the interior Cascade Volcanic Ranges, which have drastically different 40Ar-39Ar bedrock ages (130-147 Ma versus 10-30 Ma, respectively) and different climate responses occurring on glacial-interglacial timescales. We perturb a watershed-scale model of bedrock 40Ar-39Ar ages by the P-E changes to reproduce the total range of variability observed in downcore, bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar ages and Nd isotopic values at the core site. We find that climate model percent changes in P-E values cannot reproduce the total range of variability seen in the provenance record before 22 ka without invoking drastic reductions in Klamath Mountain and Eel River sediment sources. A relatively unconstrained variable in the source area at this time is the presence of a large pluvial lake, Lake Modoc. It is possible that discharges from it could carry large volumes of young, Cascade Mountain-derived sediments offshore. Alternatively, an offshore switch in ocean current direction or reduction (relative to present-day) could explain the downcore sedimentological changes, as material discharged from the Eel River (the largest sediment source south of the core site) would not be carried north. To reproduce the observed downcore shift in

  7. Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in an Area of Active Gas Seepage: the Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of oceanic methane and its impact on the global climate has been of particular interest to the global community. The potential for vast amounts of methane to be emitted from the seafloor into the atmosphere due to gas hydrate decomposition has been under scientific evaluation. However, despite the great extent of these geological reservoirs, much of the methane released from the seafloor in deep ocean environments does not reach the atmosphere. Once dissolved in ocean water, the emitted methane can be microbially converted to either carbon dioxide or assimilated to biomass. Here, we will present results from a research cruise to the Hudson Canyon, northern US Atlantic Margin, where we investigated changes in ocean water carbonate chemistry induced by the oxidation of methane released from gas seeps. We will be presenting high precision pH data as well as methane and DIC concentrations, natural stable isotopes, and methane oxidation rates collected inside and adjacent to the Hudson Canyon in the summer of 2014.

  8. Evidence and biogeochemical implications for glacially-derived sediments in an active margin cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Novosel, Ivana; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Coffin, Richard B.; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Knies, David L.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Spence, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Delineating sediment organic matter origins and sediment accumulation rates at gas hydratebearing and hydrocarbon seeps is complicated by the microbial transfer of 13C-depleted and 14Cdepleted methane carbon into sedimentary pools. Sediment 13C and 14C measurements from four cores recovered at Bullseye vent on the northern Cascadia margin are used to identify methane carbon assimilation into different carbon pools. While the total organic carbon (TOC) is mostly unaltered and primarily terrigenous in origin, planktonic foraminifera and the bulk carbonate display evidence of methane overprinting. Mass balance models are applied to determine the extent to which methane overprinting increased the radiocarbon ages of the biogenic foraminifera. The corrected and calibrated foraminifera ages between sediment depths of 70 and 573 cm are from 14.9 to 15.9 ka BP, which coincides with the retreat of the late Quaternary Cordilleran Ice Sheet from Vancouver Island. Uniform TOC _13C values of -24.5 ± 0.5‰ from the upper 8 meters of sediment at Bullseye vent suggest all cored material is Pleistocene-derived glacimarine material deposited as the ice edge retreated landward. Bullseye vent is located within an uplifted sediment block isolated from turbidite deposition and has been a site of non-deposition since the ice sheet retreated from the shelf. Biogeochemical implications of seep sediments being dominated by aged, organic-poor (<0.4 wt% TOC) material are that methane is the primary energy source, and microbes directly and indirectly associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) will dominate the seep microbial community.

  9. From Margins to Mainstream: Social Media as a Tool for Campus Sexual Violence Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Chris; Myers, Jess S.; Riggle, Colleen; Lacy, Marvette

    2016-01-01

    Using Internet-related ethnography (Postill & Pink, 2012), we examined the role of social media in campus sexual violence activism. Based on observations of online activist communities and interviews with 23 activists, we highlight raising awareness, community building, and interrupting power dynamics as activism strategies enhanced by social…

  10. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  11. A Signal of Ice Loading in Late Pleistocene Activity of the Sudetic Marginal Fault (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartvich, F.; Stepancikova, P.; Rockwell, T. K.; Nývlt, D.; Stemberk, J.; Rood, D. H.; Hók, J.; Ortuňo, M.; Myers, M.; Luttrell, K. M.; Wechsler, N.

    2014-12-01

    We combine paleoseismic trench and cosmogenic dating results to study the late Pleistocene-Holocene history of morphologically pronounced NW-SE trending Sudetic Marginal Fault (SMF) situated at the northeastern limit of the Bohemian Massif in central Europe. Eighteen trenches were excavated at the Bila Voda site to study 3D distribution of a beheaded alluvial fan on the NE block of the fault and to find the offset "feeder channel" that sourced the deposits. We interpret a small drainage of about 40-60 m to the SE of the fan apex as the feeder channel. A 2.5 m depth profile was collected for cosmogenic exposure dating from a well-preserved part of the fan. Using a simple model that accounts for pre-depositional exposure (inheritance) and assuming no surface erosion, 10Be concentrations are well-fit with an apparent exposure age of ~12 ka. However, this is a minimum limiting age if the surface was eroded by gelifluction in the late Pleistocene. Assuming a ~25 ka OSL age for the base of the fan apex it gives a left-lateral slip rate of ~2 mm/yr. As the Holocene deposits do not show significant displacement, most of the recorded slip took place during Late Pleistocene with corresponding slip rate of 2.8 to 3.5 mm/yr. Bila Voda site lies ~150 km south from the Late Pleistocene Weichselian maximum (~20 ka) ice-sheet front. Thus, we hypothesize that the slip rate acceleration was due to ice-loading and subsequent unloading during deglaciation. To test this, we calculated the stress induced in the lithosphere from ablation of the Weichselian ice sheet modeled as a flexing elastic plate. Preliminary modeling results indicate that complete deglaciation alters the stress field such that it would inhibit left lateral failure on the SMF, consistent with observations suggesting no slip occurred during the Holocene. Although the SMF is ~150 km from the Weichselian ice sheet front, it is well within the flexural rebound area of the ice sheet, causing normal stress on the SMF to

  12. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  13. Synthesis and tectonic interpretation of the westernmost Paleozoic Variscan orogen in southern Mexico: From rifted Rheic margin to active Pacific margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppie, J. Duncan; Dostal, Jaroslav; Murphy, J. Brendan; Nance, R. Damian

    2008-12-01

    Paleozoic rocks in southern Mexico occur in two terranes, Oaxaquia (Oaxacan Complex) and Mixteca (Acatlán Complex) that appear to record: (1) Ordovician rifting on the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean, (2) passive drifting with Amazonia during the Silurian, (3) Devonian-Permian subduction beneath southern Mexico producing an arc complex that was partially removed by subduction erosion, subjected to HP metamorphism and Mississippian extrusion into the upper plate, followed by reestablishment of a Permian arc. In the Oaxaquia terrane, the 920-1300 Ma basement is unconformably overlain by a ˜ 200 m uppermost Cambrian-lowest Ordovician shelf sequence containing Gondwanan fauna (Tiñu Formation), unconformably overlain by 650 m of shallow marine-continental Carboniferous sedimentary rocks containing a Midcontinent (USA) fauna. In the Mixteca terrane, the low-grade Paleozoic sequence is composed of: (a) a ?Cambrian-Ordovician clastic sequence intruded by ca. 480-440 Ma bimodal, rift-related igneous rocks; and (b) a latest Devonian-Permian shallow marine sequence (> 906 m) consisting of metapsammites, metapelites and tholeiitic mafic volcanic rocks. High pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks in the Mixteca terrane consists of: (i) a Cambro-Ordovician rift-shelf intruded by bimodal rift-related intrusions that are similar to the low-grade rocks; (ii) periarc ultramafic rocks, and (iii) arc and MORB rocks. The Ordovician granitoids contain concordant inherited zircons that range in age from ca. 900 to 1300 Ma, indicating a source in the Oaxacan Complex. Concordant ages of detrital zircons in both the low- and high-grade Cambro-Ordovician metasedimentary rocks indicate a provenance in local Ordovician plutons and/or ca. 1 Ga Oaxacan basement, and distal northwestern Gondwana sources with a unique source in the 900-750 Ma Goiás magmatic arc within the Brasiliano orogen. These data combined with the rift-related nature of the Cambro-Ordovician rocks are most consistent with an

  14. Active Ways to Teach Health Concepts in the Elementary Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides three movement-based activities for teaching health concepts to elementary school students. Two activities focus on nutrition concepts and the other focuses on teaching body systems. Diagrams are provided to show the setup of activities, as well as links for accessing materials to help implement the activities.

  15. Marginality principle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is a fragile resource supplying many goods and services. Given the diversity of soil across the world and within a landscape, there are many different capacities among soils to provide the basic soil functions. Marginality of soils is a difficult process to define because the metrics to define ...

  16. The TACI receptor regulates T-cell-independent marginal zone B cell responses through innate activation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Figgett, William A; Fairfax, Kirsten; Vincent, Fabien B; Le Page, Mélanie A; Katik, Indzi; Deliyanti, Devy; Quah, Pin Shie; Verma, Pali; Grumont, Raelene; Gerondakis, Steve; Hertzog, Paul; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Strasser, Andreas; Mackay, Fabienne

    2013-09-19

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) plays a critical role in immune homeostasis and tolerance. In T-cell-dependent humoral responses, AICD of B cells is initiated by Fas ligand (FasL) on T cells, stimulating the Fas receptor on B cells. In contrast, T-cell-independent B cell responses involve innate-type B lymphocytes, such as marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and little is known about the mechanisms that control AICD during innate B cell responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. Here, we show that MZ B cells undergo AICD in response to TLR4 activation in vivo. The transmembrane activator, calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) receptor and TLR4 cooperate to upregulate expression of both FasL and Fas on MZ B cells and also to repress inhibitors of Fas-induced apoptosis signaling. These findings demonstrate an unappreciated role for TACI and its ligands in the regulation of AICD during T-cell-independent B cell responses.

  17. Project ACE Activity Sets. Book I: Grades 3, 4, and 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden City Schools, NC.

    Eleven activity sets suitable for supplementing social studies units in grades 3, 4, and 5 are presented. Each set lists appropriate resources, concepts, general objectives and instructional objectives for each activity within the set. Grade 3 sets are "You Can Help Conserve Our Natural Resources,""Urban Decay and Urban Renewal,""The Use of…

  18. Early Jurassic Volcanism in the South Lhasa Terrane, Southern Tibet: Record of Back-arc Extension in the Active Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, D. C.; Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Mo, X.

    2015-12-01

    Indus-Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (IYZSZ) represents the Mesozoic remnants of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean lithosphere after its northward subduction beneath the Lhasa Terrane. The evolution of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean prior to India-Asia collision remains unclear. To explore this period of history, we investigate zircon U-Pb geochronology, geochemistry and Nd-Hf isotopes of the Early Jurassic bimodal-like volcanic sequence around Dagze area, south Tibet. The volcanic sequence comprises calc-alkaline basalts to rhyolites whereas intermediate components are volumetrically restricted. Zircons from a basaltic andesite yielded crystallization age of 178Ma whereas those from 5 silicic rocks were dated at 183-174Ma, which suggest that both the basaltic and the silicic rocks are coeval. The basaltic rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE, and depleted in HFSE, with Epsilon Nd(t) of 1.6-4.0 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 0.7-11.8, which implies that they were derived from a heterogenetic mantle source metasomatized by subduction components. Trace element geochemistry shows that the basaltic rocks are compositionally transitional from normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) to island arc basalts (IAB, e.g. Zedong arc basalts of ~160-155Ma in the south margin of Lhasa Terrane), with the signature of immature back-arc basin basalts. The silicic rocks display similar Nd-Hf isotopic features of the Gangdese batholith with Epsilon Nd(t) of 0.9-3.4 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 2.4-17.7, indicating that they were possibly generated by anatexis of basaltic juvenile lower crust, instead of derived from the basaltic magma. These results support an Early to Middle Jurassic (183-155Ma) model that the back-arc extension tectonic setting were existing in the active continental margin in the south Lhasa Terrane.

  19. Coastal and submarine instabilities distribution in the tectonically active SW margin of the Corinth Rift (Psathopyrgos, Achaia, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simou, Eirini; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Lykousis, Vasilios; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Vassilakis, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The Corinth Rift, one of the most active rifts in the world as local extension trending NE-SW reaches the amount of 14±2 mm/yr, corresponds to one of the largest zones of seismically active normal faulting. The formation, growth and migration southwards of the prevailing fault systems, which evolve simultaneously with the intense morphogenetic processes, are overprinted in the age, facies and thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sequences constructing the south margin of the western Gulf of Corinth. The dominant fault blocks, defined by east-west trending, north dipping normal faults, are accompanied by several morphological features and anomalies, noticed in both the terrestrial and the marine environment. Our main aim has been to examine how the tectonic evolution, in combination with the attendant fierce erosional and sedimentary processes, has affected the morphology through geodynamic processes expressed as failures in the wider coastal area. High resolution multibeam bathymetry in combination with the available land surface data have contributed to submarine and subaerial morphological mapping. These have been used as a basis for the detection of all those geomorphic features that indicate instabilities probably triggered, directly or indirectly, by the ongoing active tectonic deformation. The interpretation of the combined datasets shows that the southwestern margin of the Corinth Rift towards Psathopyrgos fault zone is characterized by intense coastal relief and a narrow, almost absent, continental shelf, which passes abruptly to steep submarine slopes. These steep slope values denote the effects of the most recent brittle deformation and are related to coastal and submarine instabilities and failures. High uplift rates and rapid sedimentation, indicative of the regional high-energy terrestrial and submarine environment, are subsequently balanced by the transportation of the seafloor currents, especially where slope gradients decrease, disintegrating the

  20. Mastermind: An Activity for Becoming Aware of Negative Mental Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershaw, David A.

    Since 1974, the game, Mastermind, has been a partial requirement for an introduction to psychology course at Arizona Western College. The game is designed to help students become aware of negative mental sets and apply critical thinking skills, and requires students to duplicate a code consisting of four different colored pegs arranged in a…

  1. 40 CFR 35.3535 - Authorized set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3535 Authorized set-aside... DWSRF program and to provide technical assistance to public water systems. (c) Small systems technical... PWSS program; (ii) To administer or provide technical assistance through source water...

  2. 40 CFR 35.3535 - Authorized set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3535 Authorized set-aside... DWSRF program and to provide technical assistance to public water systems. (c) Small systems technical... PWSS program; (ii) To administer or provide technical assistance through source water...

  3. 40 CFR 35.3535 - Authorized set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3535 Authorized set-aside... DWSRF program and to provide technical assistance to public water systems. (c) Small systems technical... PWSS program; (ii) To administer or provide technical assistance through source water...

  4. Stars and Planets: A New Set of Middle School Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquhart, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A set of lesson plans for grades 6-8 which deal with the sizes and distances of stars and planets using a scale factor of 1 to 10 billion, the life cycle of stars, and the search for planets beyond the solar system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. 40 CFR 35.3535 - Authorized set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3535 Authorized set-aside... DWSRF program and to provide technical assistance to public water systems. (c) Small systems technical... PWSS program; (ii) To administer or provide technical assistance through source water...

  6. 40 CFR 35.3535 - Authorized set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3535 Authorized set-aside... DWSRF program and to provide technical assistance to public water systems. (c) Small systems technical... PWSS program; (ii) To administer or provide technical assistance through source water...

  7. Crystal structures of a marginally active thymidylate synthase mutant, Arg 126-->Glu.

    PubMed Central

    Strop, P.; Changchien, L.; Maley, F.; Montfort, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a long-standing target for anticancer drugs and is of interest for its rich mechanistic features. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of dUMP to dTMP using the co-enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate, and is perhaps the best studied of enzymes that catalyze carbon-carbon bond formation. Arg 126 is found in all TSs but forms only 1 of 13 hydrogen bonds to dUMP during catalysis, and just one of seven to the phosphate group alone. Despite this, when Arg 126 of TS from Escherichia coli was changed to glutamate (R126E), the resulting protein had kcat reduced 2000-fold and Km reduced 600-fold. The crystal structure of R126E was determined under two conditions--in the absence of bound ligand (2.4 A resolution), and with dUMP and the antifolate CB3717 (2.2 A resolution). The first crystals, which did not contain dUMP despite its presence in the crystallization drop, displayed Glu 126 in a position to sterically and electrostatically interfere with binding of the dUMP phosphate. The second crystals contained both dUMP and CB3717 in the active site, but Glu 126 formed three hydrogen bonds to nearby residues (two through water) and was in a position that partially overlapped with the normal phosphate binding site, resulting in a approximately 1 A shift in the phosphate group. Interestingly, the protein displayed the typical ligand-induced conformational change, and the covalent bond to Cys 146 was present in one of the protein's two active sites. PMID:9416600

  8. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: Example from the Pliocene of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, Rebecca J.; Kidwell, Susan M.

    1999-10-01

    Bioclast-rich, coarse-grained deposits in the Pliocene Loreto basin provide a record of mixed carbonate and siliciclastic sedimentation at the steep hanging-wall margin of this small, fault-controlled basin. Sedimentary facies consist of sand- to gravel-sized carbonate debris mixed with volcaniclastic sand and gravel in a proximal to distal facies tract that includes matrix-rich and matrix-poor shelly conglomerate, impure calcirudite and calcarenite, mixed-composition turbidites, and bioturbated calcarenitic sandstone. Carbonate material was produced by mollusks and other benthic organisms on a narrow, high-energy shelf and mixed with volcaniclastic sand and gravel in cross-shelf channels. These mixtures were transported down a steep subaqueous slope by debris flows, grain flows, and turbidity currents, forming foresets and bottomsets of marine Gilbert-type deltas. This style of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation has not been documented in detail elsewhere but should be locally abundant in the stratigraphic record of fault-bounded basins, particularly those with cool or nutrient-rich waters that support relatively few binding and framework-building faunas. Recognition of similar facies in other settings can provide useful insights into ancient conditions of carbonate production, oceanography, climate, and tectonics.

  9. Park-like campus settings and physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Urban communities can have limited access to natural environments for physical activity. Parks and college campuses may serve as pastoral islands within urban centers to promote physical activity. Purpose: To utilize a course centered on a quantitative field research experience to provi...

  10. Active Learning in a Family Day Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Susan

    Practical tips for improving the quality of child care are offered in this guide. It presents early childhood research findings in everyday language and suggests ways to apply these findings with active learning experiences for children. Developmentally appropriate, holistic activities are presented for key areas. The first five parts of the book…

  11. Activity-based costing management in a private practice setting.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, M; Draper, V

    1997-01-01

    Activity-based costing is a method of calculating cost of a service, focusing on operations. It gives quick and tangible cost information to operations and financial managers. While this method has be used more in the manufacturing area, it is gaining acceptance in the medical practice. This article describes activity-based costing and illustrates how to start utilizing it in a practice.

  12. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children’s language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children’s math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers’ structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness. PMID:22665945

  13. Cenozoic Tectonic Activity of the "Passive" North America Margin: Evidence for Cenozoic Activity on Mesozoic or Paleozoic Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedorub, O. I.; Knapp, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic history of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) incorporates two cycles of continental assembly, multiple pulses of orogeny, rifting, and post-rift geodynamic evolution. This is reflected in the heterogeneous lithosphere of the ENAM which contains fault structures originated in Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras. The South Georgia Rift basin is probably the largest Mesozoic graben within its boundaries that is associated with the breakup of Pangea. It is composed of smaller sub-basins which appear to be bounded by high-angle normal faults, some of which may have been inverted in late Cretaceous and Cenozoic eras. Paleozoic structures may have been reactivated in Cenozoic time as well. The ENAM is characterized by N-NE maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This maximum compressional stress field is sub-parallel to the strike of the Atlantic Coast province fault systems. Camden, Augusta, Allendale, and Pen Branch faults are four of the many such reactivated faults along the southern part of ENAM. These faults are now buried under the 0-400 m of loosely consolidated Cretaceous and Cenozoic age sediments and thus are either only partially mapped or currently not recognized. Some of the objectives of this study are to map the subsurface expression and geometry of these faults and to investigate the post Cretaceous deformation and possible causes of fault reactivation on a passive margin. This study employs an integrated geophysical approach to investigate the upper 200 m of identified locations of the above mentioned faults. 2-D high-resolution shallow seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity surveys, GPR, 2-D electrical resistivity and well data are used for analyses and interpretation. Preliminary results suggest that Camden fault shows signs of Cenozoic reactivation through an approximately 30 m offset NW side up mainly along a steeply dipping fault zone in the basal contact of Coastal Plain sediments with the Carolina Piedmont. Drill

  14. Applying activity-based costing to healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Canby, J B

    1995-02-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) focuses on processes that drive cost. By tracing healthcare activities back to events that generate cost, a more accurate measurement of financial performance is possible. This article uses ABC principles and techniques to determine costs associated with the x-ray process in a midsized outpatient clinic. The article also provides several tips for initiating an ABC cost system for an entire healthcare organization. PMID:10146178

  15. Applying activity-based costing to healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Canby, J B

    1995-02-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) focuses on processes that drive cost. By tracing healthcare activities back to events that generate cost, a more accurate measurement of financial performance is possible. This article uses ABC principles and techniques to determine costs associated with the x-ray process in a midsized outpatient clinic. The article also provides several tips for initiating an ABC cost system for an entire healthcare organization.

  16. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  17. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2015-01-01

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins, (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services. These include primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  18. The Central-Western Mediterranean: Anomalous igneous activity in an anomalous collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Duggen, Svend; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2011-01-01

    plate (Sardinia, Corsica, Balearic Islands, Kabylies, Calabria, Peloritani Mountains). The bulk of igneous activity in the central-western Mediterranean is believed to have tapped mantle 'wedge' regions, metasomatized by pressure-related dehydration of the subducting slabs. The presence of subduction-related igneous rocks with a wide range of chemical composition has been related to the interplay of several factors among which the pre-metasomatic composition of the mantle wedges (i.e., fertile vs. refractory mineralogy), the composition of the subducting plate (i.e., the type and amount of sediment cover and the alteration state of the crust), the variable thermo-baric conditions of magma formation, coupled with variable molar concentrations of CO 2 and H 2O in the fluid phase released by the subducting plates are the most important. Compared to classic collisional settings (e.g., Himalayas), the central-western Mediterranean area shows a range of unusual geological and magmatological features. These include: a) the rapid formation of extensional basins in an overall compressional setting related to Africa-Europe convergence; b) centrifugal wave of both compressive and extensional tectonics starting from a 'pivotal' region around the Gulf of Lyon; c) the development of concomitant Cenozoic subduction zones with different subduction and tectonic transport directions; d) subduction 'inversion' events (e.g., currently along the Maghrebian coast and in northern Sicily, previously at the southern paleo-European margin); e) a repeated temporal pattern whereby subduction-related magmatic activity gives way to magmas of intraplate geochemical type; f) the late-stage appearance of magmas with collision-related 'exotic' (potassic to ultrapotassic) compositions, generally absent from simple subduction settings; g) the relative scarcity of typical calcalkaline magmas along the Italian peninsula; h) the absence of igneous activity where it might well be expected (e.g., above the

  19. Estimating Uncertainty and Frequency of High-Velocity Paleotsunami Inundation From Geologic Records in Back Barrier Settings, Test Locality Cannon Beach, Oregon, Central Cascadia Margin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Jaffe, B.; Peters, R.

    2004-12-01

    Historic-tsunami sand deposits (1964 Alaskan far-field source) in Cascadia back barrier settings have been examined for distinctive criteria from Seaside, OR, Crescent City, CA, and Port Alberni, BC. These historic Pacific Northwest criteria have been combined with similar data from recent tsunami investigations in Papua New Guinea, Peru, and Japan to discriminate high-velocity paleotsunami inundation (at least 0.5 m/s) from non-tsunami deposition such as river flood, storm surge, extreme spring-tide, debris flow, coseismic-fluidization, and anthropogenic activities. The criteria are semi-quantitatively analyzed to evaluate the certainty of paleotsunami inundation records from geologic deposits. The criteria used for a representative test locality Cannon Beach, Oregon, include (1) event dating, (2) anomalous sand lithology, (3) debris cap, (4) distinct layer(s), (5), fining-upward grain-size, (6) laterally continuous deposition (10's of meters), (7) landward-thinning deposition (100's of meters), (8) landward-fining deposits (100's of meters), (9) beach sand mineralogy, and (10) marine diatoms. At least three nearest-neighbor' distal sites of target sand sheets were evaluated for the ten criteria, yielding a certainty index (CI). Four of the events (2-5) demonstrate high certainties (7-9) for tsunami origins. Event data as follows: Event (1/Far-field) Age (1964) CI (6) ID (50m) RI (260yr), Event (2/Cascadia) Age (1700AD) CI (8) ID (250m) RI (325yr), Event (3/Unknown) Age (0.8-0.9ka) CI (7) ID (400m) RI (434yr), Event (4/Cascadia) Age (1.1ka) CI (8) ID (500m) RI (651yr), Event (5/Cascadia) Age (1.3ka) CI (9) ID (900m) RI (1301yr). High-velocity inundation distances (ID) of 50-900m were measured by straight line from the crest of the beach barrier (6 m elevation contour). The tsunami recurrence interval (RI) where RI=(n+1)/m and n=record length (1300yr) is calculated for the 5 events. The event recurrence interval is then plotted against inundation distance (Y

  20. Neoproterozoic active continental margin in the southeastern Yangtze Block of South China: Evidence from the ca. 830-810 Ma sedimentary strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Pandit, Manoj K.; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ze-Rui

    2016-08-01

    The Jiangnan Fold Belt in the South China Block has been traditionally assumed to be Mesoproterozoic in age and related to the global Grenville orogeny. Sedimentary successions in the Jiangnan Fold Belt archive direct record of tectonic evolution; however, they have not yet been evaluated properly. The Lushan massif, comprising Kangwanggu and Xingzi groups, is the major basement complex in the Jiangnan Belt. Regional correlation of these two groups is poorly constrained, such as with the Shuangqiaoshan group, and thus their role in the regional tectonic evolution is not clear. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages suggest that the Xingzi and Kangwanggu groups were deposited at 820-810 and ca. 830 Ma, respectively. They are composed of dominantly felsic to intermediate volcanic detritus, as indicated by the relatively high Th/Cr (0.24-0.06) ratios and radiogenic Nd isotopes (εNd(t) values = + 1.5 to - 2.9) of the sedimentary rocks. An overwhelming abundance of Neoproterozoic (ca. 860-810 Ma) angular, detrital zircon grains in both the groups indicates derivation chiefly from locally distributed syn-sedimentary igneous rocks. A predominance of zircons with ages close to the time of deposition implies a convergent plate margin setting for Kangwanggu and Xingzi groups. Geochemical signatures, such as La-Th-Co and Th-Sc-Zr/10 plots for Xingzi and Kangwanggu sedimentary rocks also underline tectonically active settings, consistent with the arc affinity of the associated mafic and felsic volcanic rocks. In contrast to the dominant Neoproterozoic detritus in the Kangwanggu sandstone, argillaceous rocks of the Xingzi group received additional input of pre-Neoproterozoic detritus. Moreover, the Xingzi argillaceous rocks have εNd(t) values (+ 0.9 to - 2.9) slightly lower than those of the Kangwanggu sandstones (+ 1.5 to 0.0), indicating contribution from mature crustal materials exposed during progressive uplift of continental basement during orogenesis. These features suggest the

  1. Seismic investigations of the Earth's lithosphere and asthenosphere in two unique convergent margin settings: The Carpathians, Romania, and U.S. Cordillera, Idaho-Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, Adrian Christian

    Proposed mechanisms for the unusual seismicity ~100 km southeast of the contact between the Transylvanian Basin and the Eastern Carpathians in Romania have included tearing and rollback of a subducted slab of oceanic lithosphere and gravitational instability and delamination of continental lithosphere. We examined the upper mantle fabrics using shear wave splitting of SK(K)S phases recorded at four broadband seismic stations in the Transylvanian Basin. Our results indicate a regional NW-SE splitting trend, with measurements that reflect an abrupt change from this regional flow field in the vicinity of the Vrancea body to a NE-SW trend that is consistent with redirection of mantle flow. Crustal thickness measurements show 28-30 km in the western part of the Transylvanian Basin, 34-39 km at the contact with the Eastern Carpathians, and 40-45 km further east. These results, along with previous estimates, constrain the locus of the inferred Miocene suture between the southeastern-most portion of the Tisza-Dacia terrane and the East European Platform. The second convergent margin system represented here is in the North American Cordillera in Idaho and Oregon, where subduction and accretion of exotic terranes have modified the western margin of North America. We used teleseismic receiver functions from 85 broadband stations to analyze the geometry of the Salmon River suture zone, the western Idaho shear zone, and the Grouse Creek-Farmington zone boundary. Results show a clear break in crustal thickness from ~28 km beneath the accreted terranes to 36 km east of the surface expression of the WISZ. A strong mid-crustal converter at ~20 km depth is consistent with tectonic wedging during accretion of the Blue Mountains terranes. An eastern Moho offset of ~6 km is consistent with the Archean Grouse Creek-Farmington zone boundary. We used deep converted phases generated beneath the study area to image the mantle transition zone. We observe a continuous high amplitude P410s

  2. Setting the Stage for Physical Activity for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccomascolo, Lori; Riebe, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Despite the positive long-term physiological and psychological effects of exercise, many young adults between the ages of 12 and 21 years do not participate in regular physical activity. With the time constraints and other challenges in teaching and assessing students, physical educators need realistic strategies that will help in their efforts to…

  3. Incipient extension along the active convergent margin of Nubia in Sicily, Italy: Cefalù-Etna seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Andrea; Presti, Debora; Orecchio, Barbara; Faccenna, Claudio; Neri, Giancarlo

    2010-08-01

    Recent geodetic data are compatible with NNE-SSW tectonic extension at a rate of ˜5 mm/yr in Sicily, southern Italy, within a broader region of net active compression along the Nubian plate margin (northern Africa). The structures that accommodate such extensional regime and its cause are still unknown. From field structural surveys and seismological analyses, the geometry, kinematics, structural architecture, and seismic potential of an extensional seismic zone linking Cefalù and Mount Etna in central eastern Sicily are defined. The zone includes high-angle WNW striking normal and right-lateral strike-slip faults and subordinate north and NNE striking strike-slip faults either right or left lateral. The occurrence of small discontinuous faults and the absence of related depressions and sedimentary basins suggest that the extensional regime is still in an incipient stage. The ongoing seismic activity possibly reactivates preexisting faults. Instrumentally and historically recorded earthquakes are lower than about 6 in magnitude, and destructive events are historically unknown since at least 1300 A.D. This apparent upper bound of earthquake magnitudes is consistent with the maximum magnitude values estimated from the length of the longest mapped faults and sources of seismic swarms, which all together suggest a value between 6 and 6.5 as the maximum expected magnitude that can be proposed at the present stage of investigation for earthquakes in the study area. Lateral extension on preexisting faults and upwelling of melt mantle material beneath Mount Etna are considered viable processes to explain, at least in part, the active extensional tectonics along the Cefalù-Etna seismic zone. Strike-slip seismic faulting beneath Mount Etna may be part of a previously proposed diffuse transfer zone affecting northeastern Sicily and including the Tindari Fault.

  4. Temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in sediments of the Central Portuguese Margin: a fingerprint of human activities.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana M; Lebreiro, Susana; Richter, Thomas; de Stigter, Henko; Trancoso, Maria A; Brito, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Stable Pb isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb), (210)Pb, Pb, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn and Si concentrations were measured in 7 sediment cores from the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula to assess the Pb contamination throughout the last 200 years. Independently of their locations, all cores are characterized by increasing Pb/Al rends not related to grain-size changes. Conversely, decreasing trends of (206)Pb/(207)Pb were found towards the present. This tendency suggest a change in Pb sources reflecting an increased proportion derived from anthropogenic activities. The highest anthropogenic Pb inventories for sediments younger than 1950s were found in the two shallowest cores of Cascais and Lisboa submarine canyons, reflecting the proximity of the Tagus estuary. Lead isotope signatures also help demonstrate that sediments contaminated with Pb are not constrained to estuarine-coastal areas and upper parts of submarine canyons, but are also to transferred to a lesser extent to deeper parts of the Portuguese Margin.

  5. Temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in sediments of the Central Portuguese Margin: a fingerprint of human activities.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana M; Lebreiro, Susana; Richter, Thomas; de Stigter, Henko; Trancoso, Maria A; Brito, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Stable Pb isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb), (210)Pb, Pb, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn and Si concentrations were measured in 7 sediment cores from the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula to assess the Pb contamination throughout the last 200 years. Independently of their locations, all cores are characterized by increasing Pb/Al rends not related to grain-size changes. Conversely, decreasing trends of (206)Pb/(207)Pb were found towards the present. This tendency suggest a change in Pb sources reflecting an increased proportion derived from anthropogenic activities. The highest anthropogenic Pb inventories for sediments younger than 1950s were found in the two shallowest cores of Cascais and Lisboa submarine canyons, reflecting the proximity of the Tagus estuary. Lead isotope signatures also help demonstrate that sediments contaminated with Pb are not constrained to estuarine-coastal areas and upper parts of submarine canyons, but are also to transferred to a lesser extent to deeper parts of the Portuguese Margin. PMID:23871578

  6. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Eloy F.; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V.; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M.; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  7. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eloy F; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2016-06-14

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas.

  8. A cycling workstation to facilitate physical activity in office settings.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2014-07-01

    Facilitating physical activity during the workday may help desk-bound workers reduce risks associated with sedentary behavior. We 1) evaluated the efficacy of a cycling workstation to increase energy expenditure while performing a typing task and 2) fabricated a power measurement system to determine the accuracy and reliability of an exercise cycle. Ten individuals performed 10 min trials of sitting while typing (SIT type) and pedaling while typing (PED type). Expired gases were recorded and typing performance was assessed. Metabolic cost during PED type was ∼ 2.5 × greater compared to SIT type (255 ± 14 vs. 100 ± 11 kcal h(-1), P < 0.01). Typing time and number of typing errors did not differ between PED type and SIT type (7.7 ± 1.5 vs. 7.6 ± 1.6 min, P = 0.51, 3.3 ± 4.6 vs. 3.8 ± 2.7 errors, P = 0.80). The exercise cycle overestimated power by 14-138% compared to actual power but actual power was reliable (r = 0.998, P < 0.01). A cycling workstation can facilitate physical activity without compromising typing performance. The exercise cycle's inaccuracy could be misleading to users. PMID:24681071

  9. Integrated Modeling of Satellite Gravity data of Active Plate Margins - Bridging the Gap between Geodesy and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosse, M.; Pail, R.; Mahatsente, R.; Goetze, H.; Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, M.; Gutknecht, B. D.; Koether, N.; Lücke, O.; Sharma, R.; Zeumann, S.

    2011-12-01

    IMOSAGA (Integrated Modeling of Satellite and Airborne Gravity data of Active plate margins) is a joint research project of the Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel (Geophysics), Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena (Geophysics) and Technische Universität München (Geodesy). It aims to interpret the 3D density and dynamic structure of active convergent plate boundaries of the South and Central American subduction zones using satellite (GOCE, GRACE) and terrestrial gravity data. The density, dynamic and flexural rigidity models based on GOCE gravity, gravity gradients and invariants will add new dimension to the interpretation of lithospheric structure, localization of strain accumulation along plate interface and delineation of regions of high seismic moment release. These objectives shall be achieved using (1) robust data processing which makes GOCE gravity and gravity gradients suitable for geophysical modeling; and (2) well constrained geodynamic modeling of the interaction between the subducting and overriding plates. In this contribution, the impact of GOCE data in the test region of Central America shall be evaluated. GOCE (in combination with GRACE) shall be used on the one hand to validate available, but partly sparsely distributed terrestrial data, and on the other hand to be integrated in a regional combined gravity model for the test area using a collocation approach. By 3D static modeling applying the software IGMAS+, the gravity field will be used to constrain density models of the lithosphere and geodynamic processing in the test area. This provides a full closed-loop, including a source model, model gravity field functionals and actual measurements. By analyzing the results in detail, the sensitivity of GOCE observations to local density variations, and vice versa the impact of GOCE as new observation type for geophysical modeling purposes shall be quantified.

  10. Activity-dependent endogenous taurine release facilitates excitatory neurotransmission in the neocortical marginal zone of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Qian, Taizhe; Chen, Rongqing; Nakamura, Masato; Furukawa, Tomonori; Kumada, Tatsuro; Akita, Tenpei; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Nakahara, Daiichiro; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    In the developing cerebral cortex, the marginal zone (MZ), consisting of early-generated neurons such as Cajal-Retzius cells, plays an important role in cell migration and lamination. There is accumulating evidence of widespread excitatory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the MZ. Cajal-Retzius cells express not only GABAA receptors but also α2/β subunits of glycine receptors, and exhibit glycine receptor-mediated depolarization due to high [Cl(-)]i. However, the physiological roles of glycine receptors and their endogenous agonists during neurotransmission in the MZ are yet to be elucidated. To address this question, we performed optical imaging from the MZ using the voltage-sensitive dye JPW1114 on tangential neocortical slices of neonatal rats. A single electrical stimulus evoked an action-potential-dependent optical signal that spread radially over the MZ. The amplitude of the signal was not affected by glutamate receptor blockers, but was suppressed by either GABAA or glycine receptor antagonists. Combined application of both antagonists nearly abolished the signal. Inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter by 20 µM bumetanide reduced the signal, indicating that this transporter contributes to excitation. Analysis of the interstitial fluid obtained by microdialysis from tangential neocortical slices with high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that GABA and taurine, but not glycine or glutamate, were released in the MZ in response to the electrical stimulation. The ambient release of taurine was reduced by the addition of a voltage-sensitive Na(+) channel blocker. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy indicated that taurine was stored both in Cajal-Retzius and non-Cajal-Retzius cells in the MZ, but was not localized in presynaptic structures. Our results suggest that activity-dependent non-synaptic release of endogenous taurine facilitates excitatory neurotransmission through activation of glycine

  11. Siliciclastic Ordovician to Silurian units of the Argentine Precordillera: Constraints on provenance and tectonic setting in the proto-Andean margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abre, P.; Cingolani, C. A.; Cairncross, B.; Chemale, F.

    2012-12-01

    A combination of petrography, geochemistry, Sm-Nd, Pb-Pb and U-Pb detrital zircon dating provide constraints to the provenance of Middle Ordovician to Early Silurian clastic sequences of the Precordillera s.s. as a part of the Cuyania terrane in western-central Argentina. The uniformity shown by the provenance proxies indicate that there were no important changes in the provenance within these units. A dominant upper crustal component is evident as well as a subordinate mafic input. Nd isotopes indicate ɛNd of -5.4, ƒSm/Nd -0.34 and TDM 1.57 Ga in average for all the units studied. Pb-isotope ratios display average values for 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb of 19.37, 15.86 and 39.43 respectively. Detrital zircon dating further constraints the input as being dominantly of Mesoproterozoic age (51-83%), but with contributions from Neoproterozoic-Lower Cambrian (9-31%), Middle Cambrian to Ordovician grains (recorded up to 7%), and Palaeoproterozoic (2-7%) sources. The combination of the different provenance approaches applied indicates that the Mesoproterozoic Cuyania terrane basement, and partially the Pampia terrane were the main sources. The new information provided for the Ordovician to Silurian clastic sequences permitted enhanced the known geochemical and isotopic dataset to constrain the tectonic evolution of the Cuyania terrane. The interpretation of the obtained data supports that the terrane accretion to the proto-Andean margin of Gondwana probably occurred during Middle to early Upper Ordovician.

  12. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  13. The geology and geochemistry of the Espungabera Formation of central Mozambique and its tectonic setting on the eastern margin of the Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moabi, Neo G.; Grantham, Geoffrey H.; Roberts, James; Roux, Petrus le; Matola, Rogerio

    2015-01-01

    dykes identified by Ward (2002)), and therefore we conclude that the Espungabera lavas in Mozambique also form part of the Umkondo Igneous Province. The craton-based tholeiitic Umkondo Igneous Province is broadly coeval with tonalitic calc-alkaline and granitic gneisses in the Nampula and Maud Terranes in Mozambique and Antarctica respectively, immediately east of the Kalahari Craton in a reconstructed Gondwana. These data can be interpreted to indicate that the Espungabera and Straumsnutane lavas form part of a back-arc complex, west of a volcanic arc/subduction zone along the eastern margin of the Kalahari Craton at ∼1100 Ma.

  14. Timing of active methane seep events in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea based on benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, T.

