Science.gov

Sample records for active membrane transport

  1. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  2. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  3. Active membrane transport and receptor proteins from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, M; Bettaney, K E; Szakonyi, G; Psakis, G; Shibayama, K; Suzuki, S; Clough, J L; Blessie, V; Abu-Bakr, A; Baumberg, S; Meuller, J; Hoyle, C K; Palmer, S L; Butaye, P; Walravens, K; Patching, S G; O'reilly, J; Rutherford, N G; Bill, R M; Roper, D I; Phillips-Jones, M K; Henderson, P J F

    2005-08-01

    A general strategy for the expression of bacterial membrane transport and receptor genes in Escherichia coli is described. Expression is amplified so that the encoded proteins comprise 5-35% of E. coli inner membrane protein. Depending upon their topology, proteins are produced with RGSH6 or a Strep tag at the C-terminus. These enable purification in mg quantities for crystallization and NMR studies. Examples of one nutrient uptake and one multidrug extrusion protein from Helicobacter pylori are described. This strategy is successful for membrane proteins from H. pylori, E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Microbacterium liquefaciens, Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Campylobacter jejuni, Neisseria meningitides, Streptomyces coelicolor and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. PMID:16042616

  4. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  5. Requirement for membrane potential in active transport of glutamine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Plate, C A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of reducing the membrane potential on glutamine transport in cells of Escherichia coli has been investigated. Addition of valinomycin to tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-treated E. coli cells in the presence of 20 mM exogenous potassium reduced the membrane potential, as measured by the uptake of the lipophilic cation triphenylmethylphosphonium, and caused a complete inhibition of glutamine transport. Valinomycin plus potassium also caused a rapid decrease in the intracellular levels of ATP of normal E. coli cells, but had little if any effect on the ATP levels of two mutants of E. coli carrying lesions in the energy-transducing ATP complex (unc mutants). Yet both the membrane potential and the capacity to transport glutamine were depressed in the unc mutants by valinomycin and potassium. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that both ATP and a membrane potential are essential to the active transport of glutamine by E. coli cells. PMID:153897

  6. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  7. Opposite effect of membrane raft perturbation on transport activity of KCC2 and NKCC1.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Blaesse, Peter; Kranz, Thorsten; Wenz, Meike; Schindler, Jens; Kaila, Kai; Friauf, Eckhard; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2009-10-01

    In the majority of neurons, the intracellular Cl(-) concentration is set by the activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) and the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2). Here, we investigated the cotransporters' functional dependence on membrane rafts. In the mature rat brain, NKCC1 was mainly insoluble in Brij 58 and co-distributed with the membrane raft marker flotillin-1 in sucrose density flotation experiments. In contrast, KCC2 was found in the insoluble fraction as well as in the soluble fraction, where it co-distributed with the non-raft marker transferrin receptor. Both KCC2 populations displayed a mature glycosylation pattern. Disrupting membrane rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) increased the solubility of KCC2, yet had no effect on NKCC1. In human embryonic kidney-293 cells, KCC2 was strongly activated by a combined treatment with MbetaCD and sphingomyelinase, while NKCC1 was inhibited. These data indicate that membrane rafts render KCC2 inactive and NKCC1 active. In agreement with this, inactive KCC2 of the perinatal rat brainstem largely partitioned into membrane rafts. In addition, the exposure of the transporters to MbetaCD and sphingomyelinase showed that the two transporters differentially interact with the membrane rafts. Taken together, membrane raft association appears to represent a mechanism for co-ordinated regulation of chloride transporter function. PMID:19686239

  8. Active urea transport and an unusual basolateral membrane composition in the gills of a marine elasmobranch.

    PubMed

    Fines, G A; Ballantyne, J S; Wright, P A

    2001-01-01

    In elasmobranch fishes, urea occurs at high concentrations (350-600 mM) in the body fluids and tissues, where it plays an important role in osmoregulation. Retention of urea by the gill against this huge blood-to-water diffusion gradient requires specialized adaptations to the epithelial cell membranes. Experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms and structural features that facilitate urea retention by the gill of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias. Analysis of urea uptake by gill basolateral membrane vesicles revealed the presence of a phloretin-sensitive (half inhibition 0.09 mM), sodium-coupled, secondary active urea transporter (Michaelis constant = 10.1 mM, maximal velocity = 0.34 micromol. h(-1). mg protein(-1)). We propose that this system actively transports urea out of the gill epithelial cells back into the blood against the urea concentration gradient. Lipid analyses of the basolateral membrane revealed high levels of cholesterol contributing to the highest reported cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio (3.68). This unique combination of active urea transport and modification of the phospholipid bilayer membrane is responsible for decreasing the gill permeability to urea and facilitating urea retention by the gill of Squalus acanthias. PMID:11124129

  9. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  10. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  11. Transportation and Accumulation of Redox Active Species at the Buried Interfaces of Plasticized Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; De Marco, Roland; Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Pawlak, Marcin; Bakker, Eric; He, Ning; Latonen, Rose-Marie; Lindfors, Tom; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-09-29

    The transportation and accumulation of redox active species at the buried interface between glassy carbon electrodes and plasticized polymeric membranes have been studied using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Ferrocene tagged poly(vinyl chloride) [FcPVC], ferrocene (Fc), and its derivatives together with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) doped plasticized polymeric membrane electrodes have been investigated, so as to extend the study of the mechanism of this reaction chemistry to different time scales (both small and large molecules with variable diffusion coefficients) using a range of complementary electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. This study also provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the transportation and electrochemical reactivity of redox active species, regardless of the size of the electrochemically reactive molecule, at the buried interface of the substrate electrode. With all redox dopants, when CA electrolysis was performed, redox active species were undetectable (<1 wt % of signature elements or below the detection limit of SR-XPS and NEXAFS) in the outermost surface layers of the membrane, while a high concentration of redox species was located at the electrode substrate as a consequence of the deposition of the reaction product (Fc(+)-anion complex) at the buried interface between the electrode and the membrane. This reaction chemistry for redox active species within plasticized polymeric membranes may be useful in the fashioning of multilayered polymeric devices (e.g., chemical sensors, organic electronic devices, protective laminates, etc.) based on an electrochemical tunable deposition of redox molecules at the buried substrate electrode beneath

  12. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; De Napoli, I E; Fedecostante, M; Schophuizen, C M S; Chevtchik, N V; Wilmer, M J; van Asbeck, A H; Croes, H J; Pertijs, J C; Wetzels, J F M; Hilbrands, L B; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Stamatialis, D; Masereeuw, R

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing 'living membranes' for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP(+) uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a 'living membrane' of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  13. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities during the fourth semi-annual period of the MTP project have involved the completion of the Science Concept Review (SCR) presentation and peer review, continuation of analyses for the mass transfer coefficients measured from MTA experiment data, and development of the second generation (MTP-II) instrument. The SCR panel members were generated several recommendations for the MTP project recommendations are : Table 1 Summary of Primary SCR Panel Recommendations (1) Continue and refine development of mass transfer coefficient analyses (2) Refine and upgrade analytical modeling associated with the MTP experiment. (3) Increase resolution of measurements in proximity of the membrane interface. (4) Shift emphasis to measurement of coupled transport effects (i.e., development of MTP phase II experiment concept).

  14. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-04-01

    This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients

  16. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the seal between the membrane and the Fluid Optical Cells (FOC) has been a high priority activity. This seal occurs at an interface in the instrument where three key functions must be realized: (1) physical membrane support, (2) fluid sealing, and (3) unobscured optical transmission.

  17. Impact of humic acid fouling on membrane performance and transport of pharmaceutically active compounds in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    The impact of humic acid fouling on the membrane transport of two pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) - namely carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole - in forward osmosis (FO) was investigated. Deposition of humic acid onto the membrane surface was promoted by the complexation with calcium ions in the feed solution and the increase in ionic strength at the membrane surface due to the reverse transport of NaCl draw solute. The increase in the humic acid deposition on the membrane surface led to a substantial decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient but did not result in a significant decrease in the membrane pure water permeability coefficient. As the deposition of humic acid increased, the permeation of carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole decreased, which correlated well with the decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient. It is hypothesized that the hydrated humic acid fouling layer hindered solute diffusion through the membrane pore and enhanced solute rejection by steric hindrance, but not the permeation of water molecules. The membrane water and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficients were fully restored by physical cleaning of the membrane, suggesting that humic acid did not penetrate into the membrane pores. PMID:23764606

  18. Active transport of maltose in membrane vesicles obtained from Escherichia coli cells producing tethered maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, D A; Fikes, J D; Gehring, K; Bassford, P J; Nikaido, H

    1989-01-01

    Attempts to reconstitute periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport activity in membrane vesicles have often resulted in systems with poor and rather inconsistent activity, possibly because of the need to add a large excess of purified binding protein to the vesicles. We circumvented this difficulty by using a mutant which produces a precursor maltose-binding protein that is translocated across the cytoplasmic membrane but is not cleaved by the signal peptidase (J. D. Fikes and P. J. Bassford, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 169:2352-2359, 1987). The protein remains tethered to the cytoplasmic membrane, presumably through the hydrophobic signal sequence, and we show here that the spheroplasts and membrane vesicles prepared from this mutant catalyze active maltose transport without the addition of purified maltose-binding protein. In vesicles, the transport requires electron donors, such as ascorbate and phenazine methosulfate or D-lactate. However, inhibition by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and stimulation of transport by the inculsion of ADP or ATP in the intravesicular space suggest that ATP (or compounds derived from it) is involved in the energization of the transport. The transport activity of intact cells can be recovered without much inactivation in the vesicles, and their high activity and ease of preparation will be useful in studies of the mechanism of the binding protein-dependent transport process. Images PMID:2644203

  19. Regulating the Membrane Transport Activity and Death of Cells via Electroosmotic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Tsz Hin; Kwan, Kin Wah; Chun Yip, Timothy Tak; Fong, Hong Wai; Ngan, Kai Cheong; Yu, Miao; Yao, Shuhuai; Wan Ngan, Alfonso Hin; Lin, Yuan

    2016-06-21

    Although the volume of living cells has been known to heavily influence their behavior and fate, a method allowing us to control the cell size in a programmable manner is still lacking. Here, we develop a technique in which precise changes in the cellular volume can be conveniently introduced by varying the voltage applied across a Nafion membrane that separates the culture medium from a reservoir. It is found that, unlike sudden osmotic shocks, active ion transport across the membrane of leukemia K562 cells will not be triggered by a gradual change in the extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, when subjected to the same applied voltage, different lung and nasopharyngeal epithelial cancer cells will undergo larger volumetric changes and have a 5-10% higher death rate compared to their normal counterparts. We show that such distinct response is largely caused by the overexpression of aquaporin-4 in tumor cells, with knockout of this water channel protein resulting in a markedly reduced change in the cellular volume. Finally, by taking into account the exchange of water/ion molecules across the Nafion film and the cell membrane, a theoretical model is also proposed to describe the voltage-induced size changes of cells, which explain our experimental observations very well. PMID:27332135

  20. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. PMID:23910337

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  2. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  3. Discovery of a Biological Mechanism of Active Transport through the Tympanic Membrane to the Middle Ear.

    PubMed

    Kurabi, Arwa; Pak, Kwang K; Bernhardt, Marlen; Baird, Andrew; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a common pediatric disease for which systemic antibiotics are often prescribed. While local treatment would avoid the systemic treatment side-effects, the tympanic membrane (TM) represents an impenetrable barrier unless surgically breached. We hypothesized that the TM might harbor innate biological mechanisms that could mediate trans-TM transport. We used two M13-bacteriophage display biopanning strategies to search for mediators of trans-TM transport. First, aliquots of linear phage library displaying 10(10th) 12mer peptides were applied on the TM of rats with active bacterial OM. The middle ear (ME) contents were then harvested, amplified and the preparation re-applied for additional rounds. Second, the same naïve library was sequentially screened for phage exhibiting TM binding, internalization and then transit. Results revealed a novel set of peptides that transit across the TM to the ME in a time and temperature dependent manner. The peptides with highest transport capacities shared sequence similarities. Historically, the TM was viewed as an impermeable barrier. However, our studies reveal that it is possible to translocate peptide-linked small particles across the TM. This is the first comprehensive biopanning for the isolation of TM transiting peptidic ligands. The identified mechanism offers a new drug delivery platform into the ME. PMID:26946957

  4. Discovery of a Biological Mechanism of Active Transport through the Tympanic Membrane to the Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Pak, Kwang K.; Bernhardt, Marlen; Baird, Andrew; Ryan, Allen F.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a common pediatric disease for which systemic antibiotics are often prescribed. While local treatment would avoid the systemic treatment side-effects, the tympanic membrane (TM) represents an impenetrable barrier unless surgically breached. We hypothesized that the TM might harbor innate biological mechanisms that could mediate trans-TM transport. We used two M13-bacteriophage display biopanning strategies to search for mediators of trans-TM transport. First, aliquots of linear phage library displaying 1010th 12mer peptides were applied on the TM of rats with active bacterial OM. The middle ear (ME) contents were then harvested, amplified and the preparation re-applied for additional rounds. Second, the same naïve library was sequentially screened for phage exhibiting TM binding, internalization and then transit. Results revealed a novel set of peptides that transit across the TM to the ME in a time and temperature dependent manner. The peptides with highest transport capacities shared sequence similarities. Historically, the TM was viewed as an impermeable barrier. However, our studies reveal that it is possible to translocate peptide-linked small particles across the TM. This is the first comprehensive biopanning for the isolation of TM transiting peptidic ligands. The identified mechanism offers a new drug delivery platform into the ME. PMID:26946957

  5. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  6. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  7. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  8. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; De Napoli, I. E; Fedecostante, M.; Schophuizen, C. M. S.; Chevtchik, N. V.; Wilmer, M. J.; van Asbeck, A. H.; Croes, H. J.; Pertijs, J. C.; Wetzels, J. F. M.; Hilbrands, L. B.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Stamatialis, D.; Masereeuw, R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing ‘living membranes’ for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP+ uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a ‘living membrane’ of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  9. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  13. Modulation of ileal bile acid transporter (ASBT) activity by depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol: association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Kumar, Pradeep; Saksena, Seema; Turner, Jerrold R.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.

    2016-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) represents a highly efficient conservation mechanism of bile acids via mediation of their active transport across the luminal membrane of terminal ileum. To gain insight into the cellular regulation of ASBT, we investigated the association of ASBT with cholesterol and sphingolipid-enriched specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and examined the role of membrane cholesterol in maintaining ASBT function. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably transfected with human ASBT, human ileal brush-border membrane vesicles, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were utilized for these studies. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of ASBT protein with lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts by depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly reduced the association of ASBT with lipid rafts, which was paralleled by a decrease in ASBT activity in Caco-2 and HEK-293 cells treated with MβCD. The inhibition in ASBT activity by MβCD was blocked in the cells treated with MβCD-cholesterol complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that MβCD treatment decreased the Vmax of the transporter, which was not associated with alteration in the plasma membrane expression of ASBT. Our study illustrates that cholesterol content of lipid rafts is essential for the optimal activity of ASBT and support the association of ASBT with lipid rafts. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which ASBT activity may be rapidly modulated by alterations in cholesterol content of plasma membrane and thus have important implications in processes related to maintenance of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:18063707

  14. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  16. Volumetric Deformation of Live Cells Induced by Pressure-Activated Cross-Membrane Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, T. H.; Zhou, Z. L.; Qian, J.; Lin, Y.; Ngan, A. H. W.; Gao, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  18. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  19. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  20. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  1. Development of Novel active transport membrane devices. Phase I. Final report, 31 October 1988--31 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.; Quinn, R.; Choe, G.S.; Cook, P.J.; Tsai, Fu-Jya

    1994-08-01

    The main objective of this program was to identify and develop a technique for fabricating Active Transport Materials (ATM) into lab-scale membrane devices. Air Products met this objective by applying thin film, multilayer fabrication techniques to support the AT material on a substrate membrane. In Phase IA, spiral-wound hollow fiber membrane modules were fabricated and evaluated. These nonoptimized devices were used to demonstrate the AT-based separation of carbon dioxide from methane, hydrogen sulfide from methane, and ammonia from hydrogen. It was determined that a need exists for a more cost efficient and less energy intensive process for upgrading subquality natural gas. Air Products estimated the effectiveness of ATM for this application and concluded that an optimized ATM system could compete effectively with both conventional acid gas scrubbing technology and current membrane technology. In addition, the optimized ATM system would have lower methane loss and consume less energy than current alternative processes. Air Products made significant progress toward the ultimate goal of commercializing an advanced membrane for upgrading subquality natural gas. The laboratory program focused on developing a high performance hollow fiber substrate and fabricating and evaluating ATM-coated lab-scale hollow fiber membrane modules. Selection criteria for hollow fiber composite membrane supports were developed and used to evaluate candidate polymer compositions. A poly(amide-imide), PAI, was identified for further study. Conditions were identified which produced microporous PAI support membrane with tunable surface porosity in the range 100-1000{Angstrom}. The support fibers exhibited good hydrocarbon resistance and acceptable tensile strength though a higher elongation may ultimately be desirable. ATM materials were coated onto commercial and PAI substrate fiber. Modules containing 1-50 fibers were evaluated for permselectivity, pressure stability, and lifetime.

