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Sample records for active membrane cholesterol

  1. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  2. Activation of Membrane Cholesterol by 63 Amphipaths†

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Steck, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    A few membrane-intercalating amphipaths have been observed to stimulate the interaction of cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, saponin and cyclodextrin, presumably by displacing cholesterol laterally from its phospholipid complexes. We now report that this effect, referred to as cholesterol activation, occurs with dozens of other amphipaths, including alkanols, saturated and cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, sphingosine derivatives, terpenes, alkyl ethers, ketones, aromatics and cyclic alkyl derivatives. The apparent potency of the agents tested ranged from 3 μM to 7 mM and generally paralleled their octanol/water partition coefficients, except that relative potency declined for compounds with> 10 carbons. Some small amphipaths activated cholesterol at a membrane concentration of ~3 moles per 100 moles bilayer lipids, about equimolar with the cholesterol they displaced. Lysophosphatidylserine countered the effects of all these agents, consistent with its ability to reduce the pool of active membrane cholesterol. Various amphipaths stabilized red cells against the hemolysis elicited by cholesterol depletion, presumably by substituting for the extracted sterol. The number and location of cis and trans fatty acid unsaturations and the absolute stereochemistry of enantiomer pairs had only small effects on amphipath potency. Nevertheless, potency varied ~7-fold within a group of diverse agents with similar partition coefficients. We infer that a wide variety of amphipaths can displace membrane cholesterol by competing stoichiometrically but with only limited specificity for its weak association with phospholipids. Any number of other drugs and experimental agents might do the same. PMID:19655814

  3. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  4. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  5. Acute cholesterol depletion impairs functional expression of tissue factor in fibroblasts: modulation of tissue factor activity by membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Samir K.; Iakhiaev, Alexei; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Mohan Rao, L. Vijaya

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol, in addition to providing rigidity to the fluid membrane, plays a critical role in receptor function, endocytosis, recycling, and signal transduction. In the present study, we examined the effect of membrane cholesterol on functional expression of tissue factor (TF), a cellular receptor for clotting factor VIIa. Depletion of cholesterol in human fibroblasts (WI-38) with methyl-β-cyclodextrin–reduced TF activity at the cell surface. Binding studies with radiolabeled VIIa and TF monoclonal antibody (mAB) revealed that reduced TF activity in cholesterol-depleted cells stems from the impairment of VIIa interaction with TF rather than the loss of TF receptors at the cell surface. Repletion of cholesterol-depleted cells with cholesterol restored TF function. Loss of caveolar structure on cholesterol removal is not responsible for reduced TF activity. Solubilization of cellular TF in different detergents indicated that a substantial portion of TF in fibroblasts is associated with noncaveolar lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion studies showed that the TF association with these rafts is cholesterol dependent. Overall, the data presented herein suggest that membrane cholesterol functions as a positive regulator of TF function by maintaining TF receptors, probably in noncaveolar lipid rafts, in a high-affinity state for VIIa binding. PMID:15328160

  6. Luminol electrochemiluminescence for the analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangzhong; Zhou, Junyu; Tian, Chunxiu; Jiang, Dechen; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Hongyuan

    2013-04-16

    A luminol electrochemiluminescence assay was reported to analyze active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells. The cellular membrane cholesterol was activated by the exposure of the cells to low ionic strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). The active membrane cholesterol was reacted with cholesterol oxidase in the solution to generate a peak concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the electrode surface, which induced a measurable luminol electrochemiluminescence. Further treatment of the active cells with mevastatin decreased the active membrane cholesterol resulting in a drop in luminance. No change in the intracellular calcium was observed in the presence of luminol and voltage, which indicated that our analysis process might not interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Single cell analysis was performed by placing a pinhole below the electrode so that only one cell was exposed to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Twelve single cells were analyzed individually, and a large deviation on luminance ratio observed exhibited the cell heterogeneity on the active membrane cholesterol. The smaller deviation on ACAT/HMGCoA inhibited cells than ACAT inhibited cells suggested different inhibition efficiency for sandoz 58035 and mevastatin. The new information obtained from single cell analysis might provide a new insight on the study of intracellular cholesterol trafficking. PMID:23527944

  7. Fast serial analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunxiu; Zhou, Junyu; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Fang, Danjun; Jiang, Dechen

    2014-01-01

    Previously, our group has utilized the luminol electrochemiluminescence to analyze the active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells by the exposure of one cell to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) through a pinhole. In this paper, fast analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells was achieved by a multimicroelectrode array without the pinhole. Single cells were directly located on the microelectrodes using cell-sized microwell traps. A cycle of voltage was applied on the microelectrodes sequentially to induce a peak of luminescence from each microelectrode for the serial measurement of active membrane cholesterol. A minimal time of 1.60 s was determined for the analysis of one cell. The simulation and the experimental data exhibited a semisteady-state distribution of hydrogen peroxide on the microelectrode after the reaction of cholesterol oxidase with the membrane cholesterol, which supported the relative accuracy of the serial analysis. An eight-microelectrode array was demonstrated to analyze eight single cells in 22 s serially, including the channel switching time. The results from 64 single cells either activated by low ion strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) revealed that most of the cells analyzed had the similar active membrane cholesterol, while few cells had more active cholesterol resulting in the cellular heterogeneity. The fast single-cell analysis platform developed will be potentially useful for the analysis of more molecules in single cells using proper oxidases. PMID:24328095

  8. Trans Fatty Acid Derived Phospholipids Show Increased Membrane Cholesterol and Reduced Receptor Activation as Compared to Their Cis Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Mitchell, Drake C.; Litman, Burton J.

    2005-01-01

    The consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) is linked to the elevation of LDL cholesterol and is considered to be a major health risk factor for coronary heart disease. Despite several decades of extensive research on this subject, the underlying mechanism of how TFA modulates serum cholesterol levels remains elusive. In this study, we examined the molecular interaction of TFA-derived phospholipid with cholesterol and the membrane receptor rhodopsin in model membranes. Rhodopsin is a prototypical member of the G-protein coupled receptor family. It has a well-characterized structure and function and serves as a model membrane receptor in this study. Phospholipid–cholesterol affinity was quantified by measuring cholesterol partition coefficients. Phospholipid–receptor interactions were probed by measuring the level of rhodopsin activation. Our study shows that phospholipid derived from TFA had a higher membrane cholesterol affinity than their cis analogues. TFA phospholipid membranes also exhibited a higher acyl chain packing order, which was indicated by the lower acyl chain packing free volume as determined by DPH fluorescence and the higher transition temperature for rhodopsin thermal denaturation. The level of rhodopsin activation was diminished in TFA phospholipids. Since membrane cholesterol level and membrane receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis, the combination of higher cholesterol content and reduced receptor activation associated with the presence of TFA–phospholipid could be factors contributing to the elevation of LDL cholesterol. PMID:15766276

  9. Cholesterol dynamics in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yeagle, P L; Albert, A D; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Young, J; Frye, J

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of the sterol analogue, cholestatrienol, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin lattice relaxation time (T1c) measurements of [13C4] labeled cholesterol were exploited to determine the correlation times characterizing the major modes of motion of cholesterol in unsonicated phospholipid multilamellar liposomes. Two modes of motion were found to be important: (a) rotational diffusion and (b) time dependence of the orientation of the director for axial diffusion, or "wobble." From the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decays of cholestatrienol in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers, a value for tau perpendicular, the correlation time for wobble, of 0.9 x 10(-9) s and a value for S perpendicular, the order parameter characterizing the same motion, of 0.45 s were calculated. Both tau perpendicular and S perpendicular were relatively insensitive to temperature and cholesterol content of the membranes. The T1c measurements of [13C4] labeled cholesterol did not provide a quantitative determination of tau parallel, the correlation time for axial diffusion. T1c from the lipid hydrocarbon chains suggested a value for tau perpendicular similar to that for cholesterol. Steady-state anisotropy measurements and time-resolved anisotropy measurements of cholestatrienol were used to probe sterol behavior in a variety of pure and mixed lipid multilamellar liposomes. Both the lipid headgroups and the lipid hydrocarbons chains contributed to the determination of the sterol environment in the membrane, as revealed by these fluorescence measurements. In particular, effects of the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroup and of multiple unsaturation in the lipid hydrocarbon chains were observed. However, while the steady-state anisotropy was sensitive to these factors, the time-resolved fluorescence analysis indicated that tau perpendicular was not strongly affected by the lipid composition of the membrane. S perpendicular may be increased

  10. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4) and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293) cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn) present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1) levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells. PMID:20546600

  11. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  12. Modulation of ileal bile acid transporter (ASBT) activity by depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol: association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Kumar, Pradeep; Saksena, Seema; Turner, Jerrold R.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.

    2016-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) represents a highly efficient conservation mechanism of bile acids via mediation of their active transport across the luminal membrane of terminal ileum. To gain insight into the cellular regulation of ASBT, we investigated the association of ASBT with cholesterol and sphingolipid-enriched specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and examined the role of membrane cholesterol in maintaining ASBT function. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably transfected with human ASBT, human ileal brush-border membrane vesicles, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were utilized for these studies. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of ASBT protein with lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts by depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly reduced the association of ASBT with lipid rafts, which was paralleled by a decrease in ASBT activity in Caco-2 and HEK-293 cells treated with MβCD. The inhibition in ASBT activity by MβCD was blocked in the cells treated with MβCD-cholesterol complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that MβCD treatment decreased the Vmax of the transporter, which was not associated with alteration in the plasma membrane expression of ASBT. Our study illustrates that cholesterol content of lipid rafts is essential for the optimal activity of ASBT and support the association of ASBT with lipid rafts. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which ASBT activity may be rapidly modulated by alterations in cholesterol content of plasma membrane and thus have important implications in processes related to maintenance of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:18063707

  13. Cytotoxic bile acids, but not cytoprotective species, inhibit the ordering effect of cholesterol in model membranes at physiologically active concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mello-Vieira, João; Sousa, Tânia; Coutinho, Ana; Fedorov, Aleksander; Lucas, Susana D; Moreira, Rui; Castro, Rui E; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2013-09-01

    Submillimolar concentrations of cytotoxic bile acids (BAs) induce cell death via apoptosis. On the other hand, several cytoprotective BAs were shown to prevent apoptosis in the same concentration range. Still, the mechanisms by which BAs trigger these opposite signaling effects remain unclear. This study was aimed to determine if cytotoxic and cytoprotective BAs, at physiologically active concentrations, are able to modulate the biophysical properties of lipid membranes, potentially translating into changes in the apoptotic threshold of cells. Binding of BAs to membranes was assessed through the variation of fluorescence parameters of suitable derivatized BAs. These derivatives partitioned with higher affinity to liquid disordered than to the cholesterol-enriched liquid ordered domains. Unlabeled BAs were also shown to have a superficial location upon interaction with the lipid membrane. Additionally, the interaction of cytotoxic BAs with membranes resulted in membrane expansion, as concluded from FRET data. Moreover, it was shown that cytotoxic BAs were able to significantly disrupt the ordering of the membrane by cholesterol at physiologically active concentrations of the BA, an effect not associated with cholesterol removal. On the other hand, cytoprotective bile acids had no effect on membrane properties. It was concluded that, given the observed effects on membrane rigidity, the apoptotic activity of cytotoxic BAs could be potentially associated with changes in plasma membrane organization (e.g. modulation of lipid domains) or with an increase in mitochondrial membrane affinity for apoptotic proteins. PMID:23747364

  14. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  15. Membrane cholesterol plays an important role in enteropathogen adhesion and the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Li, Yinchau; Yang, Yang; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich ordered microdomains distributed in the plasma membrane that participates in mammalian signal transduction pathways. To determine the role of lipid rafts in mediating interactions between enteropathogens and intestinal epithelial cells, membrane cholesterol was depleted from Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells using methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis adhesion and invasion into intestinal epithelial cells. Complementation with exogenous cholesterol restored bacterial adhesion to basal levels. We also evaluated the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Toll-like receptor 5 signaling by bacterial flagellin. Depleting membrane cholesterol reduced the ability of purified recombinant E. coli flagellin to activate TLR5 signaling in intestinal cells. These data suggest that both membrane cholesterol and lipid rafts play important roles in enteropathogen adhesion and contribute to the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling. PMID:25935453

  16. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, M Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content. PMID:27119638

  17. Fusion Activity of HIV gp41 Fusion Domain is Related to its Secondary Structure and Depth of Membrane Insertion in a Cholesterol-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Moorthy, Anna Eswara; Li, Yinling; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV gp41 fusion domain plays a critical role in membrane fusion during viral entry. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the structure and activity of the fusion domain in different lipid environments helps to formulate mechanistic models on how it might function in mediating membrane fusion. The secondary structure of the fusion domain in small liposomes composed of different lipid mixtures was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In membranes containing less than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed an α-helix and in membranes containing equal to or more than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed β-sheet secondary structure. EPR spectra of spin-labeled fusion domains also indicated different conformations in membranes with and without cholesterol. Power saturation EPR data were further used to determine the orientation and depth of α-helical fusion domains in lipid bilayers. Fusion and membrane perturbation activities of the gp41 fusion domain were measured by lipid mixing and contents leakage. The fusion domain fused membranes in both its helical and β-sheet forms. High cholesterol, which induced β-sheet, promoted fusion, but acidic lipids, which promoted relatively deep membrane insertion as an α-helix, also induced fusion. The results indicate that the structure of the HIV gp41 fusion domain is plastic and depends critically on the lipid environment. Provided their membrane insertion is deep, α-helical and β-sheet conformations contribute to membrane fusion. PMID:22343048

  18. The role of cholesterol in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Lee, Jinwoo; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol modulates the bilayer structure of biological membranes in multiple ways. It changes the fluidity, thickness, compressibility, water penetration and intrinsic curvature of lipid bilayers. In multi-component lipid mixtures, cholesterol induces phase separations, partitions selectively between different coexisting lipid phases, and causes integral membrane proteins to respond by changing conformation or redistribution in the membrane. But, which of these often overlapping properties are important for membrane fusion?-Here we review a range of recent experiments that elucidate the multiple roles that cholesterol plays in SNARE-mediated and viral envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:27179407

  19. Sensitivity of cholecystokinin receptors to membrane cholesterol content

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol represents a structurally and functionally important component of the eukaryotic cell membrane, where it increases lipid order, affects permeability, and influences the lateral mobility and conformation of membrane proteins. Several G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to be affected by the cholesterol content of the membrane, with functional impact on their ligand binding and signal transduction characteristics. The effects of cholesterol can be mediated directly by specific molecular interactions with the receptor and/or indirectly by altering the physical properties of the membrane. This review focuses on the importance and differential effects of membrane cholesterol on the activity of cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. The type 1 CCK receptor is quite sensitive to its cholesterol environment, while the type 2 CCK receptor is not. The possible structural basis for this differential impact is explored and the implications of pathological states, such as metabolic syndrome, in which membrane cholesterol may be increased and CCK1R function may be abnormal are discussed. This is believed to have substantial potential importance for the development of drugs targeting the CCK receptor. PMID:23087674

  20. Purified outer membranes of Serpulina hyodysenteriae contain cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, H; Whelchel, T R; Garczynski, S F; Howerth, E W; Gherardini, F C

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated outer and inner membranes of Serpulina hyodysenteriae by using discontinuous sucrose density gradients. The outer and inner membrane fractions contained less than 1 and 2%, respectively, of the total NADH oxidase activity (soluble marker) in the cell lysate. Various membrane markers including lipooligosaccharide (LOS), the 16-kDa outer membrane lipoprotein (SmpA), and the C subunit of the F1F0 ATPase indicated that the lowest-density membrane fraction contained outer membranes while the high-density membrane fraction contained inner membranes and that both are essentially free of contamination by the periplasmic flagella, a major contaminant of membranes isolated by other techniques. The outer membrane fractions (rho = 1.10 g/cm3) contained 0.25 mg of protein/mg (dry weight), while the inner membrane samples (rho = 1.16 g/cm3) contained significantly more protein (0.55 mg of protein/mg [dry weight]). Lipid analysis revealed that the purified outer membranes contained cholesterol as a major component of the membrane lipids. Treatment of intact S. hyodysenteriae with different concentrations of digitonin, a steroid glycoside that interacts with cholesterol, indicated that the outer membrane could be selectively removed at concentrations as low as 0.125%. PMID:9286995

  1. What planar lipid membranes tell us about the pore-forming activity of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    PubMed

    Marchioretto, Marta; Podobnik, Marjetka; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Anderluh, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    Pore-forming toxins are an important group of natural molecules that damage cellular membranes by forming transmembrane pores. They are used by many organisms for attack or defense and similar proteins are employed in the immune system of vertebrates. Various biophysical approaches have been used to understand how these proteins act at the molecular level. One of the most useful, in terms of monitoring pore formation in real time, is a method that employs planar lipid membranes and involves ionic current measurements. Here we highlight the advantages and possibilities that this approach offers and show how it can advance understanding of the pore-forming mechanism and pore properties for one of the most important families of natural toxins, the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. PMID:23876488

  2. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  3. Use of cyclodextrins to manipulate plasma membrane cholesterol content: evidence, misconceptions and control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zidovetzki, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    The physiological importance of cholesterol in the cell plasma membrane has attracted increased attention in recent years. Consequently, the use of methods of controlled manipulation of membrane cholesterol content has also increased sharply, especially as a method of studying putative cholesterol-enriched cell membrane domains (rafts). The most common means of modifying the cholesterol content of cell membranes is the incubation of cells or model membranes with cyclodextrins, a family of compounds, which, due to the presence of relatively hydrophobic cavity, can be used to extract cholesterol from cell membranes. However, the mechanism of this activity of cyclodextrins is not completely established. Moreover, under conditions commonly used for cholesterol extraction, cyclodextrins may remove cholesterol from both raft and non-raft domains of the membrane as well as alter the distribution of cholesterol between plasma and intracellular membranes. In addition, other hydrophobic molecules such as phospholipids may also be extracted from the membranes by cyclodextrins. We review the evidence for the specific and non-specific effects of cyclodextrins and what is known about the mechanisms for cyclodextrin-induced cholesterol and phospholipid extraction. Finally, we discuss useful control strategies that may help to verify that the observed effects are due specifically to cyclodextrin-induced changes in cellular cholesterol. PMID:17493580

  4. Essentially All Excess Fibroblast Cholesterol Moves from Plasma Membranes to Intracellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that modestly increasing plasma membrane cholesterol beyond its physiological set point greatly increases the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial pools, thereby eliciting manifold feedback responses that return cell cholesterol to its resting state. The question arises whether this homeostatic mechanism reflects the targeting of cell surface cholesterol to specific intracellular sites or its general equilibration among the organelles. We now show that human fibroblast cholesterol can be increased as much as two-fold from 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin without changing the size of the cell surface pool. Rather, essentially all of the added cholesterol disperses rapidly among cytoplasmic membranes, increasing their overall cholesterol content by as much as five-fold. We conclude that the level of plasma membrane cholesterol is normally at capacity and that even small increments above this physiological set point redistribute essentially entirely to intracellular membranes, perhaps down their chemical activity gradients. PMID:25014655

  5. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  6. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Increases the Availability of Cholesterol in Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-02-01

    Side-chain oxysterols are enzymatically generated oxidation products of cholesterol that serve a central role in mediating cholesterol homeostasis. Recent work has shown that side-chain oxysterols, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), alter membrane structure in very different ways from cholesterol, suggesting a possible mechanism for how these oxysterols regulate cholesterol homeostasis. Here we extend our previous work, using molecular dynamics simulations of 25-HC and cholesterol mixtures in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers to examine interactions between 25-HC and cholesterol in the same bilayer. When added to cholesterol-containing membranes, 25-HC causes larger changes in membrane structure than when added to cholesterol-free membranes, demonstrating interactions between the two sterols. We also find that the presence of 25-HC changes the position, orientation, and solvent accessibility of cholesterol, shifting it into the water interface and therefore its availability to external acceptors. This is consistent with experimental results showing that oxysterols can trigger cholesterol trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. These interactions provide a potential mechanism for 25-HC-mediated regulation of cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis through direct modulation of cholesterol availability.

  7. Nanosecond Lipid Dynamics in Membranes Containing Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Haeussler, Wolfgang; Seydel, Tilo; Katsaras, John; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2014-01-01

    Lipid dynamics in the cholesterol-rich (40 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes were studied using neutron spin-echo and neutron backscattering. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence supports the notion of the liquid-ordered phase in phospholipid membranes as a locally structured liquid, with small ordered domains of a highly dynamic nature in equilibrium with a disordered matrix [S. Meinhardt, R. L. C. Vink and F. Schmid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2013, 110(12), 4476 4481, C. L. Armstrong et al., PLoS One, 2013, 8(6), e66162]. This local structure was found to have a pronounced impact on the membranes' dynamical properties. We found that the long-wavelength dynamics in the liquid-ordered phase, associated with the elastic properties of the membranes, were faster by two orders of magnitude as compared to the liquid disordered phase. At the same time, collective nanoscale diffusion was significantly slower. The presence of a soft-mode (a slowing down) in the longwavelength dispersion relationship suggests an upper size limit for the ordered lipid domain of ~220 A. Moreover, from the relaxation rate of the collective lipid diffusion of lipid lipid distances, the lifetime of these domains was estimated to be about 100 nanoseconds.

  8. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2015-10-01

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid-Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200-11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. A model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell. PMID:26074009

  9. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.

  10. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those thatmore » cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.« less

  11. On the puzzling distribution of cholesterol in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Giang, H; Schick, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of cholesterol between the two leaves of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells presents a conundrum; given cholesterol's known affinity for sphingomyelin, which resides predominantly in the exoplasmic leaf, why is it that experiment finds a majority of the cholesterol in the cytoplasmic leaf? This article reviews a recently proposed solution to this puzzle. PMID:26724709

  12. Influence of increased membrane cholesterol on membrane fluidity and cell function in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A

    1978-01-01

    , irregular (spur) form, and the survival of cholesterol-rich red cells is decreased in the presence of the spleen. Although active Na-K transport is not influenced by cholesterol enrichment of human red cells, several carrier-mediated transport pathways are inhibited. We have demonstrated this effect for the cotransport of Na + K and similar results have been obtained by others in studies of organic acid transport and the transport of small neutral molecules such as erythritol and glycerol. Thus, red cell membrane C/PL is sensitive to the C/PL of the plasma environment. Increasing membrane C/PL causes a decrease in membrane fluidity, and these changes are associated with a reduction in membrane permeability, a distortion of cell contour and filterability and a shortening of the survival of red cells in vivo. PMID:723275

  13. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Vindigni, Giulia; Testa, Barbara; Raniolo, Sofia; Fasciglione, Giovanni Francesco; Coletta, Massimiliano; Biocca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding. PMID:26495844

  14. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Barbara; Raniolo, Sofia; Fasciglione, Giovanni Francesco; Coletta, Massimiliano; Biocca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding. PMID:26495844

  15. Ionic channels and nerve membrane lipids. Cholesterol-tetrodotoxin interaction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V; Camejo, G

    1970-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate possible interactions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) with lipid molecules isolated from nerve fiber plasma membranes of the squid Dosidicus gigas. TTX has a highly selective ability to block the channel normally used by Na(+) to cross the axolemma during nervous impulse conduction. In order to investigate the interaction each lipid sample was spread on 5 x 10(-7)M TTX and TTX-free 0.15 M NaCl solutions adjusted to pH 7.4 with 7 x 10(-3)M phosphate buffer. The surface pressure-area diagrams of the lipid monolayers revealed that TTX interacts only with cholesterol. The expansion of the cholesterol monolayers at 5 x 10(-7)M TTX was 2 A(2)/molecule at zero pressure for the experiments at 20 degrees C and 2.5 A(2)/molecule for those at 25 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in KCl subphases. The apparent dissociation constant of the cholesterol-TTX complex calculated from dose-response experiments is 2.6 x 10(-7)M. Experiments at pH 10.1 revealed that the zwitter ionic form of TTX is less active. Experiments with cholesterol derivatives (cholesteryl acetate, cholesterol methyl ether, cholestanol, and cholestanyl acetate) indicate that for the interaction with TTX a partial negatively charged group at C-3 and a double bond between C-5 and C-6 on the steroid nucleus are required. Tetrodonic acid, a biologically inactive derivative of TTX, does not interact with cholesterol. The results lead us to propose that cholesterol is part of the Na(+) channel. PMID:5435784

  16. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  17. The Role of Cholesterol in Driving IAPP-Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Michele F M; Lolicato, Fabio; Di Mauro, Giacomo; Milardi, Danilo; D'Urso, Luisa; Satriano, Cristina; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; La Rosa, Carmelo

    2016-07-12

    Our knowledge of the molecular events underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus-a protein conformational disease characterized by the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in pancreatic β cells-is limited. However, amyloid-mediated membrane damage is known to play a key role in IAPP cytotoxicity, and therefore the effects of lipid composition on modulating IAPP-membrane interactions have been the focus of intense research. In particular, membrane cholesterol content varies with aging and consequently with adverse environmental factors such as diet and lifestyle, but its role in the development of the disease is controversial. In this study, we employ a combination of experimental techniques and in silico molecular simulations to shed light on the role of cholesterol in IAPP aggregation and the related membrane disruption. We show that if anionic POPC/POPS vesicles are used as model membranes, cholesterol has a negligible effect on the kinetics of IAPP fibril growth on the surface of the bilayer. In addition, cholesterol inhibits membrane damage by amyloid-induced poration on membranes, but enhances leakage through fiber growth on the membrane surface. Conversely, if 1:2 DOPC/DPPC raft-like model membranes are used, cholesterol accelerates fiber growth. Next, it enhances pore formation and suppresses fiber growth on the membrane surface, leading to leakage. Our results highlight a twofold effect of cholesterol on the amyloidogenicity of IAPP and help explain its debated role in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27410742

  18. Enzymatic Oxidation of Cholesterol: Properties and Functional Effects of Cholestenone in Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Manna, Moutusi; Mokkila, Sini; Javanainen, Matti; Rog, Tomasz; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Ikonen, Elina

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cholesterol oxidase is commonly used as an experimental tool to reduce cellular cholesterol content. That the treatment also generates the poorly degradable metabolite 4-cholesten-3-one (cholestenone) has received less attention. Here, we investigated the membrane partitioning of cholestenone using simulations and cell biological experiments and assessed the functional effects of cholestenone in human cells. Atomistic simulations predicted that cholestenone reduces membrane order, undergoes faster flip-flop and desorbs more readily from membranes than cholesterol. In primary human fibroblasts, cholestenone was released from membranes to physiological extracellular acceptors more avidly than cholesterol, but without acceptors it remained in cells over a day. To address the functional effects of cholestenone, we studied fibroblast migration during wound healing. When cells were either cholesterol oxidase treated or part of cellular cholesterol was exchanged for cholestenone with cyclodextrin, cell migration during 22 h was markedly inhibited. Instead, when a similar fraction of cholesterol was removed using cyclodextrin, cells replenished their cholesterol content in 3 h and migrated similarly to control cells. Thus, cholesterol oxidation produces long-term functional effects in cells and these are in part due to the generated membrane active cholestenone. PMID:25157633

  19. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  20. New insights into the regulation of cholesterol efflux from the sperm membrane

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Tamara; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of the mammalian plasma membrane because it promotes membrane stability without comprising membrane fluidity. Given this important cellular role, cholesterol levels are tightly controlled at multiple levels. It has been clearly shown that cholesterol redistribution and depletion from the sperm membrane is a key part of the spermatozoon's preparation for fertilization. Some factors that regulate these events are described (e.g., bicarbonate, calcium) but the mechanisms underlying cholesterol export are poorly understood. How does a hydrophobic cholesterol molecule inserted in the sperm plasma membrane enter the energetically unfavorable aqueous surroundings? This review will provide an overview of knowledge in this area and highlight our gaps in understanding. The overall aim is to better understand cholesterol redistribution in the sperm plasma membrane, its relation to the possible activation of a cholesterol transporter and the role of cholesterol acceptors. Armed with such knowledge, sperm handling techniques can be adapted to better prepare spermatozoa for in vitro and in vivo fertilization. PMID:25926609

  1. Membrane organization and regulation of cellular Cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Garda, Horacio A; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Gonzalez, Marina C.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2010-01-01

    An excess of intracellular free Cholesterol (Chol) is cytotoxic, and its homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Apolipoprotein A–I (apoA-I) is a highly efficient Chol acceptor as it activates complex cellular pathways that tend to mobilize and export Chol from cellular depots. Here we hypothesize that membrane composition and/or organization is strongly involved in Chol homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a cell line over expressing Stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD-cells), which modifies plasma membrane (PM) composition by the enrichment of monounsaturated fatty,acids and determined this effect on membrane properties, cell viability and cholesterol homeostasis. PM in SCD-cells has a higher phospholipids/sphingomyelin ratio and is slightly enriched in Chol. These cells showed an increase in the cholesteryl esters/free Chol ratio, they were more resistant to Chol toxicity and in addition, they exported more caveolin than Control cells. The data suggest that cell functionality is preserved by regulating membrane fluidity and Chol exportation and storage. PMID:20336284

  2. Perspective on plasma membrane cholesterol efflux and spermatozoal function.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Dhastagir Sultan; Ali, Elshaari Farag

    2010-05-01

    enhancing fertility, identifying and treating certain forms of male infertility, and preventing conception. One remarkable insight is the importance of membrane cholesterol efflux in initiating transmembrane signaling events that confer fertilization competence. The identity of the physiologically relevant cholesterol acceptors and modulators of cholesterol efflux is therefore of great interest. Still, it is clear that cholesterol efflux represents only a part of this story. The involvement of phospholipid translocation in mediating dynamic changes in the membrane, rendering it conducive to transmembrane signaling, and the modulation of membrane components of signal transduction cascades by cholesterol or phospholipids will yield important insights into the links between environmental sensing and transmembrane signaling in the sperm. Understanding the membrane molecular events will ultimately provide new and exciting areas of investigation for the future. PMID:21209749

  3. Statin-induced chronic cholesterol depletion inhibits Leishmania donovani infection: Relevance of optimum host membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Roy, Saptarshi; Jafurulla, Md; Mandal, Chitra; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that invade and survive within host macrophages leading to leishmaniasis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly among economically weaker sections in tropical and subtropical regions. Visceral leishmaniasis is a potent disease caused by Leishmania donovani. The detailed mechanism of internalization of Leishmania is poorly understood. A basic step in the entry of Leishmania involves interaction of the parasite with the host plasma membrane. In this work, we have explored the effect of chronic metabolic cholesterol depletion using lovastatin on the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in host macrophages. We show here that chronic cholesterol depletion of host macrophages results in reduction in the attachment of Leishmania promastigotes, along with a concomitant reduction in the intracellular amastigote load. These results assume further relevance since chronic cholesterol depletion is believed to mimic physiological cholesterol modulation. Interestingly, the reduction in the ability of Leishmania to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, enrichment of host membrane cholesterol resulted in reduction in the entry and survival of Leishmania in host macrophages. As a control, the binding of Escherichia coli to host macrophages remained invariant under these conditions, thereby implying specificity of cholesterol requirement for effective leishmanial infection. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first comprehensive demonstration that an optimum content of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for leishmanial infection. Our results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated leishmanial infection. PMID:27319380

  4. Modulation of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump (SERCA) Function by Membrane Cholesterol during Unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. S. F.; Hammond, D. K.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated by in situ immuno-localization that cholesterol is predominantly located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), rather than in the sarcolemmal/T-tubule (SL-TT) membranes of both human and rat skeletal muscle (Clarke et al., 2000, JAP). In addition, we have demonstrated that mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle in a rat hindlimb suspension model significantly increases membrane cholesterol content and that this increase is also localized to SR rather than SL-TT membranes in such atrophied muscle. Utilizing a novel fluorescent calcium staining technique in perfusion fixed soleus muscle we observed a significant positive correlation between membrane cholesterol content and free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading. To determine if a correlation between increased SR membrane cholesterol content and increased free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading is due to a membrane cholesterol-mediated alteration in SR calcium pump function, we also describe the effects of modulating the cholesterol content of purified SR membrane preparations on SR-Ca2+ ATPase activity and ryanodine channel activity. As an increase in free intra-cellular calcium levels have previously demonstrated to induce catabolism in a wide range of biological systems, we suggest that altered SR calcium pump function may be the underlying basis for the initiation of unloading induced muscle atrophy.

  5. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  6. Differential effects of cholesterol and lanosterol on artificial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yeagle, P L; Martin, R B; Lala, A K; Lin, H K; Bloch, K

    1977-01-01

    The effects of cholesterol, 4,4-dimethylcholesterol, and lanosterol (4,4',14alpha-trimethyl-delta8,24-cholestadiene-3beta-ol) on some properties of lecithin vesicles have been compared. Unlike cholesterol, lanosterol retards the exit of trapped glucose from phospholipid vesicles only slightly. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of cholesterol/lecithin vesicles shows no resonances attributable to the sterol. By contrast, several resonances attributable to quaternary carbon atoms or methyl groups are seen in the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of lanosterol/lecithin vesicles, indicating that lanosterol is much less immobilized than cholesterol. Because the membrane behavior of 4,4-dimethylcholesterol is closely similar to that of cholesterol, it is concluded that the axial 14-alpha-methyl group is responsible for the lessened membrane immobilization of lanosterol. The results emphasize the importance of a planar sterol alpha-face for interaction with phospholipid acyl chains. PMID:270726

  7. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S; Williamson, Philip T F; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as "CARC"). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a "mirror code" controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  8. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S.; Williamson, Philip T. F.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as “CARC”). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a “mirror code” controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  9. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  10. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pundir, C.S.; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Methods: Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. Results: The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. Km and Imax for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4±2.8 and 92.3±3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were <2 and <4 per cent, respectively. Biosensor had a storage life of 6 months at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential. PMID:23168704

  11. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, D; Nunn, R S

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility modulus K, the critical areal strain alpha c, and the tensile strength tau lys, from which the failure energy or membrane toughness Tf was calculated. The elastic area expansion moduli for these lipid and lipid/cholesterol bilayers ranged from 57 dyn/cm for DAPC to 1,734 dyn/cm for BSM/CHOL. The SOPC/CHOL series and RBC lipids had intermediate values. The results indicated that the presence of cholesterol is the single most influential factor in increasing bilayer cohesion, but only for lipids where both chains are saturated, or mono- or diunsaturated. Multiple unsaturation in both lipid chains inhibits the condensing effect of cholesterol in bilayers. The SOPC/CHOL system was studied in more detail. The area expansion modulus showed a nonlinear increase with increasing cholesterol concentration up to a constant plateau, indicating a saturation limit for cholesterol in the bilayer phase of approximately 55 mol% CHOL. The membrane compressibility was modeled by a property-averaging composite theory involving two bilayer components, namely, uncomplexed lipid and a lipid/cholesterol complex of stoichiometry 1/1.22. The area expansion modulus of this molecular composite membrane was evaluated by a combination of the expansion moduli of each component scaled by their area fractions in the bilayer. Bilayer toughness, which is the energy stored in the bilayer at failure, showed a maximum value at approximately 40 mol% CHOL. This breakdown energy was found to be only a fraction of the

  12. The Insertion and Transport of Anandamide in Synthetic Lipid Membranes Are Both Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Chahinian, Henri; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Anandamide is a lipid neurotransmitter which belongs to a class of molecules termed the endocannabinoids involved in multiple physiological functions. Anandamide is readily taken up into cells, but there is considerable controversy as to the nature of this transport process (passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer vs. involvement of putative proteic transporters). This issue is of major importance since anandamide transport through the plasma membrane is crucial for its biological activity and intracellular degradation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cholesterol in membrane uptake and transport of anandamide. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular modeling simulations suggested that anandamide can adopt a shape that is remarkably complementary to cholesterol. Physicochemical studies showed that in the nanomolar concentration range, anandamide strongly interacted with cholesterol monolayers at the air-water interface. The specificity of this interaction was assessed by: i) the lack of activity of structurally related unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and arachidonic acid at 50 nM) on cholesterol monolayers, and ii) the weak insertion of anandamide into phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin monolayers. In agreement with these data, the presence of cholesterol in reconstituted planar lipid bilayers triggered the stable insertion of anandamide detected as an increase in bilayer capacitance. Kinetics transport studies showed that pure phosphatidylcholine bilayers were weakly permeable to anandamide. The incorporation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine bilayers dose-dependently stimulated the translocation of anandamide. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that cholesterol stimulates both the insertion of anandamide into synthetic lipid monolayers and bilayers, and its transport across bilayer membranes. In this respect, we suggest that besides putative anandamide protein-transporters, cholesterol could

  13. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kucerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad; Katsaras, John; Shi, A-C; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476 4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size lo domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment.

  14. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Clare L.; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kučerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered () phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476–4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment. PMID:23823623

  15. Hyperlipidemia offers protection against Leishmania donovani infection: role of membrane cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, June; Das, Shantanabha; Guha, Rajan; Ghosh, Debopam; Naskar, Kshudiram; Das, Anjan; Roy, Syamal

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania donovani (LD), the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), extracts membrane cholesterol from macrophages and disrupts lipid rafts, leading to their inability to stimulate T cells. Restoration of membrane cholesterol by liposomal delivery corrects the above defects and offers protection in infected hamsters. To reinforce further the protective role of cholesterol in VL, mice were either provided a high-cholesterol (atherogenic) diet or underwent statin treatment. Subsequent LD infection showed that an atherogenic diet is associated with protection, whereas hypocholesterolemia due to statin treatment confers susceptibility to the infection. This observation was validated in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (AE) mice that displayed intrinsic hypercholesterolemia with hepatic granuloma, production of host-protective cytokines, and expansion of antileishmanial CD8+IFN- γ + and CD8+IFN- γ +TNF- α + T cells in contrast to the wild-type C57BL/6 (BL/6) mice when infected with LD. Normal macrophages from AE mice (N-AE-M ϕ) showed 3-fold higher membrane cholesterol coupled with increased fluorescence anisotropy (FA) compared with wild-type macrophage (N-BL/6-M ϕ). Characterization of in vitro LD-infected AE macrophage (LD-AE-M ϕ) revealed intact raft architecture and ability to stimulate T cells, which were compromised in LD-BL/6-Mϕ. This study clearly indicates that hypercholesterolemia, induced intrinsically or extrinsically, can control the pathogenesis of VL by modulating immune repertoire in favor of the host. PMID:23060454

  16. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, James P; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S; Lagny, Thibaut J; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-09-22

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  17. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, James P.; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S.; Lagny, Thibaut J.; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  18. Molecular organization of cholesterol in polyunsaturated membranes: microdomain formation.

    PubMed Central

    Brzustowicz, Michael R; Cherezov, Vadim; Caffrey, Martin; Stillwell, William; Wassall, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    The molecular organization of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers composed of 1,2-diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (20:4-20:4PC), 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonylphosphatidylcholine (18:0-20:4PC), and 20:4-20:4PC/18:0-20:4PC (1/1 mol) was investigated by solid-state (2)H NMR and by low- and wide-angle x-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of distinct quadrupolar powder patterns arising from [3 alpha-(2)H(1)]cholesterol intercalated into the membrane and phase separated as solid, solubility chi(NMR)(chol) = 17 +/- 2 mol% and tilt angle alpha(0) = 25 +/- 1 degrees in 20:4-20:4PC were determined. The corresponding values in 18:0-20:4PC were chi (NMR)(chol) > or = 50 mol% and alpha(0) = 16 +/- 1 degrees. Cholesterol solubility determined by XRD was chi(NMR)(chol) = 15 +/- 2 mol% and chi(NMR)(chol) = 49 +/- 1 mol% for 20:4-20:4PC and 18:0-20:4PC, respectively. XRD experiments show that the solid sterol is monohydrate crystals presumably residing outside the bilayer. The (2)H NMR spectrum for equimolar [3 alpha-(2)H(1)]cholesterol added to mixed 20:4-20:4PC/18:0-20:4PC (1/1 mol) membranes is consistent with segregation of cholesterol into 20:4-20:4PC and 18:0-20:4PC microdomains of <160 A in size that preserve the molecular organization of sterol in the individual phospholipid constituents. Our results demonstrate unambiguously that cholesterol has low affinity to polyunsaturated fatty acids and support hypotheses of lateral phase separation of membrane constituents into sterol-poor/polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich and sterol-rich/saturated fatty acid-rich microdomains. PMID:11751316

  19. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide VI on the structure of multilamellar lipid membranes at water exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, N. Yu. Kiselev, M. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-15

    The structural changes in the multilamellar lipid membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide VI binary systems during hydration and dehydration have been studied by neutron diffraction. The effect of cholesterol and ceramide on the kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membranes is characterized. Compared to pure DPPC, membranes of binary systems swell faster during hydration (with a characteristic time of {approx}30 min). Both compounds, ceramide VI and cholesterol, similarly affect the hydration of DPPC membranes, increasing the repeat distance due to the bilayer growth. However, in contrast to cholesterol, ceramide significantly reduces the thickness of the membrane water layer. The introduction of cholesterol into a DPPC membrane slows down the change in the parameters of the bilayer internal structure during dehydration. In the DPPC/ceramide VI/cholesterol ternary system (with a molar cholesterol concentration of 40%), cholesterol is partially released from the lamellar membrane structure into the crystalline phase.

  20. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  1. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  2. Cholesterol exchange and lateral cholesterol pools in synaptosomal membranes of pair-fed control and chronic ethanol-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, W G; Rao, A M; Igbavboa, U; Semotuk, M

    1993-04-01

    Most studies on effects of ethanol on membrane cholesterol have reported on changes in the total or bulk amount of cholesterol. Membrane cholesterol, however, can be described in terms of its kinetics and domains. The kinetics and size of lateral cholesterol exchangeable and nonexchangeable pools were examined in synaptosomes of pair-fed controls and chronic ethanol-treated mice. Effects of sphingomyelin, an exofacial leaflet phospholipid, that has been shown to affect cholesterol pools, were also examined. Radiolabeled small unilamellar vesicles were used to exchange cholesterol with synaptosomes. The total amounts of membrane cholesterol, phospholipid phosphorus, and the ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid did not differ between the pair-fed control and ethanol groups. In control mice, the rate constant (hr-1) and the t1/2 (hr) of cholesterol exchange were 0.065 +/- 0.001 and 10.7 +/- 0.25 (hr), respectively. The rate constant was significantly slower (0.053 +/- 0.001, p < 0.05) and the t1/2 significantly longer (13.33 +/- 0.58, p < 0.05) in synaptosomes of the ethanol group compared with the control group. The size of the exchangeable pool of cholesterol did not differ significantly between the two groups. Sphingomyelinase-induced hydrolysis of sphingomyelin significantly slowed cholesterol exchange with the largest effect in synaptosomes of the control group as compared with the ethanol group (p < 0.05). Hydrolysis of sphingomyelin had significantly (p < 0.05) less of an effect on cholesterol exchange in synaptosomes of the ethanol group. Membrane cholesterol can be described in terms of total content, transbilayer distribution, kinetics, and size of lateral pools.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8488977

  3. Cholesterol transfer from normal and atherogenic low density lipoproteins to Mycoplasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitschelen, J.J.; St. Clair, R.W.; Hester, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the free cholesterol of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein from cholesterol-fed nonhuman primates has a greater potential for surface transfer to cell membranes than does the free cholesterol of normal low density lipoprotein. The low density lipoproteins were isolated from normal and hypercholesterolemic rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, incubated with membranes from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a mycoplasma species devoid of cholesterol in its membranes, and the mass transfer of free cholesterol determined by measuring membrane cholesterol content. Since these membranes neither synthesize nor esterify cholesterol, nor degrade the protein or cholesterol ester moieties of low density lipoprotein, they are an ideal model with which to study differences in the cholesterol transfer potential of low density lipoprotein independent of the uptake of the intact low density lipoprotein particle. These studies indicate that, even though there are marked differences in the cholesterol composition of normal and hypercholesterolemic low density lipoproteins, this does not result in a greater chemical potential for surface transfer of free cholesterol. Consequently, if a difference in the surface transfer of free cholesterol is responsible for the enhanced ability of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein to promote cellular cholesterol accumulation and, perhaps, also atherosclerosis, it must be the result of differences in the interaction to the hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein with the more complicated mammalian cell membranes, rather than differences in the chemical potential for cholesterol transfer.

  4. Enriching membrane cholesterol improves stability and cryosurvival of buffalo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Rajoriya, J S; Prasad, J K; Ramteke, S S; Perumal, P; Ghosh, S K; Singh, M; Pande, Megha; Srivastava, N

    2016-01-01

    Buffalo spermatozoa are comparatively more susceptible to freezing hazards than cattle spermatozoa. In recent times incubation of spermatozoa with cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrins (CLC) has shown improvements in semen quality in several species. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the incubation level of CLC at which maximum benefit is derived for the buffalo spermatozoa. For the study, 120 million spermatozoa were incubated in 2, 3 and 4 mg/mL of CLC (Gr II, III and IV, respectively) and cholesterol and phospholipids content, their ratio, flow cytometric evaluation of plasma membrane integrity (PMI), plasma membrane fluidity and extent of cryoinjury (Chlortetracycline, CTC assay) were compared with an untreated control (Gr I). Additionally the ability of cholesterol-loaded-spermatozoa to undergo induced acrosome reaction (IAR) using ionophore calcium (A23187) was evaluated in frozen-thaw samples. Data show a significant and linear increase (CV=0.88) in cholesterol content of spermatozoa in Gr II, III and IV and a significant decrease in phospholipids content at frozen-thaw stage in Gr IV than Gr III spermatozoa. The study revealed a significant improvement in PMI and significant reduction in plasma membrane fluidity and cryoinjury of CLC treated spermatozoa at progressive stages in three groups compared to control. Nevertheless, spermatozoa of Gr II, III and IV were significantly less responsive to ionophore calcium (A23187) than Gr I. This study shows for the first time that incubation of buffalo bull spermatozoa with CLC (3mg/120×10(6)) prior to processing permits greater numbers of sperm to survive cryopreservation while allowing spermatozoa to capacitate and the acrosome to react to AR inducer ionophore calcium (A23187). PMID:26619942

  5. Cholesterol transport from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes is inhibited by 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Mattjus, P; Slotte, J P

    1994-03-24

    The compound U1866A (3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one) has been shown to inhibit the cellular transfer of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membranes (Liscum and Faust (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11796-806). We have in this study examined the effects of U18666A on cholesterol translocation from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes. Translocation of plasma membrane cholesterol was induced by degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin. The sphingomyelinase-induced activation of the acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) reaction was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by U18666A, both in cultured human skin fibroblasts and baby hamster kidney cells. Half-maximal inhibition (within 60 min) was obtained with 0.5-1 microgram/ml of U18666A. A time-course study indicated that the onset of inhibition was rapid (within 10-15 min), and reversible if U18666A was removed from the incubation mixture. Using a cholesterol oxidase assay, we observed that the extent of plasma membrane cholesterol translocation in sphingomyelinase-treated HSF cells was significantly lowered in the presence of U18666A (at 3 micrograms/ml). The effect of U18666A on cholesterol translocation was also fully reversible when the drug was withdrawn. In mouse Leydig tumor cells, labeled to constant specific activity with [3H]cholesterol, the compound U18666A inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP-stimulated secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. The effects seen with compound U18666A appeared to be specific for this molecule, since another hydrophobic amine, imipramine, did not in our experiments affect cholesterol translocation or ACAT activation. Since different cell types display sensitivity to U18666A in various intracellular cholesterol transfer processes, they appear to have a common U18666A-sensitive regulatory mechanism. PMID:8130265

  6. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    proposed for cholesterol's condensing effect: (i) an umbrella mechanism in which the acyl chains and cholesterol become more tightly packed as cholesterol content increases because they share limited space under phospholipid headgroups and (ii) a template mechanism whereby cholesterol functions as a planar hydrophobic template at the membrane surface, thereby maximizing hydrophobic interactions and the hydrophobic effect. Specifically, our NNR experiments rule out the umbrella mechanism and provide strong support for the template mechanism. Similar NNR measurements have also allowed us to address the question of whether the interactions between low-melting kinked phospholipids and cholesterol can play a significant role in the formation of lipid rafts. Specifically, these NNR measurements have led to our discovery of a new physical principle in the lipids and membranes area that must be operating in biological membranes, that is, a "push-pull" mechanism, whereby cholesterol is pushed away from low-melting phospholipids and pulled toward high-melting lipids. Thus, to the extent that lipid rafts play a role in the functioning of cell membranes, low-melting phospholipids must be active participants. PMID:25310179

  7. Detection of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masami; Shimada, Yukiko; Inomata, Mitsushi; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko . E-mail: iwashita@tmig.or.jp

    2006-12-22

    The C-terminal domain (D4) of perfringolysin O binds selectively to cholesterol in cholesterol-rich microdomains. To address the issue of whether cholesterol-rich microdomains exist in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, we expressed D4 as a fusion protein with EGFP in MEF cells. More than half of the EGFP-D4 expressed in stable cell clones was bound to membranes in raft fractions. Depletion of membrane cholesterol with {beta}-cyclodextrin reduced the amount of EGFP-D4 localized in raft fractions, confirming EGFP-D4 binding to cholesterol-rich microdomains. Subfractionation of the raft fractions showed most of the EGFP-D4 bound to the plasma membrane rather than to intracellular membranes. Taken together, these results strongly suggest the existence of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

  8. Cholesterol Exposure at the Membrane Surface Is Necessary and Sufficient to Trigger Perfringolysin O Binding†

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, John J.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Johnson, Arthur E.; Heuck, Alejandro P.