    2015-12-01

    We study the late Quaternary assemblages and stable isotope analyses of benthic foraminifera from the marine core sediments around three methane seep area in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. Study samples are collected on the Umitaka Spur (MD179-3304), a west part of the Oki Trough (UT14-PC1303&PC1305), and a north part of the Mogami Trough (HR14-RC1408). Each sedimentation rate is calculated by the ages of 14C, tephra, oxygen isotope events, and bottoms of the thin laminated layer.Obvious occurrences of the methane related foraminifera, Rutherfordoides sp., are found from three all core sediments, and these sedimentation ages range to 28-25ka, early part of the MIS 2. However, we never find the unique occurrences from RC1408 sections except of MIS 2 even if another low stand stage of MIS 6. Above Rutherfordoides distributions, rare benthic foraminiferal number shows an anoxic bottom condition where most benthic foraminifera couldn't live during the LGM (Oba et al., 1991), nonetheless, Rutherfordoides sp. lived continuously until the LGM. From the surface sediments, Rutherfordoides cornuta, lives on plural area from the northwest Pacific but not from the Japan Sea (Matoba and Nakagawa, 2009) is related to high methane gas content of the sediments in the Sagami Bay (Akimoto et al., 1996). Nakagawa et al. (2009) reported that distributions of Rutherfordoides rotundata (closely related R. cornuta) indicate that an expulsion of a large amount of methane occurred on the Umitaka Spur during the LGM due to a massive dissociation of subsurface methane hydrate. And, the negative carbon isotope peak signal of Rutherfordoides sp. from RC1408 in the Mogami Trough, also indicate to dissociations of methane hydrate and active methane seeps by the lowest sea level same as Umitaka Spur (Takeuchi et al., 2007). Acknowledgement This research was a part of METI's project entitled "FY2014 Promoting research and development on methane hydrate" .

  15. Diversity and Characteristics of Benthic Foraminifera in Cold Seep Areas in the Active Margin of the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Meng-Ting; Thomas, Ellen; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Lin, Saulwood; Tien-Shun Lin, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The active continental margin in northeastern South China Sea (SCS) has been considered to have high potential to be a reservoir of gas hydrate, based on geographic features, geophysical evidences, as well as geochemical analyses of samples from the water column, pore water and sediments. Compared to a typical sea floor area, cold seep areas have more food for benthos and more diverse habitats. As a result, we can expect a higher species diversity of benthic organisms in cold seep areas of the SCS. Based on preliminary results of species identification of benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the upper most sediments (0-5 cm) of box cores collected around cold seeps at water depth ~1300m, the species diversity is significantly higher at seep sites (Shannon-Wiener index = 274) than at background sites (Shannon-Wiener index = 3). The faunal assemblages consist of ~68% calcareous benthic foraminifera (CBF) and ~32% agglutinated benthic foraminifera (ABF) at seep sites. On the other hand, faunal assemblages are composed of only ~24% CBF and ~76% ABF at background sites. By staining the sample with rose Bengal-ethanol solution, we were able to recognize in-situ individuals which were alive at the time of collection, and separate them from dead specimens. Among the living individuals, the most abundant CBF species in seep sites is Bulimina aculeata (~51% in the living CBF fauna), followed by the typical 'shelf-species,' Lenticulina inornata, (~10%) and the common 'brackish-species,' Miliolinella subrotunda, (~9%), while the most abundant ABF species is Cribrostomoides subglobosus (~19% in the living ABF fauna). The most common species thus are typical for shallower, more food rich environments.

  16. Continental transform margins : state of art and future milestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Transform faults were defined 45 years ago as ‘a new class of fault' (Wilson, 1965), and transform margins were consequently individualized as a new class of continental margins. While transform margins represent 20 to 25 % of the total length of continent-ocean transitions, they were poorly studied, especially when compared with the amount of data, interpretations, models and conceptual progress accumulated on divergent or convergent continental margins. The best studied examples of transform margins are located in the northern part of Norway, south of South Africa, in the gulf of California and on both sides of the Equatorial Atlantic. Here is located the Côte d'Ivoire - Ghana margin, where the more complete data set was acquired, based on numerous geological and geophysical cruises, including ODP Leg 159. The first models that encompassed the structure and evolution of transform margins were mainly driven by plate kinematic reconstructions, and evidenced the diachronic end of tectonic activity and the non-cylindrical character of these margins, with a decreasing strike-slip deformation from the convex to the concave divergent-transform intersections. Further thermo-mechanical models were more specifically designed to explain the vertical displacements along transform margins, and especially the occurrence of high-standing marginal ridges. These thermo-mechanical models involved either heat transfer from oceanic to continental lithospheres across the transform faults or tectonically- or gravity-driven mass transfer in the upper crust. These models were far from fully fit observations, and were frequently dedicated to specific example, and not easily generalizable. Future work on transform continental margins may be expected to fill some scientific gaps, and the definition of working directions can benefit from the studies dedicated to other types of margins. At regional scale the structural and sedimentological variability of transform continental margins has

  17. Temporal and spatial complexity in post-glacial sedimentation on the tectonically active, Poverty Bay continental margin of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orpin, Alan R.; Alexander, Clark; Carter, Lionel; Kuehl, Steve; Walsh, J. P.

    2006-11-01

    On the eastern Raukumara Ranges of the New Zealand East Coast, active tectonics, vigorous weather systems, and human colonisation have combined to cause widespread erosion of the mudstone- and sandstone-dominated hinterland. The Waipaoa River sedimentary dispersal system is an example that has responded to environmental change, and is now New Zealand's second largest river in terms of suspended sediment discharge. This paper presents new sediment accumulation rates for the continental shelf and slope that span century to post-glacial time scales. These data are derived from radiochemical tracer, palynological, tephrostratigraphic, and seismic methods. We hypothesise on the temporal and spatial complexity of post-glacial sedimentation across the margin and identify the broad extent of sediment dispersal from the Waipaoa system. The ˜15 km 3 Poverty Bay mid-shelf basin lies adjacent to the mouth of the Waipaoa River, reaching a maximum thickness of ˜45 m. A post-glacial mud lobe of an additional ˜3 km 3 extends through the Poverty Gap and out onto the uppermost slope, attaining 40 m thickness in a structurally controlled sub-basin. Here, an offset in the last-glacial erosion surface indicates that deposition was sympathetic with fault activity and the creation of accommodation space, implying that sedimentation was not supply limited. Contrary to classical shelf sedimentation models, the highest modern accumulation rate of 1 cm y -1 occurs on the outer-shelf sediment lobe, approximately ˜2 times the rate recorded at the mid-shelf basin depocentre, and ˜10 times faster than the excess 210Pb rates estimated from the slope. Pollen records from slope cores fingerprint Polynesian then European settlement, and broaden the spatial extent of post-settlement sedimentation initially documented from the Poverty Bay mid-shelf. Changes in sub-millennial sedimentation infer a 2-3-times increase in post-settlement accumulation on the shelf but a smaller 1-2 times increase on

  18. Development of a Measure to Assess Youth Self-Reported Experiences of Activity Settings (SEAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Batorowicz, Beata; Rigby, Patty; McMain-Klein, Margot; Thompson, Laura; Pinto, Madhu

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for psychometrically sound measures of youth experiences of community/home leisure activity settings. The 22-item Self-Reported Experiences of Activity Settings (SEAS) captures the following experiences of youth with a Grade 3 level of language comprehension or more: Personal Growth, Psychological Engagement, Social Belonging,…

  19. GeoMapApp and MARGINS Mini-Lessons: Cutting-Edge Resources for Modern Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; de Leonardo, S.; Leung, A.

    2009-12-01

    The NSF MARGINS program, a decade-long multi-disciplinary investigation covering major scientific questions in the evolution of continental margins (http://www.margins-nsf.org), has produced a number of key results that are changing our view of these complex systems. Whilst it will be some time before these key findings are incorporated in next-generation undergraduate textbooks, MARGINS researchers and educators have created a broad suite of ready-to-use education modules to highlight some of these results. The hands-on undergraduate-level modules, called MARGINS mini-lessons, range from short interactive activities to multi-session units. Hosted by the Science Education Resource Centre at Carleton College, the mini-lessons (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/collection.html) cover all four MARGINS initiatives. Examples include teaching activities on geochemical inputs and outputs at subduction zones; volcanoes of central America; insights from scientific drilling; sediment production across margins; margin morphology and earthquake/volcano locations; and, the tectonic factors behind historical earthquakes. Each mini-lesson includes a comprehensive educator guide, information on data sets and resources, and suggested assessment rubrics. GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org), a free data exploration and visualisation tool that works on any computer, has wide application across the geosciences for both research and education and is used in many of the MARGINS mini-lessons. GeoMapApp contains an extraordinary wealth of built-in and linked data sets, allowing users to rapidly and conveniently explore geo-referenced data from multiple sources, to generate compelling visualisations, and to create custom maps and grids. Developed by the group that hosts the MARGINS database (http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/margins/), GeoMapApp contains seamless links to MARGINS data and to information about MARGINS land and marine field programs. A user guide, multi-media tutorials, and webinar

  20. Structural and functional diversity of Nematoda in relation with environmental variables in the Setúbal and Cascais canyons, Western Iberian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingels, Jeroen; Billett, David S. M.; Kiriakoulakis, Konstadinos; Wolff, George A.; Vanreusel, Ann

    2011-12-01

    Samples collected at two different depths (ca. 3200 and ca. 4200 m) in the Setúbal and Cascais canyons off the Portuguese coast, during the HERMES RRS Charles Darwin cruise CD179, were analysed for (1) sediment biogeochemistry (TOC, TN) and (2) composition, and structural and trophic diversity of nematode communities. Multivariate PERMANOVA analysis on the nematode community data revealed differences between sediment layers that were greater than differences between canyons, water depths, and stations. This suggests that biogeochemical gradients along the vertical sediment profile are crucial in determining nematode community structure. The interaction between canyon conditions and the nematode community is illustrated by biogeochemical patterns in the sediment and the prevalence of nematode genera that are able to persist in disturbed sediments. Trophic analysis of the nematode community indicated that non-selective deposit feeders are dominant, presumably because of their non-selective feeding behaviour compared to other feeding types, which gives them a competitive advantage in exploiting lower-quality food resources. This study presents a preliminary conceptual scheme for interactions between canyon conditions and the resident fauna.

  1. Early Cambrian granitoids of North Gondwana margin in the transition from a convergent setting to intra-continental rifting (Ossa-Morena Zone, SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, T.; Pereira, M. F.; Bellido, F.; Chichorro, M.; Silva, J. B.; Valverde-Vaquero, P.; Pin, Ch.; Solá, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    Two distinct Cambrian magmatic pulses are recognized in the Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberia): an early rift-(ER) and a main rift-related event. This Cambrian magmatism is related to intra-continental rifting of North Gondwana that is thought to have culminated in the opening of the Rheic Ocean in Lower Ordovician times. New data of whole-rock geochemistry (19 samples), Sm-Nd-Sr isotopes (4 samples) and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon geochronology (1 sample) of the Early Cambrian ER plutonic rocks of the Ossa-Morena Zone are presented in this contribution. The ER granitoids (Barreiros, Barquete, Calera, Salvatierra de los Barros and Tablada granitoid Massifs) are mostly peraluminous granites. The Sm-Nd isotopic data show moderate negative ɛNdt values ranging from -3.5 to +0.1 and TDM ages greatly in excess of emplacement ages. Most ER granitoids are crustal melts. However, a subset of samples shows a transitional anorogenic alkaline tendency, together with more primitive isotopic signatures, documenting the participation of lower crust or mantle-derived sources and suggesting a local transient advanced stage of rifting. The Barreiros granitoid is intrusive into the Ediacaran basement of the Ossa-Morena Zone (Série Negra succession) and has yielded a crystallization age of 524.7 ± 0.8 Ma consistent with other ages of ER magmatic pulse. This age: (1) constrains the age of the metamorphism developed in the Ediacaran back-arc basins before the intrusion of granites and (2) defines the time of the transition from the Ediacaran convergent setting to the Lower Cambrian intra-continental rifting in North Gondwana.

  2. Biogeography, biodiversity and fluid dependence of deep-sea cold-seep communities at active and passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, Myriam; Olu, Karine

    1998-01-01

    To date, several cold-seep areas which fuel chemosynthesis-based benthic communities have been explored, mainly by deployment of manned submersibles. They are located in the Atlantic and in the Eastern and Western Pacific oceans and in the Mediterranean Sea, in depths ranging between 400 and 6000 m in different geological contexts in passive and active margins. Our study is based on a review of the existent literature on 24 deep cold seeps. The geographic distribution of seeps, the variations of origin and composition of fluids, and rates of fluid flow are presented as they are important factors which explain the spatial heterogeneity and the biomass of biological communities. Methane-rich fluid of thermogenic and/or biogenic origin is the principal source of energy for high-productive communities; however, production of sulphide by sulphate reduction in the sediment also has a major role. The dominant seep species are large bivalves belonging to the families Vesicomyidae or Mytilidae. Other symbiont-containing species occur belonging to Solemyidae, Thyasiridae, Lucinidae bivalves, Pogonophora worms, Cladorhizidae and Hymedesmiidae sponges. Most of the symbiont-containing cold-seep species are new to science. Different symbiont-containing species rely on sulphide or methane oxidation, or both, via chemoautotrophic endosymbiotic bacteria. A total of 211 species, from which 64 are symbiont-containing species, have been inventoried. Patterns in biodiversity and biogeography are proposed. A large majority of the species are endemic to a seep area and the symbiont-containing species are mainly endemic to the cold-seep ecosystem. A comparison of species found in other deep chemosynthesis-based ecosystems, hydrothermal vents, whale carcass and shipwreck reduced habitats, reveals from the existing data, that only 13 species, of which five are symbiont-containing species occur, at both seeps and hydrothermal vents. The species richness of cold-seep communities decreases

  3. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  4. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  5. Statistical properties of short-selling and margin-trading activities and their impacts on returns in the Chinese stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Gao, Yao

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the collective behaviors of short-selling and margin-trading between Chinese stocks and their impacts on the co-movements of stock returns by cross-correlation and partial correlation analyses. We find that the collective behaviors of margin-trading are largely attributed to the index cohesive force, while those of short-selling are mainly due to some direct interactions between stocks. Interestingly, the dominant role the finance industry plays in the collective behaviors of short-selling could make it more important in affecting the co-movement structure of stock returns by strengthening its relationship with the market index. By detecting the volume-return and volume-volatility relationships, we find that the investors of the two leverage activities are positively triggered by individual stock volatility first, and next, at the return level, margin-buyers show trend-following properties, while short-sellers are probably informative traders who trade on the information impulse of specific firms. However, the return predictability of the two leverage trading activities and their impacts on stock volatility are not significant. Moreover, both tails of the cumulative distributions of the two leverage trading activities are found following the stretched exponential law better than the power-law.

  6. Spiritual Development with Marginalized Youth: A Status Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Nicholson, Kristal S.

    2008-01-01

    In the past several years, social services agencies that work with marginalized youth have reported increased interest in using spiritual activities as one tool in a more standard array of therapeutic interventions. Where it has occurred, the use of spirituality in such settings tends to reflect the agencies' belief that spiritual concepts have a…

  7. Modulation of the Hormone Setting by Rhodococcus fascians Results in Ectopic KNOX Activation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Depuydt, Stephen; Doležal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians. PMID:18184732

  8. Ivory Coast-Ghana margin: model of a transform margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mascle, J.; Blarez, E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors present a marine study of the eastern Ivory Coast-Ghana continental margins which they consider one of the most spectacular extinct transform margins. This margin has been created during Early-Lower Cretaceous time and has not been submitted to any major geodynamic reactivation since its fabric. Based on this example, they propose to consider during the evolution of the transform margin four main and successive stages. Shearing contact is first active between two probably thick continental crusts and then between progressively thinning continental crusts. This leads to the creation of specific geological structures such as pull-apart graben, elongated fault lineaments, major fault scarps, shear folds, and marginal ridges. After the final continental breakup, a hot center (the mid-oceanic ridge axis) is progressively drifting along the newly created margin. The contact between two lithospheres of different nature should necessarily induce, by thermal exchanges, vertical crustal readjustments. Finally, the transform margin remains directly adjacent to a hot but cooling oceanic lithosphere; its subsidence behavior should then progressively be comparable to the thermal subsidence of classic rifted margins.

  9. Parallel effects of memory set activation and search on timing and working memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Schweickert, Richard; Fortin, Claudette; Xi, Zhuangzhuang; Viau-Quesnel, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating a time interval is required in everyday activities such as driving or cooking. Estimating time is relatively easy, provided a person attends to it. But a brief shift of attention to another task usually interferes with timing. Most processes carried out concurrently with timing interfere with it. Curiously, some do not. Literature on a few processes suggests a general proposition, the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis: A process interferes with concurrent timing if and only if process performance is related to complex span. Complex-span is the number of items correctly recalled in order, when each item presented for study is followed by a brief activity. Literature on task switching, visual search, memory search, word generation and mental time travel supports the hypothesis. Previous work found that another process, activation of a memory set in long term memory, is not related to complex-span. If the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis is true, activation should not interfere with concurrent timing in dual-task conditions. We tested such activation in single-task memory search task conditions and in dual-task conditions where memory search was executed with concurrent timing. In Experiment 1, activating a memory set increased reaction time, with no significant effect on time production. In Experiment 2, set size and memory set activation were manipulated. Activation and set size had a puzzling interaction for time productions, perhaps due to difficult conditions, leading us to use a related but easier task in Experiment 3. In Experiment 3 increasing set size lengthened time production, but memory activation had no significant effect. Results here and in previous literature on the whole support the Timing and Complex-Span Hypotheses. Results also support a sequential organization of activation and search of memory. This organization predicts activation and set size have additive effects on reaction time and multiplicative effects on percent

  10. Geochemistry of the metavolcanic rocks in the vicinity of the MacLellan Au-Ag deposit and an evaluation of the tectonic setting of the Lynn Lake greenstone belt, Canada: Evidence for a Paleoproterozoic-aged rifted continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, Michael W. P.; Gagnon, Joel E.; Polat, Ali

    2015-09-01

    The Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1900 Ma) Lynn Lake greenstone belt of northern Manitoba, Canada, has been previously characterized as comprising a series of tectonically juxtaposed intra-oceanic-derived metavolcanic rocks. The results of more recent local and regional studies, however, support a significant contribution of continental crust during formation of the metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and intrusive igneous rocks that comprise the majority of the Lynn Lake greenstone belt. The tectonic model previously proposed for the Lynn Lake greenstone belt, however, did not consider the geodynamics of the Lynn Lake greenstone belt in the context of all available data. In this study, we report the results of outcrop mapping and petrographic analysis, as well as major, minor, and trace element geochemical analyses for 54 samples from the Northern terrane, and integrate and compare the results with data from previously published studies. These data are used to recharacterize the metavolcanic rocks and to develop a new geodynamic model for the formation of the Lynn Lake greenstone belt. Ultramafic to intermediate rocks in the vicinity of the MacLellan Au-Ag deposit are characterized primarily by E-MORB-like trace element characteristics and Th-Nb-La systematics, which are interpreted to be the result of a primary, plume-derived melt interacting with continental lithosphere at a thinned (i.e., rifted) continental margin. Similarly, the majority of the mafic to intermediate rocks that comprise the Lynn Lake greenstone belt are characterized by flat to E-MORB-like trace element patterns and Th-Nb-La systematics, which are consistent with mantle plume-derived, contaminated, oceanic continental rift or rifted margin setting rocks. This study suggests that the metavolcanic rocks of the Lynn Lake greenstone belt were derived via rifting between the Superior and Hearne Cratons, which resulted in the formation and growth of the Manikewan Ocean. Alternatively, the metavolcanic rocks

  11. Large-scale thrusting along the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the southwest Tarim basin: 230 km long active Hotian thrust sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.; Wang, X.; He, D.; Liang, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of large-scale active thrusting in the western Kunlunshan and southwest Tarim basin, which accounts for ~130-165km total shortening of Tarim crust at the northern margin of Tibet. The great frontal structure is the ~230km long bedding-parallel Hotian thrust sheet, which is perhaps the longest active intact thrust sheet in the world, composed of flat-lying strata of the Tarim basin sliding northward on a regional gypsum detachment at the base of the Cenozoic sequence. The toe of the Hotian thrust ramps to the surface two thirds of the way across the Tarim basin, forming the Selibuya-Mazartag hills in the Taklamakan sand desert. At the southern edge of the Tarim basin in the Kunlunshan foothills, a set of high-amplitude anticlines are growing by complex break-forward ramping and wedging in the Hotian thrust sheet as it steps up to the Cenozoic gypsum detachment from a regional Cambrian evaporate detachment that extends under Tibet. More interior structures such as the Tiklik thrust bring older strata and Proterozoic basement to the surface, together with their Cenozoic Tarim cover in the Buya basin. The Cambrian detachment also extends northward under the Tarim basin with minor hanging-wall deformation that locally warps the overlying Hotian thrust sheet, producing a complete syntectonic record in seismically imaged growth strata of its northward motion over these warps. Seismic profiles in the southwest Tarim foothill belt also reveal widespread growth strata that record much of the structural history beginning in the early Pliocene Atushi Formation. Ages of seismic reflectors are calibrated to a surface magnetostratigraphic sequence (Zheng et al., 2000). The beginning of thrusting and folding in the southwest Tarim basin north of the Tiklik thrust is dated at 3.6Ma with shortening >25km and a progressive northward propagation toward the Selibuya-Mazartag hills. The overall shortening rate is ~10 mm/yr. The gypsum

  12. 'Marginal' BY Draconis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 52 dK-dM stars, obtained at 640-665 nm (with spectral resolution 70-90 pm) using CCD detectors on the coude-feed telescope at KPNO since 1982, are reported. Data for four stars found to have diluted absorption or weak emission above continuum at H-alpha are presented in tables and spectra and discussed in detail. These objects (Gliese numbers 256, 425A, 900, and 907.1) are shown to be 'marginal' BY Dra stars, single objects of age 2.5-3 Gyr with activity and rotational velocity (3-5 km/s) between those of normal dM stars and those of true BY Dra stars. An explanation based on evolution from the BY Dra stage through marginal BY Dra to inactive dM is proposed.

  13. Graduated exposure and positive reinforcement to overcome setting and activity avoidance in an adolescent with autism.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jonathan D; Luiselli, James K; Rue, Hanna; Whalley, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Some students who have developmental disabilities avoid settings and activities that can improve their learning and quality of life. This two-phase study concerned an adolescent boy with autism who avoided the gross-motor exercise room, gymnasium, and music room at his school; he demonstrated distress, agitation, and problem behaviors when prompted to enter these areas. Using graduated exposure combined with positive reinforcement, he learned to enter these settings without resisting and eventually to participate in activities within the settings. This article discusses this intervention approach for reducing and eliminating avoidant behavior.

  14. Analgesic Neural Circuits Are Activated by Electroacupuncture at Two Sets of Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Man-Li; Qiu, Zheng-Ying

    2016-01-01

    To investigate analgesic neural circuits activated by electroacupuncture (EA) at different sets of acupoints in the brain, goats were stimulated by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints or set of Housanli acupoints for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using the potassium iontophoresis method. The levels of c-Fos were determined with Streptavidin-Biotin Complex immunohistochemistry. The results showed pain threshold induced by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints was 44.74% ± 4.56% higher than that by EA at set of Housanli acupoints (32.64% ± 5.04%). Compared with blank control, EA at two sets of acupoints increased c-Fos expression in the medial septal nucleus (MSN), the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the nucleus amygdala basalis (AB), the lateral habenula nucleus (HL), the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), the locus coeruleus (LC), the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the pituitary gland, and spinal cord dorsal horn (SDH). Compared with EA at set of Housanli points, EA at set of Baihui-Santai points induced increased c-Fos expression in AB but decrease in MSN, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, HL, and SDH. It suggests that ARC-PAG-NRM/LC-SDH and the hypothalamus-pituitary may be the common activated neural pathways taking part in EA-induced analgesia at the two sets of acupoints. PMID:27429635

  15. Fungal and Prokaryotic Activities in the Marine Subsurface Biosphere at Peru Margin and Canterbury Basin Inferred from RNA-Based Analyses and Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Rédou, Vanessa; Beaudoin, David J; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2016-01-01

    The deep sedimentary biosphere, extending 100s of meters below the seafloor harbors unexpected diversity of Bacteria, Archaea, and microbial eukaryotes. Far less is known about microbial eukaryotes in subsurface habitats, albeit several studies have indicated that fungi dominate microbial eukaryotic communities and fungal molecular signatures (of both yeasts and filamentous forms) have been detected in samples as deep as 1740 mbsf. Here, we compare and contrast fungal ribosomal RNA gene signatures and whole community metatranscriptomes present in sediment core samples from 6 and 95 mbsf from Peru Margin site 1229A and from samples from 12 and 345 mbsf from Canterbury Basin site U1352. The metatranscriptome analyses reveal higher relative expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in the less nutrient rich Canterbury Basin sediments compared to the nutrient rich Peru Margin, and higher expression of motility genes in the Peru Margin samples. Higher expression of genes associated with metals transporters and antibiotic resistance and production was detected in Canterbury Basin sediments. A poly-A focused metatranscriptome produced for the Canterbury Basin sample from 345 mbsf provides further evidence for active fungal communities in the subsurface in the form of fungal-associated transcripts for metabolic and cellular processes, cell and membrane functions, and catalytic activities. Fungal communities at comparable depths at the two geographically separated locations appear dominated by distinct taxa. Differences in taxonomic composition and expression of genes associated with particular metabolic activities may be a function of sediment organic content as well as oceanic province. Microscopic analysis of Canterbury Basin sediment samples from 4 and 403 mbsf produced visualizations of septate fungal filaments, branching fungi, conidiogenesis, and spores. These images provide another important line of evidence supporting the occurrence and activity of fungi in

  16. Fungal and Prokaryotic Activities in the Marine Subsurface Biosphere at Peru Margin and Canterbury Basin Inferred from RNA-Based Analyses and Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Rédou, Vanessa; Beaudoin, David J; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2016-01-01

    The deep sedimentary biosphere, extending 100s of meters below the seafloor harbors unexpected diversity of Bacteria, Archaea, and microbial eukaryotes. Far less is known about microbial eukaryotes in subsurface habitats, albeit several studies have indicated that fungi dominate microbial eukaryotic communities and fungal molecular signatures (of both yeasts and filamentous forms) have been detected in samples as deep as 1740 mbsf. Here, we compare and contrast fungal ribosomal RNA gene signatures and whole community metatranscriptomes present in sediment core samples from 6 and 95 mbsf from Peru Margin site 1229A and from samples from 12 and 345 mbsf from Canterbury Basin site U1352. The metatranscriptome analyses reveal higher relative expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in the less nutrient rich Canterbury Basin sediments compared to the nutrient rich Peru Margin, and higher expression of motility genes in the Peru Margin samples. Higher expression of genes associated with metals transporters and antibiotic resistance and production was detected in Canterbury Basin sediments. A poly-A focused metatranscriptome produced for the Canterbury Basin sample from 345 mbsf provides further evidence for active fungal communities in the subsurface in the form of fungal-associated transcripts for metabolic and cellular processes, cell and membrane functions, and catalytic activities. Fungal communities at comparable depths at the two geographically separated locations appear dominated by distinct taxa. Differences in taxonomic composition and expression of genes associated with particular metabolic activities may be a function of sediment organic content as well as oceanic province. Microscopic analysis of Canterbury Basin sediment samples from 4 and 403 mbsf produced visualizations of septate fungal filaments, branching fungi, conidiogenesis, and spores. These images provide another important line of evidence supporting the occurrence and activity of fungi in

  17. Fungal and Prokaryotic Activities in the Marine Subsurface Biosphere at Peru Margin and Canterbury Basin Inferred from RNA-Based Analyses and Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pachiadaki, Maria G.; Rédou, Vanessa; Beaudoin, David J.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Edgcomb, Virginia P.

    2016-01-01

    The deep sedimentary biosphere, extending 100s of meters below the seafloor harbors unexpected diversity of Bacteria, Archaea, and microbial eukaryotes. Far less is known about microbial eukaryotes in subsurface habitats, albeit several studies have indicated that fungi dominate microbial eukaryotic communities and fungal molecular signatures (of both yeasts and filamentous forms) have been detected in samples as deep as 1740 mbsf. Here, we compare and contrast fungal ribosomal RNA gene signatures and whole community metatranscriptomes present in sediment core samples from 6 and 95 mbsf from Peru Margin site 1229A and from samples from 12 and 345 mbsf from Canterbury Basin site U1352. The metatranscriptome analyses reveal higher relative expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in the less nutrient rich Canterbury Basin sediments compared to the nutrient rich Peru Margin, and higher expression of motility genes in the Peru Margin samples. Higher expression of genes associated with metals transporters and antibiotic resistance and production was detected in Canterbury Basin sediments. A poly-A focused metatranscriptome produced for the Canterbury Basin sample from 345 mbsf provides further evidence for active fungal communities in the subsurface in the form of fungal-associated transcripts for metabolic and cellular processes, cell and membrane functions, and catalytic activities. Fungal communities at comparable depths at the two geographically separated locations appear dominated by distinct taxa. Differences in taxonomic composition and expression of genes associated with particular metabolic activities may be a function of sediment organic content as well as oceanic province. Microscopic analysis of Canterbury Basin sediment samples from 4 and 403 mbsf produced visualizations of septate fungal filaments, branching fungi, conidiogenesis, and spores. These images provide another important line of evidence supporting the occurrence and activity of fungi in

  18. Exo-enzymatic activities and organic matter properties in deep-sea canyon and slope systems off the southern Cretan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic activities of aminopeptidase and β- D-glucosidase were investigated in sediments collected from deep-sea canyon (Samaria) and slope systems of the unexplored southern Cretan margin (Eastern Mediterranean Sea). Stations were grouped in defined regions, inside the canyon, in nearby slopes and in open slope systems. Redox potential values, organic carbon concentrations, C/N ratios, chlorophyll- a, phaeopigments, prokaryotic abundances and carbon (C) mineralization rates were also estimated. The main aim of this investigation was to examine the links among prokaryotic abundance and activities and organic matter parameters along the axis of a submarine canyon (Samaria), and laterally along the slopes of the deep southern Cretan margin (Eastern Mediterranean Sea). The recorded aminopeptidase activities exhibited elevated values near the mouth of the canyon and the nearby slope systems and were found to be comparable to those reported for mesotrophic ecosystems. Statistical comparisons revealed that chloroplastic pigment equivalents, C/N ratios and carbon mineralization rates did not differ significantly between the deep stations in and outside the canyon (of either 2000 or 3500 m water depth). On the other hand, organic carbon and nitrogen content, prokaryotic abundances, and enzymatic activities differ substantially between the canyon and slope stations. It is suggested that the deep basins at the outlet of the submarine canyon of Samaria and the nearby slope systems are promising targets for the identification of microbial hotspots.

  19. Systematic Review of Service-Learning in Youth Physical Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Russell L.; Raguse, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which service-learning exists in the field of kinesiology broadly, and more specifically related to the physical activity of youth, remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the service-learning literature in kinesiology, with a specific focus on youth physical activity settings.…

  20. Does Pedometer Goal Setting Improve Physical Activity among Native Elders? Results from a Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Craig N.; Russo, Joan E.; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant…

  1. Affordances for Risk-Taking and Physical Activity in Australian Early Childhood Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Sweller, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Motor competence and physical activity (PA) patterns are established during the early childhood years. Early childhood education (ECE) settings are an important context for children's engagement in physically active play. This paper reports the findings from an online survey examining resources, spaces and affordances for PA and risk-taking in…

  2. 21 CFR 10.95 - Participation in outside standard-setting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the group or organization responsible for the activity. (c) Standard-setting activities by State and local government agencies and by United Nations organizations and other international organizations and... public health and preventive medicine practices by national and international organizations. (8)...

  3. 21 CFR 10.95 - Participation in outside standard-setting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the group or organization responsible for the activity. (c) Standard-setting activities by State and local government agencies and by United Nations organizations and other international organizations and... public health and preventive medicine practices by national and international organizations. (8)...

  4. 21 CFR 10.95 - Participation in outside standard-setting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the group or organization responsible for the activity. (c) Standard-setting activities by State and local government agencies and by United Nations organizations and other international organizations and... public health and preventive medicine practices by national and international organizations. (8)...

  5. Maintenance of Physical Activity among Faculty and Staff in University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Kerry; Kinney, Judy; Kattenbraker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have placed little emphasis on maintenance of healthy behaviors longer than six months. This study examined factors that contribute to maintenance of physical activity among faculty and staff in university settings. A 55-item survey on physical activity maintenance was used to assess attitudes towards exercise, exercise…

  6. Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

  7. Pedometer-Based Physical Activity Level and Body Composition among Minority Children in a Physical Activity Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Most studies focusing on the relationship between physical activity and obesity have been conducted in middle class Caucasian adults and children and few such studies are available concerning minority children in physical activity settings (Johnson, Kulinna, Tudor-Locke, Darst, & Pangrazi, 2007; Rowlands et al., 1999; Tudor-Locke, Lee, Morgan,…

  8. Alpine geodynamic evolution of passive and active continental margin sequences in the Tauern Window (eastern Alps, Austria, Italy): a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, W.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.; Dachs, E.

    The Penninic oceanic sequence of the Glockner nappe and the foot-wall Penninic continental margin sequences exposed within the Tauern Window (eastern Alps) have been investigated in detail. Field data as well as structural and petrological data have been combined with data from the literature in order to constrain the geodynamic evolution of these units. Volcanic and sedimentary sequences document the evolution from a stable continent that was formed subsequent to the Variscan orogeny, to its disintegration associated with subsidence and rifting in the Triassic and Jurassic, the formation of the Glockner oceanic basin and its consumption during the Upper Cretaceous and the Paleogene. These units are incorporated into a nappe stack that was formed during the collision between a Penninic Zentralgneis block in the north and a southern Austroalpine block. The Venediger nappe and the Storz nappe are characterized by metamorphic Jurassic shelf deposits (Hochstegen group) and Cretaceous flysch sediments (Kaserer and Murtörl groups), the Eclogite Zone and the Rote Wand-Modereck nappe comprise Permian to Triassic clastic sequences (Wustkogel quartzite) and remnants of platform carbonates (Seidlwinkl group) as well as Jurassic volcanoclastic material and rift sediments (Brennkogel facies), covered by Cretaceous flyschoid sequences. Nappe stacking was contemporaneous to and postdated subduction-related (high-pressure) eclogite and blueschist facies metamorphism. Emplacement of the eclogite-bearing units of the Eclogite zone and the Glockner nappe onto Penninic continental units (Zentralgneis block) occurred subsequent to eclogite facies metamorphism. The Eclogite zone, a former extended continental margin, was subsequently overridden by a pile of basement-cover nappes (Rote Wand-Modereck nappe) along a ductile out-of-sequence thrust. Low-angle normal faults that have developed during the Jurassic extensional phase might have been inverted during nappe emplacement.

  9. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  10. Our Solar Connection: A Themed Set of Activities for Grades 5-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, D. E.; van der Veen, W.; Gallagher, A.

    2005-05-01

    We present a set of 7 interconnected activities on the theme of Sun-Earth connections that we have developed and presented at teacher workshops as part of a NASA-funded Education and Public Outreach project. Associated with the activities are two resource centers that are maintained locally at NJIT in Newark, NJ, and at Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) in North Branch, NJ. We describe each of the activities and the resource equipment, and present some statistics of how successful the teachers have been in using the activities in their classrooms. A resource CD containing the text of a teacher's guide is available that explains each activity, lists the associated materials needed for each activity, gives estimates for the time required for each activity, and points out specific New Jersey Science Standards met by each activity. Additional resources including movies and photos are included on the CD, and links to this material are contained in the teacher's guide.

  11. Deep crust and mantle structure linked to subduction of the Pacific plate at a continental margin from an active seismic source study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Okaya, D. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Savage, M. K.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results that bear on mantle structure in a subduction zone of both the down going and over-riding plates. Wellington region, New Zealand, sits on the Australian plate a mere ~ 15-25 km above the subducted Pacific plate. This is rare: most active continental margins have at least 30-50 km of free board above subduction zones (cf, Pacific NW, Honshu). Such a shallow setting offers unusually good conditions for making terrestrial observations of the subduction process. In 2010-11 an active source seismic experiment (SAHKE) was carried out across the Wellington region. Both active and passive seismic methods were used to establish a model of the crustal structure and upper mantle structure beneath SAHKE (Henrys et al , 2013). We recorded 12 x 500 kg dynamite shots on ~ 1000 recorders place at 100 m spacing from coast to coast. These data contain excellent returns from the subduction zone at two-way travel times of 7-15 s, but we also recorded coherent reflection energy down to 30 s two-way-travel-time on vertical recorders and 47 s on horizontal recorders. We performed a low-fold stack of these deep reflections and see two zones. The deepest reflections define a westward 17 degree-dipping zone at ~ 100 km deep that is possibly the base of the subducted Pacific plate. The westward dip on this 100 km deep reflector matches that for the top of the plate. Moreover, the total plate thickness implied is ~ 80 km, which matches that predicted for 100 my old oceanic lithosphere. The other deep reflection zone dips eastward across the shot gathers and is typically seen at two-way travel times of 18-25 s on the vertical phones. We also see the same event as a Vs arrival on horizontal phones at two-way travel times of 34-47s. When migrated these reflections define an east dipping reflector that is within the mantle of the overriding Australian plate, and the surface projection of the reflector is ~ 80 km west of SAHKE line. This finding raises the question of what

  12. Understanding Continental Margin Biodiversity: A New Imperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  13. Understanding continental margin biodiversity: a new imperative.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lisa A; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  14. Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Asia joined Laurentia and Baltica during the formation of the Urals in the Early Permian. Subsequently, the northern margin of Pangea shared a paleo-Pacific facing margin. Analysis of events along this (mostly active) margin provides insight into the plate tectonic setting and evolution of the Arctic basins and their temporal links to Pacific margin events. A 3-phase tectonic evolution characterizes the northern margin of Pangea during the Mesozoic: 1. Permo-Triassic rifting (Siberian Trap magmatism)was linked to rifting in a series of back-arc basins developed along the northern margin of Pangea. Triassic-Jurasic deep-water sedimentary seqences deposited in these basins were subsequently deformed during phase 2 events. 2. Lithospheric shortening/convergence across this margin deformed these basinal sediments and shed syn-orogenic deposits cratonward in the Jura-Cretaceous. Syn-orogenic basinal successions are widespread from the Verkoyansk margin of Siberia to the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. Their sources are well-characterized by U-Pb ages of detrital zircon suites and include Pennsylvanian-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic magmatic belts, implying convergence and emplacement of a long-lived arc system onto the continental margin. 3. Structures related to phase 2 are cut and overprinted by voluminous, syn-extensional, slab-related magmatism that developed during southward or Pacific-ward migration of a N-dipping subducting slab. It is inferred that the earliest part of the Amerasia Basin likely opened during part of this magmatic event, 135 to 90 Ma. The final culmination of this magmatic event is the Ohotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, ~90-75 Ma;after this, magmatism continues to migrate Pacific-ward in a series of steps. Utilizing plate models of the Arctic by Lawver et al.(2002) it can be shown that some of the differences in the timing and style of Mesozoic orogenesis along the northern paleo-Pacific margin of Pangea (and especially the differences between the

  15. Prefrontal set activity predicts rule-specific neural processing during subsequent cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Katsuyuki; Passingham, Richard E

    2006-01-25

    Prefrontal neurons have been shown to represent task rules. Here we show the mechanisms by which the rule-selective activity in the prefrontal cortex influences subsequent cognitive performance based on that rule. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the frontopolar cortex interacted with posterior areas differently depending on whether subjects were going to perform a phonological or semantic task. Moreover, we found that the sustained "set" activity in this region predicted the activity that could be recorded in the posterior areas during the performance, as well as the speed of that performance. We argue that the prefrontal set activity does not reflect simple maintenance of the task rules but the process of implementing the rule for subsequent cognitive performance and that this is done through rule-selective interactions with areas involved in execution of the tasks.

  16. Locally constrained active contour: a region-based level set for ovarian cancer metastasis segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of ovarian cancer metastases is clinically useful to evaluate tumor growth and determine follow-up treatment. We present a region-based level set algorithm with localization constraints to segment ovarian cancer metastases. Our approach is established on a representative region-based level set, Chan-Vese model, in which an active contour is driven by region competition. To reduce over-segmentation, we constrain the level set propagation within a narrow image band by embedding a dynamic localization function. The metastasis intensity prior is also estimated from image regions within the level set initialization. The localization function and intensity prior force the level set to stop at the desired metastasis boundaries. Our approach was validated on 19 ovarian cancer metastases with radiologist-labeled ground-truth on contrast-enhanced CT scans from 15 patients. The comparison between our algorithm and geodesic active contour indicated that the volume overlap was 75+/-10% vs. 56+/-6%, the Dice coefficient was 83+/-8% vs. 63+/-8%, and the average surface distance was 2.2+/-0.6mm vs. 4.4+/-0.9mm. Experimental results demonstrated that our algorithm outperformed traditional level set algorithms.