  2. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  3. Quantitative transporter proteomics by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: addressing methodologic issues of plasma membrane isolation and expression-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet; Prasad, Bhagwat; Patilea, Gabriela; Gupta, Anshul; Salphati, Laurent; Evers, Raymond; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-02-01

    To predict transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, one approach is to measure transport activity and relate it to protein expression levels in cell lines (overexpressing the transporter) and then scale these to via in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). This approach makes two major assumptions. First, that the expression of the transporter is predominantly in the plasma membrane. Second, that there is a linear correlation between expression level and activity of the transporter protein. The present study was conducted to test these two assumptions. We evaluated two commercially available kits that claimed to separate plasma membrane from other cell membranes. The Qiagen Qproteome kit yielded very little protein in the fraction purported to be the plasma membrane. The Abcam Phase Separation kit enriched the plasma membrane but did not separate it from other intracellular membranes. For the Abcam method, the expression level of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1/2B1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) proteins in all subcellular fractions isolated from cells or human liver tissue tracked that of Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase. Assuming that Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase is predominantly located in the plasma membrane, these data suggest that the transporters measured are also primarily located in the plasma membrane. Using short hairpin RNA, we created clones of cell lines with varying degrees of OATP1B1 or BCRP expression level. In these clones, transport activity of OATP1B1 or BCRP was highly correlated with protein expression level (r² > 0.9). These data support the use of transporter expression level data and activity data from transporter overexpressing cell lines for IVIVE of transporter-mediated disposition of drugs. PMID:25488931

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  5. Water transport activity of the plasma membrane aquaporin PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, I; Karlsson, M; Shukla, V K; Chrispeels, M J; Larsson, C; Kjellbom, P

    1998-01-01

    PM28A is a major intrinsic protein of the spinach leaf plasma membrane and the major phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation of PM28A is dependent in vivo on the apoplastic water potential and in vitro on submicromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Here, we demonstrate that PM28A is an aquaporin and that its water channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation. Wild-type and mutant forms of PM28A, in which putative phosphorylation sites had been knocked out, were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the resulting increase in osmotic water permeability was measured in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of protein kinases (K252a) or of an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (okadaic acid). The results indicate that the water channel activity of PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation of two serine residues, Ser-115 in the first cytoplasmic loop and Ser-274 in the C-terminal region. Labeling of spinach leaves with 32P-orthophosphate and subsequent sequencing of PM28A-derived peptides demonstrated that Ser-274 is phosphorylated in vivo, whereas phosphorylation of Ser-115, a residue conserved among all plant plasma membrane aquaporins, could not be demonstrated. This identifies Ser-274 of PM28A as the amino acid residue being phosphorylated in vivo in response to increasing apoplastic water potential and dephosphorylated in response to decreasing water potential. Taken together, our results suggest an active role for PM28A in maintaining cellular water balance. PMID:9501117

  6. Enzymatically active ultrathin pepsin membranes.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Schmidt, Thomas; Barth, Monika; Tutus, Murat; Benes, Nieck E; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-05-11

    Enzymatically active proteins enable efficient and specific cleavage reactions of peptide bonds. Covalent coupling of the enzymes permits immobilization, which in turn reduces autolysis-induced deactivation. Ultrathin pepsin membranes were prepared by facile interfacial polycondensation of pepsin and trimesoyl chloride. The pepsin membrane allows for simultaneous enzymatic conversion and selective removal of digestion products. The large water fluxes through the membrane expedite the transport of large molecules through the pepsin layers. The presented method enables the large-scale production of ultrathin, cross-linked, enzymatically active membranes. PMID:25779668

  7. Membrane transport of antineoplastic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, I.D. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Methods for Quantifying the Transport of Drugs Across Brain Barrier Systems; Liposomes as Drug Carriers in Cancer Chemotherapy; Genetic and Bioochemical Characterization of Multidrug Resistance; Membrane Transport of Anthracyclines; and The Cellular Pharmacology of Methotrexate.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2006-05-01

    In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

  9. Solute transporters in plant thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schoefs, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Plants utilize sunlight to drive photosynthetic energy conversion in the chloroplast thylakoid membrane. Here are located four major photosynthetic complexes, about which we have great knowledge in terms of structure and function. However, much less we know about auxiliary proteins, such as transporters, ensuring an optimum function and turnover of these complexes. The most prominent thylakoid transporter is the proton-translocating ATP-synthase. Recently, four additional transporters have been identified in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana, namely one copper-transporting P-ATPase, one chloride channel, one phosphate transporter, and one ATP/ADP carrier. Here, we review the current knowledge on the function and physiological role of these transporters during photosynthesis and light stress in plants. Subsequently, we make a survey on the outlook of thylakoid activities awaiting identification of responsible proteins. Such knowledge is necessary to understand the thylakoid network of transporters, and to design strategies for bioengineering crop plants in the future. PMID:20585503

  10. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  12. Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Transport of Biologically Active Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin (VCC) from V. cholerae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Elluri, Sridhar; Enow, Constance; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Rompikuntal, Pramod K.; Dongre, Mitesh; Carlsson, Sven; Pal, Amit; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from Gram-negative bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of virulence factors. Vibrio cholerae produce OMVs but their putative role in translocation of effectors involved in pathogenesis has not been well elucidated. The V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC), is a pore-forming toxin that lyses target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. It is considered a potent toxin that contributes to V. cholerae pathogenesis. The mechanisms involved in the secretion and delivery of the VCC have not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings OMVs from V. cholerae strains were isolated and purified using a differential centrifugation procedure and Optiprep centrifugation. The ultrastructure and the contents of OMVs were examined under the electron microscope and by immunoblot analyses respectively. We demonstrated that VCC from V. cholerae strain V:5/04 was secreted in association with OMVs and the release of VCC via OMVs is a common feature among V. cholerae strains. The biological activity of OMV-associated VCC was investigated using contact hemolytic assay and epithelial cell cytotoxicity test. It showed toxic activity on both red blood cells and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the OMVs architecture might play a role in stability of VCC and thereby can enhance its biological activities in comparison with the free secreted VCC. Furthermore, we tested the role of OMV-associated VCC in host cell autophagy signalling using confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. We observed that OMV-associated VCC triggered an autophagy response in the target cell and our findings demonstrated for the first time that autophagy may operate as a cellular defence mechanism against an OMV-associated bacterial virulence factor. Conclusion/Significance Biological assays of OMVs from the V. cholerae strain V:5/04 demonstrated that OMV-associated VCC is indeed biologically active and

  13. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  14. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped Ti-substituted perovskites, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}, with 0 {le} x {le} 0.20, were investigated by neutron diffraction, magnetization, electric resistivity, and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. All samples show a rhombohedral structure (space group R3C) from 10 K to room temperature. At room temperature, the cell parameters a, c and the unit cell volume increase with increasing Ti content. However, at 10 K, the cell parameter a has a maximum value for x = 0.10, and decreases for x > 0.10, while the unit cell volume remains nearly constant for x > 0.10. The average (Mn,Ti)-O bond length increases up to x = 0.15, and the (Mn,Ti)-O-(Mn,Ti) bond angle decreases with increasing Ti content to its minimum value at x = 0.15 at room temperature. Below the Curie temperature TC, the resistance exhibits metallic behavior for the x {le} 0.05 samples. A metal (semiconductor) to insulator transition is observed for the x {ge} 0.10 samples. A peak in resistivity appears below TC for all samples, and shifts to a lower temperature as x increases. The substitution of Mn by Ti decreases the 2p-3d hybridization between O and Mn ions, reduces the bandwidth W, and increases the electron-phonon coupling. Therefore, the TC shifts to a lower temperature and the resistivity increases with increasing Ti content. A field-induced shift of the resistivity maximum occurs at x {le} 0.10 compounds. The maximum MR effect is about 70% for La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}. The separation of TC and the resistivity maximum temperature T{sub {rho},max} enhances the MR effect in these compounds due to the weak coupling between the magnetic ordering and the resistivity as compared with La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}. The bulk densities of the membranes were determined using the

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Transport through Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Sommer, Klaus; Mathai, John C.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Pohl, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Several membrane channels, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and the RhAG protein of the rhesus complex, were hypothesized to be of physiological relevance for CO2 transport. However, the underlying assumption that the lipid matrix imposes a significant barrier to CO2 diffusion was never confirmed experimentally. Here we have monitored transmembrane CO2 flux (JCO2) by imposing a CO2 concentration gradient across planar lipid bilayers and detecting the resulting small pH shift in the immediate membrane vicinity. An analytical model, which accounts for the presence of both carbonic anhydrase and buffer molecules, was fitted to the experimental pH profiles using inverse problems techniques. At pH 7.4, the model revealed that JCO2 was entirely rate-limited by near-membrane unstirred layers (USL), which act as diffusional barriers in series with the membrane. Membrane tightening by sphingomyelin and cholesterol did not alter JCO2 confirming that membrane resistance was comparatively small. In contrast, a pH-induced shift of the CO2 hydration-dehydration equilibrium resulted in a relative membrane contribution of about 15% to the total resistance (pH 9.6). Under these conditions, a membrane CO2 permeability (3.2 ± 1.6 cm/s) was estimated. It indicates that cellular CO2 uptake (pH 7.4) is always USL-limited, because the USL size always exceeds 1 μm. Consequently, facilitation of CO2 transport by AQP1, RhAG, or any other protein is highly unlikely. The conclusion was confirmed by the observation that CO2 permeability of epithelial cell monolayers was always the same whether AQP1 was overexpressed in both the apical and basolateral membranes or not. PMID:18617525

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; W.B. Yelon; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and initial studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. In addition, studies were also begun to obtain reliable estimates of fracture toughness and stable crack growth in specific environments. Newer composition of Ti doped LSF membranes were characterized by neutron diffraction analysis. Quench studies indicated an apparent correlation between the unit cell volume and oxygen occupancy. The studies however, indicated an anomaly of increasing Fe/Ti ratio with change in heat treatment. Ti doped LSF was also characterized for stoichiometry as a function of temp and pO{sub 2}. The non stoichiometry parameter {delta} was observed to increase almost linearly on lowering pO{sub 2} until a ideal stoichiometric composition of {delta} = 0.175 was approached.

  18. Ctr9, a Protein in the Transcription Complex Paf1, Regulates Dopamine Transporter Activity at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    De Gois, Stéphanie; Slama, Patrick; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Erdozain, Amaia M.; Louis, Franck; Bouvrais-Veret, Caroline; Daviet, Laurent; Giros, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a major regulator of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. The DA transporter (DAT) is the key protein that regulates the spatial and temporal activity of DA release into the synaptic cleft via the rapid reuptake of DA into presynaptic termini. Several lines of evidence have suggested that transporter-interacting proteins may play a role in DAT function and regulation. Here, we identified the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein Ctr9 as a novel DAT binding partner using a yeast two-hybrid system. We showed that Ctr9 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and forms a stable complex with DAT in vivo via GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays. In mammalian cells co-expressing both proteins, Ctr9 partially colocalizes with DAT at the plasma membrane. This interaction between DAT and Ctr9 results in a dramatic enhancement of DAT-mediated DA uptake due to an increased number of DAT transporters at the plasma membrane. We determined that the binding of Ctr9 to DAT requires residues YKF in the first half of the DAT C terminus. In addition, we characterized Ctr9, providing new insight into this protein. Using three-dimensional modeling, we identified three novel tetratricopeptide repeat domains in the Ctr9 sequence, and based on deletion mutation experiments, we demonstrated the role of the SH2 domain of Ctr9 in nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that Ctr9 localization is not restricted to the nucleus, as previously described for the transcription complex Paf1. Taken together, our data provide evidence that Ctr9 modulates DAT function by regulating its trafficking. PMID:26048990

  19. Reconstitution of the Escherichia coli macrolide transporter: the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MacA stimulates the ATPase activity of MacB.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Elena B; Devroy, Vishakha K; Lau, Sze Yi; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2007-02-01

    Periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) are essential components of the type I protein secretion systems and drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies suggested that MFPs connect the inner and outer membrane components of the transport systems and by this means co-ordinate the transfer of substrates across the two membranes. In this study, we purified and reconstituted the macrolide transporter MacAB from Escherichia coli. Here, MacA is a periplasmic MFP and MacB is an ABC-type transporter. Similar to other MFP-dependent transporters from E. coli, the in vivo function of MacAB requires the outer membrane channel TolC. The purified MacB displayed a basal ATPase activity in detergent micelles. This activity conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics but was unresponsive to substrates or accessory proteins. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of MacB was strictly dependent on MacA. The catalytic efficiency of MacAB ATPase was more than 45-fold higher than the activity of MacB alone. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of MacA were essential for this activity. MacA stimulated MacB ATPase only in phospholipid bilayers and did not need the presence of macrolides. Our results suggest that MacA is a functional subunit of the MacB transporter. PMID:17214741

  20. Demonstration of an intramitochondrial invertase activity and the corresponding sugar transporters of the inner mitochondrial membrane in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Horemans, Nele; Passarella, Salvatore; Tarcsay, Akos; Orsi, Ferenc; Salgó, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2008-10-01

    Genetic evidences indicate that alkaline/neutral invertases are present in plant cell organelles, and they might have a novel physiological function in mitochondria. The present study demonstrates an invertase activity in the mitochondrial matrix of Helianthus tuberosus tubers. The pH optimum, the kinetic parameters and the inhibitor profile of the invertase activity indicated that it belongs to the neutral invertases. In accordance with this topology, transport activities responsible for the mediation of influx/efflux of substrate/products were studied in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The transport of sucrose, glucose and fructose was shown to be bidirectional, saturable and independent of the mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential. Sucrose transport was insensitive to the inhibitors of the proton-sucrose symporters. The different kinetic parameters and inhibitors as well as the absence of cross-inhibition suggest that sucrose, glucose and fructose transport are mediated by separate transporters in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial invertase system composed by an enzyme activity in the matrix and the corresponding sugar transporters might have a role in both osmoregulation and intermediary metabolism. PMID:18600345

  1. Effects of detergents on Na+ + K+-dependent ATPase activity in plasma-membrane fractions prepared from frog muscles. Studies of insulin action on Na+ and K+ transport.

    PubMed Central

    Omatsu-Kanbe, M; Kitasato, H

    1987-01-01

    The increase in Na+/K+ transport activity in skeletal muscles exposed to insulin was analysed. Plasma-membrane fractions were prepared from frog (Rana catesbeiana) skeletal muscles, and examination of the Na,K-ATPase (Na+ + K+-dependent ATPase) activity showed that it was insensitive to ouabain. In contrast, plasma-membrane fractions prepared from ouabain-pretreated muscles, by the same procedures, showed extremely low Na,K-ATPase activity. On adding saponin to the membrane suspension, the Na,K-ATPase activity increased, according to the detergent concentration. The maximum activity was about twice the control value, at 0.33 mg of saponin/mg of protein. Thus saponin makes vesicle membranes leaky, allowing ouabain in assay solutions to reach receptors on the inner surface of vesicles. Addition of insulin to saponin-treated membrane suspensions had no effect on the Na,K-ATPase activity, whereas the maximum activity of Na,K-ATPase in whole muscles was stimulated by exposure to insulin. The results show that the stimulation of Na+/K+ transport by insulin is not directly due to insulin binding to receptors on the cell surface, but rather support the view that the increase in the Na,K-ATPase induced by insulin requires an alteration of intracellular events. PMID:2825643

  2. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  3. Membrane transporters in drug development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters can be major determinants of the pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy profiles of drugs. This presents several key questions for drug development, including which transporters are clinically important in drug absorption and disposition, and which in vitro methods are suitable for studying drug interactions with these transporters. In addition, what criteria should trigger follow-up clinical studies, and which clinical studies should be conducted if needed. In this article, we provide the recommendations of the International Transporter Consortium on these issues, and present decision trees that are intended to help guide clinical studies on the currently recognized most important drug transporter interactions. The recommendations are generally intended to support clinical development and filing of a new drug application. Overall, it is advised that the timing of transporter investigations should be driven by efficacy, safety and clinical trial enrolment questions (for example, exclusion and inclusion criteria), as well as a need for further understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of the drug molecule, and information required for drug labeling. PMID:20190787

  4. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosome membrane (SM) is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume:rhizobia symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate, and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologs of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides, and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome. PMID:25566274

  5. Polyamines interact with hydroxyl radicals in activating Ca(2+) and K(+) transport across the root epidermal plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Velarde-Buendía, Ana María; Enríquez-Figueroa, René; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús; Pottosin, Igor I

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of the plant adaptive responses to environment. Importantly, ROS affect the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics by activating a range of nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable channels in plasma membrane (PM). Using patch-clamp and noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring techniques, we have characterized ionic currents and net K(+) and Ca(2+) fluxes induced by hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) in pea (Pisum sativum) roots. OH(•), but not hydrogen peroxide, activated a rapid Ca(2+) efflux and a more slowly developing net Ca(2+) influx concurrent with a net K(+) efflux. In isolated protoplasts, OH(•) evoked a nonselective current, with a time course and a steady-state magnitude similar to those for a K(+) efflux in intact roots. This current displayed a low ionic selectivity and was permeable to Ca(2+). Active OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux in roots was suppressed by the PM Ca(2+) pump inhibitors eosine yellow and erythrosine B. The cation channel blockers gadolinium, nifedipine, and verapamil and the anionic channel blockers 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate and niflumate inhibited OH(•)-induced ionic currents in root protoplasts and K(+) efflux and Ca(2+) influx in roots. Contrary to expectations, polyamines (PAs) did not inhibit the OH(•)-induced cation fluxes. The net OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux was largely prolonged in the presence of spermine, and all PAs tested (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) accelerated and augmented the OH(•)-induced net K(+) efflux from roots. The latter effect was also observed in patch-clamp experiments on root protoplasts. We conclude that PAs interact with ROS to alter intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by modulating both Ca(2+) influx and efflux transport systems at the root cell PM. PMID:21980172

  6. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  7. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  8. Membrane metabolism mediated by Sec14 family members influences Arf GTPase activating protein activity for transport from the trans-Golgi.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tania A; Fairn, Gregory D; Poon, Pak P; Shmulevitz, Maya; McMaster, Christopher R; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2005-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GTPase activating protein (GAP) proteins with the Gcs1 + Age2 ArfGAP pair providing essential overlapping function for the movement of transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network. We have generated a temperature-sensitive but stable version of the Gcs1 protein that is impaired only for trans-Golgi transport and find that deleterious effects of this enfeebled Gcs1-4 mutant protein are relieved by increased gene dosage of the gcs1-4 mutant gene itself or by the SFH2 gene (also called CSR1), encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). This effect was not seen for the SEC14 gene, encoding the founding member of the yeast PITP protein family, even though the Gcs1 and Age2 ArfGAPs are known to be downstream effectors of Sec14-mediated activity for trans-Golgi transport. Sfh2-mediated suppression of inadequate Gcs1-4 function depended on phospholipase D, whereas inadequate Gcs1-4 activity was relieved by increasing levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). Recombinant Gcs1 protein was found to bind certain phospholipids but not DAG. Our findings favor a model of Gcs1 localization through binding to specific phospholipids and activation of ArfGAP activity by DAG-mediated membrane curvature as the transport vesicle is formed. Thus, ArfGAPs are subject to both temporal and spatial regulation that is facilitated by Sfh2-mediated modulation of the lipid environment. PMID:16126894

  9. Membrane Transport in Yeast, An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Kschischo, Maik; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Research on membrane transport has made continuous progress in the last decades and remains an active field of scientific investigation. In the case of yeast, most of the research has been conducted for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but also the so-called non-conventional yeasts are being studied, especially because of their peculiarities and, in some cases, specific transport systems. This book is based on the experience of several experts summarizing the current knowledge about important substrate transport processes in yeast. Each chapter provides both a general overview of the main transport characteristics of a specific substrate or group of substrates and the unique details that only an expert working in the field is able to transmit to the reader. PMID:26721268

  10. An ABC transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Maria G; Silverman, Julie M; Sall, Khady M; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Threonine kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein, Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and, apparatus assembly and effector export. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signalling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. PMID:22765374

  11. Proline transport across the intestinal microvillus membrane may be regulated by membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, D C; Gibbs, D J; Meddings, J B

    1992-03-23

    There is now abundant evidence that integral membrane protein function may be modulated by the physical properties of membrane lipids. The intestinal brush border membrane represents a membrane system highly specialized for nutrient absorption and, thus, provides an opportunity to study the interaction between integral membrane transport proteins and their lipid environment. We have previously demonstrated that alterations in this environment may modulate the function of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter in terms of its affinity for glucose. In this communication we report that membrane lipid-protein interactions are distinctly different for the proline transport proteins. Maximal transport rates for L-proline by either the neutral brush border or imino transport systems are reduced 10-fold when the surrounding membrane environment is made more fluid over the physiological range that exists along the crypt-villus axis. Furthermore, in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from enterocytes isolated from along the crypt-villus axis a similar gradient exists in the functional activity of these transport systems. This would imply that either the functional activity of these transporters are regulated by membrane physical properties or that the synthesis and insertion of these proteins is coordinated in concert with membrane physical properties as the enterocyte migrates up the crypt-villus axis. PMID:1567897

  12. A procedure for the rapid isolation from rat liver of plasma membrane vesicles exhibiting Ca2+-transport and Ca2+-ATPase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Epping, R J; Bygrave, F L

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described for the isolation of a plasma membrane-enriched preparation from a rat liver post-mitochondrial fraction by using discontinuous Percoll density-gradient centrifugation. The procedure is simple, of high reproducibility and yield and requires a total isolation time of only 90 min. The preparation consists almost exclusively of membrane vesicles and is enriched approx. 26-fold in plasma membrane-localized enzymes with minor contamination (less than 10%) with membranes derived mainly from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Approx. 20% of the fraction comprises tightly-sealed vesicles in the inverted orientation which are capable of accumulating calcium ions and exhibiting vanadate-insensitive Ca2+-ATPase activity. The properties of these activities, including insensitivity to vanadate, oxalate, and to p-chloromercuribenzoate as well as a lack of requirement for added Mg2+, contrast markedly with the reported properties of Ca2+ transport by the endoplasmic reticulum isolated from rat liver. The technique may have wide application in the study of plasma membrane-associated activities in rat liver, particularly in relation to sinusoidal membrane surface-related events. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6239615

  13. Glucose and fructose uptake by Limulus polyphemus hepatopancreatic brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles: evidence for Na+-dependent sugar transport activity.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Kenneth M; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    [(3)H]-fructose and [(3)H]-glucose transport activities were determined in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) from Limulus polyphemus (horseshoe crab) hepatopancreas. Glucose transport was equilibrative in the absence of sodium and sodium dependent in the presence of sodium in BBMV, suggesting GLUT-like and SGLT-like transport activity. Glucose transport by BLMV was equilibrative and sodium independent. Fructose uptake by BBMV and BLMV was equilibrative in the absence of sodium and sodium dependent in the presence of sodium. Western blot analysis using a rabbit anti-mouse SGLT-1 polyclonal antibody indicated the presence of a cross-reacting horseshoe crab BBMV protein of similar molecular weight to the mammalian SGLT1. Sequence alignment of the mouse SGLT-4 and SGLT1 with a translated, horseshoe crab-expressed sequence tag also indicated significant identity between species. Fructose and glucose uptake in the absence and presence of sodium by hepatopancreas BBMV and BLMV indicated the presence of sodium-dependent transport activity for each sugar that may result from the presence of transporters similar to those described for other species. PMID:21184084