    2010-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is the prototype for the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins, a family of bacterial pore-forming toxins that act on eukaryotic membranes. The pore-forming mechanism of PFO exhibits an absolute requirement for membrane cholesterol, but the complex interplay between the structural arrangement of the PFO C-terminal domain and the distribution of cholesterol in the target membrane is poorly understood. Herein we show that PFO binding to the bilayer and the initiation of the sequence of events that culminate in the formation of a transmembrane pore depend on the availability of free cholesterol at the membrane surface, while changes in the acyl chain packing of the phospholipids and cholesterol in the membrane core, or the presence or absence of detergent-resistant domains do not correlate with PFO binding. Moreover, PFO association with the membrane was inhibited by the addition of sphingomyelin, a typical component of membrane rafts in cell membranes. Finally, addition of molecules that do not interact with PFO, but intercalate into the membrane and displace cholesterol from its association with phospholipids (e.g., epicholesterol), reduced the amount of cholesterol required to trigger PFO binding. Taken together, our studies reveal that PFO binding to membranes is triggered when the concentration of cholesterol exceeds the association capacity of the phospholipids, and this cholesterol excess is then free to associate with the toxin. PMID:19292457

  9. Cholesterol induces surface localization of polyphenols in model membranes thus enhancing vesicle stability against lysozyme, but reduces protection of distant double bonds from reactive-oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Athayde Moncorvo Collado, Alejandro; Dupuy, Fernando G; Morero, Roberto D; Minahk, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The main scope of the present study was to analyze the membrane interaction of members of different classes of polyphenols, i.e. resveratrol, naringenin, epigallocatechin gallate and enterodiol, in model systems of different compositions and phase states. In addition, the possible association between membrane affinity and membrane protection against both lipid oxidation and bilayer-disruptive compounds was studied. Gibbs monolayer experiments indicated that even though polyphenols showed poor surface activity, it readily interacted with lipid films. Actually, a preferential interaction with expanded monolayers was observed, while condensed and cholesterol-containing monolayers decreased the affinity of these phenolic compounds. On the other hand, fluorescence anisotropy studies showed that polyphenols were able to modulate membrane order degree, but again this effect was dependent on the cholesterol concentration and membrane phase state. In fact, cholesterol induced a surface rather than deep into the hydrophobic core localization of phenolic compounds in the membranes. In general, the polyphenolic molecules tested had a better antioxidant activity when they were allowed to get inserted into the bilayers, i.e. in cholesterol-free membranes. On the other hand, a membrane-protective effect against bilayer permeabilizing activity of lysozyme, particularly in the presence of cholesterol, could be assessed. It can be hypothesized that phenolic compounds may protect membrane integrity by loosely covering the surface of lipid vesicles, once cholesterol push them off from the membrane hydrophobic core. However, this cholesterol-driven distribution may lead to a reduced antioxidant activity of linoleic acid double bonds. PMID:27063609

  10. An Unrecognized Function of Cholesterol: Regulating the Mechanism Controlling Membrane Phospholipid Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Arashiki, Nobuto; Saito, Masaki; Koshino, Ichiro; Kamata, Kotoe; Hale, John; Mohandas, Narla; Manno, Sumie; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2016-06-28

    An asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the membrane bilayer is inseparable from physiological functions, including shape preservation and survival of erythrocytes, and by implication other cells. Aminophospholipids, notably phosphatidylserine (PS), are confined to the inner leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane lipid bilayer by the ATP-dependent flippase enzyme, ATP11C, counteracting the activity of an ATP-independent scramblase. Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), a single-transmembrane protein, was previously reported to possess scrambling activity in erythrocytes. However, its function was cast in doubt by the retention of scramblase activity in erythrocytes of knockout mice lacking this protein. We show that in the human erythrocyte PLSCR1 is the predominant scramblase and by reconstitution into liposomes that its activity resides in the transmembrane domain. At or below physiological intracellular calcium concentrations, total suppression of flippase activity nevertheless leaves the membrane asymmetry undisturbed. When liposomes or erythrocytes are depleted of cholesterol (a reversible process in the case of erythrocytes), PS quickly appears at the outer surface, implying that cholesterol acts in the cell as a powerful scramblase inhibitor. Thus, our results bring to light a previously unsuspected function of cholesterol in regulating phospholipid scrambling. PMID:27267274

  11. Membrane cholesterol modulates {beta}-amyloid-dependent tau cleavage by inducing changes in the membrane content and localization of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Methner, D Nicole Riherd; Ferreira, Adriana

    2011-01-14

    We have previously shown that β-amyloid (Aβ) treatment resulted in an age-dependent calpain activation leading to Tau cleavage into a neurotoxic 17-kDa fragment in a cellular model of Alzheimer disease. This detrimental cellular response was mediated by a developmentally regulated increase in membrane cholesterol levels. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulated Aβ-induced Tau cleavage in cultured hippocampal neurons. Our results indicated that these mechanisms did not involve the regulation of the binding of Aβ aggregates to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, experiments using N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor inhibitors suggested that these receptors played an essential role in cholesterol-mediated Aβ-dependent calpain activity and 17-kDa Tau production. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that decreasing membrane cholesterol levels in mature neurons resulted in a significant reduction of the NR1 subunit at the membrane as well as an increase in the number of large NR1, NR2A, and NR2B subunit clusters. Moreover, the majority of these larger N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit immunoreactive spots was not juxtaposed to presynaptic sites in cholesterol-reduced neurons. These data suggested that changes at the synaptic level underlie the mechanism by which membrane cholesterol modulates developmental changes in the susceptibility of hippocampal neurons to Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:21047784

  12. Anti-cancer activity of the cholesterol exporter ABCA1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bradley; Land, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ABCA1 protein mediates the transfer of cellular cholesterol across the plasma membrane to apolipoprotein A-I. Loss-of-function mutations in the ABCA1 gene induce Tangier disease and familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia, both cardio-vascular conditions characterized by abnormally low levels of serum cholesterol, increased cholesterol in macrophages and subsequent formation of vascular plaque. Increased intra-cellular cholesterol levels are also frequently found in cancer cells. Here we demonstrate anti-cancer activity of ABCA1 efflux function, which is compromised following inhibition of ABCA1 gene expression by oncogenic mutations or cancer-specific ABCA1 loss-of-function mutations. In concert with elevated cholesterol synthesis found in cancer cells, ABCA1 deficiency allows for increased mitochondrial cholesterol, inhibits release of mitochondrial cell death-promoting molecules and thus facilitates cancer cell survival, overall suggesting that elevated mitochondrial cholesterol is essential to the cancer phenotype. PMID:22981231

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  14. Modulation of amphotericin B membrane interaction by cholesterol and ergosterol--a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Baginski, Maciej

    2006-08-24

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene macrolide antibiotic used to treat systemic fungal infections. According to a well-documented hypothesis, molecules of AmB form ionic membrane channels that are responsible for chemotherapeutic action. These channels disturb the barrier function of the cell membrane which, in consequence, leads to cell death. The presence of sterols in the cell membrane is necessary for full manifestation of the antibiotic's ionophoric activity, at least in vivo. Ergosterol-containing fungal membranes are targeted more efficiently by AmB than mammalian membranes containing cholesterol. However, a similar level of disturbance of fungal and mammalian membranes is responsible for serious toxicity of the antibiotic. Due to the importance of AmB and lack of better antifungal alternatives, the search for new less toxic derivatives of this antibiotic still continues. Therefore, studies of the AmB-membrane interaction are very important. The present work constitutes a continuation of a broad program of study on AmB mode of action in our group. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of AmB monomers inside the bilayers of three different compositions (pure dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and DMPC bilayer containing approximately 25 mol % of cholesterol or ergosterol) were carried out. In general, analysis of generated trajectories resulted in identifying many significant differences in the behavior of AmB monomers depending on the membrane environment. In particular, it was established that the antibiotic increases the internal order of DMPC bilayer containing 25 mol % of cholesterol, while it has no effect on the order of the bilayer with the same amount of ergosterol. Performed calculations also revealed that relatively rigid and elongated AmB molecules exhibit higher affinity toward the sterol-containing lo phases and, therefore, may be cumulated in ordered membrane domains (e.g., lipid rafts). Since the partition coefficient

  15. Increased Membrane Cholesterol in Lymphocytes Diverts T-Cells toward an Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Surls, Jacqueline; Nazarov-Stoica, Cristina; Kehl, Margaret; Olsen, Cara; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor-D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling for T-cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis is initiated in the cholesterol-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane known as lipid rafts. Herein, we investigated whether enrichment of membrane cholesterol in lipid rafts affects antigen-specific CD4 T-helper cell functions. Enrichment of membrane cholesterol by 40–50% following squalene administration in mice was paralleled by an increased number of resting CD4 T helper cells in periphery. We also observed sensitization of the Th1 differentiation machinery through co-localization of IL-2Rα, IL-4Rα, and IL-12Rβ2 subunits with GM1 positive lipid rafts, and increased STAT-4 and STAT-5 phosphorylation following membrane cholesterol enrichment. Antigen stimulation or CD3/CD28 polyclonal stimulation of membrane cholesterol-enriched, resting CD4 T-cells followed a path of Th1 differentiation, which was more vigorous in the presence of increased IL-12 secretion by APCs enriched in membrane cholesterol. Enrichment of membrane cholesterol in antigen-specific, autoimmune Th1 cells fostered their organ-specific reactivity, as confirmed in an autoimmune mouse model for diabetes. However, membrane cholesterol enrichment in CD4+ Foxp3+ T-reg cells did not alter their suppressogenic function. These findings revealed a differential regulatory effect of membrane cholesterol on the function of CD4 T-cell subsets. This first suggests that membrane cholesterol could be a new therapeutic target to modulate the immune functions, and second that increased membrane cholesterol in various physiopathological conditions may bias the immune system toward an inflammatory Th1 type response. PMID:22723880

  16. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  17. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  18. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  19. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    Plasma membrane sphingomyelin in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells was hydrolyzed with sphingomyelinase (Staphylococcus aureus) and the effects on membrane cholesterol translocation and the properties of membrane bound adenylate cyclase and Na+/K(+)-ATPase were determined. Exposure of confluent BHK-21 cells to 0.1 U/ml of sphingomyelinase led to the degradation (at 37 degrees C) of about 60% of cell sphingomyelin. No simultaneous hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine occurred. The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin subsequently led to the translocation (within 40 min) of about 50-60% of cell [3H]cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase susceptible pool to an oxidase resistant compartment. The translocation of [3H]cholesterol from the cell surface to intracellular membranes was accompanied by a paralleled increase in [3H]cholesterol ester formation. When cells were first exposed to sphingomyelinase (to degrade sphingomyelin) and then incubated without the enzyme in serum-free media, the mass of cell sphingomyelin decreased initially (by 60%), but then began to increase and reached control levels within 3-4 h. The rapid re-synthesis of sphingomyelin was accompanied by an equally rapid normalization of cell [3H]cholesterol distribution. The re-formation of cell sphingomyelin also led to a decreased content of cellular [3H]cholesterol esters, indicating that unesterified [3H]cholesterol was pulled out of the cholesterol ester cycle and transported to the cell surface. Exposure of BHK-21 cells to sphingomyelinase further led to a dramatically decreased activity of ouabain-sensitive Na+/K(+)-ATPase, whereas forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not affected. The activity of Na+/K(+)-ATPase returned to normal in parallel with the normalization of cell sphingomyelin mass and cholesterol distribution. We conclude that sphingomyelin has profound effects on the steady-state distribution of cell cholesterol, and that manipulations of cell sphingomyelin levels directly and

  20. Magnification of Cholesterol-Induced Membrane Resistance on the Tissue Level: Implications for Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shea, Ryan; Smith, Casey; Pias, Sally C

    2016-01-01

    High cellular membrane cholesterol is known to generate membrane resistance and reduce oxygen (O2) permeability. As such, cholesterol may contribute to the Warburg effect in tumor cells by stimulating intracellular hypoxia that cannot be detected from extracellular oxygen measurements. We probe the tissue-level impact of the phenomenon, asking whether layering of cells can magnify the influence of cholesterol, to modulate hypoxia in relation to capillary proximity. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we affirm that minimally hydrated, adjacent lipid bilayers have independent physical behavior. Combining this insight with published experimental data, we predict linearly increasing impact of membrane cholesterol on oxygen flux across cells layered in tissue. PMID:27526123

  1. Ionic channels and nerve membrane constituents. Tetrodotoxin-like interaction of saxitoxin with cholesterol monolayers.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V

    1972-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) have the same striking property of blocking the Na(+) channels in the axolemma. Experiments with nerve plasma membrane components of the squid Dosidicus gigas have shown that TTX interacts with cholesterol monolayers. Similar experiments were carried out with STX. The effect of STX on the surface pressure-area diagrams of lipid monolayers and on the fluorescence emission spectra of sonicated nerve membranes was studied. The results indicate a TTX-like interaction of STX with cholesterol monolayers. The expansion of the monolayers caused by 10(-6)M STX was 2.2 A(2)/cholesterol molecule at 25 degrees C. From surface pressure measurements at constant cholesterol area (39 A(2)/molecule) in media with various STX concentrations, it was calculated that the STX/cholesterol surface concentration ratio is 0.54. The apparent dissociation constant of the STX-cholesterol monolayer complex is 4.0 x 10(-7)M. The STX/cholesterol ratio and the apparent dissociation constant are similar to those determined for TTX. The presence of other lipids in the monolayers affects the STX-cholesterol association. The interactions of STX and TTX with cholesterol monolayers suggest (a) that cholesterol molecules may be part of the nerve membrane Na(+) channels, or (b) that the toxin receptor at the nerve membrane shares similar chemical features with the cholesterol monolayers. PMID:5007264

  2. The membrane as the gatekeeper of infection: Cholesterol in host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Jafurulla, Md; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    The cellular plasma membrane serves as a portal for the entry of intracellular pathogens. An essential step for an intracellular pathogen to gain entry into a host cell therefore is to be able to cross the cell membrane. In this review, we highlight the role of host membrane cholesterol in regulating the entry of intracellular pathogens using insights obtained from work on the interaction of Leishmania and Mycobacterium with host cells. The entry of these pathogens is known to be dependent on host membrane cholesterol. Importantly, pathogen entry is inhibited either upon depletion (or complexation), or enrichment of membrane cholesterol. In other words, an optimum level of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for efficient infection by pathogens. In this overall context, we propose a general mechanism, based on cholesterol-induced conformational changes, involving cholesterol binding sites in host cell surface receptors that are implicated in this process. A therapeutic strategy targeting modulation of membrane cholesterol would have the advantage of avoiding the commonly encountered problem of drug resistance in tackling infection by intracellular pathogens. Insights into the role of host membrane cholesterol in pathogen entry would be instrumental in the development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively tackle intracellular pathogenesis. PMID:26902688

  3. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  4. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  5. Cubic Phases in Phosphatidylcholine-Cholesterol Mixtures: Cholesterol as Membrane 'Fusogen'

    SciTech Connect

    Tenchov, Boris G.; MacDonald, Robert C.; Siegel, David P.

    2010-01-18

    X-ray diffraction reveals that mixtures of some unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with cholesterol (Chol) readily form inverted bicontinuous cubic phases that are stable under physiological conditions. This effect was studied in most detail for dioleoyl PC/Chol mixtures with molar ratios of 1:1 and 3:7. Facile formation of Im3m and Pn3m phases with lattice constants of 30-50nm and 25-30nm, respectively, took place in phosphate-buffered saline, in sucrose solution, and in water near the temperature of the L{alpha}HII transition of the mixtures, as well as during cooling of the HII phase. Once formed, the cubic phases displayed an ability to supercool and replace the initial L{sub {alpha}} phase over a broad range of physiological temperatures. Conversion into stable cubic phases was also observed for mixtures of Chol with dilinoleoyl PC but not for mixtures with palmitoyl-linoleoyl PC or palmitoyl-oleoyl PC, for which only transient cubic traces were recorded at elevated temperatures. A saturated, branched-chain PC, diphytanoyl PC, also displayed a cubic phase in mixture with Chol. Unlike the PEs, the membrane PCs are intrinsically nonfusogenic lipids: in excess water they only form lamellar phases and not any of the inverted phases on their own. Thus, the finding that Chol induces cubic phases in mixtures with unsaturated PCs may have important implications for its role in fusion. In ternary mixtures, saturated PCs and sphingomyelin are known to separate into liquid-ordered domains along with Chol. Our results thus suggest that unsaturated PCs, which are excluded from these domains, could form fusogenic domains with Chol. Such a dual role of Chol may explain the seemingly paradoxical ability of cell membranes to simultaneously form rigid, low-curvature raft-like patches while still being able to undergo facile membrane fusion.

  6. A role for caveolin in transport of cholesterol from endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Smart, E J; Ying, Y s; Donzell, W C; Anderson, R G

    1996-11-15

    Caveolin is a 22-kDa membrane protein found associated with a coat material decorating the inner membrane surface of caveolae. A remarkable feature of this protein is its ability to migrate from caveolae directly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) when membrane cholesterol is oxidized. We now present evidence caveolin is involved in transporting newly synthesized cholesterol from the ER directly to caveolae. MA104 cells and normal human fibroblasts transported new cholesterol to caveolae with a half-time of approximately 10 min. The cholesterol then rapidly flowed from caveolae to non-caveolae membrane. Cholesterol moved out of caveolae even when the supply of fresh cholesterol from the ER was interrupted. Treatment of cells with 10 microg/ml progesterone blocked cholesterol movement from ER to caveolae. Simultaneously, caveolin accumulated in the lumen of the ER, suggesting cholesterol transport is linked to caveolin movement. Caveolae fractions from cells expressing caveolin were enriched in cholesterol 3-4-fold, while the same fractions from cells lacking caveolin were not enriched. Cholesterol transport to the cell surface was nearly 4 times more rapid in cells expressing caveolin than in matched cells lacking caveolin. PMID:8910609

  7. Novel mechanisms of intracellular cholesterol transport: oxysterol-binding proteins and membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Du, Ximing; Brown, Andrew J; Yang, Hongyuan

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol is an essential membrane constituent, and also plays a key role in cell signalling. Within a cell, how cholesterol is transported and how its heterogeneous distribution is maintained are poorly understood. Recent advances have identified novel pathways and regulators of cholesterol trafficking. Sterol transfer by lipid-binding proteins, such as OSBP (oxysterol-binding protein), coupled with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate exchange at membrane contact sites (MCSs) has emerged as a new theme of cholesterol transport between organellar membranes. Moreover, a previously unappreciated role of peroxisomes in cholesterol trafficking has been revealed recently. These discoveries highlight the crucial role of MCSs, or junctions, in facilitating lipid movement, and provide mechanistic insights into how cholesterol is sorted in cells. PMID:25932595

  8. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry. PMID:26021693

  9. Hemagglutinin clusters in the plasma membrane are not enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert L; Frisz, Jessica F; Klitzing, Haley A; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K; Kraft, Mary L

    2015-04-01

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane. PMID:25863057

  10. Hemagglutinin Clusters in the Plasma Membrane Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert L.; Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane. PMID:25863057

  11. The Physical Properties of Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol Membranes: a Deuterium NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo, Amirmohamad; Shaghaghi, Mehran; Zuckermann, Martin; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2009-05-01

    We have used ^2H NMR to study the effect of cholesterol on N-palmitoyl(D31)-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine (PSM) membranes. NMR spectra were taken as a function of temperature and cholesterol concentration. The constructed phase diagram exhibits both solid-ordered (so) + liquid-ordered (lo) and liquid-disordered (ld) + lo phase coexistence regions with a clear three-phase line at 37^oC. The ld + lo region was characterized by examining the cholesterol dependence of the width of resolved peaks in the depaked spectra, as well as the average spectral width (M1), at a given temperature. The so + lo region was defined using spectral subtraction. Analogous experiments were done using 1-palmitoyl,2-palmitoyl(D31)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)/cholesterol membranes in order to carefully compare the data obtained using palmitoyl chains which have similar ``kinked'' conformations. The three-phase line in sn-2 perdeuterated DPPC/cholesterol is at 39^oC. The PSM/cholesterol membrane is significantly more ordered than the DPPC/cholesterol membrane in the liquid crystalline phase. This should be compared to the difference between the cholesterol-free membranes at, where the average order of PSM is more than that of DPPC.

  12. Cholesterol level affects surface charge of lipid membranes in saline solution

    PubMed Central

    Magarkar, Aniket; Dhawan, Vivek; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Viitala, Tapani; Elmowafy, Mohammed; Róg, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important component of all biological membranes as well as drug delivery liposomes. We show here that increasing the level of cholesterol in a phospholipid membrane decreases surface charge in the physiological environment. Through molecular dynamics simulation we have shown that increasing the level of cholesterol decreases Na+ ion binding. Complementary experimental ζ – potential measurements have shown a decreased ζ – potential with increasing cholesterol content, indicative of reduced surface charge. Both experiments and simulations have been carried out on both saturated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and monounsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) membranes. This result is particularly important because membrane surface charge plays an important role in the interactions of biomembranes with peripheral membrane proteins and drug delivery liposomes with the immune system. PMID:24845659

  13. Human Mitochondrial DNA-Protein Complexes Attach to a Cholesterol-Rich Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Cansiz-Arda, Şirin; Lõhmus, Madis; Engberg, Oskar; Reyes, Aurelio; van Rennes, Helga; Sanz, Alberto; Holt, Ian J.; Cooper, Helen M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    The helicase Twinkle is indispensable for mtDNA replication in nucleoids. Previously, we showed that Twinkle is tightly membrane-associated even in the absence of mtDNA, which suggests that Twinkle is part of a membrane-attached replication platform. Here we show that this platform is a cholesterol-rich membrane structure. We fractionated mitochondrial membrane preparations on flotation gradients and show that membrane-associated nucleoids accumulate at the top of the gradient. This fraction was shown to be highly enriched in cholesterol, a lipid that is otherwise low abundant in mitochondria. In contrast, more common mitochondrial lipids, and abundant inner-membrane associated proteins concentrated in the bottom-half of these gradients. Gene silencing of ATAD3, a protein with proposed functions related to nucleoid and mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis, modified the distribution of cholesterol and nucleoids in the gradient in an identical fashion. Both cholesterol and ATAD3 were previously shown to be enriched in ER-mitochondrial junctions, and we detect nucleoid components in biochemical isolates of these structures. Our data suggest an uncommon membrane composition that accommodates platforms for replicating mtDNA, and reconcile apparently disparate functions of ATAD3. We suggest that mtDNA replication platforms are organized in connection with ER-mitochondrial junctions, facilitated by a specialized membrane architecture involving mitochondrial cholesterol. PMID:26478270

  14. Direct interaction between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines in hydrated membranes revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    By using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and curve fitting we have examined temperature dependence and composition dependence of the shape of the carbonyl band in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol model membranes. Membranes were hydrated either in excess water or in excess deuterated water. The studied binary mixtures exhibit different lipid phases at appropriate temperature and amount of cholesterol, among them also the so-called liquid-ordered phase. The results confirm that cholesterol has a significant indirect influence on the carbonyl band through conformational and hydration effects. This influence was interpreted in view of the known temperature composition phase diagrams for inspected binary mixtures. In addition, direct interaction was observed, which could point to the presence of hydrogen bond between cholesterol and carbonyl group. This direct interaction, though weak, might play at least a partial role in the stabilization of cholesterol-rich lipid domains in model and biological membranes. PMID:17662974

  15. Impact of sterol tilt on membrane bending rigidity in cholesterol and 7DHC-containing DMPC membranes

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Rappolt, Michael; Chiu, See-Wing; Pabst, Georg; Harries, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is so essential to the proper function of mammalian cell membranes that even strikingly small inborn errors in cholesterol synthesis can be devastating. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with small angle x-ray diffraction experiments to compare mixed sterol/DMPC membranes over a wide range of sterol compositions for two types of sterols: cholesterol and its immediate metabolic precursor 7DHC, that differs from cholesterol by one double bond. We find that while most membrane properties are only slightly affected by the replacement of one sterol by the other, the tilt degree of freedom, as gauged by the tilt modulus, is significantly larger for cholesterol than for 7DHC over a large range of concentrations. In silico mutations of one sterol into the other further support these findings. Moreover, bending rigidities calculated from simulations and estimated in experiments show that cholesterol stiffens membranes to a larger extent than 7DHC. We discuss the possible mechanistic link between sterol tilt and the way it impacts the membrane mechanical properties, and comment on how this link may shed light on the way replacement of cholesterol by 7DHC leads to disease. PMID:23173009

  16. Cholesterol: A modulator of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase activity - A cell-free study

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Houée-Levin, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase Nox2, a multi-subunit enzyme complex comprising membrane and cytosolic proteins, catalyzes a very intense production of superoxide ions O2•−, which are transformed into other reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vitro, it has to be activated by addition of amphiphiles like arachidonic acid (AA). It has been shown that the membrane part of phagocyte NADPH oxidase is present in lipid rafts rich in cholesterol. Cholesterol plays a significant role in the development of cardio-vascular diseases that are always accompanied by oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the influence of cholesterol on the activation process of NADPH oxidase. Our results clearly show that, in a cell-free system, cholesterol is not an efficient activator of NADPH oxidase like arachidonic acid (AA), however it triggers a basal low superoxide production at concentrations similar to what found in neutrophile. A higher concentration, if present during the assembly process of the enzyme, has an inhibitory role on the production of O2•−. Added cholesterol acts on both cytosolic and membrane components, leading to imperfect assembly and decreasing the affinity of cytosolic subunits to the membrane ones. Added to the cytosolic proteins, it retains their conformations but still allows some conformational change induced by AA addition, indispensable to activation of NADPH oxidase. PMID:25462061

  17. Is There a Preferential Interaction between Cholesterol and Tryptophan Residues in Membrane Proteins?†

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Andrea; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Loura, Luís M. S.; Daily, Anna E.; Staffhorst, Rutger W. H. M.; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Prieto, Manuel; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several indications have been found that suggest a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues located near the membrane–water interface. The aim of this study was to investigate by direct methods how tryptophan and cholesterol interact with each other and what the possible consequences are for membrane organization. For this purpose, we used cholesterol-containing model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in which a transmembrane model peptide with flanking tryptophans [acetyl-GWW(LA)8LWWA-amide], called WALP23, was incorporated to mimic interfacial tryptophans of membrane proteins. These model systems were studied with two complementary methods. (1) Steady-state and time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments employing the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) in combination with a competition experiment with cholesterol were used to obtain information about the distribution of cholesterol in the bilayer in the presence of WALP23. The results were consistent with a random distribution of cholesterol which indicates that cholesterol and interfacial tryptophans are not preferentially located next to each other in these bilayer systems. (2) Solid-state 2H NMR experiments employing either deuterated cholesterol or indole ring-deuterated WALP23 peptides were performed to study the orientation and dynamics of both molecules. The results showed that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled cholesterol were not affected by an interaction with tryptophan-flanked peptides and, vice versa, that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled indole rings in WALP23 are not significantly influenced by addition of cholesterol to the bilayer. Therefore, both NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy results independently show that, at least in the model systems studied here, there is no evidence for a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophans located at the bilayer interface. PMID

  18. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates the Outward Facing Conformation of the Dopamine Transporter and Alters Cocaine Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weimin C.; Amara, Susan G.

    2010-01-01

    Clearance of synaptically released dopamine is regulated by the plasmalemmal dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral membrane protein that resides within a complex lipid milieu. Here we demonstrate that cholesterol, a major component of the lipid bilayer, can modulate the conformation of DAT and alter cocaine binding to DAT. In striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells, DAT was in cholesterol-rich membrane fractions after mild detergent extraction. After increasing the membrane cholesterol content by treatment of water-soluble cholesterol (cholesterol mixed with methyl-β-cyclodextrin), we observed an increase in DAT binding Bmax values for cocaine analogs [3H]WIN35428 and [125I]RTI-55, but similar levels of DAT proteins on the cell surface were shown by surface biotinylation assays. Membrane cholesterol addition also markedly enhanced the accessibility of cysteine sulfhydryl moieties in DAT as probed by a membrane-impermeable maleimide-biotin conjugate. We identified cysteine 306, a juxtamembrane residue on transmembrane domain 6 (TM6) of DAT, as the intrinsic residue exhibiting enhanced reactivity. Similar effects on DAT cysteine accessibility and radioligand binding were observed with addition of zinc, a reagent known to promote the outward facing conformation of DAT. Using substituted cysteine mutants on various positions likely to be extracellular, we identified additional residues located on TM1, TM6, TM7, and TM12 of DAT that are sensitive to alterations in the membrane cholesterol content. Our findings in transfected cells and native tissues support the hypothesis that DAT adopts an outward facing conformation in a cholesterol-rich membrane environment, suggesting a novel modulatory role of the surrounding membrane lipid milieu on DAT function. PMID:20688912

  19. Membrane cholesterol modulates the outward facing conformation of the dopamine transporter and alters cocaine binding.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weimin C; Amara, Susan G

    2010-10-15

    Clearance of synaptically released dopamine is regulated by the plasmalemmal dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral membrane protein that resides within a complex lipid milieu. Here we demonstrate that cholesterol, a major component of the lipid bilayer, can modulate the conformation of DAT and alter cocaine binding to DAT. In striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells, DAT was in cholesterol-rich membrane fractions after mild detergent extraction. After increasing the membrane cholesterol content by treatment of water-soluble cholesterol (cholesterol mixed with methyl-β-cyclodextrin), we observed an increase in DAT binding B(max) values for cocaine analogs [(3)H]WIN35428 and [(125)I]RTI-55, but similar levels of DAT proteins on the cell surface were shown by surface biotinylation assays. Membrane cholesterol addition also markedly enhanced the accessibility of cysteine sulfhydryl moieties in DAT as probed by a membrane-impermeable maleimide-biotin conjugate. We identified cysteine 306, a juxtamembrane residue on transmembrane domain 6 (TM6) of DAT, as the intrinsic residue exhibiting enhanced reactivity. Similar effects on DAT cysteine accessibility and radioligand binding were observed with addition of zinc, a reagent known to promote the outward facing conformation of DAT. Using substituted cysteine mutants on various positions likely to be extracellular, we identified additional residues located on TM1, TM6, TM7, and TM12 of DAT that are sensitive to alterations in the membrane cholesterol content. Our findings in transfected cells and native tissues support the hypothesis that DAT adopts an outward facing conformation in a cholesterol-rich membrane environment, suggesting a novel modulatory role of the surrounding membrane lipid milieu on DAT function. PMID:20688912

  20. Activation of factor XII and prekallikrein with cholesterol sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Kato, H; Iwanaga, S; Iwamori, M; Nagai, Y

    1985-04-01

    Cholesterol sulfate was found to display a strong ability to trigger the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein in the presence of HMW kininogen. Other sulfate ester derivatives of testosterone, estrone, pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone and cholesterol tested did not show any effect on the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein. The activity of cholesterol acetate and sulfodeoxycholic acid was very weak. Cholesterol sulfate markedly shortened the partial thromboplastin time of normal human plasma, but not plasmas deficient in Factor XII, Factor XI and HMW kininogen. Upon prolonged incubation, the partial thromboplastin time of prekallikrein-deficient plasma was also shortened. Moreover, as well as kaolin and sulfatide, cholesterol sulfate shortened the partial thromboplastin time of plasmas from monkey, dog, rat, guinea pig, sheep, cow, hog and horse, but not from duck and chicken. Since cholesterol sulfate is distributed in erythrocytes, various organs and body fluids, it may play an important role in the activation of the intrinsic blood coagulation system. PMID:3847226

  1. Detectors for evaluating the cellular landscape of sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-rich membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Takuma; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-08-01

    Although sphingomyelin and cholesterol are major lipids of mammalian cells, the detailed distribution of these lipids in cellular membranes remains still obscure. However, the recent development of protein probes that specifically bind sphingomyelin and/or cholesterol provides new information about the landscape of the lipid domains that are enriched with sphingomyelin or cholesterol or both. Here, we critically summarize the tools to study distribution and dynamics of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26993577

  2. Local Partition Coefficients Govern Solute Permeability of Cholesterol-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zocher, Florian; van der Spoel, David; Pohl, Peter; Hub, Jochen S.

    2013-01-01

    The permeability of lipid membranes for metabolic molecules or drugs is routinely estimated from the solute’s oil/water partition coefficient. However, the molecular determinants that modulate the permeability in different lipid compositions have remained unclear. Here, we combine scanning electrochemical microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations to study the effect of cholesterol on membrane permeability, because cholesterol is abundant in all animal membranes. The permeability of membranes from natural lipid mixtures to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes monotonously decreases with cholesterol concentration [Chol]. The same is true for hydrophilic solutes and planar bilayers composed of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine or dioleoyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine. However, these synthetic lipids give rise to a bell-shaped dependence of membrane permeability on [Chol] for very hydrophobic solutes. The simulations indicate that cholesterol does not affect the diffusion constant inside the membrane. Instead, local partition coefficients at the lipid headgroups and at the lipid tails are modulated oppositely by cholesterol, explaining the experimental findings. Structurally, these modulations are induced by looser packing at the lipid headgroups and tighter packing at the tails upon the addition of cholesterol. PMID:24359748

  3. Effects of neurosteroids on a model membrane including cholesterol: A micropipette aspiration study.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Daniel; Sacchi, Mattia; Vena, Giulia; Galloni, Debora; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules supposed to affect membrane protein activity could strongly interact also with the lipid component of the membrane itself. Neurosteroids are amphiphilic molecules that bind to plasma membrane receptors of cells in the central nervous system but their effect on membrane is still under debate. For this reason it is interesting to investigate their effects on pure lipid bilayers as model systems. Using the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT), here we studied the effects of a neurosteroid, allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo) and of one of its isoforms, isoallopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), on the physical properties of pure lipid bilayers composed by DOPC/bSM/chol. Allo is a well-known positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptor activity while isoAllo acts as a non-competitive functional antagonist of Allo modulation. We found that Allo, when applied at nanomolar concentrations (50-200 nM) to a lipid bilayer model system including cholesterol, induces an increase of the lipid bilayer area and a decrease of the mechanical parameters. Conversely, isoAllo, decreases the lipid bilayer area and, when applied, at the same nanomolar concentrations, it does not affect significantly its mechanical parameters. We characterized the kinetics of Allo uptake by the lipid bilayer and we also discussed its aspects in relation to the slow kinetics of Allo gating effects on GABAA receptors. The overall results presented here show that a correlation exists between the modulation of Allo and isoAllo of GABAA receptor activity and their effects on a lipid bilayer model system containing cholesterol. PMID:25660752

  4. Temperature effect of cholesterol association with synaptosomal plasma membranes of rabbit brain.

    PubMed Central

    Deliconstantinos, G

    1984-01-01

    Association of exogenous cholesterol with rabbit brain synaptosomal plasma membranes follows an exponential path described by the general formula y = a X ebx. The co-operative nature of this association was shown when increasing amounts of unlabelled cholesterol glucoside (up to 0.5 mM) were added to a fixed amount (5 microM) of [14C]cholesterol, when a biphasic curve of the binding of [14C]cholesterol into the membranes was obtained. Arrhenius plots of this association revealed two break points which occur at 25 degrees C and 42 degrees C. The first break apparently corresponds to the transition from the crystalline to the gel phase. The second break may be due to the (continuously) increasing entropy of the system which creates at a certain point difficulties in the binding of cholesterol into the lipid bilayer. PMID:6487274

  5. Stimulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity as a Possible Driving Force in Cholesterol Evolution.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas; Garcia, Alvaro; Clarke, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is exclusively produced by animals and is present in the plasma membrane of all animal cells. In contrast, the membranes of fungi and plants contain other sterols. To explain the exclusive preference of animal cells for cholesterol, we propose that cholesterol may have evolved to optimize the activity of a crucial protein found in the plasma membrane of all multicellular animals, namely the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. To test this hypothesis, mirror tree and phylogenetic distribution analyses have been conducted of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(24)-reductase (DHCR24), the last enzyme in the Bloch cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a co-evolution of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and DHCR24. The evolutionary correlation between DHCR24 and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was found to be stronger than between DHCR24 and any other membrane protein investigated. The results obtained, thus, also support the hypothesis that cholesterol evolved together with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in multicellular animals to support Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. PMID:26715509

  6. Membrane curvature and cholesterol effects on lipids packing and spin-labelled lipids conformational distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovsky, Nurit; Sanders, Ella; Matalon, Erez; Wolf, Sharon G.; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-10-01

    Nitroxide spin-labelled lipid analogues are often used to study model membrane properties using EPR spectroscopy. Whereas in liquid phase membranes the spin label assumes, on average, its putative location, in gel phases and frozen membrane, depending on its position along the acyl chain, it may exhibit a different average location. Here we used 2H three-pulse Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) of phospholipid spin probes, combined with various deuteration schemes to detect the effect of the model membrane curvature and cholesterol on vertical migrations of the spin label. We compared large and small unilamellar 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) vesicles with and without cholesterol (10%). The vertical displacement of the spin label was manifested as an apparently flat trans-membrane profile of water concentration and of label proximity to the head group choline. The spin-label propensity to migrate was found to increase with vesicle curvature and decrease in the presence of cholesterol. This in turn reflects the effect of packing and ordering of the membrane lipids. The results show that in curved vesicles lacking cholesterol, the label attached to carbon 16 may travel as far high along the membrane normal as the location of the label on carbon 5, due to the presence of U-shaped lipid conformations. This phenomenon must be taken into account when using spin-labelled lipids as membrane depth markers or to trace trans-membrane profiles.

  7. Cholesterol Modifies Huntingtin Binding to, Disruption of, and Aggregation on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Campbell, Warren A; Chaibva, Maxmore; Jain, Pranav; Leslie, Ashley E; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-01-12

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormally long CAG-repeats in the huntingtin gene that encode an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ domains are directly correlated to disease-related htt aggregation. Htt is found highly associated with a variety of cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominantly comprised of lipids. Since cholesterol homeostasis is altered in HD, we investigated how varying cholesterol content modifies the interactions between htt and lipid membranes. A combination of Langmuir trough monolayer techniques, vesicle permeability and binding assays, and in situ atomic force microscopy were used to directly monitor the interaction of a model, synthetic htt peptide and a full-length htt-exon1 recombinant protein with model membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract (TBLE) and varying amounts of exogenously added cholesterol. As the cholesterol content of the membrane increased, the extent of htt insertion decreased. Vesicles containing extra cholesterol were resistant to htt-induced permeabilization. Morphological and mechanical changes in the bilayer associated with exposure to htt were also drastically altered by the presence of cholesterol. Disrupted regions of pure TBLE bilayers were grainy in appearance and associated with a large number of globular aggregates. In contrast, morphological changes induced by htt in bilayers enriched in cholesterol were plateau-like with a smooth appearance. Collectively, these observations suggest that the presence and amount of cholesterol in lipid membranes play a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes. PMID:26652744

  8. Membrane cholesterol modulates the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, a Lys49 phospholipase A2 homologue from the venom of Bothrops asper.

    PubMed

    Rangel, José; Quesada, Orestes; Gutiérrez, José María; Angulo, Yamileth; Lomonte, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    Lys49 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) homologues present in crotalid snake venoms lack enzymatic activity, yet they induce skeletal muscle necrosis by a membrane permeabilizing mechanism whose details are only partially understood. The present study evaluated the effect of altering the membrane cholesterol content on the cytolytic activity of myotoxin II, a Lys49 PLA2 isolated from the venom of Bothrops asper, using the myogenic cell line C2C12 as a model target. Cell membrane cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) treatment enhanced the cytolytic action of myotoxin II, as well as of its bioactive C-terminal synthetic peptide p(115-129) . Conversely, cell membrane cholesterol enrichment by preformed cholesterol-MβCD complexes reduced the cytolytic effect of myotoxin II. The toxic actions of myotoxin I, a catalytically active PLA2 from the same venom, as well as of the cytolytic peptide melittin from bee venom, also increased in cholesterol-depleted cells. Although physical and functional changes resulting from variations in membrane cholesterol are complex, these findings suggest that membrane fluidity could be a relevant parameter to explain the observed modulation of the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, possibly influencing bilayer penetration. In concordance, the cytolytic effect of myotoxin II decreased in direct proportion to lower temperature, a physical factor that affects membrane fluidity. In conclusion, physicochemical properties that depend on membrane cholesterol content significantly influence the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, reinforcing the concept that the primary site of action of Lys49 PLA2 myotoxins is the plasma membrane. PMID:21506137

  9. Perfringolysin O Theta Toxin as a Tool to Monitor the Distribution and Inhomogeneity of Cholesterol in Cellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Masashi; Yang, Yanbo; Fairn, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential structural component of cellular membranes in eukaryotes. Cholesterol in the exofacial leaflet of the plasma membrane is thought to form membrane nanodomains with sphingolipids and specific proteins. Additionally, cholesterol is found in the intracellular membranes of endosomes and has crucial functions in membrane trafficking. Furthermore, cellular cholesterol homeostasis and regulation of de novo synthesis rely on transport via both vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. Thus, the ability to visualize and detect intracellular cholesterol, especially in the plasma membrane, is critical to understanding the complex biology associated with cholesterol and the nanodomains. Perfringolysin O (PFO) theta toxin is one of the toxins secreted by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens and this toxin forms pores in the plasma membrane that causes cell lysis. It is well understood that PFO recognizes and binds to cholesterol in the exofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane, and domain 4 of PFO (D4) is sufficient for the binding of cholesterol. Recent studies have taken advantage of this high-affinity cholesterol-binding domain to create a variety of cholesterol biosensors by using a non-toxic PFO or the D4 in isolation. This review highlights the characteristics and usefulness of, and the principal findings related to, these PFO-derived cholesterol biosensors. PMID:27005662

  10. Perfringolysin O Theta Toxin as a Tool to Monitor the Distribution and Inhomogeneity of Cholesterol in Cellular Membranes.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masashi; Yang, Yanbo; Fairn, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential structural component of cellular membranes in eukaryotes. Cholesterol in the exofacial leaflet of the plasma membrane is thought to form membrane nanodomains with sphingolipids and specific proteins. Additionally, cholesterol is found in the intracellular membranes of endosomes and has crucial functions in membrane trafficking. Furthermore, cellular cholesterol homeostasis and regulation of de novo synthesis rely on transport via both vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. Thus, the ability to visualize and detect intracellular cholesterol, especially in the plasma membrane, is critical to understanding the complex biology associated with cholesterol and the nanodomains. Perfringolysin O (PFO) theta toxin is one of the toxins secreted by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens and this toxin forms pores in the plasma membrane that causes cell lysis. It is well understood that PFO recognizes and binds to cholesterol in the exofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane, and domain 4 of PFO (D4) is sufficient for the binding of cholesterol. Recent studies have taken advantage of this high-affinity cholesterol-binding domain to create a variety of cholesterol biosensors by using a non-toxic PFO or the D4 in isolation. This review highlights the characteristics and usefulness of, and the principal findings related to, these PFO-derived cholesterol biosensors. PMID:27005662

  11. Imaging approaches for analysis of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Modzel, Maciej; Lund, Frederik W; Lomholt, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid component of the plasma membrane (PM) of mammalian cells, where it is involved in control of many physiological processes, such as endocytosis, cell migration, cell signalling and surface ruffling. In an attempt to explain these functions of cholesterol, several models have been put forward about cholesterol's lateral and transbilayer organization in the PM. In this article, we review imaging techniques developed over the last two decades for assessing the distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the PM of mammalian cells. Particular focus is on fluorescence techniques to study the lateral and inter-leaflet distribution of suitable cholesterol analogues in the PM of living cells. We describe also several methods for determining lateral cholesterol dynamics in the PM including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), single particle tracking (SPT) and spot variation FCS coupled to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. For proper interpretation of such measurements, we provide some background in probe photophysics and diffusion phenomena occurring in cell membranes. In particular, we show the equivalence of the reaction-diffusion approach, as used in FRAP and FCS, and continuous time random walk (CTRW) models, as often invoked in SPT studies. We also discuss mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging of cholesterol in the PM of fixed cells and compare this method with fluorescence imaging of sterols. We conclude that evidence from many experimental techniques converges towards a model of a homogeneous distribution of cholesterol with largely free and unhindered diffusion in both leaflets of the PM. PMID:27016337

  12. Effect of Melatonin and Cholesterol on the Structure of DOPC and DPPC Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Drolle, E; Kucerka, Norbert; Hoopes, M I; Choi, Y; Katsaras, John; Karttunen, M; Leonenko, Z

    2013-01-01

    The cell membrane plays an important role in the molecular mechanism of amyloid toxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease. The membrane's chemical composition and the incorporation of small molecules, such as melatonin and cholesterol, can alter its structure and physical properties, thereby affecting its interaction with amyloid peptides. Both melatonin and cholesterol have been recently linked to amyloid toxicity. Melatonin has been shown to have a protective role against amyloid toxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of this protection is still not well understood, and cholesterol's role remains controversial. We used small-angle neutron diffraction (SAND) from oriented lipid multi-layers, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from unilamellar vesicles experiments andMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to elucidate non-specific interactions of melatonin and cholesterol with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) model membranes. We conclude that melatonin decreases the thickness of both model membranes by disordering the lipid hydrocarbon chains, thus increasing membrane fluidity. This result is in stark contrast to the much accepted ordering effect induced by cholesterol, which causes membranes to thicken.

  13. Formation of cholesterol-rich supported membranes using solvent-assisted lipid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Seong-Oh; Liedberg, Bo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Parikh, Atul N; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2014-11-11

    This paper describes the application of a solvent-exchange method to prepare supported membranes containing high fractions of cholesterol (up to ∼57 mol %) in an apparent equilibrium. The method exploits the phenomenon of reverse-phase evaporation, in which the deposition of lipids in alcohol (e.g., isopropanol) is followed by the slow removal of the organic solvent from the water-alcohol mixture. This in turn induces a series of lyotropic phase transitions successively producing inverse-micelles, monomers, micelles, and vesicles in equilibrium with supported bilayers at the contacting solid surface. By using the standard cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment, a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring assay confirms that the cholesterol concentration in the supported membranes is comparable to that in the surrounding bulk phase. A quantitative characterization of the biophysical properties of the resultant bilayer, including lateral diffusion constants and phase separation, using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy establishes the formation of laterally contiguous supported lipid bilayers, which break into a characteristic domain-pattern of coexisting phases in a cholesterol concentration-dependent manner. With increasing cholesterol fraction in the supported bilayer, the size of the domains increases, ultimately yielding two-dimensional cholesterol bilayer domains near the solubility limit. A unique feature of the approach is that it enables preparation of supported membranes containing limiting concentrations of cholesterol near the solubility limit under equilibrium conditions, which cannot be obtained using conventional techniques (i.e., vesicle fusion). PMID:25286344

  14. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  15. Effect of cholesterol on distribution of stable, hydrophobic perchlorotriphenylmethyl triethylester radical incorporated in lecithin liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Keizo; Okazaki, Shoko; Kansui, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorotriphenylmethyl triethylester radical (PTM-TE) is a hydrophobic, stable radical giving a narrow singlet ESR signal with a small satellite signal for (13)C in organic solvents. In order to use PTM-TE as a label of liposomal membranes, its manner of incorporation into liposomal membranes was studied. Two components, broad and narrow signals, were observed on the ESR spectrum of PTM-TE incorporated into liposomal membranes composed of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (egg-PC). The broad signal was increased by the presence of cholesterol in the membranes. The spectral anisotropy of the broad signal was very small as analyzed with oriented planar multilamellar membranes. The narrow signal increased with an increase in temperature in the absence of cholesterol, whereas only a small increase in the signal was observed in the presence of cholesterol. The g-value and line width of the narrow signal were very close to those of PTM-TE in mineral oil, whose viscosity is close to the microviscosity in the hydrophobic region of egg-PC membranes. On the other hand, the g-value and line width of the broad signal were close to those of solid PTM-TE. These observations indicate that the broad signal observed in liposomes originates from PTM-TE clusters in the membranes. The clusters were dissolved in egg-PC membranes at a PTM-TE/egg-PC molar ratio of less than 0.017. However, the clusters were hardly dissolved in the presence of cholesterol. PMID:21532201

  16. Interaction of cholesterol with sphingomyelin in bilayer membranes: Evidence that the hydroxy group of sphingomyelin does not modulate the rate of cholesterol exchange between vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Chucheng Kan; Zhongshi Ruan; Bittman, R. )

    1991-08-06

    Cholesterol undergoes exchange between membranes containing sphingomyelin at a much slower rate than between membranes lacking sphingomyelin. To investigate the role of the hydroxy group at the 3-position of sphingomyelin in the interaction between sphingomyelin and cholesterol, the authors have measured the rates of (4-{sup 14}C)cholesterol exchange between unilamellar vesicles prepared with N-alkyl group or with hydrogen. Vesicles prepared from 3-deoxy- and 3-0-methyl-N-stearoylsphingomyelin had the same rate of ({sup 14}C) cholesterol desorption. The half-times for exchange from vesicles prepared with 3-0-methyl- and 3-deoxy-N-stearoylsphingomyelins and 10 mol% of cholesterol were only slightly faster than that found from vesicles prepared from N-stearoylsphingomyelin and 10 mol% cholesterol. The rate of cholesterol desorption from vesicles could be accelerated by preparing vesicles from bulky 3-0-alkyl analogues of sphingomyelin. These data indicate that insertion of sterically bulky groups at the 3-position of sphingomyelin in place of hydroxy interferes markedly with the molecular packing of cholesterol and sphingomyelin in bilayer membranes; however, the hydroxy group of sphingomyelin is not critical for the strong interaction of cholesterol with sphingomyelin. These results suggest that van der Waals interactions are more important than hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the hydroxy group in contributing to tight lateral packing of cholesterol with sphingomyelin.