  17. Glaciomarine sedimentation and bottom current activity on the north-western and northern continental margins of Svalbard during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Teena; Noormets, Riko; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-bottom current strength of the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) and the influence of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBIS) on the depositional environment along the northern Svalbard margins are poorly known. Two gravity cores from the southern Yermak Plateau and the upper slope north of Nordaustlandet, covering marine isotope stage (MIS) 1 to MIS 5, are investigated. Five lithofacies, based on grain size distribution, silt/clay ratio, content and mean of sortable silt (SS), are distinguished to characterise the contourite-dominated sedimentary environments. In addition, depositional environments are described using total organic carbon (TOC), total sulphur (TS) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) contents of sediments. Facies A, containing coarse SS, suggests strong bottom current activity and good bottom water ventilation conditions as inferred from low TOC content. This facies was deposited during the glacial periods MIS 4, MIS 2 and during the late Holocene. Facies B is dominated by fine SS indicating weak bottom current and poor ventilation (cf. high TOC content of 1.2-1.6%), and correlates with the MIS 4/3 and MIS 2/1 transition periods. With an equal amount of clay and sand, fine SS and high content of TOC, facies C indicates reduced bottom current strength for intervals with sediment supply from proximal sources such as icebergs, sea ice or meltwater discharge. This facies was deposited during the last glacial maximum. Facies D represents mass-flow deposits on the northern Svalbard margin attributed to the SBIS advance at or near the shelf edge. Facies E sediments indicating moderate bottom current strength were deposited during MIS 5 and MIS 3, and during parts of MIS 2. This first late Quaternary proxy record of the WSC flow and sedimentation history from the northern Svalbard margin suggests that the oceanographic conditions and ice sheet processes have exerted first-order control on sediment properties.

  18. Dose Relations between Goal Setting, Theory-Based Correlates of Goal Setting and Increases in Physical Activity during a Workplace Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Motl, Robert W.; Wilson, Mark G.; DeJoy, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of an intervention depends on its dose and on moderators of dose, which usually are not studied. The purpose of the study is to determine whether goal setting and theory-based moderators of goal setting had dose relations with increases in goal-related physical activity during a successful workplace intervention. A…

  19. Dose relations between goal setting, theory-based correlates of goal setting and increases in physical activity during a workplace trial.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Vandenberg, Robert J; Motl, Robert W; Wilson, Mark G; DeJoy, David M

    2010-08-01

    The effectiveness of an intervention depends on its dose and on moderators of dose, which usually are not studied. The purpose of the study is to determine whether goal setting and theory-based moderators of goal setting had dose relations with increases in goal-related physical activity during a successful workplace intervention. A group-randomized 12-week intervention that included personal goal setting was implemented in fall 2005, with a multiracial/ethnic sample of employees at 16 geographically diverse worksites. Here, we examined dose-related variables in the cohort of participants (N = 664) from the 8 worksites randomized to the intervention. Participants in the intervention exceeded 9000 daily pedometer steps and 300 weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during the last 6 weeks of the study, which approximated or exceeded current public health guidelines. Linear growth modeling indicated that participants who set higher goals and sustained higher levels of self-efficacy, commitment and intention about attaining their goals had greater increases in pedometer steps and MVPA. The relation between change in participants' satisfaction with current physical activity and increases in physical activity was mediated by increases in self-set goals. The results show a dose relation of increased physical activity with changes in goal setting, satisfaction, self-efficacy, commitment and intention, consistent with goal-setting theory.

  20. Do You Hear What I Hear? Overweight Children's Perceptions of Different Physical Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, Karen; Hart, Melanie A.; Griffin, L. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Social-Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1986, 1999) served as the framework to explore overweight children's perceptions of different physical activity settings. Participants were children (n = 67) enrolled in an after-school and summer program for overweight African-American and Hispanic-American children from low-income families. To gain insight into…

  1. Physical Activity Levels in Coeducational and Single-Gender High School Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James; Ratliffe, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of coeducational (coed) and single-gender game-play settings on the activity levels of Caucasian and African American high school physical education students. Students participated in flag football, ultimate Frisbee, and soccer units. Classes were as follows: there were two coed classes, two…

  2. School Engagement among Aboriginal Students in Northern Canada: Perspectives From Activity Settings Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Colleen M.; Hawe, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Background: Educational disengagement is a public health concern among Aboriginal populations in many countries. It has been investigated previously in a variety of ways, with the conventional focus being on the children themselves. Activity settings are events and places, theorized in terms of their symbols, roles, time frame, funds, people, and…

  3. Effects of Goal Setting on Dietary and Physical Activity Changes in the Boy Scout Badge Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Hira; Watson, Kathy; Nguyen, Nga; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Jago, Russell; Cullen, Karen W.; Baranowski, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates the relationship of goal setting to low-fat vegetable (LV) and fruit/100% juice (FJ) consumption and physical activity (PA) change. Methods: A total of 473 10- to 14-year-old Boy Scouts from Houston took part in a 9-week intervention. A two-group (LV and FJ or PA) intervention design was used with each group…

  4. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  5. Vocational Education Approach: New TEL Settings--New Prospects for Teachers' Instructional Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hämäläinen, Raija; De Wever, Bram

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on vocational education teachers' instructional activities in a new technology-enhanced learning (TEL) setting. A content analysis is applied to investigate teachers' and students' interactions in a 3D game context. The findings illustrate that when teachers' and students' interactions are mediated by a…

  6. 3D Printing in Instructional Settings: Identifying a Curricular Hierarchy of Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abbie

    2015-01-01

    A report of a year-long study in which the author engaged in 3D printing activity in order to determine how to facilitate and support skill building, concept attainment, and increased confidence with its use among teachers. Use of 3D printing tools and their applications in instructional settings are discussed. A hierarchy of 3D printing…

  7. Graduated Exposure and Positive Reinforcement to Overcome Setting and Activity Avoidance in an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Luiselli, James K.; Rue, Hanna; Whalley, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Some students who have developmental disabilities avoid settings and activities that can improve their learning and quality of life. This two-phase study concerned an adolescent boy with autism who avoided the gross-motor exercise room, gymnasium, and music room at his school; he demonstrated distress, agitation, and problem behaviors when…

  8. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  9. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  10. Sharing Attention and Activities among Toddlers: The Spatial Dimension of the Setting and the Educator's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musatti, Tullia; Mayer, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    The study proposes an analysis of the processes through which the material and symbolic features of the setting and the activities of the educators interact to determine the children's experience in an early educational centre. This analysis is of particular interest with regard to both educational practice and understanding developmental…

  11. Cold seep epifaunal communities on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand: composition, succession, and vulnerability to human activities.

    PubMed

    Bowden, David A; Rowden, Ashley A; Thurber, Andrew R; Baco, Amy R; Levin, Lisa A; Smith, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep communities with distinctive chemoautotrophic fauna occur where hydrocarbon-rich fluids escape from the seabed. We describe community composition, population densities, spatial extent, and within-region variability of epifaunal communities at methane-rich cold seep sites on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. Using data from towed camera transects, we match observations to information about the probable life-history characteristics of the principal fauna to develop a hypothetical succession sequence for the Hikurangi seep communities, from the onset of fluid flux to senescence. New Zealand seep communities exhibit taxa characteristic of seeps in other regions, including predominance of large siboglinid tubeworms, vesicomyid clams, and bathymodiolin mussels. Some aspects appear to be novel; however, particularly the association of dense populations of ampharetid polychaetes with high-sulphide, high-methane flux, soft-sediment microhabitats. The common occurrence of these ampharetids suggests they play a role in conditioning sulphide-rich sediments at the sediment-water interface, thus facilitating settlement of clam and tubeworm taxa which dominate space during later successional stages. The seep sites are subject to disturbance from bottom trawling at present and potentially from gas hydrate extraction in future. The likely life-history characteristics of the dominant megafauna suggest that while ampharetids, clams, and mussels exploit ephemeral resources through rapid growth and reproduction, lamellibrachid tubeworm populations may persist potentially for centuries. The potential consequences of gas hydrate extraction cannot be fully assessed until extraction methods and target localities are defined but any long-term modification of fluid flow to seep sites would have consequences for all chemoautotrophic fauna. PMID:24204691

  12. Cold Seep Epifaunal Communities on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand: Composition, Succession, and Vulnerability to Human Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, David A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Thurber, Andrew R.; Baco, Amy R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Smith, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep communities with distinctive chemoautotrophic fauna occur where hydrocarbon-rich fluids escape from the seabed. We describe community composition, population densities, spatial extent, and within-region variability of epifaunal communities at methane-rich cold seep sites on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. Using data from towed camera transects, we match observations to information about the probable life-history characteristics of the principal fauna to develop a hypothetical succession sequence for the Hikurangi seep communities, from the onset of fluid flux to senescence. New Zealand seep communities exhibit taxa characteristic of seeps in other regions, including predominance of large siboglinid tubeworms, vesicomyid clams, and bathymodiolin mussels. Some aspects appear to be novel; however, particularly the association of dense populations of ampharetid polychaetes with high-sulphide, high-methane flux, soft-sediment microhabitats. The common occurrence of these ampharetids suggests they play a role in conditioning sulphide-rich sediments at the sediment-water interface, thus facilitating settlement of clam and tubeworm taxa which dominate space during later successional stages. The seep sites are subject to disturbance from bottom trawling at present and potentially from gas hydrate extraction in future. The likely life-history characteristics of the dominant megafauna suggest that while ampharetids, clams, and mussels exploit ephemeral resources through rapid growth and reproduction, lamellibrachid tubeworm populations may persist potentially for centuries. The potential consequences of gas hydrate extraction cannot be fully assessed until extraction methods and target localities are defined but any long-term modification of fluid flow to seep sites would have consequences for all chemoautotrophic fauna. PMID:24204691

  13. Peer assisted learning in the clinical setting: an activity systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational interventions in ways that are practical and meaningful. We describe the evaluation of a PAL intervention, introduced to support students' transition into full time clinical attachments, using activity theory and activity systems analysis (ASA). Our research question was How does PAL transfer to the clinical environment? Junior students on their first clinical attachments undertook a weekly same-level, reciprocal PAL activity. Qualitative data was collected after each session, and focus groups (n = 3) were held on completion. Data was analysed using ASA. ASA revealed two competing activity systems on clinical attachment; Learning from Experts, which students saw as the primary function of the attachment and Learning with Peers, the PAL intervention. The latter took time from the first and was in tension with it. Tensions arose from student beliefs about how learning takes place in clinical settings, and the importance of social relationships, leading to variable engagement with PAL. Differing perspectives within the group were opportunities for expansive learning. PAL in the clinical environment presents challenges specific to that context. Using ASA helped to describe student activity on clinical attachment and to highlight tensions and contradictions relating PAL in that setting. Planning learning opportunities on clinical placements, must take account of how students learn in workplaces, and the complexity of the multiple competing activity systems related to learning and social activities.

  14. Abstracts in Adapted Physical Activity (AAPA). Volume I: Research on Mentally Handicapped Individuals in Relation to Physical Activity Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Michael J.

    The bibliography contains 150 annotated citations of research articles on individuals with mental retardation who were studied in relation to their physical activity settings. Citations provide information on the title, author, journal or related document in which the article appears, and the content or focus of the article. Citations are indexed…

  15. Does pedometer goal setting improve physical activity among Native elders? Results from a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Craig N; Russo, Joan E; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant between-group differences were found, within-group analyses indicated that elders significantly improved on the majority of step count, physical activity, health-related quality of life, and 6-minute walk outcomes.

  16. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  17. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  18. Accessible cultural mind-set modulates default mode activity: evidence for the culturally situated brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenbo; Oyserman, Daphna; Liu, Qiang; Li, Hong; Han, Shihui

    2013-01-01

    Self-construal priming modulates human behavior and associated neural activity. However, the neural activity associated with the self-construal priming procedure itself remains unknown. It is also unclear whether and how self-construal priming affects neural activity prior to engaging in a particular task. To address this gap, we scanned Chinese adults, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, during self-construal priming and a following resting state. We found that, relative to a calculation task, both interdependent and independent self-construal priming activated the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The contrast of interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming also revealed increased activity in the dorsal MPFC and left middle frontal cortex. The regional homogeneity analysis of the resting-state activity revealed increased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the dorsal MPFC but decreased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the PCC when contrasting interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming. The functional connectivity analysis of the resting-state activity, however, did not show significant difference in synchronization of activities in remote brain regions between different priming conditions. Our findings suggest that accessible collectivistic/individualistic mind-set induced by self-construal priming is associated with modulations of both task-related and resting-state activity in the default mode network.

  19. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  20. Histone H4 Lys 20 monomethylation by histone methylase SET8 mediates Wnt target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenfei; Nie, Fen; Wang, Sheng; Li, Lin

    2011-02-22

    Histone methylation has an important role in transcriptional regulation. However, unlike H3K4 and H3K9 methylation, the role of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me-1) in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here, we show that Wnt3a specifically stimulates H4K20 monomethylation at the T cell factor (TCF)-binding element through the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, SET8 is crucial for activation of the Wnt reporter gene and target genes in both mammalian cells and zebrafish. Furthermore, SET8 interacts with lymphoid enhancing factor-1 (LEF1)/TCF4 directly, and this interaction is regulated by Wnt3a. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is a Wnt signaling mediator and is recruited by LEF1/TCF4 to regulate the transcription of Wnt-activated genes, possibly through H4K20 monomethylation at the target gene promoters. Our findings also indicate that H4K20me-1 is a marker for gene transcription activation, at least in canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:21282610

  1. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    PubMed Central

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

  2. Meteorological conditions are associated with physical activities performed in open-air settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suminski, Richard R.; Poston, Walker C.; Market, Patrick; Hyder, Melissa; Sara, Pyle A.

    2008-01-01

    Meteorological conditions (MC) are believed to modify physical activity. However, studies in this area are limited and none have looked at the associations between MC and physical activity in open-air settings. Therefore, we examined the relationships between MC and physical activities performed on sidewalks/streets and outdoor oval tracks. Observation techniques were used to count individuals walking to school, exercising on oval tracks and walking/jogging/biking on sidewalks/streets. Meteorological conditions were obtained from an Automated Surface Observing System located at a nearby airport for the same time periods physical activities were observed. On weekdays, fewer children were seen walking to school and more bicyclists were observed on sidewalks/streets as wind speed increased ( p < 0.05). Ambient and apparent temperatures were positively ( p < 0.05) and humidity and barometric pressure negatively ( p < 0.005) related to the number of individuals walking on the track. Meteorological conditions were not significantly associated with physical activities observed on weekends. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that apparent temperature (+), barometric pressure (-) and dew point (-) accounted for 58.0% of the variance in the number of walkers on the track. A significant proportion of the variance (>30%) in the number of joggers and the length of time they jogged was accounted for by apparent temperature (+) and dew point (-). We found that meteorological conditions are related to physical activity in open-air settings. The results embellish the context in which environmental-physical activity relationships should be interpreted and provide important information for researchers applying the observation method in open-air settings.

  3. Continental Margins: Linking Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly-Gerreyn, Boris; Rabalais, Nancy; Middelburg, Jack; Roy, Sylvie; Liu, Kon-Kee; Thomas, Helmuth; Zhang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    Impacts of Global, Local and Human Forcings on Biogeochemical Cycles and Ecosystems, IMBER/LOICZ Continental Margins Open Science Conference; Shanghai, China, 17-21 September 2007; More than 100 scientists from 25 countries came together to address global, regional, local, and human pressures interactively affecting continental margin biogeochemical cycles, marine food webs, and society. Continental margins cover only 12% of the global ocean area yet account for more than 30% of global oceanic primary production. In addition, continental margins are the most intensely used regions of the world's ocean for natural commodities, including productive fisheries and mineral and petroleum resources. The land adjacent to continental margins hosts about 50% of the world's population, which will bear many direct impacts of global change on coastal margins. Understanding both natural and human-influenced alterations of biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems on continental margins and the processes (including feedbacks) that threaten sustainability of these systems is therefore of global interest.

  4. Perspectives and experiences related to physical activity of elders in long-term-care settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Flesner, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated individual and situational factors influencing physical activity (PA) practices of elders in residential-care/assisted-living (RC/AL) communities. This article describes the results of focus-group interviews involving 47 residents across 6 RC/AL settings. Thematic analysis revealed 6 themes: staying active, past PA experiences, value of PA, barriers to PA, strategies to facilitate PA, and support needs to promote PA. Staying active meant walking indoors and out, attending chair-exercise programs, performing professionally prescribed home exercises, and using available exercise equipment. Past PA experiences shaped current preferences and practices. Participants agreed that exercise helped maintain physical functioning but recounted cognitive and situational barriers to PA. Lack of dedicated exercise space and short corridors hampered efforts to stay active. Participants wished for individualized home exercise programs and supervised exercise sessions. Future research should examine the extent to which the physical environment and PA programming in RC/AL communities affect elders' PA.

  5. Deep Crustal Structure of S-Atlantic Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Schnabel, M.; Franke, D.; Heyde, I.; Schreckenberger, B.; Koopmann, H.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure along the southern South Atlantic margins with a focus on the high velocity lower crustal bodies (HVLC). This is a distinct zone at the base of the crust, where seismic P-wave velocities exceed 7.0 km/s and locally reach values up to 7.7 km/s. The study is based on a selected set of refraction seismic lines on conjugate margin segments of Uruguay-Argentina and Namibia-South Africa, acquired during marine geophysical cruises in 2004 and 1998. We performed new P-wave tomography complemented with gravity modeling along two crustal transects, and combine these with previous seismic and gravity models. The results are used to examine the interplay of rifting and magmatism during the evolution of the South Atlantic, what activated the spreading phase and how this is reflected in the distribution of high velocity lower crust. On all sections we observe HVLC, even on a magma poor southernmost section at the western margin. The HVLC varies strongly in shape and size along the margin. From South to North the area of the HVLC on 2D velocity sections increases on both margins. However, the HVLC bodies along the South American margin are much smaller than on the South African margin, possibly indicating asymmetric break up. A striking feature is the distinct seaward shift of the HVLC relative to the seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). While in the south, the HVLC is situated below the SDRs, towards the north the HVLC formed seaward of the SDRs. From this seaward migration we infer that the formation of HVLC in the magma-rich northern sections may have formed at least partly after rifting and break up.

  6. Zircon from Mesoproterozoic sediments sheds light on the subduction-collision history at the eastern active continental margin of the Archaean Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.; Storey, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (East Antarctica) was a part of the Archean Kalahari Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. Granite from the basement of the craton has been dated by U-Pb zircon dating to 3,067 Ma with inherited grains showing ages of up to 3,433 Ma [1]. At the eastern margin of the craton, the Ahlmannryggen nunataks comprise an ~2000 m thick pile of clastic and volcanic sediments of the Ritscherflya Supergroup. These were sourced from eroding a proximal active continental arc as demonstrated through the age distribution and internal zoning of detrital zircon [2]. Detrital zircon grains from the Ritscherflya Supergroup show an age distribution with a dominant age peak at ~1,130 Ma, i.e., close to the sedimentation age. Older age peaks include those at 1370 Ma, 1725 Ma, 1880 Ma, 2050 Ma, and 2700 Ma. Palaeo- and Mesoarchaean zircon grains (2800-3445 Ma) were also discovered, corresponding to the age of the Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton basement. Most significantly we found a number of inherited Archaean cores in ~1130 Ma zircons. They demonstrate that the volcanic arc was indeed located on Archaean continental crust, rather than in Mesoproterozoic, intra-oceanic island arcs. The age spectrum of the zircons bears strong evidence for (i) derivation of the entire Ritscherflya sediment sequence from an active continental convergent margin; (ii) a cratonic provenance of part of the sediments from population peaks coinciding with major tectono-thermal events in the Kalahari Craton; (iii) at least some of the active volcanism being located on cratonic basement rather than a juvenile island arc. Detrital zircons in the ~1130 Ma age group show several distinct populations in their Hf isotopic compositions. The dominant group shows negative ɛHf values of -11.5 corresponding to a model age (TDM) of ~2700 Ma (average crustal 176Lu/177Hf = 0.015). A smaller group shows ɛHf values of +2 to +6, which may represent mantle-derived subduction-zone volcanism at

  7. Methane efflux from marine sediments in passive and active margins: Estimations from bioenergetic reaction-transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Van Cappellen, P.; Aguilera, D. R.; Regnier, P.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified version of a kinetic-bioenergetic reaction model for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments [Dale, A.W., Regnier, P., Van Cappellen, P., 2006. Bioenergetic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in coastal marine sediments: a theoretical analysis. Am. J. Sci. 306, 246-294.] is used to assess the impact of transport processes on biomass distributions, AOM rates and methane release fluxes from the sea floor. The model explicitly represents the functional microbial groups and the kinetic and bioenergetic limitations of the microbial metabolic pathways involved in AOM. Model simulations illustrate the dominant control exerted by the transport regime on the activity and abundance of AOM communities. Upward fluid flow at active seep systems restricts AOM to a narrow subsurface reaction zone and sustains high rates of methane oxidation. In contrast, pore-water transport dominated by molecular diffusion leads to deeper and broader zones of AOM, characterized by much lower rates and biomasses. Under steady-state conditions, less than 1% of the upward dissolved methane flux reaches the water column, irrespective of the transport regime. However, a sudden increase in the advective flux of dissolved methane, for example as a result of the destabilization of methane hydrates, causes a transient efflux of methane from the sediment. The benthic efflux of dissolved methane is due to the slow growth kinetics of the AOM community and lasts on the order of 60 years. This time window is likely too short to allow for a significant escape of pore-water methane following a large scale gas hydrate dissolution event such as the one that may have accompanied the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM).

  8. [Marginalization and health. Introduction].

    PubMed

    Yunes, J

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between marginalization and health is clear. In Mexico, for example, life expectancy is 53 years for the poorest population sectors and 20 years more for the wealthiest. Infant mortality in poor Colombian families is twice that of wealthier families, and one-third of developing countries the rural population is only half as likely as the urban to have access to health services. Women in the Southern hemisphere are 12 times likelier than those in the Northern to die of maternal causes. The most important step in arriving at a solution to the inequity may be to analyze in depth the relationship between marginality and health. Marginality may be defined as the lack of participation of individuals or groups in certain key phases of societal life, such as production, consumption, or political decision making. Marginality came to be viewed as a social problem only with recognition of the rights of all individuals to participate in available social goods. Marginality is always relative, and marginal groups exist because central groups determine the criteria for inclusion in the marginal and central groups. Marginality thus always refers to a concrete society at a specific historical moment. Marginal groups may be of various types. At present, marginal groups include women, rural populations, people with AIDS or mental illness or certain other health conditions, refugees, ethnic or religious groups, homosexuals, and the poor, who are the largest group of marginal persons in the world. Even in developed countries, 100-200 million persons live below the poverty line. Latin America is struggling to emerge from its marginal status in the world. The economic crisis of the 1980s increased poverty in the region, and 40% are not considered impoverished. Latin America is a clear example of the relationship between marginality and health. Its epidemiologic profile is intimately related to nutrition, availability of potable water, housing, and environmental

  9. [Marginalization and health. Introduction].

    PubMed

    Yunes, J

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between marginalization and health is clear. In Mexico, for example, life expectancy is 53 years for the poorest population sectors and 20 years more for the wealthiest. Infant mortality in poor Colombian families is twice that of wealthier families, and one-third of developing countries the rural population is only half as likely as the urban to have access to health services. Women in the Southern hemisphere are 12 times likelier than those in the Northern to die of maternal causes. The most important step in arriving at a solution to the inequity may be to analyze in depth the relationship between marginality and health. Marginality may be defined as the lack of participation of individuals or groups in certain key phases of societal life, such as production, consumption, or political decision making. Marginality came to be viewed as a social problem only with recognition of the rights of all individuals to participate in available social goods. Marginality is always relative, and marginal groups exist because central groups determine the criteria for inclusion in the marginal and central groups. Marginality thus always refers to a concrete society at a specific historical moment. Marginal groups may be of various types. At present, marginal groups include women, rural populations, people with AIDS or mental illness or certain other health conditions, refugees, ethnic or religious groups, homosexuals, and the poor, who are the largest group of marginal persons in the world. Even in developed countries, 100-200 million persons live below the poverty line. Latin America is struggling to emerge from its marginal status in the world. The economic crisis of the 1980s increased poverty in the region, and 40% are not considered impoverished. Latin America is a clear example of the relationship between marginality and health. Its epidemiologic profile is intimately related to nutrition, availability of potable water, housing, and environmental

  10. Active Commuting Behaviors in a Nordic Metropolitan Setting in Relation to Modality, Gender, and Health Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Stigell, Erik; Schantz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting between home and place of work or study is often cited as an interesting source of physical activity in a public health perspective. However, knowledge about these behaviors is meager. This was therefore studied in adult active commuters (n = 1872) in Greater Stockholm, Sweden, a Nordic metropolitan setting. They received questionnaires and individually adjusted maps to draw their normal commuting route. Three different modality groups were identified in men and women: single-mode cyclists and pedestrians (those who only cycle or walk, respectively) and dual-mode commuters (those who alternately walk or cycle). Some gender differences were observed in trip distances, frequencies, and velocities. A large majority of the commuting trip durations met the minimum health recommendation of at least 10-minute-long activity bouts. The median single-mode pedestrians and dual-mode commuters met or were close to the recommended weekly physical activity levels of at least 150 minutes most of the year, whereas the single-mode cyclists did so only during spring–mid-fall. A high total number of trips per year (range of medians: 231–389) adds to the value in a health perspective. To fully grasp active commuting behaviors in future studies, both walking and cycling should be assessed over different seasons and ideally over the whole year. PMID:26690193

  11. Stability margins for Hurwitz polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapellat, Herve; Bhattacharyya, S. P.; Keel, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors treat the robust stability issue using the characteristic polynomial, for two different cases: first in coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficient of the characteristic polynomial; and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l-(squared) stability margin for both the monic and nonmonic cases. Following this, a method is given to find the l(infinity) margin, and the method is extended to reveal much larger stability regions. In parameter space the authors consider all single-input (multi-output) or single-output (multi-input) systems with a fixed controller and a plant described by a set of transfer functions which are ratios of polynomials with variable coefficients. A procedure is presented to calculate the radius of the largest stability ball in the space of these variable parameters. The calculation serves as a stability margin for the control system. The formulas that result are quasi-closed-form expressions for the stability margin and are computationally efficient.

  12. Generalized locality preserving Maxi-Min Margin Machine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhancheng; Choi, Kup-Sze; Luo, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shitong

    2012-12-01

    Research on large margin classifiers from the "local" and "global" view has become an active topic in machine learning and pattern recognition. Inspired from the typical local and global learning machine Maxi-Min Margin Machine (M⁴) and the idea of the Locality Preserving Projections (LPP), we propose a novel large margin classifier, the Generalized Locality Preserving Maxi-Min Margin Machine (GLPM), where the within-class matrices are constructed using the labeled training points in a supervised way, and then used to build the classifier. The within-class matrices of GLPM preserve the intra-class manifold in the training sets, as well as the covariance matrices which indicate the global projection direction in the M⁴ model. Moreover, the connections among GLPM, M⁴ and LFDA are theoretically analyzed, and we show that GLPM can be considered as a generalized M⁴ machine. The GLPM is also more robust since it requires no assumption on data distribution while Gaussian data distribution is assumed in the M⁴ machine. Experiments on data sets from the machine learning repository demonstrate its advantage over M⁴ in both local and global learning performance.

  13. On the Relationship between Variational Level Set-Based and SOM-Based Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamea, Mohammed M; Gnecco, Giorgio; Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Elyan, Eyad

    2015-01-01

    Most Active Contour Models (ACMs) deal with the image segmentation problem as a functional optimization problem, as they work on dividing an image into several regions by optimizing a suitable functional. Among ACMs, variational level set methods have been used to build an active contour with the aim of modeling arbitrarily complex shapes. Moreover, they can handle also topological changes of the contours. Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) have attracted the attention of many computer vision scientists, particularly in modeling an active contour based on the idea of utilizing the prototypes (weights) of a SOM to control the evolution of the contour. SOM-based models have been proposed in general with the aim of exploiting the specific ability of SOMs to learn the edge-map information via their topology preservation property and overcoming some drawbacks of other ACMs, such as trapping into local minima of the image energy functional to be minimized in such models. In this survey, we illustrate the main concepts of variational level set-based ACMs, SOM-based ACMs, and their relationship and review in a comprehensive fashion the development of their state-of-the-art models from a machine learning perspective, with a focus on their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25960736

  14. On the Relationship between Variational Level Set-Based and SOM-Based Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsamea, Mohammed M.; Gnecco, Giorgio; Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Elyan, Eyad

    2015-01-01

    Most Active Contour Models (ACMs) deal with the image segmentation problem as a functional optimization problem, as they work on dividing an image into several regions by optimizing a suitable functional. Among ACMs, variational level set methods have been used to build an active contour with the aim of modeling arbitrarily complex shapes. Moreover, they can handle also topological changes of the contours. Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) have attracted the attention of many computer vision scientists, particularly in modeling an active contour based on the idea of utilizing the prototypes (weights) of a SOM to control the evolution of the contour. SOM-based models have been proposed in general with the aim of exploiting the specific ability of SOMs to learn the edge-map information via their topology preservation property and overcoming some drawbacks of other ACMs, such as trapping into local minima of the image energy functional to be minimized in such models. In this survey, we illustrate the main concepts of variational level set-based ACMs, SOM-based ACMs, and their relationship and review in a comprehensive fashion the development of their state-of-the-art models from a machine learning perspective, with a focus on their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25960736

  15. Exploring Daily Physical Activity and Nutrition Patterns in Early Learning Settings: Snapshots of Young Children in Head Start, Primary, and After-School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegelin, Dolores A.; Anderson, Denise; Kemper, Karen; Wagner, Jennifer; Evans, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to gain a greater understanding of daily routines of 4-7 year olds regarding physical activity and nutrition practices in typical early learning environments. The settings selected for this observational study included Head Start, primary, and after-school learning environments in a city in the southeast.…

  16. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available Taenia solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to E. granulosus Ag5 protein. The Taenia solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis. PMID:21893105

  17. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available T. solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to Echinococcus granulosus Ag5 protein. The T. solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis.

  18. Modeling aerosol activation in a tropical, orographic, island setting: Sensitivity tests and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Storelvmo, T.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol, updraft and cloud droplet observations from the 2011 Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) field campaign provide an interesting opportunity to investigate the process of cloud droplet activation in a tropical, orographic, convective setting. This study involves adiabatic parcel model simulations with a state-of-the-art parameterization of droplet activation, which we run with aerosol size distributions and updraft velocities based on DOMEX data. We compare the cloud droplet concentrations predicted by the parameterization with the observations from DOMEX, and run various sensitivity tests to changes in model inputs on the order of their uncertainty, in order to gain insights into what factors are most important in determining the aerosol activation fraction in this setting. Our control simulations overestimated the observed droplet concentrations, especially for the days with strong trade winds, but in most cases these discrepancies could be eliminated by realistic changes in our assumptions. The remaining error could be the result of entrainment of sub-saturated air, precipitation, or advection of pre-existing clouds from upwind. We found strong sensitivities to the mean updraft velocity and to the size distribution and composition of particles in the Aitken mode, the smallest mode including particles below 100 nm. The Aitken mode accounted for 42% to 68% of the simulated droplet concentration in our control simulations, and simulations excluding the Aitken mode underestimated the observed droplet concentrations under realistic assumptions. Droplets from the Aitken mode dominated the changes in the simulated droplet concentrations in our sensitivity tests. The precision of our simulations, and our ability to constrain the role of the Aitken mode, were limited by our lack of knowledge of the composition and size distribution of Aitken mode particles, highlighting the importance of measuring these variables in field campaigns in similar settings.

  19. Closing the North American Carbon Budget: Continental Margin Fluxes Matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, R.; Benway, H. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Boyer, E. W.; Cai, W. J.; Coble, P. G.; Cross, J. N.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Goni, M. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Herrmann, M.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Mathis, J. T.; McKinley, G. A.; Pilskaln, C. H.; Smith, R. A.; Alin, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, continental margins are regions of intense carbon and nutrient processing, export and exchange, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles. In response to recommendations for regional synthesis and carbon budget estimation for North America put forth in the North American Continental Margins workshop report (Hales et al., 2008), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program and North American Carbon Program (NACP) began coordinating a series of collaborative, interdisciplinary Coastal CARbon Synthesis (CCARS) research activities in five coastal regions of North America (Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, Gulf of Mexico, Arctic, Laurentian Great Lakes) to improve quantitative assessments of the North American carbon budget. CCARS workshops and collaborative research activities have resulted in the development of regional coastal carbon budgets based on recent literature- and model-based estimates of major carbon fluxes with estimated uncertainties. Numerous peer-reviewed papers and presentations by involved researchers have highlighted these findings and provided more in-depth analyses of processes underlying key carbon fluxes in continental margin systems. As a culminating outcome of these synthesis efforts, a comprehensive science plan highlights key knowledge gaps identified during this synthesis and provides explicit guidance on future research and observing priorities in continental margin systems to help inform future agency investments in continental margins research. This presentation will provide an overview of regional and flux-based (terrestrial inputs, biological transformations, sedimentary processes, atmospheric exchanges, lateral carbon transport) synthesis findings and key recommendations in the science plan, as well as a set of overarching priorities and recommendations on observations and modeling approaches for continental margin systems.

  20. Negative role of TAK1 in marginal zone B-cell development incidental to NF-κB noncanonical pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Hisaaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is crucial in B-cell physiology. One key molecule regulating this pathway is the serine/threonine kinase TAK1 (MAP3K7). TAK1 is responsible for positive feedback mechanisms in B-cell receptor signaling that serve as an NF-κB activation threshold. This study aimed to better understand the correlation between TAK1-mediated signaling and B-cell development and humoral immune responses. Here we showed that a B-cell conditional deletion of TAK1 using mb1-cre resulted in a dramatic elimination of the humoral immune response, consistent with the absence of the B-1 B-cell subset. When monitoring the self-reactive B-cell system (the immunoglobulin hen egg lysozyme/soluble hen egg lysozyme double-transgenic mouse model), we found that TAK1-deficient B cells exhibited an enhanced susceptibility to cell death that might explain the disappearance of the B1 subset. In contrast, these mice gained numerous marginal zone (MZ) B cells. We consequently examined the basal and B-cell receptor-induced activity of NF-κB2 that is reported to regulate MZ B-cell development, and demonstrated that the activity of NF-κB2 increased in TAK1-deficient B cells. Thus, our results present a novel in vivo function, the negative role of TAK1 in MZ B-cell development that is likely associated with NF-κB2 activation. PMID:27121163

  1. Effectiveness of Active-Online, an Individually Tailored Physical Activity Intervention, in a Real-Life Setting: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Diener, Eva; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bauer, Georg; Martin, Brian W

    2009-01-01

    Background Effective interventions are needed to reduce the chronic disease epidemic. The Internet has the potential to provide large populations with individual advice at relatively low cost. Objective The focus of the study was the Web-based tailored physical activity intervention Active-online. The main research questions were (1) How effective is Active-online, compared to a nontailored website, in increasing self-reported and objectively measured physical activity levels in the general population when delivered in a real-life setting? (2) Do respondents recruited for the randomized study differ from spontaneous users of Active-online, and how does effectiveness differ between these groups? (3) What is the impact of frequency and duration of use of Active-online on changes in physical activity behavior? Methods Volunteers recruited via different media channels completed a Web-based baseline survey and were randomized to Active-online (intervention group) or a nontailored website (control group). In addition, spontaneous users were recruited directly from the Active-online website. In a subgroup of participants, physical activity was measured objectively using accelerometers. Follow-up assessments took place 6 weeks (FU1), 6 months (FU2), and 13 months (FU3) after baseline. Results A total of 1531 respondents completed the baseline questionnaire (intervention group n = 681, control group n = 688, spontaneous users n = 162); 133 individuals had valid accelerometer data at baseline. Mean age of the total sample was 43.7 years, and 1146 (74.9%) were women. Mixed linear models (adjusted for sex, age, BMI category, and stage of change) showed a significant increase in self-reported mean minutes spent in moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity from baseline to FU1 (coefficient = 0.14, P = .001) and to FU3 (coefficient = 0.19, P < .001) in all participants with no significant differences between groups. A significant increase in the proportion of individuals meeting

  2. The cost of changing physical activity behaviour: evidence from a "physical activity pathway" in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 'Physical Activity Care Pathway' (a Pilot for the 'Let's Get Moving' policy) is a systematic approach to integrating physical activity promotion into the primary care setting. It combines several methods reported to support behavioural change, including brief interventions, motivational interviewing, goal setting, providing written resources, and follow-up support. This paper compares costs falling on the UK National Health Service (NHS) of implementing the care pathway using two different recruitment strategies and provides initial insights into the cost of changing physical activity behaviour. Methods A combination of a time driven variant of activity based costing, audit data through EMIS and a survey of practice managers provided patient-level cost data for 411 screened individuals. Self reported physical activity data of 70 people completing the care pathway at three month was compared with baseline using a regression based 'difference in differences' approach. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses in combination with hypothesis testing were used to judge how robust findings are to key assumptions and to assess the uncertainty around estimates of the cost of changing physical activity behaviour. Results It cost £53 (SD 7.8) per patient completing the PACP in opportunistic centres and £191 (SD 39) at disease register sites. The completer rate was higher in disease register centres (27.3% vs. 16.2%) and the difference in differences in time spent on physical activity was 81.32 (SE 17.16) minutes/week in patients completing the PACP; so that the incremental cost of converting one sedentary adult to an 'active state' of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week amounts to £ 886.50 in disease register practices, compared to opportunistic screening. Conclusions Disease register screening is more costly than opportunistic patient recruitment. However, additional costs come with a higher completion rate and better

  3. Everyday science & science every day: Science-related talk & activities across settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Heather

    To understand the development of science-related thinking, acting, and learning in middle childhood, I studied youth in schools, homes, and other neighborhood settings over a three-year period. The research goal was to analyze how multiple everyday experiences influence children's participation in science-related practices and their thinking about science and scientists. Ethnographic and interaction analysis methodologies were to study the cognition and social interactions of the children as they participated in activities with peers, family, and teachers (n=128). Interviews and participant self-documentation protocols elucidated the participants' understandings of science. An Everyday Expertise (Bell et al., 2006) theoretical framework was employed to study the development of science understandings on three analytical planes: individual learner, social groups, and societal/community resources. Findings came from a cross-case analysis of urban science learners and from two within-case analyses of girls' science-related practices as they transitioned from elementary to middle school. Results included: (1) children participated actively in science across settings---including in their homes as well as in schools, (2) children's interests in science were not always aligned to the school science content, pedagogy, or school structures for participation, yet children found ways to engage with science despite these differences through crafting multiple pathways into science, (3) urban parents were active supporters of STEM-related learning environments through brokering access to social and material resources, (4) the youth often found science in their daily activities that formal education did not make use of, and (5) children's involvement with science-related practices can be developed into design principles to reach youth in culturally relevant ways.

  4. Developmental relationships as the active ingredient: a unifying working hypothesis of "what works" across intervention settings.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlei; Julian, Megan M

    2012-04-01

    Developmental relationships are characterized by reciprocal human interactions that embody an enduring emotional attachment, progressively more complex patterns of joint activity, and a balance of power that gradually shifts from the developed person in favor of the developing person. The working hypothesis of this article is that developmental relationships constitute the active ingredient of effective interventions serving at-risk children and youth across settings. In the absence of developmental relationships, other intervention elements yield diminished or minimal returns. Scaled-up programs and policies serving children and youth often fall short of their potential impact when their designs or implementation drift toward manipulating other "inactive" ingredients (e.g., incentive, accountability, curricula) instead of directly promoting developmental relationships. Using empirical studies as case examples, this study demonstrates that the presence or absence of developmental relationships distinguishes effective and ineffective interventions for diverse populations across developmental settings. The conclusion is that developmental relationships are the foundational metric with which to judge the quality and forecast the impact of interventions for at-risk children and youth. It is both critical and possible to give foremost considerations to whether program, practice, and policy decisions promote or hinder developmental relationships among those who are served and those who serve.

  5. Effect of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Howashi, G; Kanetou, T; Masumi, S; Ueno, O; Fujii, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting. The materials used were four commercially available photo-activated composite resins. Three light-irradiation instruments were selected and prepared so as to obtain four light intensities (200, 480, 800 and 1600 mW cm(-2)). The linear shrinkage during setting was examined 10 min after light irradiation using a trial balance plastometer, and the specimen thickness was 2.0 mm for all materials. The depth of cure was examined according to the test method described in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/FDIS 4049: 2000(E)). In measuring the linear shrinkage 60 s from the start of light irradiation for 10 s, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.89-0.94) between the amount of linear shrinkage and the light intensity: an increase in light intensity produced a greater linear shrinkage. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.92-1.0) between the linear shrinkage and the irradiation time: an increase in irradiation time resulted in a greater linear shrinkage. Values of the depth of cure ranged from 1.69 to 3.75 mm. PMID:15634297

  6. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture. PMID:27650071

  7. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-21

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture.