  14. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  15. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  16. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  17. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  18. Active Transport and Diffusion Barriers Restrict Joubert Syndrome-Associated ARL13B/ARL-13 to an Inv-like Ciliary Membrane Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Sebiha; Clarke, Lara; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Hori, Yuji; Horn, Nicola; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Wdowicz, Anita; Mullins, Andrea; Kida, Katarzyna; Kaplan, Oktay I.; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Man Wu, Ka; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Mans, Dorus A.; Katada, Toshiaki; Kontani, Kenji; Ueffing, Marius; Roepman, Ronald; Kremer, Hannie; Blacque, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    , these findings reveal distinct requirements for sequence motifs, IFT and ciliopathy modules in defining an ARL-13 subciliary membrane compartment. We conclude that MKS/NPHP modules comprise a TZ barrier to ARL-13 diffusion, whereas IFT genes predominantly facilitate ARL-13 ciliary entry and/or retention via active transport mechanisms. PMID:24339792

  19. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  20. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  1. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  2. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  3. Role of plasma membrane transporters in muscle metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, A; Fandos, C; Palacín, M

    2000-01-01

    Muscle plays a major role in metabolism. Thus it is a major glucose-utilizing tissue in the absorptive state, and changes in muscle insulin-stimulated glucose uptake alter whole-body glucose disposal. In some conditions, muscle preferentially uses lipid substrates, such as fatty acids or ketone bodies. Furthermore, muscle is the main reservoir of amino acids and protein. The activity of many different plasma membrane transporters, such as glucose carriers and transporters of carnitine, creatine and amino acids, play a crucial role in muscle metabolism by catalysing the influx or the efflux of substrates across the cell surface. In some cases, the membrane transport process is subjected to intense regulatory control and may become a potential pharmacological target, as is the case with the glucose transporter GLUT4. The goal of this review is the molecular characterization of muscle membrane transporter proteins, as well as the analysis of their possible regulatory role. PMID:10903126

  4. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  5. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  6. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  7. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-01-01

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains. PMID:22733749

  8. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-07-10

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains. PMID:22733749

  9. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Penumetcha, Sai S.; Kona, Ravikanth; Hardin, Jonathan L.; Molder, Andrew L.; Steinle, Erich D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examine alumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The function of these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing the local environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long (C18) or short and branched (isopropyl) hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantly decreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containing alumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionic surfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to an increased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance the sensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilane attachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy, which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters of these silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electron microscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanes that are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  10. Actinide transport across cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Bulman, R A; Griffin, R J

    1980-01-01

    Protactinium uptake into the normal liver does not exceed 3%, but when the phospholipid levels in the liver are elevated by administration of thioacetamide this uptake increases to 31%. Phosphatidic acid, which is absent from the normal liver, has been shown to extract protactinium into organic solvents. However, phosphatidylserine, a component of normal liver cell membranes, does not extract protactinium. It might be conjectured that this is why so little protactinium is taken up by the normal liver. The hypothesis is advanced that phosphatidylserine, which is known to complex plutonium, americium and curium, may regulate the uptake of these elements by liver. PMID:7373293

  11. Hydroxide Solvation and Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-27

    Understanding hydroxide solvation and transport in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) can provide important insight into the design principles of these new membranes. To accurately model hydroxide solvation and transport, we developed a new multiscale reactive molecular dynamics model for hydroxide in aqueous solution, which was then subsequently modified for an AEM material. With this model, we investigated the hydroxide solvation structure and transport mechanism in the membrane. We found that a relatively even separation of the rigid side chains produces a continuous overlapping region for hydroxide transport that is made up of the first hydration shell of the tethered cationic groups. Our results show that hydroxide has a significant preference for this overlapping region, transporting through it and between the AEM side chains with substantial contributions from both vehicular (standard diffusion) and Grotthuss (proton hopping) mechanisms. Comparison of the AEM with common proton exchange membranes (PEMs) showed that the excess charge is less delocalized in the AEM than the PEMs, which is correlated with a higher free energy barrier for proton transfer reactions. The vehicular mechanism also contributes considerably more than the Grotthuss mechanism for hydroxide transport in the AEM, while our previous studies of PEM systems showed a larger contribution from the Grotthuss mechanism than the vehicular mechanism for proton transport. The activation energy barrier for hydroxide diffusion in the AEM is greater than that for proton diffusion in PEMs, implying a more significant enhancement of ion transport in the AEM at elevated temperatures. PMID:26716727

  12. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  13. Organelle morphogenesis by active membrane remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Ipsen, John H.; Rao, Madan; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    Intracellular organelles are subject to a steady flux of lipids and proteins through active, energy consuming transport processes. Active fission and fusion are promoted by GTPases, e.g., Arf-Coatamer and the Rab-Snare complexes, which both sense and generate local membrane curvature. Here we investigate through Dynamical Triangulation Monte Carlo simulations, the role that these active processes play in determining the morphology and compositional segregation in closed membranes. Our results suggest that the ramified morphologies of organelles observed in-vivo are a consequence of driven nonequilibrium processes rather than equilibrium forces.

  14. Hydrogen transport in composite inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model simulating hydrogen transport through composite inorganic membranes is proposed. This model simulates operation of membranes made of three or more porous or metallic layers. Transport through Pd-alloy metallic layers is simulated using a comprehensive model proposed by Ward and Dao. The model accounts for external mass transfer, surface adsorption and desorption, transport to and from the bulk metal, and diffusion within the metal. Transport through porous ceramic layers is simulated following Burggraaf, who proposed an expression that combines viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, and transition flow through porous media of complex geometrical structure. The model can also use experimentally determined permeance data when available. The theoretical model has been computationally implemented. Computations show very good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The proposed model predicts hydrogen fluxes through composite membranes of several layers for standard operating conditions. The model can also predict which of the several layers used in manufacturing the membrane is controlling the total hydrogen flux. This information can be used to determine optimal thickness values for metallic and porous layers.

  15. Method of making a hydrogen transport membrane, and article

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Joseph M.; Corpus, Joseph M.; Lim, Hankwon

    2015-07-21

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a hydrogen transport membrane and the composite article itself. More specifically, the invention relates to producing a membrane substrate, wherein the ceramic substrate is coated with a metal oxide slurry, thereby eliminating the need for an activation step prior to plating the ceramic membrane through an electroless plating process. The invention also relates to modifying the pore size and porosity of the substrate by oxidation or reduction of the particles deposited by the metal oxide slurry.

  16. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Porter, Jason; Patki, Neil; Kelley, Madison; Stanislowski, Josh; Tolbert, Scott; Way, J. Douglas; Makuch, David

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  17. Recent Advances in Synthetic Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    McNALLY, BETH A.; LEEVY, W. MATTHEW; SMITH, BRADLEY D.

    2010-01-01

    It is 25 years since the first report of a synthetic ion channel transporter. Today, dozens of molecular and supramolecular designs have been developed to facilitate ion and small molecule transport across a bilayer membrane. Presented here is a concise summary of the advances made over the past four years. The transporters are grouped into three mechanistic classes: mobile carrier, monomeric channel, and self-assembled pore. Common building blocks are crown ethers, steroids, cyclodextrins, peptides, curcubiturils, and calixarenes. The eventual goal is to produce functional supramolecular devices such as sensors, enzyme assays, and lead candidates for pharmaceutical development. PMID:20376284

  18. Computer Simulations of Ion Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Borodin, Oleg; Ganesan, Venkat

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and optimizing ion transport in polymer membranes have been the subject of active research for more than three decades. We present an overview of the progress and challenges involved with the modeling and simulation aspects of the ion transport properties of polymer membranes. We are concerned mainly with atomistic and coarser level simulation studies and discuss some salient work in the context of pure binary and single ion conducting polymer electrolytes, polymer nanocomposites, block copolymers, and ionic liquid-based hybrid electrolytes. We conclude with an outlook highlighting future directions. PMID:27070764

  19. Transport in nanoporous carbon membranes: Experiments and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, M.; Foley, H.C.

    2000-05-01

    Single-component permeances of six gases were measured on three different supported nanoporous carbon membranes prepared by spray coating and pyrolysis of poly(furfuryl alcohol) on porous stainless-steel disks. Global activation energies were regressed from data collected as a function of temperature. Permeances and global activation energies were correlated to molecular size, assuming that entropic affects dominated the transport. The permeance was best correlated to the minimum projected area of the molecule computed from first principles. The free-energy barriers to transport within the membranes were derived from the temperature dependence of the permeance data, after accounting for porosity differences between the membranes and differences in molecular adsorption. Using transition-state theory and an entropic model derived, the free energy, enthalpy, and entropic barriers to transport within the membrane were examined as a function of molecular size. Computed on the basis of size, the entropic component of this barrier did not account for the large differences in the transition-state free energies. However, when these entropic barrier values were used to compute the enthalpic portion of the barrier free energies, the minimum projected area of each molecule correlated strongly. Furthermore, these enthalpic components of the barriers were fitted nicely by the Everett-Powl mean field potential, using only the pore size as the adjustable parameter. These results shed light on the underlying mechanism by which shape-selective transport takes place in the NPC membranes and small molecules are separated.

  20. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  1. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  2. Water permeation through Nafion membranes: the role of water activity.

    PubMed

    Majsztrik, Paul; Bocarsly, Andrew; Benziger, Jay

    2008-12-25

    The permeation of water through 1100 equivalent weight Nation membranes has been measured for film thicknesses of 51-254 microm, temperatures of 30-80 degrees C, and water activities (a(w)) from 0.3 to 1 (liquid water). Water permeation coefficients increased with water content in Nafion. For feed side water activity in the range 0 < a(w) < 0.8, permeation coefficients increased linearly with water activity and scaled inversely with membrane thickness. The permeation coefficients were independent of membrane thickness when the feed side of the membrane was in contact with liquid water (a(w) = 1). The permeation coefficient for a 127 microm thick membrane increased by a factor of 10 between contacting the feed side of the membrane to water vapor (a(w) = 0.9) compared to liquid water (a(w) = 1). Water permeation couples interfacial transport across the fluid membrane interface with water transport through the hydrophilic phase of Nafion. At low water activity the hydrophilic volume fraction is small and permeation is limited by water diffusion. The volume fraction of the hydrophilic phase increases with water activity, increasing water transport. As a(w) --> 1, the effective transport rate increased by almost an order of magnitude, resulting in a change of the limiting transport resistance from water permeation across the membrane to interfacial mass transport at the gas/membrane interface. PMID:19053672

  3. Plasma Membrane Transporters in Modern Liver Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Jose J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The liver plays a crucial role in the detoxification of drugs used in the treatment of many diseases. The liver itself is the target for drugs aimed to modify its function or to treat infections and tumours affecting this organ. Both detoxification and pharmacological processes occurring in the liver require the uptake of the drug by hepatic cells and, in some cases, the elimination into bile. These steps have been classified as detoxification phase 0 and phase III, respectively. Since most drugs cannot cross the plasma membrane by simple diffusion, the involvement of transporters is mandatory. Several members of the superfamilies of solute carriers (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, with a minor participation of other families of transporters, account for the uptake and efflux, respectively, of endobiotic and xenobiotic compounds across the basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. These transporters are also involved in the sensitivity and refractoriness to the pharmacological treatment of liver tumours. An additional interesting aspect of the role of plasma membrane transporters in liver pharmacology regards the promiscuity of many of these carriers, which accounts for a variety of drug-drug, endogenous substances-drug and food components-drug interactions with clinical relevance. PMID:24278693

  4. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  5. Prism-patterned Nafion membrane for enhanced water transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Yun Sik; Ahn, Chiyeong; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a simple and effective strategy to enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by imprinting prism-patterned arrays onto the Nafion membrane, which provides three combined effects directly related to the device performance. First, a locally thinned membrane via imprinted micro prism-structures lead to reduced membrane resistance, which is confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Second, increments of the geometrical surface area of the prism-patterned Nafion membrane compared to a flat membrane result in the increase in the electrochemical active surface area. Third, the vertically asymmetric geometry of prism structures in the cathode catalyst layer lead to enhanced water transport, which is confirmed by oxygen gain calculation. To explain the enhanced water transport, we propose a simple theoretical model on removal of water droplets existing in the asymmetric catalyst layer. These three combined effects achieved via incorporating prism patterned arrays into the Nafion membrane effectively enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of integral membrane transport proteins in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ujjwal; Saier, Milton H

    2015-01-01

    Integral membrane transport proteins homologous to those found in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; www.tcdb.org) were identified and bioinformatically characterized by transporter class, family, and substrate specificity in three ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia (Para), Tetrahymena thermophila (Tetra), and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich). In these three organisms, 1,326 of 39,600 proteins (3.4%), 1,017 of 24,800 proteins (4.2%), and 504 out of 8,100 proteins (6.2%) integral membrane transport proteins were identified, respectively. Thus, an inverse relationship was observed between the % transporters identified and the number of total proteins per genome reported. This surprising observation provides insight into the evolutionary process, giving rise to genome reduction following whole genome duplication (as in the case of Para) or during pathogenic association with a host organism (Ich). Of these transport proteins in Para and Tetra, about 41% were channels (more than any other type of organism studied), 31% were secondary carriers (fewer than most eukaryotes) and 26% were primary active transporters, mostly ATP-hydrolysis driven (more than most other eukaryotes). In Ich, the number of channels was selectively reduced by 66%, relative to Para and Tetra. Para has four times more inorganic anion transporters than Tetra, and Ich has nonselectively lost most of these. Tetra and Ich preferentially transport sugars and monocarboxylates while Para prefers di- and tricarboxylates. These observations serve to characterize the transport proteins of these related ciliates, providing insight into their nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25099884

  7. Does hindered transport theory apply to desalination membranes?

    PubMed

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Kolev, Vesselin; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2014-10-01

    As reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration polyamide membranes become increasingly used for water purification, prediction of pollutant transport is required for membrane development and process engineering. Many popular models use hindered transport theory (HTT), which considers a spherical solute moving through an array of fluid-filled rigid cylindrical pores. Experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, however, reveal that polyamide membranes have a distinctly different structure of a "molecular sponge", a network of randomly connected voids widely distributed in size. In view of this disagreement, this study critically examined the validity of HTT by directly measuring diffusivities of several alcohols within a polyamide film of commercial RO membrane using attenuated total reflection-FTIR. It is found that measured diffusivities deviate from HTT predictions by as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude. This result indicates that HTT does not adequately describe solute transport in desalination membranes. As a more adequate alternative, the concept of random resistor networks is suggested, with resistances described by models of activated transport in "soft" polymers without a sharp size cutoff and with a proper address of solute partitioning. PMID:25137614

  8. Lateral transport of Smoothened from the plasma membrane to the membrane of the cilium

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    The function of primary cilia depends critically on the localization of specific proteins in the ciliary membrane. A major challenge in the field is to understand protein trafficking to cilia. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway protein Smoothened (Smo), a 7-pass transmembrane protein, moves to cilia when a ligand is received. Using microscopy-based pulse-chase analysis, we find that Smo moves through a lateral transport pathway from the plasma membrane to the ciliary membrane. Lateral movement, either via diffusion or active transport, is quite distinct from currently studied pathways of ciliary protein transport in mammals, which emphasize directed trafficking of Golgi-derived vesicles to the base of the cilium. We anticipate that this alternative route will be used by other signaling proteins that function at cilia. The path taken by Smo may allow novel strategies for modulation of Hh signaling in cancer and regeneration. PMID:19948480

  9. Membrane transporter proteins: a challenge for CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Girardin, François

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins present in various tissues such as the lymphocytes, intestine, liver, kidney, testis, placenta, and central nervous system. These transporters play a significant role in drug absorption and distribution to organic systems, particularly if the organs are protected by blood-organ barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier or the maternal-fetal barrier. In contrast to neurotransmitters and receptor-coupled transporters or other modes of interneuronal transmission, drug transporters are not directly involved in specific neuronal functions, but provide global protection to the central nervous system. The lack of capillary fenestration, the low pinocytic activity, and the tight junctions between brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells represent further gatekeepers limiting the entrance of endogenous and exogenous compounds into the central nervous system. Drug transport is a result of the concerted action of efflux and influx pumps (transporters) located both in the basolateral and apical membranes of brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells. By regulating efflux and influx of endogenous or exogenous substances, the blood-brain barrier and, to a lesser extent, the blood-cerebrospinal barrier in the ventricles, represents the main interface between the central nervous system and the blood, ie, the rest of the body. As drug distribution to organs is dependent on the affinity of a substrate for a specific transport system, membrane transporter proteins are increasingly recognized as a key determinant of drug disposition. Many drug transporters are members of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily or the solute-linked carrier (SLC) class. The multidrug resistance protein MDR1 (ABCB1), also called P-glycoprotein, the multidrug resistance-associated proteins MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2), and the breast cancer-resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) are ATP-dependent efflux

  10. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  11. A membrane transporter for tryptophan composed of RNA

    PubMed Central

    JANAS, TERESA; JANAS, TADEUSZ; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2004-01-01

    We have incorporated an RNA binding site for the biological amino acid tryptophan within an RNA complex with affinity for phospholipid bilayer membranes. The resulting RNA (9:10Trp) creates a selective route through the bilayer for the amino acid. Binding and enhanced tryptophan permeability are nonlinear in RNA concentration, suggesting that RNA aggregation is required for both. Tryptophan permeability saturates with increased concentration, though at ~1000-fold greater level than when binding a free aptamer. The RNA (9:10Trp) complex, bound at a mean of two per liposome, halves the activation energy for tryptophan transport (to 46 kJ/mole), specifically increasing tryptophan entry to a maximal velocity of 0.5 sec-1 per liposome with little or no accompanying increase in general permeability. Individual RNAs turn over tens of thousands of times at high tryptophan concentration. Thus, a specific passive membrane transporter whose properties overlap those of single-molecule transporter proteins, can be made of RNA alone. Permeability changes probably rely on disturbances in lipid conformation as well as on an advantageous low free energy position for tryptophan at the membrane. Other RNA activities may yield other RNA-membrane nanosystems via this route. PMID:15383677

  12. Understanding the transport processes in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, May Jean

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy conversion devices suitable for automotive, stationary and portable applications. An engineering challenge that is hindering the widespread use of PEM fuel cells is the water management issue, where either a lack of water (resulting in membrane dehydration) or an excess accumulation of liquid water (resulting in fuel cell flooding) critically reduces the PEM fuel cell performance. The water management issue is addressed by this dissertation through the study of three transport processes occurring in PEM fuel cells. Water transport within the membrane is a combination of water diffusion down the water activity gradient and the dragging of water molecules by protons when there is a proton current, in a phenomenon termed electro-osmotic drag, EOD. The impact of water diffusion and EOD on the water flux across the membrane is reduced due to water transport resistance at the vapor/membrane interface. The redistribution of water inside the membrane by EOD causes an overall increase in the membrane resistance that regulates the current and thus EOD, thereby preventing membrane dehydration. Liquid water transport in the PEM fuel cell flow channel was examined at different gas flow regimes. At low gas Reynolds numbers, drops transitioned into slugs that are subsequently pushed out of the flow channel by the gas flow. The slug volume is dependent on the geometric shape, the surface wettability and the orientation (with respect to gravity) of the flow channel. The differential pressure required for slug motion primarily depends on the interfacial forces acting along the contact lines at the front and the back of the slug. At high gas Reynolds number, water is removed as a film or as drops depending on the flow channel surface wettability. The shape of growing drops at low and high Reynolds number can be described by a simple interfacial energy minimization model. Under flooding conditions, the fuel cell local current

  13. Morphology and transport in ionic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disabb-Miller, Melanie Lisa

    Ion-containing polymers for fuel cell membranes have been studied to determine the chemical structure and ion content relationship to membrane water uptake, conductivity, and morphology. Random and block copolymer proton exchange membranes (PEMs) and anion exchange membranes (AEMs) with unique properties, such as diblock and triblock copolymers, superacidic moieties, and charge-delocalized polymer-tethered Ru-complex based cations, were investigated, and new metrics were developed to analyze fundamental ion transport behavior in these polymers. The morphology of the polymer systems was examined using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By studying a number of different ion-conducting systems using multiple techniques and deep analysis of structure-property relationships, a more complete picture of the property landscape of these materials was developed. Model diblock and unique triblock copolymer systems with center-functionalized blocks based on poly(styrene), PS, and poly(hexyl methacrylate), PHMA, were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PS block was functionalized for backbone-independent comparisons of PEM and AEM water uptake and conductivity to provide insight in how the properties of PEMs and AEMs compare and aid in further AEM development. The ratio of the mobile ion diffusion coefficients and dilute solution ion diffusivity (D/D0) was developed as a new metric, allowing for accurate comparison of polymer systems with different ion moieties and contents. Subsequently, it was determined that block copolymer PEMs and AEMs demonstrate the same barriers to ion transport if the mobility of the charge carrier is considered.