  17. Phenothiazines Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry, Likely by Increasing the Fluidity of Cholesterol-Rich Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun-Emanuelli, Ana M.; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Simeon, Rudo L.; Huang, Da; Cremer, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV), more effective therapies are still urgently needed. We and others previously identified three phenothiazine compounds as potent HCV entry inhibitors. In this study, we show that phenothiazines inhibit HCV entry at the step of virus-host cell fusion, by intercalating into cholesterol-rich domains of the target membrane and increasing membrane fluidity. Perturbation of the alignment/packing of cholesterol in lipid membranes likely increases the energy barrier needed for virus-host fusion. A screening assay based on the ability of molecules to selectively increase the fluidity of cholesterol-rich membranes was subsequently developed. One compound that emerged from the library screen, topotecan, is able to very potently inhibit the fusion of liposomes with cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc). These results yield new insights into HCV infection and provide a platform for the identification of new HCV inhibitors. PMID:23529728

  18. Critical Role of Membrane Cholesterol in Exocytosis Revealed by Single Platelet Study

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Shencheng; White, James G.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2010-01-01

    Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process, pivotal in a wide range of cell types, used to deliver chemical messengers from one cell to another cell or tissue. While a tremendous amount of knowledge has been gained in the past several decades about the exocytotic machinery, recently, it has become clear that the role of membrane lipids is also crucial in this process. In particular, the critical role of the abundant and ubiquitous cholesterol molecules has not been well defined. Early insight has been gleaned from single cell amperometric studies on several commonly used secretory cell models, including chromaffin cells and PC12 cells; however, these secretory cell models are not ideal because manipulations of membrane cholesterol content may influence downstream cholesterol-dependent processes, making data interpretation difficult. Herein, blood platelets are employed as a simpler secretory cell model based on their anuclear nature and unique chemical messenger exocytosis behavior. Carbon-fiber microelectrochemistry was employed to measure real-time exocytosis from single platelets with depleted or enriched cholesterol either in the naturally occurring form or as the synthetic analog epicholesterol. The experimental results show that membrane cholesterol directly modulates the secretion efficiency of individual platelets as well as the kinetics of secretion events. Moreover, substitution of platelet membrane cholesterol with epicholesterol yields exocytotic behavior indistinguishable from normal platelets, arguing against the possibility of the cholesterol-specific interactions in regulating exocytosis. It is clear from this work that membrane cholesterol plays a critical biophysical, rather than biochemical, role in platelet exocytosis and likely in exocytosis in general. PMID:20590163

  19. Cholesterol Dictates the Freedom of EGF Receptors and HER2 in the Plane of the Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Ozcelik, Serdar; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Colson, Steve D.

    2005-05-20

    The flow of information through the EGF receptor (EGFR) is shaped by molecular interactions in the plasma membrane. The EGFR is associated with lipid rafts, but their role in modulating receptor mobility and subsequent interactions is unclear. To investigate the role of nanoscale rafts in EGFR dynamics, we used single-molecule fluorescence imaging to track individual receptors and their dimerization partner, HER2, in the membrane of human mammary epithelial cells. We found that the motion of both receptors was interrupted by dwellings within nanodomains. EGFR was significantly less mobile than HER2. This difference was likely due to F-actin because its deploymerization led to similar diffusion patterns between the EGFR and HER2. Manipulations of membrane cholesterol content dramatically altered the diffusion pattern of both receptors. Cholesterol depletion led to almost complete confinement of the receptors, whereas cholesterol enrichment extended the boundaries of the restricted areas. Interestingly, F-actin deploymerization partially restored receptor mobility in cholesterol depleted membranes. Our observations suggest that membrane cholesterol provides a dynamic environment that facilitates the free motion of EGFR and HER2, possible by modulating the dynamic state of F-actin. The association of the receptors with lipid rafts could therefore promote their rapid interactions only upon ligand stimulation.

  20. Use of Bodipy-labeled sphingolipid and cholesterol analogs to examine membrane microdomains in cells

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David L.; Bittman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Much evidence has accumulated to show that cellular membranes such as the plasma membrane, contain multiple “microdomains” of differing lipid and protein composition and function. These domains are sometimes enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids and are believed to be important structures for the regulation of many biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on the use of fluorescent (Bodipy) labeled analogs of sphingolipids and cholesterol to study such domains. We discuss the similarities between the behavior of Bodipy-cholesterol and natural cholesterol in artificial bilayers and in cultured cells, and the use of Bodipy-sphingolipid analogs to visualize membrane domains in living cells based on the concentration-dependent monomer-excimer fluorescence properties of the Bodipy-fluorophore. The use of Bodipy-d-erythro-lactosylceramide is highlighted for detection of domains on the plasma membrane and endosome membranes, and the importance of the sphingolipid stereochemistry in modulating domain formation is discussed. Finally, we suggest that Bodipy-sphingolipids may be useful in future studies to examine the relationship between membrane domains at the cell surface and domains enriched in other lipids and proteins on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. PMID:18820942

  1. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  2. Effect of cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of fluid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Heiss, Arno; Salditt, Tim; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the effect of 5 and 40 mol% cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of phospholipid membranes. By measuring the excitation spectrum at several lateral q || values (up to q || = 3 1), complete dispersion curves were determined of gel, fluid and liquid-ordered phase bilayers. The inclusion of cholesterol had a distinct effect on the collective dynamics of the bilayer s hydrocarbon chains; specifically, we observed a pronounced stiffening of the membranes on the nanometer length scale in both gel and fluid bilayers, even though they were experiencing a higher degree of molecular disorder. Also, for the first time we determined the nanoscale dynamics in the high-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase of bilayers containing cholesterol. Namely, this phase appears to be softer than fluid bilayers, but better ordered than bilayers in the gel phase.

  3. FLIM studies of 22- and 25-NBD-cholesterol in living HEK293 cells: plasma membrane change induced by cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Ostašov, Pavel; Sýkora, Jan; Brejchová, Jana; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Hof, Martin; Svoboda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells stably expressing δ-opioid receptor were labeled first with fluorescent analog of cholesterol, 22-NBD-cholesterol, exposed to cholesterol-depleting agent β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) and analyzed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In accordance with chemical analysis of cholesterol level, the total cellular signal of this probe was decreased to half. Distribution of lifetime (τtot) values of 22-NBD-cholesterol, however, when screened over the whole cell area indicated no significant difference between control (τtot=4.9±0.1 ns) and β-CDX-treated (τtot=4.8±0.1 ns) cells. On the contrary, comparison of control (τtot=5.1±0.1 ns) and β-CDX-treated (τtot=4.4±0.1 ns) cells by analysis of 25-NBD-cholesterol fluorescence implied highly significant decrease of lifetime values of this probe. The observation that 22-NBD-cholesterol appears to be indifferent to the changes in the membrane packing in living cells is in agreement with previous studies in model membranes. However, our data indicate that the alternation of plasma membrane structure induced by decrease of cholesterol level by β-CDX makes the membrane environment of NBD moiety of 25-NBD-cholesterol probe a significantly more hydrated. This finding not only encourages using 25-NBD-cholesterol in living cells, but also demonstrates that previously drawn discouraging conclusions on the use of 25-NBD-cholesterol in model membranes are not valid for living cells. PMID:23466534

  4. Cholesterol prevents interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Nemec, Marjana; Schara, Milan; Johansson, Henrik; Langel, Ulo; Zorko, Matjaz

    2008-12-01

    Interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) cysteine-transportan (Cys-TP) with model lipid membranes was examined by spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes were labeled with lipophilic spin probes and the influence of Cys-TP on membrane structure was studied. The influence of Cys-TP on membrane permeability was monitored by the reduction of a liposome-trapped water-soluble spin probe. Cys-TP caused lipid ordering in membranes prepared from pure dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and in DMPC membranes with moderate cholesterol concentration. In addition, Cys-TP caused a large increase in permeation of DMPC membranes. In contrast, with high cholesterol content, at which model lipid membranes are in the so-called liquid-ordered phase, no effect of Cys-TP was observed, either on the membrane structure or on the membrane permeability. The interaction between Cys-TP and the lipid membrane therefore depends on the lipid phase. This could be of great importance for understanding of the CPP-lipid interaction in laterally heterogeneous membranes, while it implies that the CPP-lipid interaction can be different at different points along the membrane. PMID:18683276

  5. Impact of HIV-1 Membrane Cholesterol on Cell-Independent Lytic Inactivation and Cellular Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat; Li, Huiyuan; Bailey, Lauren; Rashad, Adel A; Aneja, Rachna; Weiss, Karl; Huynh, James; Bastian, Arangaserry Rosemary; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Abrams, Cameron; Wrenn, Steven; Chaiken, Irwin

    2016-01-26

    Peptide triazole thiols (PTTs) have been found previously to bind to HIV-1 Env spike gp120 and cause irreversible virus inactivation by shedding gp120 and lytically releasing luminal capsid protein p24. Since the virions remain visually intact, lysis appears to occur via limited membrane destabilization. To better understand the PTT-triggered membrane transformation involved, we investigated the role of envelope cholesterol on p24 release by measuring the effect of cholesterol depletion using methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). An unexpected bell-shaped response of PTT-induced lysis to [MβCD] was observed, involving lysis enhancement at low [MβCD] vs loss of function at high [MβCD]. The impact of cholesterol depletion on PTT-induced lysis was reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol and other sterols that support membrane rafts, while sterols that do not support rafts induced only limited reversal. Cholesterol depletion appears to cause a reduced energy barrier to lysis as judged by decreased temperature dependence with MβCD. Enhancement/replenishment responses to [MβCD] also were observed for HIV-1 infectivity, consistent with a similar energy barrier effect in the membrane transformation of virus cell fusion. Overall, the results argue that cholesterol in the HIV-1 envelope is important for balancing virus stability and membrane transformation, and that partial depletion, while increasing infectivity, also makes the virus more fragile. The results also reinforce the argument that the lytic inactivation and infectivity processes are mechanistically related and that membrane transformations occurring during lysis can provide an experimental window to investigate membrane and protein factors important for HIV-1 cell entry. PMID:26713837

  6. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Morgan D; Ford, Rebecca J; McGregor, Chelsea P; LeBlond, Nicholas D; Snider, Shayne A; Stypa, Stephanie A; Day, Emily A; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Austin, Richard C; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1(-/-)) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1(-/-) mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  7. Cholesterol side chain analogs but not its ether analogs possess cholesterol-lowering activity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lin; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weihuan; Liu, Yuwei; Zheng, Fangrui; Ma, Ka Ying; Li, Yuk Man; Wang, Lijun; Man, Sun Wa; Zhang, Chengnan; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Cholesterol analogs can be used to treat hypercholesterolemia. The present study was to test the effects of cholesteryl 3β-ethoxy (CE) and cholesteryl 3β-methoxy (CM) on plasma total cholesterol (TC) compared with that of β-sitosterol (SI) in hamsters fed a high cholesterol diet. CM and CE are the methoxy and ethoxy analogs of cholesterol while SI is an analog of cholesterol having an additional ethyl group on the side chain. Results showed that SI at a dose of 0.1% could effectively reduce plasma TC by 18%. The analysis of sterols in the plasma and liver did not detect the presence of SI, proving that it was poorly absorbed in the intestine. In contrast, both CE and CM had no effect on plasma TC. However, CE and CM were found to accumulate in both plasma and liver, indicating that they could be well absorbed in the intestine. It was therefore concluded that analogs having different side chains possessed plasma TC-lowering activity, while analogs or derivatives on the hydroxyl group had no hypocholesterolemic activity. PMID:25536519

  8. Double Potential Pulse Chronocoulometry for Detection of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Efflux at Disk Platinum Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    West, Richard H.; Lu, Hui; Shaw, Kendrick; Chiel, Hillel J.; Kelley, Thomas J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    A double potential pulse scheme is reported for observation of cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of a single neuron cell. Capillary Pt disk microelectrodes having a thin glass insulator allow the 10 μm diameter electrode and cell to be viewed under optical magnification. The electrode, covalently functionalized with cholesterol oxidase, is positioned in contact with the cell surface resulting in enzyme catalyzed cholesterol oxidation and efflux of cholesterol from the plasma membrane at the electrode contact site. Enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide accumulates at the electrode/cell interface during a 5 s hold-time and is oxidized during application of a potential pulse. A second, replicate potential pulse is applied 0.5 s after the first potential pulse to gauge background charge prior to significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. The difference in charge passed between the first and second potential pulse provides a measure of hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme and is an indication of the cholesterol efflux. Control experiments for bare Pt microelectrodes in contact with the cell plasma membrane show difference charge signals in the range of about 7–10 pC. Enzyme-modified electrodes in contact with the plasma membrane show signals in the range of 16–26 pC. PMID:27330196

  9. Effect of cholesterol on structural and mechanical properties of membranes depends on lipid chain saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of cholesterol on membrane bending modulus K{sub C}, membrane thickness D{sub HH}, the partial and apparent areas of cholesterol and lipid, and the order parameter S{sub xray} are shown to depend upon the number of saturated hydrocarbon chains in the lipid molecules. Particularly striking is the result that up to 40% cholesterol does not increase the bending modulus K{sub C} of membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine lipids with two cis monounsaturated chains, although it does have the expected stiffening effect on membranes composed of lipids with two saturated chains. The B fluctuational modulus in the smectic liquid crystal theory is obtained and used to discuss the interactions between bilayers. Our K{sub C} results motivate a theory of elastic moduli in the high cholesterol limit and they challenge the relevance of universality concepts. Although most of our results were obtained at 30 deg. C, additional data at other temperatures to allow consideration of a reduced temperature variable do not support universality for the effect of cholesterol on all lipid bilayers. If the concept of universality is to be valid, different numbers of saturated chains must be considered to create different universality classes. The above experimental results were obtained from analysis of x-ray scattering in the low angle and wide angle regions.

  10. A synergistic effect between cholesterol and tryptophan-flanked transmembrane helices modulates membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    van Duyl, Bianca Y; Meeldijk, Hans; Verkleij, Arie J; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Chupin, Vladimir; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2005-03-22

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the structural consequences of hydrophobic mismatch for membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that contain cholesterol. For this purpose, tryptophan-flanked peptides, designed to mimic transmembrane segments of membrane proteins, were incorporated in model membranes of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness and containing varying amounts of cholesterol. Analysis of the lipid organization by (31)P NMR and cryo-TEM demonstrated the formation of an isotropic phase, most likely representing a cubic phase, which occurred exclusively in mixtures containing lipids with relatively long acyl chains. Formation of this phase was inhibited by incorporation of lysophosphatidylcholine. These results indicate that the isotropic phase is formed as a consequence of negative hydrophobic mismatch and that its formation is related to a negative membrane curvature. When either peptide or cholesterol was omitted from the mixture, isotropic-phase formation did not occur, not even when the concentrations of these compounds were significantly increased. This suggests that formation of the isotropic phase is the result of a synergistic effect between the peptides and cholesterol. Interestingly, isotropic-phase formation was not observed when the tryptophans in the peptide were replaced by either lysines or histidines. We propose a model for the mechanism of this synergistic effect, in which its dependence on the flanking residues is explained by preferential interactions between cholesterol and tryptophan residues. PMID:15766283

  11. Cholesterol modulates CFTR confinement in the plasma membrane of primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Pandzic, Elvis; Goepp, Julie; Matthes, Elizabeth; Hanrahan, John W; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a plasma-membrane anion channel that, when mutated, causes the disease cystic fibrosis. Although CFTR has been detected in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction prepared from airway epithelial cells, suggesting that it may partition into cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), its compartmentalization has not been demonstrated in intact cells and the influence of microdomains on CFTR lateral mobility is unknown. We used live-cell imaging, spatial image correlation spectroscopy, and k-space image correlation spectroscopy to examine the aggregation state of CFTR and its dynamics both within and outside microdomains in the plasma membrane of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. These studies were also performed during treatments that augment or deplete membrane cholesterol. We found two populations of CFTR molecules that were distinguishable based on their dynamics at the cell surface. One population showed confinement and had slow dynamics that were highly cholesterol dependent. The other, more abundant population was less confined and diffused more rapidly. Treatments that deplete the membrane of cholesterol caused the confined fraction and average number of CFTR molecules per cluster to decrease. Elevating cholesterol had the opposite effect, increasing channel aggregation and the fraction of channels displaying confinement, consistent with CFTR recruitment into cholesterol-rich microdomains with dimensions below the optical resolution limit. Viral infection caused the nanoscale microdomains to fuse into large platforms and reduced CFTR mobility. To our knowledge, these results provide the first biophysical evidence for multiple CFTR populations and have implications for regulation of their surface expression and channel function. PMID:26153705

  12. Haploid Genetic Screen Reveals a Profound and Direct Dependence on Cholesterol for Hantavirus Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Jangra, Rohit K.; Jae, Lucas T.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Mittler, Eva; Stiles, Katie M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Kielian, Margaret; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Old World and a highly fatal hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the New World. No vaccines or antiviral therapies are currently available to prevent or treat hantavirus disease, and gaps in our understanding of how hantaviruses enter cells challenge the search for therapeutics. We performed a haploid genetic screen in human cells to identify host factors required for entry by Andes virus, a highly virulent New World hantavirus. We found that multiple genes involved in cholesterol sensing, regulation, and biosynthesis, including key components of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, are critical for Andes virus entry. Genetic or pharmacological disruption of the membrane-bound transcription factor peptidase/site-1 protease (MBTPS1/S1P), an SREBP control element, dramatically reduced infection by virulent hantaviruses of both the Old World and New World clades but not by rhabdoviruses or alphaviruses, indicating that this pathway is broadly, but selectively, required by hantaviruses. These results could be fully explained as arising from the modest depletion of cellular membrane cholesterol that accompanied S1P disruption. Mechanistic studies of cells and with protein-free liposomes suggested that high levels of cholesterol are specifically needed for hantavirus membrane fusion. Taken together, our results indicate that the profound dependence on target membrane cholesterol is a fundamental, and unusual, biophysical property of hantavirus glycoprotein-membrane interactions during entry. PMID:26126854

  13. Laurdan Fluorescence Lifetime Discriminates Cholesterol Content from Changes in Fluidity in Living Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Golfetto, Ottavia; Hinde, Elizabeth; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the fluorescent properties of Laurdan has been proven to be an efficient tool to investigate membrane packing and ordered lipid phases in model membranes and living cells. Traditionally the spectral shift of Laurdan’s emission from blue in the ordered lipid phase of the membrane (more rigid) toward green in the disordered lipid phase (more fluid) is quantified by the generalized polarization function. Here, we investigate the fluorescence lifetime of Laurdan at two different emission wavelengths and find that when the dipolar relaxation of Laurdan’s emission is spectrally isolated, analysis of the fluorescence decay can distinguish changes in membrane fluidity from changes in cholesterol content. Using the phasor representation to analyze changes in Laurdan’s fluorescence lifetime we obtain two different phasor trajectories for changes in polarity versus changes in cholesterol content. This gives us the ability to resolve in vivo membranes with different properties such as water content and cholesterol content and thus perform a more comprehensive analysis of cell membrane heterogeneity. We demonstrate this analysis in NIH3T3 cells using Laurdan as a biosensor to monitor changes in the membrane water content during cell migration. PMID:23528083

  14. Cholesterol facilitates interactions between α-synuclein oligomers and charge-neutral membranes.

    PubMed

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-09-14

    Oligomeric species formed during α-synuclein fibrillation are suggested to be membrane-disrupting agents, and have been associated with cytotoxicity in Parkinson's disease. The majority of studies, however, have revealed that the effect of α-synuclein oligomers is only noticeable on systems composed of anionic lipids, while the more physiologically relevant zwitterionic lipids remain intact. We present experimental evidence for significant morphological changes in zwitterionic membranes containing cholesterol, induced by α-synuclein oligomers. Depending on the lipid composition, model membranes are either unperturbed, disrupt, or undergo dramatic morphological changes and segregate into structurally different components, which we visualize by 2-photon fluorescence microscopy and generalized polarization analysis using the fluorescent probe Laurdan. Our results highlight the crucial role of cholesterol for mediating interactions between physiologically relevant membranes and α-synuclein. PMID:26297828

  15. Chain ordering of hybrid lipids can stabilize domains in saturated/hybrid/cholesterol lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Brewster, R.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    We use a liquid-crystal model to predict that hybrid lipids (lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated tail) can stabilize line interfaces between domains in mixed membranes of saturated lipids, hybrid lipids, and cholesterol (SHC membranes). The model predicts the phase separation of SHC membranes with both parabolic and loop binodals depending on the cholesterol concentration, modeled via an effective pressure. In some cases, the hybrid lipids can reduce the line tension to zero in SHC membranes at temperatures that approach the critical temperature as the pressure is increased. The differences in the hybrid saturated tail conformational order in bulk and at the interface are responsible for the reduction of the line tension.

  16. Synthesis of Cholesterol-Substituted Glycopeptides for Tailor-Made Glycocalyxification of Artificial Membrane Systems.

    PubMed

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Madl, Josef; Villringer, Sarah; Aili, Ulrika; Römer, Winfried; Blixt, Ola

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic minimal membrane systems are extremely useful for better understanding of complex cellular structures and cell surface processes. We have developed a facile method for synthesis of cholesterylated peptides, each bearing a carbohydrate moiety and a fluorescent tag. The position of the cholesterol moiety on the peptide can be controlled by using a new Fmoc-protected cholesterol-triazole-lysine group, which we constructed by means of solid-phase peptide synthesis. We succeeded in integrating the glyco modules into giant unilamellar vesicles by electroformation or infusion in buffer solution. The glyco-decorated liposomes were recognized by a lectin and had unique topological membrane features. In conclusion, this work is a proof of principle for the functionalization of artificial membranes with a primitive synthetic glycocalyx useful for studying carbohydrate-protein interactions on a simplified cell-like membrane surface. PMID:27168414

  17. Lipid Membrane Deformation Accompanied by Disk-to-Ring Shape Transition of Cholesterol-Rich Domains.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Yoo, Daehan; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Jordan, Luke R; Lee, Sin-Doo; Parikh, Atul N; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-07-15

    During vesicle budding or endocytosis, biomembranes undergo a series of lipid- and protein-mediated deformations involving cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts. If lipid rafts of high bending rigidities become confined to the incipient curved membrane topology such as a bud-neck interface, they can be expected to reform as ring-shaped rafts. Here, we report on the observation of a disk-to-ring shape morpho-chemical transition of a model membrane in the absence of geometric constraints. The raft shape transition is triggered by lateral compositional heterogeneity and is accompanied by membrane deformation in the vertical direction, which is detected by height-sensitive fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. Our results suggest that a flat membrane can become curved simply by dynamic changes in local chemical composition and shape transformation of cholesterol-rich domains. PMID:26053547

  18. Tracking Cholesterol/Sphingomyelin-Rich Membrane Domains with the Ostreolysin A-mCherry Protein

    PubMed Central

    Skočaj, Matej; Resnik, Nataša; Grundner, Maja; Ota, Katja; Rojko, Nejc; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Sobota, Andrzej; Maček, Peter; Veranič, Peter; Sepčić, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Ostreolysin A (OlyA) is an ∼15-kDa protein that has been shown to bind selectively to membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. In this study, we investigated whether OlyA fluorescently tagged at the C-terminal with mCherry (OlyA-mCherry) labels cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in artificial membrane systems and in membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. OlyA-mCherry showed similar lipid binding characteristics to non-tagged OlyA. OlyA-mCherry also stained cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in the plasma membranes of both fixed and living MDCK cells, and in the living cells, this staining was abolished by pretreatment with either methyl-β-cyclodextrin or sphingomyelinase. Double labelling of MDCK cells with OlyA-mCherry and the sphingomyelin-specific markers equinatoxin II–Alexa488 and GST-lysenin, the cholera toxin B subunit as a probe that binds to the ganglioside GM1, or the cholesterol-specific D4 domain of perfringolysin O fused with EGFP, showed different patterns of binding and distribution of OlyA-mCherry in comparison with these other proteins. Furthermore, we show that OlyA-mCherry is internalised in living MDCK cells, and within 90 min it reaches the juxtanuclear region via caveolin-1–positive structures. No binding to membranes could be seen when OlyA-mCherry was expressed in MDCK cells. Altogether, these data clearly indicate that OlyA-mCherry is a promising tool for labelling a distinct pool of cholesterol/sphingomyelin membrane domains in living and fixed cells, and for following these domains when they are apparently internalised by the cell. PMID:24664106

  19. Specific release of membrane-bound annexin II and cortical cytoskeletal elements by sequestration of membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, T; Kellner, R; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1997-01-01

    Annexin II is an abundant protein which is present in the cytosol and on the cytoplasmic face of plasma membrane and early endosomes. It is generally believed that this association occurs via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to lipids, a mechanism typical for the annexin protein family. Although previous studies have shown that annexin II is involved in early endosome dynamics and organization, the precise biological role of the protein is unknown. In this study, we found that approximately 50% of the total cellular annexin was associated with membranes in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This binding was extremely tight, since it resisted high salt and, to some extent, high pH treatments. We found, however, that membrane-associated annexin II could be quantitatively released by low concentrations of the cholesterol-sequestering agents filipin and digitonin. Both treatments released an identical and limited set of proteins but had no effects on other membrane-associated proteins. Among the released proteins, we identified, in addition to annexin II itself, the cortical cytoskeletal proteins alpha-actinin, ezrin and moesin, and membrane-associated actin. Our biochemical and immunological observations indicate that these proteins are part of a complex containing annexin II and that stability of the complex is sensitive to cholesterol sequestering agents. Since annexin II is tightly membrane-associated in a cholesterol-dependent manner, and since it seems to interact physically with elements of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, we propose that the protein serves as interface between membranes containing high amounts of cholesterol and the actin cytoskeleton. Images PMID:9188103

  20. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  1. Combined influence of cholesterol and synthetic amphiphillic peptides upon bilayer thickness in model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nezil, F A; Bloom, M

    1992-01-01

    Deuterium (2H) NMR was used to study bilayer hydrophobic thickness and mechanical properties when cholesterol and/or synthetic amphiphillic polypeptides were added to deuterated POPC lipid bilayer membranes in the liquid-crystalline (fluid) phase. Smoothed acyl chain orientational order profiles were used to calculate bilayer hydrophobic thickness. Addition of 30 mol% cholesterol to POPC at 25 degrees C increased the bilayer thickness from 2.58 to 2.99 nm. The peptides were chosen to span the bilayers with more or less mismatch between the hydrophobic peptide length and membrane hydrophobic thickness. The average thickness of the pure lipid bilayers was significantly perturbed upon addition of peptide only in cases of large mismatch, being increased (decreased) when the peptide hydrophobic length was greater (less) than that of the pure bilayer, consistent with the "mattress" model of protein lipid interactions (Mouritsen, O.G., and M. Bloom. 1984. Biophys. J. 46:141-153). The experimental results were also used to examine the combined influence of the polypeptides and cholesterol on the orientational order profile and thickness expansivity of the membranes. A detailed model for the spatial distribution of POPC and cholesterol molecules in the bilayers was proposed to reconcile the general features of these measurements with micromechanical measurements of area expansivity in closely related systems. Experiments to test the model were proposed. PMID:1600079

  2. Covalent binding and anchoring of cytochrome c to mitochondrial mimetic membranes promoted by cholesterol carboxyaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Appolinário, Patricia P; Mugnol, Katia C U; Bloch, Carlos; Nantes, Iseli L; Di Mascio, Paolo; Miyamoto, Sayuri

    2013-10-21

    Mitochondrial cholesterol has been reported to be increased under specific pathological conditions associated with enhanced oxidative stress parameters. In this scenario, cholesterol oxidation would be increased, leading to the production of reactive aldehydes, including cholesterol carboxyaldehyde (ChAld). By using SDS micelles as a mitochondrial mimetic model, we have demonstrated that ChAld covalently modifies cytochrome c (cytc), a protein known to participate in electron transport and apoptosis signaling. This mimetic model induces changes in cytc structure in the same way as mitochondrial membranes do. Tryptic digestion of the cytc-ChAld adduct followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses revealed that modifications occur at Lys residues (K22) localized at cytc site L, a site involved in protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. Interestingly, ChAld ligation prevented cytc detachment from liposomes even under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, it can be concluded that ChAld ligation to Lys residues at site L creates a hydrophobic tail at cytc, which promotes cytc anchoring to the membrane. Although not investigated in detail in this study, cytc adduction to cholesterol derived aldehydes could have implications in cytc release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. PMID:24059586

  3. Molecular simulations of the effects of phospholipid and cholesterol peroxidation on lipid membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Neto, Antenor J P; Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2016-09-01

    Non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation may change biomembrane structure and function. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of either phospholipid or cholesterol peroxidation individually, as well as the combined peroxidation of both components. When lipids were peroxidized, the generated OOH groups migrated to the membrane surface and engaged in H-bonds with each other and the phospholipid carbonyl ester groups. It caused the sn-2 acyl chains of phospholipid hydroperoxides to bend and the whole sterol backbone of cholesterol hydroperoxides to tilt. When phospholipids were kept intact, peroxidation of the sterol backbone led to a partial degradation of its condensing and ordering properties, independently of the position and isomerism of the OOH substitution. However, even in massively peroxidized membranes in which all phospholipids and cholesterol were peroxidized, the condensing and ordering properties of the sterol backbone were still significant. The possible implications for the formation of membrane lateral domains were discussed. Cholesterol peroxyl radicals were also investigated and we found that the OO groups did not migrate to the headgroups region. PMID:27349733

  4. Niemann-Pick C1 protein regulates cholesterol transport to the trans-Golgi network and plasma membrane caveolae.

    PubMed

    Garver, William S; Krishnan, Kumar; Gallagos, Jayme R; Michikawa, Makoto; Francis, Gordon A; Heidenreich, Randall A

    2002-04-01

    The Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein regulates cholesterol transport from late endosomes-lysosomes to other intracellular compartments. In this article, cholesterol transport to caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 containing compartments, such as the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and plasma membrane caveolae, was examined in normal (NPC+/+), NPC heterozygous (NPC+/-), and NPC homozygous (NPC-/-) human fibroblasts. The expression and distribution of NPC1 in each cell type were similar, and characterized by a finely dispersed, granular staining pattern. The expression of caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 was increased in NPC+/- and NPC-/- fibroblasts, although the distribution in each cell type was similar and characterized by predominant staining of the TGN and plasma membrane. The TGN in NPC+/+ fibroblasts was relatively cholesterol-enriched, whereas the TGN in NPC+/- and NPC-/- fibroblasts was partially or completely cholesterol-deficient, respectively. Consistent with studies demonstrating the transport of cholesterol from the TGN to plasma membrane caveolae, the concentration of cholesterol in plasma membrane caveolae isolated from NPC+/- and NPC-/- fibroblasts was significantly decreased, even though the total concentration of plasma membrane cholesterol in each cell type was similar. These studies demonstrate that NPC1 regulates cholesterol transport to caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 containing compartments such as the TGN and plasma membrane caveolae. PMID:11907140

  5. Nonequilibrium patterns of cholesterol-rich chemical heterogenieties within single fluid supported phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sapuri-Butti, Annapoorna R; Li, Qijuan; Groves, Jay T; Parikh, Atul N

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a simple method to introduce cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich chemical heterogeneities into controlled densities and concentrations within predetermined regions of another distinct fluid phospholipid bilayer supported on a solid substrate. A contiguous primary phase--a fluid POPC bilayer displaying a well-defined array of lipid-free voids (e.g., 20-100 microm squares)--was first prepared on a clean glass surface by microcontact printing under water using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp. The aqueous-phase primary bilayer pattern was subsequently incubated with secondary-phase small unilamellar vesicles composed of independent chemical compositions. Backfilling by comparable vesicles resulted in gradual mixing between the primary- and secondary-phase lipids, effacing the pattern. When the secondary vesicles consisted of phase-separating mixtures of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and a phospholipid (2:1:1 POPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol or 1:1:1 DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), well-defined spatial patterns of fluorescence, chemical compositions, and fluidities emerged. We conjecture that these patterns form because of the differences in the equilibration rates of the secondary liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases with the primary fluid POPC phase. The pattern stability depended strongly on the ambient-phase temperature, cholesterol concentration, and miscibility contrast between the two phases. When cholesterol concentration in the secondary vesicles was below 20 mol %, secondary intercalants gradually diffused within the primary POPC bilayer phase, ultimately dissolving the pattern in several minutes and presumably forming a new quasi-equilibrated lipid mixture. These phase domain micropatterns retain some properties of biological rafts including detergent resistance and phase mixing induced by selective cholesterol extraction. These patterns enable direct comparisons of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich phase domains and fluid phospholipid

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Cholesterol-Containing Polyunsaturated Lipid Membranes Studied by Neutron Diffraction and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Soubias, Olivier; Worcester, David; White, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    A direct and quantitative analysis of the internal structure and dynamics of a polyunsaturated lipid bilayer composed of 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0-22:6n3-PC) containing 29 mol% cholesterol was carried out by neutron diffraction, 2H-NMR and 13C-MAS NMR. Scattering length distribution functions of cholesterol segments as well as of the sn-1 and sn-2 hydrocarbon chains of 18:0-22:6n3-PC were obtained by conducting experiments with specifically deuterated cholesterol and lipids. Cholesterol orients parallel to the phospholipids, with the A-ring near the lipid glycerol and the terminal methyl groups 3 Å away from the bilayer center. Previously, we reported that the density of polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) chains was higher near the lipid–water interface. Addition of cholesterol partially redistributes DHA density from near the lipid–water interface to the center of the hydrocarbon region. Cholesterol raises chain-order parameters of both stearic acid and DHA chains. The fractional order increase for stearic acid methylene carbons C8–C18 is larger, reflecting the redistribution of DHA chain density toward the bilayer center. The correlation times of DHA chain isomerization are short and mostly unperturbed by the presence of cholesterol. The uneven distribution of saturated and polyunsaturated chain densities and the cholesterol-induced balancing of chain distributions may have important implications for the function and integrity of membrane receptors, such as rhodopsin. PMID:21161517

  7. Quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate effect on the anisotropy of model membranes with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Diana; Margină, Denisa; Ilie, Mihaela; Iftime, Adrian; Ganea, Constanţa

    2013-11-01

    Cell membrane fluidity, which can be altered by oxidative stress, plays an important role in the cell physiology. Flavonoids are among the most studied food substances that prevent and/or reduce oxidative stress, but their action mechanisms are far from being understood. We performed a study on the effect of quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate on 2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) with different amounts of cholesterol, using Laurdan as a fluorescent probe, to put into evidence the perturbations of the phospholipid membrane fluidity and local lipid order in an attempt to decipher the action mechanism of the flavonoids at the cell membrane level. Results indicate that polyphenols modulate the transition from the gel phase to the liquid crystalline phase of SUVs in all studied membranes. SUVs with cholesterol have by themselves higher phase transition temperature and the presence of polyphenols stabilizes further the membrane. Quercetin has a dose-dependent effect on the fluidity and local order of the lipid membranes, whilst epigallocatechin-3-gallate action is not dose-dependent, the differences being attributable to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character of the substances. The findings are discussed within the frame of earlier reports on the effect of polyphenols on artificial membranes. PMID:23523830

  8. The cholesterol dependence of activation and fast desensitization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, S E; Addona, G H; Kloczewiak, M A; Bugge, B; Miller, K W

    1997-01-01

    When nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are reconstituted into lipid bilayers lacking cholesterol, agonists no longer stimulate cation flux. The kinetics of this process are difficult to study because variations in vesicle morphology cause errors in flux measurements. We developed a new stopped-flow fluorescence assay to study activation independently of vesicle morphology. When receptors were rapidly mixed with agonist plus ethidium, the earliest fluorescence increase reported the fraction of channels that opened and their apparent rate of fast desensitization. These processes were absent when the receptor was reconstituted into dioleoylphosphatidylcholine or into a mixture of that lipid with dioleoylphosphatidic acid (12 mol%), even though a fluorescent agonist reported that resting-state receptors were still present. The agonist-induced channel opening probability increased with bilayer cholesterol, with a midpoint value of 9 +/- 1.7 mol% and a Hill coefficient of 1.9 +/- 0.69, reaching a plateau above 20-30 mol% cholesterol that was equal to the native value. On the other hand, the observed fast desensitization rate was comparable to that for native membranes from the lowest cholesterol concentration examined (5 mol%). Thus the ability to reach the open state after activation varies with the cholesterol concentration in the bilayer, whereas the rate of the open state to fast desensitized state transition is unaffected. The structural basis for this is unknown, but an interesting corollary is that the channels of newly synthesized receptors are not fully primed by cholesterol until they are inserted into the plasma membrane--a novel form of posttranslational processing. PMID:9370438

  9. Incorporation of fluorophore-cholesterol conjugates into liposomal and mycobacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Wercholuk, Ashley N; Thuman, Jenna M; Stanley, Jordan L; Sargent, Andrew L; Anderson, Eric S; Allen, William E

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescently-labeled steroids that emit intense blue light in nonpolar solvent (λem (CH2Cl2)≈440nm, ΦF=0.70) were prepared by treating cholesteryl chloroformate with 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides. The lipid portion of the conjugates embeds into liposomal membrane bilayers in minutes, leaving the fluorophore exposed to the external aqueous environment. This causes a 40-nm red-shift in λem and significant quenching. DFT optimizations predict the conjugates to be about 30Å long when fully extended, but rotation about the linker group can bring the compounds into an 'L'-shape. Such a conformation would allow the cholesteryl anchor to remain parallel to the acyl chains of a membrane while the fluorescent group resides in the interfacial region, instead of extending beyond it. When incubated with Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155, a bacterial species known to use natural cholesterol, the labeled steroids support growth and can be found localized in the membrane fraction of the cells using HPLC. These findings demonstrate stable integration of fluorescent cholesterols into bacterial membranes in vivo, indicating that these compounds may be useful for evaluating cholesterol uptake in prokaryotic organisms. PMID:26827139

  10. Transit of Hormonal and EGF receptor-dependent Signals Through Cholesterol-rich Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael R.; Cinar, Bekir; Kim, Jayoung; Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Solomon, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    The functional consequences of changes in membrane lipid composition that coincide with malignant growth are poorly understood. Sufficient data have been acquired from studies of lipid binding proteins, post-translational modifications of signaling proteins, and biochemical inhibition of lipidogenic pathways to indicate that growth and survival pathways might be substantially re-directed by alterations in the lipid content of membranes. Cholesterol and glycosphingolipids segregate into membrane patches that exhibit a liquid-ordered state in comparison to membrane domains containing relatively lower amounts of these classes of lipids. These “lipid raft” structures, which may vary in size and stability in different cell types, both accumulate and exclude signaling proteins and have been implicated in signal transduction through a number of cancer-relevant pathways. In prostate cancer cells, signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the serine-threonine kinase Akt1, as well as from IL-6 to STAT3, have been demonstrated to be influenced by experimental interventions that target cholesterol homeostasis. The recent finding that classical steroid hormone receptors also reside in these microdomains, and thus may function within these structures in a signaling capacity independent of their role as nuclear factors, suggests a novel means of cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinase-derived and steroidogenic signals. Potential points of intersection between components of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases and androgen receptor signaling pathways, which may be sensitive to disruptions in cholesterol metabolism, are discussed. Understanding the manner in which these pathways converge within cholesterol-rich membranes may present new avenues for therapeutic intervention in hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:17173942

  11. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell. PMID:26719944

  12. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  13. Cholesterol-induced suppression of membrane elastic fluctuations at the atomistic level.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Trivikram R; Brown, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy for investigating the influences of lipid-cholesterol interactions on membrane fluctuations are reviewed in this paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the energy landscapes and fluctuations at an emergent atomistic level. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy directly measures residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) due to individual C-(2)H labeled segments of the lipid molecules. Moreover, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) of (13)C-(1)H bonds are obtained in separated local-field NMR spectroscopy. The distributions of RQC or RDC values give nearly complete profiles of the order parameters as a function of acyl segment position. Measured equilibrium properties of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids including their binary and tertiary mixtures with cholesterol show unequal mixing associated with liquid-ordered domains. The entropic loss upon addition of cholesterol to sphingolipids is less than for glycerophospholipids and may drive the formation of lipid rafts. In addition relaxation time measurements enable one to study the molecular dynamics over a wide time-scale range. For (2)H NMR the experimental spin-lattice (R1Z) relaxation rates follow a theoretical square-law dependence on segmental order parameters (SCD) due to collective slow dynamics over mesoscopic length scales. The functional dependence for the liquid-crystalline lipid membranes is indicative of viscoelastic properties as they emerge from atomistic-level interactions. A striking decrease in square-law slope upon addition of cholesterol denotes stiffening relative to the pure lipid bilayers that is diminished in the case of lanosterol. Measured equilibrium properties and relaxation rates infer opposite influences of cholesterol and detergents on collective dynamics and elasticity at an atomistic scale that potentially affects lipid raft formation in cellular membranes. PMID:27154600

  14. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes: implications for viral trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R.; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Vuento, Matti

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the effect of desipramine (DMI) on phospholipid bilayers and parvoviral entry was elucidated. In atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, DMI was found to introduce disorder in cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers. This was manifested by a decrease in the deuterium order parameter SCD as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence on the penetration of the virus through an endosomal membrane.

  15. How Cholesterol Could Be Drawn to the Cytoplasmic Leaf of the Plasma Membrane by Phosphatidylethanolamine

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Ha; Schick, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian plasma membrane, cholesterol can translocate rapidly between the exoplasmic and cytoplasmic leaves, so that its distribution between them should be given by the equality of its chemical potential in the leaves. Due to its favorable interaction with sphingomyelin, which is almost entirely in the outer leaf, one expects the great majority of cholesterol to be there also. Experimental results do not support this, implying that there is some mechanism attracting cholesterol to the inner leaf. We hypothesize that it is drawn there to reduce the bending free energy of the membrane caused by the presence of PE (phosphatidylethanolamine). It does this in two ways: first by simply diluting the amount of PE in the inner leaf, and second by ordering the tails of the PE to reduce its spontaneous curvature. Incorporating this mechanism into a model free energy for the bilayer, we find that between 50 and 60% of the total cholesterol should be in the inner leaf of human erythrocytes. PMID:25418302

  16. Nuclear relaxation and critical fluctuations in membranes containing cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Harden

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear resonance frequencies in bilayer membranes depend on lipid composition. Our calculations describe the combined effects of composition fluctuations and diffusion on nuclear relaxation near a miscibility critical point. Both tracer and gradient diffusion are included. The calculations involve correlation functions and a correlation length ξ =ξ0T/(T -Tc), where T -Tc is temperature above the critical temperature and ξ0 is a parameter of molecular length. Several correlation functions are examined, each of which is related in some degree to the Ising model correlation function. These correlation functions are used in the calculation of transverse deuterium relaxation rates in magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculations are compared with experiments that report maxima in deuterium and proton nuclear relaxation rates at the critical temperature [Veatch et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 17650 (2007)]. One Ising-model-related correlation function yields a maximum 1/T2 relaxation rate at the critical temperature for both magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculated rates at the critical temperature are close to the experimental rates. The rate maxima involve relatively rapid tracer diffusion in a static composition gradient over distances of up to 10-100 nm.

  17. Differential Dynamic and Structural Behavior of Lipid-Cholesterol Domains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Luis F.; Pino, José A.; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A.; Cuevas, Francisco J.; Sánchez, Susana; Sotomayor, Carlos P.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the cholesterol (Chol) content of biological membranes are known to alter the physicochemical properties of the lipid lamella and consequently the function of membrane-associated enzymes. To characterize these changes, we used steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon-excitation microscopy techniques. The membrane systems were chosen according to the techniques that were used: large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) for cuvette and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) for microscopy measurements; they were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) in mixtures that are well known to form lipid domains. Two fluorescent probes, which insert into different regions of the bilayer, were selected: 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was located at the deep hydrophobic core of the acyl chain regions and 2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene (Laurdan) at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic membrane interface. Our spectroscopy results show that (i) the changes induced by cholesterol in the deep hydrophobic phospholipid acyl chain domain are different from the ones observed in the superficial region of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface, and these changes depend on the state of the lamella and (ii) the incorporation of cholesterol into the lamella induces an increase in the orientation dynamics in the deep region of the phospholipid acyl chains with a corresponding decrease in the orientation at the region close to the polar lipid headgroups. The microscopy data from DOPC/DPPC/Chol GUVs using Laurdan generalized polarization (Laurdan GP) suggest that a high cholesterol content in the bilayer weakens the stability of the water hydrogen bond network and hence the stability of the liquid-ordered phase (Lo). PMID:22768264

  18. Regulation of Membrane Proteins by Dietary Lipids: Effects of Cholesterol and Docosahexaenoic Acid Acyl Chain-Containing Phospholipids on Rhodopsin Stability and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael P.; Mitchell, Drake C.

    2008-01-01

    Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into vesicles consisting of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine or 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine with and without 30 mol % cholesterol. Rhodopsin stability was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal unfolding transition temperature (Tm) of rhodopsin was scan rate-dependent, demonstrating the presence of a rate-limited component of denaturation. The activation energy of this kinetically controlled process (Ea) was determined from DSC thermograms by four separate methods. Both Tm and Ea varied with bilayer composition. Cholesterol increased the Tm both the presence and absence of docosahexaenoic acid acyl chains (DHA). In contrast, cholesterol lowered Ea in the absence of DHA, but raised Ea in the presence of 20 mol % DHA-containing phospholipid. The relative acyl chain packing order was determined from measurements of diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy decay. The Tm for thermal unfolding was inversely related to acyl chain packing order. Rhodopsin kinetic stability (Ea) was reduced in highly ordered or disordered membranes. Maximal kinetic stability was found within the range of acyl chain order found in native bovine rod outer segment disk membranes. The results demonstrate that membrane composition has distinct effects on the thermal versus kinetic stabilities of membrane proteins, and suggests that a balance between membrane constituents with opposite effects on acyl chain packing, such as DHA and cholesterol, may be required for maximum protein stability. PMID:18424497

  19. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to suppress expression of the enzyme CYP46A1. This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates trans-membrane extrusion. A sh-RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to an adeno-associated virus (AAV5) was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the CA3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, inter-ictal EEG events occurred during exploration and non-REM sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. While episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behavior PMID:25847620

  20. Sphingolipid–Cholesterol Rafts Diffuse as Small Entities in the Plasma Membrane of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pralle, A.; Keller, P.; Florin, E.-L.; Simons, K.; Hörber, J.K.H.