  8. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Eszter C.; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture. PMID:27650071

  9. Colorado Basin Structure and Rifting, Argentine passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autin, Julia; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Loegering, Markus; Anka, Zahie; Vallejo, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Jorge; Marchal, Denis; Reichert, Christian; di Primio, Rolando

    2010-05-01

    partly supports this hypothesis and shows two main directions of faulting: margin-parallel faults (~N30°) and rift-parallel faults (~N125°). A specific distribution of the two fault sets is observed: margin-parallel faults are restrained to the most distal part of the margin. Starting with a 3D structural model of the basin fill based on seismic and well data the deeper structure of the crust beneath the Colorado Basin can be evaluate using isostatic and thermal modelling. Franke, D., et al. (2002), Deep Crustal Structure Of The Argentine Continental Margin From Seismic Wide-Angle And Multichannel Reflection Seismic Data, paper presented at AAPG Hedberg Conference "Hydrocarbon Habitat of Volcanic Rifted Passive Margins", Stavanger, Norway Franke, D., et al. (2006), Crustal structure across the Colorado Basin, offshore Argentina Geophysical Journal International 165, 850-864. Gladczenko, T. P., et al. (1997), South Atlantic volcanic margins Journal of the Geological Society, London 154, 465-470. Hinz, K., et al. (1999), The Argentine continental margin north of 48°S: sedimentary successions, volcanic activity during breakup Marine and Petroleum Geology 16(1-25). Hirsch, K. K., et al. (2009), Tectonic subsidence history and thermal evolution of the Orange Basin, Marine and Petroleum Geology, in press, doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2009.1006.1009

  10. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lushuai; Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia; Han, Xiao; Li, Xiaohua; Niu, Yuanjie; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yingli

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  11. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  12. Gene-set activity toolbox (GAT): A platform for microarray-based cancer diagnosis using an integrative gene-set analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Engchuan, Worrawat; Meechai, Asawin; Tongsima, Sissades; Doungpan, Narumol; Chan, Jonathan H

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that cannot be diagnosed reliably using only single gene expression analysis. Using gene-set analysis on high throughput gene expression profiling controlled by various environmental factors is a commonly adopted technique used by the cancer research community. This work develops a comprehensive gene expression analysis tool (gene-set activity toolbox: (GAT)) that is implemented with data retriever, traditional data pre-processing, several gene-set analysis methods, network visualization and data mining tools. The gene-set analysis methods are used to identify subsets of phenotype-relevant genes that will be used to build a classification model. To evaluate GAT performance, we performed a cross-dataset validation study on three common cancers namely colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The results show that GAT can be used to build a reasonable disease diagnostic model and the predicted markers have biological relevance. GAT can be accessed from http://gat.sit.kmutt.ac.th where GAT's java library for gene-set analysis, simple classification and a database with three cancer benchmark datasets can be downloaded. PMID:27102089

  13. Late Pleistocene to Holocene sedimentation and hydrocarbon seeps on the continental shelf of a steep, tectonically active margin, southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Ryan, Holly F.; Wong, Florence L.; Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Small, steep, uplifting coastal watersheds are prolific sediment producers that contribute significantly to the global marine sediment budget. This study illustrates how sedimentation evolves in one such system where the continental shelf is largely sediment-starved, with most terrestrial sediment bypassing the shelf in favor of deposition in deeper basins. The Santa Barbara-Ventura coast of southern California, USA, is considered a classic area for the study of active tectonics and of Tertiary and Quaternary climatic evolution, interpretations of which depend upon an understanding of sedimentation patterns. High-resolution seismic-reflection data over >570 km2 of this shelf show that sediment production is concentrated in a few drainage basins, with the Ventura and Santa Clara River deltas containing most of the upper Pleistocene to Holocene sediment on the shelf. Away from those deltas, the major factor controlling shelf sedimentation is the interaction of wave energy with coastline geometry. Depocenters containing sediment 5-20 m thick exist opposite broad coastal embayments, whereas relict material (bedrock below a regional unconformity) is exposed at the sea floor in areas of the shelf opposite coastal headlands. Locally, natural hydrocarbon seeps interact with sediment deposition either to produce elevated tar-and-sediment mounds or as gas plumes that hinder sediment settling. As much as 80% of fluvial sediment delivered by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers is transported off the shelf (some into the Santa Barbara Basin and some into the Santa Monica Basin via Hueneme Canyon), leaving a shelf with relatively little recent sediment accumulation. Understanding factors that control large-scale sediment dispersal along a rapidly uplifting coast that produces substantial quantities of sediment has implications for interpreting the ancient stratigraphic record of active and transform continental margins, and for inferring the distribution of hydrocarbon resources

  14. Short- and long-term changes in anterior cingulate activation during resolution of task-set competition.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Todd S; Ruff, Christian C; Ngan, Elton T C

    2006-01-12

    Alternating between task sets involves detection that the current task set is unfavorable, initiation of a change in set, and application of the new task set while fine-tuning to optimally adjust to the demands of the environment. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of cognitive flexibility consistently report activation of the anterior cingulate cortex and/or adjacent pre-supplementary motor regions (ACC/pre-SMA, medial Brodmann's areas 24/32/6), suggesting that these cortical regions are involved in switching task set. In the current study, our objective was to probe whether ACC/pre-SMA activation would decrease for a number of trials following a switch in task set, implying longer-term involvement in fine-tuning adjustments. By measuring activation when switching between word reading and color naming in response to Stroop stimuli, ACC/pre-SMA activation was observed when actively countering the influence of the irrelevant task set, and this activation decreased as a function of the number of trials since a task switch. Basal ganglia and thalamic regions also displayed a decreased response over successive trials after task switches. These findings suggest that the ACC/pre-SMA are not only involved in generating a new course of action, but are also involved (along with subcortical regions) in fine-tuning operations that resolve competition between task sets over subsequent repetitions of the same task. PMID:16376861

  15. Shared Investment Projects and Forecasting Errors: Setting Framework Conditions for Coordination and Sequencing Data Quality Activities

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Brauneis, Alexander; Rausch, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments’ efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that—in some setups—a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm’s point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that—in particular for relatively good forecasters—most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model. PMID:25803736

  16. Shared investment projects and forecasting errors: setting framework conditions for coordination and sequencing data quality activities.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Stephan; Brauneis, Alexander; Rausch, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments' efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that-in some setups-a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm's point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that-in particular for relatively good forecasters-most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model. PMID:25803736

  17. Shared investment projects and forecasting errors: setting framework conditions for coordination and sequencing data quality activities.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Stephan; Brauneis, Alexander; Rausch, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments' efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that-in some setups-a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm's point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that-in particular for relatively good forecasters-most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model.

  18. Optically-Activated GaAs Switches for Ground Penetrating Radar and Firing Set Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, J.; Brown, D.J.; Carin, L.; Denison, G.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; O'Malley, M.W.; Rinehart, L.F.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1999-07-14

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different applications. TWO such applications are ground penetrating radar (GPR) and firing set switches. The ability of high gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSs) to deliver fast risetime pulses makes them suitable for their use in radars that rely on fast impulses. This type of direct time domain radar is uniquely suited for the detection of buried items because it can operate at low frequency, high average power, and close to the ground, greatly increasing power on target. We have demonstrated that a PCSs based system can be used to produce a bipolar waveform with a total duration of about 6 ns and with minimal ringing. Such a pulse is radiated and returns from a 55 gallon drum will be presented. For firing sets, the switch requirements include small size, high current, dc charging, radiation hardness and modest longevity. We have switched 1 kA at 1 kV and 2.8 kA at 3 kV dc charge.

  19. Multiprocessor speed-up, Amdahl's Law, and the Activity Set Model of parallel program behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelenbe, Erol

    1988-01-01

    An important issue in the effective use of parallel processing is the estimation of the speed-up one may expect as a function of the number of processors used. Amdahl's Law has traditionally provided a guideline to this issue, although it appears excessively pessimistic in the light of recent experimental results. In this note, Amdahl's Law is amended by giving a greater importance to the capacity of a program to make effective use of parallel processing, but also recognizing the fact that imbalance of the workload of each processor is bound to occur. An activity set model of parallel program behavior is then introduced along with the corresponding parallelism index of a program, leading to upper and lower bounds to the speed-up.

  20. An E3 ligase complex regulates SET-domain polycomb group protein activity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Cheol Woong; Roh, Hyungmin; Dang, Tuong Vi; Choi, Yang Do; Fischer, Robert L.; Lee, Jong Seob; Choi, Yeonhee

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional repression via methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) by the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is conserved in higher eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis PRC2 controls homeotic gene expression, flowering time, and gene imprinting. Although downstream target genes and the regulatory mechanism of PRC2 are well understood, much less is known about the significance of posttranslational regulation of PRC2 protein activity. Here, we show the posttranslational regulation of CURLY LEAF (CLF) SET-domain polycomb group (PcG) protein by the F-box protein, UPWARD CURLY LEAF1 (UCL1). Overexpression of UCL1 generates mutant phenotypes similar to those observed in plants with a loss-of-function mutation in the CLF gene. Leaf curling and early flowering phenotypes of UCL1 overexpression mutants, like clf mutants, are rescued by mutations in the AGAMOUS and FLOWERING LOCUS T genes, which is consistent with UCL1 and CLF functioning in the same genetic pathway. Overexpression of UCL1 reduces the level of CLF protein and alters expression and H3K27 methylation of CLF-target genes in transgenic plants, suggesting that UCL1 negatively regulates CLF. Interaction of UCL1 with CLF was detected in plant nuclei and in the yeast two-hybrid system. The UCL1 F-box binds in vivo to components of the E3 ligase complex, which ubiquitylate proteins that are subsequently degraded via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate the posttranslational regulation of the CLF SET-domain PcG activity by the UCL1 F-box protein in the E3 ligase complex. PMID:21518870

  1. Variable enzymatic activity of prokaryotes under different hydrological settings in a river floodplain of the Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieczko, Anna; Meisterl, Karin; Peduzzi, Peter

    2013-04-01

    This study tackles the role of different hydrological settings in a river-floodplain for organic matter processing by bacteria. Sampling locations in the Danube river-floodplain near Vienna (Austria) were chosen in a way that they represent a gradient of connectivity to the main river. We focused on the influence of variable hydrological connectivity and retention on microbial substrate utilization in the different subsystems of this river-floodplain section. We investigated extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) both associated with particles (PA) and in the ambient water (FL). The activity of six enzymes was assessed: enzymes involved in the metabolism of carbon (β-d-glucosidase, α-d-glucosidase, β-d-xylosidase, cellobiohydrolase), peptide (endopeptidase [Endo]) and for degradation of refractory lignin material (phenol oxidase [PhOx]). We hypothesized that the degree of connectivity and water exchange in floodplain lakes influences prokaryotic enzymatic activity and productivity both on particles and in the surrounding water. The strong correlation between endopeptidase and phenol oxidase of the FL fraction in all locations suggests a tight coupling of enzymes responsible for utilization of labile and refractory material. Our results indicate that particle-associated bacterial growth in frequently flooded locations was supported by allochthonous carbon derived from polysaccharide hydrolysis, whereas in isolated locations, bacterial biomass was fuelled with carbon obtained largely from lignin utilization. This implies that prolonged residence time in isolated locations allows more refractory material to be utilized. Most of the enzymes (PA and FL) did not show clear dependencies on the degree of connectivity. However, phenol oxidase displayed an interesting pattern: activity of PhOx in ambient water decreased, whereas PA PhOx increased, together with the degree of connectivity. The study also demonstrates enhanced metabolism of the PA bacterial community and a

  2. Robust Flutter Margin Analysis that Incorporates Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Martin J.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for computing worst-case flutter margins has been formulated in a robust stability framework. Uncertainty operators are included with a linear model to describe modeling errors and flight variations. The structured singular value, mu, computes a stability margin that directly accounts for these uncertainties. This approach introduces a new method of computing flutter margins and an associated new parameter for describing these margins. The mu margins are robust margins that indicate worst-case stability estimates with respect to the defined uncertainty. Worst-case flutter margins are computed for the F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft using uncertainty sets generated by flight data analysis. The robust margins demonstrate flight conditions for flutter may lie closer to the flight envelope than previously estimated by p-k analysis.

  3. Surgical resection margins after breast-conserving surgery: Senonetwork recommendations.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Taffurelli, Mario; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Aristei, Cynthia; Trentin, Chiara; Cassano, Enrico; Pietribiasi, Francesca; Corso, Giovanni; Munzone, Elisabetta; Tondini, Carlo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Cataliotti, Luigi; Santini, Donatella

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports findings of the "Focus on Controversial Areas" Working Party of the Italian Senonetwork, which was set up to improve the care of breast cancer patients. After reviewing articles in English on the MEDLINE system on breast conserving surgery for invasive carcinoma, the Working Party presents their recommendations for identifying risk factors for positive margins, suggests how to manage them so as to achieve the highest possible percentage of negative margins, and proposes standards for investigating resection margins and therapeutic approaches according to margin status. When margins are positive, approaches include re-excision, mastectomy, or, as second-line treatment, radiotherapy with a high boost dose. When margins are negative, boost administration and its dose depend on the risk of local recurrence, which is linked to biopathological tumor features and surgical margin width. Although margin status does not affect the choice of systemic therapy, it may delay the start of chemotherapy when further surgery is required. PMID:27103209

  4. [Application of the rough sets theory to the analysis of structure-activity relationships of pyridinium antifungal compounds].

    PubMed

    Krysiński, J

    1994-04-01

    Relationships between chemical structure and antifungal activity of 72 quaternary pyridinium chlorides were analysed using the method of rough sets. In the information system the compounds are described by eight condition attributes and divided into three classes of activity. Using the rough sets approach a smallest set of four condition attributes significant for a high quality of classification and accuracy of classes has been found. The resulting decision algorithm describes relations between structure and antifungal activity in terms of significant condition attributes. It may be helpful in predicting structures of new antifungal compounds to be synthesized. PMID:8204024

  5. Potential-based methodology for active sound control in three dimensional settings.

    PubMed

    Lim, H; Utyuzhnikov, S V; Lam, Y W; Kelly, L

    2014-09-01

    This paper extends a potential-based approach to active noise shielding with preservation of wanted sound in three-dimensional settings. The approach, which was described in a previous publication [Lim et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129(2), 717-725 (2011)], provides several significant advantages over conventional noise control methods. Most significantly, the methodology does not require any information including the characterization of sources, impedance boundary conditions and surrounding medium, and that the methodology automatically differentiates between the wanted and unwanted sound components. The previous publication proved the concept in one-dimensional conditions. In this paper, the approach for more realistic conditions is studied by numerical simulation and experimental validation in three-dimensional cases. The results provide a guideline to the implementation of the active shielding method with practical three-dimensional conditions. Through numerical simulation it is demonstrated that while leaving the wanted sound unchanged, the developed approach offers selective volumetric noise cancellation within a targeted domain. In addition, the method is implemented in a three-dimensional experiment with a white noise source in a semi-anechoic chamber. The experimental study identifies practical difficulties and limitations in the use of the approach for real applications. PMID:25190385

  6. Translating Physical Activity Evidence to Hospital Settings: A Call for Culture Change.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon J; Carr, Lucas J

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists on the multiple physical and psychological benefits of physical activity (PA) across the lifespan. Yet, the vast majority of Americans engage in highly sedentary lifestyles, and most do not meet recommended PA levels that can achieve health benefits. Moreover, nurses and other healthcare providers are highly inconsistent in their PA recommendations to patients in all settings, as well as in achieving their own levels of PA. The consequences are growing obesity and health-related conditions, disability, and mortality. A culture change is sorely needed that reimagines and reintegrates PA into the course of daily life activities. In this article, we present the research on PA benefits, declining PA levels, and healthcare practice deficits and propose designing an inpatient unit of the future with a mission of PA for all that is integrated into the fabric and operations of the unit. Malcolm Gladwell's Tipping Point ideas are used as a change framework to guide strategies recommended in this futuristic unit. These strategies include leadership by clinical nurse specialists, engagement of other key people, resources, and structures. The entire process will require bold leadership and a willingness to think outside existing models of hospital care, which are costly and outdated. PMID:27309785

  7. Coseismic landslides reveal near-surface rock strength in a high-relief tectonically active setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallen, Sean F; Clark, Marin K; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We present quantitative estimates of near-surface rock strength relevant to landscape evolution and landslide hazard assessment for 15 geologic map units of the Longmen Shan, China. Strength estimates are derived from a novel method that inverts earthquake peak ground acceleration models and coseismic landslide inventories to obtain material proper- ties and landslide thickness. Aggregate rock strength is determined by prescribing a friction angle of 30° and solving for effective cohesion. Effective cohesion ranges are from 70 kPa to 107 kPa for 15 geologic map units, and are approximately an order of magnitude less than typical laboratory measurements, probably because laboratory tests on hand-sized specimens do not incorporate the effects of heterogeneity and fracturing that likely control near-surface strength at the hillslope scale. We find that strength among the geologic map units studied varies by less than a factor of two. However, increased weakening of units with proximity to the range front, where precipitation and active fault density are the greatest, suggests that cli- matic and tectonic factors overwhelm lithologic differences in rock strength in this high-relief tectonically active setting.

  8. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  9. Developing an Active Play Resource for a Range of Australian Early Childhood Settings: Formative Findings and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riethmuller, Annaleise; McKeen, Kim; Okely, Anthony D.; Bell, Colin; de Silva Sanigorski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity habits are established in early childhood. Increasing a child's fundamental movement skill confidence and competence may result in a trajectory of increased physical activity and a lower risk of becoming overweight. The evidence upon which the promotion of physical activity in early childhood settings is based is tenuous. This…

  10. The Effect of Activity Type on the Engagement and Interaction of Young Children with Disabilities in Inclusive Childcare Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Coral; Kishida, Yuriko; Carter, Mark; Sweller, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    The engagement and adult and peer interaction of 37 young children with a range of disabilities was measured in free play, group, and meal-routine activities in inclusive childcare settings. A significant effect for activity type was found for total engagement, active engagement, and passive engagement, with the children being more engaged in…

  11. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  12. Who are the active players of the Iberian Margin deep biosphere? Microbial diversity of borehole U1385 through analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. A.; Orsi, W.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Biddle, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial community structure and activity in marine deep subsurface environments across the globe have been assayed using various molecular biology tools including 16S rDNA sequencing, microarrays, FISH/CARD-FISH, and metagenomics. Many studies involving these techniques are DNA-based. This limits study of microbial function in these environments as DNA does not degrade as quickly as RNA and may lead to misinterpreting relic microbial genes as important for present-day activity. In this study, the diversity of bacteria and archaea from sediments of the Iberian Margin IODP borehole U1385 was analyzed from bulk extracted DNA and RNA at seven different depths ranging from 10 to 123 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Presented data suggests that the picture of microbial diversity obtained from DNA is markedly different from that seen through analysis of RNA. IODP borehole U1385 offers a great comparison to ODP Site 1229, a well characterized borehole on the Peru Margin. Similar sediment depositional history and geochemistry will allow exploration of what represents a 'typical' continental margin sediment microbial community or if microbial endemism is established despite similar conditions. This study represents the first molecular exploration of sediment microbial communities from the Iberian Margin IODP Site U1385.

  13. The marginal band system in nymphalid butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns are highly complex and diverse, but they are believed to be derived from the nymphalid groundplan, which is composed of several color pattern systems. Among these pattern systems, the marginal band system, including marginal and submarginal bands, has rarely been studied. Here, we examined the color pattern diversity of the marginal band system among nymphalid butterflies. Marginal and submarginal bands are usually expressed as a pair of linear bands aligned with the wing margin. However, a submarginal band can be expressed as a broken band, an elongated oval, or a single dot. The marginal focus, usually a white dot at the middle of a wing compartment along the wing edge, corresponds to the pupal edge spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots that signify the locations of color pattern organizing centers. A marginal band can be expressed as a semicircle, an elongated oval, or a pair of eyespot-like structures, which suggest the organizing activity of the marginal focus. Physical damage at the pupal edge spot leads to distal dislocation of the submarginal band in Junonia almana and in Vanessa indica, suggesting that the marginal focus functions as an organizing center for the marginal band system. Taken together, we conclude that the marginal band system is developmentally equivalent to other symmetry systems. Additionally, the marginal band is likely a core element and the submarginal band a paracore element of the marginal band system, and both bands are primarily specified by the marginal focus organizing center.

  14. Structural design/margin assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Determining structural design inputs and the structural margins following design completion is one of the major activities in space exploration. The end result is a statement of these margins as stability, safety factors on ultimate and yield stresses, fracture limits (fracture control), fatigue lifetime, reuse criteria, operational criteria and procedures, stability factors, deflections, clearance, handling criteria, etc. The process is normally called a load cycle and is time consuming, very complex, and involves much more than structures. The key to successful structural design is the proper implementation of the process. It depends on many factors: leadership and management of the process, adequate analysis and testing tools, data basing, communications, people skills, and training. This process and the various factors involved are discussed.

  15. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study.

    PubMed

    Olaka, Lydia A; Wilke, Franziska D H; Olago, Daniel O; Odada, Eric O; Mulch, Andreas; Musolff, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02-75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F(-) concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2-9.2mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27-75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from -6.2 to +5.8‰ and -31.3 to +33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750-6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (<1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F(-) enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management in Naivasha as well as similar

  16. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study.

    PubMed

    Olaka, Lydia A; Wilke, Franziska D H; Olago, Daniel O; Odada, Eric O; Mulch, Andreas; Musolff, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02-75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F(-) concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2-9.2mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27-75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from -6.2 to +5.8‰ and -31.3 to +33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750-6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (<1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F(-) enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management in Naivasha as well as similar

  17. Data-Driven Derivation of an "Informer Compound Set" for Improved Selection of Active Compounds in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-09-26

    Despite the usefulness of high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, for some systems, low assay throughput or high screening cost can prohibit the screening of large numbers of compounds. In such cases, iterative cycles of screening involving active learning (AL) are employed, creating the need for smaller "informer sets" that can be routinely screened to build predictive models for selecting compounds from the screening collection for follow-up screens. Here, we present a data-driven derivation of an informer compound set with improved predictivity of active compounds in HTS, and we validate its benefit over randomly selected training sets on 46 PubChem assays comprising at least 300,000 compounds and covering a wide range of assay biology. The informer compound set showed improvement in BEDROC(α = 100), PRAUC, and ROCAUC values averaged over all assays of 0.024, 0.014, and 0.016, respectively, compared to randomly selected training sets, all with paired t-test p-values <10(-15). A per-assay assessment showed that the BEDROC(α = 100), which is of particular relevance for early retrieval of actives, improved for 38 out of 46 assays, increasing the success rate of smaller follow-up screens. Overall, we showed that an informer set derived from historical HTS activity data can be employed for routine small-scale exploratory screening in an assay-agnostic fashion. This approach led to a consistent improvement in hit rates in follow-up screens without compromising scaffold retrieval. The informer set is adjustable in size depending on the number of compounds one intends to screen, as performance gains are realized for sets with more than 3,000 compounds, and this set is therefore applicable to a variety of situations. Finally, our results indicate that random sampling may not adequately cover descriptor space, drawing attention to the importance of the composition of the training set for predicting actives. PMID:27487177

  18. Data-Driven Derivation of an "Informer Compound Set" for Improved Selection of Active Compounds in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-09-26

    Despite the usefulness of high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, for some systems, low assay throughput or high screening cost can prohibit the screening of large numbers of compounds. In such cases, iterative cycles of screening involving active learning (AL) are employed, creating the need for smaller "informer sets" that can be routinely screened to build predictive models for selecting compounds from the screening collection for follow-up screens. Here, we present a data-driven derivation of an informer compound set with improved predictivity of active compounds in HTS, and we validate its benefit over randomly selected training sets on 46 PubChem assays comprising at least 300,000 compounds and covering a wide range of assay biology. The informer compound set showed improvement in BEDROC(α = 100), PRAUC, and ROCAUC values averaged over all assays of 0.024, 0.014, and 0.016, respectively, compared to randomly selected training sets, all with paired t-test p-values <10(-15). A per-assay assessment showed that the BEDROC(α = 100), which is of particular relevance for early retrieval of actives, improved for 38 out of 46 assays, increasing the success rate of smaller follow-up screens. Overall, we showed that an informer set derived from historical HTS activity data can be employed for routine small-scale exploratory screening in an assay-agnostic fashion. This approach led to a consistent improvement in hit rates in follow-up screens without compromising scaffold retrieval. The informer set is adjustable in size depending on the number of compounds one intends to screen, as performance gains are realized for sets with more than 3,000 compounds, and this set is therefore applicable to a variety of situations. Finally, our results indicate that random sampling may not adequately cover descriptor space, drawing attention to the importance of the composition of the training set for predicting actives.

  19. Understanding continental margin biodiversity: a new imperative.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lisa A; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know. PMID:22457970

  20. Distinguishing Terrestrial Organic Carbon in Marginal Sediments of East China Sea and Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Selvaraj; Lin, Baozhi; Wang, Huawei; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Zhifei; Lou, Jiann-Yuh; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Mayer, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the sources, transport pathways and behavior of terrestrial organic carbon in continental margins adjoining to large rivers has improved in recent decades, but uncertainties and complications still exist with human-influenced coastal regions in densely populated wet tropics and subtropics. In these regions, the monsoon and other episodic weather events exert strong climatic control on mineral and particulate organic matter delivery to the marginal seas. Here we investigate elemental (TOC, TN and bromine-Br) and stable carbon isotopic (δ13C) compositions of organic matter (OM) in surface sediments and short cores collected from active (SW Taiwan) and passive margin (East China Sea) settings to understand the sources of OM that buried in these settings. We used sedimentary bromine to total organic carbon (Br/TOC) ratios to apportion terrigenous from marine organic matter, and find that Br/TOC may serve as an additional, reliable proxy for sedimentary provenance in both settings. Variations in Br/TOC are consistent with other provenance indicators in responding to short-lived terrigenous inputs. Because diagenetic alteration of Br is insignificant on shorter time scales, applying Br/TOC ratios as a proxy to identify organic matter source along with carbon isotope mixing models may provide additional constraints on the quantity and transformation of terrigenous organics in continental margins. We apply this combination of approaches to land-derived organic matter in different depositional environments of East Asian marginal seas.

  1. Relationship between achievement goal constructs and physical self-perceptions in a physical activity setting.

    PubMed

    Newton, Maria; Detling, Nicole; Kilgore, Jennifer; Bernhardt, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The relations of achievement goal theory constructs and physical self-perceptions were explored with 225 students (91 men, 109 women, and 25 nonindicators; M age=23.5 yr., SD=9.2), enrolled in basic physical activity classes (aerobics, weight training, modern dance, badminton, yoga, tai chi, basketball, racquetball, gymnastics, bowling, aquatone, and step aerobics) in a university setting. Goal orientations (Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire), perceptions of the motivational climate (Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire-2), and physical self-perceptions (Physical Self-perception Profile) were assessed. Data were analyzed separately by sex. Ego orientation was the only predictor of Physical Self-perceptions in men, accounting for between 12 and 15% of the variance in Physical Self-worth, Sport Competence, Physical Conditioning, and Body Attractiveness. Constructs of achievement goal theory were not predictive of Physical Self-perceptions in the women. The results are discussed in light of achievement goal theory and the nature of the sample.

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active lupus mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Sundaram, V; Tam, M; Parikh, S A

    2015-07-01

    A 33-year-old male with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with acute abdominal pain and was found to have lupus mesenteric vasculitis on imaging and during exploratory laparotomy. Post laparotomy he continued to have persistent nausea and dyspepsia and an electrocardiogram showed evidence of an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergency cardiac catheterization showed evidence of thrombotic right coronary artery occlusion. His coronaries were otherwise normal with no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease. Extensive workup with trans-esophageal echo, serologies for antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and bubble study was negative. This effectively ruled out Libman-Sacks endocarditis, APS-induced arterial thrombus and paradoxical emboli as potential causes of his STEMI. By exclusion of other causes, the etiology of his STEMI was felt to be secondary to in-situ coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active SLE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with SLE presenting with both lupus mesenteric vasculitis and in-situ coronary arterial thrombosis in the absence of APS.

  3. Relationship between achievement goal constructs and physical self-perceptions in a physical activity setting.

    PubMed

    Newton, Maria; Detling, Nicole; Kilgore, Jennifer; Bernhardt, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The relations of achievement goal theory constructs and physical self-perceptions were explored with 225 students (91 men, 109 women, and 25 nonindicators; M age=23.5 yr., SD=9.2), enrolled in basic physical activity classes (aerobics, weight training, modern dance, badminton, yoga, tai chi, basketball, racquetball, gymnastics, bowling, aquatone, and step aerobics) in a university setting. Goal orientations (Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire), perceptions of the motivational climate (Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire-2), and physical self-perceptions (Physical Self-perception Profile) were assessed. Data were analyzed separately by sex. Ego orientation was the only predictor of Physical Self-perceptions in men, accounting for between 12 and 15% of the variance in Physical Self-worth, Sport Competence, Physical Conditioning, and Body Attractiveness. Constructs of achievement goal theory were not predictive of Physical Self-perceptions in the women. The results are discussed in light of achievement goal theory and the nature of the sample. PMID:15648467

  4. Chemical Space Mapping and Structure-Activity Analysis of the ChEMBL Antiviral Compound Set.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Kyrylo; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-08-22

    Curation, standardization and data fusion of the antiviral information present in the ChEMBL public database led to the definition of a robust data set, providing an association of antiviral compounds to seven broadly defined antiviral activity classes. Generative topographic mapping (GTM) subjected to evolutionary tuning was then used to produce maps of the antiviral chemical space, providing an optimal separation of compound families associated with the different antiviral classes. The ability to pinpoint the specific spots occupied (responsibility patterns) on a map by various classes of antiviral compounds opened the way for a GTM-supported search for privileged structural motifs, typical for each antiviral class. The privileged locations of antiviral classes were analyzed in order to highlight underlying privileged common structural motifs. Unlike in classical medicinal chemistry, where privileged structures are, almost always, predefined scaffolds, privileged structural motif detection based on GTM responsibility patterns has the decisive advantage of being able to automatically capture the nature ("resolution detail"-scaffold, detailed substructure, pharmacophore pattern, etc.) of the relevant structural motifs. Responsibility patterns were found to represent underlying structural motifs of various natures-from very fuzzy (groups of various "interchangeable" similar scaffolds), to the classical scenario in medicinal chemistry (underlying motif actually being the scaffold), to very precisely defined motifs (specifically substituted scaffolds). PMID:27410486

  5. Marginal Teachers from the Eyes of School Principals: Concept, Problems and Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Cetin; Demirkasimoglu, Nihan

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to determine how Turkish principals define marginal teachers and which strategies they use to deal with them. Within this purpose, the following points are examined: (a) the concept of marginal teacher, (b) the underlying reasons for marginal teacher behaviors, (c) the problems marginal teachers cause in school settings, (d)…

  6. Evolution of the late Paleozoic accretionary complex and overlying forearc-magmatic arc, south central Chile (38°-41°S): Constraints for the tectonic setting along the southwestern margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Mark W.; Kato, Terence T.; Rodriguez, Carolina; Godoy, Estanislao; Duhart, Paul; McDonough, Michael; Campos, Alberto

    1999-08-01

    Stratigraphic, structural, metamorphic, and geochronologic studies of basement rocks in the Andean foothills and Coast Ranges of south central Chile (39°-41°S) suggest a protracted late Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic deformational and metamorphic history that imposes important constraints on the tectonic development of the southwestern Gondwana margin. In the study area the late Paleozoic paired metamorphic belt, coeval magmatic arc, and overlying Triassic sedimentary units preserve a record of Late Carboniferous to Early Permian subduction and arc magmatism, subsequent deep exhumation of the Western Series subduction complex, and diminished uplift and erosion of the Eastern Series arc-forearc region by the Late Triassic. Late Paleozoic structural elements and metamorphic assemblages formed during early subduction and arc magmatism, collectively referred to as Dl, are largely erased in the Western Series by the dominant D2 schistosity and lower greenschist grade metamorphism. D1 structural features, as well as original sedimentary textures, are relatively well preserved in the less penetratively deformed Eastern Series. The regional distribution of late Paleozoic arc magmatism suggests that the late Paleozoic convergent margin deviated from a N-S trend north of this area to a NW-SE trend near this latitude and faced an open marine environment to the southwest. A transition from F2 isoclinal folding to more open, larger-scale F3 folds, interpreted as change in ductility during differential uplift of the Western Series, is not apparent in the Eastern Series. Despite a lesser degree of uplift during the main exhumational D2 event, delineation of unconformities and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons and intrusions into the Eastern Series allow tighter constraints to be placed on timing of uplift and denudation of the Eastern Series than on that in the Western Series. A regional unconformity exposed in the Lake District that separates more highly deformed Eastern Series

  7. Basin evolution at the SW Barents Sea margin and its conjugate off NE Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faleide, Jan Inge; Wong, Po Wan; Helge Gabrielsen, Roy; Tsikalas, Filippos; Blaich, Olav A.; Planke, Sverre; Myklebust, Reidun

    2015-04-01

    The SW Barents Sea margin developed from a megashear zone which linked the Norwegian-Greenland Sea and the Artic Eurasia Basin during the initial Eocene opening. Within the dextral megashear system, a series of deep and narrow basins formed in the SW Barents Sea. These basins formed in response to multiple rift events and rapid differential subsidence. The distribution of salt structures both in the SW Barents Sea and on the conjugate NE Greenland margin reflects the Late Paleozoic basin configuration. Late Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rifting affected all deep basins in the SW Barents Sea (e.g., Bjørnøya, Tromsø, Harstad and Sørvestsnaget basins) as on the mid-Norwegian margin and the conjugate NE Greenland margin. Following rifting, a wide region subsided and was covered by thick Cretaceous strata. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene rifting between Norway and Greenland was taken up within the megashear zone and pull-apart basins formed in the SW Barents Sea and in the Wandel Sea Basin in NE Greenland. Contraction/inversion formed structural highs separating distinct Late Cretaceous depocenters that continued to subside rapidly. The rifting culminated in crustal breakup and accretion of oceanic crust near the Paleocene-Eocene transition. NE Atlantic breakup was accompanied by large-scale igneous activity, which also affected parts of the SW Barents Sea margin. The sheared Senja FZ margin is segmented, each segment having different structural styles reflecting a complex interplay between the geometry of the sheared margin segments and the opening direction. A continental sliver was also cut off the SW Barents Sea margin, now forming the Greenland Ridge which is a protrusion of the NE Greenland margin. The continent-ocean transition is confined within a narrow zone, bounded by a characteristic marginal high along the Senja Fracture Zone. During Eocene, the Harstad and southern Sørvestsnaget basins developed as narrow, elongated, en echelon basins landward of the

  8. SET1 and p300 act synergistically, through coupled histone modifications, in transcriptional activation by p53.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhanyun; Chen, Wei-Yi; Shimada, Miho; Nguyen, Uyen T T; Kim, Jaehoon; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Sengoku, Toru; McGinty, Robert K; Fernandez, Joseph P; Muir, Tom W; Roeder, Robert G

    2013-07-18

    The H3K4me3 mark in chromatin is closely correlated with actively transcribed genes, although the mechanisms involved in its generation and function are not fully understood. In vitro studies with recombinant chromatin and purified human factors demonstrate a robust SET1 complex (SET1C)-mediated H3K4 trimethylation that is dependent upon p53- and p300-mediated H3 acetylation, a corresponding SET1C-mediated enhancement of p53- and p300-dependent transcription that reflects a primary effect of SET1C through H3K4 trimethylation, and direct SET1C-p53 and SET1C-p300 interactions indicative of a targeted recruitment mechanism. Complementary cell-based assays demonstrate a DNA-damage-induced p53-SET1C interaction, a corresponding enrichment of SET1C and H3K4me3 on a p53 target gene (p21/WAF1), and a corresponding codependency of H3K4 trimethylation and transcription upon p300 and SET1C. These results establish a mechanism in which SET1C and p300 act cooperatively, through direct interactions and coupled histone modifications, to facilitate the function of p53. PMID:23870121

  9. Middle Triassic magma mixing in an active continental margin: Evidence from mafic enclaves and host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Mo, X.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen was formed through the collision of the North and South China blocks, but the precise timing of the closure of the Paleo-Tethys ocean between the two blocks remains debated. Large volumes of Triassic granites associated with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) were emplaced in the Qinling terrane. This paper presents field observations, petrography, geochronology and geochemistry of the MMEs and their host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling. The host rocks comprise granodiorite and granodioritic porphyry, and the The MMEs range in composition from gabbroic diorite to diorite. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages suggest that the granites and MMEs were coeval at ca. 245 Ma. The granites are relatively enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE, and have evolved Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon Hf isotopic compositions [initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7070-0.7076, ɛNd(t) = -7.5 to -6.8, ɛHf(t) = -8.2 to -4.2], indicative of an origin from the amphibolitic lower crust. The near-primitive gabbro-dioritic MMEs bear a remarkable geochemical resemblance to the high-magnesium andesite (HMA), such as moderate SiO2 (~55 wt.%), low FeOT/MgO (~0.75), high Cr (268-308 ppm) and MgO (8.58-8.77 wt.%) with Mg# of ~70. Additionally, they exhibit lower initial 87Sr/86Sr, higher ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and more radiogenic Pb isotopes than the dioritic MMEs which share similar isotopic compositions with the granites. These features, together with the presence of the specific minerals in the MMEs (e.g., felsic xenocrysts and acicular apatite), point to mixing process between the lower crust-derived magmas and the melts produced by the reaction of the subducting sediment-derived components and the overlying mantle. Taking into account the regional occurrence of synchronous plutonic-volcanic complexes (250-234 Ma) ranging from basaltic to granitic variants, we suggest that the Dewulu pluton formed in an active continental margin in response to the local extension triggered by the

  10. Predicting service life margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Margins are developed for equipment susceptible to malfunction due to excessive time or operation cycles, and for identifying limited life equipment so monitoring and replacing is accomplished before hardware failure. Method applies to hardware where design service is established and where reasonable expected usage prediction is made.

  11. Deep continental margin reflectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

  12. Marginalization and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  13. CT liver volumetry using geodesic active contour segmentation with a level-set algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Obajuluwa, Ademola; Xu, Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi; Baron, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Automatic liver segmentation on CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes. We developed an automated volumetry scheme for the liver in CT based on a 5 step schema. First, an anisotropic smoothing filter was applied to portal-venous phase CT images to remove noise while preserving the liver structure, followed by an edge enhancer to enhance the liver boundary. By using the boundary-enhanced image as a speed function, a fastmarching algorithm generated an initial surface that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour-evolution refined the initial surface so as to more precisely fit the liver boundary. The liver volume was calculated based on the refined liver surface. Hepatic CT scans of eighteen prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multi-detector CT system. Automated liver volumes obtained were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as "gold standard." The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1,520 cc, whereas the mean manual volume was 1,486 cc, with the mean absolute difference of 104 cc (7.0%). CT liver volumetrics based on an automated scheme agreed excellently with "goldstandard" manual volumetrics (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f)=0.32), and required substantially less completion time. Our automated scheme provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes.

  14. Hamstring Fatigue and Muscle Activation Changes During Six Sets of Nordic Hamstring Exercise in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul W M; Lovell, Ric; Knox, Michael F; Brennan, Scott L; Siegler, Jason C

    2015-11-01

    The Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) is a bodyweight movement commonly prescribed to increase eccentric hamstring strength and reduce the incidence of strain injury in sport. This study examined hamstring fatigue and muscle activation responses throughout 6 sets of 5 repetitions of the NHE. Ten amateur-level soccer players performed a single session of 6 sets of 5 repetitions of NHE. Maximal eccentric and concentric torque output (in newton meters) was measured after every set. Hamstrings electromyograms (EMG) were measured during all maximal contractions and exercise repetitions. Hamstring maximal eccentric torque was reduced throughout the range of motion after only a single set of NHE between 7.9 and 17.1% (p ≤ 0.05), with further reductions in subsequent sets. Similarly, maximal concentric torque reductions between 7.8 and 17.2% were observed throughout the range of motion after 1 set of NHE (p ≤ 0.05). During the descent phase of the NHE repetitions, hamstring muscle activity progressively increased as the number of sets performed increased. These increases were observed in the first half of the range of motion. During the ascent phase, biceps femoris muscle activity but not medial hamstrings was reduced from the start of exercise during latter sets of repetitions. These data provide unique insight into the extent of fatigue induced from a bodyweight only exercise after a single set of 5 repetitions. Strength and conditioning coaches need to be aware of the speed and extent of fatigue induced from NHE, particularly in practical settings in which this exercise is now prescribed before sport-specific training sessions (i.e., the FIFA-11 before soccer training). PMID:25886019

  15. 40 CFR 35.3540 - Requirements for funding set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... changes the scope of work from what was originally described in its workplans, it must amend the workplans... with general grant regulations at 40 CFR part 30 or part 31, as appropriate. (b) Set-aside accounts. A...-year workplans to EPA for approval describing how set-aside funds will be expended. For...