  14. Proton transport via the membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Georgievskii, Yuri; Medvedev, Emile S; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2002-01-01

    Some proton pumps, such as cytochrome c oxidase (C(c)O), translocate protons across biological membranes at a rate that considerably exceeds the rate of proton transport to the entrance of the proton-conducting channel via bulk diffusion. This effect is usually ascribed to a proton-collecting antenna surrounding the channel entrance. In this paper, we consider a realistic phenomenological model of such an antenna. In our model, a homogeneous membrane surface, which can mediate proton diffusion toward the channel entrance, is populated with protolytic groups that are in dynamic equilibrium with the solution. Equations that describe coupled surface-bulk proton diffusion are derived and analyzed. A general expression for the rate constant of proton transport via such a coupled surface-bulk diffusion mechanism is obtained. A rigorous criterion is formulated of when proton diffusion along the surface enhances the transport. The enhancement factor is found to depend on the ratio of the surface and bulk diffusional constants, pK(a) values of surface protolytic groups, and their concentration. A capture radius for a proton on the surface and an effective size of the antenna are found. The theory also predicts the effective distance that a proton can migrate on the membrane surface between a source (such as CcO) and a sink (such as ATP synthase) without fully equilibrating with the bulk. In pure aqueous solutions, protons can travel over long distances (microns). In buffered solutions, the travel distance is much shorter (nanometers); still the enhancement effect of the surface diffusion on the proton flow to a target on the surface can be tens to hundreds at physiological buffer concentrations. These results are discussed in a general context of chemiosmotic theory. PMID:12023208

  15. Influence of water and membrane microstructure on the transport properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Ana Rosa

    Proton transport in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) depends on interaction between water and acid groups covalently bound to the polymer. Although the presence of water is important in maintaining the PEM's functions, a thorough understanding of this topic is still lacking. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of how the nature water, confined to ionic domains of the polymer, influences the membrane's ability to transport protons, methanol and water. Understanding this topic will facilitate development of new materials with favorable transport properties for fuel cells use. Five classes of polymer membranes were used in this work: polyacrylonitrile-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PAN-g-macPSSA); poly(vinylidene difluoride) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PVDF-g-PSSA); poly(ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (ETFE-gPSSA); PVDF-g-PSSA with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA); and perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion). The nature of water within the polymers (freezable versus non-freezable states) was measured by systematically freezing samples, and observing the temperature at which water freezes and the amount of heat released in the process. Freezing water-swollen membranes resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the proton conductivity of the PEM. Activation energies of proton transport before and after freezing were ˜ 0.15 eV and 0.5 eV, consistent with proton transport through liquid water and bound water, respectively. Reducing the content of water in membrane samples decreased the amount of freezable and non-freezable water. Calorimetric measurements of membranes in various degrees of hydration showed that water molecules became non-freezable when lambda, (water molecules per sulfonic acid group) was less than ˜14. Proton conduction through membranes containing only non-freezable water was demonstrated to be feasible. Diffusion experiments showed that the permeability of methanol

  16. Structure and Function of Thyroid Hormone Plasma Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model. PMID:25538896

  17. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design. PMID:19433508

  18. Physiological and pathophysiological factors affecting the expression and activity of the drug transporter MRP2 in intestine. Impact on its function as membrane barrier.

    PubMed

    Arana, Maite R; Tocchetti, Guillermo N; Rigalli, Juan P; Mottino, Aldo D; Villanueva, Silvina S M

    2016-07-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium functions as a selective barrier to absorb nutrients, electrolytes and water, but at the same time restricts the passage into the systemic circulation of intraluminal potentially toxic compounds. This epithelium maintains its selective barrier function through the presence of very selective and complex intercellular junctions and the ability of the absorptive cells to reject those compounds. Accordingly, the enterocytes metabolize orally incorporated xenobiotics and secrete the hydrophilic metabolites back into the intestinal lumen through specific transporters localized apically. In the recent decades, there has been increasing recognition of the existence of the intestinal cellular barrier. In the present review we focus on the role of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2) in the apical membrane of the enterocytes, as an important component of this intestinal barrier, as well as on its regulation. We provide a detailed compilation of significant contributions demonstrating that MRP2 expression and function vary under relevant physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Because MRP2 activity modulates the availability and pharmacokinetics of many therapeutic drugs administered orally, their therapeutic efficacy and safety may vary as well. PMID:27109321

  19. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M.; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design. PMID:19433508

  20. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  1. Shared Molecular Mechanisms of Membrane Transporters.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Boudker, Olga

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the crystal structures of small-molecule transporters has shed light on the conformational changes that take place during structural isomerization from outward- to inward-facing states. Rather than using a simple rocking movement of two bundles around a central substrate-binding site, it has become clear that even the most simplistic transporters utilize rearrangements of nonrigid bodies. In the most dramatic cases, one bundle is fixed while the other, structurally divergent, bundle carries the substrate some 18 Å across the membrane, which in this review is termed an elevator alternating-access mechanism. Here, we compare and contrast rocker-switch, rocking-bundle, and elevator alternating-access mechanisms to highlight shared features and novel refinements to the basic alternating-access model. PMID:27023848

  2. Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied. PMID:12878724

  3. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  4. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes.

    PubMed

    Zgurskaya, Helen I; Weeks, Jon W; Ntreh, Abigail T; Nickels, Logan M; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  5. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; Weeks, Jon W.; Ntreh, Abigail T.; Nickels, Logan M.; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  6. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  7. Multicomponent transport in membranes for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) incorporate separator membranes, which ideally prevent mixing of electrochemically active species while permitting crossover of inactive supporting ions. Understanding crossover and membrane selectivity may require multicomponent transport models that account for solute/solute interactions within the membrane, as well as solute/membrane interactions. Application of the Onsager-Stefan-Maxwell formalism allows one to account for all the dissipative phenomena that may accompany component fluxes through RFB membranes. The magnitudes of dissipative interactions (diffusional drag forces) are quantified by matching experimentally established concentration transients with theory. Such transients can be measured non-invasively using DC conductometry, but the accuracy of this method requires precise characterization of the bulk RFB electrolytes. Aqueous solutions containing both vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) are relevant to RFB technology. One of the first precise characterizations of aqueous vanadyl sulfate has been implemented and will be reported. To assess the viability of a separator for vanadium RFB applications with cell-level simulations, it is critical to understand the tendencies of various classes of membranes to absorb (uptake) active species, and to know the relative rates of active-species and supporting-electrolyte diffusion. It is also of practical interest to investigate the simultaneous diffusion of active species and supports, because interactions between solutes may ultimately affect the charge efficiency and power efficiency of the RFB system as a whole. A novel implementation of Barnes's classical model of dialysis-cell diffusion [Physics 5:1 (1934) 4-8] is developed to measure the binary diffusion coefficients and sorption equilibria for single solutes (VOSO4 or H2SO4) in porous membranes and cation-exchange membranes. With the binary diffusion and uptake measurement in hand, a computer simulation that

  8. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  9. Calcium and sodium transport processes in patients with cystic fibrosis 2. Mg2+- dependent, Ca2+ ATPase activity in fibroblast membrane preparations from cystic fibrosis patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Katz, S

    1978-03-01

    Mg2+-dependent Ca2+-ATPase activity was determined in membrane preparations of fibroblasts grown from skin biopsies of cystic fibrosis patients and age-matched controls. This enzyme was stimulated by increasing free calcium concentrations with an apparent Kdiss for calcium of approximately 45 micron. Although there was a great deal of variation in Ca2+-ATPase activity observed between individual strains, there was a significant decrease in the maximal activation of the Ca2+-ATPase in membrane preparations of fibroblasts obtained from cystic fibrosis patients compared to the controls (P less than 0.05). This observation indicates that decreased Ca2+-ATPase activity is a generalized phenomenon in cystic fibrosis found in more than one cell-type. This decrease in Ca2+-ATPase activity may have a number of implications that may explain some of the manifestations of the disease. PMID:148720

  10. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  11. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  12. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions. PMID:26721276

  13. Control of Plasma Membrane Permeability by ABC Transporters.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Johnson, Soraya S; Manoharlal, Raman; Russo, Sarah B; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Sunshine, Anna B; Dunham, Maitreya J; Cowart, L Ashley; Devaux, Frédéric; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2015-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae control the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane as well as serving as ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps. Mutant strains lacking these transporter proteins were found to exhibit very different resistance phenotypes to two inhibitors of sphingolipid biosynthesis that act either late (aureobasidin A [AbA]) or early (myriocin [Myr]) in the pathway leading to production of these important plasma membrane lipids. These pdr5Δ yor1 strains were highly AbA resistant but extremely sensitive to Myr. We provide evidence that these phenotypic changes are likely due to modulation of the plasma membrane flippase complexes, Dnf1/Lem3 and Dnf2/Lem3. Flippases act to move phospholipids from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Genetic analyses indicate that lem3Δ mutant strains are highly AbA sensitive and Myr resistant. These phenotypes are fully epistatic to those seen in pdr5Δ yor1 strains. Direct analysis of AbA-induced signaling demonstrated that loss of Pdr5 and Yor1 inhibited the AbA-triggered phosphorylation of the AGC kinase Ypk1 and its substrate Orm1. Microarray experiments found that a pdr5Δ yor1 strain induced a Pdr1-dependent induction of the entire Pdr regulon. Our data support the view that Pdr5/Yor1 negatively regulate flippase function and activity of the nuclear Pdr1 transcription factor. Together, these data argue that the interaction of the ABC transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 with the Lem3-dependent flippases regulates permeability of AbA via control of plasma membrane protein function as seen for the high-affinity tryptophan permease Tat2. PMID:25724885

  14. Natural polyphenols: Influence on membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Sulaiman, Amal Ajaweed; Alhaddad, Hasan; Alhadidi, Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has focused on the use of natural polyphenolic compounds as nutraceuticals since they showed a wide range of bioactivities and exhibited protection against variety of age-related disorders. Polyphenols have variable potencies to interact, and hence alter the activities of various transporter proteins, many of them classified as anion transporting polypeptide-binding cassette transporters like multidrug resistance protein and p-glycoprotein. Some of the efflux transporters are, generally, linked with anticancer and antiviral drug resistance; in this context, polyphenols may be beneficial in modulating drug resistance by increasing the efficacy of anticancer and antiviral drugs. In addition, these effects were implicated to explain the influence of dietary polyphenols on drug efficacy as result of food-drug interactions. However, limited data are available about the influence of these components on uptake transporters. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review the potential efficacies of polyphenols in modulating the functional integrity of uptake transporter proteins, including those terminated the effect of neurotransmitters, and their possible influence in neuropharmacology. PMID:27069731

  15. Natural polyphenols: Influence on membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Sulaiman, Amal Ajaweed; Alhaddad, Hasan; Alhadidi, Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has focused on the use of natural polyphenolic compounds as nutraceuticals since they showed a wide range of bioactivities and exhibited protection against variety of age-related disorders. Polyphenols have variable potencies to interact, and hence alter the activities of various transporter proteins, many of them classified as anion transporting polypeptide-binding cassette transporters like multidrug resistance protein and p-glycoprotein. Some of the efflux transporters are, generally, linked with anticancer and antiviral drug resistance; in this context, polyphenols may be beneficial in modulating drug resistance by increasing the efficacy of anticancer and antiviral drugs. In addition, these effects were implicated to explain the influence of dietary polyphenols on drug efficacy as result of food-drug interactions. However, limited data are available about the influence of these components on uptake transporters. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review the potential efficacies of polyphenols in modulating the functional integrity of uptake transporter proteins, including those terminated the effect of neurotransmitters, and their possible influence in neuropharmacology. PMID:27069731

  16. Sum frequency generation studies of membrane transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Shreve, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to study the transport of protons and ions across biological membranes, one of the most fundamental processes in living organisms, critical for energy transduction in respiration and photosynthesis and for a wide variety of cellular signal transduction events. Membrane protein structure and function, in particular proton and ion pumping are poorly understood. The authors have developed sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy for the study of membrane phenomena, a nonlinear spectroscopic technique that is uniquely sensitive to interfaces and with demonstrated structural specificity. They have used SFG and conventional vibrational spectroscopic approaches to study proton transport processes in cytochrome c oxidase. A key finding has been the identification of vibrational modes associated with proton labile groups, including a glutamic acid near the redox active binuclear center and structural waters. These groups are sensitive to the ligation and redox states of the metal centers and hence are ideal candidates for coupling redox energy to proton transport processes.

  17. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  18. The ABCC4 membrane transporter modulates platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheepala, Satish B; Pitre, Aaron; Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Pestina, Tamara; Gartner, T Kent; Jackson, Carl; Schuetz, John D

    2015-11-12

    Controlling the activation of platelets is a key strategy to mitigate cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have suggested that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCC4, functions in platelet-dense granules. Using plasma membrane biotinylation and super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that ABCC4 is primarily expressed on the plasma membrane of both mouse and human platelets. Platelets lacking ABCC4 have unchanged dense-granule function, number, and volume, but harbor a selective impairment in collagen-induced aggregation. Accordingly, Abcc4 knockout (KO) platelet attachment to a collagen substratum was also faulty and associated with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and reduced plasma membrane localization of the major collagen receptor, GPVI. In the ferric-chloride vasculature injury model, Abcc4 KO mice exhibited markedly impaired thrombus formation. The attenuation of platelet aggregation by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor EHNA (a non-ABCC4 substrate), when combined with Abcc4 deficiency, illustrated a crucial functional interaction between phosphodiesterases and ABCC4. This was extended in vivo where EHNA dramatically prolonged the bleeding time, but only in Abcc4 KO mice. Further, we demonstrated in human platelets that ABCC4 inhibition, when coupled with phosphodiesterase inhibition, strongly impaired platelet aggregation. These findings have important clinical implications because they directly highlight an important relationship between ABCC4 transporter function and phosphodiesterases in accounting for the cAMP-directed activity of antithrombotic agents. PMID:26405223

  19. Analytical Applications of Transport Through Bulk Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Ioana; Ruse, Elena; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bunaciu, Andrei A

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the results of research in the use of bulk liquid membranes in separation processes and preconcentration for analytical purposes. It includes some theoretical aspects, definitions, types of liquid membranes, and transport mechanism, as well as advantages of using liquid membranes in laboratory studies. These concepts are necessary to understand fundamental principles of liquid membrane transport. Due to the multiple advantages of liquid membranes several studies present analytical applications of the transport through liquid membranes in separation or preconcentration processes of metallic cations and some organic compounds, such as phenol and phenolic derivatives, organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, and drugs. This review presents coupled techniques such as separation through the liquid membrane coupled with flow injection analysis. PMID:26185963

  20. Nanostructured silicon membranes for control of molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Fowlkes, Jason D; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-11-01

    A membrane that allows selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering on the nanoscale. Membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure and surface chemistry of the pores. Here, a combination of electron beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, has been used to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust, have uniform pore sizes, and are directly integrated into a microfluidic network. Additional reductions in pore size were achieved using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide to coat membrane surfaces. Cross sectioning of the membranes using focused ion beam milling was used to determine the physical shape of the membrane pores before and after coating. Functional characterization of the membranes was performed by using quantitative fluorescence microscopy to document the transport of molecular species across the membrane. PMID:24932436

  1. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  2. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  3. Glia plasma membrane transporters: Key players in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system, elicits its functions through the activation of specific membrane receptors that are expressed in neurons and glial cells. The re-cycling of this amino acid is carried out mostly through a continuous interplay between neurons and glia cells, given the fact that the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft depends mainly on glial glutamate transporters. Therefore, a functional and physical interaction between membrane transporters links glutamate uptake, transformation to glutamine and its release to the extra-synaptic space and its uptake to the pre-synaptic terminal. This sequence of events, best known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle is central to glutamatergic transmission. In this sense, the uptake process triggers a complex series of biochemical cascades that modify the physiology of glial cells in the immediate, short and long term so as to be capable to take up, transform and release these amino acids in a regulated amount and in an appropriate time frame to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission. Among the signaling cascades activated in glial cells by glutamate transporters, a sustained Na(+) and Ca(2+) influx, protein posttranslational modifications and gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels are present. Therefore, it is clear that the pivotal role of glial cells in the context of excitatory transmission has been constantly underestimated. PMID:27083407

  4. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  5. Study of transport through an electro responsive polymer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Datta, A.; Contractor, A. Q.

    2015-02-01

    Conducting polymers have been used widely for development of several electronic, sensing devices because of its electro active nature. In the present work porous polycarbonate (PC) support was coated with a thin gold layer. An electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) film was deposited on gold coated PC and characterisation was done by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring the concentration of potassium ion (K+) inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used. Potassium ion transport across PANI membrane at various potential showed the gradual opening of the coiled PANI. In this work an effort has been given to picture the situation in the membrane electrolyte junction on application of potential.

  6. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  7. Microscopic Characterization of Membrane Transporter Function by In Silico Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, J V; Trebesch, N; Mayne, C G; Thangapandian, S; Shekhar, M; Mahinthichaichan, P; Baylon, J L; Jiang, T; Wang, Y; Muller, M P; Shinn, E; Zhao, Z; Wen, P-C; Tajkhorshid, E

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters mediate one of the most fundamental processes in biology. They are the main gatekeepers controlling active traffic of materials in a highly selective and regulated manner between different cellular compartments demarcated by biological membranes. At the heart of the mechanism of membrane transporters lie protein conformational changes of diverse forms and magnitudes, which closely mediate critical aspects of the transport process, most importantly the coordinated motions of remotely located gating elements and their tight coupling to chemical processes such as binding, unbinding and translocation of transported substrate and cotransported ions, ATP binding and hydrolysis, and other molecular events fueling uphill transport of the cargo. An increasing number of functional studies have established the active participation of lipids and other components of biological membranes in the function of transporters and other membrane proteins, often acting as major signaling and regulating elements. Understanding the mechanistic details of these molecular processes require methods that offer high spatial and temporal resolutions. Computational modeling and simulations technologies empowered by advanced sampling and free energy calculations have reached a sufficiently mature state to become an indispensable component of mechanistic studies of membrane transporters in their natural environment of the membrane. In this article, we provide an overview of a number of major computational protocols and techniques commonly used in membrane transporter modeling and simulation studies. The article also includes practical hints on effective use of these methods, critical perspectives on their strengths and weak points, and examples of their successful applications to membrane transporters, selected from the research performed in our own laboratory. PMID:27497175

  8. Hypoxia directly increases serotonin transport by porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.B.; Block, E.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Alterations in the physical state and composition of membrane lipids have been shown to interfere with a number of critical cellular and membrane functions including transmembrane transport. The authors have reported that hypoxia has profound effects upon the physical state and lipid composition of the PAEC plasma membrane bilayer and have suggested that this is responsible for increased serotonin uptake by these cells. In order to determine whether hypoxia has a direct effect on the plasma membrane transport of serotonin, they measured serotonin transport activity (1) in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from normoxic (20% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) and hypoxic (0% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) PAEC and (2) in PAEC plasma membrane vesicles that were exposed directly to normoxia or hypoxia. A 24-h exposure of PAEC to hypoxia resulted in a 40% increase in specific serotonin transport by plasma membrane vesicles derived from these cells. When plasma membrane vesicles were isolated and then directly exposed to normoxia or hypoxia for 1 h at 37C, a 31% increase in specific 5-HT transport was observed in hypoxic vesicles. Hypoxia did not alter the Km of serotonin transport (normoxia = 3.47 {mu}M versus hypoxia = 3.76 {mu}M) but markedly increased the maximal rate of transport (V{sup max}) (normoxia = 202.4 pmol/min/mg protein versus hypoxia = 317.9 pmol/min/mg protein). These results indicate that hypoxia increases serotonin transport in PAEC by a direct effect on the plasma membrane leading to an increase in the effective number of transporter molecules without alteration in transporter affinity for serotonin.