    2000-01-01

    To probe the dynamics and size of lipid rafts in the membrane of living cells, the local diffusion of single membrane proteins was measured. A laser trap was used to confine the motion of a bead bound to a raft protein to a small area (diam ≤ 100 nm) and to measure its local diffusion by high resolution single particle tracking. Using protein constructs with identical ectodomains and different membrane regions and vice versa, we demonstrate that this method provides the viscous damping of the membrane domain in the lipid bilayer. When glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) -anchored and transmembrane proteins are raft-associated, their diffusion becomes independent of the type of membrane anchor and is significantly reduced compared with that of nonraft transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol depletion accelerates the diffusion of raft-associated proteins for transmembrane raft proteins to the level of transmembrane nonraft proteins and for GPI-anchored proteins even further. Raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins were never observed to dissociate from the raft within the measurement intervals of up to 10 min. The measurements agree with lipid rafts being cholesterol-stabilized complexes of 26 ± 13 nm in size diffusing as one entity for minutes. PMID:10704449

  1. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages: A Novel Link between Cholesterol Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Välimäki, Elina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation of the arterial wall is a key element in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, yet the factors that trigger and sustain the inflammation remain elusive. Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic caspase-1-activating protein complexes that promote maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin(IL)-1β and IL-18. The most intensively studied inflammasome, NLRP3 inflammasome, is activated by diverse substances, including crystalline and particulate materials. As cholesterol crystals are abundant in atherosclerotic lesions, and IL-1β has been linked to atherogenesis, we explored the possibility that cholesterol crystals promote inflammation by activating the inflammasome pathway. Principal Findings Here we show that human macrophages avidly phagocytose cholesterol crystals and store the ingested cholesterol as cholesteryl esters. Importantly, cholesterol crystals induced dose-dependent secretion of mature IL-1β from human monocytes and macrophages. The cholesterol crystal-induced secretion of IL-1β was caspase-1-dependent, suggesting the involvement of an inflammasome-mediated pathway. Silencing of the NLRP3 receptor, the crucial component in NLRP3 inflammasome, completely abolished crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, thus identifying NLRP3 inflammasome as the cholesterol crystal-responsive element in macrophages. The crystals were shown to induce leakage of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B into the cytoplasm and inhibition of this enzyme reduced cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurred via lysosomal destabilization. Conclusions The cholesterol crystal-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages may represent an important link between cholesterol metabolism and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20668705

  2. Probing the effect of elevated cholesterol on the mechanical properties of membrane-cytoskeleton by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, Arun S.; Muley, Ajit; Chatterjee, Suvro; Jaffar Ali, B. M.

    2010-08-01

    The composition of the cell membrane and the surrounding physiological factors determine the nature and dynamics of membrane-cytoskeleton coupling. Mechanical strength of a cell is mainly derived from such coupling. In this article, we investigate the effect of extra cellular cholesterol on the membrane-cytoskelaton connectivity of single cell endothelium and consequent remodeling of its mechanical properties. Using optical tweezers as a force probe, we have measured membrane stiffness (km), membrane microviscosity (ηeff ) and the two-dimensional shear modulus (G'(f)) as a function of extracellular cholesterol in the range of 0.1mM to 6mM. We find that membrane stiffness and shear modulus are dependent on cholesterol-induced membrane-cytoskeletal organization. Further, by disrupting the membranecytoskeletal connectivity with Cytochalasin D, an actin delpolymerizing molecule, we recover pure membrane behaviour devoid of any cytoskeleton attachment. However, behaviour of ηeff was found to be unaffected by disruption of membrane-cytoskeleton organization. We infer that cholesterol is playing a distinct role in modulating membrane organization and membrane-cytoskeleton connectivity independently. We further discuss implications of our approach in characterizing cellular mechanics.

  3. Ultrafast Diffusion of a Fluorescent Cholesterol Analog in Compartmentalized Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto-Yamaki, Nao; Tanaka, Kenji A K; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Hirosawa, Koichiro M; Miyahara, Manami S H; Kalay, Ziya; Tanaka, Koichiro; Kasai, Rinshi S; Kusumi, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Takahiro K

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane (PM) are poorly understood. The recent development of Bodipy488-conjugated cholesterol molecule (Bdp-Chol) allowed us to study cholesterol behavior in the PM, using single fluorescent-molecule imaging. Surprisingly, in the intact PM, Bdp-Chol diffused at the fastest rate ever found for any molecules in the PM, with a median diffusion coefficient (D) of 3.4 µm2/second, which was ∼10 times greater than that of non-raft phospholipid molecules (0.33 µm2/second), despite Bdp-Chol's probable association with raft domains. Furthermore, Bdp-Chol exhibited no sign of entrapment in time scales longer than 0.5 milliseconds. In the blebbed PM, where actin filaments were largely depleted, Bdp-Chol and Cy3-conjugated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Cy3-DOPE) diffused at comparable Ds (medians = 5.8 and 6.2 µm2/second, respectively), indicating that the actin-based membrane skeleton reduces the D of Bdp-Chol only by a factor of ∼2 from that in the blebbed PM, whereas it reduces the D of Cy3-DOPE by a factor of ∼20. These results are consistent with the previously proposed model, in which the PM is compartmentalized by the actin-based membrane-skeleton fence and its associated transmembrane picket proteins for the macroscopic diffusion of all of the membrane molecules, and suggest that the probability of Bdp-Chol passing through the compartment boundaries, once it enters the boundary, is ∼10× greater than that of Cy3-DOPE. Since the compartment sizes are greater than those of the putative raft domains, we conclude that raft domains coexist with membrane-skeleton-induced compartments and are contained within them. PMID:24506328

  4. Sterol transfer between cyclodextrin and membranes: similar but not identical mechanism to NPC2-mediated cholesterol transfer.

    PubMed

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Storch, Judith

    2011-08-30

    Niemann--Pick C disease is an inherited disorder in which cholesterol and other lipids accumulate in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Recently, cyclodextrins (CD) have been shown to reduce symptoms and extend lifespan in animal models of the disease. In the present studies we examined the mechanism of sterol transport by CD using in vitro model systems and fluorescence spectroscopy and NPC2-deficient fibroblasts. We demonstrate that cholesterol transport from the lysosomal cholesterol-binding protein NPC2 to CD occurs via aqueous diffusional transfer and is very slow; the rate-limiting step appears to be dissociation of cholesterol from NPC2, suggesting that specific interactions between NPC2 and CD do not occur. In contrast, the transfer rate of the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) from CD to phospholipid membranes is very rapid and is directly proportional to the acceptor membrane concentration, as is DHE transfer from membranes to CD. Moreover, CD dramatically increases the rate of sterol transfer between membranes, with rates that can approach those mediated by NPC2. The results suggest that sterol transfer from CD to membranes occurs by a collisional transfer mechanism involving direct interaction of CD with membranes, similar to that shown previously for NPC2. For CD, however, absolute rates are slower compared to NPC2 for a given concentration, and the lysosomal phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) does not stimulate rates of sterol transfer between membranes and CD. As expected from the apparent absence of interaction between CD and NPC2, the addition of CD to NPC2-deficient fibroblasts rapidly rescued the cholesterol accumulation phenotype. Thus, the recent observations of CD efficacy in mouse models of NPC disease are likely the result of CD enhancement of cholesterol transport between membranes, with rapid sterol transfer occurring during CD--membrane interactions. PMID:21740003

  5. LOCALIZATION AND PROTEOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANE MICRODOMAINS IN THE INNER EAR

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul V.; Cheng, Andrew L.; Colby, Candice C.; Liu, Liqian; Patel, Chintan K.; Josephs, Lydia; Duncan, R. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes organize and compartmentalize cell signaling into discrete microdomains, a process that often involves stable, cholesterol-rich platforms that facilitate protein-protein interactions. Polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral cell processes rely on such compartmentalization to maintain proper function. In the cochlea, a variety of highly polarized sensory and non-sensory cells are responsible for the early stages of sound processing in the ear, yet little is known about the mechanisms that traffic and organize signaling complexes within these cells. We sought to determine the prevalence, localization, and protein composition of cholesterol-rich lipid microdomains in the cochlea. Lipid raft components, including the scaffolding protein caveolin and the ganglioside GM1, were found in sensory, neural, and glial cells. Mass spectrometry of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fractions revealed over 600 putative raft proteins associated with subcellular localization, trafficking, and metabolism. Among the DRM constituents were several proteins involved in human forms of deafness including those involved in ion homeostasis, such as the potassium channel KCNQ1, the co-transporter SLC12A2, and gap junction proteins GJA1 and GJB6. The presence of caveolin in the cochlea and the abundance of proteins in cholesterol-rich DRM suggest that lipid microdomains play a significant role in cochlear physiology. PMID:24713161

  6. The membrane attack complex, perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysin superfamily of pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    The membrane attack complex and perforin proteins (MACPFs) and bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are two branches of a large and diverse superfamily of pore-forming proteins that function in immunity and pathogenesis. During pore formation, soluble monomers assemble into large transmembrane pores through conformational transitions that involve extrusion and refolding of two α-helical regions into transmembrane β-hairpins. These transitions entail a dramatic refolding of the protein structure, and the resulting assemblies create large holes in cellular membranes, but they do not use any external source of energy. Structures of the membrane-bound assemblies are required to mechanistically understand and modulate these processes. In this Commentary, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of assembly mechanisms and molecular details of the conformational changes that occur during MACPF and CDC pore formation. PMID:27179071

  7. A Major Fraction of Glycosphingolipids in Model and Cellular Cholesterol-containing Membranes Is Undetectable by Their Binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoud, Radhia; Manis, Adam; Binnington, Beth; Ackerley, Cameron; Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2010-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in cholesterol-enriched cell membrane domains and provide receptors for protein ligands. Lipid-based “aglycone” interactions can influence GSL carbohydrate epitope presentation. To evaluate this relationship, Verotoxin binding its receptor GSL, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), was analyzed in simple GSL/cholesterol, detergent-resistant membrane vesicles by equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. Vesicles separated into two Gb3/cholesterol-containing populations. The lighter, minor fraction (<5% total GSL), bound VT1, VT2, IgG/IgM mAb anti-Gb3, HIVgp120 or Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin. Only IgM anti-Gb3, more tolerant of carbohydrate modification, bound both vesicle fractions. Post-embedding cryo-immuno-EM confirmed these results. This appears to be a general GSL-cholesterol property, because similar receptor-inactive vesicles were separated for other GSL-protein ligand systems; cholera toxin (CTx)-GM1, HIVgp120-galactosyl ceramide/sulfatide. Inclusion of galactosyl or glucosyl ceramide (GalCer and GlcCer) rendered VT1-unreactive Gb3/cholesterol vesicles, VT1-reactive. We found GalCer and GlcCer bind Gb3, suggesting GSL-GSL interaction can counter cholesterol masking of Gb3. The similar separation of Vero cell membrane-derived vesicles into minor “binding,” and major “non-binding” fractions when probed with VT1, CTx, or anti-SSEA4 (a human GSL stem cell marker), demonstrates potential physiological relevance. Cell membrane GSL masking was cholesterol- and actin-dependent. Cholesterol depletion of Vero and HeLa cells enabled differential VT1B subunit labeling of “available” and “cholesterol-masked” plasma membrane Gb3 pools by fluorescence microscopy. Thus, the model GSL/cholesterol vesicle studies predicted two distinct membrane GSL formats, which were demonstrated within the plasma membrane of cultured cells. Cholesterol masking of most cell membrane GSLs may impinge many GSL receptor functions. PMID

  8. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour. PMID:25847620

  9. Effect of cis-(Z)-flupentixol on DPPC membranes in the presence and absence of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Yonar, Dilek; Sunnetcioglu, M Maral

    2016-06-01

    Cis-(Z)-flupentixol dihydrochloride (FLU), a thioxanthene drug, is used in therapy of schizophrenia as well as in anxiolytic and depressive disorders. Since the action mechanism of FLU is not completely understood, the main objective of present study is to provide a detailed evaluation of flupentixol-phospholipid membrane interactions at molecular level. FLU-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interactions in presence and absence of cholesterol (CHO) were investigated as a function of temperature. The changes in upper part of membrane were more pronounced than those in central part of membrane, as indicated by EPR and FTIR. FLU was proposed to incorporate into phospholipid membranes with its triple ring parallel to head group and its chain toward alkyl chain of phospholipids. According to DSC results, the incorporation of 10 mol% FLU into DPPC caused a shoulder in transition peak, suggesting the occurence of a phase separation, and formation of this new phase is still observable in presence of CHO. It is well known that, structure and dynamics of lipids have significant influence on the function of membrane bound proteins, and consecutively their actions. Based upon these, it was proposed that FLU may modify membrane associated receptors and transport proteins, which would form the basis of its clinical efficiency. PMID:27282777

  10. Stepwise visualization of membrane pore formation by suilysin, a bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysin

    PubMed Central

    Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hodel, Adrian W; Farabella, Irene; Pandurangan, Arun P; Jahan, Nasrin; Pires Damaso, Mafalda; Osmanović, Dino; Reboul, Cyril F; Dunstone, Michelle A; Andrew, Peter W; Lonnen, Rana; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attack complex/perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins constitute a major superfamily of pore-forming proteins that act as bacterial virulence factors and effectors in immune defence. Upon binding to the membrane, they convert from the soluble monomeric form to oligomeric, membrane-inserted pores. Using real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy (EM), and atomic structure fitting, we have mapped the structure and assembly pathways of a bacterial CDC in unprecedented detail and accuracy, focussing on suilysin from Streptococcus suis. We show that suilysin assembly is a noncooperative process that is terminated before the protein inserts into the membrane. The resulting ring-shaped pores and kinetically trapped arc-shaped assemblies are all seen to perforate the membrane, as also visible by the ejection of its lipids. Membrane insertion requires a concerted conformational change of the monomeric subunits, with a marked expansion in pore diameter due to large changes in subunit structure and packing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04247.001 PMID:25457051

  11. Specific effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the cholesterol-poor membrane domain in a model membrane.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Hagiwara, Chihiro; Sugibayashi, Ko; Takayama, Kozo

    2008-08-01

    To understand more fully the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on lipid bilayers, we investigated the effects of treatment with fatty acids on the properties of a model membrane. Three kinds of liposomes comprising dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (Ch) were used as the model membrane, and the fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and detergent insolubility were determined. Characterization of the liposomes clarified that DPPC, DPPC/Ch, and DPPC/DOPC/Ch existed as solid-ordered phase (L beta), liquid-ordered phase (l o), and a mixture of l o and liquid-disordered phase (L alpha) membranes at room temperature. Treatment with unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) markedly decreased the fluorescence anisotropy value and detergent insolubility. PUFAs and OA had different effects on the model membranes. In DPPC liposomes, the most prominent change was induced by PUFAs, whereas, in DPPC/Ch and DPPC/DOPC/Ch liposomes, OA had a stronger effect than PUFAs. The effect of PUFAs was strongly affected by the amount of Ch in the membrane, which confirmed a specific effect of PUFAs on the Ch-poor membrane domain. We further explored the effect of fatty acids dispersed in a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion and found that unsaturated fatty acids acted on the membranes even when incorporated in emulsion form. These findings suggest that treatment with PUFAs increases the segregation of ordered and disordered phase domains in membranes. PMID:18670110

  12. Membrane cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and ostreolysin A are obligatory for pore-formation by a MACPF/CDC-like pore-forming protein, pleurotolysin B.

    PubMed

    Ota, Katja; Leonardi, Adrijana; Mikelj, Miha; Skočaj, Matej; Wohlschlager, Therese; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus; Narat, Mojca; Križaj, Igor; Anderluh, Gregor; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus has been reported to produce the hemolytic proteins ostreolysin (OlyA), pleurotolysin A (PlyA) and pleurotolysin B (PlyB). The present study of the native and recombinant proteins dissects out their lipid-binding characteristics and their roles in lipid binding and membrane permeabilization. Using lipid-binding studies, permeabilization of erythrocytes, large unilamellar vesicles of various lipid compositions, and electron microscopy, we show that OlyA, a PlyA homolog, preferentially binds to membranes rich in sterol and sphingomyelin, but it does not permeabilize them. The N-terminally truncated Δ48PlyB corresponds to the mature and active form of native PlyB, and it has a membrane attack complex-perforin (MACPF) domain. Δ48PlyB spontaneously oligomerizes in solution, and binds weakly to various lipid membranes but is not able to perforate them. However, binding of Δ48PlyB to the cholesterol and sphingomyelin membranes, and consequently, their permeabilization is dramatically promoted in the presence of OlyA. On these membranes, Δ48PlyB and OlyA form predominantly 13-meric oligomers. These are rosette-like structures with a thickness of ∼9 nm from the membrane surface, with 19.7 nm and 4.9 nm outer and inner diameters, respectively. When present on opposing vesicle membranes, these oligomers can dimerize and thus promote aggregation of vesicles. Based on the structural and functional characteristics of Δ48PlyB, we suggest that it shares some features with MACPF/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) proteins. OlyA is obligatory for the Δ48PlyB permeabilization of membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. PMID:23806422

  13. The Role of Nutrition and Physical Activity in Cholesterol and Aging.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Luz, Silmara Dos Santos; Aquino, Rita de Cássia

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of several substances with important biologic activities; however, it is common to associate this molecule only with bad outcomes. This article reviews the cholesterol metabolism, its functions in the human body, its pathogenicity, and its elimination. The modifications in biochemical paths of cholesterol in aging are highlighted. Finally, the role of diet, physical activity, and exercise in cholesterol management is discussed. PMID:26195099

  14. N-Nervonoylsphingomyelin (C24:1) Prevents Lateral Heterogeneity in Cholesterol-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maté, Sabina; Busto, Jon V.; García-Arribas, Aritz B.; Sot, Jesús; Vazquez, Romina; Herlax, Vanesa; Wolf, Claude; Bakás, Laura; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore how the nature of the acyl chains of sphingomyelin (SM) influence its lateral distribution in the ternary lipid mixture SM/cholesterol/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), focusing on the importance of the hydrophobic part of the SM molecule for domain formation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed that the presence of a double bond in the 24:1 SM molecule in mixtures with cholesterol (CHO) or in pure bilayers led to a decrease in the molecular packing. Confocal microscopy and AFM showed, at the meso- and nanoscales respectively, that unlike 16:0 and 24:0 SM, 24:1 SM does not induce phase segregation in ternary lipid mixtures with DOPC and CHO. This ternary lipid mixture had a nanomechanical stability intermediate between those displayed by liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, as reported by AFM force spectroscopy measurements, demonstrating that 24:1 SM is able to accommodate both DOPC and CHO, forming a single phase. Confocal experiments on giant unilamellar vesicles made of human, sheep, and rabbit erythrocyte ghosts rich in 24:1 SM and CHO, showed no lateral domain segregation. This study provides insights into how the specific molecular structure of SM affects the lateral behavior and the physical properties of both model and natural membranes. Specifically, the data suggest that unsaturated SM may help to keep membrane lipids in a homogeneous mixture rather than in separate domains. PMID:24940778

  15. N-nervonoylsphingomyelin (C24:1) prevents lateral heterogeneity in cholesterol-containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Maté, Sabina; Busto, Jon V; García-Arribas, Aritz B; Sot, Jesús; Vazquez, Romina; Herlax, Vanesa; Wolf, Claude; Bakás, Laura; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-06-17

    This study was conducted to explore how the nature of the acyl chains of sphingomyelin (SM) influence its lateral distribution in the ternary lipid mixture SM/cholesterol/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), focusing on the importance of the hydrophobic part of the SM molecule for domain formation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed that the presence of a double bond in the 24:1 SM molecule in mixtures with cholesterol (CHO) or in pure bilayers led to a decrease in the molecular packing. Confocal microscopy and AFM showed, at the meso- and nanoscales respectively, that unlike 16:0 and 24:0 SM, 24:1 SM does not induce phase segregation in ternary lipid mixtures with DOPC and CHO. This ternary lipid mixture had a nanomechanical stability intermediate between those displayed by liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, as reported by AFM force spectroscopy measurements, demonstrating that 24:1 SM is able to accommodate both DOPC and CHO, forming a single phase. Confocal experiments on giant unilamellar vesicles made of human, sheep, and rabbit erythrocyte ghosts rich in 24:1 SM and CHO, showed no lateral domain segregation. This study provides insights into how the specific molecular structure of SM affects the lateral behavior and the physical properties of both model and natural membranes. Specifically, the data suggest that unsaturated SM may help to keep membrane lipids in a homogeneous mixture rather than in separate domains. PMID:24940778

  16. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  17. Specific Cellular Incorporation of a Pyrene-Labelled Cholesterol: Lipoprotein-Mediated Delivery toward Ordered Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gaibelet, Gérald; Azalbert, Vincent; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Hamdi, Safouane; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of testing tools for tracing cell trafficking of exogenous cholesterol, two fluorescent derivatives of cholesterol, 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol) and 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol), with distinctive chemico-physical characteristics, have been compared for their cell incorporation properties, using two cell models differently handling cholesterol, with two incorporation routes. In the Caco-2 cell model, the cholesterol probes were delivered in bile salt micelles, as a model of intestinal absorption. The two probes displayed contrasting behaviors for cell uptake characteristics, cell staining, and efflux kinetics. In particular, Pyr-met-Chol cell incorporation involved SR-BI, while that of NBD-Chol appeared purely passive. In the PC-3 cell model, which overexpresses lipoprotein receptors, the cholesterol probes were delivered via the serum components, as a model of systemic delivery. We showed that Pyr-met-Chol-labelled purified LDL or HDL were able to specifically deliver Pyr-met-Chol to the PC-3 cells, while NBD-Chol incorporation was independent of lipoproteins. Observations by fluorescence microscopy evidenced that, while NBD-Chol readily stained the cytosolic lipid droplets, Pyr-met-Chol labelling led to the intense staining of intracellular structures of membranous nature, in agreement with the absence of detectable esterification of Pyr-met-Chol. A 48 h incubation of PC-3 cells with either Pyr-met-Chol-labelled LDL or HDL gave same staining patterns, mainly colocalizing with Lamp1, caveolin-1 and CD63. These data indicated convergent trafficking downwards their respective receptors, LDL-R and SR-BI, toward the cholesterol-rich internal membrane compartments, late endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Interestingly, Pyr-met-Chol staining of these structures exhibited a high excimer fluorescence emission, revealing their ordered membrane environment, and indicating that Pyr-met-Chol behaves as a fair cholesterol tracer

  18. Specific cellular incorporation of a pyrene-labelled cholesterol: lipoprotein-mediated delivery toward ordered intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Gaibelet, Gérald; Allart, Sophie; Tercé, François; Azalbert, Vincent; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Hamdi, Safouane; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of testing tools for tracing cell trafficking of exogenous cholesterol, two fluorescent derivatives of cholesterol, 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol) and 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol), with distinctive chemico-physical characteristics, have been compared for their cell incorporation properties, using two cell models differently handling cholesterol, with two incorporation routes. In the Caco-2 cell model, the cholesterol probes were delivered in bile salt micelles, as a model of intestinal absorption. The two probes displayed contrasting behaviors for cell uptake characteristics, cell staining, and efflux kinetics. In particular, Pyr-met-Chol cell incorporation involved SR-BI, while that of NBD-Chol appeared purely passive. In the PC-3 cell model, which overexpresses lipoprotein receptors, the cholesterol probes were delivered via the serum components, as a model of systemic delivery. We showed that Pyr-met-Chol-labelled purified LDL or HDL were able to specifically deliver Pyr-met-Chol to the PC-3 cells, while NBD-Chol incorporation was independent of lipoproteins. Observations by fluorescence microscopy evidenced that, while NBD-Chol readily stained the cytosolic lipid droplets, Pyr-met-Chol labelling led to the intense staining of intracellular structures of membranous nature, in agreement with the absence of detectable esterification of Pyr-met-Chol. A 48 h incubation of PC-3 cells with either Pyr-met-Chol-labelled LDL or HDL gave same staining patterns, mainly colocalizing with Lamp1, caveolin-1 and CD63. These data indicated convergent trafficking downwards their respective receptors, LDL-R and SR-BI, toward the cholesterol-rich internal membrane compartments, late endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Interestingly, Pyr-met-Chol staining of these structures exhibited a high excimer fluorescence emission, revealing their ordered membrane environment, and indicating that Pyr-met-Chol behaves as a fair cholesterol tracer

  19. (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding sites and (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)ATPase activity in heart of rats fed cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.; Alam, S.Q.

    1986-03-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of cholesterol on the characteristics of ouabain binding sites and (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)ATPase activity in heart. Three groups of male, weanling, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 5 weeks diets containing 0, 1 or 2% cholesterol. Membranes were prepared from deoxycholate-treated heart homogenates by differential centrifugation and assayed for ouabain binding and (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)ATPase activity. Membranes were incubated with (/sup 3/H)-ouabain in the presence of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) and rapidly filtered on glass fiber filters, GF/A. Non-specific binding was measured in the presence of 6 mM non-labeled ouabain. Concentration of (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding sites (B/sub max/) was decreased and the binding affinity was increased in the membranes of rats fed 2% cholesterol. The ouabain-sensitive (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)ATPase activity was 50-75% lower in membranes prepared from heart of rats fed cholesterol. The Mg/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity was not changed by dietary cholesterol. The results suggest that cholesterol feeding decreases the number of (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)ATPase units and allosterically modifies the enzyme.

  20. Effects of β-Cyclodextrin on the Structure of Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jablin, Michael S.; Flasiński, Michał; Dubey, Manish; Ratnaweera, Dilru R.; Broniatowski, Marcin; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja; Majewski, Jarosław

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with mixed bilayers composed of sphingomylein and cholesterol (Chol) above and below the accepted stable complexation ratio (67:33) was investigated. Membranes with the same (symmetric) and different (asymmetric) compositions in their inner and outer leaflets were deposited at surface pressures of 20, 30, and 40 mN/m at the solid-liquid interface. Using neutron reflectometry, membranes of various global molar ratios (defined as the sum of the molar ratios of the inner and outer leaflets), were characterized before and after β-CD was added to the subphase. The structure of bilayers with global molar ratios at or above the stable complexation ratio was unchanged by β-CD, indicating that β-CD is unable to remove sphingomyelin or complexed Chol. However, β-CD removed all uncomplexed Chol from bilayers composed of global molar ratios below the stable complexation ratio. The removal of Chol by β-CD was independent of the initial structure of the membranes as deposited, suggesting that asymmetric membranes homogenize by the exchange of molecules between leaflets. The interaction of β-CD with the aforementioned membranes was independent of the deposition surface pressure except for a symmetric 50:50 membrane deposited at 40 mN/m. The scattering from 50:50 bilayers with higher packing densities (deposited at 40 mN/m) was unaffected by β-CD, suggesting that the removal of Chol can depend on both the composition and packing density of the membrane. PMID:20816059

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages. PMID:26776055

  2. Monitoring of cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer membrane using streptolysin O as a sensing and signal transduction element.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Atsushi; Ikeya, Kana; Aoyagi, Miki; Takatsuji, Ryutaro; Yanagida, Akio; Shibusawa, Yoichi; Sugawara, Masao

    2016-09-01

    Streptolysin O (SLO), which recognizes sterols and forms nanopores in lipid membranes, is proposed as a sensing element for monitoring cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer. The structural requirements of eight sterols for forming nanopores by SLO confirmed that a free 3-OH group in the β-configuration of sterols is required for recognition by SLO in a lipid bilayer. The extent of nanopore formation by SLO in lipid bilayers increased in the order of cholestanol<cholesterol<25-OH cholesterol and in a sterol concentration-dependent manner. The immobilization of liposomes consisting of PC, cholesterol and 4-cholesten-3-one exhibited a linear relationship between calcein permeability and the molar ratio of cholesterol and 4-cholesten-3-one. The SLO-based method was successfully applied for monitoring of cholesterol oxidase-mediated oxidation of cholesterol in a lipid bilayer. The potential of the SLO nanopore-based method for monitoring cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer by other oxidative enzymes is also discussed. PMID:27362457

  3. 21-Methylpyrenyl-cholesterol stably and specifically associates with lipoprotein peripheral hemi-membrane: A new labelling tool

    SciTech Connect

    Gaibelet, Gérald; Tercé, François; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Allart, Sophie; Azalbert, Vincent; Lecompte, Marie-France; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •21-Methylpyrenyl-cholesterol specifically and stably associates to lipoproteins. •It is not esterified by LCAT, and thus reliably labels their peripheral hemi-membrane. •HDL vs. LDL are well distinguishable by various fluorescent labelling characteristics. •LDL peripheral hemi-membrane harbors cholesterol-rich ordered lipid (micro)domains. •Cultured cells can be stained by such labelled lipoproteins-mediated delivery. -- Abstract: Lipoproteins are important biological components. However, they have few convenient fluorescent labelling probes currently reported, and their physiological reliability can be questioned. We compared the association of two fluorescent cholesterol derivatives, 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol) and 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol), to serum lipoproteins and to purified HDL and LDL. Both lipoproteins could be stably labelled by Pyr-met-Chol, but virtually not by NBD-Chol. At variance with NBD-Chol, LCAT did not esterify Pyr-met-Chol. The labelling characteristics of lipoproteins by Pyr-met-Chol were well distinguishable between HDL and LDL, regarding dializability, associated probe amount and labelling kinetics. We took benefit of the pyrene labelling to approach the structural organization of LDL peripheral hemi-membrane, since Pyr-met-Chol-labelled LDL, but not HDL, presented a fluorescence emission of pyrene excimers, indicating that the probe was present in an ordered lipid micro-environment. Since the peripheral membrane of LDL contains more sphingomyelin (SM) than HDL, this excimer formation was consistent with the existence of cholesterol- and SM-enriched lipid microdomains in LDL, as already suggested in model membranes of similar composition and reminiscent to the well-described “lipid rafts” in bilayer membranes. Finally, we showed that Pyr-met-Chol could stain cultured PC-3 cells via lipoprotein-mediated delivery, with a staining pattern well different to that observed with NBD

  4. Restoration of IFNγR Subunit Assembly, IFNγ Signaling and Parasite Clearance in Leishmania donovani Infected Macrophages: Role of Membrane Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Subha; Roy, Koushik; Mukherjee, Sandip; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Roy, Syamal

    2011-01-01

    Despite the presence of significant levels of systemic Interferon gamma (IFNγ), the host protective cytokine, Kala-azar patients display high parasite load with downregulated IFNγ signaling in Leishmania donovani (LD) infected macrophages (LD-MØs); the cause of such aberrant phenomenon is unknown. Here we reveal for the first time the mechanistic basis of impaired IFNγ signaling in parasitized murine macrophages. Our study clearly shows that in LD-MØs IFNγ receptor (IFNγR) expression and their ligand-affinity remained unaltered. The intracellular parasites did not pose any generalized defect in LD-MØs as IL-10 mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation remained unaltered with respect to normal. Previously, we showed that LD-MØs are more fluid than normal MØs due to quenching of membrane cholesterol. The decreased rigidity in LD-MØs was not due to parasite derived lipophosphoglycan (LPG) because purified LPG failed to alter fluidity in normal MØs. IFNγR subunit 1 (IFNγR1) and subunit 2 (IFNγR2) colocalize in raft upon IFNγ stimulation of normal MØs, but this was absent in LD-MØs. Oddly enough, such association of IFNγR1 and IFNγR2 could be restored upon liposomal delivery of cholesterol as evident from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiment and co-immunoprecipitation studies. Furthermore, liposomal cholesterol treatment together with IFNγ allowed reassociation of signaling assembly (phospho-JAK1, JAK2 and STAT1) in LD-MØs, appropriate signaling, and subsequent parasite killing. This effect was cholesterol specific because cholesterol analogue 4-cholestene-3-one failed to restore the response. The presence of cholesterol binding motifs [(L/V)-X1–5-Y-X1–5-(R/K)] in the transmembrane domain of IFNγR1 was also noted. The interaction of peptides representing this motif of IFNγR1 was studied with cholesterol-liposome and analogue-liposome with difference of two orders of magnitude

  5. Enzymatically active ultrathin pepsin membranes.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Schmidt, Thomas; Barth, Monika; Tutus, Murat; Benes, Nieck E; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-05-11

    Enzymatically active proteins enable efficient and specific cleavage reactions of peptide bonds. Covalent coupling of the enzymes permits immobilization, which in turn reduces autolysis-induced deactivation. Ultrathin pepsin membranes were prepared by facile interfacial polycondensation of pepsin and trimesoyl chloride. The pepsin membrane allows for simultaneous enzymatic conversion and selective removal of digestion products. The large water fluxes through the membrane expedite the transport of large molecules through the pepsin layers. The presented method enables the large-scale production of ultrathin, cross-linked, enzymatically active membranes. PMID:25779668

  6. Cholesterol exchange as a function of cholesterol/phospholipid mole ratios.

    PubMed Central

    Poznansky, M J; Czekanski, S

    1979-01-01

    The activation energy (Ea) for cholesterol exchange between dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles and erythrocyte 'ghosts' is measured as a function of molar percentage of cholesterol in both donor and acceptor membranes. A sharp increase in Ea occurs (from 39.9kJ/mol to 84kJ/mol) when the molar percentage of cholesterol decreases from 30 to 20%. PMID:444215

  7. Interdigitation of long-chain sphingomyelin induces coupling of membrane leaflets in a cholesterol dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-02-01

    It has been a long-standing question how the two leaflets in a lipid bilayer modulate each others' physical properties. In this paper, we discuss how this interaction may take place through interdigitation. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to consider asymmetric lipid membrane models whose compositions are based on the lipidomics data determined for exosomes released by PC-3 prostate cancer cells. The simulations show interdigitation to be exceptionally strong for long-chain sphingomyelin (SM) molecules. In asymmetric membranes the amide-linked chain of SM is observed to extend deep into the opposing membrane leaflet. Interestingly, we find that the conformational order of the amide-linked SM chain increases the deeper it penetrates to the opposing leaflet. Analysis of this finding reveals that the amide-linked SM chain interacts favorably with the lipid chains in the opposite leaflet, and that cholesterol modulates the effect of SM interdigitation by influencing the conformational order of lipid hydrocarbon chains in the opposing (cytosolic) leaflet. PMID:26654782

  8. Annexin A1 Tethers Membrane Contact Sites that Mediate ER to Endosome Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; Sanchez-Heras, Elena; Tsapara, Anna; Sobota, Andrzej; Levine, Tim P; Futter, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Membrane contact sites between the ER and multivesicular endosomes/bodies (MVBs) play important roles in endosome positioning and fission and in neurite outgrowth. ER-MVB contacts additionally function in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase downregulation by providing sites where the ER-localized phosphatase, PTP1B, interacts with endocytosed EGFR before the receptor is sorted onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). Here we show that these contacts are tethered by annexin A1 and its Ca(2+)-dependent ligand, S100A11, and form a subpopulation of differentially regulated contact sites between the ER and endocytic organelles. Annexin A1-regulated contacts function in the transfer of ER-derived cholesterol to the MVB when low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in endosomes is low. This sterol traffic depends on interaction between ER-localized VAP and endosomal oxysterol-binding protein ORP1L, and is required for the formation of ILVs within the MVB and thus for the spatial regulation of EGFR signaling. PMID:27270042

  9. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  10. Inward cholesterol gradient of the membrane system in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes involves a dilution effect from parasite-produced lipids

    PubMed Central

    Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Crivat, Georgeta; Ackerman, Hans; Hwang, Jeeseong; Wellems, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection remodels the human erythrocyte with new membrane systems, including a modified host erythrocyte membrane (EM), a parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a tubulovesicular network (TVN), and Maurer's clefts (MC). Here we report on the relative cholesterol contents of these membranes in parasitized normal (HbAA) and hemoglobin S-containing (HbAS, HbAS) erythrocytes. Results from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) experiments with a cholesterol-sensitive fluorophore show that membrane cholesterol levels in parasitized erythrocytes (pRBC) decrease inwardly from the EM, to the MC/TVN, to the PVM, and finally to the parasite membrane (PM). Cholesterol depletion of pRBC by methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment caused a collapse of this gradient. Lipid and cholesterol exchange data suggest that the cholesterol gradient involves a dilution effect from non-sterol lipids produced by the parasite. FLIM signals from the PVM or PM showed little or no difference between parasitized HbAA vs HbS-containing erythrocytes that differed in lipid content, suggesting that malaria parasites may regulate the cholesterol contents of the PVM and PM independently of levels in the host cell membrane. Cholesterol levels may affect raft structures and the membrane trafficking and sorting functions that support Pf survival in HbAA, HbAS and HbSS erythrocytes. PMID:24876390

  11. Targeting and insertion of the cholesterol-binding translocator protein into the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Rone, Malena B; Liu, Jun; Blonder, Josip; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D; Young, Jason C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-07-28

    Translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) protein necessary for cholesterol import and steroid production. We reconstituted the mitochondrial targeting and insertion of TSPO into the OMM to analyze the signals and mechanisms required for this process. Initial studies indicated the formation of a mitochondrial 66 kDa complex through Blue Native-PAGE analysis. The formation of this complex was found to be dependent on the presence of ATP and the cytosolic chaperone Hsp90. Through mutational analysis we identified two areas necessary for TSPO targeting, import, and function: amino acids 103-108 (Schellman motif), which provide the necessary structural orientation for import, and the cholesterol-binding C-terminus required for insertion. Although the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex proteins Tom22 and Tom40 were present in the OMM, the TOM complex did not interact with TSPO. In search of proteins involved in TSPO import, we analyzed complexes known to interact with TSPO by mass spectrometry. Formation of the 66 kDa complex was found to be dependent on an identified protein, Metaxin 1, for formation and TSPO import. The level of import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria was increased following treatment of the cells with cAMP. These findings suggest that the initial targeting of TSPO to mitochondria is dependent upon the presence of cytosolic chaperones interacting with the import receptor Tom70. The C-terminus plays an important role in targeting TSPO to mitochondria, whereas its import into the OMM is dependent upon the presence of the Schellman motif. Final integration of TSPO into the OMM occurs via its interaction with Metaxin 1. Import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria is regulated by cAMP. PMID:19552401

  12. Membrane interactions of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers and encapsulation efficiencies of a RIP II protein.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, V; Winkler, K; Bunjes, V; Neub, A; Schubert, R; Bugarski, B; Leneweit, G

    2008-07-15

    Membrane interactions of liposomes of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers are investigated. These interactions lead to discoidal deformations and regular aggregations and are strongly enhanced by the presence of mistletoe lectin (ML), a RIP II type protein. The encapsulation of ML into liposomal nanocapsules is studied with a systematic variation of the lipid composition to monitor its effect on the physical properties: entrapment, mean size, morphology, and stability. Extrusion of multilamellar vesicles through filters 80 nm pore size was used for the generation of liposomes. The mean sizes of liposomes ranged between 120 and 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distributions. The increase in flow rate with pressure for three dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol (Chol)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid mixtures was linear and allowed to extrapolate to the minimum burst pressure of the liposomal bilayers. From the minimum pressures P(min), the bilayer lysis tensions gamma(l) were determined. The increase in P(min) and gamma(l) with an increasing content of a saturated phosopholipid (DPPC) indicates that DPPC increases the mechanical strength of lipid bilayers. Apparently, DPPC, like cholesterol, leads to a less compressible surface and a more cohesive membrane. After preparation, vesicle solutions were purified by gel permeation chromatography to separate encapsulated ML from free ML in the extravesicular solution. Purified liposomes were then characterized. The content of entrapped and adsorbed ML was measured using ELISA. Repetitive freezing/thawing cycles prior to extrusion significantly increased ML uptake. On the contrary, adsorption was not affected neither by lipid composition, nor concentration and preparation. Differences in experimental encapsulation efficiency only reflect the differences in the mean vesicle sizes of the different samples as is revealed by a comparison to a theoretical estimate. Cryo-transmission electron

  13. 21-Methylpyrenyl-cholesterol stably and specifically associates with lipoprotein peripheral hemi-membrane: a new labelling tool.

    PubMed

    Gaibelet, Gérald; Tercé, François; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Allart, Sophie; Azalbert, Vincent; Lecompte, Marie-France; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Lipoproteins are important biological components. However, they have few convenient fluorescent labelling probes currently reported, and their physiological reliability can be questioned. We compared the association of two fluorescent cholesterol derivatives, 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol) and 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol), to serum lipoproteins and to purified HDL and LDL. Both lipoproteins could be stably labelled by Pyr-met-Chol, but virtually not by NBD-Chol. At variance with NBD-Chol, LCAT did not esterify Pyr-met-Chol. The labelling characteristics of lipoproteins by Pyr-met-Chol were well distinguishable between HDL and LDL, regarding dializability, associated probe amount and labelling kinetics. We took benefit of the pyrene labelling to approach the structural organization of LDL peripheral hemi-membrane, since Pyr-met-Chol-labelled LDL, but not HDL, presented a fluorescence emission of pyrene excimers, indicating that the probe was present in an ordered lipid micro-environment. Since the peripheral membrane of LDL contains more sphingomyelin (SM) than HDL, this excimer formation was consistent with the existence of cholesterol- and SM-enriched lipid microdomains in LDL, as already suggested in model membranes of similar composition and reminiscent to the well-described "lipid rafts" in bilayer membranes. Finally, we showed that Pyr-met-Chol could stain cultured PC-3 cells via lipoprotein-mediated delivery, with a staining pattern well different to that observed with NBD-Chol non-specifically delivered to the cells. PMID:24103760

  14. Cholesterol and synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fratangeli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Lipids may affect synaptic function in at least two ways: by acting as ligands for effector proteins [e.g., phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, diacylglycerol-mediated signaling] or by modifying the physicochemical properties and molecular organization of synaptic membranes. One that acts in the latter manner is cholesterol, an essential structural component of plasma membranes that is largely enriched in the membranes of synapses and synaptic vesicles, in which it may be involved in lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions. Cholesterol is an important constituent of the “membrane rafts” that may play a role in recruiting and organizing the specific proteins of the exocytic pathways. Furthermore, many synaptic proteins bind directly to cholesterol. The regulation of cholesterol and lipid levels may therefore influence the specific interactions and activity of synaptic proteins, and have a strong impact on synaptic functions. PMID:20798824

  15. Cholesterol favors the anchorage of human dystrophin repeats 16 to 21 in membrane at physiological surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline; Paboeuf, Gilles; Nicolas, Aurélie; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Vié, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Dystrophin (DYS) is a filamentous protein that connects the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix via the sarcolemma, conferring resistance to muscular cells. In this study, interactions between the DYS R16-21 fragment and lipids were examined using Langmuir films made of anionic and zwitterionic lipids. The film fluidity was modified by the addition of 15% cholesterol. Whatever the lipid mixture examined, at low surface pressure (20 mN/m) few differences appeared on the protein insertion and the presence of cholesterol did not affect the protein/lipid interactions. At high surface pressure (30 mN/m), the protein insertion was very low and occurred only in zwitterionic films in the liquid-expanded phase. In anionic films, electrostatic interactions prevented the protein insertion outright, and caused accumulation of the protein on the hydrophilic part of the monolayer. Addition of cholesterol to both lipid mixtures drastically modified the protein-lipid interactions: the DYS R16-21 insertion increased and its organization in the monolayer appeared to be more homogeneous. The presence of accessible cholesterol recognition amino-acid consensus sequences in this fragment may enhance the protein/membrane binding at physiological lateral pressure. These results suggest that the anchorage of dystrophin to the membrane in vivo may be stabilized by cholesterol-rich nano-domains in the inner leaflet of sarcolemma. PMID:24440661

  16. Cholesterol regulatory effects and antioxidant activities of protein hydrolysates from zebra blenny (Salaria basilisca) in cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ktari, Naourez; Belguith-Hadriche, Olfa; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Hadj, Aïda; Turki, Mouna; Makni-Ayedi, Fatma; Boudaouara, Tahia; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Boualga, Ahmed; Ben Salah, Riadh; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the hypocholesterolemic effects and antioxidative activities of zebra blenny protein hydrolysates (ZBPHs) in rats fed with a hypercholesterolemic diet. The rats were fed during eight weeks a standard laboratory diet (normal rats), a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) (1%) or a HCD and orally treated with ZBPHs or undigested zebra blenny proteins (UZBPs) (400 mg per kg per day). Results showed that a hypercholesterolemic diet induced the increase of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Treatment with ZBPHs increased the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and decreased significantly the levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C. In addition, ZBPH treatment showed significant normalization of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels as well as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in renal and hepatic tissues. Furthermore, ZBPHs may also exert significant protective effects on liver and kidney functions, evidenced by a marked decrease in the level of serum urea, uric acid, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). Histological studies confirmed that ZBPHs effectively protected the livers and kidneys against hypercholesterolemia-mediated oxidative damage. Therefore, the study strengthens the hypothesis that ZBPHs can be used as novel antioxidants and hypocholesterolemic compounds against hyperlipidemia induced atherosclerosis. PMID:26065510

  17. Multifaceted Activity of Listeriolysin O, the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are a large family of pore-forming toxins that are produced by numerous Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. These toxins are released in the extracellular environment as water-soluble monomers or dimers that bind to cholesterol-rich membranes and assemble into large pore complexes. Depending upon their concentration, the nature of the host cell and membrane (cytoplasmic or intracellular) they target, the CDCs can elicit many different cellular responses. Among the CDCs, listeriolysin O (LLO), which is a major virulence factor of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, is involved in several stages of the intracellular lifecycle of the bacterium and displays unique characteristics. It has long been known that following L. monocytogenes internalization into host cells, LLO disrupts the internalization vacuole, enabling the bacterium to replicate into the host cell cytosol. LLO is then used by cytosolic bacteria to spread from cell to cell, avoiding bacterial exposure to the extracellular environment. Although LLO is continuously produced during the intracellular lifecycle of L. monocytogenes, several processes limit its toxicity to ensure the survival of infected cells. It was previously thought that LLO activity was limited to mediating vacuolar escape during bacterial entry and cell to cell spreading. This concept has been challenged by compelling evidence suggesting that LLO secreted by extracellular L. monocytogenes perforates the host cell plasma membrane, triggering important host cell responses. This chapter provides an overview of the well-established intracellular activity of LLO and the multiple roles attributed to LLO secreted by extracellular L. monocytogenes. PMID:24798012

  18. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins pneumolysin and streptolysin O require binding to red blood cell glycans for hemolytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Shewell, Lucy K.; Harvey, Richard M.; Higgins, Melanie A.; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Chen, Austen Y.; Gillen, Christine M.; James, David B. A.; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J.; Walker, Mark J.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pneumolysin (Ply) is a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Membrane cholesterol is required for the cytolytic activity of this toxin, but it is not clear whether cholesterol is the only cellular receptor. Analysis of Ply binding to a glycan microarray revealed that Ply has lectin activity and binds glycans, including the Lewis histo-blood group antigens. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that Ply has the highest affinity for the sialyl LewisX (sLeX) structure, with a Kd of 1.88 × 10−5 M. Ply hemolytic activity against human RBCs showed dose-dependent inhibition by sLeX. Flow cytometric analysis and Western blots showed that blocking binding of Ply to the sLeX glycolipid on RBCs prevents deposition of the toxin in the membrane. The lectin domain responsible for sLeX binding is in domain 4 of Ply, which contains candidate carbohydrate-binding sites. Mutagenesis of these predicted carbohydrate-binding residues of Ply resulted in a decrease in hemolytic activity and a reduced affinity for sLeX. This study reveals that this archetypal CDC requires interaction with the sLeX glycolipid cellular receptor as an essential step before membrane insertion. A similar analysis conducted on streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes revealed that this CDC also has glycan-binding properties and that hemolytic activity against RBCs can be blocked with the glycan lacto-N-neotetraose by inhibiting binding to the cell surface. Together, these data support the emerging paradigm shift that pore-forming toxins, including CDCs, have cellular receptors other than cholesterol that define target cell tropism. PMID:25422425

  19. The interaction of the polyene antibiotic lucensomycin with cholesterol in erythrocyte membranes and in model systems. III. Characterization of spectral parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, R; Blumberg, W E; Dale, R E; Crifo, C

    1976-01-01

    The variations of optical density and fluorescence of lucensomycin are good indices of the binding of this polyenic antibiotic to membranes. The former parameter reflects more generally the binding to any site present in the membrane, while the latter is more specific for binding to cholesterol. The chromophore of the lucensomycin-cholesterol complex has a relatively long lifetime, is almost immobile in the membrane, and is not accessible to water-soluble fluorescence-quenching agents. The stoichiometry, evaluated fluorometrically, corresponds to about two cholesterol molecules per polyene. In colloidal cholesterol suspensions, the extent of binding as a function of free polyene concentration is described by rectangular hyperbolae, the dissociation constant being, however, dependent on the sterol concentration. In erythrocyte membranes, on the other hand, and even more markedly in model systems containing appropriate solvents, the combination between lucensomycin and the sterol sites is described by sigmoid titration curves, indicative of cooperative effects, and probably due to solvation of cholesterol. PMID:974222

  20. Inhibition of CaV2.3 channels by NK1 receptors is sensitive to membrane cholesterol but insensitive to caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Licon, Yamhilette; Leandro, Deniss; Romero-Mendez, Catalina; Rodriguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Sanchez-Armass, Sergio; Meza, Ulises

    2015-08-01

    Voltage-gated, CaV2.3 calcium channels and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors are both present in nuclei of the central nervous system. When transiently coexpressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, CaV2.3 is primarily inhibited during strong, agonist-dependent activation of NK1 receptors. NK1 receptors localize to plasma membrane rafts, and their modulation by Gq/11 protein-coupled signaling is sensitive to plasma membrane cholesterol. Here, we show that inhibition of CaV2.3 by NK1 receptors is attenuated following methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD)-mediated depletion of membrane cholesterol. By contrast, inhibition of CaV2.3 was unaffected by intracellular diffusion of caveolin-1 scaffolding peptide or by overexpression of caveolin-1. Interestingly, MΒCD treatment had no effect on the macroscopic biophysical properties of CaV2.3, though it significantly decreased whole-cell membrane capacitance. Our data indicate that (1) cholesterol supports at least one component of the NK1 receptor-linked signaling pathway that inhibits CaV2.3 and (2) caveolin-1 is dispensable within this pathway. Our findings suggest that NK1 receptors reside within non-caveolar membrane rafts and that CaV2.3 resides nearby but outside the rafts. Raft-dependent modulation of CaV2.3 could be important in the physiological and pathophysiological processes in which these channels participate, including neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, epilepsy, and chronic pain. PMID:25204428

  1. Effects of cholesterol concentration on the interaction of cytarabine with lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Karami, Leila; Jalili, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design. PMID:25068451

  2. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide in Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Membranes: A Comparative Study of Experiments In Silico and with Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Ménorval, Marie-Amélie; Mir, Lluis M.; Fernández, M. Laura; Reigada, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been known to enhance cell membrane permeability of drugs or DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single-component lipid bilayers predicted the existence of three regimes of action of DMSO: membrane loosening, pore formation and bilayer collapse. We show here that these modes of action are also reproduced in the presence of cholesterol in the bilayer, and we provide a description at the atomic detail of the DMSO-mediated process of pore formation in cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. We also successfully explore the applicability of DMSO to promote plasma membrane permeability to water, calcium ions (Ca2+) and Yo-Pro-1 iodide (Yo-Pro-1) in living cell membranes. The experimental results on cells in culture can be easily explained according to the three expected regimes: in the presence of low doses of DMSO, the membrane of the cells exhibits undulations but no permeability increase can be detected, while at intermediate DMSO concentrations cells are permeabilized to water and calcium but not to larger molecules as Yo-Pro-1. These two behaviors can be associated to the MD-predicted consequences of the effects of the DMSO at low and intermediate DMSO concentrations. At larger DMSO concentrations, permeabilization is larger, as even Yo-Pro-1 can enter the cells as predicted by the DMSO-induced membrane-destructuring effects described in the MD simulations. PMID:22848583

  3. The Position of Aβ22−40 and Aβ1−42 in Anionic Lipid Membranes Containing Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Matthew A.; Alsop, Richard J.; Hauß, Thomas; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptides interact with cell membranes in the human brain and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. An emerging explanation of the molecular mechanism, which results in neurodegeneration, places the cause of neurotoxicity of the amyloid-β peptides on their potentially negative interaction with neuronal membranes. It is known that amyloid-β peptides interact with the membrane, modifying the membrane’s structural and dynamic properties. We present a series of X-ray diffraction experiments on anionic model lipid membranes containing various amounts of cholesterol. These experiments provide experimental evidence for an interaction of both the full length amyloid-β1−42 peptide, and the peptide fragment amyloid-β22−40 with anionic bilayer containing cholesterol. The location of the amyloid-β peptides was determined from these experiments, with the full length peptide embedding into the membrane, and the peptide fragment occupying 2 positions—on the membrane surface and embedded into the membrane core. PMID:26633529

  4. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  5. Evidence for cholesterol-lowering activity by Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 through gut microbiota modulation.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Ilaria; Turroni, Francesca; Piemontese, Antonio; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Milani, Christian; Viappiani, Alice; Prevedini, Gilda; Sanchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; Elviri, Lisa; Franco, Bernini; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, which are known to influence the metabolic abilities of their host. Here, we investigated the capabilities of bifidobacteria to reduce cholesterol levels in synthetic growth media, clearly demonstrating assimilation of this molecule by particular bifidobacterial strains, including Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 (LMG S-28692). The transcriptomic analysis of PRL2010 cells cultivated in the presence of cholesterol revealed a significantly increased transcription level of genes encoding putative transporters and reductases, indicative of specific mechanisms for cholesterol assimilation as well as cholesterol conversion to coprostanol. Cholesterol lowering activity of B. bifidum PRL2010 cells was further evaluated by means of an in vivo murine model, showing that the fecal microbiota of mice is modified toward those bacteria involved in the metabolism of cholesterol. PMID:25863679

  6. Membrane Partitioning of Anionic, Ligand-Coated Nanoparticles Is Accompanied by Ligand Snorkeling, Local Disordering, and Cholesterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gkeka, Paraskevi; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Sarkisov, Lev; Cournia, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) may induce phase transitions, restructuring, stretching, or even complete disruption of the cell membrane. Therefore, NP cytotoxicity assessment requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which these engineered nanostructures interact with the cell membrane. In this study, extensive Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the partitioning of an anionic, ligand-decorated NP in model membranes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) phospholipids and different concentrations of cholesterol. Spontaneous fusion and translocation of the anionic NP is not observed in any of the 10-µs unbiased MD simulations, indicating that longer timescales may be required for such phenomena to occur. This picture is supported by the free energy analysis, revealing a considerable free energy barrier for NP translocation across the lipid bilayer. 5-µs unbiased MD simulations with the NP inserted in the bilayer core reveal that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands of the NP surface rearrange to form optimal contacts with the lipid bilayer, leading to the so-called snorkeling effect. Inside cholesterol-containing bilayers, the NP induces rearrangement of the structure of the lipid bilayer in its vicinity from the liquid-ordered to the liquid phase spanning a distance almost twice its core radius (8–10 nm). Based on the physical insights obtained in this study, we propose a mechanism of cellular anionic NPpartitioning, which requires structural rearrangements of both the NP and the bilayer, and conclude that the translocation of anionic NPs through cholesterol-rich membranes must be accompanied by formation of cholesterol-lean regions in the proximity of NPs. PMID:25474252

  7. Is the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease relationship modified by activity level in older persons?