  16. 40 CFR 35.3540 - Requirements for funding set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... changes the scope of work from what was originally described in its workplans, it must amend the workplans... with general grant regulations at 40 CFR part 30 or part 31, as appropriate. (b) Set-aside accounts. A...-year workplans to EPA for approval describing how set-aside funds will be expended. For...

  17. Peer Assisted Learning in the Clinical Setting: An Activity Systems Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational…

  18. Active Aging: Exploration into Self-Ratings of "Being Active," Out-of-Home Physical Activity, and Participation among Older Australian Adults Living in Four Different Settings.

    PubMed

    Aird, Rosemary L; Buys, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether self-ratings of "being active" among older people living in four different settings (major city high and lower density suburbs, a regional city, and a rural area) were associated with out-of-home participation and outdoor physical activity. A mixed-methods approach (survey, travel diary, and GPS tracking over a one-week period) was used to gather data from 48 individuals aged over 55 years. Self-ratings of "being active" were found to be positively correlated with the number of days older people spent time away from home but unrelated to time traveled by active means (walking and biking). No significant differences in active travel were found between the four study locations, despite differences in their respective built environments. The findings suggest that additional strategies to the creation of "age-friendly" environments are needed if older people are to increase their levels of outdoor physical activity. "Active aging" promotion campaigns may need to explicitly identify the benefits of walking outdoors to ambulatory older people as a means of maintaining their overall health, functional ability, and participation within society in the long-term and also encourage the development of community-based programs in order to facilitate regular walking for this group. PMID:26346381

  19. The Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

  20. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  1. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structures and biological activity of set of Cu(II) benzothiazole complexes: artificial nucleases with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ramsey A; Foreman, David; Lin, Han X; Carney, Bruce K; Fox, Kristin M; Cassimeris, Lynne; Tanski, Joseph M; Tyler, Laurie A

    2014-08-01

    A series of Cu(II) complexes with ligand frames based on quinoline derivatives appended with a benzothiazole substituent has been isolated. The complexes, Cu(Q(oBt))(NO3)2(H2O)∙CH3OH (1∙CH3OH), Cu(8OHQ(oBt))Cl2∙CH3OH (2∙CH3OH), Cu(8OQ(oBt))Cl(CH3OH)∙CH3OH (3∙CH3OH) and [Cu(8OH1/2Q(oBt))(CH3OH)(NO3)]2(NO3) (4) have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR and UV-visible spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The ligand frame within the set of complexes differs in the substituent on the quinoline ring: complex 1 remains unsubstituted at this position while complexes 2-4 have a substituted OH group. In complex 2, the bound phenol remains protonated while in 3 it is a phenolato group. Complex 4 contains two complexes within the unit cell and one NO3(-) giving rise to an overall 'half-protonation'. The interaction between complexes 1-3 with CT-DNA was investigated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy and revealed 2 and 3 strongly intercalate DNA with Kapp values of 1.47×10(7)M(-1) and 3.09×10(7)M(-1), respectively. The ability of complexes 1-3 to cleave SC-DNA was monitored using gel electrophoresis. Each complex exhibits potent, concentration dependent nuclease activity forming single and double-nicked DNA as low as 10μM. The nuclease activity of complexes 1-3 is primarily dependent on (1)O2 species while ·OH radicals play a secondary role in the cleavage by complexes 2 and 3. The cytotoxic effects of 1-3 were examined using HeLa cells and show cell death in the micromolar range. The distribution of cell cycle stages remains unchanged when complexes are present indicating DNA damage may be occurring throughout the cell cycle. PMID:24794274

  2. Set7 facilitates hepatitis C virus replication via enzymatic activity-dependent attenuation of the IFN-related pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Wan, Yushun; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Li; She, Yinglong; Broering, Ruth; Lu, Mengji; Ye, Linbai; Zhu, Ying

    2015-03-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, usually resulting in persistent infection involving hepatic steatosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma via escape of the host's immune response. Set7 is a lysine-specific methyltransferase that is involved in gene regulation and virus replication. However, the mechanism underlying the immune evasion between HCV and Set7 is not well understood. In this study, we observed that the expression of Set7 in Huh7.5.1 cells was upregulated by HCV infection, and high levels of Set7 expression were also found in the sera, PBMCs, and liver tissue of HCV patients relative to healthy individuals. Further investigation showed that Set7 enhanced HCV replication in an enzymatic activity-dependent manner. Moreover, our data showed that Set7 decreased the expression of virus-induced IFN and IFN-related effectors, such as dsRNA-activated protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase. Further investigation suggested that Set7 suppressed the endogenous IFN expression by reducing the nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3/7 and the p65 subunit of NF-κB and reduced IFN-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase via attenuation of the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Additionally, IFN receptors, including IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, which are located upstream of the JAK/STAT pathway, were reduced by Set7. Taken together, our results reveal that Set7 facilitates HCV replication through the attenuation of IFN signaling pathways and IFN-related effectors.

  3. 40 CFR 35.3540 - Requirements for funding set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with general grant regulations at 40 CFR part 30 or part 31, as appropriate. (b) Set-aside accounts. A... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds §...

  4. 40 CFR 35.3540 - Requirements for funding set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with general grant regulations at 40 CFR part 30 or part 31, as appropriate. (b) Set-aside accounts. A... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds §...

  5. [Marginality and infant mortality].

    PubMed

    Jimenez Ornelas, R

    1988-01-01

    This study is concerned with differentials in infant and child mortality among low-income urban groups in Mexico. Mortality differentials within and among marginal socioeconomic groups in suburbs of Mexico City and Leon are analyzed and compared using data collected in interviews in 1980 and 1983. The results indicate that the health benefits associated with modernization, such as improved sanitation, can sometimes be offset by their negative impact on mortality, such as industrial accidents and environmental pollution.

  6. The 2006 Bahía Asunción Earthquake Swarm: Seismic Evidence of Active Deformation Along the Western Margin of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Méndez, Ignacio; González-Escobar, Mario; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    The study of the Bahía Asunción earthquake swarm is important for two reasons. First, the earthquakes are clear evidence of present activity along the zone of deformation on the Pacific margin of Baja California. The swarm, with earthquakes of magnitude M w of up to 5.0, occurred on the coastline of the peninsula, showing that the Tosco-Abreojos zone of deformation is wider than previously thought. Second, the larger earthquakes in the swarm caused some damage and much concern in Bahía Asunción, a small town located in the zone of epicenters. We relocated the larger earthquakes with regional and/or local seismic data. Our results put the earthquake sources below the urban area of Bahía Asunción, at 40-50 km to the north of the teleseismically determined epicenters. In addition, these new locations are in the area of epicenters of many smaller events that were located with data from local temporary stations. This area trends in an E-W direction and has dimensions of approximately 15 km by 10 km. Most earthquakes had sources at depths that are between 4 and 9 km. A composite focal mechanism for the smaller earthquakes indicated right-lateral strike-slip motion and pure-normal faulting occurred during this swarm. Interestingly, the ANSS earthquake catalog of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported each one of these faulting styles for two large events of the swarm, with one of these earthquakes occurring 2 days before the other one. We associate the earthquake with strike-slip mechanism with the San Roque Fault, and the earthquake with the normal faulting style with the Asunción Fault. However, there is need of further study to verify this possible relation between the faults and the earthquakes. In addition, we recorded peak accelerations of up to 0.63g with an accelerometer installed in Bahía Asunción. At this site, an earthquake of M w 4.9 produced those high values at a distance of 4.1 km. We also used the acceleration dataset from this site

  7. The 2006 Bahía Asunción Earthquake Swarm: Seismic Evidence of Active Deformation Along the Western Margin of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Méndez, Ignacio; González-Escobar, Mario; Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The study of the Bahía Asunción earthquake swarm is important for two reasons. First, the earthquakes are clear evidence of present activity along the zone of deformation on the Pacific margin of Baja California. The swarm, with earthquakes of magnitude M w of up to 5.0, occurred on the coastline of the peninsula, showing that the Tosco-Abreojos zone of deformation is wider than previously thought. Second, the larger earthquakes in the swarm caused some damage and much concern in Bahía Asunción, a small town located in the zone of epicenters. We relocated the larger earthquakes with regional and/or local seismic data. Our results put the earthquake sources below the urban area of Bahía Asunción, at 40-50 km to the north of the teleseismically determined epicenters. In addition, these new locations are in the area of epicenters of many smaller events that were located with data from local temporary stations. This area trends in an E-W direction and has dimensions of approximately 15 km by 10 km. Most earthquakes had sources at depths that are between 4 and 9 km. A composite focal mechanism for the smaller earthquakes indicated right-lateral strike-slip motion and pure-normal faulting occurred during this swarm. Interestingly, the ANSS earthquake catalog of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported each one of these faulting styles for two large events of the swarm, with one of these earthquakes occurring 2 days before the other one. We associate the earthquake with strike-slip mechanism with the San Roque Fault, and the earthquake with the normal faulting style with the Asunción Fault. However, there is need of further study to verify this possible relation between the faults and the earthquakes. In addition, we recorded peak accelerations of up to 0.63 g with an accelerometer installed in Bahía Asunción. At this site, an earthquake of M w 4.9 produced those high values at a distance of 4.1 km. We also used the acceleration dataset from this site

  8. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  9. Initial evidence of a failure to activate right anterior insula during affective set-shifting in PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alan; Strigo, Irina A.; Matthews, Scott C.; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Interoception is the perception of one's internal physiological, sensory, and emotional status. Extensive evidence supports a link between interoception and subjective experience. An altered ability to monitor or modulate interoception as it relates to subjective experience may provide a mechanistic explanation for the development of some forms of psychiatric illness. Methods We investigated which neural networks are activated when anticipating a change in affective (and thus interoceptive) state, which we term “affective set-shifting”, in women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to intimate partner violence, and in non-traumatized healthy volunteers. Results Although both groups activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during affective set-shifting, the PTSD group showed significantly less activation in the right anterior insula than did the controls. Conclusions These findings may suggest that although individuals with PTSD are cognitively aware of the impending shift in interoceptive state, they fail to appropriately activate neural circuitry involved in modulating interoceptive responses. PMID:19398499

  10. KMTase Set7/9 is a critical regulator of E2F1 activity upon genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lezina, L; Aksenova, V; Ivanova, T; Purmessur, N; Antonov, A V; Tentler, D; Fedorova, O; Garabadgiu, A V; Talianidis, I; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2014-01-01

    During the recent years lysine methyltransferase Set7/9 ((Su(var)-3–9, Enhancer-of-Zeste, Trithorax) domain containing protein 7/9) has emerged as an important regulator of different transcription factors. In this study, we report a novel function for Set7/9 as a critical co-activator of E2 promoter-binding factor 1 (E2F1)-dependent transcription in response to DNA damage. By means of various biochemical, cell biology, and bioinformatics approaches, we uncovered that cell-cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint of tumour cells upon DNA damage is defined by the threshold of expression of both E2F1 and Set7/9. The latter affects the activity of E2F1 by indirectly modulating histone modifications in the promoters of E2F1-dependent genes. Moreover, Set7/9 differentially affects E2F1 transcription targets: it promotes cell proliferation via expression of the CCNE1 gene and represses apoptosis by inhibiting the TP73 gene. Our biochemical screening of the panel of lung tumour cell lines suggests that these two factors are critically important for transcriptional upregulation of the CCNE1 gene product and hence successful progression through cell cycle. These findings identify Set7/9 as a potential biomarker in tumour cells with overexpressed E2F1 activity. PMID:25124555

  11. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2015-08-11

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin's transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ's histone chaperone activity.

  12. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin’s transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ’s histone chaperone activity. PMID:26216969

  13. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2015-08-11

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin's transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ's histone chaperone activity. PMID:26216969

  14. Active faulting and seismicity across the SW Gulf of California plate margin: anomalous rifting at slow geologic rates 2-3 m.y. after spreading initiated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, R.; Busch, M. M.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Martínez-Gutiérrez, G.; Maloney, S. J.; Buchanan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Onshore and offshore paleoseismology provides new constraints on late Quaternary to Present deformation rates across the SW margin of the Gulf of California plate boundary at the latitude of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Here we report the results of a 2008 CHIRP survey of offshore faults and what it tells us about the combined onshore - offshore faulting patterns. From west to east the Carrizal - Centenario, San Juan de los Planes (SJP) - La Gata to Espiritu Santo faults are being studied in detail, and to date the San Jose del Cabo (SJC) fault is being studied in reconnaissance. GPS results suggest rates of motion across the marginal fault array of ~1 mm/year while recent data from Alarcon rise suggests 46 mm/yr on the main plate boundary. Onshore studies suggest 0.1 - 0.3 mm/yr along the Carrizal and Los Planes faults in the late Quaternary from paleoseismic excavations, uplifted marine terraces, and geomorphic analysis. Geologic estimates and fault patterns with faults splaying and ending onshore to the south suggest that faulting rates may be higher to the north offshore. CHIRP and onshore data indicate three faults across La Paz Bay that form one system along the rift escarpment. Similar data suggest a second fault system including the onshore Los Planes and La Gata faults that form a complex step over to the NW to the Espiritu Santo fault, along which a M6.2 earthquake occurred in 1995. The third fault system in the transect across the plate margin are the Cerralvo trough faults along which the 1969 M5.6 earthquake probably occurred. It is not clear why the residual 1-2% of plate motion is being accomodated in the margin. The large topographic gradient across the plate boundary and dominantly down-to-Gulf normal faults suggest that potential gravitational energy may be a factor. Low sedimentation rates in the arid region are presumably even slower than faulting rates and result in relief being maintained and semi-starved basins.

  15. Validation of Five Minimally Obstructive Methods to Estimate Physical Activity Energy Expenditure in Young Adults in Semi-Standardized Settings

    PubMed Central

    Schneller, Mikkel B.; Pedersen, Mogens T.; Gupta, Nidhi; Aadahl, Mette; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We compared the accuracy of five objective methods, including two newly developed methods combining accelerometry and activity type recognition (Acti4), against indirect calorimetry, to estimate total energy expenditure (EE) of different activities in semi-standardized settings. Fourteen participants performed a standardized and semi-standardized protocol including seven daily life activity types, while having their EE measured by indirect calorimetry. Simultaneously, physical activity was quantified by an ActivPAL3, two ActiGraph GT3X+’s and an Actiheart. EE was estimated by the standard ActivPAL3 software (ActivPAL), ActiGraph GT3X+ (ActiGraph) and Actiheart (Actiheart), and by a combination of activity type recognition via Acti4 software and activity counts per minute (CPM) of either a hip- or thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ (AGhip + Acti4 and AGthigh + Acti4). At group level, estimated physical activities EE by Actiheart (MSE = 2.05) and AGthigh + Acti4 (MSE = 0.25) were not significantly different from measured EE by indirect calorimetry, while significantly underestimated by ActiGraph, ActivPAL and AGhip + Acti4. AGthigh + Acti4 and Actiheart explained 77% and 45%, of the individual variations in measured physical activity EE by indirect calorimetry, respectively. This study concludes that combining accelerometer data from a thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ with activity type recognition improved the accuracy of activity specific EE estimation against indirect calorimetry in semi-standardized settings compared to previously validated methods using CPM only. PMID:25781506

  16. Establishing "Fields of Care": Teaching Settings as Active Participants in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Erica N.

    2014-01-01

    In their article, "Space, relations, and the learning of science," Wolff-Michael Roth and Pei-Ling Hsu draw our attention to the importance of field in the teaching and learning of science. While the Roth and Hsu study is focused on the scientific research laboratory as an internship setting for the teaching of science, this response to…

  17. 40 CFR 35.3540 - Requirements for funding set-aside activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds § 35.3540... with general grant regulations at 40 CFR part 30 or part 31, as appropriate. (b) Set-aside accounts. A... workplan describing how it will expend funds needed to provide technical assistance to public water...

  18. Development of proteomic signatures of platelet activation using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization technology in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Czuchlewski, David; Peerschke, Ellinor I

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop proteomic profiles that would distinguish between resting and activated platelets in a clinical setting using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) time of flight (TOF) technology. A data set of 50 donors was analyzed. Distinct spectral patterns emerged in the low-molecular-weight range (2-10 kDa) for resting platelets and platelets aggregated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or thrombin receptor activation peptide SFLLRN (TRAP) and in platelets exposed to shear stress. Platelets from patients treated with ADP receptor antagonists did not show the expected change in proteomic profile following aggregation with ADP. These data provide the first demonstration that proteomic signatures of platelets can be developed using SELDI-TOF in a clinical laboratory setting. PMID:18480001

  19. Preventing Obesity among Preschool Children: How Can Child-Care Settings Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity? Research Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Nicole; Ward, Dianne; Neelon, Sara Benjamin; Story, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Child-care settings provide numerous opportunities to promote healthy eating and physical activity behaviors among preschool children. The majority of U.S. children are placed in some form of non-parental care during their preschool years. While approximately 15 percent of preschool children are primarily cared for by their relatives, most…

  20. Teachers' Facebook Use: Their Use Habits, Intensity, Self-Disclosure, Privacy Settings, and Activities on Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumuer, Evren; Esfer, Sezin; Yildirim, Soner

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated K12 teachers' Facebook usage habits, intensity, self-disclosure, privacy settings and activities. A multi-method design was employed by collecting quantitative data from 616 teachers with a Facebook account using an online questionnaire and qualitative data from 32 teachers using online open-ended questions. The…

  1. Reliability of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire in Research Settings: Last 7-Day Self-Administered Long Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Susan S.; Readdy, R. Tucker

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of the last 7-day long form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Craig et al., 2003) and to examine the construct validity for the measure in a research setting. Participants were 151 male (n = 52) and female (n = 99) university students (M age = 24.15 years, SD = 5.01)…

  2. Plate Margin Deformation and Active Tectonics Along the Northern Edge of the Yakutat Terrane in the Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, Ronald L.; Sauber, Jeanne; Cotton, Michele M.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Burgess, Evan; Ruppert, Natalia; Forster, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane into the cusp of southern Alaska. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds is poorly constrained, however, due to pervasive glaciation. In this study we used high-resolution topography, geodetic imaging, seismic, and geologic data to advance understanding of the transition from strike-slip motion on the Fairweather fault to plate margin deformation on the Bagley fault, which cuts through the upper plate of the collisional suture above the subduction megathrust. The Fairweather fault terminates by oblique-extensional splay faulting within a structural syntaxis, allowing rapid tectonic upwelling of rocks driven by thrust faulting and crustal contraction. Plate motion is partly transferred from the Fairweather to the Bagley fault, which extends 125 km farther west as a dextral shear zone that is partly reactivated by reverse faulting. The Bagley fault dips steeply through the upper plate to intersect the subduction megathrust at depth, forming a narrow fault-bounded crustal sliver in the obliquely convergent plate margin. Since . 20 Ma the Bagley fault has accommodated more than 50 km of dextral shearing and several kilometers of reverse motion along its southern flank during terrane accretion. The fault is considered capable of generating earthquakes because it is linked to faults that generated large historic earthquakes, suitably oriented for reactivation in the contemporary stress field, and locally marked by seismicity. The fault may generate earthquakes of Mw <= 7.5.

  3. Social Connection and Psychological Outcomes in a Physical Activity-Based Youth Development Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; McDonough, Meghan H.; Smith, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that the social connections formed by participating in physical activity-based positive youth development (PYD) programs contributes to building personal and social assets. In this study, we examined how changes in social connection over a physical activity-based PYD program for low-income youth were associated with changes in…

  4. Trends in Physical Activity Interest in the College and University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bridget; Hansen, Andrew; Gross, Jonathon

    2010-01-01

    High levels of interest in physical activity courses correlate positively with student participation. Awareness of students' physical activity interests allows college and university program coordinators to match student interests with appropriate course offerings. Purpose: The purpose of this research is to track students' physical activity…

  5. The Effects of Reflective Activities on Skill Adaptation in a Work-Related Instrumental Learning Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessger, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In work-related instrumental learning contexts, the role of reflective activities is unclear. Kolb's experiential learning theory and Mezirow's transformative learning theory predict skill adaptation as an outcome. This prediction was tested by manipulating reflective activities and assessing participants' response and error rates…

  6. Teachers' Beliefs Related to Activity Play in the Preschool Setting: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisha, Lorelei Emma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate how early childhood teachers working in Head Start programs made meaning of preschool-age children's physical activity play by exploring their personal childhood and professional experiences with physical activity play. The study was conducted to contribute research-based recommendations for…

  7. East Africa continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bosellini, A.

    1986-01-01

    New well data from Somalia, together with the history of sea-floor spreading in the Indian Ocean derived from magnetic anomalies, show that the East African margins from latitude 15/sup 0/S into the Gulf of Aden comprise four distinct segments that formed successively by the southward drift of Madagascar from Somalia during the Middle to Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, by the northeastward drift of India along the Owen Transform during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene, and by the opening of the Gulf of Aden during the Neogene.

  8. Amphetamine margin in sports

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1981-10-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seem clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both humans and rats. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogs of such performances have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  9. Structural basis for the requirement of additional factors for MLL1 SET domain activity and recognition of epigenetic marks.

    PubMed

    Southall, Stacey M; Wong, Poon-Sheng; Odho, Zain; Roe, S Mark; Wilson, Jon R

    2009-01-30

    The mixed-lineage leukemia protein MLL1 is a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in early development and hematopoiesis. The biological function of MLL1 is mediated by the histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity of the carboxyl-terminal SET domain. We have determined the crystal structure of the MLL1 SET domain in complex with cofactor product AdoHcy and a histone H3 peptide. This structure indicates that, in order to form a well-ordered active site, a highly variable but essential component of the SET domain must be repositioned. To test this idea, we compared the effect of the addition of MLL complex members on methyltransferase activity and show that both RbBP5 and Ash2L but not Wdr5 stimulate activity. Additionally, we have determined the effect of posttranslational modifications on histone H3 residues downstream and upstream from the target lysine and provide a structural explanation for why H3T3 phosphorylation and H3K9 acetylation regulate activity. PMID:19187761

  10. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Debra M; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C; Wirth, Christopher K; Kraus, Caroline; Venezia, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  11. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  12. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Magdalena M H E; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N M; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E

    2015-12-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space. PMID:26694426

  13. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Magdalena M H E; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N M; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E

    2015-12-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  14. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Magdalena M.H.E.; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N.M.; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space. PMID:26694426

  15. Active fault detection and isolation of discrete-time linear time-varying systems: a set-membership approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtaba Tabatabaeipour, Seyed

    2015-08-01

    Active fault detection and isolation (AFDI) is used for detection and isolation of faults that are hidden in the normal operation because of a low excitation signal or due to the regulatory actions of the controller. In this paper, a new AFDI method based on set-membership approaches is proposed. In set-membership approaches, instead of a point-wise estimation of the states, a set-valued estimation of them is computed. If this set becomes empty the given model of the system is not consistent with the measurements. Therefore, the model is falsified. When more than one model of the system remains un-falsified, the AFDI method is used to generate an auxiliary signal that is injected into the system for detection and isolation of faults that remain otherwise hidden or non-isolated using passive FDI (PFDI) methods. Having the set-valued estimation of the states for each model, the proposed AFDI method finds an optimal input signal that guarantees FDI in a finite time horizon. The input signal is updated at each iteration in a decreasing receding horizon manner based on the set-valued estimation of the current states and un-falsified models at the current sample time. The problem is solved by a number of linear and quadratic programming problems, which result in a computationally efficient algorithm. The method is tested on a numerical example as well as on the pitch actuator of a benchmark wind turbine.

  16. Candidacidal Activity of Selected Ceragenins and Human Cathelicidin LL-37 in Experimental Settings Mimicking Infection Sites.

    PubMed

    Durnaś, Bonita; Wnorowska, Urszula; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Deptuła, Piotr; Wątek, Marzena; Piktel, Ewelina; Głuszek, Stanisław; Gu, Xiaobo; Savage, Paul B; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens, have become a serious public health problem due to the growing number of immunocompromised patients, including those subjected to anticancer treatment or suffering from HIV infection. In this study we assessed fungicidal activity of the ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-131 and CSA-192 against four fluconazole-resistant Candida strains. We found that ceragenins activity against planktonic Candida cells was higher than activity of human LL-37 peptide and synthetic cationic peptide omiganan. Compared to LL-37 peptide, ceragenins in the presence of DNase I demonstrated an increased ability to kill DNA-induced Candida biofilm. Microscopy studies show that treatment with LL-37 or ceragenins causes Candida cells to undergo extensive surface changes indicating surface membrane damage. This conclusion was substantiated by observation of rapid incorporation of FITC-labeled CSA-13, CSA-131 or LL-37 peptide into the more lipophilic environment of the Candida membrane. In addition to activity against Candida spp., ceragenins CSA-131 and CSA-192 display strong fungicidal activity against sixteen clinical isolates including Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus. These results indicate the potential of ceragenins for future development as new fungicidal agents. PMID:27315208

  17. Candidacidal Activity of Selected Ceragenins and Human Cathelicidin LL-37 in Experimental Settings Mimicking Infection Sites

    PubMed Central

    Durnaś, Bonita; Wnorowska, Urszula; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Deptuła, Piotr; Wątek, Marzena; Piktel, Ewelina; Głuszek, Stanisław; Gu, Xiaobo; Savage, Paul B.; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens, have become a serious public health problem due to the growing number of immunocompromised patients, including those subjected to anticancer treatment or suffering from HIV infection. In this study we assessed fungicidal activity of the ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-131 and CSA-192 against four fluconazole–resistant Candida strains. We found that ceragenins activity against planktonic Candida cells was higher than activity of human LL-37 peptide and synthetic cationic peptide omiganan. Compared to LL-37 peptide, ceragenins in the presence of DNase I demonstrated an increased ability to kill DNA-induced Candida biofilm. Microscopy studies show that treatment with LL-37 or ceragenins causes Candida cells to undergo extensive surface changes indicating surface membrane damage. This conclusion was substantiated by observation of rapid incorporation of FITC-labeled CSA-13, CSA-131 or LL-37 peptide into the more lipophilic environment of the Candida membrane. In addition to activity against Candida spp., ceragenins CSA-131 and CSA-192 display strong fungicidal activity against sixteen clinical isolates including Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus. These results indicate the potential of ceragenins for future development as new fungicidal agents. PMID:27315208

  18. Inorganic polymers from alkali activation of metakaolin: Effect of setting and curing on structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Ponzoni, Chiara; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-04-15

    Geopolymers, obtained by chemical reaction between aluminosilicate oxides and silicates under highly alkaline conditions, are studied in this paper. The proposed mechanism of geopolymer setting and hardening or curing consists of a dissolution, a transportation or an orientation, as well as a polycondensation step. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the curing time and temperature, the relative humidity and the reagents temperature on the geopolymerization process in order to obtain a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous wastes. The evolution of the process from the precursors dissolution to final geopolymer matrix hardening has been followed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/EDS and leaching tests. The results show the significant influence of both curing temperature in the curing stage and of the mould materials on the matrix stability. The easy-to-run preparation procedure for a chemically stable metakaolin geopolymer individuated can be summarized as reagents setting and curing at room temperature and material mould which permits moisture level around 40%. - Graphical abstract: Chemical stability as a function of curing conditions. Highlights: ► Metakaolin in highly alkaline solutions produced solid materials at room temperature. ► Curing time and temperature, relative humidity, reagents temperature were optimized. ► Leaching tests were used to confirm final hardening. ► FTIR spectroscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray diffractometry were used to interpret matrix stability.

  19. Inorganic polymers from alkali activation of metakaolin: Effect of setting and curing on structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Catauro, Michelina; Ponzoni, Chiara; Bollino, Flavia; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Geopolymers, obtained by chemical reaction between aluminosilicate oxides and silicates under highly alkaline conditions, are studied in this paper. The proposed mechanism of geopolymer setting and hardening or curing consists of a dissolution, a transportation or an orientation, as well as a polycondensation step. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the curing time and temperature, the relative humidity and the reagents temperature on the geopolymerization process in order to obtain a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous wastes. The evolution of the process from the precursors dissolution to final geopolymer matrix hardening has been followed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/EDS and leaching tests. The results show the significant influence of both curing temperature in the curing stage and of the mould materials on the matrix stability. The easy-to-run preparation procedure for a chemically stable metakaolin geopolymer individuated can be summarized as reagents setting and curing at room temperature and material mould which permits moisture level around 40%.

  20. Prenatal malnutrition leads to deficits in attentional set shifting and decreases metabolic activity in prefrontal subregions that control executive function.

    PubMed

    McGaughy, Jill A; Amaral, Ana C; Rushmore, R Jarrett; Mokler, David J; Morgane, Peter J; Rosene, Douglas L; Galler, Janina R

    2014-01-01

    Globally, over 25% of all children under the age of 5 years experience malnutrition leading to cognitive and emotional impairments that can persist into adulthood and beyond. We use a rodent model to determine the impact of prenatal protein malnutrition on executive functions in an attentional set-shifting task and metabolic activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC) subregions critical to these behaviors. Long-Evans dams were provided with a low (6% casein) or adequate (25% casein) protein diet 5 weeks before mating and during pregnancy. At birth, the litters were culled to 8 pups and fostered to control dams on the 25% casein diet. At postnatal day 90, prenatally malnourished rats were less able to shift attentional set and reverse reward contingencies than controls, demonstrating cognitive rigidity. Naive same-sexed littermates were assessed for regional brain activity using the metabolic marker (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The prenatally malnourished rats had lower metabolic activity than controls in prelimbic, infralimbic, anterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortices, but had comparable activity in the nearby piriform cortex and superior colliculus. This study demonstrates that prenatal protein malnutrition in a well-described animal model produces cognitive deficits in tests of attentional set shifting and reversal learning, similar to findings of cognitive inflexibility reported in humans exposed to early childhood malnutrition. PMID:25342495

  1. Novel zinc alginate hydrogels prepared by internal setting method with intrinsic antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Straccia, Maria Cristina; d'Ayala, Giovanna Gomez; Romano, Ida; Laurienzo, Paola

    2015-07-10

    In this paper, a controlled gelation of alginate was performed for the first time using ZnCO3 and GDL. Uniform and transparent gels were obtained and investigated as potential wound dressings. Homogeneity, water content, swelling capability, water evaporation rate, stability in normal saline solution, mechanical properties and antibacterial activity were assessed as a function of zinc concentration. Gelation rate increased at increasing zinc content, while a decrease in water uptake and an improvement of stability were found. Release of zinc in physiological environments showed that concentration of zinc released in solution lies below the cytotoxicity level. Hydrogels showed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The hydrogel with highest zinc content was stabilized with calcium by immersion in a calcium chloride solution. The resulting hydrogel preserved homogeneity and antibacterial activity. Furthermore, it showed even an improvement of stability and mechanical properties, which makes it suitable as long-lasting wound dressing.

  2. Leg muscle activation and distance setting of the leg cycle ergometer for use by the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Chill; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Lee, Young-Ik

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] This study verified the leg muscle activities of elderly subjects performing leg cycle ergometer exercise. [Subjects] Forty-one elderly persons were the subjects of this study. [Methods] For the three distances corresponding to knee flexion angles of 15, 45, and 70, the muscle activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius were measured while the subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer. [Results] The rectus femoris and biceps femoris showed statistically significant increases as the distance between the cycle ergometer and the body increased, and the lateral gastrocnemius muscle activation showed a statistically significant increase as the distance from the body to the cycle ergometer decreased. [Conclusion] When the elderly have limb muscle weakness, leg cycle ergometer distances should be adjusted.

  3. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  4. Stepping toward Physical Activity Requirements: Integrating Pedometers into Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Wadsworth, Danielle D.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is an essential component for lifelong wellness and the quality of life. Over the past years, childhood obesity has dramatically increased. Data supports that young children are adopting sedentary behaviors within and outside of school hours that may contribute to obesity and other health-related diseases. This paper provides…

  5. Peace Perceptions of Prospective Teachers for Promoting Peace Activities for School Settings in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousuf, Muhammad Imran; Sarwar, Muhammad; Dart, Gareth; Naseer-ud-Din, Muhmmad

    2010-01-01

    Peace has been recognized as a matter of education and to be promoted at the initial level. The present study attempts to generate a profile of activities toward peace education among prospective teachers. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) was used by selecting fifteen prospective teachers as a Nominal Group (NG). NGT was applied under a sequence…

  6. The Role of a Caring-Based Intervention in a Physical Activity Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Maria; Watson, Doris L.; Gano-Overway, Lori; Fry, Mary; Kim, Mi-Sook; Magyar, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of a caring-based versus a traditionally-focused physical activity intervention on underserved adolescents' perceptions of the caring climate, the motivational climate, empathetic concern, enjoyment, and future anticipated participation. Multiethnic youth (N = 353) aged 9 to 17 involved in two National…

  7. Making Numbers Your Friends: A Set of "Make This Number" Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Fluency with basic number facts is vital for students' progress in mathematics. Not only does it contribute to students' facility with mental computation and algorithms, but an understanding of numbers and their properties builds a foundation for future mathematical work including algebra. There are many activities that can help students "make…

  8. Darwin and Evolution: A Set of Activities Based on the Evolution of Mammals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haresnape, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    These activities, prepared for key stage 5 students (ages 16-18) and also suitable for key stage 4 (ages 14-16), show that physical appearance is not necessarily the best way to classify mammals. DNA structure is examined to show how similarities and differences between DNA sequences of mammals can be used to establish evolutionary relationships.…

  9. Role of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) in setting the flash sensitivity of rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ana; Burns, Marie E.; Sokal, Izabela; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Baylor, Denis A.; Chen, Jeannie

    2001-01-01

    The retina's photoreceptor cells adjust their sensitivity to allow photons to be transduced over a wide range of light intensities. One mechanism thought to participate in sensitivity adjustments is Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase (GC) by guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). We evaluated the contribution of GCAPs to sensitivity regulation in rods by disrupting their expression in transgenic mice. The GC activity from GCAPs−/− retinas showed no Ca2+ dependence, indicating that Ca2+ regulation of GCs had indeed been abolished. Flash responses from dark-adapted GCAPs−/− rods were larger and slower than responses from wild-type rods. In addition, the incremental flash sensitivity of GCAPs−/− rods failed to be maintained at wild-type levels in bright steady light. GCAP2 expressed in GCAPs−/− rods restored maximal light-induced GC activity but did not restore normal flash response kinetics. We conclude that GCAPs strongly regulate GC activity in mouse rods, decreasing the flash sensitivity in darkness and increasing the incremental flash sensitivity in bright steady light, thereby extending the rod's operating range. PMID:11493703

  10. Child goal setting of dietary and physical activity in a serious videogame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To inform child obesity prevention programs, the current article identified what children thought were the most important goals, values, and perceived barriers related to healthy eating and physical activity (PA) within a serious video game for health, "Escape from Diab" (Archimage Inc., Houston, TX...

  11. Accelerating wavefunction in density-functional-theory embedding by truncating the active basis set.

    PubMed

    Bennie, Simon J; Stella, Martina; Miller, Thomas F; Manby, Frederick R

    2015-07-14

    Methods where an accurate wavefunction is embedded in a density-functional description of the surrounding environment have recently been simplified through the use of a projection operator to ensure orthogonality of orbital subspaces. Projector embedding already offers significant performance gains over conventional post-Hartree-Fock methods by reducing the number of correlated occupied orbitals. However, in our first applications of the method, we used the atomic-orbital basis for the full system, even for the correlated wavefunction calculation in a small, active subsystem. Here, we further develop our method for truncating the atomic-orbital basis to include only functions within or close to the active subsystem. The number of atomic orbitals in a calculation on a fixed active subsystem becomes asymptotically independent of the size of the environment, producing the required O(N(0)) scaling of cost of the calculation in the active subsystem, and accuracy is controlled by a single parameter. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated for the embedded many-body expansion of binding energies of water hexamers and calculation of reaction barriers of SN2 substitution of fluorine by chlorine in α-fluoroalkanes.

  12. Active Learning in a Large Medical Classroom Setting for Teaching Renal Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.; Stevenson, Frazier T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an active learning exercise which has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ system-based curriculum for first-year medical students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with ~150 students. The authors, who are faculty members, lead the discussions,…

  13. Wearable accelerometry-based technology capable of assessing functional activities in neurological populations in community settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating rehabilitation services through wearable systems has the potential to accurately assess the type, intensity, duration, and quality of movement necessary for procuring key outcome measures. Objectives This review aims to explore wearable accelerometry-based technology (ABT) capable of assessing mobility-related functional activities intended for rehabilitation purposes in community settings for neurological populations. In this review, we focus on the accuracy of ABT-based methods, types of outcome measures, and the implementation of ABT in non-clinical settings for rehabilitation purposes. Data sources Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and IEEE Xplore. The search strategy covered three main areas, namely wearable technology, rehabilitation, and setting. Study selection Potentially relevant studies were categorized as systems either evaluating methods or outcome parameters. Methods Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by two customized checklists, depending on their categorization and rated independently by three blinded reviewers. Results Twelve studies involving ABT met the eligibility criteria, of which three studies were identified as having implemented ABT for rehabilitation purposes in non-clinical settings. From the twelve studies, seven studies achieved high methodological quality scores. These studies were not only capable of assessing the type, quantity, and quality measures of functional activities, but could also distinguish healthy from non-healthy subjects and/or address disease severity levels. Conclusion While many studies support ABT’s potential for telerehabilitation, few actually utilized it to assess mobility-related functional activities outside laboratory settings. To generate more appropriate outcome measures, there is a clear need to translate research findings and novel methods into practice. PMID:24625308

  14. Hypo-activity screening in school setting; examining reliability and validity of the Teacher Estimation of Activity Form (TEAF).

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Sara; Engel-Yeger, Batya

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that physical activity during childhood contributes to children's physical and psychological health. The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Hebrew version of the Teacher Estimation of Activity Form (TEAF) questionnaire as a screening tool among school-aged children in Israel. Six physical education teachers completed TEAF questionnaires of 123 children aged 5-12 years, 68 children (55%) with Typical Development (TD) and 55 children (45%) diagnosed with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). The Hebrew version of the TEAF indicates a very high level of internal consistency (α = .97). There were no significant gender differences. Significant differences were found between children with and without DCD attesting to the test's construct validity. Concurrent validity was established by finding a significant high correlation (r = .76, p < .01) between the TEAF and the Movement-ABC mean scores within the DCD group. The TEAF demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity estimates. It appears to be a promising standardized practical tool in both research and practice for describing information about school-aged children's involvement in physical activity. Further research is indicated with larger samples to establish cut-off scores determining what point identifies hypo activity in striated age groups. Furthermore, the majority of the participants in this study were boys, and further research is needed to include more girls for a better understanding of the phenomena of hypo activity.

  15. Analyzing soil erosion using a multi-temporal UAV data set after one year of active agriculture in Navarra, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Masselink, Rens

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) are becoming popular tools in the geosciences due to improving technology and processing/analysis techniques. They can potentially fill the gap between spaceborne or manned aircraft remote sensing and terrestrial remote sensing, both in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. In this study we analyze a multi-temporal data set that was acquired with a fixed-wing UAS in an agricultural catchment (2 sq. km) in Navarra, Spain. The goal of this study is to register soil erosion activity after one year of agricultural activity. The aircraft was equipped with a Panasonic GX1 16MP pocket camera with a 20 mm lens to capture normal JPEG RGB images. The data set consisted of two sets of imagery acquired in the end of February in 2013 and 2014 after harvesting. The raw images were processed using Agisoft Photoscan Pro which includes the structure-from-motion (SfM) and multi-view stereopsis (MVS) algorithms producing digital surface models and orthophotos of both data sets. A discussion is presented that is focused on the suitability of multi-temporal UAS data and SfM/MVS processing for quantifying soil loss, mapping the distribution of eroded materials and analyzing re-occurrences of rill patterns after plowing.

  16. Steric structure-activity relationship of cyproheptadine derivatives as inhibitors of histone methyltransferase Set7/9.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Ohira, Kasumi; Urushibara, Ko; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Kanai, Misae; Tanatani, Aya; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Tomoya

    2016-09-15

    Set7/9 is a histone lysine methyltransferase, but it is also thought to be involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological functions. We previously identified cyproheptadine, which has a characteristic butterfly-like molecular conformation with bent tricyclic dibenzosuberene and chair-form N-methylpiperidine moieties, as a Set7/9 inhibitor. In this work, we synthesized several derivatives in order to examine the steric structure-inhibitory activity relationship. We found that even a small change of molecular shape due to reduction or replacement of the 10,11-olefinic bond of the tricyclic ring generally resulted in a drastic decrease of the inhibitory activity. Our results should be useful not only for development of more potent and selective inhibitors, but also for the construction of novel inhibitor scaffolds.