  9. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  10. Residues in the pathway through a membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, R T; Maloney, P C

    1995-01-01

    The structure of solute transporters is understood largely from analysis of their amino acid sequences, and more direct information is greatly needed. Here we report work that applies cysteine scanning mutagenesis to describe structure-function relations in UhpT, a bacterial membrane transporter. By using an impermeant SH-reactive agent to probe single-cysteine variants, we show that UhpT transmembrane segment 7 spans the membrane as an alpha-helix and that the central portion of this helix is exposed to both membrane surfaces, forming part of the translocation pathway through this transporter. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597063

  11. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  12. Thermodynamics of Ionic Transport through Functionalized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vikramjit; Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    Through microphase separation of block copolymers, highly porous solid membranes may be assembled. Further functionalization with amine and sulfonic acid groups has demonstrated promise in exquisitely controlling the flux of charged species, and in particular multivalent ions. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explore the essential thermodynamics underlying salt rejection in charge-functionalized membranes, and develop a model capable of linking the performance of these membranes to their molecular character through free energy calculations.

  13. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1), the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2), the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1). Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters. PMID:24278698

  14. Differential Activity of Plasma and Vacuolar Membrane Transporters Contributes to Genotypic Differences in Salinity Tolerance in a Halophyte Species, Chenopodium quinoa

    PubMed Central

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Lana; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Zeng, Fanrong; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow (SV) and fast (FV) tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013) Plant Physiology). This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa. These include: (i) a higher rate of Na+ exclusion from leaf mesophyll; (ii) maintenance of low cytosolic Na+ levels; (iii) better K+ retention in the leaf mesophyll; (iv) a high rate of H+ pumping, which increases the ability of mesophyll cells to restore their membrane potential; and (v) the ability to reduce the activity of SV and FV channels under saline conditions. These mechanisms appear to be highly orchestrated, thus enabling the remarkable overall salinity tolerance of quinoa species. PMID:23629664

  15. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  16. ALUMINUM ALTERS CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium is actively transported into intracellular organelles and out of the cytoplasm by Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPases located in the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes. he effects of aluminum on calcium transport were examined in the adult rat brain. 5Ca-uptake was examined in micr...

  17. Ionic transport properties of template-synthesized gold nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    Ionic transport in nanotubes exhibits unique properties due to the strong interactions between ions and the nanotube surface. The main objective of my research is to explore and regulate the ionic transport in gold nanotube membranes. Chapter 1 overviews a versatile method of fabricating nanostructured materials, called the template synthesis. Important parameters of the template synthesis are introduced such as templates and deposition methods. The template synthesis method is used to prepare membranes used in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes a method to increase the ionic conductivity in membranes containing gold nanotubes with small diameter (4 nm). The gold nanotube membrane is prepared by the electroless plating of gold in a commercially available polycarbonate membrane. Voltages are applied to the gold nanotube membrane and fixed charges are injected on the gold nanotube walls. We show that ionic conductivity of the gold nanotube membrane can be enhanced in aqueous potassium chloride (KCl) solution at negative applied voltages. When the most negative voltage (-0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied to the membrane, the ionic conductivity of the solution inside the gold nanotube (94 mS.cm-1) is comparable to that of 1 M aqueous KCl, over two orders of magnitude higher than that of the 0.01 M KCl contacting the membrane. Chapter 3 explores another important transport property of the gold nanotube membrane -- ion permselectivity. When the permselective membrane separates two electrolyte solutions at different concentrations, a membrane potential is developed and measured by the potentiometric method. Surface charge density and the ion mobilities are estimated by fitting the experimental data with a pre-existing model. The surface charge density of the gold nanotube membrane in this research is estimated to be 2 muC/cm2. Chapter 4 describes voltage-controlled ionic transport in a gold/polypyrrole membrane doped with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Polypyrrole

  18. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  19. Water and Molecular Transport across Nanopores in Monolayer Graphene Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Doojoon; O'Hern, Sean; Kidambi, Piran; Boutilier, Michael; Song, Yi; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Kong, Jing; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Graphene's atomic thickness and high tensile strength allow it to outstand as backbone material for next-generation high flux separation membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted that a single-layer graphene membrane could exhibit high permeability and selectivity for water over ions/molecules, qualifying as novel water desalination membranes. However, experimental investigation of water and molecular transport across graphene nanopores had remained barely explored due to the presence of intrinsic defects and tears in graphene. We introduce two-step methods to seal leakage across centimeter scale single-layer graphene membranes create sub-nanometer pores using ion irradiation and oxidative etching. Pore creation parameters were varied to explore the effects of created pore structures on water and molecular transport driven by forward osmosis. The results demonstrate the potential of nanoporous graphene as a reliable platform for high flux nanofiltration membranes.

  20. Simulating and Modeling Transport Through Atomically Thin Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph; Eaves, Joel

    2014-03-01

    The world is running out of clean portable water. The efficacy of water desalination technologies using porous materials is a balance between membrane selectivity and solute throughput. These properties are just starting to be understood on the nanoscale, but in the limit of atomically thin membranes it is unclear whether one can apply typical continuous time random walk models. Depending on the size of the pore and thickness of the membrane, mass transport can range from single stochastic passage events to continuous flow describable by the usual hydrodynamic equations. We present a study of mass transport through membranes of various pore geometries using reverse nonequilibrium simulations, and analyze transport rates using stochastic master equations.

  1. Transport in Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes I. Physical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2003-06-02

    In this paper, a physical model is developed that is semiphenomenological and takes into account Schroeder's paradox. Using the wealth of knowledge contained in the literature regarding polymer-electrolyte membranes as a basis, a novel approach is taken in tying together all of the data into a single coherent theory. This approach involves describing the structural changes of the membrane due to water content, and casting this in terms of capillary phenomena. By treating the membrane in this fashion, Schroeder's paradox can be elucidated. Along with the structural changes, two different transport mechanisms are presented and discussed. These mechanisms, along with the membrane's structural changes, comprise the complete physical model of the membrane. The model is shown to agree qualitatively with different membranes and different membrane forms, and is applicable to modeling perfluorinated sulfonic acid and similar membranes. It is also the first physically based comprehensive model of transport in a membrane that includes a physical description of Schroeder's paradox, and it bridges the gap between the two types of macroscopic models currently in the literature.

  2. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  3. Towards Co-evolution of Membrane Transport and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    nucleosides or their activated derivatives are synthesized outside protocells and subsequently transported across protocellular membranes the kinetic mechanism does not apply because all diastereomers, which have their sugars in the furanose rather than pyranose form, permeate the membrane at approximately the same rate. Properties of membranes might have been also coupled to metabolism involving peptides. Recently, Adamala and Szostak (2013) have shown that a dipeptide inside fatty-acid vesicles catalyzes the formation of another dipeptide that binds to vesicle walls and, by doing so, promotes their growth at the expense of other vesicles. This coupling of metabolism, permeability of vesicles and their growth is the first demonstration of evolutionary advantage imparted by small, membrane-bound peptides. Building on this work we have calculated the rate at which different blocked amino acids are delivered to a protocell for synthesis of dipeptides. We have further shown that the dipeptides are located at the water-membrane interface rather than in the center of the bilayer. On these basis it is anticipated that other dipeptides containing aromatic, but not necessarily hydrophobic amino acids (e.g. tyrosine) could have the same catalytic effects. Insight from these studies allows for estimating the rate of vesicle growth and the rates of dipeptide synthesis required to keep the system in balance. These results, in combination with our earlier studies, lead to a general scenario for evolution from membrane-bound dipeptides to ion channels in the origin of life.

  4. Current topics in membranes and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinzeller, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Expression of the Oxytocin and Vasopressin Genes; Steroid Effects on Excitable Membranes: The Secretory Vesicle in Processing and Secretion of Neuropeptides: and Steroid Hormone Influences on Cyclic AMP-Generating Systems.

  5. Morphology and Proton Transport in Porous Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Kortright, Jeffrey; Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of a proton-conducting block and an uncharged structural block are attractive due to their potential in clean energy applications. Herein we demonstrate a novel approach of fabricating block copolymer electrolyte membranes, by inducing pores in the proton-conducting phase. We examine morphology of these membranes with contrast-matched resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSoXS) and electron tomography. Proton conductivity as a function of porosity and water activity is also investigated. By tuning the porosity of the membranes, we are able to adjust the water uptake of the membranes for improved proton conductivities, in both humid air and liquid water.

  6. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  7. Label-Free Optical Method for Quantifying Molecular Transport Across Cellular Membranes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sharifian Gh, Mohammad; Wilhelm, Michael J; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear optical method for the label-free quantification of membrane transport rates of small/medium size molecules in living cells. Specifically, second-harmonic generation (SHG) laser scattering permits surface-specific characterization of transport across membranes. Unfortunately, most biologically relevant molecules are SHG-inactive. In the interest of extending this methodology for characterizing transport of any molecule, we monitor the SHG produced from an SHG-active reference molecule, in the presence of an SHG-inactive target molecule-of-interest as both molecules compete to cross a membrane. Of significance, the SHG-inactive target transport rate can be deduced as a perturbation in the measured transport rate of the reference. As proof-of-principle, we examine competitive transport of the strongly SHG-active cation, malachite green (MG), in the presence of a weakly SHG-active dication, propidium (Pro), across the outer-membrane protein channels in living bacteria. Comparison of the extracted and directly measured Pro transport rates validates the effectiveness of the method. PMID:27518496

  8. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  9. Structure and Water Transport in Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Eric; Page, Kirt

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorinated ionomers, specifically Nafion, are the most widely used ion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications, where an understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and transport of water/ions is critical to battery performance. In this study, the structure of Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes, synthesized using sol-gel chemistry, as well as cast directly from Nafion/SiO2 nanoparticle dispersions, was measured using both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). Through contrast match studies of the SiO2 nanoparticles, direct information on the change in the structure of the Nafion membranes and the ion-transport channels within was obtained, where differences in membrane structure was observed between the solution-cast membranes and the membranes synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. Additionally, water sorption and diffusion in these Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes were measured using in situ time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

  10. Hydrogen transport membranes for dehydrogenation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran; Uthamalingam

    2008-02-12

    A method of converting C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes to olefins by contacting a feedstock containing C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes with a first surface of a metal composite membrane of a sintered homogenous mixture of an Al oxide or stabilized or partially stabilized Zr oxide ceramic powder and a metal powder of one or more of Pd, Nb, V, Zr, Ta and/or alloys or mixtures thereof. The alkanes dehydrogenate to olefins by contact with the first surface with substantially only atomic hydrogen from the dehydrogenation of the alkanes passing through the metal composite membrane. Apparatus for effecting the conversion and separation is also disclosed.

  11. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  12. Enzyme Activities in Polarized Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bass, L.; McIlroy, D. K.

    1968-01-01

    The theoretical pH dependence of enzyme activities in membranes of low dielectric constant is estimated. It is shown that in biological membranes some types of enzymes may attain a limiting pH sensitivity such that an increment of only 0.2 pH unit (sufficient to induce action potentials in squid axons) causes a relative activity change of over 25%. The transients of enzyme activity generated by membrane depolarization and by pH increments in the bathing solution are discussed in relation to the transients of nervous excitation. PMID:5641405

  13. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  14. Electroosmosis in Membranes: Effects of Unstirred Layers and Transport Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. H.; Hope, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    When a current is passed through a membrane system, differences in transport numbers between the membrane and the adjacent solutions will, in general, result in depletion and enhancement of concentrations at the membrane-solution interfaces. This will be balanced by diffusion back into the bulk solution, diffusion of solute back across the membrane itself, and osmosis resulting from these local concentration gradients. The two main results of such a phenomenon are (1) that there is a current-induced volume flow, which may be mistaken for electroosmosis, and (2) that there will generally develop transient changes in potential difference (PD) across membranes during and after the passage of current through them. PMID:5786317

  15. Versatile Membrane Deformation Potential of Activated Pacsin

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1) has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD) of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties. PMID:23236520

  16. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  17. Proton-Assisted Amino Acid Transporter PAT1 Complexes with Rag GTPases and Activates TORC1 on Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H.; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M.; Shaw, Michael K.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H+-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments. PMID:22574197

  18. The relationship between cAMP, Ca(2)+, and transport of CFTR to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Hwang, T C; Gillis, K D

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism whereby cAMP stimulates Cl(-) flux through CFTR ion channels in secretory epithelia remains controversial. It is generally accepted that phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases the open probability of the CFTR channel. A more controversial hypothesis is that cAMP triggers the translocation of CFTR from an intracellular pool to the cell surface. We have monitored membrane turnover in Calu-3 cells, a cell line derived from human airway submucosal glands that expresses high levels of CFTR using membrane capacitance and FM1-43 fluorescence measurements. Using a conventional capacitance measurement technique, we observe an apparent increase in membrane capacitance in most cells that exhibit an increase in Cl(-) current. However, after we carefully correct our recordings for changes in membrane conductance, the apparent changes in capacitance are eliminated. Measurements using the fluorescent membrane marker FM1-43 also indicate that no changes in membrane turnover accompany the activation of CFTR. Robust membrane insertion can be triggered with photorelease of caged Ca(2)+ in Calu-3 cells. However, no increase in Cl(-) current accompanies Ca(2)+-evoked membrane fusion. We conclude that neither increases in cAMP or Ca(2)+ lead to transport of CFTR to the plasma membrane in Calu-3 cells. In addition, we conclude that membrane capacitance measurements must be interpreted with caution when large changes in membrane conductance occur. PMID:11479341

  19. The Relationship between Camp, Ca2+, and Transport of Cftr to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Gillis, Kevin D.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism whereby cAMP stimulates Cl− flux through CFTR ion channels in secretory epithelia remains controversial. It is generally accepted that phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases the open probability of the CFTR channel. A more controversial hypothesis is that cAMP triggers the translocation of CFTR from an intracellular pool to the cell surface. We have monitored membrane turnover in Calu-3 cells, a cell line derived from human airway submucosal glands that expresses high levels of CFTR using membrane capacitance and FM1–43 fluorescence measurements. Using a conventional capacitance measurement technique, we observe an apparent increase in membrane capacitance in most cells that exhibit an increase in Cl− current. However, after we carefully correct our recordings for changes in membrane conductance, the apparent changes in capacitance are eliminated. Measurements using the fluorescent membrane marker FM1–43 also indicate that no changes in membrane turnover accompany the activation of CFTR. Robust membrane insertion can be triggered with photorelease of caged Ca2+ in Calu-3 cells. However, no increase in Cl− current accompanies Ca2+-evoked membrane fusion. We conclude that neither increases in cAMP or Ca2+ lead to transport of CFTR to the plasma membrane in Calu-3 cells. In addition, we conclude that membrane capacitance measurements must be interpreted with caution when large changes in membrane conductance occur. PMID:11479341

  20. Faropenem Transport across the Renal Epithelial Luminal Membrane via Inorganic Phosphate Transporter Npt1

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Hiroshi; Tamai, Ikumi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; China, Kayoko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Tsuji, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We previously showed that the mouse inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1 operates in the hepatic sinusoidal membrane transport of anionic drugs such as benzylpenicillin and mevalonic acid. In the present study, the mechanism of renal secretion of penem antibiotics was examined by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system. Faropenem (an oral penem antibiotic) was transported via Npt1 with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.77 ± 0.34 mM in a sodium-independent but chloride ion-sensitive manner. When the concentration of chloride ions was increased, the transport activity of faropenem by Npt1 was decreased. Since the concentration gradient of chloride ions is in the lumen-to-intracellular direction, faropenem is expected to be transported from inside proximal tubular cells to the lumen. So, we tested the release of faropenem from Xenopus oocytes. The rate of efflux of faropenem from Npt1-expressing oocytes was about 9.5 times faster than that from control water-injected Xenopus oocytes. Faropenem transport by Npt1 was significantly inhibited by β-lactam antibiotics such as benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cephalexin, and cefazolin to 24.9, 40.5, 54.4, and 26.2% of that for the control, respectively. Zwitterionic β-lactam antibiotics showed lesser inhibitory effects on faropenem uptake than anionic derivatives, indicating that Npt1 preferentially transports anionic compounds. Other anionic compounds, such as indomethacin and furosemide, and the anion transport inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid significantly inhibited faropenem uptake mediated by Npt1. In conclusion, our results suggest that Npt1 participates in the renal secretion of penem antibiotics. PMID:10681320

  1. Faropenem transport across the renal epithelial luminal membrane via inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1.

    PubMed

    Uchino, H; Tamai, I; Yabuuchi, H; China, K; Miyamoto, K; Takeda, E; Tsuji, A

    2000-03-01

    We previously showed that the mouse inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1 operates in the hepatic sinusoidal membrane transport of anionic drugs such as benzylpenicillin and mevalonic acid. In the present study, the mechanism of renal secretion of penem antibiotics was examined by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system. Faropenem (an oral penem antibiotic) was transported via Npt1 with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.77 +/- 0.34 mM in a sodium-independent but chloride ion-sensitive manner. When the concentration of chloride ions was increased, the transport activity of faropenem by Npt1 was decreased. Since the concentration gradient of chloride ions is in the lumen-to-intracellular direction, faropenem is expected to be transported from inside proximal tubular cells to the lumen. So, we tested the release of faropenem from Xenopus oocytes. The rate of efflux of faropenem from Npt1-expressing oocytes was about 9.5 times faster than that from control water-injected Xenopus oocytes. Faropenem transport by Npt1 was significantly inhibited by beta-lactam antibiotics such as benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cephalexin, and cefazolin to 24.9, 40. 5, 54.4, and 26.2% of that for the control, respectively. Zwitterionic beta-lactam antibiotics showed lesser inhibitory effects on faropenem uptake than anionic derivatives, indicating that Npt1 preferentially transports anionic compounds. Other anionic compounds, such as indomethacin and furosemide, and the anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid significantly inhibited faropenem uptake mediated by Npt1. In conclusion, our results suggest that Npt1 participates in the renal secretion of penem antibiotics. PMID:10681320

  2. Investigating polymorphisms in membrane-associated transporter protein SLC45A2, using sucrose transporters as a model.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    Solute carrier family 45 member 2 encodes the melanosomal membrane protein, membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP), of unknown function, that is required for normal melanin synthesis. The present study analyzed the effects of two human MATP mutations, D93N, which causes oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA4), and L374F, which is correlated with light pigmentation in European populations. Corresponding mutations were produced in the related and well-characterized sucrose transporter from rice, OsSUT1, and transport activity was measured by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in addition to 14C-sucrose uptake in yeast. The mutation corresponding to D93N resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. The mutation corresponding to L374F resulted in a 90% decrease in transport activity, although the substrate affinity was unaffected. The results indicated that the D93N mutation causes OCA4 as a result of loss of MATP transport activity, and that the F374 allele confers significantly lower transport activity than L374. PMID:25760657

  3. Characterization of Nanostructured Silicon Membranes for Control of Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Fowlkes, Jason; Doktycz, Mitchel

    2011-03-01

    Fabrication of nanoporous membranes for selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering at the nanoscale. The membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure and the surface chemistry of the pores. We use a combination of electron-beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust and have uniform pore sizes. Pore sizes are further reduced using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide onto the membrane surfaces. Integrating nanoporous membranes within a microfluidic network provides a platform for tailoring molecular exchange between microchannels, independent of hydrodynamic effects. In enzymatic reactions, for example, tuning the pores size will allow smaller enzymatic substrates to traverse the membrane at controlled rates while larger enzymes remain spatially separated. Our results from membrane cross-sectioning using focused ion beam milling show that pore sizes can be controlled at dimensions below 10nm. Functional characterization was performed by quantitative fluorescence microscopy to observe the selective transport of molecular species of different sizes.