    PubMed

    Harris, T B; Makuc, D M; Kleinman, J C; Gillum, R F; Curb, J D; Schatzkin, A; Feldman, J J

    1991-08-01

    Although coronary heart disease remains a leading cause of death and disability in old age, the relationship of serum cholesterol level to risk of coronary heart disease in old age is controversial. Data for 2,388 white persons aged 65-74 who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS) were examined to determine the relationship of serum cholesterol level to coronary heart disease incidence and whether activity level would modify this relationship. While there was no overall relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease risk in either men or women, the relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease differed within activity groups. For persons who were more active, serum cholesterol level was associated with a graded increase in risk of coronary heart disease, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.7, 2.3) in those with serum cholesterol level of 4.7-5.1 to 1.7 in those with serum cholesterol level of 6.2 mmol/L or more (95% CI 1.0, 2.7), when compared with those with serum cholesterol level below 4.7. For the least active persons, all levels of cholesterol were associated with a significant inverse relative risk, including cholesterol of 6.2 mmol/L or more (Relative risk = 0.4 (95% CI 0.2, 0.7]. These data suggest that factors such as activity level may modify the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in old age. The serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in more active older persons resembles that seen in younger populations, whereas the association in less active persons is that of serum cholesterol level and risk of cancer or death. The modification of the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association by activity level may have implications for appropriate clinical management as well as appropriate design of research studies of this association. PMID:2071804

  8. Cholesterol 26-hydroxylase activity of hamster liver mitochondria: Isotope ratio analysis using deuterated 26-hydroxycholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, E.; Javitt, N.B. )

    1990-04-01

    Deuterated 26-hydroxycholesterol prepared from diosgenin by modifications of existing methods permitted the determination of mitochondrial cholesterol 26-hydroxylase using endogenous cholesterol as the substrate. Enzyme activity in a group of Syrian hamsters was found to be 10.3 +/- 3.7 pmol.min-1.mg protein-1.

  9. Cholesterol oxidase with high catalytic activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Screening, molecular genetic analysis, expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Doukyu, Noriyuki; Nihei, Shyou

    2015-07-01

    An extracellular cholesterol oxidase producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA157, was isolated by a screening method to detect 6β-hydroperoxycholest-4-en-3-one-forming cholesterol oxidase. On the basis of a putative cholesterol oxidase gene sequence in the genome sequence data of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1, the cholesterol oxidase gene from strain PA157 was cloned. The mature form of the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The overexpressed enzyme formed inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli cells grown at 20 °C and 30 °C. A soluble and active PA157 enzyme was obtained when the recombinant cells were grown at 10 °C. The purified enzyme was stable at pH 5.5 to 10 and was most active at pH 7.5-8.0, showing optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 70 °C. The enzyme retained about 90% of its activity after incubation for 30 min at 70 °C. The enzyme oxidized 3β-hydroxysteroids such as cholesterol, β-cholestanol, and β-sitosterol at high rates. The Km value and Vmax value for the cholesterol were 92.6 μM and 15.9 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. The Vmax value of the enzyme was higher than those of commercially available cholesterol oxidases. This is the first report to characterize a cholesterol oxidase from P. aeruginosa. PMID:25573142

  10. Effects of an Aerobic Activity Program on the Cholesterol Levels of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.; Rimmer, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the effects of a 15-week aerobic activity program on high school students' cholesterol levels. Analysis of control and participating students indicated that there were significant reductions in total cholesterol in the training group. There were no significant differences between groups in high density lipoprotein…

  11. High-frequency, spin-label EPR of nonaxial lipid ordering and motion in cholesterol-containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, B J; Marsh, D

    1998-10-27

    The EPR spectra of spin-labeled lipid chains in fully hydrated bilayer membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine containing 40 mol % of cholesterol have been studied in the liquid-ordered phase at a microwave radiation frequency of 94 GHz. At such high field strengths, the spectra should be optimally sensitive to lateral chain ordering that is expected in the formation of in-plane domains. The high-field EPR spectra from random dispersions of the cholesterol-containing membranes display very little axial averaging of the nitroxide g-tensor anisotropy for lipids spin labeled toward the carboxyl end of the sn-2 chain (down to the 8-C atom). For these positions of labeling, anisotropic 14N-hyperfine splittings are resolved in the gzz and gyy regions of the nonaxial EPR spectra. For positions of labeling further down the lipid chain, toward the terminal methyl group, the axial averaging of the spectral features systematically increases and is complete at the 14-C atom position. Concomitantly, the time-averaged element of the 14N-hyperfine tensor decreases, indicating that the axial rotation at the terminal methyl end of the chains arises from correlated torsional motions about the bonds of the chain backbone, the dynamics of which also give rise to a differential line broadening of the 14N-hyperfine manifolds in the gzz region of the spectrum. These results provide an indication of the way in which lateral ordering of lipid chains in membranes is induced by cholesterol. PMID:9789019

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; DeVane, Russell H.; Shinoda, Wataru; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermaid, Christopher M. Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo; Kashyap, Hemant K.; DeVane, Russell H.; Shinoda, Wataru; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  14. Gangliosides GM1 and GM3 in the Living Cell Membrane Form Clusters Susceptible to Cholesterol Depletion and Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Akikazu; Cheng, Jinglei; Hirakawa, Minako; Furukawa, Koichi; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Presence of microdomains has been postulated in the cell membrane, but two-dimensional distribution of lipid molecules has been difficult to determine in the submicrometer scale. In the present paper, we examined the distribution of gangliosides GM1 and GM3, putative raft molecules in the cell membrane, by immunoelectron microscopy using quick-frozen and freeze-fractured specimens. This method physically immobilized molecules in situ and thus minimized the possibility of artifactual perturbation. By point pattern analysis of immunogold labeling, GM1 was shown to make clusters of <100 nm in diameter in normal mouse fibroblasts. GM1-null fibroblasts were not labeled, but developed a similar clustered pattern when GM1 was administered. On cholesterol depletion or chilling, the clustering of both endogenous and exogenously-loaded GM1 decreased significantly, but the distribution showed marked regional heterogeneity in the cells. GM3 also showed cholesterol-dependent clustering, and although clusters of GM1 and GM3 were found to occasionally coincide, these aggregates were separated in most cases, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous microdomains. The present method enabled to capture the molecular distribution of lipids in the cell membrane, and demonstrated that GM1 and GM3 form clusters that are susceptible to cholesterol depletion and chilling. PMID:17392511

  15. An amperometric bienzymatic cholesterol biosensor based on functionalized graphene modified electrode and its electrocatalytic activity towards total cholesterol determination.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, Revanasiddappa; Shivappa Suresh, Gurukar; Melo, Jose Savio; D'Souza, Stanislaus F; Venkatesha, Thimmappa Venkatarangaiah

    2012-09-15

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and cholesterol esterase (ChEt) have been covalently immobilized onto functionalized graphene (FG) modified graphite electrode. Enzymes modified electrodes were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). FG accelerates the electron transfer from electrode surface to the immobilized ChOx, achieving the direct electrochemistry of ChOx. A well defined redox peak was observed, corresponding to the direct electron transfer of the FAD/FADH(2) of ChOx. The electron transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer rate constant (K(s)) were calculated and their values are found to be 0.31 and 0.78 s(-1), respectively. For the free cholesterol determination, ChOx-FG/Gr electrode exhibits a sensitive response from 50 to 350 μM (R=-0.9972) with a detection limit of 5 μM. For total cholesterol determination, co-immobilization of ChEt and ChOx on modified electrode, i.e. (ChEt/ChOx)-FG/Gr electrode showed linear range from 50 to 300 μM (R=-0.9982) with a detection limit of 15 μM. Some common interferents like glucose, ascorbic acid and uric acid did not cause any interference, due to the use of a low operating potential. The FG/Gr electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). A wide linear response to H(2)O(2) ranging from 0.5 to 7 mM (R=-0.9967) with a sensitivity of 443.25 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) has been obtained. PMID:22967556

  16. The membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1)-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1)-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1)-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25549363

  17. Cholesterol as a co-solvent and a ligand for membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanli; Kenworthy, Anne K; Sanders, Charles R

    2014-01-01

    As of mid 2013 a Medline search on “cholesterol” yielded over 200,000 hits, reflecting the prominence of this lipid in numerous aspects of animal cell biology and physiology under conditions of health and disease. Aberrations in cholesterol homeostasis underlie both a number of rare genetic disorders and contribute to common sporadic and complex disorders including heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. The corresponding author of this review and his lab stumbled only recently into the sprawling area of cholesterol research when they discovered that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds cholesterol, a topic covered by the Hans Neurath Award lecture at the 2013 Protein Society Meeting. Here, we first provide a brief overview of cholesterol-protein interactions and then offer our perspective on how and why binding of cholesterol to APP and its C99 domain (β-CTF) promotes the amyloidogenic pathway, which is closely related to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24155031

  18. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fallmore » in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence

  19. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fall in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence of 20 mol

  20. Pore formation in lipid bilayer membranes made of phosphatidylinositol and oxidized cholesterol followed by means of alternating current.

    PubMed Central

    Gallucci, E; Micelli, S; Monticelli, G

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of porin incorporation into black lipid membranes (BLM) made of phosphatidylinositol (PI) or oxidized cholesterol (Ox Ch) were studied by means of alternating current; the set-up was able to acquire resistance and capacitance simultaneously by means of a mixed double-frequency approach at 1 Hz and 1 KHz, respectively. Conductance was dependent on the interaction between protein-forming pores and lipids. For PI membranes below a porin concentration of 12.54 ng/ml, there was no membrane conductivity, whereas at 200 ng/ml a steady-state value was reached. Different behavior was displayed by Ox Ch membranes, in which a concentration of 12.54 ng/ml was sufficient to reach a steady state. The incorporation kinetics when porin was added after membrane formation were sigmoidal. When porin was present in the medium before membrane formation, the kinetics were sigmoidal for PI membranes but became exponential for Ox Ch membranes. Furthermore, for BLM made of PI, the conductance-versus-porin concentration relationship is sigmoidal, with a Hill coefficient of 5.6 +/- 0.07, which is functional evidence corroborating the six-channel repeating units seen previously. For BLM made of Ox Ch, this relationship followed a binding isotherm curve with a Hill coefficient of 0.934 +/- 0.129. PMID:8842220

  1. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed. PMID:26987951

  2. Lipid raft components cholesterol and sphingomyelin increase H+/OH− permeability of phosphatidylcholine membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gensure, Rebekah H.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2006-01-01

    H+/OH− permeation through lipid bilayers occurs at anomalously high rates and the determinants of proton flux through membranes are poorly understood. Since all life depends on proton gradients, it is important to develop a greater understanding of proton leak phenomena. We have used stopped-flow fluorimetry to probe the influence of two lipid raft components, chol (cholesterol) and SM (sphingomyelin), on H+/OH− and water permeability. Increasing the concentrations of both lipids in POPC (palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine) liposomes decreased water permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that correlated with increased lipid order. Surprisingly, proton flux was increased by increasing the concentration of chol and SM. The chol effect was complex with molar concentrations of 17.9, 33 and 45.7% giving 2.8-fold (P<0.01), 2.2-fold (P<0.001) and 5.1-fold (P<0.001) increases in H+/OH− permeability from a baseline of 2.4×10−2 cm/s. SM at 10 mole% effected a 2.8-fold increase (P<0.01), whereas 20 and 30 mole% enhanced permeability by 3.6-fold (P<0.05) and 4.1-fold respectively (P<0.05). Supplementing membranes containing chol with SM did not enhance H+/OH− permeability. Of interest was the finding that chol addition to soya-bean lipids decreased H+/OH− permeability, consistent with an earlier report [Ira and Krishnamoorthy (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 1484–1488]. We speculate that the presence of proton carriers in crude lipid extracts might contribute to this result. We conclude that (i) chol and SM specifically and independently increase rates of proton permeation in POPC bilayers, (ii) domains enriched in these lipids or domain interfaces may represent regions with high H+/OH− conductivity, (iii) H+/OH− fluxes are not governed by lipid order and (iv) chol can inhibit or promote H+/OH− permeability depending on the total lipid environment. Theories of proton permeation are discussed in the light of these results. PMID

  3. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  4. Effect of antimicrobial peptide on the dynamics of phosphocholine membrane: role of cholesterol and physical state of bilayer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Anunciado, D B; O'Neill, H; Urban, V S

    2015-09-14

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fall in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol% melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Their importance lies in the fact that many membrane processes, including signaling and energy transduction pathways, are controlled to a great extent by the lateral diffusion of lipids in the membrane. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin

  5. Cholesterol-sensitive Modulation of Transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Leyt, Julieta; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Vaerman, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, Shulamit; Weiss, Aryeh M.

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich membrane domains (e.g., lipid rafts) are thought to act as molecular sorting machines, capable of coordinating the organization of signal transduction pathways within limited regions of the plasma membrane and organelles. The significance of these domains in polarized postendocytic sorting is currently not understood. We show that dimeric IgA stimulates the incorporation of its receptor into cholesterol-sensitive detergent-resistant membranes confined to the basolateral surface/basolateral endosomes. A fraction of human transferrin receptor was also found in basolateral detergent-resistant membranes. Disrupting these membrane domains by cholesterol depletion (using methyl-β-cyclodextrin) before ligand-receptor internalization caused depolarization of traffic from endosomes, suggesting that cholesterol in basolateral lipid rafts plays a role in polarized sorting after endocytosis. In contrast, cholesterol depletion performed after ligand internalization stimulated cargo transcytosis. It also stimulated caveolin-1 phosphorylation on tyrosine 14 and the appearance of the activated protein in dimeric IgA-containing apical organelles. We propose that cholesterol depletion stimulates the coupling of transcytotic and caveolin-1 signaling pathways, consequently prompting the membranes to shuttle from endosomes to the plasma membrane. This process may represent a unique compensatory mechanism required to maintain cholesterol balance on the cell surface of polarized epithelia. PMID:17392516

  6. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-10-27

    Cell-membrane lipid composition can greatly influence biophysical properties of cell membranes, affecting various cellular functions. We previously showed that lipid synthesis becomes altered in the membranes of resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR); they form a more rigid, hydrophobic lipid monolayer than do sensitive cell membranes (MCF-7). These changes in membrane lipids of resistant cells, attributed to epigenetic aberration, significantly affected drug transport and endocytic function, thus impacting the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The present study's objective was to determine the effects of the epigenetic drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), delivered in sustained-release nanogels (DAC-NGs), on the composition and biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells. Resistant and sensitive cells were treated with DAC in solution (DAC-sol) or DAC-NGs, and cell-membrane lipids were isolated and analyzed for lipid composition and biophysical properties. In resistant cells, we found increased formation of cholesterol-sphingomyelin (CHOL-SM) rafts with culturing time, whereas DAC treatment reduced their formation. In general, the effect of DAC-NGs was greater in changing the lipid composition than with DAC-sol. DAC treatment also caused a rise in levels of certain phospholipids and neutral lipids known to increase membrane fluidity, while reducing the levels of certain lipids known to increase membrane rigidity. Isotherm data showed increased lipid membrane fluidity following DAC treatment, attributed to decrease levels of CHOL-SM rafts (lamellar beta [Lβ] structures or ordered gel) and a corresponding increase in lipids that form lamellar alpha-structures (Lα, liquid crystalline phase). Sensitive cells showed marginal or insignificant changes in lipid profile following DAC-treatment, suggesting that epigenetic changes affecting lipid biosynthesis are more specific to resistant cells. Since membrane fluidity plays a major role in drug transport

  7. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  8. Importance of cholesterol in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kymry T.; Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The conformation and function of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can be affected by manipulating membrane cholesterol, yet there is no agreement as to the impact of cholesterol on the activity of lipid-raft localized DATs compared to non-raft DATs. Given the paucity of information regarding the impact of cholesterol on substrate efflux by the DAT, this study explores its influence on the kinetics of DAT-mediated DA efflux induced by dextroamphetamine, as measured by rotating disk electrode voltammetry (RDEV). Treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD), which effectively depletes total membrane cholesterol- uniformly affecting cholesterol-DAT interactions in both raft and non-raft membrane domains- reduced both DA uptake and efflux rate. In contrast, disruption of raft localized DAT by cholesterol chelation with nystatin had no effect, arguing against a vital role for raft-localized DAT in substrate uptake or efflux. Supra-normal repletion of cholesterol depleted cells with the analogue desmosterol, a non-raft promoting sterol, was as effective as cholesterol itself in restoring transport rates. Further studies with Zn2+ and the conformationally-biased W84L DAT mutant supported the idea that cholesterol is important for maintaining the outward-facing DAT with normal rates of conformational interconversions. Collectively, these results point to a role for direct cholesterol-DAT interactions in regulating DAT function. PMID:22957537

  9. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  10. Cholesterol in the rod outer segment: A complex role in a "simple" system.

    PubMed

    Albert, Arlene; Alexander, Desiree; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    The rod outer segment (ROS) of retinal photoreceptor cells consists of disk membranes surrounded by the plasma membrane. It is a relatively uncomplicated system in which to investigate cholesterol distribution and its functional consequences in biologically relevant membranes. The light sensitive protein, rhodopsin is the major protein in both membranes, but the lipid compositions are significantly different in the disk and plasma membranes. Cholesterol is high in the ROS plasma membrane. Disk membranes are synthesized at the base of the ROS and are also high in cholesterol. However, cholesterol is rapidly depleted as the disks are apically displaced. During this apical displacement the disk phospholipid fatty acyl chains become progressively more unsaturated, which creates an environment unfavorable to cholesterol. Membrane cholesterol has functional consequences. The high cholesterol found in the plasma membrane and in newly synthesized disks inhibits the activation of rhodopsin. As disks are apically displaced and cholesterol is depleted rhodopsin becomes more responsive to light. This effect of cholesterol on rhodopsin activation has been shown in both native and reconstituted membranes. The modulation of activity can be at least partially explained by the effect of cholesterol on bulk lipid properties. Cholesterol decreases the partial free volume of the hydrocarbon region of the bilayer and thereby inhibits rhodopsin conformational changes required for activation. However, cholesterol binds to rhodopsin and may directly affect the protein also. Furthermore, cholesterol stabilizes rhodopsin to thermal denaturation. The membrane must provide an environment that allows rhodopsin conformational changes required for activation while also stabilizing the protein to thermal denaturation. Cholesterol thus plays a complex role in modulating the activity and stability of rhodopsin, which have implications for other G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:27216754

  11. Role of membrane cholesterol in spontaneous exocytosis at frog neuromuscular synapses: reactive oxygen species–calcium interplay

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey M; Yakovleva, Anastasiya A; Zefirov, Andrey L

    2014-01-01

    Using electrophysiological and optical techniques, we studied the mechanisms by which cholesterol depletion stimulates spontaneous transmitter release by exocytosis at the frog neuromuscular junction. We found that methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD, 10 mm)-mediated exhaustion of cholesterol resulted in the enhancement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. An increase in ROS levels occurred both extra- and intracellularly, and it was associated with lipid peroxidation in synaptic regions. Cholesterol depletion provoked a rise in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which was diminished by NAC and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channel blockers (ruthenium red and capsazepine). By contrast, the MCD-induced rise in [Ca2+]i remained unaffected if Ca2+ release from endoplasmic stores was blocked by TMB8 (8-(diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride). The effects of cholesterol depletion on spontaneous release and exocytosis were significantly reduced by the antioxidant, intracellular Ca2+ chelation with BAPTA-AM and blockers of TRPV channels. Bath application of the calcineurin antagonist cyclosporine A blocked MCD-induced enhancement of spontaneous release/exocytosis, whereas okadaic acid, an inhibitor of phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, had no effect. Thus, our findings indicate that enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis induced by cholesterol depletion may depend on ROS generation, leading to an influx of Ca2+ via TRPV channels and, subsequently, activation of calcineurin. PMID:25326454

  12. Cholesterol-lowering activity of the major polyphenols in grape seed.

    PubMed

    Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Mäkynen, Kittana; Thilawech, Thavaree; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    The major polyphenols in grape seed have been shown to have beneficial health effects in the prevention of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. In this present study, we investigated the cholesterol-lowering activity of three major polyphenolic compounds found in grape seed. The results showed that gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin significantly inhibited pancreatic cholesterol esterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, they bound to taurocholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid at levels ranging from 38.6% to 28.2%. At the concentration of 0.2 mg/mL, gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin reduced the formation of cholesterol micelles 27.26 ± 2.17%, 11.88 ± 0.75%, and 19.49 ± 3.71%, respectively. These findings clearly demonstrate that three major polyphenolic compounds present in a particular grape seed have cholesterol-lowering activity by inhibiting pancreatic cholesterol esterase, binding of bile acids, and reducing solubility of cholesterol in micelles which may result in delayed cholesterol absorption. PMID:21694670

  13. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  14. Alterations in the activities of hepatic plasma-membrane and microsomal enzymes during liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Deliconstantinos, G; Ramantanis, G

    1983-01-01

    A marked increase in the activities of rat liver plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and microsomal Ca2+-stimulated ATPase was observed 18h after partial hepatectomy. Lipid analyses for both membrane preparations reveal that in partially hepatectomized rats the cholesterol and sphingomyelin content are decreased with a subsequent decrease in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio compared with those of sham-operated animals. Changes in the allosteric properties of plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase by F- (as reflected by changes in the Hill coefficient) indicated a fluidization of the lipid bilayer of both membrane preparations in 18 h-regenerating liver. The amphipathic dodecyl glucoside incorporated into the hepatic plasma membranes evoked a marked increase in the (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities. The lack of effect of the glucoside on the Lubrol-PX-solubilized 5'-nucleotidase indicates that changes in the activities of the membrane-bound enzymes caused by the glucoside are due to modulation of the membrane fluidity. Dodecyl glucoside appears to increase the membrane fluidity, evaluated through changes in the Hill coefficient for plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase. The biological significance of these data is discussed in terms of the differences and changes in the interaction of membrane-bound enzymes with membrane lipids during liver regeneration. PMID:6309144

  15. On the physiological/pathological link between Aβ peptide, cholesterol, calcium ions and membrane deformation: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Pannuzzo, Martina

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cholesterol, asymmetrically (at physiological condition) or symmetrically (hallmark of aging) distributed in membrane, and β amyloid peptides is investigated by a computational approach. The drawn overall picture, starting from the very appearance of β amyloid peptides and going through their self-assembling into potentially toxic oligomeric species, reinforces some of the experimental and theoretical shots recently reported in literature, while new important molecular hints on the physiological role played by the β amyloid peptide are proposed. The so dreaded formation of amyloid pores selective for the passage of calcium ions could in fact explain their physiological concomitant recruitment in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27003127

  16. Determination of membrane cholesterol partition coefficient using a lipid vesicle-cyclodextrin binary system: effect of phospholipid acyl chain unsaturation and headgroup composition.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Litman, Burton J

    2002-01-01

    Lateral domain or raft formation in biological membranes is often discussed in terms of cholesterol-lipid interactions. Preferential interactions of cholesterol with lipids, varying in headgroup and acyl chain unsaturation, were studied by measuring the partition coefficient for cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles. A novel vesicle-cyclodextrin system was used, which precludes the possibility of cross-contamination between donor-acceptor vesicles or the need to modify one of the vesicle populations. Variation in phospholipid headgroup resulted in cholesterol partitioning in the order of sphingomyelin (SM) > phosphatidylserine > phosphatidylcholine (PC) > phosphatidylenthanolamine (PE), spanning a range of partition DeltaG of -1181 cal/mol to +683 cal/mol for SM and PE, respectively. Among the acyl chains examined, the order of cholesterol partitioning was 18:0(stearic acid),18:1n-9(oleic acid) PC > di18:1n-9PC > di18:1n-12(petroselenic acid) PC > di18:2n-6(linoleic acid) PC > 16:0(palmitic acid),22:6n-3(DHA) PC > di18:3n-3(alpha-linolenic acid) PC > di22:6n-3PC with a range in partition DeltaG of 913 cal/mol. Our results suggest that the large differences observed in cholesterol-lipid interactions contribute to the forces responsible for lateral domain formation in plasma membranes. These differences may also be responsible for the heterogeneous cholesterol distribution in cellular membranes, where cholesterol is highly enriched in plasma membranes and relatively depleted in intracellular membranes. PMID:12496107

  17. What's so special about cholesterol?

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Zuckermann, Martin J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol (or other higher sterols such as ergosterol and phytosterols) is universally present in large amounts (20-40 mol%) in eukaryotic plasma membranes, whereas it is universally absent in the membranes of prokaryotes. Cholesterol has a unique ability to increase lipid order in fluid membranes while maintaining fluidity and diffusion rates. Cholesterol imparts low permeability barriers to lipid membranes and provides for large mechanical coherence. A short topical review is given of these special properties of cholesterol in relation to the structure of membranes, with results drawn from a variety of theoretical and experimental studies. Particular focus is put on cholesterol's ability to promote a special membrane phase, the liquid-ordered phase, which is unique for cholesterol (and other higher sterols like ergosterol) and absent in membranes containing the cholesterol precursor lanosterol. Cholesterol's role in the formation of special membrane domains and so-called rafts is discussed. PMID:15726825

  18. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Kyung; Jang, Seok; Baek, Eun Hye; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Kyung Soon; Shin, Hea Soon; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Jin Eung; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20~30 years old) to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108~109 CFU/ml) were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet) every day for 2 weeks. Results B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p < 0.05), and slightly increased serum HDL. B. longum SPM1207 also increased fecal LAB levels and fecal water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Conclusion Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation. PMID:19515264

  19. RNAi screen of Salmonella invasion shows role of COPI in membrane targeting of cholesterol and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dilling, Sabrina; Vonaesch, Pascale; Sacher, Raphael; Snijder, Berend; Schlumberger, Markus; Rout, Samuel; Stark, Manuel; Mering, Christian von; Pelkmans, Lucas; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    The pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of diarrhea and invades the gut tissue by injecting a cocktail of virulence factors into epithelial cells, triggering actin rearrangements, membrane ruffling and pathogen entry. One of these factors is SopE, a G-nucleotide exchange factor for the host cellular Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. How SopE mediates cellular invasion is incompletely understood. Using genome-scale RNAi screening we identified 72 known and novel host cell proteins affecting SopE-mediated entry. Follow-up assays assigned these ‘hits' to particular steps of the invasion process; i.e., binding, effector injection, membrane ruffling, membrane closure and maturation of the Salmonella-containing vacuole. Depletion of the COPI complex revealed a unique effect on virulence factor injection and membrane ruffling. Both effects are attributable to mislocalization of cholesterol, sphingolipids, Rac1 and Cdc42 away from the plasma membrane into a large intracellular compartment. Equivalent results were obtained with the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, COPI-facilitated maintenance of lipids may represent a novel, unifying mechanism essential for a wide range of pathogens, offering opportunities for designing new drugs. PMID:21407211

  20. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  1. Effect of cyclodextrin-loaded cholesterol conjugates on plasma membrane viability of Piau swine breed frozen/thawed spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Pinho, R O; Lima, D M A; Shiomi, H H; Siqueira, J B; Silveira, C O; Faria, V R; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F; Guimarães, J D

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclodextrin-loaded cholesterol conjugates addition to freezing extenders on plasma membrane viability of frozen-thawed spermatozoa of the Piau swine breed. Twenty semen samples were used from five males. The freezing extender was based on lactose-egg yolk extender, added to 2% glycerol, 3% dimethylacetamide. The addition of cyclodextrin-loaded cholesterol conjugates was performed after centrifugation, when semen was diluted with the cooling extender. Four groups were subjected to the following treatment: without addition (group 1); 1.5 mg of cyclodextrin-loaded cholesterol/120 × 10(6) sperm (group 2); 1.5 mg of cyclodextrin-loaded cholestanol/120 × 10(6) sperm (group 3); 1.5 mg of cyclodextrin-loaded desmosterol/120 × 10(6) sperm (group 4). To check post-thawing sperm quality sperm motility and sperm morphology evaluation were used. Additionally, to check sperm viability the hypoosmotic swelling test, supravital staining, and fluorescent assay were used. The mean values recorded for total sperm motility of semen immediately after thawing were 54.5 ± 5.8, 55.5 ± 5.3, 53.7 ± 6.7, and 52.5 ± 6.6% respectively for groups one to four, without difference between themselves (p > 0.05). Regarding fluorescent assay the results were 28.3 ± 13.2, 26.9 ± 12.2, 22.2 ± 11.4, and 32.0 ± 15.3% respectively for groups one to four, also without difference between groups (p > 0,05). Similarly, complementary tests for evaluating the integrity and functionality of the plasma membrane showed no difference between treatments (p > 0.05). In conclusion, use of cyclodextrin-loaded cholesterol conjugates added to the plasma membrane of sperm did not demonstrate any additive effect on increasing and/or maintaining sperm motility. PMID:27393245

  2. Area per Lipid and Cholesterol Interactions in Membranes from Separated Local-Field 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive. PMID:25418296

  3. Cholesterol modulates Orai1 channel function.

    PubMed

    Derler, Isabella; Jardin, Isaac; Stathopulos, Peter B; Muik, Martin; Fahrner, Marc; Zayats, Vasilina; Pandey, Saurabh K; Poteser, Michael; Lackner, Barbara; Absolonova, Marketa; Schindl, Rainer; Groschner, Klaus; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ikura, Mitsu; Romanin, Christoph

    2016-01-26

    STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) and Orai proteins are the essential components of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. We focused on the role of cholesterol in the regulation of STIM1-mediated Orai1 currents. Chemically induced cholesterol depletion enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and Orai1 currents. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion in mucosal-type mast cells augmented endogenous CRAC currents, which were associated with increased degranulation, a process that requires calcium influx. Single point mutations in the Orai1 amino terminus that would be expected to abolish cholesterol binding enhanced SOCE to a similar extent as did cholesterol depletion. The increase in Orai1 activity in cells expressing these cholesterol-binding-deficient mutants occurred without affecting the amount in the plasma membrane or the coupling of STIM1 to Orai1. We detected cholesterol binding to an Orai1 amino-terminal fragment in vitro and to full-length Orai1 in cells. Thus, our data showed that Orai1 senses the amount of cholesterol in the plasma membrane and that the interaction of Orai1 with cholesterol inhibits its activity, thereby limiting SOCE. PMID:26814231

  4. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  5. Dietary cholesterol promotes AOM-induced colorectal cancer through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qianming; Wang, Qing; Fan, Huimin; Wang, Jianing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol-enriched diet induces chronic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems including colorectal cancer. Inflammasomes are thought to mediate intestinal homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, in vitro and in vivo information regarding the inflammation-inducing and tumor-promoting effect of cholesterol is lacking. Here we show that the cholesterol promoted colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. High cholesterol diet (HCD) significantly increased inflammatory responses and tumor burden. Cholesterol crystals, detected in the colon of mice fed with HCD, also promoted NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages, as indicated by elevated expression of cleaved caspase-1, formation of NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1 complex assembly, and higher IL-1β secretion. Importantly, cholesterol was found to inhibit the activity of AMPKα in macrophages, leading to a significant production of mitochondrial ROS, which in turn activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, crystal uptake and cathepsin B accounted for cholesterol crystal-induced inactivation of AMPKα. Finally, HCD-induced increase in IL-1β secretion, macrophage infiltration and tumor burden was diminished by the deletion of NLRP3 in AOM-treated mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the pro-inflammatory and cancer-promoting effects of HCD are mediated by the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Our study extended our knowledge on how dietary choices can influence processes involved in chronic inflammatory disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:26921636

  6. A pore-forming toxin requires a specific residue for its activity in membranes with particular physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-04-24

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane. PMID:25759390

  7. A Pore-Forming Toxin Requires a Specific Residue for Its Activity in Membranes with Particular Physicochemical Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane. PMID:25759390

  8. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  9. HIV gp41-Mediated Membrane Fusion Occurs at Edges of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Simmons, James A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts in plasma membranes have emerged as possible platforms for entry of HIV and other viruses into cells. However, how lipid phase heterogeneity contributes to viral entry is little known due to the fine-grained and still poorly understood complexity of biological membranes. We used model systems mimicking HIV envelopes and T-cell membranes and showed that raft-like (Lo phase) lipid domains are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane targeting and fusion. Interestingly, membrane binding and fusion was low in homogeneous Ld and Lo phase membranes, indicating that lipid phase heterogeneity is essential. The HIV fusion peptide preferentially targeted to Lo/Ld boundary regions and promoted full fusion at the interface between ordered and disordered lipids. Ld phase vesicles proceeded only to hemifusion. Thus, we propose that the edges, but not the areas of raft-like ordered lipid domains are vital for HIV entry and membrane fusion. PMID:25915200

  10. Colorimetric cholesterol sensor based on peroxidase like activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Haider, Waqar; Raza, Yousuf; Marty, Jean Louis

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive and selective colorimetric method based on the incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was shown to posses synergistic peroxidase like activity for the detection of cholesterol. The proposed nanocomposite catalyzed the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce a green colored product which can be monitored at 405 nm. H2O2 is the oxidative product of cholesterol in the presence of cholesterol oxidase. Therefore, the oxidation of cholesterol can be quantitatively related to the colorimetric response by combining these two reactions. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the colorimetric response was proportional to the concentration of cholesterol in the range of 0.5-500 nmol/L, with a detection limit of 0.2 nmol/L. The applicability of the proposed assays was demonstrated for the determination of cholesterol in milk powder samples with good recovery results. PMID:26078143

  11. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  12. Membrane Fluidity and Lipid Order in Ternary Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Using a New Bodipy-Cholesterol Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Ariola, Florly S.; Li, Zaiguo; Cornejo, Christine; Bittman, Robert; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich, liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are believed to be biologically relevant, and yet detailed knowledge about them, especially in live cells under physiological conditions, is elusive. Although these domains have been observed in model membranes, understanding cholesterol-lipid interactions at the molecular level, under controlled lipid mixing, remains a challenge. Further, although there are a number of fluorescent lipid analogs that partition into liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, the number of such analogs with a high affinity for biologically relevant Lo domains is limited. Here, we use a new Bodipy-labeled cholesterol (Bdp-Chol) derivative to investigate membrane fluidity, lipid order, and partitioning in various lipid phases in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a model system. GUVs were prepared from mixtures of various molar fractions of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and egg sphingomyelin. The Ld phase domains were also labeled with 1,1′-didodecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine (DiI-C12) for comparison. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy imaging of Bdp-Chol are sensitive to lipid phase domains in GUVs. The fluorescence lifetime of Bdp-Chol in liquid-disordered, single-phase GUVs is 5.50 ± 0.08 ns, compared with 4.1 ± 0.4 ns in the presence of DiI-C12. The observed reduction of fluorescence lifetime is attributed to Förster resonance energy transfer between Bdp-Chol (a donor) and DiI-C12 (an acceptor) with an estimated efficiency of 0.25 and donor-acceptor distance of 2.6 ± 0.2 nm. These results also indicate preferential partitioning (Kp = 1.88) of Bdp-Chol into the Lo phase. One-photon, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of Bdp-Chol decays as a triexponential in the lipid bilayer with an average rotational diffusion coefficient, lipid order parameter, and membrane fluidity that are sensitive to phase domains. The translational diffusion coefficient of Bdp-Chol, as measured using fluorescence

  13. Reduced cholesterol levels impair Smoothened activation in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blassberg, Robert; Macrae, James I.; Briscoe, James; Jacob, John

    2016-01-01

    Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder that results from mutations in the gene encoding the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). Impaired DHCR7 function is associated with a spectrum of congenital malformations, intellectual impairment, epileptiform activity and autism spectrum disorder. Biochemically, there is a deficit in cholesterol and an accumulation of its metabolic precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) in developing tissues. Morphological abnormalities in SLOS resemble those seen in congenital Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-deficient conditions, leading to the proposal that the pathogenesis of SLOS is mediated by aberrant SHH signalling. SHH signalling is transduced through the transmembrane protein Smoothened (SMO), which localizes to the primary cilium of a cell on activation and is both positively and negatively regulated by sterol molecules derived from cholesterol biosynthesis. One proposed mechanism of SLOS involves SMO dysregulation by altered sterol levels, but the salient sterol species has not been identified. Here, we clarify the relationship between disrupted cholesterol metabolism and reduced SHH signalling in SLOS by modelling the disorder in vitro. Our results indicate that a deficit in cholesterol, as opposed to an accumulation of 7DHC, impairs SMO activation and its localization to the primary cilium. PMID:26685159

  14. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  15. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  16. Cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity of bioactives from leaves of Mangifera indica L

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, G. M.; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Dethe, Shekhar M.; Sangli, Gopala K.; Abhilash, K.; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the earlier studies, methanolic extract of Mangifera indica L leaf was exhibited hypocholesterol activity. However, the bioactive compounds responsible for the same are not reported so far. Objective: To isolate the bioactive compounds with hypocholesterol activity from the leaf extract using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay which can be used for the standardization of extract. Materials and Methods: The leaf methanolic extract of M. indica (Sindoora variety) was partitioned with ethyl acetate and chromatographed on silica gel to yield twelve fractions and the activity was monitored by using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. Active fractions were re-chromatographed to yield individual compounds. Results and Discussion: A major compound mangiferin present in the extract was screened along with other varieties of mango leaves for cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. However, the result indicates that compounds other than mangiferin may be active in the extract. Invitro pancreatic cholesterol esterase inhibition assay was used for bioactivity guided fractionation (BAGF) to yield bioactive compound for standardization of extract. Bioactivity guided fractionation afford the active fraction containing 3b-taraxerol with an IC50 value of 0.86μg/ml. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that M. indica methanol extract of leaf have significant hypocholesterol activity which is standardized with 3b-taraxerol, a standardized extract for hypocholesterol activity resulted in development of dietary supplement from leaves of Mangifera indica. PMID:26692750

  17. Pantethine Alters Lipid Composition and Cholesterol Content of Membrane Rafts, With Down-Regulation of CXCL12-Induced T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    van Gijsel-Bonnello, Manuel; Acar, Niyazi; Molino, Yves; Bretillon, Lionel; Khrestchatisky, Michel; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2015-10-01

    Pantethine, a natural low-molecular-weight thiol, shows a broad activity in a large range of essential cellular pathways. It has been long known as a hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic agent. We have recently shown that it exerts a neuroprotective action in mouse models of cerebral malaria and Parkinson's disease through multiple mechanisms. In the present study, we looked at its effects on membrane lipid rafts that serve as platforms for molecules engaged in cell activity, therefore providing a target against inappropriate cell response leading to a chronic inflammation. We found that pantethine-treated cells showed a significant change in raft fatty acid composition and cholesterol content, with ultimate downregulation of cell adhesion, CXCL12-driven chemotaxis, and transendothelial migration of various T cell types, including human Jurkat cell line and circulating effector T cells. The mechanisms involved include the alteration of the following: (i) CXCL12 binding to its target cells; (ii) membrane dynamics of CXCR4 and CXCR7, the two CXCL12 receptors; and (iii) cell redox status, a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. In addition, we considered the linker for activation of T cells molecule to show that pantethine effects were associated with the displacement from the rafts of the acylated signaling molecules which had their palmitoylation level reduced.. In conclusion, the results presented here, together with previously published findings, indicate that due to its pleiotropic action, pantethine can downregulate the multifaceted process leading to pathogenic T cell activation and migration. PMID:25728249

  18. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site. PMID:27056331

  19. HDL derived from the different phases of conjugated diene formation reduces membrane fluidity and contributes to a decrease in free cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Girona, Josefa; LaVille, Agnes E; Solà, Rosa; Motta, Claude; Masana, Lluís

    2003-09-22

    Oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) has been reported to reduce free cholesterol efflux from cells. In this study we investigate the effect of different stages of ox-HDL on macrophage membrane fluidity and its effect on free cholesterol efflux from macrophages as a cell function influenced by ox-HDL. HDL was oxidized by means of conjugated diene production using copper as a prooxidant. Fluidity of HDL and human THP-1 macrophage membranes was evaluated by changes in fluorescence anisotropy (r) by DPH probe where lower (r) values give higher fluidity. We found that ox-HDL derived from the propagation phase (PP-HDL) and the decomposition phase (DP-HDL) became less fluid ((r): 0.263+/-0.001, 0.279+/-0.002, respectively) than HDL from the lag phase (LP-HDL) and native HDL (nat-HDL) ((r): 0.206+/-0.001) (P<0.05). Macrophages incubated with PP-HDL and DP-HDL had less fluid membranes ((r): 0.231+/-0.001, 0.243+/-0.002, respectively) than those incubated with LP-HDL and nat-HDL ((r): 0.223+/-0.001) (P<0.05). Consequently, fluidity was reduced not only in ox-HDL but also in the cell membranes exposed to ox-HDL. A significant negative correlation was observed between macrophage membrane fluorescence anisotropy (r) and free cholesterol efflux from these cells (-0.876; P<0.05). Thus, lower membrane fluidity was associated with lower free cholesterol efflux from cells. In conclusion, the increase in the HDL oxidation process leads to a lost of macrophage membrane fluidity that could contribute to an explanation of the reduction of free cholesterol efflux from cells by ox-HDL. PMID:14499733

  20. Cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin is associated with down-regulation on genes of sterol transporters involved in cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yin Tong; Chen, Jingnan; Jiao, Rui; Peng, Cheng; Zuo, Yuanyuan; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Ma, Ka Ying; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-03-25

    Sesame seed is rich in sesamin. The present study was to (i) investigate the plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of dietary sesamin and (ii) examine the interaction of dietary sesamin with the gene expression of sterol transporters, enzymes, receptors, and proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. Thirty hamsters were divided into three groups fed the control diet (CON) or one of two experimental diets containing 0.2% (SL) and 0.5% (SH) sesamin, respectively, for 6 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels in hamsters given the CON, SL, and SH diets were 6.62 ± 0.40, 5.32 ± 0.40, and 5.00 ± 0.44 mmol/L, respectively, indicating dietary sesamin could reduce plasma TC in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the excretion of total fecal neutral sterols was dose-dependently increased with the amounts of sesamin in diets (CON, 2.65 ± 0.57; SL, 4.30 ± 0.65; and SH, 5.84 ± 1.27 μmol/day). Addition of sesamin into diets was associated with down-regulation of mRNA of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 protein (NPC1L1), acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), microsomal triacylglycerol transport protein (MTP), and ATP-binding cassette transporters subfamily G members 5 and 8 (ABCG5 and ABCG8). Results also showed that dietary sesamin could up-regulate hepatic cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), whereas it down-regulated hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). It was concluded that the cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin was mediated by promoting the fecal excretion of sterols and modulating the genes involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism. PMID:25745846

  1. Policosanol inhibits cholesterol synthesis in hepatoma cells by activation of AMP-kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dev K; Li, Li; Porter, Todd D

    2006-09-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of long-chain primary alcohols that has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol in animals and in humans. The hypocholesterolemic effect results from a decrease in cholesterol synthesis by suppression of HMG-CoA reductase activity, but the mechanism of this suppression and the active components of policosanol have not been established. In the present study, we investigated the ability of policosanol and its principal components to inhibit cholesterol synthesis in cultured rat hepatoma cells. Maximal inhibition by policosanol yielded a 30% decrease in [(14)C]acetate incorporation without evidence of cellular toxicity. Octacosanol (C28, the major constituent of policosanol), heptacosanol (C27), and hexacosanol (C26) yielded smaller and statistically insignificant decreases in cholesterol synthesis, whereas triacontanol (1-hydroxytriacontane; C30) replicated the inhibition obtained with policosanol. At pharmacological concentrations (<5 microg/ml), policosanol and triacontanol decreased [(14)C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol without affecting the incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate, indicating that these compounds act at or above HMG-CoA reductase. Policosanol and triacontanol did not directly inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, and incubation of these compounds with hepatoma cells did not affect reductase enzyme levels. However, reductase activity was decreased by up to 55% in lysates prepared from these cells, suggesting that HMG-CoA reductase activity was down-regulated by policosanol treatment. Consistent with this hypothesis, a 3-fold increase in AMP-kinase phosphorylation was noted in policosanol-treated cells. Because AMP-kinase is activated by phosphorylation and is well established to suppress HMG-CoA reductase activity, these results suggest that policosanol or a metabolite decreases HMG-CoA reductase activity by activating AMP-kinase. PMID:16714400

  2. Association of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate and low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity with cardiovascular risk: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The cholesterol-esterifying enzyme, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), is believed to play a key role in reverse cholesterol transport. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that higher LCAT activity levels increase the formation of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and atherogenesis. We hypothesized that higher LCAT activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate by the endogenous substrate method might increase the formation of TRLs and thereby alter low-density lipoprotein (LDL) heterogeneity. The estimated LDL particle size [relative LDL migration (LDL-Rm)] was measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the LipoPhor system (Joko, Tokyo, Japan) in 538 consecutive patients with at least risk factor for atherosclerosis. Multivariate regression analysis after adjustments for traditional risk factors identified elevated TRL-related marker (TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, apolipoprotein C-II, and apolipoprotein C-III) levels as independent predictors of smaller-sized LDL particle size, both in the overall subject population and in the subset of patients with serum LDL cholesterol levels of <100 mg/dL. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the LCAT activity (0.79; sensitivity 60 %; specificity 84.8 %) was observed for the evaluation of the indicators of an LDL-Rm value of ≥0.40, which suggests the presence of large amounts of small-dense LDL. The results lend support to the hypothesis that increased LCAT activity may be associated with increased formation of TRLs, leading to a reduction in LDL particle size. Therefore, to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it may be of importance to pay attention not only to a quantitative change in the serum LDL-C, but also to the LCAT activity which is possibly associated with LDL heterogeneity. PMID:25894629

  3. Effect of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol on activity of rat liver enzymes for synthesis and hydrolysis of cholesterol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Yu.P.; Dushkin, M.I.; Dolgov, A.V.; Gordienko, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Administration of estrogens is known to lower the concentration of cholesterol esters in the blood vessel wall and may delay the development of arteriosclerosis. It is also known that under the influence of estrogens the redistribution of concentrations of free cholesterol and cholesterol esters takes place in rats between the blood and liver as a result of the intensification of receptor-dependent uptake of low-density lipoproteins by the hepatocytes. The mechanisms of this intracellular redistribution, however, have been inadequately studied. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol on the activity of lysosomal and cytoplasmic cholesterol esterases, acyl-CoA-cholesterol-O-acyltransferase, lysosomal acid phosphatase, and beta-D-galactosidase. The activity was measured by using cholesterol (1-C 14)-oleate as the substrate. The influence of the estradiol is found to be based on cholesterol redistribution between the blood and liver. Accumulation of free cholesterol in the liver under these conditions stimulates bile acid formation. Depression of cholesterol ester synthesis as a result of direct inhibition of the acyltransferase by the estradiol is found to possibly contribute to the fall in the cholesterol level in the body. Liquid scintillation counting was used to measure distribution and accumulation.