  17. Steric structure-activity relationship of cyproheptadine derivatives as inhibitors of histone methyltransferase Set7/9.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Ohira, Kasumi; Urushibara, Ko; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Kanai, Misae; Tanatani, Aya; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Tomoya

    2016-09-15

    Set7/9 is a histone lysine methyltransferase, but it is also thought to be involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological functions. We previously identified cyproheptadine, which has a characteristic butterfly-like molecular conformation with bent tricyclic dibenzosuberene and chair-form N-methylpiperidine moieties, as a Set7/9 inhibitor. In this work, we synthesized several derivatives in order to examine the steric structure-inhibitory activity relationship. We found that even a small change of molecular shape due to reduction or replacement of the 10,11-olefinic bond of the tricyclic ring generally resulted in a drastic decrease of the inhibitory activity. Our results should be useful not only for development of more potent and selective inhibitors, but also for the construction of novel inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27448773

  18. Assessing fault activity in intracontinental settings: paleoseismology and geomorphology in SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Christoph; Carson, Emily; Mackenzie, David; Elliott, Austin; Campbell, Grace; Walker, Richard; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake recurrence intervals of active faults often exceed the time span covered by instrumental, historical, and archaeological earthquake records in continental interiors. The identification of active faults then often relies on finding the geomorphological expression of surface faulting preserved in the landscape. In rather arid areas, single earthquake scarps can be preserved for thousands of years, but erosional and depositional processes will eventually obliterate features such as fault scarps and offset geological markers. Active faults with very long intervals between surface ruptures might therefore remain undetected, which constitutes a major problem for tectonic studies and seismic hazard assessment. Here we present data from the 50 km-long 'Charyn Canyon' thrust fault in the northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan). Remote sensing, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), differential GPS, field mapping, and paleoseismic trenching were used to reveal the earthquake history of this fault. Radiocarbon dating, infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL), and scarp diffusion modelling were used for bracketing the occurrence of paleo-earthquakes. In the paleoseismological trenches we identified two surface rupturing events within the last ~37 ka BP. The most recent earthquake took place between 3.5 - 7.3 ka BP, the penultimate event occurred between ~17-37 ka BP. We estimate magnitudes of ~MW6.5-7.3. Only the younger event has a morphological expression as a 25 km-long fault scarp of ~2 m height. This implicates that a major landscape reset occurred between these two earthquakes, most likely related to the significant climatic change that marked the end of the last glacial maximum. Similar observations from other paleoseismic investigation sites in this area support this interpretation. Our study shows that faults in the northern Tien Shan tend to break in strong earthquakes with very long recurrence intervals. As a consequence, morphological evidence for the most recent

  19. Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

  20. Activated Glucocorticoid Receptor Interacts with the INHAT Component Set/TAF-Iβ and Releases it from a Glucocorticoid-responsive Gene Promoter, Relieving Repression: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Glucocorticoid Resistance in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia with Set-Can Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Iβ, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Iβ interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Iβ was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Iβ from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Iβ acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids. PMID:18096310

  1. Comparison of Morphometry of Active Landslides in Differing Geological Settings Using LiDAR-derived DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Kuda, T.; Okuda, S.; Fujisawa, K.; Asahina, T.; Matsuda, M.

    2008-12-01

    Deep seated landslides develop fine-scale geomorphic forms such as cracks and internal scars, forming rough surfaces as they move. Because the data density of LiDAR measurement is of sufficient detail to extract these forms, DEM-derived surface fabric filters can be used to estimate their recent activity. To utilize LiDAR data for this purpose, it is first necessary to establish the relationships that exist between filter values and actual surface features, and slide activities. These relationships are expected to differ between sites, reflecting the local geological and topographic characteristics, and the resolution and grid size of DEMs. In this presentation, these relationships are investigated at three study sites in Japan. The major geologies were Tertiary Tuff at two sites and sheared Mesozoic sedimentary rocks at the other. DEM cell sizes ranged from 1 to 5 m. The eigenvalue ratio, which represents the 3-dimensional surface roughness, was calculated from the DEMs. The spatial pattern of cell values within landslide blocks was compared with local surface features and slide conditions observed in the field. Results suggest that similar surface features were likely to be expressed in a higher and wider range of eigenvalue ratios as DEM grid size increased. Change in grid size, however, did not greatly alter their spatial distribution patterns. Consequently, the different major hillslope processes could be highlighted by comparing the patterns of recently active blocks from each site. In the Mesozoic sedimentary rock site, active slides contained steep slope parts which were characterized by a higher proportion of cells with an eigenvalue ratio < 2.5, when compared with surrounding areas. These low values mostly represent cracks in bedrock outcrops and scars. In contrast, the softer underlying rocks at the Tuff sites, has allowed landslides to evolve with gentle slopes, while maintaining a slow but consistent downslope motion. Here, there were a high proportion

  2. Inferring Meal Eating Activities in Real World Settings from Ambient Sounds: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomaz, Edison; Zhang, Cheng; Essa, Irfan; Abowd, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary self-monitoring has been shown to be an effective method for weight-loss, but it remains an onerous task despite recent advances in food journaling systems. Semi-automated food journaling can reduce the effort of logging, but often requires that eating activities be detected automatically. In this work we describe results from a feasibility study conducted in-the-wild where eating activities were inferred from ambient sounds captured with a wrist-mounted device; twenty participants wore the device during one day for an average of 5 hours while performing normal everyday activities. Our system was able to identify meal eating with an F-score of 79.8% in a person-dependent evaluation, and with 86.6% accuracy in a person-independent evaluation. Our approach is intended to be practical, leveraging off-the-shelf devices with audio sensing capabilities in contrast to systems for automated dietary assessment based on specialized sensors. PMID:25859566

  3. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Faulting History Along the Northern El Carrizal Fault, Baja California Sur, Mexico: Earthquake Recurrence at a Persistently Active Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, S. J.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Gutiérrez, G. M.; Santillanez, A. U.; Rittenour, T. R.

    2007-12-01

    The El Carrizal fault is a NW striking, east dipping normal fault located 25 km west of the city of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico and is the westernmost bounding fault of the gulf-margin system at this latitude. The fault is ~70 km long onshore and ~50 km long offshore to the north in La Paz Bay. As many as three Quaternary geomorphic surfaces formed on the footwall and were identified on the basis of mapping and topographic profiling. In the north, the El Carrizal fault splays into multiple strands and exhibits a pattern of alternating N-S and NW-trending segments. Results from geologic mapping, paleoseismic investigations, and preliminary optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) geochronology provide some of the first numerical constraints on late Pleistocene-Holocene faulting along the El Carrizal fault. A 20 m long, 2-3 m deep trench (Trench 28) was excavated across the fault 23 km south of La Paz Bay. The trench was photographed, hand logged, and sampled for OSL dating. The trench revealed a succession of fluvial and channel deposits of sands, gravels, and cobbles. The main fault zone is manifested by a 0.5 m thick wedge-shaped deposit that consists of silty-sand and also contains rotated blocks of caliche- cemented gravels. Preliminary OSL ages from a silty-sand unit offset 2 m by the fault average latest Pleistocene. A trench 4 km south of Trench 28 (Cuadradito Trench) was also documented and sampled for OSL analysis. Preliminary OSL ages from a fluvial sand unit deposited against faulted bedrock range from mid to late Holocene. Sedimentary comparisons and surficial mapping suggest that the Holocene unit at Cuadradito Trench may be correlative to sediment that overlies faulted units from Trench 28. Such a correlation would constrain the timing of the 2 m offset at Trench 28 to be between latest Pleistocene and mid Holocene. A quarry 10 km north of Trench 28 exposes Quaternary sand and gravels buttressed against a 5-10 m wide bedrock shear zone. Here

  4. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    PubMed Central

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ϵ-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ϵ-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  5. Physical Activity and Self-Efficacy in Physical Activity and Healthy Eating in an Urban Elementary Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Tracey D.; O'Neill, Elizabeth; Kostelis, Kimberly T.; Jaffe, Daniel; Vitti, Steven; Quinlan, Melissa; Boland, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identifying lifestyle factors such as physical activity (PA) patterns and eating behaviors of children may be beneficial in implementing interventions in urban elementary schools. Purpose: To examine PA levels and self-efficacy (SE) in PA and health eating (HE) of third, fourth, and fifth graders in 3 low economic elementary schools in…

  6. Reconstructing Drainage Evolution in Response to Tectonic Deformation Along an Active Rift Margin Using Cosmogenic Exposure Age Dating of Desert Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guralnik, B.; Matmon, A.; Avni, Y.; Zilberman, E.; Fink, D.

    2009-04-01

    Fragmentation and rearrangement of drainage basins, and stream reversal occur in response to tectonic forcing such as subsidence of continental rift valleys and uplift of rift shoulders. We present new cosmogenic data from the central Negev Desert, southern Israel, that sheds light on the relations between the tectonic history of the western margins of the southern Dead Sea Rift (DSR) and drainage basin evolution since the Pliocene. In the Pliocene a major north-oriented river system drained the Negev into the Dead Sea basin and collected tributaries that originated east of the DSR and flowed westward across the central Negev. Tectonic deformation along the western margin of the DSR that began in the Pliocene caused regional eastward tilting and reversal of these tributaries by the early Pleistocene. Zero regional gradients which prevailed during the reversal stage, were accompanied by the accumulation of red beds and lake deposits, currently found on progressively lower elevations towards the rift. The present elevations of these deposits record Quaternary subsidence. To constrain the breakdown history of the Pliocene drainage system and reconstruct Quaternary subsidence, we sampled mature desert pavement from 13 abandoned alluvial surfaces associated with the Plio-Pleistocene deposits. From each surface, hundreds of chert clasts were collected and amalgamated into a single sample. Seven samples were collected from the highest windgaps along major water divides, in which remnants of the early Pleistocene surface are preserved. Five of these samples yielded exposure ages that range between 1.9 Ma and 1.5 Ma. These ages bracket the collapse of the Pliocene drainage basin and suggest the eastward migration of this process. Six other samples which yielded ages that range between 1.3 Ma and 0.5 Ma were collected from alluvial terraces inset into the early Pleistocene surface. They indicate stages of incision of the present drainage system. Under conditions of long

  7. Eastern Venezuela Basin's Post-Jurassic evolution as a passive transform margin basin

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.P. Jr. ); Sams, R.H. )

    1993-02-01

    Passive transform margins are segments of rifted continental margins bounded by transform faults that are active during rifting and that become inactive during drifting. Examples include the northern coast of Brazil and its matching margin along the Liberia-Nigeria coast. We propose that the northern margin of the Eastern Venezuela Basin was dominantly a passive transform margin during the Cretaceous and early Paleogene, rather than a purely passive margin. Published microplate reconstructions of the southern Caribbean show Jurassic separation of the Bahamas platform from northern South America along a northwest-trending transform fault postulated to lie just northeast of Trinidad and the Guianas. We conjecture that the [open quotes]Deflexion de Barcelona[close quotes] (a northwest-trending zone of strike slip faults along the southwestern edge of the Serrania del Interior) is controlled by a basement geofracture that is the onshore expression of Jurassic transform fault southwest of and subparallel to the southwestern Bahamas transform. Implications of this conjecture for the Eastern Venezuela Basin include: (1) absence of McKenzie-type regional crustal stretching, Mesozoic thermal anomaly, and Mesozoic thermal-tectonic subsidence; (2) abrupt rather than gradual seaward changes in crustal thickness; (3)abrupt lateral changes in thickness and facies of Mesozoic sediments, as in the Piaui-Ceara basins of northern Brazil; (4) tendency for structural styles developed during Neogene compression to include more strike-slip faults and en enchelon fold sets (because of reactivation of Mesozoic transforms) than would be expected by structural inversion of a purely passive margin.

  8. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper

  9. An evaluation of the residual activity of antiseptic handrub lotions: an 'in use' setting study.

    PubMed

    Namura, S; Nishijima, S; Asada, Y

    1994-07-01

    An evaluation of the residual activity of quick-drying agents (alcoholic solutions) used for hygienic hand disinfection is described. We looked for residual efficacy following hand disinfection with soap and water alone or followed by one of two alcoholic handrub lotions supplied from an automatic hand washing machine. The bacterial counts on the hands obtained before and within 2 successive hours after disinfection showed that alcoholic chlorhexidine was the most effective for 10 minutes after contamination of the hands. WELPAS (alcoholic chlorbenzarconium) followed this in its immediate effect and was better than soap and water alone. There were no significant differences after 30' or 120' between the three disinfecting methods.

  10. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  11. Comparison of chiropractic student scores before and after utilizing active learning techniques in a classroom setting

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Joseph G.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We report the differences in final examination scores achieved by students at the culmination of two different teaching strategies in an introductory skills course. Methods Multiple choice examination scores from six consecutive academic calendar sessions over 18 months (n = 503) were compared. Two groups were used: Cohort A (n = 290) represented students who were enrolled in the course 3 consecutive academic sessions before an instructional change and Cohort B (n = 213) included students who were enrolled in 3 consecutive academic sessions following the instructional change, which included a more active learning format. Statistical analyses used were 2-tailed independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD), and effect size. Results The 2-tailed independent t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t = −3.71, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–4.20). Significant difference was found in the highest performing subgroup compared to the lowest performing subgroup in Cohort A (F = 3.343, p = .037). For Cohort A subgroups 1 and 2, Tukey's HSD was p < .028. In Cohort B, no difference was found among subgroups (F = 1.912, p = .150, HSD p > .105). Conclusion Compared to previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, the students in the new course design performed better, suggesting that using active learning techniques helps improve student achievement. PMID:23964739

  12. Escaping to and being active in neighbourhood parks: park use in a post-disaster setting.

    PubMed

    Rung, Ariane L; Broyles, Stephanie T; Mowen, Andrew J; Gustat, Jeanette; Sothern, Melinda S

    2011-04-01

    Neighbourhood parks may serve as a coping resource in post-disaster communities, yet little is known about the impact of large-scale disasters on park use. The objective of this study is to explore the impact of Hurricane Katrina (August 2005) on park use by visitors from flooded areas of New Orleans, Louisiana, compared to visitors from non-flooded areas. In 2006 and 2007, following Hurricane Katrina, 201 adults who visited 27 New Orleans parks were interviewed. Visitors from flooded neighbourhoods used their parks less often and were less likely to engage in animal interaction than visitors from non-flooded neighbourhoods. They placed more importance on escape and physically-active motivations than visitors from non-flooded areas. Social reasons were also more important to visitors from flooded areas, but these differences disappeared after adjusting for race. Neighbourhood parks are a community asset that may play a role in the post-disaster recovery process by providing opportunities for escape and physical activity.

  13. Fault Orientations at Obliquely Rifted Margins: Where? When? Why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha

    2015-04-01

    Present-day knowledge of rifted margin formation is largely based on 2D seismic lines, 2D conceptual models, and corroborated by 2D numerical experiments. However, the 2D assumption that the extension direction is perpendicular to the rift trend is often invalid. In fact, worldwide more than 75% of all rifted margin segments have been formed under significant obliquity exceeding 20° (angle measured between extension direction and rift trend normal): During formation of the Atlantic Ocean, oblique rifting dominated at the sheared margins of South Africa and Patagonia, the Equatorial Atlantic margins, separation of Greenland and North America, and it played a major role in the protracted rift history of the North East Atlantic. Outside the Atlantic Ocean, oblique rifting occurred during the split between East and West Gondwana, the separation of India and Australia, India and Madagascar, Australia and Antarctica, as well as Arabia and Africa. It is presently observed in the Gulf of California, the Aegean and in the East African Rift. Despite its significance, the degree to which oblique lithospheric extension affects first-order rift and passive margin properties like surface stress pattern, fault azimuths, and basin geometry, is still not entirely clear. This contribution provides insight in crustal stress patterns and fault orientations by applying a 3D numerical rift model to oblique extensional settings. The presented forward experiments cover the whole spectrum of oblique extension (i.e. rift-orthogonal extension, low obliquity, high obliquity, strike-slip deformation) from initial deformation to breakup. They are conducted using an elasto-visco-plastic finite element model and involve crustal and mantle layers accounting for self-consistent necking of the lithosphere. Results are thoroughly compared to previous analogue experiments, which yields many similarities but also distinct differences for late rift stages and for high obliquity. Even though the model

  14. Setting mastery learning standards.

    PubMed

    Yudkowsky, Rachel; Park, Yoon Soo; Lineberry, Matthew; Knox, Aaron; Ritter, E Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Mastery learning is an instructional approach in which educational progress is based on demonstrated performance, not curricular time. Learners practice and retest repeatedly until they reach a designated mastery level; the final level of achievement is the same for all, although time to mastery may vary. Given the unique properties of mastery learning assessments, a thoughtful approach to establishing the performance levels and metrics that determine when a learner has demonstrated mastery is essential.Standard-setting procedures require modification when used for mastery learning settings in health care, particularly regarding the use of evidence-based performance data, the determination of appropriate benchmark or comparison groups, and consideration of patient safety consequences. Information about learner outcomes and past performance data of learners successful at the subsequent level of training can be more helpful than traditional information about test performance of past examinees. The marginally competent "borderline student" or "borderline group" referenced in traditional item-based and examinee-based procedures will generally need to be redefined in mastery settings. Patient safety considerations support conjunctive standards for key knowledge and skill subdomains and for items that have an impact on clinical outcomes. Finally, traditional psychometric indices used to evaluate the quality of standards do not necessarily reflect critical measurement properties of mastery assessments. Mastery learning and testing are essential to the achievement and assessment of entrustable professional activities and residency milestones. With careful attention, sound mastery standard-setting procedures can provide an essential step toward improving the effectiveness of health professions education, patient safety, and patient care. PMID:26375263

  15. Young children's hand contact activities: an observational study via videotaping in primarily outdoor residential settings.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Willa; Canales, Robert A; Beamer, Paloma; Ferguson, Alesia C; Leckie, James O

    2006-09-01

    Microlevel activity time series (MLATS) data were gathered on hand contact activities of 38 children (1-6 years old) by videotaping in primarily outdoor residential environments. The videotape recordings were then translated into text files using a specialized software called VirtualTimingDevicetrade mark. Contact frequency (contacts/h), duration per contact (s/contact), and hourly contact duration (min/h) were summarized for outdoor hand contacts with 15 distinct object/surface categories ("Animal", "Body", "Clothes/Towels", "Fabric", "Floor", "Food", "Footwear", "Metal", "Non-dietary Water", "Paper/Wrapper", "Plastic", "Rock/Brick", "Toys", "Vegetation/Grass", and "Wood") and two aggregate object/surface categories ("Non-dietary objects/surfaces" and "Total objects/surfaces"). For outdoor both hand contacts with "Total objects/surfaces", contact frequencies ranged from 229.9 to 1517.7 contacts/h, median durations/contact ranged from < 1 to 5 s, and hourly contact durations ranged from 42.6 to 102.2 m/h. The data were analyzed for significant differences in hand contact activities as a function of (1) age, (2) location, (3) gender, and (4) hand. Significant differences (P < or = 0.05) were found for all four factors analyzed. Hourly contact durations with "Non-dietary objects/surfaces" and "Total objects/surfaces" increased with age (P = 0.01, rs = 0.42 and P = 0.005, rs = 0.46, respectively), while contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Wood" decreased with age (P = 0.02, rs = -0.38 and P = 0.05, rs = -0.32, respectively). Location was found to affect contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with certain objects/surfaces. For example, contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Fabric" were higher indoors (P = 0.02 for both), while contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Vegetation/Grass" were higher outdoors (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Girls had longer hourly contact durations with "Footwear" (P = 0

  16. The safety attitudes of people who use multi-purpose recreation facilities as a physical activity setting.

    PubMed

    Finch, Caroline F; Otago, Leonie; White, Peta; Donaldson, Alex; Mahoney, Mary

    2011-06-01

    Multi-purpose recreation facilities (MPRFs) are a popular setting for physical activity and it is therefore important that they are safe for all patrons. However, the attitudes of MPRF users towards safety are a potential barrier to the success of injury prevention programmes implemented within MPRFs. This article reports a survey of the safety attitudes of over 700 users of four indoor MPRFs. Factor analysis of 12 five-point Likert scale statements showed that the attitudes clustered around three major dimensions - the importance of safety, the benefits of safety and the perceptions of injury risk. Together, these three dimensions accounted for 49% of the variability in the attitudes. More than 85% of respondents agreed/strongly agreed that: safety was an important aspect of physical activity participation; being injured affected enjoyment of physical activity; people should adopt appropriate safety measures for all physical activity; and individuals were responsible for their own safety. The MPRF users, particularly women and older people, were generally safety conscious, believed in adopting safety measures, and were willing to take responsibility for their own safety. Facility managers can be confident that if they provide evidence-based injury prevention interventions in these settings, then users will respond appropriately and adopt the promoted behaviours.

  17. Polar continental margins: Studies off East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, J.; Thiede, J.; Kenyon, N. H.; Hollender, F.-J.

    The passive continental margin off east Greenland has been shaped by tectonic and sedimentary processes, and typical physiographic patterns have evolved over the past few million years under the influence of the late Cenozoic Northern Hemisphere glaciations. The Greenland ice shield has been particularly affected.GLORIA (Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic), the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences' (IOS) long-range, side-scan sonar, was used on a 1992 RV Livonia cruise to map large-scale changes in sedimentary patterns along the east Greenland continental margin. The overall objective of this research program was to determine the variety of large-scale seafloor processes to improve our understanding of the interaction between ice sheets, current regimes, and sedimentary processes. In cooperation with IOS and the RV Livonia, a high-quality set of seafloor data has been produced. GLORIA'S first survey of east Greenland's continental margin covered several 1000- × 50-km-wide swaths (Figure 1) and yielded an impressive sidescan sonar image of the complete Greenland Basin and margin (about 250,000 km2). A mosaic of the data was made at a scale of 1:375,000. The base map was prepared with a polar stereographic projection having a standard parallel of 71°.

  18. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth.

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit(®) activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with "goal" and "do your best" groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities.

  19. Magnitude and kinetics of CD8+ T cell activation during hyperacute HIV infection impacts viral set point

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Zaza; Kamya, Philomena; Mewalal, Nikoshia; Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Nkosi, Thandeka; Pretorius, Karyn; Laher, Faatima; Ogunshola, Funsho; Chopera, Denis; Shekhar, Karthik; Ghebremichael, Musie; Ismail, Nasreen; Moodley, Amber; Malik, Amna; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip J.R; Buus, Søren; Chakraborty, Arup; Dong, Krista; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary CD8+ T cells contribute to the control of HIV, but it is not clear whether initial immune responses modulate the viral set point. We screened high-risk uninfected women twice a week for plasma HIV RNA and identified twelve hyperacute infections. Onset of viremia elicited a massive HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response, with limited bystander activation of non-HIV memory CD8+ T cells. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells secreted little interferon-γ, underwent rapid apoptosis and failed to upregulate the interleukin 7 receptor, known to be important for T cell survival. The rapidity to peak CD8+ T cell activation and the absolute magnitude of activation induced by the exponential rise in viremia were inversely correlated with set point viremia. These data indicate that rapid, high magnitude HIV-induced CD8+ T cell responses are crucial for subsequent immune control of acute infection, which has important implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:26362266

  20. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth.

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit(®) activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with "goal" and "do your best" groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities. PMID:27649219

  1. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit® activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with “goal” and “do your best” groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities. PMID:27649219

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationship study of antioxidative peptide by using different sets of amino acids descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao-Wang; Li, Bo; He, Jiguo; Qian, Ping

    2011-07-01

    A database consisting of 214 tripeptides which contain either His or Tyr residue was applied to study quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of antioxidative tripeptides. Partial Least-Squares Regression analysis (PLSR) was conducted using parameters individually of each amino acid descriptor, including Divided Physico-chemical Property Scores (DPPS), Hydrophobic, Electronic, Steric, and Hydrogen (HESH), Vectors of Hydrophobic, Steric, and Electronic properties (VHSE), Molecular Surface-Weighted Holistic Invariant Molecular (MS-WHIM), isotropic surface area-electronic charge index (ISA-ECI) and Z-scale, to describe antioxidative tripeptides as X-variables and antioxidant activities measured with ferric thiocyanate methods were as Y-variable. After elimination of outliers by Hotelling's T 2 method and residual analysis, six significant models were obtained describing the entire data set. According to cumulative squared multiple correlation coefficients ( R2), cumulative cross-validation coefficients ( Q2) and relative standard deviation for calibration set (RSD c), the qualities of models using DPPS, HESH, ISA-ECI, and VHSE descriptors are better ( R2 > 0.6, Q2 > 0.5, RSD c < 0.39) than that of models using MS-WHIM and Z-scale descriptors ( R2 < 0.6, Q2 < 0.5, RSD c > 0.44). Furthermore, the predictive ability of models using DPPS descriptor is best among the six descriptors systems (cumulative multiple correlation coefficient for predict set ( Rext2) > 0.7). It was concluded that the DPPS is better to describe the amino acid of antioxidative tripeptides. The results of DPPS descriptor reveal that the importance of the center amino acid and the N-terminal amino acid are far more than the importance of the C-terminal amino acid for antioxidative tripeptides. The hydrophobic (positively to activity) and electronic (negatively to activity) properties of the N-terminal amino acid are suggested to play the most important significance to activity, followed

  3. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models. PMID:26703557

  4. Evolution of Devonian carbonate-shelf margin, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, J.R.; Sandberg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    The north-trending, 550-km-long Nevada segment of the Devonian carbonate-shelf margin, which fringed western North America, evidences the complex interaction of paleotectonics, eustasy, biotic changes, and bolide impact-related influences. Margin reconstruction is complicated by mid-Paleozoic to Paleogene compressional tectonics and younger extensional and strike-slip faulting. Reports published during the past three decades identify 12 important events that influenced development of shelf-margin settings; in chronological order, these are: (1) Early Devonian inheritance of Silurian stable shelf inargin, (2) formation of Early to early Middle 'Devonian shelf-margin basins, (3) propradation of later Middle Devonian shelf margin, (4) late Middle Devonian Taghanic ondap and continuing long-term Frasnian transgression, (5) initiation of latest Middle Devonian to early Frasnian proto-Antler orogenic forebulge, (6) mid-Frasnian Alamo Impact, (7) accelerated development of proto-Antler forebulge and backbulge Pilot basin, (8) global late Frasnian sentichatovae sea-level rise, (9) end-Frasnian sea-level fluctuations and ensuing mass extinction, (10) long-term Famennian regression and continept-wide erosion, (11) late Famennian emergence: of Ahtler orogenic highlands, and (12) end-Devonian eustatic sea-level fall. Although of considerable value for understanding facies relationships and geometries, existing standard carbonate platform-margin models developed for passive settings else-where do not adequately describe the diverse depositional and, structural settings along the Nevada Devonian platform margin. Recent structural and geochemical studies suggest that the Early to Middle Devonian-shelf-margin basins may have been fault-bound and controlled by inherited Precambrian structure. Subsequently, the migrating latest Middle to Late Devonian Antler orogenic forebulge exerted a dominant control on shelf-margin position, morphology, and sedimentation. ??Geological Society of

  5. The Physics of a Volcanic System: What is the Actual Role Played by Tectonic Setting in Controlling Volcanic Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Modern text-books commonly explain volcanic activity as a direct consequence of plate tectonics, overlooking the different scales characteristic of both types of processes. By acknowledging such differences, however, it is possible to envisage a model of a volcanic system that is based in the same principles of hydrostatics established by Blaise Pascal over 300 yrs ago. Such principles allow us to estimate the local conditions required for the occurrence of volcanism at a given location highlighting the importance of the rock strength and the density difference between melt and its surroundings. This model shows that the minimum thickness of the zone of partial melting in the mantle (or seismically defined Low Velocity Zone) that is required to feed volcanic activity might range from 5 to over 100 km, but also that under certain circumstances a rock strength < 200 MPa may suffice to keep magma trapped at depth whereas in other cases a strength > 600 MPa will not suffice to stop magma ascent resulting in volcanic activity at the surface. Consequently, the model of volcanism developed here explains why is that a given LVZ may lead to volcanic activity in some places whereas a completely identical LVZ may not result in volcanic activity in a different location. Consequently, this model provides a general framework that allows us to better understand the actual role played by tectonic setting in controlling volcanism at a planetary scale.

  6. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy: uncertainties and margins].

    PubMed

    Lacornerie, T; Marchesi, V; Reynaert, N

    2014-01-01

    The principles governing stereotactic body radiation therapy are tight margins and large dose gradients around targets. Every step of treatment preparation and delivery must be evaluated before applying this technique in the clinic. Uncertainties remain in each of these steps: delineation, prescription with the biological equivalent dose, treatment planning, patient set-up taking into account movements, the machine accuracy. The calculation of margins to take into account uncertainties differs from conventional radiotherapy because of the delivery of few fractions and large dose gradients around the target. The quest of high accuracy is complicated by the difficulty to reach it and the lack of consensus regarding the prescription. Many schemes dose/number of fractions are described in clinical studies and there are differences in the way describing the delivered doses. While waiting for the ICRU report dedicated to this technique, it seems desirable to use the quantities proposed in ICRU Report 83 (IMRT) to report the dose distribution. PMID:25023588

  7. Energy transport in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Tony W.; Squire, Vernon A.

    2001-09-01

    A novel approach to modeling ocean wave scattering in the marginal ice zone that uses the coherent potential approximation to compute the energy transport velocity is reported. The necessary theory is developed by considering sea ice floes to be thin elastic beams governed by the Euler-Bernoulli equation, with the open water surrounding each floe subject to the same equation with its material coefficients set to be very small quantities. This mathematical stratagem facilitates the solution of the problem and yields interesting results about the speed at which wave energy propagates through a marginal ice zone, the dispersion relation for a random mixture of ice floes and water, and the mean free path or attenuation coefficient. Results from the model are compared with data reported by Wadhams et al. [1988].

  8. Optogenetic silencing of locus coeruleus activity in mice impairs cognitive flexibility in an attentional set-shifting task

    PubMed Central

    Janitzky, Kathrin; Lippert, Michael T.; Engelhorn, Achim; Tegtmeier, Jennifer; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Ohl, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is the sole source of noradrenergic projections to the cortex and essential for attention-dependent cognitive processes. In this study we used unilateral optogenetic silencing of the LC in an attentional set-shifting task (ASST) to evaluate the influence of the LC on prefrontal cortex-dependent functions in mice. We expressed the halorhodopsin eNpHR 3.0 to reversibly silence LC activity during task performance, and found that silencing selectively impaired learning of those parts of the ASST that most strongly rely on cognitive flexibility. In particular, extra-dimensional set-shifting (EDS) and reversal learning was impaired, suggesting an involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, those parts of the task that are less dependent on cognitive flexibility, i.e., compound discrimination (CD) and the intra-dimensional shifts (IDS) were not affected. Furthermore, attentional set formation was unaffected by LC silencing. Our results therefore suggest a modulatory influence of the LC on cognitive flexibility, mediated by different frontal networks. PMID:26582980

  9. Set7 mediated Gli3 methylation plays a positive role in the activation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Wu, Hailong; Cheng, Steven Y; Gao, Daming; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays very important roles in development and cancers. Vertebrates have three transcriptional factors, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3. Among them, Gli3 is a very special transcriptional factor which closely resembles Cubitus interruptus (Ci, in Drosophila) structurally and functionally as a ‘double agent’ for Shh target gene expression. Here we show that Gli3 full-length, but not the truncated form, can be methylated at K436 and K595. This methylation is specifically catalyzed by Set7, a lysine methyltransferase (KMT). Methylation at K436 and K595 respectively increases the stability and DNA binding ability of Gli3, resulting in an enhancement of Shh signaling activation. Furthermore, functional experiments indicate that the Gli3 methylation contributes to the tumor growth and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we propose that Set7 mediated methylation is a novel PTM of Gli3, which positively regulates the transactivity of Gli3 and the activation of Shh signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15690.001 PMID:27146893

  10. Error margin analysis for feature gene extraction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feature gene extraction is a fundamental issue in microarray-based biomarker discovery. It is normally treated as an optimization problem of finding the best predictive feature genes that can effectively and stably discriminate distinct types of disease conditions, e.g. tumors and normals. Since gene microarray data normally involves thousands of genes at, tens or hundreds of samples, the gene extraction process may fall into local optimums if the gene set is optimized according to the maximization of classification accuracy of the classifier built from it. Results In this paper, we propose a novel gene extraction method of error margin analysis to optimize the feature genes. The proposed algorithm has been tested upon one synthetic dataset and two real microarray datasets. Meanwhile, it has been compared with five existing gene extraction algorithms on each dataset. On the synthetic dataset, the results show that the feature set extracted by our algorithm is the closest to the actual gene set. For the two real datasets, our algorithm is superior in terms of balancing the size and the validation accuracy of the resultant gene set when comparing to other algorithms. Conclusion Because of its distinct features, error margin analysis method can stably extract the relevant feature genes from microarray data for high-performance classification. PMID:20459827

  11. Factors controlling structural style and magmatism in passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2015-04-01

    Comparing volcanic and non-volcanic passive margins, the distinct variability in geometry and subsidence history implies that the thermo-mechanical conditions vary at the time of rifting. Volcanic rifted margins (such as in the North Atlantic) show large magmatic activity and shallow water condition at the rift-drift transition, implying high geothermal gradients. For non-volcanic rifted margins where the initial thermal condition is potentially colder, it may develop in two end-member styles (Type I and Type II). Type-I margin with limited magmatism can be observed at Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins where the continental crustal thins across a narrow region and large tracts of continental mantle lithosphere are exposed at the seafloor. Type-II margin as observed in the ultra-wide central South Atlantic margins, in contrast, has normal magmatic activity and has a strongly thinned continental crust that span very wide regions (>250 km) below which the continental mantle lithosphere was removed. Here we perform thermo-mechanical finite element numerical experiments to investigate factors that are potentially important for the formation of volcanic and non-volcanic passive margins. Forward numerical models are used to predict the structural styles and characteristic magmatism associated with each of these end members. A number of parameters including different rheological stratifications and thermal gradients are tested and factors that control the degree of magmatism and structural style during rifting are focused.

  12. Translating epidemiology into policy to prevent childhood obesity: the case for promoting physical activity in school settings.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Ross C; Chriqui, Jamie F; Burgeson, Charlene R; Fisher, Megan C; Ness, Roberta B

    2010-06-01

    Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem resulting from energy imbalance (when the intake of energy is greater than the amount of energy expended through physical activity). Numerous health authorities have identified policy interventions as promising strategies for creating population-wide improvements in physical activity. This case study focuses on energy expenditure through physical activity (with a particular emphasis on school-based physical education [PE]). Policy-relevant evidence for promoting physical activity in youth may take numerous forms, including epidemiologic data and other supporting evidence (e.g., qualitative data). The implementation and evaluation of school PE interventions leads to a set of lessons related to epidemiology and evidence-based policy. These include the need to: (i) enhance the focus on external validity, (ii) develop more policy-relevant evidence on the basis of "natural experiments," (iii) understand that policy making is political, (iv) better articulate the factors that influence policy dissemination, (v) understand the real-world constraints when implementing policy in school environments, and (vi) build transdisciplinary teams for policy progress. The issues described in this case study provide leverage points for practitioners, policy makers, and researchers as they seek to translate epidemiology to policy. PMID:20470970

  13. Translating Epidemiology into Policy to Prevent Childhood Obesity: The Case for Promoting Physical Activity in School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Burgeson, Charlene R.; Fisher, Megan C.; Ness, Roberta B.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem, resulting from energy imbalance (when the intake of energy is greater than the amount of energy expended through physical activity). Numerous health authorities have identified policy interventions as promising strategies for creating population-wide improvements in physical activity. This case study focuses on energy expenditure through physical activity (with a particular emphasis on school-based physical education [PE]). Policy-relevant evidence for promoting physical activity in youth may take numerous forms including epidemiologic data and other supporting evidence (e.g., qualitative data). The implementation and evaluation of school PE interventions leads to a set of lessons related to epidemiology and evidence-based policy. These include the need to: 1) enhance the focus on external validity, 2) develop more policy-relevant evidence based on “natural experiments,” 3) understand that policymaking is political, 4) better articulate the factors that influence policy dissemination, 5) understand the real world constraints when implementing policy in school environments, and 6) build transdisciplinary teams for policy progress. The issues described in this case study provide leverage points for practitioners, policy makers, and researchers as they seek to translate epidemiology to policy. PMID:20470970

  14. Activation of Marginally Reactive Boron Enolates by MeLi for the Formation of Enol Phosphates and Synthesis of the Δ(9)-THC Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ikoma, Atsushi; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi

    2015-09-18

    The addition of MeLi to boron enolates produced by the 1,4-addition of Ar2Cu(CN)Li2 to BF3·OEt2-activated enones was followed by the reaction with ClP(O)(OEt)2 to afford the corresponding enol phosphates in moderate to good yields. The scope of this method was examined with sterically hindered or electronically biased enones and/or reagents. This activation of boron enolates was successfully applied to the synthesis of the methyl ether of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

  15. Integrated geophysical study of Newfoundland continental margin (east coast Canada)

    SciTech Connect

    Enachescu, M.E.

    1987-05-01

    A synergetic approach is used to delineate the tectono-structural framework and establish a model of the geologic evolution of the Newfoundland continental margin. Over 100,000 mi of regional and detailed reflection seismic, various potential field maps and profiles, and selected well information constitute the data base of this study. More than two decades of exploratory effort was recently rewarded by significant oil discoveries contained in the Upper Jurassic-Early Cretaceous sands of the Jeanne d'Arc basin. Although a part of the East Coast North America chain (Florida to Baffin Bay) of passive margin basins, the Jeanne d'Arc basin had a unique intracratonic setting during its development. This prolific hydrocarbon-bearing basin is only one of the structural provinces identified on the Newfoundland Shelf. Other adjacent basins, sediment-covered ridges, platforms, and basement horsts were identified through integration of all available geophysical and geological data. All of the structural provinces defined in this paper are part of an aborted rift system which initially developed in the Late Triassic and was first activated at the end of the Jurassic and then again in Aptian time. Thermal subsidence prevailed during the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. The extensional history of the Newfoundland passive margin was additionally complicated by intensive salt tectonics. A large 2-D and 3-D seismic base of more than 100,000 mi shows numerous and complex hydrocarbon traps are present, but up to now only the extensional sedimentary cycle has been found to be productive.

  16. Feasibility of activity-promoting video games among obese adolescents and young adults in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Fürbeck, Barbara; Thomas, Silke; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Nowak, Dennis; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    One component of the recent obesity epidemic is the sedentary behaviour of children and adolescents e.g., use of video games consoles. The new generation of video games requires body movements and might thus increase activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such games could have an effect on physical activity in obese adolescents in a clinical setting. Between March and May 2007 activity-promoting video games ("apvg") were offered to all 84 inpatients (aged 13-28 years) registered in a long-term rehabilitation programme on a voluntary base. Reasons for (non-)attendance were assessed. Frequency and duration of use of the activity-promoting video game sessions were documented. Furthermore, heart rate and activity counts during use of "apvg", endurance training, and strength training were measured. Of 84 inpatients, 51 used the "apvg" at least once (69%) over the study period. The median weekly use of the intervention was 27 min during the first week (range 0-182 min), declining to zero (range 0-74 min) in week four. Mean heart rate during the sessions (mean 115 bpm; 95% confidence interval 108-122 bpm) was similar to the heart rate during strength training (106 bpm; 101-112 bpm). The results indicate that the video games could have an impact on the activity of obese adolescents and young adults. However, as the interest in the devices seems to be too low the suitability of them for weight reduction programmes in young people cannot be ensured. PMID:20837400

  17. Feasibility of activity-promoting video games among obese adolescents and young adults in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Fürbeck, Barbara; Thomas, Silke; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Nowak, Dennis; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    One component of the recent obesity epidemic is the sedentary behaviour of children and adolescents e.g., use of video games consoles. The new generation of video games requires body movements and might thus increase activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such games could have an effect on physical activity in obese adolescents in a clinical setting. Between March and May 2007 activity-promoting video games ("apvg") were offered to all 84 inpatients (aged 13-28 years) registered in a long-term rehabilitation programme on a voluntary base. Reasons for (non-)attendance were assessed. Frequency and duration of use of the activity-promoting video game sessions were documented. Furthermore, heart rate and activity counts during use of "apvg", endurance training, and strength training were measured. Of 84 inpatients, 51 used the "apvg" at least once (69%) over the study period. The median weekly use of the intervention was 27 min during the first week (range 0-182 min), declining to zero (range 0-74 min) in week four. Mean heart rate during the sessions (mean 115 bpm; 95% confidence interval 108-122 bpm) was similar to the heart rate during strength training (106 bpm; 101-112 bpm). The results indicate that the video games could have an impact on the activity of obese adolescents and young adults. However, as the interest in the devices seems to be too low the suitability of them for weight reduction programmes in young people cannot be ensured.