  4. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  5. Nonisothermal water transport through hydrophobic membranes in a stirred cell

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Gonzalez, M.I.; Martinez, L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper studies the transport of pure water through microporous hydrophobic membranes in a stirred cell when bathed by two phases at different temperatures. The dependence of the phenomena on the stirring rate and on the average temperature has been investigated. The influence of these operating conditions on the mass transfer rate is discussed while keeping in mind the theories of mass and heat transfer within the membrane and adjoining liquids. The concept of temperature polarization is introduced in the transport equations, and it is shown to be important in the interpretation of our experimental results.

  6. Modeling of Active Transmembrane Transport in a Mixture Theory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature. PMID:20213212

  7. No facilitator required for membrane transport of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Lee, John K.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a new and important member in the group of gaseous signaling molecules. However, the molecular transport mechanism has not yet been identified. Because of structural similarities with H2O, it was hypothesized that aquaporins may facilitate H2S transport across cell membranes. We tested this hypothesis by reconstituting the archeal aquaporin AfAQP from sulfide reducing bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus into planar membranes and by monitoring the resulting facilitation of osmotic water flow and H2S flux. To measure H2O and H2S fluxes, respectively, sodium ion dilution and buffer acidification by proton release (H2S ⇆ H+ + HS−) were recorded in the immediate membrane vicinity. Both sodium ion concentration and pH were measured by scanning ion-selective microelectrodes. A lower limit of lipid bilayer permeability to H2S, PM,H2S ≥ 0.5 ± 0.4 cm/s was calculated by numerically solving the complete system of differential reaction diffusion equations and fitting the theoretical pH distribution to experimental pH profiles. Even though reconstitution of AfAQP significantly increased water permeability through planar lipid bilayers, PM,H2S remained unchanged. These results indicate that lipid membranes may well act as a barrier to water transport although they do not oppose a significant resistance to H2S diffusion. The fact that cholesterol and sphingomyelin reconstitution did not turn these membranes into an H2S barrier indicates that H2S transport through epithelial barriers, endothelial barriers, and membrane rafts also occurs by simple diffusion and does not require facilitation by membrane channels. PMID:19805349

  8. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  9. Taurine transport in renal brush-border-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, R; Tenenhouse, H S; Scriver, C R

    1979-01-01

    Taurine transport in isolated brush-border-membrane vesicles from rat kidney is concentrative and it is driven by the Na+ gradient and transmembrane potential difference; binding is not a significant component of net uptake. The Na+-dependent component of net uptake is saturable with an apparent Km of 17 microM. The taurine-transport mechanism is selective for beta-amino compounds. PMID:486101

  10. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases Can Transport Protons at Low Sodium Concentrations*

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, Heidi H.; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A.; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-bound Na+-pyrophosphatase (Na+-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na+ transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ∼75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na+-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na+ concentrations (<5 mm), the Na+-PPases of Chlorobium limicola, four other bacteria, and one archaeon additionally exhibit an H+-pumping activity in inverted membrane vesicles prepared from recombinant Escherichia coli strains. H+ accumulation in vesicles was measured with fluorescent pH indicators. At pH 6.2–8.2, H+ transport activity was high at 0.1 mm Na+ but decreased progressively with increasing Na+ concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mm Na+. In contrast, 22Na+ transport activity changed little over a Na+ concentration range of 0.05–10 mm. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu242 and nearby Ser243 and Asn677 residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na+ dependence of H+ transport, whereas a Lys681 substitution abolished H+ (but not Na+) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na+ ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na+-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H+ transport activity. The inherent H+ transport activity of Na+-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H+ transport. PMID:24158447

  11. Electrochemical control of ion transport through a mesoporous carbon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Chai, Songhai; Choi, Jai-Pil; Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Jeseung; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fluids through nanometer scale channels typically on the order of 1 -100 nm often exhibit unique properties compared to the bulk fluid. These phenomena occur because the channel dimensions and molecular size become comparable to the range of several important forces including electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Small changes in properties such as the electric double layer or surface charge can significantly affect molecular transport through the channels. Based on these emerging properties, a variety of nanofluidic devices such as nanofluidic transistors, nanofluidic diodes or lab-on-a-chip devices have been developed3-7 with a diverse range of applications including water purification, biomolecular sensing, DNA separation, and rectified ion transport. Nanofluidic devices are typically fabricated using expensive lithography techniques or sacrificial templates. Here we report a carbon-based, three-dimensional nanofluidic transport membrane that enables gated, or on/off, control of the transport of organic molecular species and metal ions using an applied electrical potential. In the absence of an applied potential, both cationic and anionic molecules freely diffuse across the membrane via a concentration gradient. However, when an electrochemical potential is applied, the transport of ions through the membrane is inhibited.

  12. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  13. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  14. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  15. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental well-being. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be utilized to enhance yields of staple crops, incre...

  16. Cyclohexane triones, novel membrane-active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, W J; Broadhurst, A V; Hall, M J; Andrews, K J; Barber, W E; Wong-Kai-In, P

    1988-01-01

    The cyclohexane triones are a novel group of synthetic antibacterial agents that are active against gram-positive bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, and Mycobacterium smegmatis. In general, these compounds behaved in a manner similar to that of hexachlorophene, inhibiting the transport of low-molecular-weight hydrophilic substances into bacteria. Unlike cationic detergents, such as chlorhexidine, they did not cause disruption of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane over a short time period. The most potent antibacterial cyclohexane trione studied had a reduced ability to inhibit solute transport in comparison with certain less active analogs. Cyclohexane triones may express more than a single type of antibacterial effect. PMID:3137860

  17. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    is incredible freedom in designing the block copolymer architecture in order to optimize the mechanical and other properties of the membrane without sacrificing conductivity. The derived scaling relationships are shown to be general for many block copolymer and ionic liquid chemistries. In certain cases, the mechanism of ion conduction in the ionic liquid is affected by block copolymer nanoconfinement. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced proton conductivity as well as a high H+ transference number due to facilitated proton hopping between imidazole molecules. We show that there is increased proton hopping when the nonstoichiometric ionic liquid is confined to lamellar block copolymer nanodomains, which we hypothesize is due to changes in the hydrogen bond structure of the ionic liquid under confinement. This, in combination with unique ion aggregation behavior, leads to a lower activation energy for macroscopic ion transport compared to that in a corresponding homopolymer/ionic liquid mixture. Through this work, we further the understanding of the relationship between membrane composition, structure, and ion transport. The findings presented herein portend the rational design of nanostructured membranes having improved mechanical properties and conductivity.

  18. Membrane transporters studied by EPR spectroscopy: structure determination and elucidation of functional dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Anna; Hall, Jenny; Diegel, Janika; Hassan, Isa; Fey, Adam; MacMillan, Fraser

    2016-06-15

    During their mechanistic cycles membrane transporters often undergo extensive conformational changes, sampling a range of orientations, in order to complete their function. Such membrane transporters present somewhat of a challenge to conventional structural studies; indeed, crystallization of membrane-associated proteins sometimes require conditions that vary vastly from their native environments. Moreover, this technique currently only allows for visualization of single selected conformations during any one experiment. EPR spectroscopy is a magnetic resonance technique that offers a unique opportunity to study structural, environmental and dynamic properties of such proteins in their native membrane environments, as well as readily sampling their substrate-binding-induced dynamic conformational changes especially through complementary computational analyses. Here we present a review of recent studies that utilize a variety of EPR techniques in order to investigate both the structure and dynamics of a range of membrane transporters and associated proteins, focusing on both primary (ABC-type transporters) and secondary active transporters which were key interest areas of the late Professor Stephen Baldwin to whom this review is dedicated. PMID:27284059

  19. RND transporters protect Corynebacterium glutamicum from antibiotics by assembling the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Lu, Shuo; Belardinelli, Juan; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Jones, Victoria; Jackson, Mary; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium–Mycobacterium–Nocardia (CMN) group are the causative agents of a broad spectrum of diseases in humans. A distinctive feature of these Gram-positive bacteria is the presence of an outer membrane of unique structure and composition. Recently, resistance–nodulation–division (RND) transporters (nicknamed MmpLs, Mycobacterial membrane protein Large) have emerged as major contributors to the biogenesis of the outer membranes in mycobacteria and as promising drug targets. In this study, we investigated the role of RND transporters in the physiology of Corynebacterium glutamicum and analyzed properties of these proteins. Our results show that in contrast to Gram-negative species, in which RND transporters actively extrude antibiotics from cells, in C. glutamicum and relatives these transporters protect cells from antibiotics by playing essential roles in the biogenesis of the low-permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Conditional C. glutamicum mutants lacking RND proteins and with the controlled expression of either NCgl2769 (CmpL1) or NCgl0228 (CmpL4) are hypersusceptible to multiple antibiotics, have growth deficiencies in minimal medium and accumulate intracellularly trehalose monocorynomycolates, free corynomycolates, and the previously uncharacterized corynomycolate-containing lipid. Our results also suggest that similar to other RND transporters, Corynebacterial membrane proteins Large (CmpLs) functions are dependent on a proton-motive force. PMID:24942069

  20. Transport of cadmium(II) ion through a supported liquid membrane containing a bathocuproine

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Takashi )

    1991-12-01

    The active transport of cadmium ions across a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing a ligand based on a driving force supplied by the concentration gradient of the chloride ion is described. The SLM used is a microporous polypropylene membrane impregnated with a bathocuproine (4,7-diphenyl-2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) solution in dibenzyl ether as a carrier. The characteristics of the cadmium ion transport system are examined under various experimental conditions. The active transport of cadmium ions through an SLM is dependent on the concentrations of the cadmium ion, ligand, and chloride ion. An equation for the permeation velocity of cadmium ions, consisting of three important factors for this transport system, is proposed.

  1. Transportation of Critically Ill Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Broman, L. Mikael; Frenckner, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be a life-saving procedure for patients with severe reversible pulmonary or cardiac failure or for patients in need for a bridge to transplantation. ECMO is provided by specialized centers, but patients in need of ECMO are frequently taken care of at other centers. Conventional transports to an ECMO center can be hazardous and deaths have been described. For this reason, many ECMO centers have developed transport programs with mobile ECMO. After request, the mobile team including all necessary equipment to initiate ECMO is sent to the referring hospital, where the patient is cannulated and ECMO commenced. The patient is then transported on ECMO to the ECMO facility by road, helicopter, or fixed-wing aircraft depending on distance, weather conditions, etc. Eight publications have reported series of more than 50 transports on ECMO of which the largest included over 700. Together, these papers report on more than 1400 patient transports on ECMO. Two deaths during transport have occurred. A number of other adverse events are described, but without effect on patient outcome. Survival of patients transported on ECMO is equivalent to that of non-transported ECMO patients. It is concluded that long-, short-distance interhospital transports on ECMO can be performed safely. The staff should be experienced and highly competent in intensive care, ECMO cannulation, ECMO treatment, intensive care transport, and air transport medicine. PMID:27379221

  2. Transportation of Critically Ill Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Broman, L Mikael; Frenckner, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be a life-saving procedure for patients with severe reversible pulmonary or cardiac failure or for patients in need for a bridge to transplantation. ECMO is provided by specialized centers, but patients in need of ECMO are frequently taken care of at other centers. Conventional transports to an ECMO center can be hazardous and deaths have been described. For this reason, many ECMO centers have developed transport programs with mobile ECMO. After request, the mobile team including all necessary equipment to initiate ECMO is sent to the referring hospital, where the patient is cannulated and ECMO commenced. The patient is then transported on ECMO to the ECMO facility by road, helicopter, or fixed-wing aircraft depending on distance, weather conditions, etc. Eight publications have reported series of more than 50 transports on ECMO of which the largest included over 700. Together, these papers report on more than 1400 patient transports on ECMO. Two deaths during transport have occurred. A number of other adverse events are described, but without effect on patient outcome. Survival of patients transported on ECMO is equivalent to that of non-transported ECMO patients. It is concluded that long-, short-distance interhospital transports on ECMO can be performed safely. The staff should be experienced and highly competent in intensive care, ECMO cannulation, ECMO treatment, intensive care transport, and air transport medicine. PMID:27379221

  3. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness. PMID:6498590

  4. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein in membrane domains transport and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Diana; Nola, Sébastien; Lam, Sin Man; Verraes, Agathe; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Boncompain, Gaëlle; Perez, Franck; Wenk, Markus; Shui, Guanghou; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes in eukaryotes contain a large variety of proteins and lipids often distributed in domains in plasma membrane and endomembranes. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the transport and the organization of these membrane domains along the secretory pathway still remain elusive. Here we show that vesicular SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 plays a major role in membrane domains composition and transport. We found that the transport of exogenous and endogenous GPI-anchored proteins was altered in fibroblasts isolated from VAMP7-knockout mice. Furthermore, disassembly and reformation of the Golgi apparatus induced by Brefeldin A treatment and washout were impaired in VAMP7-depleted cells, suggesting that loss of VAMP7 expression alters biochemical properties and dynamics of the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lipid profiles from these knockout cells indicated a defect in glycosphingolipids homeostasis. We conclude that VAMP7 is required for effective transport of GPI–anchored proteins to cell surface and that VAMP7-dependent transport contributes to both sphingolipids and Golgi homeostasis. PMID:26196023

  5. Membrane transport of andrographolide in artificial membrane and rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Daodee, Supawadee; Wangboonskul, Jinda; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Murakami, Teruo

    2007-06-15

    In the present study, the possible drug interactions of andrographolide with co-administering drugs such as acetaminophen, amoxycillin, aspirin, chlorpheniramine and norfloxacin to treat various infectious and inflammatory diseases that may be induced during absorption process were examined using artificial lipophilic membrane and everted rat intestine. The membrane transport of andrographolide across the artificial membrane was not affected by different pH of the medium (simulated gastric and intestinal fluids), different concentrations of andrographolide and co-administered drugs examined. In everted rat intestine, above co-administered drugs examined showed no significant effect on andrographolide membrane transport. The participation of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and MRP2 in andrographolide transport was then examined, since andrographolide is a diterpene compound and some diterpene compounds are known as P-glycoprotein substrates. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein/MRP2 inhibitor, significantly suppressed the efflux transport of andrographolide in distal region of intestine, whereas probenecid, an MRP inhibitor, showed no significant effect in both proximal and distal regions of intestine. These results suggest that P-glycoprotein, but not MRP, is participated in the intestinal absorption of andrographolide and P-glycoprotein-mediated drug interactions occur depending on the co-administered drugs and its concentrations. PMID:19093450

  6. Membrane-associated DNA Transport Machines

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Briana; Dubnau, David

    2010-01-01

    DNA pumps play important roles in bacteria during cell division and during the transfer of genetic material by conjugation and transformation. The FtsK/SpoIIIE proteins carry out the translocation of double-stranded DNA to ensure complete chromosome segregation during cell division. In contrast, the complex molecular machines that mediate conjugation and genetic transformation drive the transport of single stranded DNA. The transformation machine also processes this internalized DNA and mediates its recombination with the resident chromosome during and after uptake, whereas the conjugation apparatus processes DNA before transfer. This article reviews these three types of DNA pumps, with attention to what is understood of their molecular mechanisms, their energetics and their cellular localizations. PMID:20573715

  7. Multicomponent Transport through Realistic Zeolite Membranes: Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks

    SciTech Connect

    William C. Conner

    2007-08-02

    These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

  8. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. PMID:25172888

  9. Overexpression of Mal61p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterization of maltose transport in artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    van der Rest, M E; de Vries, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-10-01

    For maltose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, multiple kinetic forms of transport as well as inhibition of transport by high concentrations of maltose at the trans side of the plasma membrane have been described. Most of these studies were hampered by a lack of genetically well-defined mutants and/or the lack of an artificial membrane system to study translocation catalysis in vitro. A genetically well-defined S. cerevisiae strain lacking the various MAL loci was constructed by gene disruption. Expression of the maltose transport protein (Mal61p) was studied by using various plasmid vectors that differed in copy number and/or type of promoter. The expression levels were quantitated by immunoblotting with antibodies generated against the N-terminal half of Mal61p. The levels of expression as well as the initial uptake rates were increased 20-fold compared with those in a yeast strain carrying only one chromosomal MAL locus. Similar results were obtained when the transport activities were compared in hybrid membranes of the corresponding strains. To generate a proton motive force, isolated membranes were fused with liposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase as a proton pump. Fusion was achieved by a cycle of freeze-thawing, after which the hybrid membranes were passed through a filter with a defined pore size to obtain unilamellar membrane vesicles. Proton motive force-driven maltose uptake, maltose efflux down the concentration gradient, and equilibrium exchange of maltose in the hybrid membranes vesicles have been analyzed. The data indicate that maltose transport by the maltose transporter is kinetically monophasic and fully reversible under all conditions tested. PMID:7559327

  10. Overexpression of Mal61p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterization of maltose transport in artificial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Rest, M E; de Vries, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    For maltose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, multiple kinetic forms of transport as well as inhibition of transport by high concentrations of maltose at the trans side of the plasma membrane have been described. Most of these studies were hampered by a lack of genetically well-defined mutants and/or the lack of an artificial membrane system to study translocation catalysis in vitro. A genetically well-defined S. cerevisiae strain lacking the various MAL loci was constructed by gene disruption. Expression of the maltose transport protein (Mal61p) was studied by using various plasmid vectors that differed in copy number and/or type of promoter. The expression levels were quantitated by immunoblotting with antibodies generated against the N-terminal half of Mal61p. The levels of expression as well as the initial uptake rates were increased 20-fold compared with those in a yeast strain carrying only one chromosomal MAL locus. Similar results were obtained when the transport activities were compared in hybrid membranes of the corresponding strains. To generate a proton motive force, isolated membranes were fused with liposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase as a proton pump. Fusion was achieved by a cycle of freeze-thawing, after which the hybrid membranes were passed through a filter with a defined pore size to obtain unilamellar membrane vesicles. Proton motive force-driven maltose uptake, maltose efflux down the concentration gradient, and equilibrium exchange of maltose in the hybrid membranes vesicles have been analyzed. The data indicate that maltose transport by the maltose transporter is kinetically monophasic and fully reversible under all conditions tested. PMID:7559327

  11. The influence of erythrocyte maturity on ion transport and membrane lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vokurková, M; Rauchová, H; Dobešová, Z; Loukotová, J; Nováková, O; Kuneš, J; Zicha, J

    2016-01-01

    Significant relationships between ion transport and membrane lipid composition (cholesterol, total phospholipids and sphingomyelins) were found in erythrocytes of salt hypertensive Dahl rats. In these animals mean cellular hemoglobin content correlated negatively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and Na(+) leak but positively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Immature erythrocytes exhibit lower mean cellular hemoglobin content (MCHC) than mature ones. The aim of the present study was to find a relationship between erythrocyte maturity, membrane lipid composition and ion transport activity in Wistar rats aged three months which were subjected to repeated hemorrhage (blood loss 2 ml/day for 6 days) to enrich circulating erythrocytes with immature forms. Immature and mature erythrocyte fractions in control and hemorrhaged rats were separated by repeated centrifugation. Hemorrhaged rats had increased number of reticulocytes but reduced hematocrit and MCHC compared to control rats. Immature erythrocytes of hemorrhaged rats differed from mature ones of control animals by elevated Na(+)-K(+) pump activity, reduced Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity and increased Rb(+) leak. These ion transport changes in immature erythrocytes were accompanied by higher concentration of total phospholipids in their cell membranes. Membrane phospholipid content correlated positively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and cation leaks but negatively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Moreover, they were also negatively related with MCHC which correlated negatively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and Rb(+) leak but positively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Thus certain abnormalities of erythrocyte ion transport and membrane lipid composition detected in hypertensive animals might be caused by higher incidence of immature cells. PMID:26988297

  12. Thioredoxin-like activity of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, A.R.; Brennan, T.; Anderson, L.E.

    1980-10-01

    The inactivation of pea leaf chloroplast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by dithiothreitol can be catalyzed by thioredoxin-like molecules that are present in chloroplasts. This thioredoxin activity occurs predominantly as a soluble species, but washed thylakoid membranes also exhibit some thioredoxin-like activity. The membrane-associated thioredoxin can be extracted by treatment with the detergent Triton X-100. The solubilized thioredoxing appears to have a molecular size similar to that of the soluble thioredoxin which catalyzes the same reaction. The thylakoid-bound activity constitutes only about 5% of the total chloroplast thioredoxin activity. The thioredoxin occurring in the membrane fraction cannot, however, be ascribed to the trapping of stroma since less than 0.1% of three stromal marker enzymes are found in the same thylakoid extract.