  4. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  5. Influence of eicosapentaenoic acid and vitamin E on brain cortex Ca2+ ATPase activity in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bekpinar, S; Oner, P; Altug, T; Eryürek, F; Sürmen, E; Deniz, G

    1989-01-01

    The influence of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and vitamin E on brain cortex Ca2+ ATPase activity was examined in rabbits receiving cholesterol-rich diets for a period of 45 days. Rabbits were divided as control (A) and cholesterol-fed groups (B, C, and D). Group C received 80 mg of EPA and group D received 100 IU of vitamin E every day in addition to the cholesterol-rich (2%, w/w) diet which was solely given to Group B. Rabbits receiving cholesterol alone had a significant reduction in brain microsomal phospholipid level. Microsomal free cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were significantly increased in all experimental groups. Cortex microsomal Ca2+ ATPase activity was found to be inhibited in all cholesterol-fed rabbits as compared to controls, but the highest inhibition was seen in rabbits fed cholesterol alone. Additions of EPA or Vitamin E to the cholesterol-rich diets resulted in a recovery of the enzymatic activity. It is concluded that cholesterol feeding without any addition of PUFA or antioxidant agent might cause an inhibition of brain Ca2+ ATPase activity in rabbits, thereby leading to the dysfunction in ion transport and neurotransmitter release. PMID:2550382

  6. Modulation of endothelial inward-rectifier K+ current by optical isomers of cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G; Rothblat, George H; Levitan, Irena

    2002-01-01

    Membrane potential of aortic endothelial cells under resting conditions is dominated by inward-rectifier K(+) channels belonging to the Kir 2 family. Regulation of endothelial Kir by membrane cholesterol was studied in bovine aortic endothelial cells by altering the sterol composition of the cell membrane. Our results show that enriching the cells with cholesterol decreases the Kir current density, whereas depleting the cells of cholesterol increases the density of the current. The dependence of the Kir current density on the level of cellular cholesterol fits a sigmoid curve with the highest sensitivity of the Kir current at normal physiological levels of cholesterol. To investigate the mechanism of Kir regulation by cholesterol, endogenous cholesterol was substituted by its optical isomer, epicholesterol. Substitution of approximately 50% of cholesterol by epicholesterol results in an early and significant increase in the Kir current density. Furthermore, substitution of cholesterol by epicholesterol has a stronger facilitative effect on the current than cholesterol depletion. Neither single channel properties nor membrane capacitance were significantly affected by the changes in the membrane sterol composition. These results suggest that 1) cholesterol modulates cellular K(+) conductance by changing the number of the active channels and 2) that specific cholesterol-protein interactions are critical for the regulation of endothelial Kir. PMID:12496090

  7. Spatial distribution and activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in lipid bilayer membranes with phase boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Brewer, Jonathan; Bagatolli, Luis A; Simonsen, Adam C; Ipsen, John H; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-06-01

    We have reconstituted functional Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of well-defined binary and ternary lipid composition including cholesterol. The activity of the membrane system can be turned on and off by ATP. The hydrolytic activity of NKA is found to depend on membrane phase, and the water relaxation in the membrane on the presence of NKA. By collapsing and fixating the GUVs onto a solid support and using high-resolution atomic-force microscopy (AFM) imaging we determine the protein orientation and spatial distribution at the single-molecule level and find that NKA is preferentially located at lo/ld interfaces in two-phase GUVs and homogeneously distributed in single-phase GUVs. When turned active, the membrane is found to unbind from the support suggesting that the protein function leads to softening of the membrane. PMID:26994932

  8. Binding of a pleurotolysin ortholog from Pleurotus eryngii to sphingomyelin and cholesterol-rich membrane domains[S

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Hema Balakrishna; Kishimoto, Takuma; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Makino, Asami; Inaba, Takehiko; Murate, Motohide; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kurahashi, Atsushi; Nishibori, Kozo; Fujimori, Fumihiro; Greimel, Peter; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    A mixture of sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) exhibits a characteristic lipid raft domain of the cell membranes that provides a platform to which various signal molecules as well as virus and bacterial proteins are recruited. Several proteins capable of specifically binding either SM or Chol have been reported. However, proteins that selectively bind to SM/Chol mixtures are less well characterized. In our screening for proteins specifically binding to SM/Chol liposomes, we identified a novel ortholog of Pleurotus ostreatus, pleurotolysin (Ply)A, from the extract of edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii, named PlyA2. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-conjugated PlyA2 bound to SM/Chol but not to phosphatidylcholine/Chol liposomes. Cell surface labeling of PlyA2-EGFP was abolished after sphingomyelinase as well as methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment, removing SM and Chol, respectively, indicating that PlyA2-EGFP specifically binds cell surface SM/Chol rafts. Tryptophan to alanine point mutation of PlyA2 revealed the importance of C-terminal tryptophan residues for SM/Chol binding. Our results indicate that PlyA2-EGFP is a novel protein probe to label SM/Chol lipid domains both in cell and model membranes. PMID:23918047

  9. Cholesterol-dependent partitioning of PtdIns(4,5)P2 into membrane domains by the N-terminal fragment of NAP-22 (neuronal axonal myristoylated membrane protein of 22 kDa).

    PubMed Central

    Epand, Richard M; Vuong, Phan; Yip, Christopher M; Maekawa, Shohei; Epand, Raquel F

    2004-01-01

    A myristoylated peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of NAP-22 (neuronal axonal myristoylated membrane protein of 22 kDa) causes the quenching of the fluorescence of BODIPY-TMR-labelled PtdIns(4,5) P2 in bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine containing 40 mol% cholesterol and 0.1 mol% BODIPY-PtdIns(4,5)2. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy revealed the cholesterol-dependent nature of PtdIns(4,5) P2-enriched membrane-domain formation. PMID:14989697

  10. Cholesteryl ester transfer activity in hamster plasma: increase by fat and cholesterol rich diets.

    PubMed

    Stein, Y; Dabach, Y; Hollander, G; Stein, O

    1990-01-16

    We investigated the presence of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) in plasma of hamsters kept on various dietary regimens. In hamsters kept on a regular diet, CETA activity was about 5 units/4 mg protein of d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction of plasma, as compared to about 35 units present in human d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction. Addition of 15% margarine or butter alone or together with 2% cholesterol resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in plasma CETA. The increase in plasma CETA was correlated with plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.78; P less than 0.001) and plasma triacylglycerol levels (r = 0.56, P less than 0.001). Hamsters consuming the cholesterol + butter-supplemented diets had the highest plasma CETA, cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, while CETA in plasma of rats and mice remained nondetectable even after 4 weeks on the diet. The causal relation between hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and evaluation in CETA in hamsters remains to be elucidated. PMID:2297517

  11. Cholesterol strongly affects the organization of lipid monolayers studied as models of the milk fat globule membrane: Condensing effect and change in the lipid domain morphology.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Paboeuf, Gilles; Vié, Véronique; Lopez, Christelle

    2015-10-01

    The biological membrane that surrounds the milk fat globules exhibits phase separation of polar lipids that is poorly known. The objective of this study was to investigate the role played by cholesterol in the organization of monolayers prepared as models of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction experiments allowed characterization of the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature of lipids, Tm ~35°C, in vesicles prepared with a MFGM lipid extract. For temperature below Tm, atomic force microscopy revealed phase separation of lipids at 30 mN·m(-1) in Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of the MFGM lipid extract. The high Tm lipids form liquid condensed (LC) domains that protrude by about 1.5 nm from the continuous liquid expanded (LE) phase. Cholesterol was added to the MFGM extract up to 30% of polar lipids (cholesterol/milk sphingomyelin (MSM) molar ratio of 50/50). Compression isotherms evidenced the condensing effect of the cholesterol onto the MFGM lipid monolayers. Topography of the monolayers showed a decrease in the area of the LC domains and in the height difference H between the LC domains and the continuous LE phase, as the cholesterol content increased in the MFGM lipid monolayers. These results were interpreted in terms of nucleation effects of cholesterol and decrease of the line tension between LC domains and LE phase in the MFGM lipid monolayers. This study revealed the major structural role of cholesterol in the MFGM that could be involved in biological functions of this interface (e.g. mechanisms of milk fat globule digestion). PMID:26087463

  12. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Pei; Hsieh, You-Miin; Zhang, Zi-yi; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25538960

  13. Cholesterol-lowering potentials of lactic acid bacteria based on bile-salt hydrolase activity and effect of potent strains on cholesterol metabolism in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Pei-Pei; Hsieh, You-Miin; Zhang, Zi-yi; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25538960

  14. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Family Members Are Differentially Affected by Alterations in Host Glycans and Membrane Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Aria; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J.; Gargi, Amandeep; Cardwell, Marissa M.; Prouty, Michael G.; Blanke, Steven R.; Bradley, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are tripartite protein exotoxins produced by a diverse group of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Based on their ability to induce DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis of cultured cells, CDTs are proposed to enhance virulence by blocking cellular division and/or directly killing epithelial and immune cells. Despite the widespread distribution of CDTs among several important human pathogens, our understanding of how these toxins interact with host cells is limited. Here we demonstrate that CDTs from Haemophilus ducreyi, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni differ in their abilities to intoxicate host cells with defined defects in host factors previously implicated in CDT binding, including glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids. The absence of cell surface sialic acid sensitized cells to intoxication by three of the four CDTs tested. Surprisingly, fucosylated N-linked glycans and glycolipids, previously implicated in CDT-host interactions, were not required for intoxication by any of the CDTs tested. Finally, altering host-cellular cholesterol, also previously implicated in CDT binding, affected intoxication by only a subset of CDTs tested. The findings presented here provide insight into the molecular and cellular basis of CDT-host interactions. PMID:20385557

  15. ATP-Binding Membrane Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1): A Possible Link between Inflammation and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Liao, Duan-fang; Tang, Chao-ke

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory condition that involves numerous cellular and molecular inflammatory components. A wide array of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and proteins produced by macrophages and other cells, play a critical role in the development and progression of the disease. ATP-binding membrane cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is crucial for cellular cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and is also identified as an important target in antiatherosclerosis treatment. Evidence from several recent studies indicates that inflammation, along with other atherogenic-related mediators, plays distinct regulating roles in ABCA1 expression. Proatherogenic cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-1β have been shown to inhibit the expression of ABCA1, while antiatherogenic cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, have been shown to promote the expression of ABCA1. Moreover, some cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α seem to regulate ABCA1 expression in species-specific and dose-dependent manners. Inflammatory proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 are likely to inhibit ABCA1 expression during inflammation, and inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also found to block the expression of ABCA1. Interestingly, recent experiments revealed ABCA1 can function as an antiinflammatory receptor to suppress the expression of inflammatory factors, suggesting that ABCA1 may be the molecular basis for the interaction between inflammation and RCT. This review aims to summarize recent findings on the role of inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory proteins, inflammatory lipids, and the endotoxin-mediated inflammatory process in expression of ABCA1. Also covered is the current understanding of the function of ABCA1 in modulating the immune response and inflammation through its direct and indirect antiinflammatory mechanisms

  16. Enzyme Activities in Polarized Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bass, L.; McIlroy, D. K.

    1968-01-01

    The theoretical pH dependence of enzyme activities in membranes of low dielectric constant is estimated. It is shown that in biological membranes some types of enzymes may attain a limiting pH sensitivity such that an increment of only 0.2 pH unit (sufficient to induce action potentials in squid axons) causes a relative activity change of over 25%. The transients of enzyme activity generated by membrane depolarization and by pH increments in the bathing solution are discussed in relation to the transients of nervous excitation. PMID:5641405

  17. The steroidal analog GW707 activates the SREBP pathway through disruption of intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jessie; Dudley-Rucker, Nicole; Crowley, Jan R; Lopez-Perez, Elvira; Issandou, Marc; Schaffer, Jean E; Ory, Daniel S

    2004-02-01

    Recently, a new class of lipid-lowering agents has been described that upregulate LDL receptor (LDLr) activity. These agents are proposed to activate sterol-regulated gene expression through binding to the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein (SCAP). Here, we show that the steroidal LDLr upregulator, GW707, induces accumulation of lysosomal free cholesterol and inhibits LDL-stimulated cholesterol esterification, similar to that observed in U18666A-treated cells and in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) mutants. Moreover, we demonstrate that induction of the NPC-like phenotype by GW707 is independent of SCAP function. We find that treatment with GW707 does not increase SREBP-dependent gene expression above that observed in lipoprotein-starved cells. Rather, we show that the apparent increase in SREBP-dependent activity in GW707-treated cells is attributable to a failure to appropriately suppress sterol-regulated gene expression, as has been shown previously for U18666A-treated cells and NPC mutant fibroblasts. We further demonstrate that cells treated with either GW707 or U18666A fail to appropriately generate 27-hydroxycholesterol in response to LDL cholesterol. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which GW707 exerts its hypolipidemic effects through disruption of late endosomal/lysosomal sterol trafficking and subsequent stimulation of LDLr activity. PMID:14617742

  18. Versatile Membrane Deformation Potential of Activated Pacsin

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1) has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD) of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties. PMID:23236520

  19. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  20. Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Gu; Ren, Dandan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the hypolipidemic activity of okra; therefore, we investigated the hypolipidemic activity of okra and its interaction with gene expression of several key components involved in lipid homeostasis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups and fed with hyperlipidemic diet or two hyperlipidemic diets supplemented with 1% or 2% okra powder for eight weeks. Results demonstrated that okra dose-dependently decreased serum and hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride, and enhanced fecal excretion of bile acids. Gene expression analysis revealed that okra upregulated cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression, downregulated expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), with no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A). It was suggested that hypolipidemic activity of okra was mediated most likely by upregulation of cholesterol degradation through CYP7A1 and by inhibition of lipogenesis through SREBP1c and FAS. Okra raw and fractionated polysaccharide showed strong bile acid binding capacity in vitro, which may contribute to the hypolipidemic activity observed. In conclusion, okra has potential application in the management of hyperlipidemia and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:23606408

  1. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is more likely to clog blood vessels because ... Here's a way to remember the difference: the LDL cholesterol is the bad kind, so call it "lousy" ...

  2. Effect of unesterified cholesterol on the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, O V; Chan, R Y; Sawyer, W H

    1994-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) catalyses the transfer of cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein to triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and the transfer of triacylglycerols in the reverse direction. The activity of CETP has been studied using a continuous fluorescence assay which measures the excimer fluorescence of cholesteryl 1-pyrene decanoate in a synthetic donor microemulsion as the indicator of cholesteryl ester transfer. Emulsions were composed of cholesteryl oleate and egg phosphatidylcholine and had an average particle size of 14 +/- 1 nm as calculated from the molar volume of the components. The effect of changing the physical state of the emulsion surface was examined by including unesterified cholesterol in the donor and acceptor particles. The rate of CETP-induced transfer of the fluorescent cholesteryl ester between microemulsion particles increased when unesterified cholesterol was present at concentrations up to 17 mol% relative to phospholipid. The presence of cholesterol also changed the exchange kinetics from an apparent single-exponential to a double-exponential phenomenon. Binding of CETP to the emulsion surface was accompanied by an enhancement of fluorescence which was used to measure the binding equilibria. The enhancement of exchange due to the presence of cholesterol did not correlate with any increased binding of CETP to the emulsion surface. The presence of unesterified cholesterol in the donor did not affect the rate of transfer of the fluorescent cholesteryl ester when unlabelled emulsion was replaced by high-density lipoprotein as the acceptor. The studies demonstrate the use of microemulsions of defined size and composition for the study of the mechanism of action of CETP. PMID:7998976

  3. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  4. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  5. Cholesterol-Dependent Phase-Demixing in Lipid Bilayers as a Switch for the Activity of the Phosphoinositide-Binding Cytoskeletal Protein Gelsolin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Bucki, Robert; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The lateral distribution of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in lipid bilayers is affected both by divalent cation-mediated attractions and cholesterol-dependent phase demixing. The effects of lateral redistribution of PIP2 within a membrane on PIP2-protein interactions are explored with an N-terminal fragment of gelsolin (NtGSN) that severs actin in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner. The extent of NtGSN inhibition by PIP2-containing large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) depends on the lateral organization of the membrane as quantified by an actin-severing assay. At a fixed PIP2 mole fraction, the inhibition is largely enhanced by the segregation of liquid ordered/liquid disordered (Lo/Ld) phases that is induced by altering either cholesterol content or temperature, whereas the presence of Ca(2+) only slightly improves the inhibition. Inhibition of gelsolin induced by demixed LUVs is more effective with decreasing temperature, coincident with increasing membrane order as determined by Laurdan generalized polarization and is reversible as the temperature increases. This result suggests that PIP2-mediated inhibition of gelsolin function depends not only on changes in global concentration but also on lateral distribution of PIP2. These observations imply that gelsolin, and perhaps other PIP2-regulated proteins, can be activated or inactivated by the formation of nanodomains or clusters without changing PIP2 bulk concentration in the cell membrane. PMID:27224309

  6. Cholesterol-dependent syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 clustering regulates caveolar fusion with the endothelial plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda A; Predescu, Dan N; Shimizu, Kayo; Klein, Irene K; Malik, Asrar B

    2005-11-01

    We determined the organization of target (t) SNARE proteins on the basolateral endothelial plasma membrane (PM) and their role in the mechanism of caveolar fusion. Studies were performed in a cell-free system involving endothelial PM sheets and isolated biotin-labeled caveolae. We monitored the fusion of caveolae with the PM by the detection of biotin-streptavidin complexes using correlative high resolution fluorescence microscopy and gold labeling electron microscopy on ultrathin sections of PM sheets. Imaging of PM sheets demonstrated and biochemical findings showed that the t-SNARE proteins present in endothelial cells (SNAP-23 and syntaxin-4) formed cholesterol-dependent clusters in discrete areas of the PM. Upon fusion of caveolae with the target PM, 50% of the caveolae co-localized with the t-SNARE clusters, indicating that these caveolae were at the peak of the fusion reaction. Fluorescent streptavidin staining of PM sheets correlated with the ultrastructure in the same area. These findings demonstrate that t-SNARE clusters in the endothelial target PM serve as the fusion sites for caveolae during exocytosis. PMID:16118213

  7. Cellular cholesterol controls TRPC3 function: evidence from a novel dominant-negative knockdown strategy

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Annarita; Rosker, Christian; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Zhu, Michael X.; Romanin, Christoph; Sattler, Wolfgang; Groschner, Klaus; Poteser, Michael

    2006-01-01

    TRPC3 (canonical transient receptor potential protein 3) has been suggested to be a component of cation channel complexes that are targeted to cholesterol-rich lipid membrane microdomains. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of membrane cholesterol as a regulator of cellular TRPC3 conductances. Functional experiments demonstrated that cholesterol loading activates a non-selective cation conductance and a Ca2+ entry pathway in TRPC3-overexpressing cells but not in wild-type HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The cholesterol-induced membrane conductance exhibited a current-to-voltage relationship similar to that observed upon PLC (phospholipase C)-dependent activation of TRPC3 channels. Nonetheless, the cholesterol-activated conductance lacked negative modulation by extracellular Ca2+, a typical feature of agonist-activated TRPC3 currents. Involvement of TRPC3 in the cholesterol-dependent membrane conductance was further corroborated by a novel dominant-negative strategy for selective blockade of TRPC3 channel activity. Expression of a TRPC3 mutant, which contained a haemagglutinin epitope tag in the second extracellular loop, conferred antibody sensitivity to both the classical PLC-activated as well as the cholesterol-activated conductance in TRPC3-expressing cells. Moreover, cholesterol loading as well as PLC stimulation was found to increase surface expression of TRPC3. Promotion of TRPC3 membrane expression by cholesterol was persistent over 30 min, while PLC-mediated enhancement of plasma membrane expression of TRPC3 was transient in nature. We suggest the cholesterol content of the plasma membrane as a determinant of cellular TRPC3 activity and provide evidence for cholesterol dependence of TRPC3 surface expression. PMID:16448384

  8. Alterations in Membrane Caveolae and BKCa Channel Activity in Skin Fibroblasts in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gongyi; Jacob, Robert F.; Kaulin, Yuri; DiMuzio, Paul; Xie, Yi; Mason, R. Preston; Tint, G. Stephen; Steiner, Robert D.; Roulett, Jean-Baptiste; Merkens, Louise; Whitaker-Mendez, Diana; Frank, Phillipe G.; Lisanti, Michael; Cox, Robert H.; Tulenko, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an inherited disorder of cholesterol synthesis caused by mutations in DHCR7 which encodes the final enzyme in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. The immediate precursor to cholesterol synthesis, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) accumulates in the plasma and cells of SLOS patients which has led to the idea that the accumulation of abnormal sterols and/or reduction in cholesterol underlies the phenotypic abnormalities of SLOS. We tested the hypothesis that 7-DHC accumulates in membrane caveolae where it disturbs caveolar bilayer structure-function. Membrane caveolae from skin fibroblasts obtained from SLOS patients were isolated and found to accumulate 7-DHC. In caveolar-like model membranes containing 7-DHC, subtle, but complex alterations in intermolecular packing, lipid order and membrane width were observed. In addition, the BKCa K+ channel, which co-migrates with caveolin-1 in a membrane fraction enriched with cholesterol, was impaired in SLOS cells as reflected by reduced single channel conductance and a 50 mV rightward shift in the channel activation voltage. In addition, a marked decrease in BKCa protein but not mRNA expression levels were seen suggesting post-translational alterations. Accompanying these changes was a reduction in caveolin-1 protein and mRNA levels, but membrane caveolar structure was not altered. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that 7-DHC accumulation in the caveolar membrane results in defective caveolar signaling. However, additional cellular alterations beyond mere changes associated with abnormal sterols in the membrane likely contribute to the pathogenesis of SLOS. PMID:21724437

  9. Cholesterol modulates open probability and desensitization of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Korinek, Miloslav; Vyklicky, Vojtech; Borovska, Jirina; Lichnerova, Katarina; Kaniakova, Martina; Krausova, Barbora; Krusek, Jan; Balik, Ales; Smejkalova, Tereza; Horak, Martin; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the CNS. Although these receptors are in direct contact with plasma membrane, lipid–NMDAR interactions are little understood. In the present study, we aimed at characterizing the effect of cholesterol on the ionotropic glutamate receptors. Whole-cell current responses induced by fast application of NMDA in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were almost abolished (reduced to 3%) and the relative degree of receptor desensitization was increased (by seven-fold) after acute cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Both of these effects were fully reversible by cholesterol repletion. By contrast, the responses mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors were not affected by cholesterol depletion. Similar results were obtained in CGCs after chronic inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis by simvastatin and acute enzymatic cholesterol degradation to 4-cholesten-3-one by cholesterol oxidase. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that membrane fluidity increased after methyl-β-cyclodextrin pretreatment. However, no change in fluidity was observed after cholesterol enzymatic degradation, suggesting that the effect of cholesterol on NMDARs is not mediated by changes in membrane fluidity. Our data show that diminution of NMDAR responses by cholesterol depletion is the result of a reduction of the open probability, whereas the increase in receptor desensitization is the result of an increase in the rate constant of entry into the desensitized state. Surface NMDAR population, agonist affinity, single-channel conductance and open time were not altered in cholesterol-depleted CGCs. The results of our experiments show that cholesterol is a strong endogenous modulator of NMDARs. Key points NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are tetrameric cation channels permeable to calcium; they mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS and their excessive activation can lead to

  10. Thioredoxin-like activity of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, A.R.; Brennan, T.; Anderson, L.E.

    1980-10-01

    The inactivation of pea leaf chloroplast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by dithiothreitol can be catalyzed by thioredoxin-like molecules that are present in chloroplasts. This thioredoxin activity occurs predominantly as a soluble species, but washed thylakoid membranes also exhibit some thioredoxin-like activity. The membrane-associated thioredoxin can be extracted by treatment with the detergent Triton X-100. The solubilized thioredoxing appears to have a molecular size similar to that of the soluble thioredoxin which catalyzes the same reaction. The thylakoid-bound activity constitutes only about 5% of the total chloroplast thioredoxin activity. The thioredoxin occurring in the membrane fraction cannot, however, be ascribed to the trapping of stroma since less than 0.1% of three stromal marker enzymes are found in the same thylakoid extract.

  11. Organelle morphogenesis by active membrane remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Ipsen, John H.; Rao, Madan; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    Intracellular organelles are subject to a steady flux of lipids and proteins through active, energy consuming transport processes. Active fission and fusion are promoted by GTPases, e.g., Arf-Coatamer and the Rab-Snare complexes, which both sense and generate local membrane curvature. Here we investigate through Dynamical Triangulation Monte Carlo simulations, the role that these active processes play in determining the morphology and compositional segregation in closed membranes. Our results suggest that the ramified morphologies of organelles observed in-vivo are a consequence of driven nonequilibrium processes rather than equilibrium forces.

  12. Cholesterol-mediated activation of acid sphingomyelinase disrupts autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Tan, Li Xuan; Jiang, Zhichun; Radu, Roxana A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential mechanism for clearing damaged organelles and proteins within the cell. As with neurodegenerative diseases, dysfunctional autophagy could contribute to blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. However, precisely how inefficient autophagy promotes retinal damage is unclear. In this study, we investigate innate mechanisms that modulate autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key site of insult in macular degeneration. High-speed live imaging of polarized adult primary RPE cells and data from a mouse model of early-onset macular degeneration identify a mechanism by which lipofuscin bisretinoids, visual cycle metabolites that progressively accumulate in the RPE, disrupt autophagy. We demonstrate that bisretinoids trap cholesterol and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, an acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cofactor, within the RPE. ASMase activation increases cellular ceramide, which promotes tubulin acetylation on stabilized microtubules. Live-imaging data show that autophagosome traffic and autophagic flux are inhibited in RPE with acetylated microtubules. Drugs that remove excess cholesterol or inhibit ASMase reverse this cascade of events and restore autophagosome motility and autophagic flux in the RPE. Because accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids and abnormal cholesterol homeostasis are implicated in macular degeneration, our studies suggest that ASMase could be a potential therapeutic target to ensure the efficient autophagy that maintains RPE health. PMID:25378587

  13. [Correlations of lipoprotein metabolism indicators in persons with low and high cholesterol ester transport activity].

    PubMed

    Tvorogova, M G; Rozhkova, T A; Kukharchuk, V V; Titov, V N

    1999-01-01

    For clarifying the role of plasma cholesterol ester transfer activity (CETA) in forming hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) and determination of high density lipoproteins cholesterol (Ch HDL) level, lipoprotein metabolism indicators were compared for individuals with high and low CETA. 257 subjects were investigated: 195 patients with different forms of hereditary HLP and individuals without HLP: 34 healthy and 28 with coronary heart disease (CHD). Lipids were determined enzymatically, apoproteins content by immunoturbodimetric and immunodiffusion methods. CETA and cholesterol esterification rate (CER) were measured through autological methods. Selected groups of patients with high and low CETA were significantly distinguished only by plasma Ch level (average Ch > 6.2 mmol/l in both groups), free Ch HDL and CER. The groups were not significantly different by men-women ratio (chi 2 = 0.016, p = 0.9) and CHD patients share (chi 2 = 0.126, p = 0.723). The correlation between CETA and Ch levels was significant for healthy individuals only. The data does not correspond to assumption of exclusively atherogenic influence of high CETA: 1) no correlation between CETA and atherogenic parameters of LP metabolism among different HLP forms was found; 2) Ch HDL levels were not distinguished at high and low CETA; 3) no domination of CHD patients among the subjects with high CETA was found. PMID:10547884

  14. Cholesterol Decreases the Size and the Mechanical Resistance to Rupture of Sphingomyelin Rich Domains, in Lipid Bilayers Studied as a Model of the Milk Fat Globule Membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin-rich microdomains have been observed in the biological membrane surrounding milk fat globules (MFGM). The role played by cholesterol in these domains and in the physical properties and functions of the MFGM remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate the phase state, topography, and mechanical properties of MFGM polar lipid bilayers as a function of cholesterol concentration, by combining X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy imaging, and force spectroscopy. At room temperature, i.e. below the phase transition temperature of the MFGM polar lipids, the bilayers showed the formation of sphingomyelin-rich domains in the solid ordered (so) phase that protruded about 1 nm above the liquid disordered (ld) phase. These so phase domains have a higher mechanical resistance to rupture than the ld phase (30 nN versus 15 nN). Addition of cholesterol in the MFGM polar lipid bilayers (i) induced the formation of liquid ordered (lo) phase for up to 27 mol % in the bilayers, (ii) decreased the height difference between the thicker ordered domains and the surrounding ld phase, (iii) promoted the formation of small sized domains, and (iv) decreased the mechanical resistance to rupture of the sphingomyelin-rich domains down to ∼5 nN. The biological and functional relevance of the lo phase cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich domains in the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk remains to be elucidated. This study brought new insight about the functional role of cholesterol in milk polar lipid ingredients, which can be used in the preparation of food emulsions, e.g. infant milk formulas. PMID:27300157

  15. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lithgow, Trevor; Martin, Lisandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of membrane proteins is often difficult to sustain following reconstitution, since the composition of the model phospholipid bilayer differs from that of the native cell membrane. This review will discuss the reconstitution of membrane protein activities in four different types of model membrane—monolayers, supported lipid bilayers, liposomes and nanodiscs, comparing their advantages in membrane protein reconstitution. Variation in the surrounding model environments for these four different types of membrane layer can affect the three-dimensional structure of reconstituted proteins and may possibly lead to loss of the proteins activity. We also discuss examples where the same membrane proteins have been successfully reconstituted into two or more model membrane systems with comparison of the observed activity in each system. Understanding of the behavioral changes for proteins in model membrane systems after membrane reconstitution is often a prerequisite to protein research. It is essential to find better solutions for retaining membrane protein activities for measurement and characterization in vitro. PMID:23344058

  16. Effect of cholesterol nanodomains on monolayer morphology and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Zell, Zachary A.; Squires, Todd M.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    At low mole fractions, cholesterol segregates into 10- to 100-nm-diameter nanodomains dispersed throughout primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) domains in mixed DPPC:cholesterol monolayers. The nanodomains consist of 6:1 DPPC:cholesterol “complexes” that decorate and lengthen DPPC domain boundaries, consistent with a reduced line tension, λ. The surface viscosity of the monolayer, ηs, decreases exponentially with the area fraction of the nanodomains at fixed surface pressure over the 0.1- to 10-Hz range of frequencies common to respiration. At fixed cholesterol fraction, the surface viscosity increases exponentially with surface pressure in similar ways for all cholesterol fractions. This increase can be explained with a free-area model that relates ηs to the pure DPPC monolayer compressibility and collapse pressure. The elastic modulus, G′, initially decreases with cholesterol fraction, consistent with the decrease in λ expected from the line-active nanodomains, in analogy to 3D emulsions. However, increasing cholesterol further causes a sharp increase in G′ between 4 and 5 mol% cholesterol owing to an evolution in the domain morphology, so that the monolayer is elastic rather than viscous over 0.1–10 Hz. Understanding the effects of small mole fractions of cholesterol should help resolve the controversial role cholesterol plays in human lung surfactants and may give clues as to how cholesterol influences raft formation in cell membranes. PMID:23901107

  17. U18666A Treatment Results in Cholesterol Accumulation, Reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Activity, and Increased Oxidative Stress in Rat Cortical Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Copetti-Santos, Daniela; Moraes, Vitoria; Weiler, Dácio Franco; de Mello, Alexandre Silva; Machado, Fernanda de Souza; Marinho, Jéssica Pereira; Siebert, Cassiana; Kolling, Janaina; Funchal, Cláudia; Wyse, Angela T S; Coelho, Janice Carneiro

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of U18666A, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and its intracellular transport, on oxidative stress parameters in cortical astrocytes cultured from Wistar rats (0-3 days old). The cultures were incubated with U18666A (0.25 µg/mL) for 48 h, conditions that are considered ideal to mimic Niemann-Pick type C disease. A variety of indicators of oxidative stress were measured. U18666A treatment increased cholesterol 2-fold in treated compared to control astrocytes. Oxidative stress was significantly elevated in treated cells as demonstrated by a 1.7-fold increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a 60% decrease is sulfhydral groups, and a 3.7-fold increase in carbonyl groups, indicative of increased lipid and protein oxidation following U18666A treatment. Consistent with these changes, both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly reduced nearly 50% in treated compared to control astrocytes. Collectively, these change resulted in a 50% reduction in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase specific activity following U18666A treatment, suggesting a significant alteration in its plasma membrane environment. Overall, these changes indicate that U18666A treatment results in increased cholesterol levels and an increased level of oxidative stress in cortical astrocytes, consistent with what is observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease. PMID:26344921

  18. Membrane optical activity: some facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Wallach, D F; Low, D A; Bertland, A V

    1973-11-01

    The circular dichroism of hypothetical, water-filled, spherical shells, 75-3500 nm in radius, with walls 7.5 nm thick, composed of poly(L-lysine) in various conformational proportions, and suspended in water, were computed from the known optical properties of this polypeptide by classical general light-scattering theory (Mie theory). Comparison of the computed curves of circular dichroism spectra with those of diverse membranes reveals large discrepancies below 215 nm and shows that light scattering does not adequately account for the optical activity of membranes containing appreciable proportions of nonhelical conformation. However, turbidity effects can explain the anomalies of membrane optical rotatory dispersion near 233 nm, if not uniquely so. We conclude that the optical activity of neither most soluble proteins nor membrane proteins can provide accurate conformational information when synthetic polypeptides are used as standards and list the reasons for this argument. We also show that present techniques to "correct" membrane optical activity are likely to produce additional artifact. PMID:4522300

  19. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  20. E17110 promotes reverse cholesterol transport with liver X receptor β agonist activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Ni; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Peng; Lu, Duo; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Yanni; Si, Shuyi

    2016-05-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and activation of LXR could reduce atherosclerosis. In the present study we used a cell-based screening method to identify new potential LXRβ agonists. A novel benzofuran-2-carboxylate derivative was identified with LXRβ agonist activity: E17110 showed a significant activation effect on LXRβ with an EC50 value of 0.72 μmol/L. E17110 also increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1) in RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, E17110 significantly reduced cellular lipid accumulation and promoted cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, we found that the key amino acids in the LXRβ ligand-binding domain had distinct interactions with E17110 as compared to TO901317. These results suggest that E17110 was identified as a novel compound with LXRβ agonist activity in vitro via screening, and could be developed as a potential anti-atherosclerotic lead compound. PMID:27175330

  1. E17110 promotes reverse cholesterol transport with liver X receptor β agonist activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ni; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Peng; Lu, Duo; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Yanni; Si, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and activation of LXR could reduce atherosclerosis. In the present study we used a cell-based screening method to identify new potential LXRβ agonists. A novel benzofuran-2-carboxylate derivative was identified with LXRβ agonist activity: E17110 showed a significant activation effect on LXRβ with an EC50 value of 0.72 μmol/L. E17110 also increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1) in RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, E17110 significantly reduced cellular lipid accumulation and promoted cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, we found that the key amino acids in the LXRβ ligand-binding domain had distinct interactions with E17110 as compared to TO901317. These results suggest that E17110 was identified as a novel compound with LXRβ agonist activity in vitro via screening, and could be developed as a potential anti-atherosclerotic lead compound. PMID:27175330

  2. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs. PMID:27108066

  3. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  4. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin family of gram-positive bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Alejandro P; Moe, Paul C; Johnson, Benjamin B

    2010-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are a family of beta-barrel pore-forming toxins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria. These toxins are produced as water-soluble monomeric proteins that after binding to the target cell oligomerize on the membrane surface forming a ring-like pre-pore complex, and finally insert a large beta-barrel into the membrane (about 250 A in diameter). Formation of such a large transmembrane structure requires multiple and coordinated conformational changes. The presence of cholesterol in the target membrane is absolutely required for pore-formation, and therefore it was long thought that cholesterol was the cellular receptor for these toxins. However, not all the CDCs require cholesterol for binding. Intermedilysin, secreted by Streptoccocus intermedius only binds to membranes containing a protein receptor, but forms pores only if the membrane contains sufficient cholesterol. In contrast, perfringolysin O, secreted by Clostridium perfringens, only binds to membranes containing substantial amounts of cholesterol. The mechanisms by which cholesterol regulates the cytolytic activity of the CDCs are not understood at the molecular level. The C-terminus of perfringolysin O is involved in cholesterol recognition, and changes in the conformation of the loops located at the distal tip of this domain affect the toxin-membrane interactions. At the same time, the distribution of cholesterol in the membrane can modulate toxin binding. Recent studies support the concept that there is a dynamic interplay between the cholesterol-binding domain of the CDCs and the excess of cholesterol molecules in the target membrane. PMID:20213558

  5. Quercetin increases macrophage cholesterol efflux to inhibit foam cell formation through activating PPARγ-ABCA1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqiang; Li, En; Wang, Feng; Wang, Tao; Qin, Zhiping; Niu, Shaohui; Qiu, Chunguang

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages could induce the formation of foam cells and increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We wonder if quercetin, one of flavonoids with anti-inflammation functions in different cell types, could elevate the development of foam cells formation in atherosclerosis. We treated foam cells derived from oxLDL induced THP-1 cells with quercetin, and evaluated the foam cells formation, cholesterol content and apoptosis of the cells. We found that quercetin induced the expression of ABCA1 in differentiated THP-1 cells, and increased the cholesterol efflux from THP-1 cell derived foam cells. Eventually, cholesterol level and the formation of foam cell derived from THP-1 cells decreased after quercetin treatment. In addition, quercetin activated PPARγ-LXRα pathway to upregulate ABCA1 expression through increasing protein level of PPARγ and its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of PPARγ activity by siRNA knockdown or the addition of chemical inhibitor, GW9662, abolished quercetin induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages. Our data demonstrated that quercetin increased cholesterol efflux from macrophages through upregulating the expressions of PPARγ and ABCA1. Taken together, increasing uptake of quercetin or quercetin-rich foods would be an effective way to lower the risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:26617799

  6. The effect of cholesterol on the long-range network of interactions established among sea anemone Sticholysin II residues at the water-membrane interface.

    PubMed

    García-Linares, Sara; Alm, Ida; Maula, Terhi; Gavilanes, José G; Slotte, Johan Peter; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Actinoporins are α-pore forming proteins with therapeutic potential, produced by sea anemones. Sticholysin II (StnII) from Stichodactyla helianthus is one of its most extensively characterized members. These proteins remain stably folded in water, but upon interaction with lipid bilayers, they oligomerize to form a pore. This event is triggered by the presence of sphingomyelin (SM), but cholesterol (Chol) facilitates pore formation. Membrane attachment and pore formation require changes involving long-distance rearrangements of residues located at the protein-membrane interface. The influence of Chol on membrane recognition, oligomerization, and/or pore formation is now studied using StnII variants, which are characterized in terms of their ability to interact with model membranes in the presence or absence of Chol. The results obtained frame Chol not only as an important partner for SM for functional membrane recognition but also as a molecule which significantly reduces the structural requirements for the mentioned conformational rearrangements to occur. However, given that the DOPC:SM:Chol vesicles employed display phase coexistence and have domain boundaries, the observed effects could be also due to the presence of these different phases on the membrane. In addition, it is also shown that the Arg51 guanidinium group is strictly required for membrane recognition, independently of the presence of Chol. PMID:25815890

  7. The Effect of Cholesterol on the Long-Range Network of Interactions Established among Sea Anemone Sticholysin II Residues at the Water-Membrane Interface

    PubMed Central

    García-Linares, Sara; Alm, Ida; Maula, Terhi; Gavilanes, José G.; Slotte, Johan Peter; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Actinoporins are α-pore forming proteins with therapeutic potential, produced by sea anemones. Sticholysin II (StnII) from Stichodactyla helianthus is one of its most extensively characterized members. These proteins remain stably folded in water, but upon interaction with lipid bilayers, they oligomerize to form a pore. This event is triggered by the presence of sphingomyelin (SM), but cholesterol (Chol) facilitates pore formation. Membrane attachment and pore formation require changes involving long-distance rearrangements of residues located at the protein-membrane interface. The influence of Chol on membrane recognition, oligomerization, and/or pore formation is now studied using StnII variants, which are characterized in terms of their ability to interact with model membranes in the presence or absence of Chol. The results obtained frame Chol not only as an important partner for SM for functional membrane recognition but also as a molecule which significantly reduces the structural requirements for the mentioned conformational rearrangements to occur. However, given that the DOPC:SM:Chol vesicles employed display phase coexistence and have domain boundaries, the observed effects could be also due to the presence of these different phases on the membrane. In addition, it is also shown that the Arg51 guanidinium group is strictly required for membrane recognition, independently of the presence of Chol. PMID:25815890

  8. Active urea transport and an unusual basolateral membrane composition in the gills of a marine elasmobranch.

    PubMed

    Fines, G A; Ballantyne, J S; Wright, P A

    2001-01-01

    In elasmobranch fishes, urea occurs at high concentrations (350-600 mM) in the body fluids and tissues, where it plays an important role in osmoregulation. Retention of urea by the gill against this huge blood-to-water diffusion gradient requires specialized adaptations to the epithelial cell membranes. Experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms and structural features that facilitate urea retention by the gill of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias. Analysis of urea uptake by gill basolateral membrane vesicles revealed the presence of a phloretin-sensitive (half inhibition 0.09 mM), sodium-coupled, secondary active urea transporter (Michaelis constant = 10.1 mM, maximal velocity = 0.34 micromol. h(-1). mg protein(-1)). We propose that this system actively transports urea out of the gill epithelial cells back into the blood against the urea concentration gradient. Lipid analyses of the basolateral membrane revealed high levels of cholesterol contributing to the highest reported cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio (3.68). This unique combination of active urea transport and modification of the phospholipid bilayer membrane is responsible for decreasing the gill permeability to urea and facilitating urea retention by the gill of Squalus acanthias. PMID:11124129

  9. The perspective on cholesterol-lowering mechanisms of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ishimwe, Nestor; Daliri, Eric B; Lee, Byong H; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics as food components combats not only cardiovascular diseases but also many gastrointestinal tract disorders. Their health benefits along with their increased global market have interested scientists for better formulation and appropriate administration to the consumers. However, the lack of clear elucidation of their cholesterol-lowering mechanisms has complicated their proper dosage and administration to the beneficiaries. In this review, proposed mechanisms of cholesterol reduction such as deconjugation of bile via bile salt hydrolase activity, binding of cholesterol to probiotic cellular surface and incorporation into their cell membrane, production of SCFAs from oligosaccharides, coprecipitation of cholesterol with deconjugated bile, and cholesterol conversion to coprostanol have been discussed. Also, hypocholesterolemic effects on human- and animal-trial results, commonly used probiotics and synbiotics with effect on serum cholesterol regulation, types of bile salt hydrolase genes, and substrate specificities have been discussed. PMID:25403164

  10. Hypocholesterolemic activity of nut shell extract of Semecarpus anacardium (Bhilawa) in cholesterol fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Mathur, R; Dixit, V P

    1995-06-01

    Administration of S. anacardium nut shell extract to cholesterol fed rabbits resulted in a significant reduction in serum cholesterol (-73.3%) and serum LDL-Chol. (-80%). The extract feeding also prevented the accumulation of cholesterol/triglycerides in liver, heart muscle and aorta and caused a regression of plaques (75.3-83.5%). These results indicate that S. anacardium is hypocholesterolemic in action and prevents cholesterol induced atheroma. Possible mechanism of action is discussed. PMID:7590951

  11. Detection of lipid phase coexistence and lipid interactions in sphingomyelin/cholesterol membranes by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The phase behavior of binary mixtures of egg sphingomyelin and cholesterol has been inspected by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in the amide I' band region of the spectrum. Because cholesterol does not have any major absorption bands in this region, effects seen in the spectra of mixtures of sphingomyelin and cholesterol can be attributed to the change in the lipid phase and to the interaction with cholesterol. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the overall bandwidth of the amide I' band displays a phase-specific behavior. In addition, it is observed that the amide I' band for a sample exhibiting phase coexistence can be described by a linear combination of the spectra of the individual lipid phases. Description of changes in the amide I' band shape and by that the study of possible hydrogen bonding interactions of sphingomyelin with cholesterol was assisted by the use of curve fitting. It turns out that the presence of hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group of cholesterol and carbonyl group of sphingomyelin is obscured by the complexity of different possible hydrogen bonding and coupling between the N-H (N-D) and the CO group vibrations. PMID:18191633

  12. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  13. β-sitosterol inhibits high cholesterol-induced platelet β-amyloid release.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun; Liu, Jun; Wu, Fengming; Zhu, Xiaoming; Yew, David T; Xu, Jie

    2011-12-01

    Recently, increasing evidence has linked high cholesterol to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting that cholesterol may be a target for developing new compounds to prevent or treat AD. Plant sterols, a group of sterols enriched in plant oils, nuts, and avocados, have the structure very similar to that of cholesterol, and have been widely used to reduce blood cholesterol. Due to their cholesterol-lowering property, plant sterols such as β-sitosterol may also influence cholesterol-depending functions including its role in AD development. Using human platelets, a type of peripheral blood cells containing the most circulating amyloid precursor protein (APP), this study investigated the effect of β-sitosterol on high cholesterol-induced secretion of β amyloid protein (Aβ). It was found that β-sitosterol effectively inhibited high cholesterol-driven platelet Aβ release. In addition, β-sitosterol prevented high cholesterol-induced increase of activities of β- and γ-secretase, two APP cleaving enzymes to generate Aβ. Additional experiments showed that high cholesterol up-regulated lipid raft cholesterol. This effect of cholesterol could be suppressed by β-sitosterol. These findings suggest that β-sitosterol is able to inhibit high cholesterol-induced Aβ release probably through maintenance of membrane cholesterol homeostasis. Given that dietary plant sterols have the potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB), these data suggest that plant sterols such as β-sitosterol may be useful in AD prevention. PMID:21969169

  14. Membrane activity of biomimetic facially amphiphilic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Arnt, Lachelle; Rennie, Jason R; Linser, Sebastian; Willumeit, Regine; Tew, Gregory N

    2006-03-01

    Membranes are a central feature of all biological systems, and their ability to control many cellular processes is critically important. As a result, a better understanding of how molecules bind to and select between biological membranes is an active area of research. Antimicrobial host defense peptides are known to be membrane-active and, in many cases, exhibit discrimination between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The design of synthetic molecules that capture the biological activity of these natural peptides has been shown. In this report, the interaction between our biomimetic structures and different biological membranes is reported using both model vesicle and in vitro bacterial cell experiments. Compound 1 induces 12% leakage at 20 microg/mL against phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) vesicles vs only 3% leakage at 200 microg/mL against phosphatidyl-L-serine (PS)-phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Similarly, a 40% reduction in fluorescence is measured in lipid movement experiments for PG-PE compared to 10% for PS-PC at 600 s. A 30 degrees C increase in the phase transition of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine is observed in the presence of 1. These results show that lipid composition is more important for selectivity than overall net charge. Additionally, the overall concentration of a given lipid is another important factor. An effort is made to connect model vesicle studies with in vitro data and naturally occurring lipid compositions. PMID:16494408

  15. The association of physical activity and cholesterol concentrations across different combinations of central adiposity and body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate if those who are physically active,compared to physically inactive, have better cholesterol profiles across different combinations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Methods: Data from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 16 095). Cholesterol parameters included total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), TC/HDL-C ratio, triglycerides and at herogenic index(Log10 [triglycerides/HDL-C]). Physical activity (PA) was assessed via self-report, with BMI and WC objectively measured. Cholesterol concentrations of 6 combinations of BMI and WC were evaluated among active and inactive participants. Multivariable linear regression analysis was utilized. Results: Findings were not consistent across sex. There was little evidence to suggest an association of PA on TC across varying BMI and WC combinations. For example, among those who had an obese BMI and high WC, inactive participants did not have different TC level when compared to active participants (β = -1.2; 95% CI: -3.9-1.5, P = 0.38). There was evidence to suggest a favorable association of PA on HDL-C, triglycerides and at herogenic index across varying BMI and WC combinations. For example, among those who had an obese BMI and high WC, inactive (vs. active) participants had a lower HDL-C (βadjusted = -1.6, P < 0.01). When considering either gender, there was sufficient evidence to suggest a favorable association of PA on at least one of the evaluated cholesterol parameters for each of the BMI/WC combinations with the exception of normal BMI and high WC. Conclusion: Except for those having normal weight central obesity, PA is favorably associated with cholesterol parameters across various combinations of BMI and WC. PMID:27579256

  16. Role of cholesterol in parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Devendra; Bhatti, Harinderpal Singh; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    The requirement of cholesterol for internalization of eukaryotic pathogens like protozoa (Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Toxoplasmosis) and the exchange of cholesterol along with other metabolites during reproduction in Schistosomes (helminths) under variable circumstances are poorly understood. In patients infected with some other helminthes, alterations in the lipid profile have been observed. Also, the mechanisms involved in lipid changes especially in membrane proteins related to parasite infections remain uncertain. Present review of literature shows that parasites induce significant changes in lipid parameters, as has been shown in the in vitro study where substitution of serum by lipid/cholesterol in medium and in experimental models (in vivo). Thus changes in lipid profile occur in patients having active infections with most of the parasites. Membrane proteins are probably involved in such reactions. All parasites may be metabolising cholesterol, but the exact relationship with pathogenic mechanism is not clear. So far, studies suggest that there may be some factors or enzymes, which allow the parasite to breakup and consume lipid/cholesterol. Further studies are needed for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in vivo. The present review analysis the various studies till date and the role of cholesterol in pathogenesis of different parasitic infections. PMID:15882457

  17. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  18. Cholesterol in unusual places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Nieh, M. P.; Marquardt, D.; Harroun, T. A.; Wassail, S. R.; Katsaras, J.