  18. Evolution of Northeast Atlantic magmatic continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Richard; Cornwell, David; Ramsden, Alice

    2014-05-01

    One of the major problems interpreting the evolution of magmatic continental margins such as those which dominate the Irish, UK and Norwegian margins of the NE Atlantic is that the structure which should record the pre-magmatic evolution of the rift and which potentially influences the character of the rifting process is partially or completely obscured by thick basalt lava flows and sills. A limited number of deep reflection seismic profiles acquired with tuned seismic sources have penetrated the basalts and provide an image of the pre-magmatic structure, otherwise the principle data are lower resolution wide-angle/refraction profiles and potential field models which have greater uncertainties associated with them. In order to sidestep the imaging contraints we have examined the Ethiopian ñ Afar rift system to try to understand the rifting process. This magmatic rift system provides, along its length, a series of ësnapshotsí into the possible tectonic evolution of a magmatic continental margin which are associated with different amounts of extension. The Main Ethiopian rift contains an embryonic magmatic passive margin dominated by faulting at the margins of the rift and en-echlon magmatic zones at the centre. Further north toward Afar the rift becomes infilled with extensive lava flows fed from fissure systems in the widening rift zone. Deep seismic profiles crossing the NE Atlantic margins reveal ocean dipping reflector sequences (ODRS) of basaltic lavas overlying extended crust and lower crustal sill complexes of intruded igneous rock, often referred to as underplate, which extend back beneath the continental margin. The ODRS show a variety of morphologies and settings but frequently occur in fault bounded rift structures along the margins. We suggest, by analogy to the observations that can be made in the Ethiopia Afar rift that these fault bounded basins largely form at the embryonic rift stage and are then partially or completely filled with lavas fed

  19. Organic geochemistry of outer continental margins and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the activities and progress made in the study of continental margins and deep ocean sediments. Topics discussed are the calibration of thermal maturation markers, hydrous pyrolysis studies and sample collection. (KS)

  20. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  1. Marginal seas—Terminological crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarovich, A. O.

    2011-07-01

    The terms marginal sea, peripheral sea, and backarc sea are widely used in the contemporary Russian geological literature as synonyms but do not have, in my opinion, unequivocal treatment. The application of the term marginal sea is briefly discussed. The seas of the Pacific transitional zone are reviewed. It is proposed to define a marginal sea as a marine basin a few thousand kilometers in extent and connected with the open ocean. Domains underlain by crust of the continental and oceanic types must coexist therein. The domains with oceanic crust are expressed in the topography as deepwater basins (one or several), where fragments of continental crust may also occur. A marginal sea must be bounded by at least one island arc.

  2. Sedimentary loading, lithospheric flexure and subduction initiation at passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.G. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Recent theoretical models have demonstrated the difficulty of subduction initiation at passive margins, whether subduction is assumed to initiate by overcoming the shear resistance on a thrust fault through the lithosphere or by failure of the entire lithosphere in bending due to sedimentary loading. A mechanism for subduction initiation at passive margins that overcomes these difficulties incorporates the increased subsidence of a marginal basin during decoupling of a previously locked margin. A passive margin may decouple by reactivation of rift-related faults in a local extensional or strike-slip setting. Flexure of marginal basins by sedimentary loading is modeled here by the bending of infinite and semi-infinite elastic plates under a triangular load. The geometry of a mature marginal basin fits the deflection produced by loading of an infinite plate in which the flexural rigidity of continental lithosphere is larger than that of oceanic lithosphere. Decoupling of such a locked passive margin by fault reactivation may cause the lithospheric bending behavior of the margin to change from that of an infinite plate to that of a semi-infinite plate, with a resultant increase in deflection of the marginal basin. The increase in deflection depends on the flexural rigidities of continental and oceanic lithosphere. For flexural rigidities of 10[sup 30]-10[sup 31] dyn-cm (elastic lithosphere thicknesses 24--51 km), the difference in deflections between infinite and semi-infinite plates is 15--17 km, so that decoupling sinks the top of the oceanic lithosphere to depths of ca 35 km. Additional sedimentation within the basin and phase changes within the oceanic crust may further increase this deflection. Subduction may initiate if the top of the oceanic lithosphere sinks to the base of the adjacent elastic lithosphere.

  3. Application of geoinformation techniques in sustainable development of marginal rural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynska, G.

    2009-04-01

    The basic objective of the studies is to create a geographic information system that would assure integration of activities aimed at protecting biological diversity with sustainable development of marginal rural areas through defining the conditions for development of tourism and recreation in the identified areas. The choice of that solution is a consequence of the fact that numerous phenomena and processes presented in maps are linked to functional relations or they can be viewed as functions of space, time and attributes. The paper presents the system development stage aimed at elaborating the template for the system serving solution of the above-presented problem. In case of this issue the geographic information system will be developed to support development of marginal rural areas through selection of appropriate forms of tourism for the endangered areas including indication of locations for development of appropriate tourist infrastructure. Selection of the appropriate form of tourism will depend on natural, tourist and infrastructure values present in a given area and conditioned by the need to present the biodiversity component present in those areas together with elements of traditional agricultural landscape. The most important problem is to reconcile two seemingly contradictory aims: 1. Preventing social and economic marginalization of the restructured rural areas. 2. Preserving biological diversity in the restructured areas.Agriculture influences many aspects of the natural environment such as water resources, biodiversity and status of natural habitats, status of soils, landscape and, in a wider context, the climate. Project implementation will involve application of technologies allowing analysis of the systems for managing marginal rural areas as spatial models based on geographic information systems. Modelling of marginal rural areas management using the GIS technologies will involve creating spatial models of actual objects. On the basis of data

  4. [Condition setting for the measurement of blood coagulation factor XIII activity using a fully automated blood coagulation analyzer, COAGTRON-350].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nobuko; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanabe, Kumiko; Jyona, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-12-01

    The automated laboratory analyzer COAGTRON-350 (Trinity Biotech) is used for routine and specific coagulation testing for the detection of fibrin formation utilizing either mechanical principles (ball method) or photo-optical principles, chromogenic kinetic enzyme analysis, and immune-turbidimetric detection systems in one benchtop unit. In this study, we demonstrated and established a parameter for the measurement of factor XIII (FXIII) activity using Berichrom FXIII reagent and the COAGTRON-350 analyzer. The usual protocol used for this reagent, based on the handling method, was slightly modified for this device. The analysis showed that fundamental study for the measurement of FXIII activity under our condition setting was favorable in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and correlation with another assays. Since FXIII is the key enzyme that plays important roles in hemostasis by stabilizing fibrin formation, the measurement of FXIII is essential for the diagnosis of bleeding disorders. Therefore, FXIII activity assessment as well as a routine coagulation testing can be conducted simultaneously with one instrument, which is useful in coagulopathy assessment.

  5. QSAR prediction of estrogen activity for a large set of diverse chemicals under the guidance of OECD principles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-11-01

    A large number of environmental chemicals, known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, are suspected of disrupting endocrine functions by mimicking or antagonizing natural hormones, and such chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. They are thought to act through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen-receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is practically impossible to perform thorough toxicological tests on all potential xenoestrogens, and thus, the quantitative structure--activity relationship (QSAR) provides a promising method for the estimation of a compound's estrogenic activity. Here, QSAR models of the estrogen receptor binding affinity of a large data set of heterogeneous chemicals have been built using theoretical molecular descriptors, giving full consideration to the new OECD principles in regulation for QSAR acceptability, during model construction and assessment. An unambiguous multiple linear regression (MLR) algorithm was used to build the models, and model predictive ability was validated by both internal and external validation. The applicability domain was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability. The results obtained using several validation paths indicate that the proposed QSAR model is robust and satisfactory, and can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogen activity of organic compounds.

  6. A Conceptual Framework for Organizational Readiness to Implement Nutrition and Physical Activity Programs in Early Childhood Education Settings

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Mudita; Schober, Daniel J.; Byrd-Williams, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Across multiple sectors, organizational readiness predicts the success of program implementation. However, the factors influencing readiness of early childhood education (ECE) organizations for implementation of new nutrition and physical activity programs is poorly understood. This study presents a new conceptual framework to measure organizational readiness to implement nutrition and physical activity programs in ECE centers serving children aged 0 to 5 years. The framework was validated for consensus on relevance and generalizability by conducting focus groups; the participants were managers (16 directors and 2 assistant directors) of ECE centers. The framework theorizes that it is necessary to have “collective readiness,” which takes into account such factors as resources, organizational operations, work culture, and the collective attitudes, motivation, beliefs, and intentions of ECE staff. Results of the focus groups demonstrated consensus on the relevance of proposed constructs across ECE settings. Including readiness measures during program planning and evaluation could inform implementation of ECE programs targeting nutrition and physical activity behaviors. PMID:25357258

  7. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  8. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: A theoretical study using the Solubility Basis Set (SBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Riipinen, Ilona; Pandis, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Organic aerosol particles often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and CCN activation of the organic particles. Here we investigate the CCN activation behavior of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. METHODS We considered a monodisperse population of spherical aerosol particles consisting of an internal mixture of organic compounds. When exposed to water vapor, these particles were assumed to grow reaching a thermodynamic equilibrium between the water vapor and the particle phase. The composition of the organic and aqueous phases was determined on one hand by the equilibrium between the aqueous phase and water vapor, and on the other hand by the equilibrium of the aqueous phase with the organic insoluble phase. We modelled the mixtures with the help of a solubility basis set (SBS, analogous to the volatility basis set VBS, Donahue et al. 2006, 2011, 2012), describing the mixture with n surrogate compounds with varying solubilities. We varied the range and shape of the solubility distribution, and the number of components n in the distribution, we also assumed two different kinds of interactions between the organic compounds in the insoluble phase 1) ideal mixture, where organics limit each other's dissolution; 2) unity activity, where organics behave as pure compounds and do not influence each other's dissolution. Critical supersaturations and the dissolution behavior at the point of CCN activation were calculated utilizing the Köhler theory for all organic mixtures (denoted here as the "full model"). The full model predictions were compared with the three simplified models: 1) assuming complete dissolution of all compounds; 2) treating the organic mixture solubility with the hygroscopicity parameter κ and 3) assuming a fixed soluble fraction ɛ for each mixture. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS

  9. Worst-Case Flutter Margins from F/A-18 Aircraft Aeroelastic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Marty

    1997-01-01

    An approach for computing worst-case flutter margins has been formulated in a robust stability framework. Uncertainty operators are included with a linear model to describe modeling errors and flight variations. The structured singular value, micron, computes a stability margin which directly accounts for these uncertainties. This approach introduces a new method of computing flutter margins and an associated new parameter for describing these margins. The micron margins are robust margins which indicate worst-case stability estimates with respect to the defined uncertainty. Worst-case flutter margins are computed for the F/A-18 SRA using uncertainty sets generated by flight data analysis. The robust margins demonstrate flight conditions for flutter may lie closer to the flight envelope than previously estimated by p-k analysis.

  10. Mineralogical and chemical characteristics of newer dolerite dyke around Keonjhar, Orissa: Implication for hydrothermal activity in subduction zone setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Piyali; Ray, Arijit; Pramanik, Sayantani

    2014-06-01

    The newer dolerite dykes around Keonjhar within the Singbhum Granite occur in NE-SW, NW-SE and NNE-SSW trends. The mafic dykes of the present study exhibit several mineralogical changes like clouding of plagioclase feldspars, bastitisation of orthopyroxene, and development of fibrous amphibole (tremolite-actinolite) from clinopyroxene, which are all considered products of hydrothermal alterations. This alteration involves addition and subtraction of certain elements. Graphical analyses with Alteration index and elemental abundances show that elements like Rb, Ba, Th, La and K have been added during the alteration process, whereas elements like Sc, Cr, Co, Ni, Si, Al, Fe, Mg and Ca have been removed. It is observed that in spite of such chemical alteration, correlation between major and trace elements, characteristic of petrogenetic process, is still preserved. This might reflect systematic Alteration (addition or subtraction) of elements without disturbing the original element to element correlation. It has also been established by earlier workers that the evolution of newer dolerite had occurred in an arc-back arc setting which may also be true for newer dolerites of the present study. This is evident from plots of pyroxene composition and whole rock composition of newer dolerite samples in different tectonic discrimination diagrams using immobile elements. The newer dolerite dykes of the Keonjhar area may thus be considered to represent an example of hydrothermal activity on mafic rocks in an arc setting.

  11. Development of the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting the impact of storms on high-energy, active-margin coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Maarten van Ormondt,; Erikson, Li H.; Jodi Eshleman,; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Peter Ruggiero,; Peter Adams,; Foxgrover, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) applies a predominantly deterministic framework to make detailed predictions (meter scale) of storm-induced coastal flooding, erosion, and cliff failures over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers). CoSMoS was developed for hindcast studies, operational applications (i.e., nowcasts and multiday forecasts), and future climate scenarios (i.e., sea-level rise + storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm hazards information that may be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. The prototype system, developed for the California coast, uses the global WAVEWATCH III wave model, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry-based global tide model, and atmospheric-forcing data from either the US National Weather Service (operational mode) or Global Climate Models (future climate mode), to determine regional wave and water-level boundary conditions. These physical processes are dynamically downscaled using a series of nested Delft3D-WAVE (SWAN) and Delft3D-FLOW (FLOW) models and linked at the coast to tightly spaced XBeach (eXtreme Beach) cross-shore profile models and a Bayesian probabilistic cliff failure model. Hindcast testing demonstrates that, despite uncertainties in preexisting beach morphology over the ~500 km alongshore extent of the pilot study area, CoSMoS effectively identifies discrete sections of the coast (100s of meters) that are vulnerable to coastal hazards under a range of current and future oceanographic forcing conditions, and is therefore an effective tool for operational and future climate scenario planning.

  12. Investigations of the bottom current sculpted margin of Hatton Bank, NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, S. E.; Elliott, G. M.; Parson, L. M.

    2007-12-01

    The NW Hatton Bank in the NE Atlantic represents a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of bottom currents with complex seabed topography and to analyse the affects on the morphology and distribution of sediments along the margin. The NW Hatton Bank margin is a slope located remote from any major terrigenous sediment supply and at present is over 200 NM from the closest sediment source onshore. The data presented in this study were collected on the research vessel R.R.S. Charles Darwin in 1999, for the purpose of determining the outer limit of the legal continental shelf according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Swath bathymetry and high resolution acoustic data allow us to evaluate both local and regional controls on slope sedimentation and the possible mechanisms for bottom current velocity variability across a slope setting within the NW European continental margin. The slope is characterised by an intense bottom current flow related to the Deep Northern Boundary Current. Along the slope, bottom-current sedimentation is dominant, leading to the development of the Hatton drift and sediment wave fields. Non-depositional and erosional features related to bottom current activity were also identified and include moats encircling the volcanic cones and deep erosional scours. The interaction between bottom current circulation and complex margin morphology controls the distribution, geometry and scale of the sediment wave fields.

  13. A pilot randomized trial of technology-assisted goal setting to improve physical activity among primary care patients with prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Mann, Devin M; Palmisano, Joseph; Lin, Jenny J

    2016-12-01

    Lifestyle behavior changes can prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes but providers often are not able to effectively counsel about preventive lifestyle changes. We developed and pilot tested the Avoiding Diabetes Thru Action Plan Targeting (ADAPT) program to enhance primary care providers' counseling about behavior change for patients with prediabetes. Primary care providers in two urban academic practices and their patients with prediabetes were recruited to participate in the ADAPT study, an unblinded randomized pragmatic trial to test the effectiveness of the ADAPT program, including a streamlined electronic medical record-based goal setting tool. Providers were randomized to intervention or control arms; eligible patients whose providers were in the intervention arm received the ADAPT program. Physical activity (the primary outcome) was measured using pedometers, and data were gathered about patients' diet, weight and glycemic control. A total of 54 patients were randomized and analyzed as part of the 6-month ADAPT study (2010-2012, New York, NY). Those in the intervention group showed an increase total daily steps compared to those in the control group (+ 1418 vs - 598, p = 0.007) at 6 months. There was also a trend towards weight loss in the intervention compared to the control group (- 1.0 lbs. vs. 3.0 lbs., p = 0.11), although no change in glycemic control. The ADAPT study is among the first to use standard electronic medical record tools to embed goal setting into realistic primary care workflows and to demonstrate a significant improvement in prediabetes patients' physical activity.

  14. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  15. Observations at convergent margins concerning sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and the growth of continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Huene, R.; Scholl, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    subducted beneath the frontal accretionary body and its active buttress. In rounded figures the contemporary rate of solid-volume sediment subduction at convergent ocean margins (???43,500 km) is calculated to be 1.5 km3/yr. Correcting type 1 margins for high rates of terrigenous seafloor sedimentation during the past 30 m.y. or so sets the long-term rate of sediment subduction at 1.0 km3/yr. The bulk of the subducted material is derived directly or indirectly from continental denudation. Interstitial water currently expulsed from accreted and deeply subducted sediment and recycled to the ocean basins is estimated at 0.9 km3/yr. The thinning and truncation caused by subduction erosion of the margin's framework rock and overlying sedimentary deposits have been demonstrated at many convergent margins but only off northern Japan, central Peru, and northern Chile has sufficient information been collected to determine average or long-term rates, which range from 25 to 50 km3/m.y. per kilometer of margin. A conservative long-term rate applicable to many sectors of convergent margins is 30 km3/km/m.y. If applied to the length of type 2 margins, subduction erosion removes and transports approximately 0.6 km3/yr of upper plate material to greater depths. At various places, subduction erosion also affects sectors of type 1 margins bordered by small- to medium-sized accretionary prisms (for example, Japan and Peru), thus increasing the global rate by possibly 0.5 km3/yr to a total of 1.1 km3/yr. Little information is available to assess subduction erosion at margins bordered by large accretionary prisms. Mass balance calculations allow assessments to be made of the amount of subducted sediment that bypasses the prism and underthrusts the margin's rock framework. This subcrustally subducted sediment is estimated at 0.7 km3/yr. Combined with the range of terrestrial matter removed from the margin's rock framework by subduction erosion, the global volume of subcrustally subducted materia

  16. Radiotherapy margin design with particular consideration of high curvature CTVs

    SciTech Connect

    Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris

    2009-03-15

    In applying 3D conformal radiation therapy to a tumor clinical target volume (CTV), a margin is added around the CTV to account for any sources of error in the application of treatment which may result in misalignment between the CTV and the dose distribution actually delivered. The volume enclosed within the CTV plus the margin is known as the PTV, or planning target volume. The larger the errors are anticipated to be, the wider the margin will need to be to accommodate those errors. Based on the approach of van Herk et al. [''The probability of correct target dosage: Dose-population histograms for deriving treatment margins in radiotherapy,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol., Phys. 47(4), 1121-1135 (2000)] this paper develops the mathematical theory behind the calculation of the margin width required to ensure that the entire CTV receives sufficiently high dose with sufficiently high probability. The margin recipe developed not only considers the magnitude of the errors but also includes a term to adjust for curved CTV surfaces. In doing so, the accuracy of the margin recipe is enhanced yet remains mathematically concise enough to be readily implemented in the clinical setting. The results are particularly relevant for clinical situations in which the uncertainties in treatment are large relative to the size of the CTV.

  17. Influence of seep emission on the non-symbiont-bearing fauna and vagrant species at an active giant pockmark in the Gulf of Guinea (Congo-Angola margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, K.; Caprais, J. C.; Galéron, J.; Causse, R.; von Cosel, R.; Budzinski, H.; Ménach, K. Le; Roux, C. Le; Levaché, D.; Khripounoff, A.; Sibuet, M.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed surveying with an ROV found that a dense and diverse cold-seep community colonises a giant pockmark located at 3200 m depth, 8 km north from the deep Congo channel. Several types of assemblages, either dominated by Mytilidae and Vesicomyidae bivalves or Siboglinidae polychaetes, are distributed on the 800-m diameter active area. The site is characterised by a most active central zone in a depression with abundant carbonate concretions and high methane fluxes where high-density clusters of mussels and siboglinids dominate. In contrast, the peripheral zones display large fields of dead and live vesicomyids on soft sediment, with a lower mean density and lower methane concentration in seawater. The associated megafauna includes Alvinocarididae shrimps, echinoids, holothurians of the family Synaptidae, several species of gastropods, two species of galatheids, and Zoarcidae and Ophidiidae fishes. Multivariate analyses of video transect data show that the distribution of these major megafauna species at the pockmark scale is influenced by the habitat heterogeneity due to fluid or gas emission, occurrence of hydrates, substratum variability and by the presence of large symbiont-bearing species. Several assemblages dominated either by mytilids, vesicomyids, or siboglinids have been sampled for megafauna densities and biomass estimations and stable isotope measurements ( δ13C and δ15N) of dominant species and food sources. The highest estimates of megafauna densities have been obtained in mytilid beds. According to their stable isotopes values, non-symbiont-bearing species mainly rely on chemosynthesis-originated carbon, either as primary consumers of chemoautotrophic microorganisms, or at higher trophic level recycling organic matter, or relying on bivalve and tubeworm production. Most of them likely feed on different sources like shrimps, but differences according to habitat have been evidenced. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of galatheids and benthic or

  18. The initiation of orogenic margin reverse faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R. C.

    2002-04-01

    Laboratory values of rock friction coefficients suggest that reverse faulting should be very difficult to initiate by simple horizontal compression of the crust. Values of stresses required by Andersonian faulting may be an order of magnitude higher than those actually present in orogenic margins. A simple stress balance calculation shows that the effect of the excess lithostatic pressure under an elevated orogen, if transmitted laterally through a crustal ductile layer to the orogenic margin, is to provide sufficient hydraulic lift under the orogen flanks to initiate reverse faulting by direct lift, even with rock friction coefficients of order 0.8. The required orogenic elevation above surrounding ``normal'' lithosphere is about one fifth of the thickness of the brittle crust of the orogen. This elevation may be as small as 2 km in tectonically active regions. The mechanism works even in the absence of regional lithospheric compressive stresses.

  19. Combined Regional Gravity Model of the Andean Convergent Subduction Zone and Its Application to Crustal Density Modelling in Active Plate Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosse, M.; Pail, R.; Horwath, M.; Holzrichter, N.; Gutknecht, B. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Central Andean subduction system is one of the most active geological structures on Earth. Although there have been a few previous studies, the structure and dynamics of the system are still not well understood. In the present study, we determine a combined regional gravity model of the Andean convergent subduction region for constraining lithospheric models. After a thorough validation and cleaning of the terrestrial gravity and height databases, the method of Least Squares Collocation was applied to consistently combine terrestrial and satellite gravity data, putting much emphasis on the stochastic modelling of the individual data components. As a result, we computed the first high-resolution regional gravity model of the study region that includes GOCE satellite gravity information. The inclusion of GOCE is an essential distinction from the independent global gravity model EGM2008. Validation against EGM2008 reveals that our regional solution is very consistent in regions where terrestrial gravity data are available, but shows systematic differences in areas with terrestrial data gaps. Artefacts in the EGM2008 of up to 150 mGal could be identified. The new combined regional model benefits from the very homogeneous error characteristics and accuracy of GOCE gravity data in the long-to-medium wavelengths down to 80-100 km. Reliable density modelling became possible also in the region of Central Andes, which lacks terrestrial gravity data. Finally, density models were adapted to fit the new regional gravity field solution. The results clearly demonstrate the capabilities of GOCE to better constrain lithospheric models.

  20. Local context influence, activity space, and foodscape exposure in two canadian metropolitan settings: is daily mobility exposure associated with overweight?

    PubMed

    Lebel, Alexandre; Kestens, Yan; Pampalon, Robert; Thériault, Marius; Daniel, Mark; Subramanian, S V

    2012-01-01

    It has become increasingly common to attribute part of the obesity epidemic to changes in the environment. Identification of a clear and obvious role for contextual risk factors has not yet been demonstrated. The objectives of this study were to explain differences in local overweight risk in two different urban settings and to explore sex-specific associations with estimated mobility patterns. Overweight was modeled within a multilevel framework using built environmental and socioeconomic contextual indicators and individual-level estimates of activity space exposure to fast-food restaurants (or exposure to visited places). Significant variations in local levels in overweight risk were observed. Physical and socioeconomic contexts explained more area-level differences in overweight among men than among women and among inhabitants of Montreal than among inhabitants of Quebec City. Estimated activity space exposure to fast-food outlets was significantly associated with overweight for men in Montreal. Local-level analyses are required to improve our understanding of contextual influences on obesity, including multiple influences in people's daily geographies.

  1. Validity of the New Lifestyles NL-1000 Accelerometer for Measuring Time Spent in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMinn, David; Rowe, David A.; Stark, Michelle; Nicol, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Current interest in promoting physical activity in the school environment necessitates an inexpensive, accurate method of measuring physical activity in such settings. Additionally, it is recognized that physical activity must be of at least moderate intensity in order to yield substantial health benefits. The purpose of the study, therefore, was…

  2. The Ebro margin study, northwestern Mediterranean Sea - an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, A.; Hans, Nelson C.

    1990-01-01

    The Ebro continental margin from the coast to the deep sea off northeastern Spain was selected for a multidisciplinary project because of the abundant Ebro River sediment supply, Pliocene and Quaternary progradation, and margin development in a restricted basin where a variety of controlling factors could be evaluated. The nature of this young passive margin for the last 5 m.y. was investigated with particular emphasis on marine circulation, sediment dynamics, sediment geochemistry, depositional facies, seismic stratigraphy, geotechnical properties, geological hazards and human influences. These studies show the importance of marine circulation, variation in sediment supply, sea-level oscillation and tectonic setting for the understanding of modern and ancient margin depositional processes and growth patterns. ?? 1990.

  3. Flexural behaviour of the north Algerian margin and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamai, Lamine; Petit, Carole; Abtout, Abdeslem; Yelles-Chaouche, Abdelkarim; Déverchère, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    The Algerian margin formed through back-arc opening of the Algerian basin (Mediterranean Sea) resulting from the roll-back of the Tethyan slab. Recent geophysical data acquired along the Algerian margin showed evidence of active or recent compressive deformation in the basin due to the ongoing Africa-Eurasia convergence. Published data from four wide-angle seismic profiles have allowed imaging the deep structure of the Algerian margin and its adjacent basins. In this study, we converted these velocity models into density models, then into isostatic anomalies. This allowed us to image an isostatic disequilibrium (relative to a local isostasy model) reaching a maximum amplitude at the margin toe. Converting isostatic anomalies into Moho depth variations shows that the Moho extracted from wide-angle seismic data is deeper than the one predicted by a local isostasy model in the oceanic domain, and shallower than it in the continental domain. These anomalies can be interpreted by opposite flexures of two plates separated by a plate boundary located close to the margin toe. We use a finite element model to simulate the lithospheric flexure. The amplitude of the equivalent vertical Moho deflection is larger in the central part of the study area (6-7 km) than on the easternmost and westernmost profiles (3 km). The effective elastic thickness used to best match the computed deflection is always extremely low (always less than 10 km) and probably reflects the relatively low strength of the lithosphere close to the plate boundary. Comparison with other wide-angle seismic profiles across an active and a passive margin show that the North Algerian margin displays isostatic anomalies close to that of an active margin. Finally, plate flexure is highest at the southern tip of the ocean-continent transition, possibly indicating that a former passive margin detachment is reactivated as a crustal scale reverse fault pre-dating a future subduction.

  4. Actively evolving microplate formation by oblique collision and sideways motion along strike-slip faults: An example from the northeastern Caribbean plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, F. W.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Ku, Teh-Lung

    1995-06-01

    The pattern of folding, faulting, and late Quaternary coral-reef uplift rates in western and central Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) suggest that the elongate Gonave microplate, a 190,000-km 2 area of the northeastern Caribbean plate, is in the process of shearing off the Caribbean plate and accreting to the North American plate. Late Cenozoic transpression between the southeastern Bahama Platform and the Caribbean plate in Hispaniola has inhibited the eastward motion of the northeastern corner of the plate. Transpression is manifested in western and central Hispaniola by the formation of regional scale folds that correspond to present-day, anticlinal topographic mountain chains continuous with offshore anticlinal ridges. Areas of most rapid Quaternary uplift determined from onland coral reefs 125 ka and younger, coincide with the axial traces of these folds. Offshore data suggest recent folding and faulting of the seafloor. Onshore reef data do not conclusively require late Quaternary folding, but demonstrate that tectonic uplift rates of the axial areas of the anticlines decrease from the Northwest Peninsula of Haiti (0.37 mm/yr) to to the central part of the coast of western Haiti (0.19 mm/yr) to the south-central part of western Haiti (0 mm/yr). Formation of the 1200-km-long Enriquillo-Plantain Garden-Walton fault zone as a 'bypass' strike-slip fault has isolated the southern edge of the Gonave microplate and is allowing continued, unimpeded eastward motion of a smaller Caribbean plate past the zone of late Neogene convergence and Quaternary uplift of coral reefs in Hispaniola. Offshore seismic reflection data from the Jamaica Passage, the marine strait separating Jamaica and Haiti, show that the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone forms a narrow but deep, active fault-bounded trough beneath the passage. The active fault is continuous with active faults mapped onshore in western Haiti and eastern Jamaica; the bathymetric deep is present because the

  5. Conjugate volcanic rifted margins, spreading and micro-continent: Lessons from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernigon, L.; Blischke, A.; Nasuti, A.; Sand, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have acquired and processed new aeromagnetic data that covers the entire Norway Basin oceanic spreading system located between the Møre volcanic rifted margin and its (intermediate) conjugate system, the Jan Mayen microcontinent (JMMC). The new compilation allows us to revisit its entire structure and spreading evolution from the Early Eocene breakup to the Late Oligocene abortion of the Aegir Ridge. We here discuss the dynamics of conjugate volcanic (rifted) margin formation and reconstruct the subsequent spreading evolution of the Norway Basin until its abortion. We have estimated a new set of Euler poles of rotation for the Norway Basin derived from more than 88,000 km of new magnetic profiles. The new compilation confirms that a fan-shaped spreading evolution of the Norway Basin was particularly active before the cessation of seafloor spreading and abortion of the Aegir Ridge. The Norway Basin shows a more complex system of micro-plates and asymmetric segments locally affected by episodic ridge jumps. The new observations have implications for the syn- and post-breakup stratigraphic and rifted-margin tectonic development of the JMMC and its conjugate margins. In particular, an important Mid-Eocene geodynamic event at around magnetic chron C21r is recognized in the Norway Basin. This event coincides with the onset of diking and rifting between the proto-JMMC and the East Greenland margin, leading to a second phase of breakup in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea ~26 My later in the Oligocene. Restored in its pre-breakup configuration, the new surveys also allow us to discuss further the tectonic and crustal evolution of the conjugate volcanic rifted margins and associated transform and oblique segments. The applicability of magma-poor concepts, off Norway, for example, remains questionable for us. The significant amount of breakup magmatism, the huge amount of pre-breakup sag sedimentation and the presence of thinned and preserved continental crust without the

  6. Atlantic marginal basins of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    The over 10,000-km long Atlantic margin of Africa is divisible into thirty basins or segments of the margin that collectively contain over 18.6 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 3/ of syn-breakup and post-breakup sediments. Twenty of these basins contain a sufficiently thick volume of sediments to be considered prospects. These basins lie, at least partially, within the 200 m isobath. The distribution of source rocks is broad enough to give potential to each of these basins. The sedimentation patterns, tectonics, and timing of events differ from basin to basin and are related directly to the margin's complex history. Two spreading modes exist: rift and transform. Rifting dates from Late Triassic-Early Jurassic in the northwest to Early Cretaceous south of the Niger Delta. A complex transform fault system separated these two margins. Deep-water communication between the two basins became established in the middle Cretaceous. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of rifting and seafloor spreading has segmented the margin and where observable, basins tend to be bounded by these segments.

  7. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting... Provisions Health Status Reports § 137.205 Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate...

  8. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting... Provisions Health Status Reports § 137.205 Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate...

  9. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting... Provisions Health Status Reports § 137.205 Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate...

  10. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting... Provisions Health Status Reports § 137.205 Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate...

  11. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting... Provisions Health Status Reports § 137.205 Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate...

  12. Impact of gravity processes on the initial post-rift stages of construction and evolution of a continental margin: Insights from the eastern Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurion, Celine; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Sylvie; Migeon, Sebastien; Lucazeau, Francis; Bache, Francois; Zaragosi, Sebastien; Smit, Jeroen; Al-Toubi, Khalfan; dos Reis, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The study of the post-rift sediment architecture and continental slope morphology leads to a reconstruction of the initial stages of formation and evolution of gravity-driven processes on the northern margin of the eastern Gulf of Aden. The slope-related features and associated deposits in the deep basin along this young passive margin are investigated through the analysis of a set of seismic-reflection and multibeam bathymetry data. This study demonstrates how preconditioning and triggering factors (tectonics, climate and eustatic variations) can interact and control the margin morphology and post-rift sediment architecture in a source-to-sink perspective. The combined geomorphological and stratigraphic study of this margin allows us to identify three morphological domains inherited from the structural segmentation. The monsoon climate combined with a major eustatic lowstand is proposed as the most likely set of factors preconditioning slope destabilisation on the whole margin. These factors also enhance the effect of the late post-rift uplift of the eastern morphological domain of the studied margin. The formation and distribution of the slope-related features are thus mainly controlled by active faults on the continental slope and the potential effect of bottom currents at the base of the continental slope. The oversteepening of the continental slope in the eastern domain of the studied margin is probably the main triggering factor controlling the generation of failure processes and subsequent canyon formation by upslope erosion. The analysis of canyon location and morphology along the uplifted part of the continental slope reveals the long-term influence of secondary slope-related features, contour currents and turbidite flows on the development of canyons. As a consequence of the late post-rift uplift that only affected the eastern part of the studied margin, huge volumes of sediment were accumulated in mass-transport complexes at the foot of numerous slope

  13. 12 CFR 220.4 - Margin account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Margin account. 220.4 Section 220.4 Banks and... BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.4 Margin account. (a) Margin transactions. (1) All transactions not specifically authorized for inclusion in another account shall be recorded in the margin...

  14. 12 CFR 220.4 - Margin account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Margin account. 220.4 Section 220.4 Banks and... BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.4 Margin account. (a) Margin transactions. (1) All transactions not specifically authorized for inclusion in another account shall be recorded in the margin...

  15. Anomalous subsidence at South China Sea rifted margin: Sediments digging their own hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha; Clift, Peter; Quinteros, Javier

    2015-04-01

    Rifted continental margins subside as a consequence of combined crustal thinning and mantle lithosphere cooling. While standard models predict a slowing of subsidence after the end of rifting, the deep basins on the northern margin of the South China Sea, notably the Baiyun Sag exhibit subsidence that accelerated several million years after the end of active extension. Additionally, backstripping analysis at the South China margin has shown that the amount of subsidence is much greater than that predicted from the degree of brittle upper crustal extension seen in seismic profiles. Here we explain these observations by linking climate change onshore and deformation of the crystalline crust offshore: Early Miocene monsoon intensification increased erosion and thus the sediment flux to offshore basins after the cessation of active extension. When the sediment load encountered the weak crust of the South China Sea margin, it induced lower crustal flow away from the basin axis so that the deep Baiyun basin was formed nearly without brittle extension. We corroborate this concept using seismic observations and backstripping techniques, as well as thermo-mechanical forward modeling. The numerical forward model is a 2D version of the finite element code SLIM3D. The code includes nonlinear temperature- and stress-dependent elasto-visco-plastic rheology and is able to reproduces a wide range of rift-related deformation processes such as flexure, lower crustal flow, and faulting. We find that two factors allow to satisfy the observational constraints: (1) Post-rift increase of sediment load: The East Asian Summer Monsoon strengthened around the start of the Miocene (~23 Ma), several million years after continental rupture. Changes in the flora of continental China date from around this time and sedimentation rates across continental margins and deltas in South and Southeast Asia increased, as might be expected under the influence of heavier precipitation driving faster erosion

  16. GeoMapApp: A free, on-line resource for plate margins research and education (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Chan, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; O'Hara, S.; Arko, R. A.; Nitsche, F. O.; Bonczkowski, J.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; Leung, A.

    2010-12-01

    A wide range of plate boundary data sets compiled over the years has been augmented more recently by data collected through the 1999-2010 NSF MARGINS program and through the on-going Ridge 2000 program. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, map-based data discovery and visualisation tool has been developed as part of the MARGINS and Ridge 2000 integrated database system. As a result, GeoMapApp contains many of the data sets of interest to MARGINS-R2k researchers and educators and has been widely adopted by those communities. The intuitive GeoMapApp interface allows users to quickly locate, interrogate and download geospatial data, to layer multiple data sets that aid data comparisons, and to create useful images and maps. The backbone of GeoMapApp is a global elevation base map, called the Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis, that is compiled from many sources including much multibeam swath bathymetry data and that is updated regularly. Examples of built-in data sets include bathymetry and backscatter grids; EarthChem and PetDB geochemical sample analyses; the locations of samples and instruments from major NSF-funded field programs; and, seafloor photos and Alvin dive video images. Portals within GeoMapApp offer enhanced data functionality and include multi-channel seismics, drill core logs and photos, and earthquake catalogues. Users can import their own tabular data sets and spreadsheets and perform all of the standard GeoMapApp functionality upon them - the data symbols can be coloured, scaled, graphed, and points can be selected with an interactive lasso tool. Imported grids can be profiled, shaded, contoured and viewed in 3-D. GeoMapApp is used in the majority of MARGINS undergraduate-level mini-lessons (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/collection.html). These self-contained learning activities range from short interactive illustrations for in-class use to in-depth multi-lab modules. Each mini-lesson contains learning goals and

  17. Modelling the role of magmatic intrusions in the post-breakup thermal evolution of Volcanic Passive Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peace, Alexander; McCaffrey, Ken; Imber, Jonny; van Hunen, Jeroen; Hobbs, Richard; Gerdes, Keith

    2013-04-01

    Passive margins are produced by continental breakup and subsequent seafloor spreading, leaving a transition from continental to oceanic crust. Magmatism is associated with many passive margins and produces diagnostic criteria that include 1) abundant breakup related magmatism resulting in a thick igneous crust, 2) a high velocity zone in the lower crust and 3) seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) in seismic studies. These Volcanic Passive Margins (VPMs) represent around 75% of the Atlantic passive margins, but beyond this high level description, these magma-rich settings remain poorly understood and present numerous challenges to petroleum exploration. In VPMs the extent to which the volume, timing, location and emplacement history of magma has played a role in controlling heat flow and thermal evolution during margin development remains poorly constrained. Reasons for this include; 1) paucity of direct heat flow and thermal gradient measurements at adequate depth ranges across the margins, 2) poor onshore exposure 3) highly eroded flood basalts and 4) poor seismic imaging beneath thick offshore basalt sequences. As a result, accurately modelling the thermal history of the basins located on VPMs is challenging, despite the obvious importance for determining the maturation history of potential source rocks in these settings. Magmatism appears to have affected the thermal history of the Vøring Basin on the Norwegian VPM, in contrast the effects on the Faeroe-Shetland Basin was minimal. The more localised effects in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin compared to Vøring Basin may be explained by the fact that the main reservoir sandstones appear to be synchronous with thermal uplift along the basin margin and pulsed volcanism, indicating that the bulk of the magmatism occurred at the basin extremities in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin, where its effect on source maturation was lessened. Our hypothesis is that source maturation occurs as a result of regional temperature and pressure

  18. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  19. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  20. Comparison of active-set method deconvolution and matched-filtering for derivation of an ultrasound transit time spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, M.-L.; Zapf, M.; Ruiter, N. V.; Gemmeke, H.; Langton, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrasound computed tomography imaging is primarily determined by the accuracy of ultrasound transit time measurement. A major problem in analysis is the overlap of signals making it difficult to detect the correct transit time. The current standard is to apply a matched-filtering approach to the input and output signals. This study compares the matched-filtering technique with active set deconvolution to derive a transit time spectrum from a coded excitation chirp signal and the measured output signal. The ultrasound wave travels in a direct and a reflected path to the receiver, resulting in an overlap in the recorded output signal. The matched-filtering and deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the transit times associated with the two signal paths. Both techniques were able to detect the two different transit times; while matched-filtering has a better accuracy (0.13 μs versus 0.18 μs standard deviations), deconvolution has a 3.5 times improved side-lobe to main-lobe ratio. A higher side-lobe suppression is important to further improve image fidelity. These results suggest that a future combination of both techniques would provide improved signal detection and hence improved image fidelity.