  13. Mechanism of electrodialytic ion transport through solvent extraction membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskvin, L.N.; Shmatko, A.G.; Krasnoperov, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    The authors construct a mathematical model for electrodialysis and solvent extraction via an ion-selective ion exchange membrane and accounts for the electrochemical, ion exchange, and diffusional behavior of the processes including their dependence on component concentration and current and voltage. The model is tested against experimental data for the electrodialytic transport of anionic platinum complexes of chlorides from hydrochloric acid solution through tributylphosphate membranes. The platinum concentration in the aqueous solution was determined by gamma spectroscopy obtained via platinum 191 as a radiotracer.

  14. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  15. The Insertion and Transport of Anandamide in Synthetic Lipid Membranes Are Both Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Chahinian, Henri; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Anandamide is a lipid neurotransmitter which belongs to a class of molecules termed the endocannabinoids involved in multiple physiological functions. Anandamide is readily taken up into cells, but there is considerable controversy as to the nature of this transport process (passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer vs. involvement of putative proteic transporters). This issue is of major importance since anandamide transport through the plasma membrane is crucial for its biological activity and intracellular degradation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cholesterol in membrane uptake and transport of anandamide. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular modeling simulations suggested that anandamide can adopt a shape that is remarkably complementary to cholesterol. Physicochemical studies showed that in the nanomolar concentration range, anandamide strongly interacted with cholesterol monolayers at the air-water interface. The specificity of this interaction was assessed by: i) the lack of activity of structurally related unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and arachidonic acid at 50 nM) on cholesterol monolayers, and ii) the weak insertion of anandamide into phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin monolayers. In agreement with these data, the presence of cholesterol in reconstituted planar lipid bilayers triggered the stable insertion of anandamide detected as an increase in bilayer capacitance. Kinetics transport studies showed that pure phosphatidylcholine bilayers were weakly permeable to anandamide. The incorporation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine bilayers dose-dependently stimulated the translocation of anandamide. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that cholesterol stimulates both the insertion of anandamide into synthetic lipid monolayers and bilayers, and its transport across bilayer membranes. In this respect, we suggest that besides putative anandamide protein-transporters, cholesterol could

  16. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  17. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lithgow, Trevor; Martin, Lisandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of membrane proteins is often difficult to sustain following reconstitution, since the composition of the model phospholipid bilayer differs from that of the native cell membrane. This review will discuss the reconstitution of membrane protein activities in four different types of model membrane—monolayers, supported lipid bilayers, liposomes and nanodiscs, comparing their advantages in membrane protein reconstitution. Variation in the surrounding model environments for these four different types of membrane layer can affect the three-dimensional structure of reconstituted proteins and may possibly lead to loss of the proteins activity. We also discuss examples where the same membrane proteins have been successfully reconstituted into two or more model membrane systems with comparison of the observed activity in each system. Understanding of the behavioral changes for proteins in model membrane systems after membrane reconstitution is often a prerequisite to protein research. It is essential to find better solutions for retaining membrane protein activities for measurement and characterization in vitro. PMID:23344058

  18. Accelerated interleaflet transport of phosphatidylcholine molecules in membranes under deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, R M; Waugh, R E

    1996-01-01

    Biological membranes are lamellar structures composed of two leaflets capable of supporting different mechanical stresses. Stress differences between leaflets were generated during micromechanical experiments in which long thin tubes of lipid (tethers) were formed from the surfaces of giant phospholipid vesicles. A recent dynamic analysis of this experiment predicts the relaxation of local differences in leaflet stress by lateral slip between the leaflets. Differential stress may also relax by interleaflet transport of lipid molecules ("flip-flop"). In this report, we extend the former analysis to include interleaflet lipid transport. We show that transmembrane lipid flux will evidence itself as a linear increase in tether length with time after a step reduction in membrane tension. Multiple measurements were performed on 24 different vesicles composed of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine plus 3% dinitrophenol-linked di-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine. These tethers all exhibited a linear phase of growth with a mean value of the rate of interlayer permeation, cp = 0.009 s-1. This corresponds to a half-time of approximately 8 min for mechanically driven interleaflet transport. This value is found to be consistent with longer times obtained for chemically driven transport if the lipids cross the membrane via transient, localized defects in the bilayer. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 7 PMID:8874013

  19. Understanding ion and solvent transport in anion exchange membranes under humidified conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarode, Himanshu

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) have been studied for more than a decade for potential applications in low temperature fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. They offer the advantage of faster reaction kinetics under alkaline conditions and ability to perform without costly platinum catalyst. Inherently slow diffusion of hydroxide ions compared to protons is a primary reason for synthesizing and studying the ion transport properties in AEMs. The aim of this thesis is to understand ion transport in novel AEMs using Pulse Gradient stimulated Spin Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique (PGSE NMR), water uptake, ionic conductivity, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) etc. All experiments were performed under humidified conditions (80--95% relative humidity) and fuel cell operating temperatures of 30--90°C. In this work, the NMR tube design was modified for humidifying the entire NMR tube evenly from our previous design. We have developed a new protocol for replacing caustic hydroxide with harmless fluoride or bicarbonate ions for 19F and 13 C NMR diffusion experiments. After performing these NMR experiments, we have obtained in-depth understanding of the morphology linked ion transport in AEMs. We have obtained the highest fluoride self-diffusion coefficient of > 1 x 10-5 cm2/sec ( 55°C) for ETFE-g-PVBTMA membrane which is a result of low tortuosity of 1 obtained for the membrane. This faster fluoride transport combined with low tortuosity of the membrane resulted in > 100mS/cm hydroxide conductivity for the membrane. Polycyclooctene (PCOE) based triblock copolymers are also studied for in-depth understanding of molecular weight, IEC, mechanical and transport properties. Effect of melting temperature of PCOE has favorable effect on increasing ion conductivity and lowering activation energy. Mechanical properties of these types of membranes were studied showing detrimental effect of water plasticization which results in unsuitable mechanical properties

  20. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    SciTech Connect

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  1. Enhancing oxygen transport through Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony S.

    Ceramic membranes based on Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting (MIEC) oxides are capable of separating oxygen from air in the presence of an oxygen partial-pressure gradient. These MIEC membranes show great promise for oxygen consuming industrial processes, such as the production of syngas from steam reforming of natural gas (SRM), as well as for electricity generation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). For both applications, the overall performance is dictated by the rate of oxygen transport across the membrane. Oxygen transport across MIEC membranes is composed of a bulk oxygen-ion diffusion process and surface processes, such as surface reactions and adsorption/desorption of gaseous reactants/products. The main goal of this thesis was to determine which process is rate-limiting in order to significantly enhance the overall rate of oxygen transport in MIEC membrane systems. The rate-limiting step was determined by evaluating the total resistance to oxygen transfer, Rtot. Rtot is the sum of a bulk diffusion resistance in the membrane itself, Rb, and interfacial loss components, Rs. Rb is a function of the membrane's ionic conductivity and thickness, while Rs arises primarily from slow surface-exchange kinetics that cause the P(O2) at the surfaces of the membrane to differ from the P(O 2) in the adjacent gas phases. Rtot can be calculated from the Nernst potential across the membrane and the measured oxygen flux. The rate-limiting process can be determined by evaluating the relative contributions of the various losses, Rs and Rb, to Rtot. Using this method, this thesis demonstrates that for most membrane systems, Rs is the dominating factor. In the development of membrane systems with high oxygen transport rates, thin membranes with high ionic conductivities are required to achieve fast bulk oxygen-ion diffusion. However, as membrane thickness is decreased, surface reaction kinetics become more important in determining the overall transport rate. The two

  2. Does aberrant membrane transport contribute to poor outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia in adults is a highly heterogeneous disease. Gene expression profiling performed using unsupervised algorithms can be used to distinguish specific groups of patients within a large patient cohort. The identified gene expression signatures can offer insights into underlying physiological mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Here, the analysis of several related gene expression clusters associated with poor outcome, worst overall survival and highest rates of resistant disease and obtained from the patients at the time of diagnosis or from previously untreated individuals is presented. Surprisingly, these gene clusters appear to be enriched for genes corresponding to proteins involved in transport across membranes (transporters, carriers and channels). Several ideas describing the possible relationship of membrane transport activity and leukemic cell biology, including the “Warburg effect,” the specific role of chloride ion transport, direct “import” of metabolic energy through uptake of creatine phosphate, and modification of the bone marrow niche microenvironment are discussed. PMID:26191006

  3. Membrane optical activity: some facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Wallach, D F; Low, D A; Bertland, A V

    1973-11-01

    The circular dichroism of hypothetical, water-filled, spherical shells, 75-3500 nm in radius, with walls 7.5 nm thick, composed of poly(L-lysine) in various conformational proportions, and suspended in water, were computed from the known optical properties of this polypeptide by classical general light-scattering theory (Mie theory). Comparison of the computed curves of circular dichroism spectra with those of diverse membranes reveals large discrepancies below 215 nm and shows that light scattering does not adequately account for the optical activity of membranes containing appreciable proportions of nonhelical conformation. However, turbidity effects can explain the anomalies of membrane optical rotatory dispersion near 233 nm, if not uniquely so. We conclude that the optical activity of neither most soluble proteins nor membrane proteins can provide accurate conformational information when synthetic polypeptides are used as standards and list the reasons for this argument. We also show that present techniques to "correct" membrane optical activity are likely to produce additional artifact. PMID:4522300

  4. Statistical-mechanical theory of passive transport through semipermeable membranes.

    PubMed

    del Castillo, L F; Mason, E A; Revercomb, H E

    1979-09-01

    The first general multicomponent equations for transport through semipermeable membranes are derived from basic statistical-mechanical principles. The procedure follows that used earlier for open membranes, but semipermeability is modelled mathematically by the introduction of external forces on the impermeant species. Gases are treated first in order to clarify the problems involved, but the final results apply to general nonideal solutions of any concentration. The mixed-solvent effect is treated rigorously, and a mixed-solvent osmotic pressure is defined. A useful specific identification of so-called osmotic flow is given, along with a demonstration that such an identification cannot be unique. Results are obtained both for discontinuous membrane models, and for a continuous model. PMID:486702

  5. OCTN3 is a mammalian peroxisomal membrane carnitine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Tilups, Aina; Edwards, Vernon D.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Tein, Ingrid . E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

    2005-12-30

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. The role of the carnitine system is to maintain homeostasis in the acyl-CoA pools of the cell, keeping the acyl-CoA/CoA pool constant even under conditions of very high acyl-CoA turnover, thereby providing cells with a critical source of free CoA. Carnitine derivatives can be moved across intracellular barriers providing a shuttle mechanism between mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. We now demonstrate expression and colocalization of mOctn3, the intermediate-affinity carnitine transporter (K {sub m} 20 {mu}M), and catalase in murine liver peroxisomes by TEM using immunogold labelled anti-mOctn3 and anti-catalase antibodies. We further demonstrate expression of hOCTN3 in control human cultured skin fibroblasts both by Western blotting and immunostaining analysis using our specific anti-mOctn3 antibody. In contrast with two peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, we show reduced expression of hOCTN3 in human PEX 1 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is impaired but the biosynthesis of peroxisomal membrane proteins is normal, versus a complete absence of hOCTN3 in human PEX 19 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which both the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes as well as peroxisomal membranes are deficient. This supports the localization of hOCTN3 to the peroxisomal membrane. Given the impermeability of the peroxisomal membrane and the key role of carnitine in the transport of different chain-shortened products out of peroxisomes, there appears to be a critical need for the intermediate-affinity carnitine/organic cation transporter, OCTN3, on peroxisomal membranes now shown to be expressed in both human and murine peroxisomes. This Octn3 localization is in keeping with the essential role of carnitine in peroxisomal lipid metabolism.

  6. Amino acid transport by membrane vesicles of an obligate anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Ubbink-Kok, T; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from the obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was inserted in these membrane vesicles by membrane fusion by using the freeze-thaw sonication technique (A. J. M. Driessen, W. de Vrij, and W. N. Konings, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7555-7559, 1985) to accommodate them with a functional proton motive force-generating system. With ascorbate-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine-cytochrome c as the electron donor, a proton motive force (delta p) of -80 to -120 mV was generated in these fused membranes. This delta p drove the accumulation of leucine and lysine up to 40- and 100-fold, respectively. High transport activities were observed in fused membranes containing Escherichia coli lipids, whereas the transport activities in fused membranes containing mainly soybean lipids or phosphatidylcholine were low. It is suggested that branched-chain amino acids and lysine were taken up by separate systems. The effects of the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin indicated that lysine and leucine were translocated in symport with a proton. PMID:2828326

  7. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  8. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    SeCheol, Oh

    2015-01-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding - enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors. PMID:25676707

  9. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  10. Membrane transporters and drought resistance - a complex issue.

    PubMed

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  11. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  12. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M.; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  13. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  14. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  15. Allosteric Mechanisms of Molecular Machines at the Membrane: Transport by Sodium-Coupled Symporters.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Michael V; Cuendet, Michel A; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-06-01

    Solute transport across cell membranes is ubiquitous in biology as an essential physiological process. Secondary active transporters couple the unfavorable process of solute transport against its concentration gradient to the energetically favorable transport of one or several ions. The study of such transporters over several decades indicates that their function involves complex allosteric mechanisms that are progressively being revealed in atomistic detail. We focus on two well-characterized sodium-coupled symporters: the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is the prototype for the "gated pore" mechanism in the mammalian synaptic monoamine transporters, and the archaeal GltPh, which is the prototype for the "elevator" mechanism in the mammalian excitatory amino acid transporters. We present the evidence for the role of allostery in the context of a quantitative formalism that can reconcile biochemical and biophysical data and thereby connects directly to recent insights into the molecular structure and dynamics of these proteins. We demonstrate that, while the structures and mechanisms of these transporters are very different, the available data suggest a common role of specific models of allostery in their functions. We argue that such allosteric mechanisms appear essential not only for sodium-coupled symport in general but also for the function of other types of molecular machines in the membrane. PMID:26892914

  16. Proline transport in Leishmania donovani amastigotes: dependence on pH gradients and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Glaser, T A; Mukkada, A J

    1992-03-01

    Amastigotes of Leishmania donovani develop and multiply within the acidic phagolysosomes of mammalian macrophages. Isolated amastigotes are acidophilic; they catabolize substrates and synthesize macromolecules optimally at pH 5.5. Substrate transport in amastigotes has not been characterized. Here we show that amastigotes exhibit an uphill transport of proline (active transport) with an acid pH optimum (pH 5.5). It is dependent upon metabolic energy and is driven by proton motive force. Agents which selectively disturb the component forces of proton motive force, such as carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazone, nigericin and valinomycin, inhibit proline transport. Transport is sensitive to dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and insensitive to ouabain, demonstrating the involvement of a proton ATPase in the maintenance of proton motive force. It is suggested that the plasma membrane pH gradient probably makes the greatest contribution to proton motive force that drives substrate transport in the amastigote stage. PMID:1533014

  17. Analysis of the irreversible process of proton transport in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Hong, T; Manqi, T

    1980-04-01

    The proton transport across biological membrane, accompanied by energy transformation, is closely related with many basic processes involved in the maintenance of life. Active researches are carried out in this field, but so far we have not known a complete calculation. This paper presents a model of an open and closed photon-controlled ion pore with a quantitative analysis of the irreversible process of the proton transport across the purple membrane. Upon absorbing photon by the purple membrane, the deprotonation of the Schiff base causes the ion pore to open, but it will close when it returns to bR570. A set of nonlinear differential equations describing this model is given. The stability of the equations is discussed. The results of the numerical calculation for steady state are found in good agreement with the experimental data of Bakker. PMID:6250213

  18. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  19. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-12-01

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. PMID:26442590

  20. Activation of Membrane Cholesterol by 63 Amphipaths†

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Steck, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    A few membrane-intercalating amphipaths have been observed to stimulate the interaction of cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, saponin and cyclodextrin, presumably by displacing cholesterol laterally from its phospholipid complexes. We now report that this effect, referred to as cholesterol activation, occurs with dozens of other amphipaths, including alkanols, saturated and cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, sphingosine derivatives, terpenes, alkyl ethers, ketones, aromatics and cyclic alkyl derivatives. The apparent potency of the agents tested ranged from 3 μM to 7 mM and generally paralleled their octanol/water partition coefficients, except that relative potency declined for compounds with> 10 carbons. Some small amphipaths activated cholesterol at a membrane concentration of ~3 moles per 100 moles bilayer lipids, about equimolar with the cholesterol they displaced. Lysophosphatidylserine countered the effects of all these agents, consistent with its ability to reduce the pool of active membrane cholesterol. Various amphipaths stabilized red cells against the hemolysis elicited by cholesterol depletion, presumably by substituting for the extracted sterol. The number and location of cis and trans fatty acid unsaturations and the absolute stereochemistry of enantiomer pairs had only small effects on amphipath potency. Nevertheless, potency varied ~7-fold within a group of diverse agents with similar partition coefficients. We infer that a wide variety of amphipaths can displace membrane cholesterol by competing stoichiometrically but with only limited specificity for its weak association with phospholipids. Any number of other drugs and experimental agents might do the same. PMID:19655814

  1. Membrane activity of biomimetic facially amphiphilic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Arnt, Lachelle; Rennie, Jason R; Linser, Sebastian; Willumeit, Regine; Tew, Gregory N

    2006-03-01

    Membranes are a central feature of all biological systems, and their ability to control many cellular processes is critically important. As a result, a better understanding of how molecules bind to and select between biological membranes is an active area of research. Antimicrobial host defense peptides are known to be membrane-active and, in many cases, exhibit discrimination between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The design of synthetic molecules that capture the biological activity of these natural peptides has been shown. In this report, the interaction between our biomimetic structures and different biological membranes is reported using both model vesicle and in vitro bacterial cell experiments. Compound 1 induces 12% leakage at 20 microg/mL against phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) vesicles vs only 3% leakage at 200 microg/mL against phosphatidyl-L-serine (PS)-phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Similarly, a 40% reduction in fluorescence is measured in lipid movement experiments for PG-PE compared to 10% for PS-PC at 600 s. A 30 degrees C increase in the phase transition of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine is observed in the presence of 1. These results show that lipid composition is more important for selectivity than overall net charge. Additionally, the overall concentration of a given lipid is another important factor. An effort is made to connect model vesicle studies with in vitro data and naturally occurring lipid compositions. PMID:16494408

  2. YTPdb: a wiki database of yeast membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Barriot, Roland; Moreau, Yves; André, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Membrane transporters constitute one of the largest functional categories of proteins in all organisms. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this represents about 300 proteins ( approximately 5% of the proteome). We here present the Yeast Transport Protein database (YTPdb), a user-friendly collaborative resource dedicated to the precise classification and annotation of yeast transporters. YTPdb exploits an evolution of the MediaWiki web engine used for popular collaborative databases like Wikipedia, allowing every registered user to edit the data in a user-friendly manner. Proteins in YTPdb are classified on the basis of functional criteria such as subcellular location or their substrate compounds. These classifications are hierarchical, allowing queries to be performed at various levels, from highly specific (e.g. ammonium as a substrate or the vacuole as a location) to broader (e.g. cation as a substrate or inner membranes as location). Other resources accessible for each transporter via YTPdb include post-translational modifications, K(m) values, a permanently updated bibliography, and a hierarchical classification into families. The YTPdb concept can be extrapolated to other organisms and could even be applied for other functional categories of proteins. YTPdb is accessible at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/ytpdb/. PMID:20599686