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cells, and is required for building and maintaining cell membranes, regulating their fluidity, and possibly acting as an antioxidant. Cholesterol has also been implicated in cell signaling processes, where it has been suggested that it triggers the formation of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. Aside from cholesterol's physiological roles, what is also becoming clear is its poor affinity for lipids with unsaturated fatty acids as opposed to saturated lipids, such as sphingomyelin with which it forms rafts. We previously reported the location of cholesterol in membranes with varying degrees of acyl chain unsaturation as determined by neutron diffraction studies (Harroun et al 2006 Biochemistry 45, 1227; Harroun et al 2008 Biochemistry 47, 7090). In bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules with a saturated acyl chain at the sn-1 position or a monounsaturated acyl chain at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions, cholesterol was found in its much-accepted "upright" position. However, in dipolyunsaturated 1,2-diarachidonyl phosphatidylcholine (20:4-20:4PC) membranes the molecule was found sequestered in the center of the bilayers. In further experiments, mixing l-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0-18:1 PC) with 20:4-20:4PC resulted in cholesterol reverting to its upright orientation at approximately 40 mol% 16:0-18:1 PC. Interestingly, the same effect was achieved with only 5 mol% 1,2-dimyristoyl phosphatidylchoile (14:0-14:0PC).

  19. Cholesterol Regulates Multiple Forms of Vesicle Endocytosis at a Mammalian Central Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis in synapses sustains neurotransmission by recycling vesicle membrane and maintaining the homeostasis of synaptic membrane. A role of membrane cholesterol in synaptic endocytosis remains controversial because of conflicting observations, technical limitations in previous studies, and potential interference from nonspecific effects after cholesterol manipulation. Furthermore, it is unclear whether cholesterol participates in distinct forms of endocytosis that function under different activity levels. In this study, applying the whole-cell membrane capacitance measurement to monitor endocytosis in real time at the rat calyx of Held terminals, we found that disrupting cholesterol with dialysis of cholesterol oxidase (COase) or methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) impaired three different forms of endocytosis, i.e., slow endocytosis, rapid endocytosis, and endocytosis of the retrievable membrane that exists at the surface before stimulation. The effects were observed when disruption of cholesterol was mild enough not to change Ca2+ channel current or vesicle exocytosis, indicative of stringent cholesterol requirement in synaptic endocytosis. Extracting cholesterol with high concentrations of MCD reduced exocytosis, mainly by decreasing the readily releasable pool (RRP) and the vesicle replenishment after RRP depletion. Our study suggests that cholesterol is an important, universal regulator in multiple forms of vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses. PMID:25893258

  20. Squalene synthase, a determinant of Raft-associated cholesterol and modulator of cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Brusselmans, Koen; Timmermans, Leen; Van de Sande, Tine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Guan, Guimin; Shechter, Ishaiahu; Claessens, Frank; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2007-06-29

    Several cues for cell proliferation, migration, and survival are transmitted through lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. Cells obtain cholesterol from the circulation but can also synthesize cholesterol de novo through the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway. This pathway, however, has several branches and also produces non-sterol isoprenoids. Squalene synthase (SQS) is the enzyme that determines the switch toward sterol biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that in prostate cancer cells SQS expression is enhanced by androgens, channeling intermediates of the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway toward cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, the resulting increase in de novo synthesis of cholesterol mainly affects the cholesterol content of lipid rafts, while leaving non-raft cholesterol levels unaffected. Conversely, RNA interference-mediated SQS inhibition results in a decrease of raft-associated cholesterol. These data show that SQS activity and de novo cholesterol synthesis are determinants of membrane microdomain-associated cholesterol in cancer cells. Remarkably, SQS knock down also attenuates proliferation and induces death of prostate cancer cells. Similar effects are observed when cancer cells are treated with the chemical SQS inhibitor zaragozic acid A. Importantly, although the anti-tumor effect of statins has previously been attributed to inhibition of protein isoprenylation, the present study shows that specific inhibition of the cholesterol biosynthesis branch of the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway also induces cancer cell death. These findings significantly underscore the importance of de novo cholesterol synthesis for cancer cell biology and suggest that SQS is a potential novel target for antineoplastic intervention. PMID:17483544

  1. Cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover in multiple sclerosis: relationship with disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; McKay, Kyla A; Metz, Luanne M; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Rangachari, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disease that is associated with progressive loss of myelin and subsequent axonal degeneration. Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cellular and myelin membranes. In this systematic review, we examined the relationship between levels of cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover in circulation and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and disease outcomes in adults with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or confirmed MS. Studies suggest that elevated levels of circulating low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), total cholesterol, and particularly, apolipoprotein B and oxidized LDL are associated with adverse clinical and MRI outcomes in MS. These relationships were observed as early as CIS. The studies also suggest that oxysterols, cholesterol precursors, and apolipoprotein E may be markers of specific disease processes in MS, but more research is required to elucidate these processes and relationships. Taken together, the data indicate that cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover have potential to be used clinically as biomarkers of disease activity and may even be implicated in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:26856944

  2. Plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of gingerol- and shogaol-enriched extract is mediated by increasing sterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Jiao, Rui; Ma, Ka Ying; Li, Yuk Man; Wang, Lijun; Man, Sun Wa; Sang, Shengmin; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2014-10-29

    The present study investigated the cholesterol-lowering activity of gingerol- and shogaol-enriched ginger extract (GSE). Thirty hamsters were divided into three groups and fed the control diet or one of the two experimental diets containing 0.5 and 1.0% GSE. Plasma total cholesterol, liver cholesterol, and aorta atherosclerotic plaque were dose-dependently decreased with increasing amounts of GSE added into diets. The fecal sterol analysis showed dietary GSE increased the excretion of both neutral and acidic sterols in a dose-dependent manner. GSE down-regulated the mRNA levels of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 protein (NPC1L1), acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), microsomal triacylglycerol transport protein (MTP), and ATP binding cassette transporter 5 (ABCG5), whereas it up-regulated hepatic cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). It was concluded that beneficial modification of the lipoprotein profile by dietary GSE was mediated by enhancing excretion of fecal cholesterol and bile acids via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 and down-regulation of mRNA of intestinal NPC1L1, ACAT2, and MTP. PMID:25290252

  3. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  4. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  5. Capsaicinoids but not their analogue capsinoids lower plasma cholesterol and possess beneficial vascular activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weihuan; Cheang, Wai San; Wang, Xiaobo; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Ma, Ka Ying; Zheng, Fangrui; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2014-08-20

    Capsaicinoids exist in chili peppers, whereas capsinoids are present in some sweet peppers. The present study investigated the effects of capsaicinoids and capsinoids on plasma lipids, relaxation of the aorta, atherosclerotic plaque development, and fecal sterol excretion in hamsters fed a high-cholesterol diet. Five groups of male hamsters were given the control diet or one of the four experimental diets containing 1.3 mmol of capsaicinoids (NL), 2.6 mmol of capsaicinoids (NH), 1.3 mmol of capsinoids (OL), or 2.6 mmol of capsinoids (OH), respectively. Results showed capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could decrease plasma total cholesterol (TC), reduce the formation of atherosclerotic plaque, and relax the aortic artery. This was accompanied by a 28-175% increase in fecal excretion of acidic sterols in hamsters fed the diets containing capsaicinoids. Similarly, capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could decrease the pad weights of epididymal and prerenal adipose tissues. It was concluded that capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could favorably modulate plasma lipids and possess beneficial vascular activity. PMID:25078570

  6. Identification of the active-site serine in human lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Farooqui, J.; Wohl, R.C.; Kezdy, F.J.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) from human plasma reacts stoichiometrically with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) resulting in the complete loss of transacylase activity. Purified LCAT was covalently labeled with (TH) DFP and the labeled protein was reduced and carboxymethylated. Cyanogen bromide cleavage followed by gel permeation chromatography yielded a peptide of 4-5 KDa (LCAT CNBr-III) containing most of the radioactive label. Preliminary studies comparing the amino acid composition of the LCAT-CNBr-III with the sequence of LCAT indicate that this peptide corresponds to fragment 168-220. Automated Edman degradation of the radioactive peptide recovered a radioactive PTC-amino acid at cycle 14. Of all predicted CNBr fragments only peptide 168-220 contained a serine at residue 14 from the amino terminus of the peptide. The authors conclude that serine 181 is the active site serine of LCAT.

  7. Ldl modified by hypochlorous acid is a potent inhibitor of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    McCall, M R; Carr, A C; Forte, T M; Frei, B

    2001-06-01

    Modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by myeloperoxidase-generated HOCl has been implicated in human atherosclerosis. Incubation of LDL with HOCl generates several reactive intermediates, primarily N-chloramines, which may react with other biomolecules. In this study, we investigated the effects of HOCl-modified LDL on the activity of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), an enzyme essential for high density lipoprotein maturation and the antiatherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. We exposed human LDL (0.5 mg protein/mL) to physiological concentrations of HOCl (25 to 200 micromol/L) and characterized the resulting LDL modifications to apolipoprotein B and lipids; the modified LDL was subsequently incubated with apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma (density >1.063 g/mL fraction), which contains functional LCAT. Increasing concentrations of HOCl caused various modifications to LDL, primarily, loss of lysine residues and increases in N-chloramines and electrophoretic mobility, whereas lipid hydroperoxides were only minor products. LCAT activity was extremely sensitive to HOCl-modified LDL and was reduced by 23% and 93% by LDL preincubated with 25 and 100 micromol/L HOCl, respectively. Addition of 200 micromol/L ascorbate or N-acetyl derivatives of cysteine or methionine completely prevented LCAT inactivation by LDL preincubated with activity. Our data indicate that N-chloramines from HOCl-modified LDL mediate the loss of plasma LCAT activity and provide a novel mechanism by which myeloperoxidase-generated HOCl may promote atherogenesis. PMID:11397717

  8. Membrane Composition Tunes the Outer Hair Cell Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, L.; Sfondouris, J.; Oghalai, J. S.; Pereira, F. A.; Brownell, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω-3 fatty acid, affect membrane mechanical properties in different ways and modulate the function of membrane proteins. We have probed the functional consequence of altering cholesterol and DHA levels in the membranes of OHCs and prestin expressing HEK cells. Large, dynamic and reversible changes in prestin-associated charge movement and OHC motor activity result from altering the concentration of membrane cholesterol. Increasing membrane cholesterol shifts the q/V function ~ 50 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction, possibly a response related to increases in membrane stiffness. The voltage shift is linearly related to total membrane cholesterol. Increasing cholesterol also decreases the total charge moved in a linear fashion. Decreasing membrane cholesterol shifts the q/V function ~ 50 mV in the depolarizing direction with little or no effect on the amount of charge moved. In vivo increases in membrane cholesterol transiently increase but ultimately lead to decreases in DPOAE. Docosahexaenoic acid shifts the q/V function in the hyperpolarizing direction < 15 mV and increases total charge moved. Tuning of cochlear function by membrane cholesterol contributes to the exquisite temporal and frequency processing of mammalian hearing by optimizing the cochlear amplifier.

  9. The Response of the Prostate to Circulating Cholesterol: Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) as a Prominent Node in a Cholesterol-Sensing Network

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Vizio, Dolores Di; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Kim, Jonghwan; Kim, Minjung; Pelton, Kristine; Clinton, Steven K.; Hai, Tsonwin; Hwang, Daehee; Solomon, Keith R.; Freeman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated circulating cholesterol is a systemic risk factor for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, however the manner in which the normal prostate responds to variations in cholesterol levels is poorly understood. In this study we addressed the molecular and cellular effects of elevated and suppressed levels of circulating cholesterol on the normal prostate. Integrated bioinformatic analysis was performed using DNA microarray data from two experimental formats: (1) ventral prostate from male mice with chronically elevated circulating cholesterol and (2) human prostate cells exposed acutely to cholesterol depletion. A cholesterol-sensitive gene expression network was constructed from these data and the transcription factor ATF3 was identified as a prominent node in the network. Validation experiments confirmed that elevated cholesterol reduced ATF3 expression and enhanced proliferation of prostate cells, while cholesterol depletion increased ATF3 levels and inhibited proliferation. Cholesterol reduction in vivo alleviated dense lymphomononuclear infiltrates in the periprostatic adipose tissue, which were closely associated with nerve tracts and blood vessels. These findings open new perspectives on the role of cholesterol in prostate health, and provide a novel role for ATF3, and associated proteins within a large signaling network, as a cholesterol-sensing mechanism. PMID:22768301

  10. Regulation of plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase. II. Activation during alimentary lipemia.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Juliano, J

    1977-03-01

    The effect of dietary fat on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity has been investigated in 14 normal male subjects. After determination of postabsorptive lipid and LCAT levels, a high-fat liquid test meal (1 to 2 gm./kg. body weight) was fed, followed by lipid and LCAT determinations at 2.5 hour intervals. Plasma triglycerides were elevated by 2.5 hours, peaked at 5.0 hours, fell at 7.5 hours, and were normalized by 10 hours. LCAT was unchanged at 2.5 hours but was elevated by 5.0 hours, exhibiting a broad plateau through 10 hours. Most subjects manifested peak responses at 7.5 hours. The mean maximal increase in individual subjects was 37.2 +/- 13.3 (S.D.) percent. LCAT changes similarly followed the elevation and recession of chylomicrons (Sf greater than 400) and very-low-density lipoprotein triglycerides, both of which closely paralleled plasma triglycerides. Enzyme responses were proportional to percentage elevations of plasma triglycerides (r = 0.93, p less than 0.01) and related to quantity of fat in the test diet. Three subjects who ingested the test diet devoid of the fat component showed no significant change in enzyme activity. Enzyme progress curves revealed linearity for 3 hours for both postabsorptive and lipemic (7.5 hour) plasma from the same subjects, supporting the validity of the assay as a measure of enzyme rate. These studies demonstrate an increase in cholesterol esterifying activity temporally related to the clearance of alimentary particles, suggesting a physiologic role in the clearance process. PMID:839110

  11. Cholesterol ester hydrolase in pig liver is activated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.S.; Dubin, E.; Margolis, S.

    1986-05-01

    To examine whether hepatic neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) is regulated by phosphorylation, the authors have assayed CEH activity from pig liver cytosol by measuring /sup 14/C-oleate release from labeled cholesteryl oleate at pH 7.4. When pig liver cytosol was incubated with 2 mM Mg and 0.5 mM ATP, CEH activity was increased (141 +/- 8% of control, mean +/- SEM). Addition of 25..mu..M cyclic AMP (cAMP) further activated CEH activity (164 +/- 4% of control) as compared to incubation with Mg and ATP (p < 0.02). In the presence of 5 mM EDTA or in the absence of either Mg or ATP, no activation of CEH was observed. The activation was completely abolished by further incubation of activated cytosol with E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Activation of CEH activity was partially prevented by the addition of protein kinase inhibitor (p < 0.02) and this effect was completely reversed in the presence of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase (p < 0.05). To examine further the role of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CEH activity was purified 240-fold by 35% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ precipitation and Sepharose 4B chromatography. Incubation of partially purified CEH fractions with Mg, ATP and cAMP did not increase CEH activity. Addition of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activated CEH activity of partially purified fractions. The authors observations indicate that pig liver CEH is activated by phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  12. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  13. α-Synuclein-induced synapse damage in cultured neurons is mediated by cholesterol-sensitive activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated forms of the α-synuclein (αSN) is associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The loss of synapses is an important event in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we show that aggregated recombinant human αSN, but not βSN, triggered synapse damage in cultured neurons as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. Pre-treatment with the selective cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitors AACOCF3 and MAFP protected neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with the αSN-induced activation of synaptic cPLA2 and the production of prostaglandin E2. The activation of cPLA2 is the first step in the generation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF receptor antagonists (ginkgolide B or Hexa-PAF) also protect neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. αSN-induced synapse damage was also reduced in neurons pre-treated with the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor (squalestatin). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that αSN triggered synapse damage via hyperactivation of cPLA2. They also indicate that αSN-induced activation of cPLA2 is influenced by the cholesterol content of membranes. Inhibitors of this pathway that can cross the blood brain barrier may protect against the synapse damage seen during PD. PMID:25761116

  14. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  15. Antihyperlipidemic effect of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) protein isolate in rats fed a normal and high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arundhati; Dhar, Pubali; Ghosh, Santinath

    2010-01-01

    The dietary influence of sesame protein isolate (protein content 91.5%), produced from dehulled, defatted sesame meal, on blood and tissue lipid profile and lipid peroxidation has been assessed in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. To evaluate their hypocholesterolemic and antioxidative activity in vivo, we fed 18% sesame protein isolate with or without 2% cholesterol in comparison with casein to rats for 28 d. We determined plasma total protein, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triacylglycerol as well as susceptibility of plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid to oxidation ex vivo. Liver tissue lipid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and lipid peroxidations were also determined. The total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were significantly reduced in the sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group than the corresponding control casein groups. HDL-cholesterol level was also increased in sesame protein isolate (41%) and protein isolate containing cholesterol group (38%) than the corresponding control casein and casein containing cholesterol groups. There was 49% and 64% lowering of plasma lipid peroxidation as well as 36% and 56% lowering of lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility (LOS) in the 2 experimental groups (sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group) than the corresponding control (casein and casein containing cholesterol) groups. There was significant lowering of erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation (68% and 63% lowering in sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol groups) and liver lipid peroxidation (61% and 76% lowering in the 2 experimental groups than the corresponding control casein groups). Therefore, our results indicate that sesame protein isolate decreases cholesterol concentration in plasma, increases HDL-cholesterol, and also decreases plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation with or

  16. Optically Active Liquid Crystalline Polyoxometalates via Electrostatic Encapsulation with Cholesterol-Containing Amphiphile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Jingfang; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Guohua; Li, Bao; Li, Wen; Wei, Xuehong; Duan, Xin-E; Wu, Lixin

    2016-07-20

    A novel cholesterol-containing amphiphile was designed and prepared in the study, which is a room-temperature ionic liquid crystal over a broad temperature range with pronounced chiroptical properties. Four types of inorganic polyoxometalates (PMs) with different numbers of charges were encapsulated by the chiral amphiphile. The incorporation of chiral organic cations triggers achiral PMs in the complexes to show induced chirality through intermolecular interactions, as demonstrated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The electrostatic encapsulation with mesomorphic promoters provides the inorganic PMs with liquid crystalline behavior, characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The strategy applied herein represents a unique example of liquid crystalline PM complexes with optical activity. PMID:27197844

  17. High Pre-β1 HDL Concentrations and Low Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase Activities Are Strong Positive Risk Markers for Ischemic Heart Disease and Independent of HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amar A.; Sampson, Maureen; Warnick, Russell; Muniz, Nehemias; Vaisman, Boris; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that patients with high HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) may have dysfunctional HDL or unrecognized nonconventional risk factors. METHODS Individuals with IHD (Copenhagen University Hospital) and either high HDL-C (n = 53; women ≥735 mg/L; men ≥619 mg/L) or low HDL-C (n = 42; women ≤387 mg/L; men ≤341 mg/L) were compared with individuals without IHD (Copenhagen City Heart Study) matched by age, sex, and HDL-C concentrations (n = 110). All participants had concentrations within reference intervals for LDL-C (<1600 mg/L) and triglyceride (<1500 mg/L), and none were treated with lipid-lowering medications. Pre-β1 HDL and phospholipid transfer protein concentrations were measured by using commercial kits and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity by using a proteoliposome cholesterol esterification assay. RESULTS Pre-β1 HDL concentrations were 2-fold higher in individuals with IHD vs no IHD in both the high [63 (5.7) vs 35 (2.3) mg/L; P < 0.0001] and low HDL-C [49 (5.0) vs 27 (1.5) mg/L; P = 0.001] groups. Low LCAT activity was also associated with IHD in the high [95.2 (6.7) vs 123.0 (5.3) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.002] and low [93.4 (8.3) vs 113.5 (4.9) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.03] HDL-C groups. ROC curves for pre-β1 HDL in the high–HDL-C groups yielded an area under the curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61–0.81) for predicting IHD, which increased to 0.92 (0.87–0.97) when LCAT was included. Similar results were obtained for low HDL-C groups. An inverse correlation between LCAT activity and pre-β1 HDL was observed (r2 = 0.30; P < 0.0001) in IHD participants, which was stronger in the low HDL-C group (r2 = 0.56; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS IHD was associated with high pre-β1 HDL concentrations and low LCAT levels, yielding correct classification in more than 90% of the IHD cases for which both were measured, thus making pre-β1 HDL concentration and LCAT activity level potentially

  18. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Khondker R; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A; Valenzuela, Stella M

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  19. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Khondker R.; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  20. Cholesterol interactions with tetracosenoic acid phospholipids in model cell membranes: role of the double-bond position.

    PubMed

    Ayanoglu, E; Chiche, B H; Beatty, M; Djerassi, C; Düzgüneş, N

    1990-04-10

    The synthesis and thermotropic properties of 1,2-di-(9Z)-9-tetracosenoylphosphatidylcholine [delta 9-PC(24:1,24:1), 1], 1,2-di-(5Z)-5-tetracosenoylphosphatidylcholine [delta 5-PC(24:1,24:1), 2], and 1,2-di-(15Z)-15- tetracosenoylphosphatidylcholine [delta 15-PC(24:1,24:1), 3] are reported. Liposomes prepared from these phospholipids differ from those of the natural sponge phospholipids, 1,2-di-(5Z,9Z)-5,9-hexacosadienoylphosphatidylcholine (4a) and the corresponding ethanolamine (4b), both of which virtually exclude cholesterol from their bilayers. The behavior of 1 and 2 is similar to that of 1,2-di-(6Z,9Z)-6,9-hexacosadienoylphosphatidylcholine (5), which exhibits a partial molecular interaction with cholesterol. In the case of 3, cholesterol appears to interact with the saturated acyl chain regions of this phospholipid in a manner similar to that of its interaction with DPPC acyl chains. This study delineates the effect of the double-bond location in long fatty acyl chains of phospholipids on their interactions with cholesterol. PMID:2354147

  1. Sphingomyelinase D Activity in Model Membranes: Structural Effects of in situ Generation of Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Roberto P.; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes. PMID:22558302

  2. Membrane activity of the phospholipase C-δ1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    PH-PLCδ1 [the PH domain (pleckstrin homology domain) of PLCδ1 (phospholipase C-δ1)] is among the best-characterized phosphoinositide-binding domains. PH-PLCδ1 binds with high specificity to the headgroup of PtdIns(4,5)P2, but little is known about its interfacial properties. In the present study, we show that PH-PLCδ1 is also membrane-active and can insert significantly into PtdIns(4,5)P2-containing monolayers at physiological (bilayer-equivalent) surface pressures. However, this membrane activity appears to involve interactions distinct from those that target PH-PLCδ1 to the PtdIns(4,5)P2 headgroup. Whereas the majority of PtdIns(4,5)P2-bound PH-PLCδ1 can be displaced by adding excess of soluble headgroup [Ins(1,4,5)P3], membrane activity of PH-PLCδ1 cannot. PH-PLCδ1 differs from other phosphoinositide-binding domains in that its membrane insertion does not require that the phosphoinositide-binding site be occupied. Significant monolayer insertion remains when the phosphoinositide-binding site is mutated, and PH-PLCδ1 can insert into monolayers that contain no PtdIns(4,5)P2 at all. Our results suggest a model in which reversible membrane binding of PH-PLCδ1, mediated by PtdIns(4,5)P2 or other acidic phospholipids, occurs without membrane insertion. Accumulation of the PH domain at the membrane surface enhances the efficiency of insertion, but does not significantly affect its extent, whereas the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the lipid mixture promotes the extent of insertion. This is the first report of membrane activity in an isolated PH domain and has implications for understanding the membrane targeting by this common type of domain. PMID:15755258

  3. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  4. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  5. Case report: A novel apolipoprotein A-I missense mutation apoA-I (Arg149Ser)Boston associated with decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activation and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Asztalos, Bela F; Polisecki, Eliana; Zachariah, Benoy; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel heterozygous apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) missense mutation (c.517C>A, p.Arg149Ser, designated as apoA-IBoston) in a 67-year-old woman and her 2 sons, who had mean serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-I in very large α-1 HDL that were 10%, 35%, and 16% of normal, respectively (all P < .05). The percentage of HDL cholesterol in the esterified form was also significantly (P < .05) reduced to 52% of control values. Cholesteryl ester tranfer protein (CETP) activity was normal. The mean global, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 and scavenger receptor B type I-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux capacity in apoB-depleted serum from affected family members were 41%, 37%, 47%, 54%, and 48% of control values, respectively (all P < .05). lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in plasma was 71% of controls, whereas in the cell-based assay, it was 73% of control values (P < .05). The data indicate that this novel apoA-I missense is associated with markedly decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and very large α-1 HDL, as well as decreased serum cellular cholesterol efflux and LCAT activity, but not with premature coronary heart disease, similar to other apoA-I mutations that have been associated with decreased LCAT activity. PMID:26073399

  6. Temperature-Dependent Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Gamma Linolenic Acid Effects on Phospholipid Membranes With and Without Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonar, D.; Horasanb, N.; Sünnetçioğlu, M. Maral

    2016-07-01

    Free docosahexaenoic acid (DHAn-3) and gamma linolenic acid (GLAn-6) effects on dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes were studied as a function of temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-, 16-DS) spin labels were utilized to obtain information from the interfacial and alkyl chain region, respectively. In the studied temperature range, the presence of DHAn-3 or GLAn-6 caused decreases in maximum hyperfi ne splitting values and correlation times of DMPC membranes. Both in the interfacial region and depths of membrane, changes were more pronounced for DHAn-3 in pure DMPC. In the presence of cholesterol (CH), DHAn-3 and GLAn-6 effects were similar and more pronounced in the depths of the membrane. The changes in the structure and dynamics of samples were obtained from simulations of spectra, which indicated some changes in the number of spectral components by incorporation of DHAn-3 and GLAn-6. In the interfacial region and below the main phase transition temperature of DMPC, there was an increase in heterogeneity. For temperatures above the phase transition, a more homogeneous environment for spin label was obtained in the presence of fatty acids.

  7. Designing Mimics of Membrane Active Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sgolastra, Federica; deRonde, Brittany M.; Sarapas, Joel M.; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS As a semi-permeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) because of their unique properties. In this account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, it has been possible to generate scaffolds with biological potency superior to the natural analogs. In one case, a compound has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan)staph infections. Modern biophysical assays highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition leading to negative Gaussian curvature, a requirement for both pore formation and endosomal escape. The complexity of this interplay between lipids, bilayer components, and the scaffolds remains to be better resolved, but significant new insight has been provided. It is worthwhile to consider the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to ‘pore formation.’ More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or cell penetrating peptide, mimics. The combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium) rich side chains has produced an array of polymers with robust transduction (and delivery) activity. Being a new area, the fundamental interactions between these new scaffolds and the plasma membrane are just beginning to be understood. Negative Gaussian

  8. Biological autoxidation. II. Cholesterol esters as inert barrier antioxidants. Self-assembly of porous membrane sacs. An hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kon, S H

    1978-01-01

    The antioxidation defenses recognized thus far appear too weak. Needed are inert barriers to encapsulate foci of activated oxygen (FAOs) and contain their spreading. These capsules must: 1. self-assemble nonenzymatically and spontaneously in face of adversity; 2. resist oxidation and dissolution in water; and 3. be moderately fluid and elastic enough to withstand flexing by tissues. Evidence shows activated oxygen: a. is produced by common cholesterolester (CE)-raising agents; b. boosts accumulation of CEs; and c. splits low-density lipoproteins (LDL), thus releasing CE-rich coalescence-prone lipid micelles. I am proposing that CEs, combined with polar lipids, are uniquely suited to form inert-lipid antioxidation barriers (ILABs). Porous ILAB capsules self-assemble from lipid micelles released by oxidatively degraded LDL. The capsules are thermodynamically unstable but elastic, durable and capable of self-repair through oxidation of ambient LDL. All capsules tend to contract into spheres. Enclosed needle-like "foreign bodies", such as asbestos, puncture the contracting capsules. Hence the odd bulbous architecture of asbestos bodies. ILABs protect from--and their failure initiates and promotes--carcinogenesis and atherosclerosis. ILABs may be mediators of membrane biogenesis. The loss of arterial flexibility in atherosclerosis protects ILAB capsules from breakage. PMID:748727

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Are Able to Manage Internal Cholesterol Levels under Nutritional Lipid Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Miria Gomes; Visbal, Gonzalo; Salgado, Leonardo T.; Vidal, Juliana Cunha; Godinho, Joseane L. P.; De Cicco, Nuccia N. T.; Atella, Geórgia C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes store high amounts of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in reservosomes. These unique organelles are responsible for cellular digestion by providing substrates for homeostasis and parasite differentiation. Here we demonstrate that under nutritional lipid stress, epimastigotes preferentially mobilized reservosome lipid stocks, instead of lipid bodies, leading to the consumption of parasite cholesterol reservoirs and production of ergosterol. Starved epimastigotes acquired more LDL-NBD-cholesterol by endocytosis and distributed the exogenous cholesterol to their membranes faster than control parasites. Moreover, the parasites were able to manage internal cholesterol levels, alternating between consumption and accumulation. With normal lipid availability, parasites esterified cholesterol exhibiting an ACAT-like activity that was sensitive to Avasimibe in a dose-dependent manner. This result also implies that exogenous cholesterol has a role in lipid reservoirs in epimastigotes. PMID:26068009

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Are Able to Manage Internal Cholesterol Levels under Nutritional Lipid Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Miria Gomes; Visbal, Gonzalo; Salgado, Leonardo T; Vidal, Juliana Cunha; Godinho, Joseane L P; De Cicco, Nuccia N T; Atella, Geórgia C; de Souza, Wanderley; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes store high amounts of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in reservosomes. These unique organelles are responsible for cellular digestion by providing substrates for homeostasis and parasite differentiation. Here we demonstrate that under nutritional lipid stress, epimastigotes preferentially mobilized reservosome lipid stocks, instead of lipid bodies, leading to the consumption of parasite cholesterol reservoirs and production of ergosterol. Starved epimastigotes acquired more LDL-NBD-cholesterol by endocytosis and distributed the exogenous cholesterol to their membranes faster than control parasites. Moreover, the parasites were able to manage internal cholesterol levels, alternating between consumption and accumulation. With normal lipid availability, parasites esterified cholesterol exhibiting an ACAT-like activity that was sensitive to Avasimibe in a dose-dependent manner. This result also implies that exogenous cholesterol has a role in lipid reservoirs in epimastigotes. PMID:26068009

  11. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  12. BacMam production of active recombinant lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase: Expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Romanow, William G; Piper, Derek E; Fordstrom, Preston; Thibault, Stephen; Zhou, Mingyue; Walker, Nigel P C

    2016-09-01

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key enzyme in the esterification of cholesterol and its subsequent incorporation into the core of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. It is also involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the mechanism by which cholesterol is removed from peripheral cells and transported to the liver for excretion. These processes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD) and may have therapeutic implications. This work describes the use of baculovirus as a transducing vector to express LCAT in mammalian cells, expression of the recombinant protein as a high-mannose glycoform suitable for deglycosylation by Endo H and its purification to homogeneity and characterization. The importance of producing underglycosylated forms of secreted glycoproteins to obtain high-resolution crystal structures is discussed. PMID:26363122

  13. Semisynthesis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of some cholesterol-based hydrazone derivatives as insecticidal agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Shao, Yonghua; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Huan, Qu; Yu, Xiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Xu, Hui

    2013-09-01

    In continuation of our program aimed at the discovery and development of natural-product-based insecticidal agents, four series of novel cholesterol-based hydrazone derivatives were synthesized, and their insecticidal activity was tested against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) in vivo at 1mg/mL. All the derivatives showed the better insecticidal activity than their precursor cholesterol. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model demonstrated that six descriptors such as RDF085v, Mor06u, Mor11u, Dv, HATS0v and H-046, are likely to influence the insecticidal activity of these compounds. Among them, two important ones are the Mor06u and RDF085v. PMID:23891182

  14. Regulation of Rac1 translocation and activation by membrane domains and their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Kiessling, Volker; Wan, Chen; Hoffman, Brenton D.; Norambuena, Andres; Tamm, Lukas K.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activation of Rac1 and related Rho GTPases involves dissociation from Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor proteins and translocation to membranes, where they bind effectors. Previous studies have suggested that the binding of Rac1 to membranes requires, and colocalizes with, cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered (lo) membrane domains (lipid rafts). Here, we have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that robustly detects Rac1 membrane targeting in living cells. Surprisingly, FRET with acceptor constructs that were targeted to either raft or non-raft areas indicated that Rac1 was present in both regions. Functional studies showed that Rac1 localization to non-raft regions decreased GTP loading as a result of inactivation by GTPase-activating proteins. In vitro, Rac1 translocation to supported lipid bilayers also required lo domains, yet Rac1 was concentrated in the liquid-disordered (ld) phase. Single-molecule analysis demonstrated that translocation occurred preferentially at lo–ld boundaries. These results, therefore, suggest that Rac1 translocates to the membrane at domain boundaries, then diffuses into raft and non-raft domains, which controls interactions. These findings resolve discrepancies in our understanding of Rac biology and identify novel mechanisms by which lipid rafts modulate Rho GTPase signaling. PMID:24695858

  15. Both STAT3 activation and cholesterol efflux contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chongren; Houston, Barbara A; Storey, Carl; LeBoeuf, Renee C

    2016-05-01

    ABCA1 exports excess cholesterol from cells to apoA-I and is essential for HDL synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that ABCA1 protects against cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 activates signaling molecule Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), which optimizes the cholesterol efflux activity of ABCA1. ABCA1-mediated activation of JAK2 also activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which significantly attenuates proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. To determine the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction, we identified two special ABCA1 mutants, one with normal STAT3-activating capacity but lacking cholesterol efflux ability and the other with normal cholesterol efflux ability but lacking STAT3-activating capacity. We showed that activation of STAT3 by the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 without cholesterol efflux could significantly decrease proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. Mechanistic studies showed that the anti-inflammatory effect of the apoA-I/ABCA1/STAT3 pathway is suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 dependent. Moreover, we showed that apoA-I/ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux without STAT3 activation can also reduce proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. These findings suggest that the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 activates cholesterol efflux and STAT3 branch pathways to synergistically suppress inflammation in macrophages. PMID:26989082

  16. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  17. N-terminal domain of PB1-F2 protein of influenza A virus can fold into amyloid-like oligomers and damage cholesterol and cardiolipid containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Ajjaji, Dalila; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Mazerat, Sandra; Chevalier, Christophe; Vidic, Jasmina

    2016-08-12

    PB1-F2 protein is a factor of virulence of influenza A viruses which increases the mortality and morbidity associated with infection. Most seasonal H1N1 Influenza A viruses express nowadays a truncated version of PB1-F2. Here we show that truncation of PB1-F2 modified supramolecular organization of the protein in a membrane-mimicking environment. In addition, full-length PB1-F2(1-90) and C-terminal PB1-F2 domain (53-90), efficiently permeabilized various anionic liposomes while N-terminal domain PB1-F2(1-52) only lysed cholesterol and cardiolipin containing lipid bilayers. These findings suggest that the truncation of PB1-F2 may impact the pathogenicity of a given virus strain. PMID:27282484

  18. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  19. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  20. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yi; Rezelj, Saša; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Anderluh, Gregor; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Listeriolysin-O (LLO) plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context. PMID:27104344

  1. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yi; Rezelj, Saša; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Anderluh, Gregor; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Listeriolysin-O (LLO) plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context. PMID:27104344

  2. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam; Noutsi, Pakiza; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  3. Chronic activation of FXR in transgenic mice caused perinatal toxicity and sensitized mice to cholesterol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Inaba, Yuka; Lu, Peipei; Xu, Meishu; He, Jinhan; Zhao, Yueshui; Guo, Grace L; Kuruba, Ramalinga; de la Vega, Rona; Evans, Rhobert W; Li, Song; Xie, Wen

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4, or NR1H4) is highly expressed in the liver and intestine. Previous reports have suggested beneficial functions of FXR in the homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose, as well as in promoting liver regeneration and inhibiting carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of chronic FXR activation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and tissue specifically express the activated form of FXR in the liver and intestine. Unexpectedly, the transgenic mice showed several intriguing phenotypes, including partial neonatal lethality, growth retardation, and spontaneous liver toxicity. The transgenic mice also displayed heightened sensitivity to a high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatotoxicity but resistance to the gallstone formation. The phenotypes were transgene specific, because they were abolished upon treatment with doxycycline to silence the transgene expression. The perinatal toxicity, which can be rescued by a maternal vitamin supplement, may have resulted from vitamin deficiency due to low biliary bile acid output as a consequence of inhibition of bile acid formation. Our results also suggested that the fibroblast growth factor-inducible immediate-early response protein 14 (Fn14), a member of the proinflammatory TNF family, is a FXR-responsive gene. However, the contribution of Fn14 induction in the perinatal toxic phenotype of the transgenic mice remains to be defined. Because FXR is being explored as a therapeutic target, our results suggested that a chronic activation of this nuclear receptor may have an unintended side effect especially during the perinatal stage. PMID:25719402

  4. Chronic Activation of FXR in Transgenic Mice Caused Perinatal Toxicity and Sensitized Mice to Cholesterol Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Inaba, Yuka; Lu, Peipei; Xu, Meishu; He, Jinhan; Zhao, Yueshui; Guo, Grace L.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; de la Vega, Rona; Evans, Rhobert W.; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4, or NR1H4) is highly expressed in the liver and intestine. Previous reports have suggested beneficial functions of FXR in the homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose, as well as in promoting liver regeneration and inhibiting carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of chronic FXR activation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and tissue specifically express the activated form of FXR in the liver and intestine. Unexpectedly, the transgenic mice showed several intriguing phenotypes, including partial neonatal lethality, growth retardation, and spontaneous liver toxicity. The transgenic mice also displayed heightened sensitivity to a high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatotoxicity but resistance to the gallstone formation. The phenotypes were transgene specific, because they were abolished upon treatment with doxycycline to silence the transgene expression. The perinatal toxicity, which can be rescued by a maternal vitamin supplement, may have resulted from vitamin deficiency due to low biliary bile acid output as a consequence of inhibition of bile acid formation. Our results also suggested that the fibroblast growth factor-inducible immediate-early response protein 14 (Fn14), a member of the proinflammatory TNF family, is a FXR-responsive gene. However, the contribution of Fn14 induction in the perinatal toxic phenotype of the transgenic mice remains to be defined. Because FXR is being explored as a therapeutic target, our results suggested that a chronic activation of this nuclear receptor may have an unintended side effect especially during the perinatal stage. PMID:25719402

  5. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  6. Improved Coarse-Grained Modeling of Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Michael D.; Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-24

    In mammalian cells cholesterol is essential for membrane function, but in excess can be cytototoxic. The cellular response to acute cholesterol loading involves biophysical-based mechanisms that regulate cholesterol levels, through modulation of the “activity” or accessibility of cholesterol to extra-membrane acceptors. Experiments and united atom (UA) simulations show that at high concentrations of cholesterol, lipid bilayers thin significantly and cholesterol availability to external acceptors increases substantially. Such cholesterol activation is critical to its trafficking within cells. Here we aim to reduce the computational cost to enable simulation of large and complex systems involved in cholesterol regulation, such as those including oxysterols and cholesterol-sensing proteins. To accomplish this, we have modified the published MARTINI coarse-grained force field to improve its predictions of cholesterol-induced changes in both macroscopic and microscopic properties of membranes. Most notably, MARTINI fails to capture both the (macroscopic) area condensation and membrane thickening seen at less than 30% cholesterol and the thinning seen above 40% cholesterol. The thinning at high concentration is critical to cholesterol activation. Microscopic properties of interest include cholesterol-cholesterol radial distribution functions (RDFs), tilt angle, and accessible surface area. First, we develop an “angle-corrected” model wherein we modify the coarse-grained bond angle potentials based on atomistic simulations. This modification significantly improves prediction of macroscopic properties, most notably the thickening/thinning behavior, and also slightly improves microscopic property prediction relative to MARTINI. Second, we add to the angle correction a “volume correction” by also adjusting phospholipid bond lengths to achieve a more accurate volume per molecule. The angle + volume correction substantially further improves the quantitative

  7. Temperature and cholesterol composition-dependent behavior of 1-myristoyl-2-[12-[(5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonyl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membranes.