  1. Comparison of active-set method deconvolution and matched-filtering for derivation of an ultrasound transit time spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wille, M-L; Zapf, M; Ruiter, N V; Gemmeke, H; Langton, C M

    2015-06-21

    The quality of ultrasound computed tomography imaging is primarily determined by the accuracy of ultrasound transit time measurement. A major problem in analysis is the overlap of signals making it difficult to detect the correct transit time. The current standard is to apply a matched-filtering approach to the input and output signals. This study compares the matched-filtering technique with active set deconvolution to derive a transit time spectrum from a coded excitation chirp signal and the measured output signal. The ultrasound wave travels in a direct and a reflected path to the receiver, resulting in an overlap in the recorded output signal. The matched-filtering and deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the transit times associated with the two signal paths. Both techniques were able to detect the two different transit times; while matched-filtering has a better accuracy (0.13 μs versus 0.18 μs standard deviations), deconvolution has a 3.5 times improved side-lobe to main-lobe ratio. A higher side-lobe suppression is important to further improve image fidelity. These results suggest that a future combination of both techniques would provide improved signal detection and hence improved image fidelity.

  2. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  3. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  4. Differences in root functions during long-term drought adaptation: comparison of active gene sets of two wheat genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sečenji, M; Lendvai, Á; Miskolczi, P; Kocsy, G; Gallé, Á; Szucs, A; Hoffmann, B; Sárvári, É; Schweizer, P; Stein, N; Dudits, D; Györgyey, J

    2010-11-01

    In an attempt to shed light on the role of root systems in differential responses of wheat genotypes to long-term water limitation, transcriptional differences between two wheat genotypes (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Plainsman V and landrace Kobomugi) were identified during adaptation to moderate water stress at the tillering stage. Differences in organ sizes, water-use efficiency and seed production were detected in plants grown in soil, and root functions were characterised by expression profiling. The molecular genetic background of the behaviour of the two genotypes during this stress was revealed using a cDNA macroarray for transcript profiling of the roots. During a 4-week period of moderate water deficit, a set of up-regulated genes displaying transiently increased expression was identified in young plantlets, mostly in the second week in the roots of Kobomugi, while transcript levels remained constantly high in roots of Plainsman V. These genes encode proteins with various functions, such as transport, protein metabolism, osmoprotectant biosynthesis, cell wall biogenesis and detoxification, and also regulatory proteins. Oxidoreductases, peroxidases and cell wall-related genes were induced significantly only in Plainsman V, while induction of stress- and defence-related genes was more pronounced in Kobomugi. Real-time qPCR analysis of selected members of the glutathione S-transferase gene family revealed differences in regulation of family members in the two genotypes and confirmed the macroarray results. The TaGSTZ gene was stress-activated only in the roots of Kobomugi.

  5. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  6. Trace element characteristics of graywackes and tectonic setting discrimination of sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Mukul R.; Crook, Keith A. W.

    1986-02-01

    The graywackes of Paleozoic turbidite sequences of eastern Australia show a large variation in their trace element characteristics, which reflect distinct provenance types and tectonic settings for various suites. The tectonic settings recognised are oceanic island arc, continental island arc, active continental margin, and passive margins. Immobile trace elements, e.g. La, Ce, Nd, Th, Zr, Nb, Y, Sc and Co are very useful in tectonic setting discrimination. In general, there is a systematic increase in light rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd), Th, Nb and the Ba/Sr, Rb/Sr, La/Y and Ni/Co ratios and a decrease in V, Sc and the Ba/Rb, K/Th and K/U ratios in graywackes from oceanic island arc to continental island arc to active continental margin to passive margin settings. On the basis of graywacke geochemistry, the optimum discrimination of the tectonic settings of sedimentary basins is achieved by La-Th, La-Th-Sc, Ti/Zr-La/Sc, La/Y-Sc/Cr, Th-Sc-Zr/10 and Th-Co-Zr/10 plots. The analysed oceanic island arc graywackes are characterised by extremely low abundances of La, Th, U, Zr, Nb; low Th/U and high La/Sc, La/Th, Ti/Zr, Zr/Th ratios. The studied graywackes of the continental island arc type setting are characterised by increased abundances of La, Th, U, Zr and Nb, and can be identified by the La-Th-Sc and La/Sc versus Ti/Zr plots. Active continental margin and passive margin graywackes are discriminated by the Th-Sc-Zr/10 and Th-Co-Zr/10 plots and associated parameters (e.g. Th/Zr, Th/Sc). The most important characteristic of the analysed passive margin type graywackes is the increased abundance of Zr, high Zr/Th and lower Ba, Rb, Sr and Ti/Zr ratio compared to the active continental margin graywackes.

  7. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  8. The role of Variscan to pre-Jurassic active extension in controlling the architecture of the rifted passive margin of Adria: the example of the Canavese Zone (Western Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succo, Andrea; De Caroli, Sara; Centelli, Arianna; Barbero, Edoardo; Balestro, Gianni; Festa, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Canavese Zone, in the Italian Western Southern Alps, represents the remnant of the Jurassic syn-rift stretching, thinning and dismemberment of the distal passive margin of Adria during the opening of the Penninic Ocean (i.e., Northern Alpine Tethys). Our findings, based on detailed geological mapping, structural analysis and stratigraphic and petrographic observations, document however that the inferred hyper-extensional dismemberment of this distal part of the passive margin of Adria, up to seafloor spreading, was favored by the inherited Variscan geometry and crustal architecture of the rifted margin, and by the subsequent Alpine-related strike-slip deformation. The new field data document, in fact, that the limited vertical displacement of syn-extensional (syn-rift) Jurassic faults was ineffective in producing and justifying the crustal thinning observed in the Canavese Zone. The deformation and thinning of the continental basement of Adria are constrained to the late Variscan time by the unconformable overlying of Late Permian deposits. Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene and Late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting (i.e., Alpine and Insubric tectonic stages) reactivated previously formed faults, leading to the formation of a complex tectonic jigsaw which only partially coincides with the direct product of the Jurassic syn-rift dismemberment of the distal part of the passive margin of Adria. Our new findings document that this dismemberment of the rifted continental margin of Adria did not simply result from the syn-rift Jurassic extension, but was strongly favored by the inheritance of older (Variscan and post-Variscan) tectonic stages, which controlled earlier lithospheric weakness. The formation of rifted continental margins by extension of continental lithosphere leading to seafloor spreading is a complex and still poorly understood component of the plate tectonic cycle. Geological mapping of rifted continental margins may thus provide significant information to

  9. Scientific Ocean Drilling to Assess Submarine Geohazards along European Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ask, M. V.; Camerlenghi, A.; Kopf, A.; Morgan, J. K.; Ocean DrillingSeismic Hazard, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine geohazards are some of the most devastating natural events in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Earthquakes pose a big threat to society and infrastructure, but the understanding of their episodic generation is incomplete. Tsunamis are known for their potential of striking coastlines world-wide. Other geohazards originating below the sea surface are equally dangerous for undersea structures and the coastal population: submarine landslides and volcanic islands collapse with little warning and devastating consequences. The European scientific community has a strong focus on geohazards along European and nearby continental margins, especially given their high population densities, and long historic and prehistoric record of hazardous events. For example, the Mediterranean is surrounded by very densely-populated coastline and is the World's leading holiday destination, receiving up 30% of global tourism. In addition, its seafloor is criss-crossed by hydrocarbon pipelines and telecommunication cables. However, the governing processes and recurrence intervals of geohazards are still poorly understood. Examples include, but are not limited to, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions along the active tectonic margins of the Mediterranean and Sea of Marmara, landslides on both active and passive margins, and tsunamites and seismites in the sedimentary record that suggest a long history of similar events. The development of geophysical networks, drilling, sampling and long-term monitoring are crucial to the understanding of earthquake, landslide, and tsunami processes, and to mitigate the associated risks in densely populated and industrialized regions such as Europe. Scientific drilling, particularly in the submarine setting, offers a unique tool to obtain drill core samples, borehole measurements and long-term observations. Hence, it is a critical technology to investigate past, present, and possible future influences of hazardous processes in this area. The

  10. Women's Science: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhart, Margaret; Finkel, Elizabeth; Behm, Linda; Lawrence, Nancy; Touso, Karen

    This monograph addresses the gender gap in science and engineering. Case studies of women in marginalized science and engineering settings are presented including an innovative high school genetics class, a school-to-work internship for prospective engineers, an environmental action group, and a nonprofit conservation agency. The high proportion…

  11. Setting a minimum threshold CD4 count for initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cf; Lee, Ss; Wong, Kh; Cheng, Ls; Lam, My

    2007-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine a minimum threshold CD4 count for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation in HIV-infected patients. A schema using longitudinal data from a clinical cohort was designed. The presenting CD4 counts of asymptomatic HIV-infected patients in Hong Kong were evaluated in relation to their progression to AIDS within 1 year of diagnosis of HIV infection. A graph was generated to depict the changes in the percentage of cumulative AIDS diagnoses for every 10 cell/microL increase in presenting CD4 count. Of 181 patients, 24 had developed AIDS within 1 year of diagnosis of HIV infection. Setting the CD4 count threshold at 150 cells/microL gave a good balance between the number of preventable AIDS-defining events and the number of non-AIDS patients initiating HAART. No extra AIDS-defining events occurred when the CD4 count threshold was reduced from 200 to 150 cells/microL, despite the addition of 13 more patients. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, presenting CD4 count was a significant predictor for AIDS occurrence. The relative hazard for AIDS occurrence of patients with presenting CD4 counts

  12. Using a Team Approach to Address Bullying of Students with Asperger's Syndrome in Activity-Based Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Simpson, Cynthia; Gaus, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of bullying among individuals with disabilities is alarming. Because of the social and motor deficiencies that individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) often display, they are frequently targets of bullying. The physical education setting often consists of a larger number of students than the typical academic instructional setting. This…

  13. Development of passive volcanic margins of the Central Atlantic and initial opening of ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melankholina, E. N.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Geological and geophysical data on the Central Atlantic are discussed in order to elucidate the tectonic setting of the initial magmatic activity, rifting, and breakup resulting in the origination of Mesozoic ocean. The structural, magmatic, and historical aspects of the problem are considered. It has been established that the initial dispersed rifting and low-capacity magmatism at proximal margins was followed by the migration of the process toward the central part of region with the formation of distal zones and the development of vigorous magmmatism, further breakup of the lithosphere and ocean opening. Magmatism, its sources, and the features of newly formed magmatic crust at both the rifting and breakup stages of margin development are discussed and compared with subsequent spreading magmatism. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions show that the magmatic evolution of the Central Atlantic proximal margins bears the features of two enriched components, one of which is related to the EM-1 source, developing only at the North American margin. Another enriched component typical of the province as a whole is related to the EM-2 source. To a lesser extent, this component is expressed in igneous rocks of Guyana, which also bear the signature of the MORB-type depleted source typical of spreading tholeiites in the Atlantic Ocean. Similar conditions are assumed for subsequent magmatism at the distal margins and for the early spreading basalts in the adjacent Atlantic belt, which also contain a small admixture of enriched material. A comparison of the magmatism at the margins of Central and North Atlantic reveals their specificity distinctly expressed in isotopic compositions of igneous rocks. In contrast to the typical region of the North Atlantic, the immediate melting of the enriched lithospheric source without the participation of plume-related melts is reconstructed for the proximal margins of the Central Atlantic. At the same time, decompression and melting in the

  14. Review and Assessment of JPL's Thermal Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebes, G.; Kingery, C.; Farguson, C.; White, M.; Blakely, M.; Nunes, J.; Avila, A.; Man, K.; Hoffman, A.; Forgrave, J.

    2012-01-01

    JPL has captured its experience from over four decades of robotic space exploration into a set of design rules. These rules have gradually changed into explicit requirements and are now formally implemented and verified. Over an extended period of time, the initial understanding of intent and rationale for these rules has faded and rules are now frequently applied without further consideration. In the meantime, mission classes and their associated risk postures have evolved, coupled with resource constraints and growing design diversity, bringing into question the current "one size fits all" thermal margin approach. This paper offers a systematic review of the heat flow path from an electronic junction to the eventual heat rejection to space. This includes the identification of different regimes along this path and the associated requirements. The work resulted in a renewed understanding of the intent behind JPL requirements for hot thermal margins and a framework for relevant considerations, which in turn enables better decision making when a deviation to these requirements is considered.

  15. [Marginality, ethnic groups and health].

    PubMed

    Corretger, J M; Fortuny, C; Botet, F; Valls, O

    1992-06-01

    Main marginated ethnic groups in Span are to be found among gypsies and 3rd world immigrants. The first group include about 250,000 persons and the second group more tan half a million people. Their origins and their being past of the less fortunate social layers made them a group of health risk. Pediatric pathologies are those favored by socio-economic shortcomings as well as hygienic-sanitary deficiencies. Imported pediatric pathologies have a small incident.

  16. 77 FR 77016 - Authorization of Production Activity: Foreign-Trade Zone 230: Sonoco Corrflex (Kitting-Gift Sets...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 56809... (Kitting-Gift Sets); Rural Hall and Winston-Salem, North Carolina On August 20, 2012, the Piedmont...

  17. Healthy Kids Out of School: Using Mixed Methods to Develop Principles for Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Out-of-School Settings in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shanti; Dietz, William H.; Dolan, Peter R.; Nelson, Miriam E.; Newman, Molly B.; Rockeymoore, Maya; Economos, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Widespread practices supporting availability of healthful foods, beverages, and physical activity in out-of-school-time (OST) settings would further obesity prevention efforts. The objective of this article was to describe principles to guide policy development in support of healthy eating and physical activity practices in out-of-school settings to promote obesity prevention. Methods The Institute of Medicine’s L.E.A.D. framework (Locate Evidence, Evaluate it, Assemble it, and Inform Decisions) was used to identify practices relevant to children’s healthful eating in most OST settings: 1) locate and evaluate information from a national survey of children’s perceptions of healthful-food access; published research, reports, policies and guidelines; and roundtables with OST organizations’ administrators; 2) assemble information to prioritize actionable practices; and 3) inform programmatic direction. Results Three evidence-informed guiding principles for short-duration OST resulted: 1) drink right: choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; 2) move more: boost movement and physical activity in all programs; and 3) snack smart: fuel up on fruits and vegetables. Conclusion Healthy Kids Out of School was launched to support the dissemination and implementation of these guiding principles in short-duration OST settings, complementing efforts in other OST settings to shift norms around eating and physical activity. PMID:25551182

  18. Using the Sampling Margin of Error to Assess the Interpretative Validity of Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David E.; Schraw, Gregory; Kuch, Fred

    2015-01-01

    We present an equation, derived from standard statistical theory, that can be used to estimate sampling margin of error for student evaluations of teaching (SETs). We use the equation to examine the effect of sample size, response rates and sample variability on the estimated sampling margin of error, and present results in four tables that allow…

  19. The effectiveness of multi-component goal setting interventions for changing physical activity behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Desmond; Harden, Samantha M; Zumbo, Bruno D; Sylvester, Benjamin D; Kaulius, Megan; Ruissen, Geralyn R; Dowd, A Justine; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from goal setting theory (Latham & Locke, 1991; Locke & Latham, 2002; Locke et al., 1981), the purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of multi-component goal setting interventions for changing physical activity (PA) behaviour. A literature search returned 41,038 potential articles. Included studies consisted of controlled experimental trials wherein participants in the intervention conditions set PA goals and their PA behaviour was compared to participants in a control group who did not set goals. A meta-analysis was ultimately carried out across 45 articles (comprising 52 interventions, 126 effect sizes, n = 5912) that met eligibility criteria using a random-effects model. Overall, a medium, positive effect (Cohen's d(SE) = .552(.06), 95% CI = .43-.67, Z = 9.03, p < .001) of goal setting interventions in relation to PA behaviour was found. Moderator analyses across 20 variables revealed several noteworthy results with regard to features of the study, sample characteristics, PA goal content, and additional goal-related behaviour change techniques. In conclusion, multi-component goal setting interventions represent an effective method of fostering PA across a diverse range of populations and settings. Implications for effective goal setting interventions are discussed.

  20. Sedimentary pigments on the Pakistan margin: Controlling factors and organic matter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Cowie, Greg L.

    2009-03-01

    Sedimentary pigments can provide information on various aspects of benthic processes and biogeochemistry. In this study, sediments from sites at depths of 140 to 1850 m spanning the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), and representing dramatic contrasts in depositional conditions and benthic communities, were analysed for pigment yields and compositions. This has allowed a rare consideration of how different factors, including oxygen concentration, organic matter (OM) supply and biological activity (e.g., degree of bioturbation) may influence sedimentary pigment distribution in a continental margin environment. It has also allowed one of the first efforts to study the impact of biological activity on pigment concentrations in the natural environment, rather than in a microcosm setting. Total extractable surface sediment pigment concentrations showed a range of ˜1.5-49 μg g -1 of dry sediment. The pigment suite was dominated by pheophytin and pheophorbide (which together constituted ˜75% of total pigments), with minor amounts of chlorophyll- a, alloxanthin, diatoxanthin, zeaxanthin and β-carotene. Low oxygen concentration appeared to influence pigment abundance by increasing the concentration of refractory pigments ultimately buried. In addition, maximal pigment abundances were associated with minimal amounts of sediment mixing by macrofauna, and at one site macrofaunal digestion may have altered the relative dominance of the different pheopigments. In contrast, the lack of a marked increase in pigment concentrations after the summer monsoon plus the lack of a correlation between pigment concentration and water depth suggest that OM supply plays a relatively small role in controlling sedimentary pigments. Pigment concentrations and suites, together with modelled decay half-lives (˜0.8-15 years), suggest that in general OM on the Pakistan margin, despite the low oxygen concentrations and monsoon-driven productivity, is surprisingly degraded compared to

  1. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, L.; Burov, E. B.; Werner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle. PMID:26442807

  2. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  3. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-01-01

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle. PMID:26442807

  4. The Impact of a Physical Activity Intervention Program on Academic Achievement in a Swedish Elementary School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Käll, Lina B.; Nilsson, Michael; Lindén, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the emerging body of research on the potential of physical activity to improve learning and academic achievement, conclusive evidence regarding the effects of physical activity on academic achievement is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of a physical activity intervention program on academic…

  5. Illustrations of the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.; Ryan, W. ); Twichell, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Side-looking sonar imagery and swath bathymetry from a variety of contemporary continental slopes all display erosional scars and debris aprons, illustrating the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins. The continental slopes examined include slopes fed directly from the fronts of ice sheets, slopes adjacent to continental shelves that were the sites of glacial outwash, slopes supplied exclusively by fluvial drainage, slopes at carbonate platforms, and slopes on accretionary prisms. Examples are drawn from the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mediterranean Sea in both passive and active continental margin settings. The sonar imagery and bathymetry used in this study indicate that continental slopes in different tectonic and climatic environments show similar forms of mass wasting. However, in some cases the dominant mode of erosion and/or the overall degree of mass wasting appears to be distinct to particular sedimentary environments. Timing of both recent and older exhumed erosional surfaces identified in the imagery and in seismic reflection profiles is obtained by ground truth observations using submersibles, towed camera sleds, drilling, and coring. These observations suggest that eustatic fluctuations common to all the margins examined do not explain the range in magnitude and areal density of the observed mass wasting. More localized factors such as lithology, diagenesis, pore fluid conditions, sediment supply rates, and seismic ground motion appear to have a major influence in the evolution of erosional scars and their corresponding unconformities.

  6. Passive margin formation, Timor Sea, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, R.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent ODP data show that sea-floor spreading began in the Argo Abyssal Plain in the earliest Cretaceous, and not the Callovian-Oxfordian as had previously been believed. These data are now consistent with the Callovian-Valanginian rifting observed on seismic records over the adjacent continental shelf (Vulcan subbasin, western Timor Sea). Tectonic subsidence plots have been constructed for well, extrapolated well, and significant off-well (seismically based) locations in the Vulcan subbasin and adjacent highs. The fully corrected plots show relatively little tectonic subsidence during the Callovian-Valanginian rift phase, even in the depocenter of the Swan Graben, where the Callovian-Valanginian interval reaches its maximum thickness. This is atypical for a passive margin basin. Assuming an extensional origin for the margin, the absence of tectonic subsidence is considered to indicate that continental rifting in the area was wet (accompanied by major volcanic activity). Recent studies have shown that extensive volcanism may occur where rift zones cut through regions of anomalously hot mantle (100-200{degree}C above normal). The addition to the crust of igneous material, the density of which has been modified by adiabatic decompression, inhibits syn-rift subsidence. A wet rifting model also has implications for the origin of the nearby marginal plateaux such as the Scott Plateau. Their relatively thick crust and lack of subsidence may be due to igneous underplating associated with wet rifting. As such the plateaux may be regarded as transitional between oceanic and continental crust. The post-Valanginian Cretaceous subsidence of the Vulcan subbasin and adjacent areas is consistent with typical post-rift thermal subsidence, the predicted exponentially decaying subsidence history for a wet rift being indistinguishable from that of a dry rift.

  7. SU-E-T-573: The Robustness of a Combined Margin Recipe for Uncertainties During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variability of a safety margin recipe that combines CTV and PTV margins quadratically, with several tumor, treatment, and user related factors. Methods: Margin recipes were calculated by monte-carlo simulations in 5 steps. 1. A spherical tumor with or without isotropic microscopic was irradiated with a 5 field dose plan2. PTV: Geometric uncertainties were introduced using systematic (Sgeo) and random (sgeo) standard deviations. CTV: Microscopic disease distribution was modelled by semi-gaussian (Smicro) with varying number of islets (Ni)3. For a specific uncertainty set (Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)), margins were varied until pre-defined decrease in TCP or dose coverage was fulfilled. 4. First, margin recipes were calculated for each of the three uncertainties separately. CTV and PTV recipes were then combined quadratically to yield a final recipe M(Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)).5. The final M was verified by simultaneous simulations of the uncertainties.Now, M has been calculated for various changing parameters like margin criteria, penumbra steepness, islet radio-sensitivity, dose conformity, and number of fractions. We subsequently investigated A: whether the combined recipe still holds in all these situations, and B: what the margin variation was in all these cases. Results: We found that the accuracy of the combined margin recipes remains on average within 1mm for all situations, confirming the correctness of the quadratic addition. Depending on the specific parameter, margin factors could change such that margins change over 50%. Especially margin recipes based on TCP-criteria are more sensitive to more parameters than those based on purely geometric Dmin-criteria. Interestingly, measures taken to minimize treatment field sizes (by e.g. optimizing dose conformity) are counteracted by the requirement of larger margins to get the same tumor coverage. Conclusion: Margin recipes combining geometric and microscopic uncertainties quadratically are

  8. Silenced, Silence, Silent: Motherhood in the Margins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Lorelei; Austin, Helena

    2007-01-01

    This project explores the experiences of women who mother children with ADHD. The authors use the metaphor of the text and the margin. The text is the "motherhood myth" that describes a particular sort of "good" mothering. The margin is the space beyond that text. This marginal space is inhabited by some or all of the mothers they spoke with, some…

  9. 12 CFR 220.4 - Margin account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Margin account. 220.4 Section 220.4 Banks and...) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.4 Margin account. (a) Margin transactions. (1) All transactions not specifically authorized for inclusion in another account shall be recorded in the...

  10. 12 CFR 220.4 - Margin account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Margin account. 220.4 Section 220.4 Banks and...) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.4 Margin account. (a) Margin transactions. (1) All transactions not specifically authorized for inclusion in another account shall be recorded in the...

  11. Diminishing Marginal Utility in Economics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmer, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Many introductory microeconomics textbook authors derive the law of demand from the assumption of diminishing marginal utility. Authors of intermediate and graduate textbooks derive demand from diminishing marginal rate of substitution and ordinal preferences. These approaches are not interchangeable; diminishing marginal utility for all goods is…

  12. Formation and evolution of magma-poor margins, an example of the West Iberia margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Morgan, Jason P.; Ranero, Cesar R.; Reston, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The West Iberia-Newfoundland (WIM-NF) conjugate margins have been geophysically and geologically surveyed for the last 30 years and have arguably become a paradigm for magma-poor extensional margins. Here we present a coherent picture of the WIM-NF rift to drift evolution that emerges from these observations and numerical modeling, and point out important differences that may exist with other magma-poor margins world-wide. The WIM-NF is characterized by a continental crust that thins asymmetrically and a wide and symmetric continent-ocean transition (COT) interpreted to consist of exhumed and serpentinised mantle with magmatic products increasing oceanward. The architectural evolution of these margins is mainly dominated by cooling under very slow extension velocities (<~6 mm/yr half-rate) and a lower crust that most probably was not extremely weak at the start of rifting. These conditions lead to a system where initially deformation is distributed over a broad area and the upper, lower crust and lithosphere are decoupled. As extension progresses upper, lower, crust and mantle become tightly coupled and deformation localizes due to strengthening and cooling during rifting. Coupling leads to asymmetric asthenospheric uplift and weakening of the hanginwall of the active fault, where a new fault forms. This continued process leads to the formation of an array of sequential faults that dip and become younger oceanward. Here we show that these processes acting in concert: 1) reproduce the margin asymmetry observed at the WIM-NF, 2) explain the fault geometry evolution from planar, to listric to detachment like by having one common Andersonian framework, 3) lead to the symmetric exhumation of mantle with little magmatism, and 4) explain the younging of the syn-rift towards the basin centre and imply that unconformities separating syn- and post-rift may be diachronous and younger towards the ocean. Finally, we show that different lower crustal rheologies lead to different

  13. Leisure activity and well-being among the elderly in Taiwan: Testing hypotheses in an Asian setting.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Z; Lin, H S

    1996-06-01

    Studies conducted in Western nations suggest hypotheses regarding the relationship between leisure activity and well-being among older adults. For instance, leisure activity is found to increase feelings of emotional well-being, and there are gender differences in both the types of activities in which elders tend to engage and their subsequent influences. This study attempts to verify these relationships among a sample of 4,049 Taiwanese elders (age 60+). Analyses show that men participate in most leisure activities with greater frequency than women; physical activity has the strongest positive influence on emotional well-being; contemplative activity, the only pursuit in which women out-participate men, displays a negative effect for women, and; the impact of different activity types vary by gender. These results both substantiate and refute hypotheses developed in the West, suggesting cultural variation in the impact of activity. Gender differences are explained in the context of role expectations and self-concept development. jg]Key words gw]Life satisfaction gw]Well-being gw]Activity participation gw]Leisure activity gw]Taiwan gw]Elderly.

  14. Social Capital in the College Setting: The Impact of Participation in Campus Activities on Drinking and Alcohol-Related Harms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theall, Katherine P.; DeJong, William; Scribner, Richard; Mason, Karen; Schneider, Shari Kessel; Simonsen, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to replicate previous findings on social capital and harmful alcohol outcomes in the college setting and to ascertain the protective effects of additional indicators of social capital. Methods: Over 4 years (2000-2004), the authors conducted annual cross-sectional, random-sample student surveys at 32 US institutions of…

  15. Visual Communication in Transition: Designing for New Media Literacies and Visual Culture Art Education across Activities and Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuiker, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    As an example of design-based research, this case study describes and analyses the enactment of a collaborative drawing and animation studio in a Singapore secondary school art classroom. The design embodies principles of visual culture art education and new media literacies in order to organize transitions in the settings of participation and…

  16. Canada basin: age and history of its continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Presently available age controls suggest that the Canada basin formed during the Cretaceous Period between about 131 and 79 Ma. The opening process began with continental breakup that may have involved all parts of the North American polar margin at about the same time. The opening was completed by the formation of oceanic crust during the extended Cretaceous interval of normal geomagnetic polarity. Features characteristics of continental breakup, insofar as they are known, show systematic regional differences. From Brock to Axel Heiberg Island, continental breakup was associated with an extended (100 + Ma) stratigraphic hiatus and, northeastward from Ellef Ringnes Island, with extensive tholeiitic igneous activity. From Banks Island to northeastern Alaska, the breakup interval was abbreviated (20-30 Ma), and sparse igneous activity occurred. These differences can be produced by changes in the rate and/or amount of crustal stretching during margin formation and would imply relatively faster or more stretching northeast of Brock island. A continental margin of fixed age, exhibiting the indicated pattern of crustal stretching, could be produced along the trailing edge of a rotating block (Arctic Alaska terrane AA) with its pivot near the Mackenzie delta. When the rotation is restored, however, geological discrepancies are evident between Devonian and older rocks across the conjugate margins, suggesting an earlier history of drifting for the AA. Early Paleozoic correlations appear improved if the AA is placed, polar margin to polar margin, against northern Ellesmere Island and Greenland, where in the middle Paleozoic, it was sheared sinistrally along the Canadian margin to its pre-rotated position opposite Banks Island.

  17. Northern and eastern margins of the Siberian continent in Triassic

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A.Yu. )

    1993-09-01

    Siliciclastic sedimentation has been predominant on the northern and eastern margins of the Siberian continent since the Triassic period. Seven transgression-regression cycles can be recognized in the Triassic succession: Griesbachien-Dienerian, Smithian-Low Spathian, Upper Spathian, Anissian (with subcycles), Ladian, Carnian, and Norlan (with subcycles). All zonal units were distinguished within transgressive portions of the cycles. Regressive portions of the cycles formed practically instantaneously. Very high sedimentation rate (300-3000 mm/1000 yr), specific structures of sedimentary rocks, and distribution of unconformities led to the conclusion that active avalanche sedimentation at the basin margins was of major significance. six facies regions are recognized in the sedimentation area: Taimyr, Kotuy-Anabar, Leno-Anabar, Bur-Olenek, Verkhoyansk, and Novosibirsk (New Siberian Islands). The main source areas were located at the Patoma Mountains for the eastern margin and at the Anabar anticline and Olenek uplift for the northern margin. Most sediments were transported to the eastern margin by a large river with a huge delta which was similar in size to the modern Lena's delta. Sediments were further distributed by contour streams. Local synsedimentary structures controlled the paleogeography of the entire area. The paleogeographical evolution of the eastern margin is the history of this delta development. The rifting activities with the trappean magmatism were the main events at the northern margin, especially in the Talmyr area. The pelagic sedimentation has been predominant in the New Siberian Islands area and most of the Laptev Sea aquatoria. The organic-rich sediments have been distinguished in Low Olenekian (Smithian), Low Anissian, Low Ladinian, and Low Carnian substages. Most of them could be hydrocarbon source rocks. Triassic oil and gas seeps have been discovered at the northern portion of the Vilyui syncline, near the Lena's delta and the Nordvic Bay.

  18. Determination of pyrotechnic functional margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1993-01-01

    Following the failure of a previously qualified pyrotechnically actuated pin puller design, an investigation led to a redesign and requalification. The emphasis of the second qualification was placed on determining the functional margin of the pin puller by comparing the energy deliverable by the pyrotechnic cartridge to the energy required to accomplish the function. Also determined were the effects of functional variables. This paper describes the failure investigation, the test methods employed and the results of the evaluation, and provides a recommended approach to assure the successful functioning of pyrotechnic devices.

  19. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  20. Managing margins through physician engagement.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas J

    2012-07-01

    Hospitals should take the following steps as they seek to engage physicians in an enterprisewide effort to effectively manage margins: Consider physicians' daily professional practice requirements and demands for time in balancing patient care and administrative duties. Share detailed transactional supply data with physicians to give them a behind-the-scenes look at the cost of products used for procedures. Institute physician-led management and monitoring of protocol compliance and shifts in utilization to promote clinical support for change. Select a physician champion to provide the framework for managing initiatives with targeted, efficient communication. PMID:22788036

  1. Reconstruction of multiple tectonic events in continental margins by integrated tectonostratigraphic and geochronological analysis: the Mesozoic to Paleogene Caribbean-South American interaction in northeastern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Agustin; Montes, Camilo; Bayona, German; Valencia, Victor; Ramirez, Diego; Zapata, Sebastian; Lara, Mario; Lopez-Martinez, Margarita; Thomson, Stuart; Weber, Marion

    2013-04-01

    Although the older record and successive tectonic scenarios experienced by a continental margin is commonly fragmentary, integrated field, petrological and geochronological analysis can reconstruct the long term tectonic evolution of continental margins and characterized major controls on the orogenic style. We present new geochronological constraints from igneous and low to very low grade metasedimentary rocks from the Caribbean continental margin of northeastern Colombia (Guajira region) in order to reconstruct the different tectonic events recorded by the margin before, during and following the arc-continent collision with the front of the Caribbean plate. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS geochronology results from leucogranites associated with garnet amphibolites, tonalites and volcanic rocks that made the continental basement of northeastern Colombia reveals and Early to Middle Mesozoic tectonic activity with peaks at ca. 220-230 Ma and 170-180 Ma. This magmatic record is related to a collisional belt link to the final agglutination of Pangea and was followed by an overimposed far field back-arc setting associated to the subduction of the Pacific (Farrallon) plate under the Pangea supercontinent. Muscovite and biotite Ar-Ar geochronology from basement rocks and low grade Mesozoic metasediments also reveals the existence of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous thermal events link to the final opening of the proto-Caribbean ocean. The South American continental margin was subsequently affected by an arc-continent collisional event with the front of the Caribbean plate. This event is recorded by the growth of a Banda-type collisional melange that mixed South American continental margin sediments with mafic and ultramafic blocks of intra-oceanic arc origin, the formation of a coherent metasedimentary belt also made of South American margin sediments, and the mylonitization of the continental basement. Ar-Ar temporal constraints on the low grade metasedimentary rocks and

  2. The genetics of nodal marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spina, Valeria; Khiabanian, Hossein; Messina, Monica; Monti, Sara; Cascione, Luciano; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Holmes, Antony B; Arcaini, Luca; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Zairis, Sakellarios; Diop, Fary; Cerri, Michaela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Marasca, Roberto; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deaglio, Silvia; Ramponi, Antonio; Tiacci, Enrico; Pasqualucci, Laura; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Rabadan, Raul; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rossi, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) is a rare, indolent B-cell tumor that is distinguished from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) by the different pattern of dissemination. NMZL still lacks distinct markers and remains orphan of specific cancer gene lesions. By combining whole-exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of tumor-related genes, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, we aimed at disclosing the pathways that are molecularly deregulated in NMZL and we compare the molecular profile of NMZL with that of SMZL. These analyses identified a distinctive pattern of nonsilent somatic lesions in NMZL. In 35 NMZL patients, 41 genes were found recurrently affected in ≥3 (9%) cases, including highly prevalent molecular lesions of MLL2 (also known as KMT2D; 34%), PTPRD (20%), NOTCH2 (20%), and KLF2 (17%). Mutations of PTPRD, a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase regulating cell growth, were enriched in NMZL across mature B-cell tumors, functionally caused the loss of the phosphatase activity of PTPRD, and were associated with cell-cycle transcriptional program deregulation and increased proliferation index in NMZL. Although NMZL shared with SMZL a common mutation profile, NMZL harbored PTPRD lesions that were otherwise absent in SMZL. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the genetics of NMZL, identify PTPRD lesions as a novel marker for this lymphoma across mature B-cell tumors, and support the distinction of NMZL as an independent clinicopathologic entity within the current lymphoma classification.

  3. The genetics of nodal marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Valeria; Khiabanian, Hossein; Messina, Monica; Monti, Sara; Cascione, Luciano; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Holmes, Antony B.; Arcaini, Luca; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Zairis, Sakellarios; Diop, Fary; Cerri, Michaela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Marasca, Roberto; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deaglio, Silvia; Ramponi, Antonio; Tiacci, Enrico; Pasqualucci, Laura; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Rabadan, Raul; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) is a rare, indolent B-cell tumor that is distinguished from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) by the different pattern of dissemination. NMZL still lacks distinct markers and remains orphan of specific cancer gene lesions. By combining whole-exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of tumor-related genes, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, we aimed at disclosing the pathways that are molecularly deregulated in NMZL and we compare the molecular profile of NMZL with that of SMZL. These analyses identified a distinctive pattern of nonsilent somatic lesions in NMZL. In 35 NMZL patients, 41 genes were found recurrently affected in ≥3 (9%) cases, including highly prevalent molecular lesions of MLL2 (also known as KMT2D; 34%), PTPRD (20%), NOTCH2 (20%), and KLF2 (17%). Mutations of PTPRD, a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase regulating cell growth, were enriched in NMZL across mature B-cell tumors, functionally caused the loss of the phosphatase activity of PTPRD, and were associated with cell-cycle transcriptional program deregulation and increased proliferation index in NMZL. Although NMZL shared with SMZL a common mutation profile, NMZL harbored PTPRD lesions that were otherwise absent in SMZL. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the genetics of NMZL, identify PTPRD lesions as a novel marker for this lymphoma across mature B-cell tumors, and support the distinction of NMZL as an independent clinicopathologic entity within the current lymphoma classification. PMID:27335277

  4. The genetics of nodal marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spina, Valeria; Khiabanian, Hossein; Messina, Monica; Monti, Sara; Cascione, Luciano; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Holmes, Antony B; Arcaini, Luca; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Zairis, Sakellarios; Diop, Fary; Cerri, Michaela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Marasca, Roberto; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deaglio, Silvia; Ramponi, Antonio; Tiacci, Enrico; Pasqualucci, Laura; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Rabadan, Raul; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rossi, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) is a rare, indolent B-cell tumor that is distinguished from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) by the different pattern of dissemination. NMZL still lacks distinct markers and remains orphan of specific cancer gene lesions. By combining whole-exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of tumor-related genes, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, we aimed at disclosing the pathways that are molecularly deregulated in NMZL and we compare the molecular profile of NMZL with that of SMZL. These analyses identified a distinctive pattern of nonsilent somatic lesions in NMZL. In 35 NMZL patients, 41 genes were found recurrently affected in ≥3 (9%) cases, including highly prevalent molecular lesions of MLL2 (also known as KMT2D; 34%), PTPRD (20%), NOTCH2 (20%), and KLF2 (17%). Mutations of PTPRD, a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase regulating cell growth, were enriched in NMZL across mature B-cell tumors, functionally caused the loss of the phosphatase activity of PTPRD, and were associated with cell-cycle transcriptional program deregulation and increased proliferation index in NMZL. Although NMZL shared with SMZL a common mutation profile, NMZL harbored PTPRD lesions that were otherwise absent in SMZL. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the genetics of NMZL, identify PTPRD lesions as a novel marker for this lymphoma across mature B-cell tumors, and support the distinction of NMZL as an independent clinicopathologic entity within the current lymphoma classification. PMID:27335277

  5. Carboniferous granites on the northern margin of Gondwana, Anatolide-Tauride Block, Turkey - Evidence for southward subduction of Paleotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candan, O.; Akal, C.; Koralay, O. E.; Okay, A. I.; Oberhänsli, R.; Prelević, D.; Mertz-Kraus, R.

    2016-06-01

    Carboniferous metagranites with U-Pb zircon crystallization ages of 331-315 Ma crop out in the Afyon zone in the northern margin of the Anatolide-Tauride Block, which is commonly regarded as part of Gondwana during the Late Palaeozoic. They are peraluminous, calc-alkaline and are characterized by increase in Rb and Ba, decrease in Nb-Ta, and enrichment in Sr and high LILE/HFSE ratios compatible with a continental arc setting. The metagranites intrude a metasedimentary sequence of phyllite, metaquartzite and marble; both the Carboniferous metagranites and metasedimentary rocks are overlain unconformably by Lower Triassic metaconglomerates, metavolcanics and Upper Triassic to Cretaceous recrystallized limestones. The low-grade metamorphism and deformation occurred at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. There is no evidence for Carboniferous deformation and metamorphism in the region. Carboniferous arc-type granites and previously described Carboniferous subduction-accretion complexes on the northern margin of the Anatolide-Tauride Block suggest southward subduction of Paleotethys under Gondwana during the Carboniferous. Considering the Variscan-related arc granites in Pelagonian and Sakarya zones on the active southern margin of Laurasia, a dual subduction of Paleotethys can be envisaged between Early Carboniferous and Late Permian. However, the southward subduction was short-lived and by the Late Permian the Gondwana margin became passive.

  6. The Feasibility of Using Nature-Based Settings for Physical Activity Programming: Views from Urban Youth and Program Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Jedediah E.; Oregon, Evelyn M.; Flett, M. Ryan; Gould, Daniel R.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the urgency to design programs to increase physical activity, especially to combat obesity in children, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions and opinions of a nature-based physical activity intervention designed for low-income urban adolescents. Methods: Four focus groups of adolescents,…

  7. Development of Junior High School Students' Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity in a Naturalistic Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaja, Sami Pekka; Jaakkola, Timo Tapio; Liukkonen, Jarmo Olavi; Digelidis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is evidence showing that fundamental movement skills and physical activity are related with each other. The ability to perform a variety of fundamental movement skills increases the likelihood of children participating in different physical activities throughout their lives. However, no fundamental movement skill interventions…

  8. Investigating the Impact of Formal Reflective Activities on Skill Adaptation in a Work-Related Instrumental Learning Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessger, Kevin M.