    PubMed

    Troup, Gregory M; Wrenn, Steven P

    2004-09-01

    We present a steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence emission spectra analysis of the membrane probe 1-myristoyl-2-[12-[(5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonyl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DANSYL) in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and cholesterol multi-lamellar vesicles (MLV) prepared by modified rapid solvent exchange. We report that the dose-dependent cholesterol-induced blue shifts in the steady-state fluorescence emission spectra observed in DMPC MLV are due to complex solvent effects that include time-dependent dipolar relaxation and the formation of internal charge transfer (ICT) states. A key finding of this investigation is identification of two distinguishable DANSYL populations existing at both shallow and deep locations in the membrane; these two DANSYL populations are evidence of laterally phase-separated domains at cholesterol compositions between X(chol) = 0.30 and 0.60 at 30 degrees C in DMPC MLV. PMID:15351269

  8. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  9. Cholesterol-modulating agents kill acute myeloid leukemia cells and sensitize them to therapeutics by blocking adaptive cholesterol responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Henry Y; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Willman, Cheryl L; Zager, Richard A; Banker, Deborah E

    2003-05-01

    The mevalonate pathway produces many critical substances in cells, including sterols essential for membrane structure and isoprenoids vital to the function of many membrane proteins. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway. Because cholesterol is a product of this pathway, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are used to treat hypercholesterolemia. Statins are also toxic to several malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although this toxicity has been attributed to the inhibition of Ras/Rho isoprenylation, we have previously shown that statin toxicity in primary AML cells (AMLs) does not correlate with Ras isoprenylation or with activating Ras mutations. In other studies, we have shown that hypoxic and oxidant injuries induce cholesterol increments in renal tubule cells and that statins sensitize these cells to injury by blocking protective cholesterol responses. We now demonstrate that exposing particular AMLs to radiochemotherapy induces much greater cellular cholesterol increments than those seen in similarly treated normal bone marrow. Treatment of these AMLs with mevastatin or zaragozic acid (which inhibits cholesterol synthesis but not isoprenoid synthesis) attenuates the cholesterol increments and sensitizes cells to radiochemotherapy. The extent of toxicity is affected by the availability of extracellular lipoproteins, further suggesting that cellular cholesterol is critical to cell survival in particular AMLs. Because zaragozic acid does not inhibit isoprenoid synthesis, these data suggest that cholesterol modulation is an important mechanism whereby statins exert toxic effects on some AMLs and that cholesterol modulators may improve therapeutic ratios in AML by impacting cholesterol-dependent cytoresistance. PMID:12506040

  10. Cellular cholesterol accumulation modulates high fat high sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced ER stress and hepatic inflammasome activation in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Amir; Nesan, Dinushan; Tavallaee, Ghazaleh; Sue-Chue-Lam, Ian; Chien, Kevin; Maguire, Graham F; Naples, Mark; Zhang, Jing; Magomedova, Lilia; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L; Ng, Dominic S

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is the form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease posing risk to progress into serious long term complications. Human and pre-clinical models implicate cellular cholesterol dysregulation playing important role in its development. Mouse model studies suggest synergism between dietary cholesterol and fat in contributing to NASH but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our laboratory previously reported the primary importance of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol (ER-Chol) in regulating hepatic ER stress by comparing the responses of wild type, Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ and Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, to a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD). Here we further investigated the roles of ER-Chol and ER stress in HFHS diet-induced NASH using the same strains. With HFHS diet feeding, both WT and Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ accumulate ER-Chol in association with ER stress and inflammasome activation but the Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice are protected. By contrast, all three strains accumulate cholesterol crystal, in correlation with ER-Chol, albeit less so in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice. By comparison, HCD feeding per se (i) is sufficient to promote steatosis and activate inflammasomes, and (ii) results in dramatic accumulation of cholesterol crystal which is linked to inflammasome activation in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, independent of ER-Chol. Our data suggest that both dietary fat and cholesterol each independently promote steatosis, cholesterol crystal accumulation and inflammasome activation through distinct but complementary pathways. In vitro studies using palmitate-induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells confirm the key roles by cellular cholesterol in the induction of steatosis and inflammasome activations. These novel findings provide opportunities for exploring a cellular cholesterol-focused strategy for treatment of NASH. PMID:27090939

  11. Chondrocytes Utilize a Cholesterol-Dependent Lipid Translocator To Externalize Phosphatidylserine†

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Golub, Ellis; Otis, Linda; Harrison, Gerald; Phillips, Christine; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate chondrocytes release plasma membrane (PM) derived matrix vesicles (MV), which are the site of initial hydroxyapatite crystal formation. MV constituents which facilitate the mineralization process include the integral membrane ectoenzymes alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) and nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase (NPP1/PC-1), along with a phosphatidylserine- (PS-) rich membrane surface that binds annexins and calcium, resulting in enhanced calcium entry into MV. In this study, we determined that chick growth plate MV were highly enriched in membrane raft microdomains containing high levels of cholesterol, glycophosphatidylinositol- (GPI-) anchored ALPase, and phosphatidylserine (PS) localized to the external leaflet of the bilayer. To determine how such membrane microdomains arise during chondrocyte maturation, we explored the role of PM cholesterol-dependent lipid assemblies in regulating the activities of lipid translocators involved in the externalization of PS. We first isolated and determined the composition of detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from chondrocyte PM. DRMs isolated from chondrocyte PM were enhanced in ganglioside 1 (GM1) and cholesterol as well as GPI-anchored ALPase. Furthermore, these membrane domains were enriched in PS (localized to the external leaflet of the bilayer) and had significantly higher ALPase activity than non-cholesterol-enriched domains. To understand the role of cholesterol-dependent lipid assemblies in the externalization of PS, we measured the activities of two lipid transporters involved in PS externalization, aminophospholipid translocase (APLT) and phospholipid scramblase (PLSCR1), during maturation of a murine chondrocytic cell line, N1511. In this report, we provide the first evidence that maturing chondrocytes express PLSCR1 and have scramblase activity. We propose that redistribution of PS is dependent on an increase in phospholipid scramblase activity and a decrease

  12. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity of spider brake (Pteris multifida) with rats fed a high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lee, Hou-I; Yang, Clinton; Yang, Chi-Ching

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the possible potency of the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of spider brake [(Pteris multifida Poiret (Pteridaceae)]. We investigated this by feeding the hyperlipidemic Sprague-Dawley rats, caused by a high cholesterol diet, with lyophilized powder of spider brake (LSB) and compared the result with the rats fed with beta-sitosterol. The results indicated that the administration of lyophilized powder of spider brake (LSB) lowered the hyperlipidemic level on rats. The relative weights of the liver, adipose tissue, and relative adipose tissue of 10% substitutions of LSB group (LSB-10) showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) by 6%, 15.9%, and 14.3% in contrast to the untreated counterparts (control), respectively. A significantly lower (P < 0.05) plasma TG, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, liver CH, and TG contents were also observed in LSB-10 compared to the untreated counterparts (by 36.8%, 21%, 18.7%, 10.2% and 14.3% reduction, respectively). Simultaneously, the wet fecal weight, dry fecal weight, nitrogen compounds, excretion of neutral steroids, and bile acids significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 9.6%, 10.6%, 23.7%, 9.7%, and 3.4% respectively. The results showed that LSB could cause not only a reduction in CH and TG, but also could increase the excretion of lipids and metabolic by-products via the intestinal tract. PMID:20645845

  13. Cholesterol lipids of Borrelia burgdorferi form lipid rafts and are required for the bactericidal mechanism of a complement-independent antibody

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Timothy J; Crowley, Jameson T; Cusack, Brian J; Pathak, Priyadarshini; Benach, Jordi; London, Erwin; Garcia-Monco, Juan C; Benach, Jorge L

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Borrelia burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease) is unusual in that it contains free cholesterol and cholesterol glycolipids. It is also susceptible to complement-independent bactericidal antibodies, such as CB2, a monoclonal IgG1 against outer surface protein B (OspB). The bactericidal action of CB2 requires the presence of cholesterol glycolipids and cholesterol. Through ultrastructural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these cholesterol glycolipids exist as lipid raft-like microdomains in the outer membrane of cultured and mouse-derived B. burgdorferi, and in model membranes from B. burgdorferi lipids. The order and size of the microdomains of intact cells and model membranes are temperature sensitive and correlate with the bactericidal activity of CB2. Here we demonstrate the existence of cholesterol-containing lipid raft-like microdomains in a prokaryote. PMID:20951967

  14. Water permeation through Nafion membranes: the role of water activity.

    PubMed

    Majsztrik, Paul; Bocarsly, Andrew; Benziger, Jay

    2008-12-25

    The permeation of water through 1100 equivalent weight Nation membranes has been measured for film thicknesses of 51-254 microm, temperatures of 30-80 degrees C, and water activities (a(w)) from 0.3 to 1 (liquid water). Water permeation coefficients increased with water content in Nafion. For feed side water activity in the range 0 < a(w) < 0.8, permeation coefficients increased linearly with water activity and scaled inversely with membrane thickness. The permeation coefficients were independent of membrane thickness when the feed side of the membrane was in contact with liquid water (a(w) = 1). The permeation coefficient for a 127 microm thick membrane increased by a factor of 10 between contacting the feed side of the membrane to water vapor (a(w) = 0.9) compared to liquid water (a(w) = 1). Water permeation couples interfacial transport across the fluid membrane interface with water transport through the hydrophilic phase of Nafion. At low water activity the hydrophilic volume fraction is small and permeation is limited by water diffusion. The volume fraction of the hydrophilic phase increases with water activity, increasing water transport. As a(w) --> 1, the effective transport rate increased by almost an order of magnitude, resulting in a change of the limiting transport resistance from water permeation across the membrane to interfacial mass transport at the gas/membrane interface. PMID:19053672

  15. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  16. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  17. Differences in X-Chromosome Transcriptional Activity and Cholesterol Metabolism between Placentae from Swine Breeds from Asian and Western Origins

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Steve R.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Hardison, Nicholas E.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Freking, Bradley A.; Nonneman, Dan J.; Rohrer, Gary A.; Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    To gain insight into differences in placental physiology between two swine breeds noted for their dissimilar reproductive performance, that is, the Chinese Meishan and white composite (WC), we examined gene expression profiles of placental tissues collected at 25, 45, 65, 85, and 105 days of gestation by microarrays. Using a linear mixed model, a total of 1,595 differentially expressed genes were identified between the two pig breeds using a false-discovery rate q-value ≤0.05. Among these genes, we identified breed-specific isoforms of XIST, a long non-coding RNA responsible X-chromosome dosage compensation in females. Additionally, we explored the interaction of placental gene expression and chromosomal location by DIGMAP and identified three Sus scrofa X chromosomal bands (Xq13, Xq21, Xp11) that represent transcriptionally active clusters that differ between Meishan and WC during placental development. Also, pathway analysis identified fundamental breed differences in placental cholesterol trafficking and its synthesis. Direct measurement of cholesterol confirmed that the cholesterol content was significantly higher in the Meishan versus WC placentae. Taken together, this work identifies key metabolic pathways that differ in the placentae of two swine breeds noted for differences in reproductive prolificacy. PMID:23383161

  18. Bovine serum albumin with glycated carboxyl groups shows membrane-perturbing activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shin-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jung; Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study aimed to investigate whether glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed novel activities on the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated BSA (Man-BSA) was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-mannopyranoside. In contrast to BSA, Man-BSA notably induced membrane permeability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM)/cholesterol (Chol) and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Noticeably, Man-BSA induced the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles, but not of EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Although BSA and Man-BSA showed similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-bound conformation of Man-BSA was distinct from that of BSA. Moreover, Man-BSA adopted distinct structure upon binding with the EYPC/EYSM/Chol and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Man-BSA could induce the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles with K562 and MCF-7 cells, while Man-BSA greatly induced the leakage of Chol-depleted K562 and MCF-7 cells. The modified BSA prepared by conjugating carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-glucopyranoside also showed membrane-perturbing activities. Collectively, our data indicate that conjugation of carboxyl groups with monosaccharide generates functional BSA with membrane-perturbing activities on the lipid-water interface. PMID:25449061

  19. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  20. Cholesterol crystal induced arterial inflammation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Janoudi, Abed; Shamoun, Fadi E; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Abela, George S

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of plaque that is prone to rupture is characterized by inflammation and physical changes. Accumulation of low-density lipoprotein in the sub-intima provides esterified cholesterol (ESC) to macrophages and smooth muscle cells that convert it into free cholesterol (FRC) by cholesteryl ester hydrolases (CEHs). Membrane-bound cholesterol carriers transport FRC to high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Impaired HDL transport function and altered composition can lead to extracellular accumulation of FRC, whereas impaired membrane carrier activity can lead to intracellular FRC accumulation. Saturation of FRC can result in cholesterol crystallization with cell death and intimal injury. Disequilibrium between ESC and FRC can impact foam cell and cholesterol crystal (CC) formation. Cholesterol crystals initiate inflammation via NLRP3 inflammasome leading to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production inducing C-reactive protein. Eventually, crystals growing from within the plaque and associated inflammation destabilize the plaque. Thus, inhibition of inflammation by antagonists to IL-1β or agents that dissolve or prevent CC formation may stabilize vulnerable plaques. PMID:26705388

  1. Nonequilibrium fluctuations, traveling waves, and instabilities in active membranes.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Toner, J; Prost, J

    2000-04-10

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g., proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case involves a spontaneous, pump-driven undulation of the membrane, with clumping of the proteins in regions of high activity. PMID:11019123

  2. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  3. Principles of lysosomal membrane digestion: stimulation of sphingolipid degradation by sphingolipid activator proteins and anionic lysosomal lipids.

    PubMed

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids and glycosphingolipids are membrane components of eukaryotic cell surfaces. Their constitutive degradation takes place on the surface of intra-endosomal and intra-lysosomal membrane structures. During endocytosis, these intra-lysosomal membranes are formed and prepared for digestion by a lipid-sorting process during which their cholesterol content decreases and the concentration of the negatively charged bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)--erroneously also called lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)--increases. Glycosphingolipid degradation requires the presence of water-soluble acid exohydrolases, sphingolipid activator proteins, and anionic phospholipids like BMP. The lysosomal degradation of sphingolipids with short hydrophilic head groups requires the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). These are the saposins (Saps) and the GM2 activator protein. Sphingolipid activator proteins are membrane-perturbing and lipid-binding proteins with different specificities for the bound lipid and the activated enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their inherited deficiency leads to sphingolipid- and membrane-storage diseases. Sphingolipid activator proteins not only facilitate glycolipid digestion but also act as glycolipid transfer proteins facilitating the association of lipid antigens with immunoreceptors of the CD1 family. PMID:16212488

  4. Effect of Cholesterol on the Interaction of Cytochrome P450 Substrate Drug Chlorzoxazone with the Phosphatidylcholine Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ayumi; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-19

    Many drugs are oxidized by membrane protein cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes during their metabolism process. CYPs are located mainly in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Recent studies have suggested that CYP substrate drugs first bind the lipid bilayers of ER membranes and then the drugs reach the active site of CYP by way of an access channel. The entrance of the channel is located in the hydrophobic regions of the lipid bilayers. One of the features of the ER membrane is a cholesterol content that is lower than those of other biomembranes. In this study, the cholesterol concentration dependence of the interaction of a CYP substrate drug, chlorzoxazone (CZX), with model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol was examined via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results indicated that CZX can bind to pure PC bilayers in the absence of cholesterol and that, by contrast, a high cholesterol concentration (30-50 mol %) tends to prevent CZX from binding to PC bilayers. Interestingly, the effect of cholesterol on the binding and insertion of CZX was biphasic. In the case of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers containing 5-10 mol % cholesterol, the CZX's binding and penetration into the bilayer were found to be greater than those with pure POPC bilayers. The concentration of 5-10 mol % nearly corresponds to the cholesterol concentration of ER membranes. The low cholesterol contents (12-20 mol %) of ER membranes might be the most suitable for the CYP drug metabolism process in ER membranes. PMID:27347790

  5. Add-on rosiglitazone therapy improves plasminogen activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Nazri; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Yusof, Zurkurnai

    2011-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is an oral hypoglycaemic agent of the thiazolidinedione group. This study aimed to assess changes in the diabetic prothrombotic state via plasminogen activity and changes in surrogate markers of atherosclerotic burden via ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) measurements after rosiglitazone was added to a pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment regime. A nonblinded interventional study was designed. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Rosiglitazone-naïve patients were prescribed oral rosiglitazone 4 mg daily for 10 weeks. ABPI, plasminogen activity, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting lipid profile were measured pretreatment and post-treatment. Forty-eight patients completed the study. At the end of this study, mean plasminogen activity improvement was nearly 16% (P<0.05), mean ABPI improvement was 0.01 (P=0.439), mean HbA1c reduction was 0.51% (P<0.05), mean total cholesterol (TC) increase was 0.36 mmol/l (P<0.05), mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase was 0.15 mmol/l (P<0.05) and mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.19 mmol/l (P=0.098). Rosiglitazone significantly improved plasminogen activity. There was also significant HbA1c reduction, and rise in both TC and HDL-C. Thus, rosiglitazone potentially improves the atherosclerotic burden and prothrombotic state. In future, more studies are needed to confirm the relationship between rosiglitazone, fibrinolytic system and atheromatous reduction in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21537159

  6. Hypolipidemic activity of a hydroalcoholic extract of Cyperus scariosus Linn. root in guinea pigs fed with a high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Chawda, Hiren M; Mandavia, Divyesh R; Parmar, Pravin H; Baxi, Seema N; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu R

    2014-11-01

    Lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of a hydroalcoholic extract of Cyperus scariosus Linn. root (HCS) were evaluated in guinea pigs fed with a high cholesterol diet. Serum lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, VLDL-C, and HDL-C), atherogenic indices and serum enzymes (ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, and CK-MB) were performed in each group at 0 days and at the end of 60 days. Histological study of liver and kidney was done in groups 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7. The total phenolic and flavonoid content in HCS and its antioxidant activity were evaluated by the DPPH assay. Both doses of HCS decreased serum lipid profile and atherogenic indices (P < 0.05). HCS has lipid lowering, immunosuppressive and antioxidant properties, and mays have value in atherosclerosis prevention. The higher dose of HCS also reduced serum AST, ALP, and LDH levels and rosuvastatin increased AST and ALP levels (P < 0.05). Histology of the liver showed decreased lipid accumulation and improvement in hepatocytes in HCS-treated animals. The antioxidant activity of HCS may be responsible for its lipid lowering and cytoprotective action. HCS had significant lipid lowering and antioxidant activity, which; may be due to the phenolic compounds. HCS may be a safe and cost effective alternative to current statin therapy for patients with dyslipidaemia. PMID:25480512

  7. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  8. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown - at least in some bilayers - to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid-water interface. In this article we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies. PMID:27056099

  9. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Last, Nicholas B; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes. Cell-penetrating peptides are natural or engineered short sequences that can spontaneously translocate across a membrane. Despite these differences in classification, many similarities in sequence, structure, and activity suggest that peptides from all three classes act through a small, common set of physical principles. Namely, these peptides alter the Brownian properties of phospholipid bilayers, enhancing the sampling of intrinsic fluctuations that include membrane defects. A complete energy landscape for such systems can be described by the innate membrane properties, differential partition, and the associated kinetics of peptides dividing between surface and defect regions of the bilayer. The goal of this review is to argue that the activities of these membrane-active families of peptides simply represent different facets of what is a shared energy landscape. PMID:23649542

  10. Regulation of diurnal variation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) activity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kovár, J; Lenícek, M; Zimolová, M; Vítek, L; Jirsa, M; Pitha, J

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, displays a pronounced diurnal variation. To better understand the regulation of CYP7A1 activity, three day-long examinations were carried out in 12 healthy men. The concentrations of 7alpha-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one (C4), a surrogate marker of CYP7A1 activity, bile acids (BA), insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol were measured in serum in 90-min intervals from 7 AM till 10 PM. To lower and to increase BA concentration during the study, the subjects received cholestyramine and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, in two examinations. No drug was used in the control examination. There was a pronounced diurnal variation of C4 concentration with a peak around 1 PM in most of the subjects. The area under the curve (AUC) of C4 concentration was five times higher and three times lower when subjects were treated with cholestyramine and CDCA, respectively. No relationship was found between AUC of C4 and AUC of BA concentration, but AUC of C4 correlated positively with that of insulin. Moreover, short-term treatment with cholestyramine resulted in about 10 % suppression of glycemia throughout the day. Our results suggest that insulin is involved in the regulation of diurnal variation of CYP7A1 activity in humans. PMID:19537927

  11. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  12. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  13. Dietary supplementation with cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid increases the activity of the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in tissues of young pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Woo Kim, Sung; Li, Xilong; Datta, Sujay; Pond, Wilson G.; Wu, Guoyao

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from L-arginine by tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-dependent NO synthase (NOS), is critical for neurological and muscular development and function. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may modulate the arginine-NO pathway in tissues of the young pig. Sixteen newborn pigs were nursed by sows for 24 h and then assigned to one of 4 treatment groups, representing supplementation with 0.0%, 0.2% cholesterol, 0.2% DHA, or cholesterol plus DHA to the basal milk-formula. All piglets were euthanized at 49 days of age. Brain, liver and gastrocnemius muscle were analyzed for BH4, NADPH and arginine, GTP cyclohydrolase-I (GTP-CH) and NOS activities, and NOS protein isoforms. Hepatic NOS activity was below the detection limit in all pigs. DHA supplementation (P<0.01) increased GTP-CH activities, as well as BH4 and NADPH concentrations in brain, liver, and muscle by 24–46%, while enhancing (P<0.05) NOS activities by 45–48% in brain and muscle. Dietary cholesterol supplementation increased (P<0.05) NOS and GTP-CH activities by 17–26% in brain but had no effect in liver or muscle. The enhanced NOS activity in the brain or muscle of cholesterol- or DHA-supplemented piglets was attributable to the combined effects of increased eNOS and nNOS activation (changes in phosphorylation levels) and total iNOS protein. Additionally, DHA and cholesterol enhanced (P>0.05) arginine concentrations in brain (35–42%), but not in liver or muscle. These tissue-specific effects of cholesterol and DHA on NO synthesis may play an important role in postnatal growth and development. PMID:18555806

  14. Cholesterol-Dependent Nanomechanical Stability of Phase-Segregated Multicomponent Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Hao, Changchun; Walker, Gilbert C.; Zou, Shan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cholesterol is involved in endocytosis, exocytosis, and the assembly of sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched domains, as has been demonstrated in both model membranes and living cells. In this work, we explored the influence of different cholesterol levels (5–40 mol %) on the morphology and nanomechanical stability of phase-segregated lipid bilayers consisting of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol (DOPC/SM/Chol) by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force mapping. Breakthrough forces were consistently higher in the SM/Chol-enriched liquid-ordered domains (Lo) than in the DOPC-enriched fluid-disordered phase (Ld) at a series of loading rates. We also report the activation energies (ΔEa) for the formation of an AFM-tip-induced fracture, calculated by a model for the rupture of molecular thin films. The obtained ΔEa values agree remarkably well with reported values for fusion-related processes using other techniques. Furthermore, we observed that within the Chol range studied, the lateral organization of bilayers can be categorized into three distinct groups. The results are rationalized by fracture nanomechanics of a ternary phospholipid/sphingolipid/cholesterol mixture using correlated AFM-based imaging and force mapping, which demonstrates the influence of a wide range of cholesterol content on the morphology and nanomechanical stability of model bilayers. This provides fundamental insights into the role of cholesterol in the formation and stability of sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched domains, as well as in membrane fusion. PMID:20643069

  15. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  16. Structural characterization of human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Wolfram; Grabovec, Irina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dichenko, Yaroslav V.; Usanov, Sergey A.; Gilep, Andrei A.; Park, Hee-Won; Strushkevich, Natallia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic conversion to bile acids is a major elimination route for cholesterol in mammals. CYP7A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in classic bile acid biosynthesis, converting cholesterol to 7α-hydroxycholesterol. To identify the structural determinants that govern the stereospecific hydroxylation of cholesterol, we solved the crystal structure of CYP7A1 in the ligand-free state. The structure-based mutation T104L in the B′ helix, corresponding to the nonpolar residue of CYP7B1, was used to obtain crystals of complexes with cholest-4-en-3-one and with cholesterol oxidation product 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh). The structures reveal a motif of residues that promote cholest-4-en-3-one binding parallel to the heme, thus positioning the C7 atom for hydroxylation. Additional regions of the binding cavity (most distant from the access channel) are involved to accommodate the elongated conformation of the aliphatic side chain. Structural complex with 7KCh shows an active site rigidity and provides an explanation for its inhibitory effect. Based on our previously published data, we proposed a model of cholesterol abstraction from the membrane by CYP7A1 for metabolism. CYP7A1 structural data provide a molecular basis for understanding of the diversity of 7α-hydroxylases, on the one hand, and cholesterol-metabolizing enzymes adapted for their specific activity, on the other hand. PMID:24927729

  17. Structural characterization of human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Grabovec, Irina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dichenko, Yaroslav V; Usanov, Sergey A; Gilep, Andrei A; Park, Hee-Won; Strushkevich, Natallia

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic conversion to bile acids is a major elimination route for cholesterol in mammals. CYP7A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in classic bile acid biosynthesis, converting cholesterol to 7α-hydroxycholesterol. To identify the structural determinants that govern the stereospecific hydroxylation of cholesterol, we solved the crystal structure of CYP7A1 in the ligand-free state. The structure-based mutation T104L in the B' helix, corresponding to the nonpolar residue of CYP7B1, was used to obtain crystals of complexes with cholest-4-en-3-one and with cholesterol oxidation product 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh). The structures reveal a motif of residues that promote cholest-4-en-3-one binding parallel to the heme, thus positioning the C7 atom for hydroxylation. Additional regions of the binding cavity (most distant from the access channel) are involved to accommodate the elongated conformation of the aliphatic side chain. Structural complex with 7KCh shows an active site rigidity and provides an explanation for its inhibitory effect. Based on our previously published data, we proposed a model of cholesterol abstraction from the membrane by CYP7A1 for metabolism. CYP7A1 structural data provide a molecular basis for understanding of the diversity of 7α-hydroxylases, on the one hand, and cholesterol-metabolizing enzymes adapted for their specific activity, on the other hand. PMID:24927729

  18. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  19. Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Lee, Jeseung; Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

  20. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  1. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L.; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  2. Identification of a Cholesterol-Binding Pocket in Inward Rectifier K+ (Kir) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; Nichols, Colin G.; Lamoureux, Guillaume; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is the major sterol component of all mammalian plasma membranes. Recent studies have shown that cholesterol inhibits both bacterial (KirBac1.1 and KirBac3.1) and eukaryotic (Kir2.1) inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels. Lipid-sterol interactions are not enantioselective, and the enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-cholesterol) does not inhibit Kir channel activity, suggesting that inhibition results from direct enantiospecific binding to the channel, and not indirect effects of changes to the bilayer. Furthermore, conservation of the effect of cholesterol among prokaryotic and eukaryotic Kir channels suggests an evolutionary conserved cholesterol-binding pocket, which we aimed to identify. Computational experiments were performed by docking cholesterol to the atomic structures of Kir2.2 (PDB: 3SPI) and KirBac1.1 (PDB: 2WLL) using Autodock 4.2. Poses were assessed to ensure biologically relevant orientation and then clustered according to location and orientation. The stability of cholesterol in each of these poses was then confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, mutation of key residues (S95H and I171L) in this putative binding pocket found within the transmembrane domain of Kir2.1 channels were shown to lead to a loss of inhibition by cholesterol. Together, these data provide support for this location as a biologically relevant pocket. PMID:25517146

  3. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  4. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  5. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  6. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  7. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Millar, John S.; Vickers, Kasey C.; Rader, Daniel J.; Phillips, Michael C.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  8. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Andrea J; Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M; Millar, John S; Vickers, Kasey C; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Mirkin, Chad A; Thaxton, C Shad

    2015-05-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  9. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  10. Use of BODIPY-Cholesterol (TF-Chol) for Visualizing Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Sezgin, Erdinc; Eggeling, Christian; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-09-01

    Dipyrromethene difluoride-cholesterol (TopFluor-Cholesterol, TF-Chol) is a widely used cholesterol analogue due to its excellent fluorescence properties and considerable similarity with natural cholesterol in terms of membrane partitioning. However, the suitability of TF-Chol for detecting lysosomal cholesterol deposition has recently been questioned. Here, we highlight the fact that the method of lipid delivery and the analysis of time-point both affect the membrane distribution and labeling pattern of TF-Chol, similarly as with radiolabeled cholesterol. Lysosomal sterol accumulation characteristic to a lysosomal storage disease is most readily detected when the probe is introduced via the physiological route, i.e. as a sterol fatty acid ester in low-density lipoprotein particles. When administered to cells from solvent, lysosomal sterol sequestration becomes evident after an overnight equilibration between membranes. PMID:27187581

  11. Transcriptional control of cholesterol biosynthesis in Schwann cells by axonal neuregulin 1.

    PubMed

    Pertusa, Maria; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Carteron, Christelle; Viana, Felix; Cabedo, Hugo

    2007-09-28

    A characteristic feature of many vertebrate axons is their wrapping by a lamellar stack of glially derived membranes known as the myelin sheath. Myelin is a cholesterol-rich membrane that allows for rapid saltatory nerve impulse conduction. Axonal neuregulins instruct glial cells on when and how much myelin they should produce. However, how neuregulin regulates myelin sheath development and thickness is unknown. Here we show that neuregulin receptors are activated by drops in plasma membrane cholesterol, suggesting that they can sense sterol levels. In Schwann cells neuregulin-1 increases the transcription of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Neuregulin activity is mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and a cAMP-response element located on the reductase promoter. We propose that by activating neuregulin receptors, neurons exploit a cholesterol homeostatic mechanism forcing Schwann cells to produce new membranes for the myelin sheath. We also show that a strong phylogenetic correlation exists between myelination and cholesterol biosynthesis, and we propose that the absence of the sterol branch of the mevalonate pathway in invertebrates precluded the myelination of their nervous system. PMID:17652086

  12. Activity of 3-Ketosteroid 9α-Hydroxylase (KshAB) Indicates Cholesterol Side Chain and Ring Degradation Occur Simultaneously in Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Capyk, Jenna K.; Casabon, Israël; Gruninger, Robert; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a significant global pathogen, contains a cholesterol catabolic pathway. Although the precise role of cholesterol catabolism in Mtb remains unclear, the Rieske monooxygenase in this pathway, 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase (KshAB), has been identified as a virulence factor. To investigate the physiological substrate of KshAB, a rhodococcal acyl-CoA synthetase was used to produce the coenzyme A thioesters of two cholesterol derivatives: 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oic acid (forming 4-BNC-CoA) and 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-22-oic acid (forming 1,4-BNC-CoA). The apparent specificity constant (kcat/Km) of KshAB for the CoA thioester substrates was 20–30 times that for the corresponding 17-keto compounds previously proposed as physiological substrates. The apparent KmO2 was 90 ± 10 μm in the presence of 1,4-BNC-CoA, consistent with the value for two other cholesterol catabolic oxygenases. The Δ1 ketosteroid dehydrogenase KstD acted with KshAB to cleave steroid ring B with a specific activity eight times greater for a CoA thioester than the corresponding ketone. Finally, modeling 1,4-BNC-CoA into the KshA crystal structure suggested that the CoA moiety binds in a pocket at the mouth of the active site channel and could contribute to substrate specificity. These results indicate that the physiological substrates of KshAB are CoA thioester intermediates of cholesterol side chain degradation and that side chain and ring degradation occur concurrently in Mtb. This finding has implications for steroid metabolites potentially released by the pathogen during infection and for the design of inhibitors for cholesterol-degrading enzymes. The methodologies and rhodococcal enzymes used to generate thioesters will facilitate the further study of cholesterol catabolism. PMID:21987574

  13. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, S.; Pinna, C.; Busnelli, M.; Cinquanta, P.; Rigamonti, E.; Ganzetti, G.S.; Dellera, F.; Sala, A.; Calabresi, L.; Franceschini, G.; Parolini, C.; Chiesa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcatwt) and LCAT knockout (LcatKO) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in LcatKO mice (P < 0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in LcatKO mice (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in LcatKO mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcatwt and LcatKO mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  14. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Pinna, C; Busnelli, M; Cinquanta, P; Rigamonti, E; Ganzetti, G S; Dellera, F; Sala, A; Calabresi, L; Franceschini, G; Parolini, C; Chiesa, G

    2015-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcat(wt)) and LCAT knockout (Lcat(KO)) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in Lcat(KO) mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcat(wt) and Lcat(KO) mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  15. The mouse CCR2 gene is regulated by two promoters that are responsive to plasma cholesterol and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yiming; Green, Simone R.; Ho, Jessica; Li, Andrew; Almazan, Felizidad; Quehenberger, Oswald . E-mail: oquehenberger@ucsd.edu

    2005-06-24

    We have previously shown that the expression of monocyte CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, is induced by plasma cholesterol. The present study examines the mechanisms that regulate monocyte CCR2 expression in hypercholesterolemia using a mouse model. Our data demonstrate that in the mouse, CCR2 expression in circulating monocytes is controlled by two promoters P1 and P2. The two distinct transcripts, which encode the same protein, are produced by alternative splicing in the 5'-untranslated region. Both promoters are constitutively active, but only P2 is stimulated by cholesterol. However, both promoters are repressed by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}.

  16. Structural Origins of Cholesterol Accelerated Lipid Flip-Flop Studied by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allhusen, John S; Kimball, Dylan R; Conboy, John C

    2016-03-31

    The unique structure of cholesterol and its role in modulating lipid translocation (flip-flop) were examined using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS). Two structural analogues of cholesterol--cholestanol and cholestene--were examined to explore the influence of ring rigidity and amphiphilicity on controlling distearoylphosphocholine (DSPC) flip-flop. Kinetic rates for DSPC flip-flop were determined as a function of sterol concentration and temperature. All three sterols increased the rate of DSPC flip-flop in a concentration-dependent manner following the order cholestene > cholestanol > cholesterol. Rates of DSPC flip-flop were used to calculate the thermodynamic activation free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) in the presence of cholesterol, cholestanol, and cholestene. The acyl chain gauche content of DSPC, mean lipid area, and membrane compressibility were correlated to observed trends in ΔG(‡). ΔG(‡) for DSPC flip-flop showed a strong positive correlation with the molar compression modulus (K*) of the membrane, influenced by the type and concentration of the sterol added. Interestingly, cholesterol is distinctive in maintaining invariant membrane compressibility over the range of 2-10 mol %. The results in this study demonstrate that the compression modulus of a membrane plays a significant role in moderating ΔG(‡) and the kinetics of native, protein-free, lipid translocation in membranes. PMID:26978577

  17. Recovery of polyphenols from red grape pomace and assessment of their antioxidant and anti-cholesterol activities.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Maura; Bin, Sofia; Vallini, Veronica; Fava, Fabio; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo; Minnucci, Giordano; Bucchi, Giacomo; Tassoni, Annalisa

    2016-05-25

    The present work aimed at the recovery and characterization of polyphenolic compounds extracted from red grape pomace (Vitis vinifera L.), a winemaking by-product. Polyphenolic compounds of wet (WP) and dried (DP) red pomace were recovered by enzymatic digestions and ethanol-based extractions. Fungamyl and Celluclast enzymes were found to be the most effective in enhancing polyphenol release from WP. WP samples showed the highest capacity of releasing polyphenols with 2h control 24°C and 2h 1% Celluclast resulting as the best treatments. A significantly lower amount of polyphenols was recovered from DP most probably as a consequence of the pomace drying. The best extracts contained high amounts of total polyphenols, flavonoids, tannins and anthocyanins and exerted antioxidant and cholesterol-lowering activities. The results support the possibility of exploiting the extracts coming from grape processing by-products as ingredients for functional and innovative products in the nutraceutical, pharmaceutical or cosmetic fields. PMID:26705904

  18. Active membranes studied by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Giahi, A; El Alaoui Faris, M; Bassereau, P; Salditt, T

    2007-08-01

    In view of recent theories of "active" membranes, we have studied multilamellar phospholipid membrane stacks with reconstituted transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) under different illumination conditions by X-ray scattering. The light-active protein is considered as an active constituent which drives the system out of equilibrium and is predicted to change the collective fluctuation properties of the membranes. Using X-ray reflectivity, X-ray non-specular (diffuse) scattering, and grazing incidence scattering, we find no detectable change in the scattering curves when changing the illumination condition. In particular the intermembrane spacing d remains constant, after eliminating hydration-related artifacts by design of a suitable sample environment. The absence of any observable non-equilibrium effects in the experimental window is discussed in view of the relevant parameters and recent theories. PMID:17712523

  19. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Maza, Paloma K; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  20. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Maza, Paloma K.; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  1. Modulation Peroxisome Proliferators Activated Receptor alpha (PPAR α) and Acyl Coenzyme A: Cholesterol Acyltransferase1 (ACAT1) Gene expression by Fatty Acids in Foam cell

    PubMed Central

    Zavvar Reza, Javad; Doosti, Mahmoud; salehipour, Masoud; PackneJad, Malehieh; Mojarrad, Majed; Heidari, Mansour; Emamian, Effat S

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most important factors in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis is the default in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis. Many genes and transcription factors such as Peroxisome Proliferators Activated Receptors (PPARs) and Acyl Coenzyme A: Cholesterol Acyltransferase1 (ACAT1) are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Fatty Acids are important ligands of PPARα and the concentration of them can effect expression of ACAT1. So this study designed to clarified on the role of these genes and fatty acids on the lipid metabolism in foam cells. Methods This study examined effects of c9, t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid(c9, t11-CLA), Alpha Linolenic Acid (LA), Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) on the PPARα and ACAT1 genes expression by using Real time PCR and cholesterol homeostasis in THP-1 macrophages derived foam cells. Results Incubation of c9, t11-CLA, LA cause a significant reduction in intracellular Total Cholesterol, Free Cholesterol, cellular and Estrified Cholesterol concentrations (P ≤ 0.05). CLA and LA had no significant effect on the mRNA levels of ACAT1, but EPA increased ACAT1 mRNA expression (P = 0.003). Treatment with EPA increased PPARα mRNA levels (P ≤ 0.001), although CLA, LA had no significant effect on PPARα mRNA expression. Conclusion In conclusion, it seems that different fatty acids have different effects on gene expression and lipid metabolism and for complete conception study of the genes involved in lipid metabolism in foam cell all at once maybe is benefit. PMID:19725980

  2. Erythrocyte membrane modifying agents and the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth: structure-activity relationships for betulinic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Franzyk, Henrik; Sairafianpour, Majid; Tabatabai, Mehrnoush; Tehrani, Mahboubeh D; Bagherzadeh, Karim; Hägerstrand, Henry; Staerk, Dan; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2004-01-01

    The natural triterpene betulinic acid and its analogues (betulinic aldehyde, lupeol, betulin, methyl betulinate and betulinic acid amide) caused concentration-dependent alterations of erythrocyte membrane shape towards stomatocytes or echinocytes according to their hydrogen bonding properties. Thus, the analogues with a functional group having a capacity of donating a hydrogen bond (COOH, CH(2)OH, CONH(2)) caused formation of echinocytes, whereas those lacking this ability (CH(3), CHO, COOCH(3)) induced formation of stomatocytes. Both kinds of erythrocyte alterations were prohibitive with respect to Plasmodium falciparum invasion and growth; all compounds were inhibitory with IC(50) values in the range 7-28 microM, and the growth inhibition correlated well with the extent of membrane curvature changes assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Erythrocytes pre-loaded with betulinic acid or its analogues and extensively washed in order to remove excess of the chemicals could not serve as hosts for P. falciparum parasites. Betulinic acid and congeners can be responsible for in vitro antiplasmodial activity of plant extracts, as shown for Zataria multiflora Boiss. (Labiatae) and Zizyphus vulgaris Lam. (Rhamnaceae). The activity is evidently due to the incorporation of the compounds into the lipid bilayer of erythrocytes, and may be caused by modifications of cholesterol-rich membrane rafts, recently shown to play an important role in parasite vacuolization. The established link between erythrocyte membrane modifications and antiplasmodial activity may provide a novel target for potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:14697777

  3. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-09-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have a substantial effect on membrane properties. In this spirit, this review describes the biological importance and the roles of oxysterols in the human body. We focus primarily on the effect of oxysterols on lipid membranes, but we also consider other issues such as enzymatic and nonenzymatic synthesis processes of oxysterols as well as pathological conditions induced by oxysterols. PMID:26956952

  4. Cholesterol-induced effects on the viscoelasticity of monoglyceride bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, J F; Earnshaw, J C

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the viscoelastic properties of glycerol monooleate bilayers resulting from the incorporation of cholesterol into the membranes have been measured. The interface tension increases with the cholesterol concentration, reaching saturation for a 4.2:1 mole ratio of cholesterol:lipid in the film-forming solution. Incorporation of cholesterol in the membrane causes the appearance of a large intrinsic viscosity; this also increases with the sterol content of the membrane. Molecular models of lipid-sterol interactions and packing are considered to explain both the observed changes in membrane properties and similarities with comparable lipid systems. PMID:6838963

  5. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state (2)H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of

  6. Specific chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins associate with active Src family kinases in microdomains that interact with the host microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Jeffrey; Miller, Natalie J.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chlamydiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause diseases with significant medical and economic impact. Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a vacuole termed an inclusion, which is extensively modified by the insertion of a number of bacterial effector proteins known as inclusion membrane proteins (Incs). Once modified, the inclusion is trafficked in a dynein-dependent manner to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC), where it associates with host centrosomes. Here we describe a novel structure on the inclusion membrane comprised of both host and bacterial proteins. Members of the Src family of kinases are recruited to the chlamydial inclusion in an active form. These kinases display a distinct, localized punctate microdomain-like staining pattern on the inclusion membrane that colocalizes with four chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins (Incs) and is enriched in cholesterol. Biochemical studies show that at least two of these Incs stably interact with one another. Furthermore, host centrosomes associate with these microdomain proteins in C. trachomatis-infected cells and in uninfected cells exogenously expressing one of the chlamydial effectors. Together, the data suggest that a specific structure on the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane may be responsible for the known interactions of chlamydiae with the microtubule network and resultant effects on centrosome stability. PMID:20331642

  7. Nanoparticle Targeting and Cholesterol Flux Through Scavenger Receptor Type B-1 Inhibits Cellular Exosome Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Plebanek, Michael P.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Volpert, Olga; Matov, Alexandre; Gatlin, Jesse C.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nanoscale vesicles that mediate intercellular communication. Cellular exosome uptake mechanisms are not well defined partly due to the lack of specific inhibitors of this complex cellular process. Exosome uptake depends on cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains called lipid rafts, and can be blocked by non-specific depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol. Scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1), found in lipid rafts, is a receptor for cholesterol-rich high-density lipoproteins (HDL). We hypothesized that a synthetic nanoparticle mimic of HDL (HDL NP) that binds SR-B1 and removes cholesterol through this receptor would inhibit cellular exosome uptake. In cell models, our data show that HDL NPs bind SR-B1, activate cholesterol efflux, and attenuate the influx of esterified cholesterol. As a result, HDL NP treatment results in decreased dynamics and clustering of SR-B1 contained in lipid rafts and potently inhibits cellular exosome uptake. Thus, SR-B1 and targeted HDL NPs provide a fundamental advance in studying cholesterol-dependent cellular uptake mechanisms. PMID:26511855

  8. Defective activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase in Niemann-Pick type C and type D fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, D M; Rastogi, S R; Cook, H W; Palmer, F B; Spence, M W

    1989-01-01

    The activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT; EC 2.3.1.26) was measured in fibroblast homogenates from Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Type D (NPD) patients to determine whether these cells exhibit similar defects in the regulation of cholesterol esterification. ACAT activity in normal cells cultured in the absence of serum lipoproteins responded rapidly (within 6 h) to the addition of serum and reached peak levels at 12-24 h, whereas little stimulation of activity in NPC cells was observed. In contrast, ACAT activity in NPD fibroblasts (cell lines from four different patients) began to increase between 6 and 12 h after serum addition, reaching levels up to 50% of normal values at 24 h. ACAT activity in NPC and NPD cell extracts could not be stimulated by preincubation with normal cell homogenates, nor was complementation between NPC and NPD homogenates observed. Addition of 25-hydroxycholesterol to fibroblasts cultured in delipidated serum increased ACAT activity for all three cell types, although stimulation in NPD cells was less than that observed in NPC cells. ACAT activity of deoxycholate-solubilized homogenates reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles was independent of the presence of serum lipoproteins during culture and dependent on cholesterol present in the vesicles for all cell types. However, ACAT activities of mutant fibroblasts in vesicles plus cholesterol were significantly (about 40%) lower than control levels. These results suggest that the metabolic lesions in NPC and NPD cells are biochemically distinct and that both may involve factors in addition to the availability of cholesterol substrate for the ACAT enzyme. PMID:2590161

  9. A Cholesterol-Based Allostery Model of T Cell Receptor Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mahima; Beck-Garcia, Katharina; Beck-Garcia, Esmeralda; Hartl, Frederike A; Morath, Anna; Yousefi, O Sascha; Dopfer, Elaine Pashupati; Molnár, Eszter; Schulze, Anna K; Blanco, Raquel; Borroto, Aldo; Martín-Blanco, Nadia; Alarcon, Balbino; Höfer, Thomas; Minguet, Susana; Schamel, Wolfgang W A

    2016-05-17

    Signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR) controls adaptive immune responses. Antigen binding to TCRαβ transmits signals through the plasma membrane to induce phosphorylation of the CD3 cytoplasmic tails by incompletely understood mechanisms. Here we show that cholesterol bound to the TCRβ transmembrane region keeps the TCR in a resting, inactive conformation that cannot be phosphorylated by active kinases. Only TCRs that spontaneously detached from cholesterol could switch to the active conformation (termed primed TCRs) and then be phosphorylated. Indeed, by modulating cholesterol binding genetically or enzymatically, we could switch the TCR between the resting and primed states. The active conformation was stabilized by binding to peptide-MHC, which thus controlled TCR signaling. These data are explained by a model of reciprocal allosteric regulation of TCR phosphorylation by cholesterol and ligand binding. Our results provide both a molecular mechanism and a conceptual framework for how lipid-receptor interactions regulate signal transduction. PMID:27192576

  10. Spatially distinct and metabolically active membrane domain in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Jennifer M; Luo, Chu-Yuan; Mayfield, Jacob A; Hsu, Tsungda; Fukuda, Takeshi; Walfield, Andrew L; Giffen, Samantha R; Leszyk, John D; Baer, Christina E; Bennion, Owen T; Madduri, Ashoka; Shaffer, Scott A; Aldridge, Bree B; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sandler, Steven J; Kinoshita, Taroh; Moody, D Branch; Morita, Yasu S

    2016-05-10

    Protected from host immune attack and antibiotic penetration by their unique cell envelope, mycobacterial pathogens cause devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis. Seamless coordination of cell growth with cell envelope elongation at the pole maintains this barrier. Unraveling this spatiotemporal regulation is a potential strategy for controlling mycobacterial infections. Our biochemical analysis previously revealed two functionally distinct membrane fractions in Mycobacterium smegmatis cell lysates: plasma membrane tightly associated with the cell wall (PM-CW) and a distinct fraction of pure membrane free of cell wall components (PMf). To provide further insight into the functions of these membrane fractions, we took the approach of comparative proteomics and identified more than 300 proteins specifically associated with the PMf, including essential enzymes involved in cell envelope synthesis such as a mannosyltransferase, Ppm1, and a galactosyltransferase, GlfT2. Furthermore, comparative lipidomics revealed the distinct lipid composition of the PMf, with specific association of key cell envelope biosynthetic precursors. Live-imaging fluorescence microscopy visualized the PMf as patches of membrane spatially distinct from the PM-CW and notably enriched in the pole of the growing cells. Taken together, our study provides the basis for assigning the PMf as a spatiotemporally distinct and metabolically active membrane domain involved in cell envelope biogenesis. PMID:27114527

  11. Effect of sardine proteins on hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, in high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Benaicheta, Nora; Labbaci, Fatima Z; Bouchenak, Malika; Boukortt, Farida O

    2016-01-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major risk factor of CVD. The effects of purified sardine proteins (SP) were examined on glycaemia, insulin sensitivity and reverse cholesterol transport in T2D rats. Rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks, and injected with a low dose of streptozotocin, were used. The diabetic rats were divided into four groups, and they were fed casein (CAS) or SP combined with 30 or 5% lipids, for 4 weeks. HFD-induced hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hyperlipidaemia in rats fed HFD, regardless of the consumed protein. In contrast, these parameters lowered in rats fed SP combined with 5 or 30% lipids, and serum insulin values reduced in SP v. CAS. HFD significantly increased total cholesterol and TAG concentrations in the liver and serum, whereas these parameters decreased with SP, regardless of lipid intake. Faecal cholesterol excretion was higher with SP v. CAS, combined with 30 or 5% lipids. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity and HDL3-phospholipids (PL) were higher in CAS-HF than in CAS, whereas HDL2-cholesteryl esters (CE) were lower. Otherwise, LCAT activity and HDL2-CE were higher in the SP group than in the CAS group, whereas HDL3-PL and HDL3-unesterified cholesterol were lower. Moreover, LCAT activity lowered in the SP-HF group than in the CAS-HF group, when HDL2-CE was higher. In conclusion, these results indicate the potential effects of SP to improve glycaemia, insulin sensitivity and reverse cholesterol transport, in T2D rats. PMID:26507559

  12. Determination of 7α-OH cholesterol by LC-MS/MS: Application in assessing the activity of CYP7A1 in cholestatic minipigs.

    PubMed

    Yun, Changhong; Yin, Taijun; Shatzer, Katherine; Burrin, Douglas G; Cui, Liwei; Tu, Yifan; Hu, Ming

    2016-07-01

    An LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to determine 7α-OH cholesterol in liver microsome. This method was convenient and fast with high specificity and sensitivity. Briefly, a gradient elution was performed on a Synergi polar-C18 column (50×4.6mm i.d., 3μm). The mobile phase (consisting of 0.1% HCOOH solution and acetonitrile) eluted in gradient at a flow rate of 1ml/min. MS detection was operated on APCI (+) mode; the MRM transitions for 7α-OH cholesterol and D7-cholesterol (I.S.) were 385.1≥159.1 and 376.4≥266.3, respectively. The linear response range of 7α-OH cholesterol was covered from 1.563 to 100.0ng/ml. All of the validation items meet the requirement of FDA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. This method was applied to enzymatic studies for determination of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylation activity catalyzed by CYP7A1 in the cholestatic minipigs liver microsomes. PMID:27218859

  13. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  14. How do sterols determine the antifungal activity of amphotericin B? Free energy of binding between the drug and its membrane targets.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anna; Baginski, Maciej; Czub, Jacek

    2010-12-29

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene antibiotic used to treat systemic fungal infections. It is commonly accepted that the presence of sterols in the membrane is essential for the AmB biological activity, that is, for the formation of transmembrane ion channels. The selective toxicity of AmB for fungal cells is attributed to the fact that it is more potent against fungal cell membranes containing ergosterol than against the mammalian membranes with cholesterol. According to the "primary complex" hypothesis, AmB associates with sterols in a membrane to form binary complexes, which may subsequently assemble into a barrel-stave channel. To elucidate the molecular nature of the AmB selectivity for ergosterol-containing membranes, in the present work, we used computational methods to study the formation of the putative AmB/sterol complexes in a lipid bilayer. The free energy profiles for the AmB-sterol association in phospholipid bilayers containing 30 mol % of sterols were calculated and thoroughly analyzed. The results obtained confirm the formation of specific AmB/ergosterol complexes and are used to determine the energetic and structural origin of the enhanced affinity of AmB for ergosterol than for cholesterol. The significance of this affinity difference for the mechanism of action of AmB is discussed. The data obtained allowed us also to suggest a possible origin of the increased selectivity of a novel class of less toxic AmB derivatives. PMID:21126070

  15. Epigenetic regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Although best known as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cholesterol is a vital component of all mammalian cells. In addition to key structural roles, choleste