  3. Evolutionarily divergent, Na+-regulated H+-transporting membrane-bound pyrophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Malinen, Anssi M; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo

    2015-04-15

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatase (mPPases) of various types consume pyrophosphate (PPi) to drive active H+ or Na+ transport across membranes. H+-transporting PPases are divided into phylogenetically distinct K+-independent and K+-dependent subfamilies. In the present study, we describe a group of 46 bacterial proteins and one archaeal protein that are only distantly related to known mPPases (23%-34% sequence identity). Despite this evolutionary divergence, these proteins contain the full set of 12 polar residues that interact with PPi, the nucleophilic water and five cofactor Mg2+ ions found in 'canonical' mPPases. They also contain a specific lysine residue that confers K+ independence on canonical mPPases. Two of the proteins (from Chlorobium limicola and Cellulomonas fimi) were expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to catalyse Mg2+-dependent PPi hydrolysis coupled with electrogenic H+, but not Na+ transport, in inverted membrane vesicles. Unique features of the new H+-PPases include their inhibition by Na+ and inhibition or activation, depending on PPi concentration, by K+ ions. Kinetic analyses of PPi hydrolysis over wide ranges of cofactor (Mg2+) and substrate (Mg2-PPi) concentrations indicated that the alkali cations displace Mg2+ from the enzyme, thereby arresting substrate conversion. These data define the new proteins as a novel subfamily of H+-transporting mPPases that partly retained the Na+ and K+ regulation patterns of their precursor Na+-transporting mPPases. PMID:25662511

  4. Characterisation of the membrane transport of pilocarpine in cell suspension cultures of Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Nathalia Luiza; Abreu, Ilka Nacif; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Pilocarpine is an alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus genus, with important pharmaceutical applications. Previous reports have investigated the production of pilocarpine by Pilocarpus microphyllus cell cultures and tried to establish the alkaloid biosynthetic route. However, the site of pilocarpine accumulation inside of the cell and its exchange to the medium culture is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the intracellular accumulation of pilocarpine and characterise its transport across membranes in cell suspension cultures of P. microphyllus. Histochemical analysis and toxicity assays indicated that pilocarpine is most likely stored in the vacuoles probably to avoid cell toxicity. Assays with exogenous pilocarpine supplementation to the culture medium showed that the alkaloid is promptly uptaken but it is rapidly metabolised. Treatment with specific ABC protein transporter inhibitors and substances that disturb the activity of secondary active transporters suppressed pilocarpine uptake and release suggesting that both proteins may participate in the traffic of pilocarpine to inside and outside of the cells. As bafilomicin A1, a specific V-type ATPase inhibitor, had little effect and NH4Cl (induces membrane proton gradient dissipation) had moderate effect, while cyclosporin A and nifedipine (ABC proteins inhibitors) strongly inhibited the transport of pilocarpine, it is believed that ABC proteins play a major role in the alkaloid transport across membranes but it is not the exclusive one. Kinetic studies supported these results. PMID:25474486

  5. Concentrative nucleoside transporter (rCNT1) is targeted to the apical membrane through the hepatic transcytotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Duflot, Sylvie; Calvo, Maria; Casado, F Javier; Enrich, Carlos; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2002-11-15

    The Na+-dependent nucleoside transporter CNT1 has been identified in a caveolin-enriched plasma membrane fraction (CEF), in transcytotic endosomes, and in canalicular membranes isolated from quiescent rat liver in which the transporter appears to be biologically active. CNT1 was also detected, albeit in small amounts, in the early/sorting endosomes. Plasma membrane preparations enriched in basolateral markers showed Na+-dependent nucleoside transport activity that is mostly, if not exclusively, accounted for by CNT2, a transporter protein which was not detected in CEF nor in the endosomal fractions. These data are consistent with different localization and trafficking pathways of the two isoforms in hepatocytes. CNT1 is the first transporter which is reported to follow the transcytotic pathway to be inserted on the apical side of liver parenchymal cells. PMID:12441131

  6. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-06-15

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size.

  7. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  8. TransportTP: A two-phase classification approach for membrane transporter prediction and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Membrane transporters play crucial roles in living cells. Experimental characterization of transporters is costly and time-consuming. Current computational methods for transporter characterization still require extensive curation efforts, especially for eukaryotic organisms. We developed a novel genome-scale transporter prediction and characterization system called TransportTP that combined homology-based and machine learning methods in a two-phase classification approach. First, traditional homology methods were employed to predict novel transporters based on sequence similarity to known classified proteins in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB). Second, machine learning methods were used to integrate a variety of features to refine the initial predictions. A set of rules based on transporter features was developed by machine learning using well-curated proteomes as guides. Results In a cross-validation using the yeast proteome for training and the proteomes of ten other organisms for testing, TransportTP achieved an equivalent recall and precision of 81.8%, based on TransportDB, a manually annotated transporter database. In an independent test using the Arabidopsis proteome for training and four recently sequenced plant proteomes for testing, it achieved a recall of 74.6% and a precision of 73.4%, according to our manual curation. Conclusions TransportTP is the most effective tool for eukaryotic transporter characterization up to date. PMID:20003433

  9. Gated ion transport through dense carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Funke, Hans H; Falconer, John L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-06-23

    Gated ion diffusion is found widely in hydrophobic biological nanopores, upon changes in ligand binding, temperature, transmembrane voltage, and mechanical stress. Because water is the main media for ion diffusion in these hydrophobic biological pores, ion diffusion behavior through these nanochannels is expected to be influenced significantly when water wettability in hydrophobic biological nanopores is sensitive and changes upon small external changes. Here, we report for the first time that ion diffusion through highly hydrophobic nanopores (approximately 3 nm) showed a gated behavior due to change of water wettability on hydrophobic surface upon small temperature change or ultrasound. Dense carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes with both 3-nm CNTs and 3-nm interstitial pores were prepared by a solvent evaporation process and used as a model system to investigate ion diffusion behavior. Ion diffusion through these membranes exhibited a gated behavior. The ion flux was turned on and off, apparently because the water wettability of CNTs changed. At 298 K, ion diffusion through dense CNT membranes stopped after a few hours, but it dramatically increased when the temperature was increased 20 K or the membrane was subjected to ultrasound. Likewise, water adsorption on dense CNT membranes increased dramatically at a water activity of 0.53 when the temperature increased from 293 to 306 K, indicating capillary condensation. Water adsorption isotherms of dense CNT membranes suggest that the adsorbed water forms a discontinuous phase at 293 K, but it probably forms a continuous layer, probably in the interstitial CNT regions, at higher temperatures. When the ion diffusion channel was opened by a temperature increase or ultrasound, ions diffused through the CNT membranes at a rate similar to bulk diffusion in water. This finding may have implications for using CNT membrane for desalination and water treatment. PMID:20504021

  10. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  11. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2002-07-30

    Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet

  12. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  13. Thylakoid Membrane Maturation and PSII Activation Are Linked in Greening Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Sandra; Bernát, Gábor; Seidel, Tobias; Rupprecht, Eva; Kahmann, Uwe; Schneider, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes are typical and essential features of both chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. While they are crucial for phototrophic growth of cyanobacterial cells, biogenesis of thylakoid membranes is not well understood yet. Dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells contain only rudimentary thylakoid membranes but still a relatively high amount of phycobilisomes, inactive photosystem II and active photosystem I centers. After shifting dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells into the light, “greening” of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells, i.e. thylakoid membrane formation and recovery of photosynthetic electron transport reactions, was monitored. Complete restoration of a typical thylakoid membrane system was observed within 24 hours after an initial lag phase of 6 to 8 hours. Furthermore, activation of photosystem II complexes and restoration of a functional photosynthetic electron transport chain appears to be linked to the biogenesis of organized thylakoid membrane pairs. PMID:23922268

  14. Diffusion, transport, and cell membrane organization investigated by imaging fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Jagadish; Manna, Manoj; Guo, Lin; Kraut, Rachel; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Cell membrane organization is dynamic and is assumed to have different characteristic length scales. These length scales, which are influenced by lipid and protein composition as well as by the cytoskeleton, can range from below the optical resolution limit (as with rafts or microdomains) to far above the resolution limit (as with capping phenomena or the formation of lipid "platforms"). The measurement of these membrane features poses a significant problem because membrane dynamics are on the millisecond timescale and are thus beyond the time resolution of conventional imaging approaches. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a widely used spectroscopic technique to measure membrane dynamics, has the required time resolution but lacks imaging capabilities. A promising solution is the recently introduced method known as imaging total internal reflection (ITIR)-FCS, which can probe diffusion phenomena in lipid membranes with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this work, we extend ITIR-FCS to perform ITIR fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCCS) between pixel areas of arbitrary shape and derive a generalized expression that is applicable to active transport and diffusion. ITIR-FCCS is applied to model systems exhibiting diffusion, active transport, or a combination of the two. To demonstrate its applicability to live cells, we observe the diffusion of a marker, the sphingolipid-binding domain (SBD) derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, on live neuroblastoma cells. We investigate the organization and dynamics of SBD-bound lipid microdomains under the conditions of cholesterol removal and cytoskeleton disruption. PMID:19883607

  15. Energy-coupled outer membrane transport proteins and regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Braun, Volkmar; Endriss, Franziska

    2007-06-01

    FhuA and FecA are two examples of energy-coupled outer membrane import proteins of gram-negative bacteria. FhuA transports iron complexed by the siderophore ferrichrome and serves as a receptor for phages, a toxic bacterial peptide, and a toxic protein. FecA transports diferric dicitrate and regulates transcription of an operon encoding five ferric citrate (Fec) transport genes. Properties of FhuA mutants selected according to the FhuA crystal structure are described. FhuA mutants in the TonB box, the hatch, and the beta-barrel are rather robust. TonB box mutants in FhuA FecA, FepA, Cir, and BtuB are compared; some mutations are suppressed by mutations in TonB. Mutant studies have not revealed a ferrichrome diffusion pathway, and tolerance to mutations in the region linking the TonB box to the hatch does not disclose a mechanism for how energy transfer from the cytoplasmic membrane to FhuA changes the conformation of FhuA such that bound substrates are released, the pore is opened, and substrates enter the periplasm, or how surface loops change their conformation such that TonB-dependent phages bind irreversibly and release their DNA into the cells. The FhuA and FecA crystal structures do not disclose the mechanism of these proteins, but they provide important information for specific functional studies. FecA is also a regulatory protein that transduces a signal from the cell surface into the cytoplasm. The interacting subdomains of the proteins in the FecA --> FecR --> FecI --> RNA polymerase signal transduction pathway resulting in fecABCDE transcription have been determined. Energy-coupled transporters transport not only iron and vitamin B12, but also other substrates of very low abundance such as sugars across the outer membrane; transcription regulation of the transport genes may occur similarly to that of the Fec transport genes. PMID:17370038

  16. Differences in neutral amino acid and glucose transport between brush border and basolateral plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hopfer, U; Sigrist-Nelson, K; Ammann, E; Murer, H

    1976-12-01

    A comparison of L-valine and D-glucose transport was carried out with vesicles of plasma membrane isolated either from the luminal (brush border) or from the contra-luminal (basolateral) region of small intestinal epithelial cells. The existence of transport systems for both non-electrolytes was demonstrated by stereospecificity and saturability of uptake, as well as tracer coupling. Transport of L-valine and D-glucose differs markedly in the two types of plasma membrane with respect to stimulation by Na+. The presence of Na+ stimulated initial L-valine and D-glucose uptake in brush border, but not in basolateral membrane. Moreover, an electro-chemical Na+ gradient, oriented with the lower potential on the inside, supported accumulation of the non-electrolytes above medium concentration only in the brush border membrane. L-Valine and D-glucose transport also were saturated at lower concentrations in brush border (10-20 mM) than in basolateral plasma membranes (30-50 mM). A third difference between the two membranes was found in the effectiveness of known inhibitors of D-glucose transport. In brush border membranes phlorizin was more potent than phloretin and 2', 3', 4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone and cytochalasin B did not inhibit at all. In contrast, with the basolateral plasma membranes the order of potency was changed to phloretin = 2',3',4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone greater than cytochalasin B greater than phlorizin. These results indicate the presence of different types of transport systems for monosaccharides and neutral amino acids in the luminal and contra-luminal region of the plasma membrane. Active transepithelial transport can be explained on the basis of the different properties of the non-electrolyte transport systems in the two cellular regions and an electro-chemical Na+ gradient that is dependent on cellular metabolism. PMID:137908

  17. PET measurement of glucose membrane transport using labeled analogs: Distinction of transport from metabolic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.E.; Koeppe, R.A.; Gatley, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Carrier mediated glucose transport rates across brain capillary and myocardial cell membranes are many times higher than those expected for simple diffusion, and transport regulation can be an important determinant of tissue metabolic status. The authors have investigated the use of glucose analogs and dynamic positron tomography for the non-invasive measurement of unidirectional membrane transport rates. If analog extraction is sufficiently low, transport rates can be inferred directly from fitted kinetic rate constants. Fitting calculations were seen to be sensitive to the difficult to measure rapid components of the arterial input curves, to contributions from blood-borne label in the early data points, and to interference from other chemical forms in cases of significant phosphorylation. This last uncertainty was studied using serial scans of normal brain after venous injection of the well-transported but poorly phosphorylated analog 3-deoxy-3-fluoroglucose. Transport rate constants derived from 4-parameter fits of three hours of data were compared to those derived from 2-parameter fits of the first 12-20 minutes of data. Errors due to trapped label were absorbed primarily into the apparent distribution volume, allowing accurate estimation of transport rate constants from a brief data acquisition period. The study of the distinction of transport from phosphorylation also bears on the important question of the significance of the individual rate constants in the four-parameter fitting of brief dynamic scan sequences in studies of metabolic rate using 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglucose.

  18. [Studies on potassium transport through glial cell membranes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Gardner-Medwin, A R; Tsacopoulos, M

    1980-04-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is used as a model for the study of ion movements across the membranes of the glial cells caused by changes in the extracellular potassium concentration. The values found for changes in extracellular potential suggest that at least some of the potassium that enters glial cells in an active region of tissue is associated with an efflux of potassium from parts of the glial syncytium not affected by an increase in extracellular potassium concentration. In addition, it appears that ions other than K+ cross the glial membrane. PMID:7421023

  19. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm2/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  20. Quantized water transport: ideal desalination through graphyne-4 membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E G; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm(2)/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  1. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Scott R. Morrison; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephen; Frank E. Anderson; Shandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites with hydrogen permeable alloys. The primary technical challenge in achieving the goals of this project will be to optimize membrane composition to enable practical hydrogen separation rates and chemical stability. Other key aspects of this developing technology include catalysis, ceramic processing methods, and separation unit design operating under high pressure. To achieve these technical goals, Eltron Research Inc. has organized a consortium consisting of CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Inc. (SCI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and NORAM. Hydrogen permeation rates in excess of 50 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were routinely achieved under less than optimal experimental conditions using a range of membrane compositions. Factors that limit the maximum permeation attainable were determined to be mass transport resistance of H{sub 2} to and from the membrane surface, as well as surface contamination. Mass transport resistance was partially overcome by increasing the feed and sweep gas flow rates to greater than five liters per minute. Under these experimental conditions, H2 permeation rates in excess of 350 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were attained. These results are presented in this report, in addition to progress with cermets, thin film fabrication, catalyst development, and H{sub 2} separation unit scale up.

  3. Voltage-induced membrane displacement in patch pipettes activates mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Ziv; Silberberg, Shai D.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1999-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique allows currents to be recorded through single ion channels in patches of cell membrane in the tips of glass pipettes. When recording, voltage is typically applied across the membrane patch to drive ions through open channels and to probe the voltage-sensitivity of channel activity. In this study, we used video microscopy and single-channel recording to show that prolonged depolarization of a membrane patch in borosilicate pipettes results in delayed slow displacement of the membrane into the pipette and that this displacement is associated with the activation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels in the same patch. The membrane displacement, ≈1 μm with each prolonged depolarization, occurs after variable delays ranging from tens of milliseconds to many seconds and is correlated in time with activation of MS channels. Increasing the voltage step shortens both the delay to membrane displacement and the delay to activation. Preventing depolarization-induced membrane displacement by applying positive pressure to the shank of the pipette or by coating the tips of the borosilicate pipettes with soft glass prevents the depolarization-induced activation of MS channels. The correlation between depolarization-induced membrane displacement and activation of MS channels indicates that the membrane displacement is associated with sufficient membrane tension to activate MS channels. Because membrane tension can modulate the activity of various ligand and voltage-activated ion channels as well as some transporters, an apparent voltage dependence of a channel or transporter in a membrane patch in a borosilicate pipette may result from voltage-induced tension rather than from direct modulation by voltage. PMID:10588750

  4. A comparative study of water uptake by and transport through ionomeric fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A.Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Jestel, R.; Lopez, C.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S. . Electronics Materials and Device Research)

    1993-07-01

    Water uptake and transport parameters measured at 30 C for several available perfluorosulfonic acid membranes are compared. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and protonic conductivity were determined for Nafion 117, Membrane C, and Dow XUS 13204.10 developmental fuel cell membrane. The diffusion coefficient and conductivity of each of these membranes were determined as functions of membrane water content. Experimental determination of transport parameters, enables one to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness which contributes in a nonlinear fashion to performance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

  5. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  6. A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II) ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II) ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II) ion from water or other solution. PMID:21762513

  7. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  8. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  9. Homodimeric Intrinsic Membrane Proteins. Identification and Modulation of Interactions between Mitochondrial Transporter (Carrier) Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wohlrab, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Transporter (carrier) proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane link metabolic pathways within the matrix and the cytosol with transport/exchange of metabolites and inorganic ions. Their strict control of these fluxes is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Understanding the ternary complex transport mechanism with which most of these transporters function requires an accounting of the number and interactions of their subunits. The phosphate transporter (PTP, Mir1p) subunit readily forms homodimers with intersubunit affinities changeable by mutations. Cys28, likely at the subunit interface, is a site for mutations yielding transport inhibition or a channel-like transport mode. Such mutations yield a small increase or decrease in affinity between the subunits. The PTP inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide decreases subunit affinity by a small amount. PTP mutations that yield the highest (40%) and the lowest (2%) liposome incorporation efficiencies (LIE) are clustered near Cys28. Such mutant subunits show the lowest and highest subunit affinities respectively. The oxaloacetate transporter (Oac1p) subunit has an almost 2-fold lower affinity than the PTP subunit. The Oac1p, dicarboxylate (Dic1p) and PTP transporter subunits form heterodimers with even lower affinities. These results form a firm basis for detailed studies to establish the effect of subunit affinities on transport mode and activity and for the identification of the mechanism that prevents formation of heterodimers that surely will negatively impact oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels with serious consequences for the cell. PMID:20171189

  10. Electrical resistance and transport numbers of ion-exchange membranes used in electrodialytic soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.K.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A.

    1999-08-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to known if this contact with the soil causes damage to the membrane. This work presents the result of transport number and electrical resistance measurements done on four sets of ion-exchange membranes (Ionics, Inc CR67 HMR412 cation-exchange membranes and Ionics, Inc AR204 SXZR anion-exchange membranes), which have been used in four different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new membranes, whereas two membranes showed a slightly increased resistance.

  11. Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Membrane structure and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeye, Akinbode; Huang, Tianzi; Gido, Samuel; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    With a view to optimizing morphology and ultimately properties, membranes have been cast from relatively inexpensive block copolymer ionomers of fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) with various sulfonation levels, in both the acid form and the cesium neutralized form. The morphology of these membranes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, as well as water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol permeability within the temperature range from 20 to 60 C. Random phase separated morphologies were obtained for all samples except the cesium sample with 50 mol% sulfonation. The transport properties increased with increasing degree of sulfonation and temperature for all samples. The acid form samples absorbed more water than the cesium samples with a maximum swelling of 595% recorded at 60 C for the acid sample having 50 mol% sulfonation. Methanol permeability for the latter sample was more than an order of magnitude less than for Nafion 112 but so was the proton conductivity within the plane of the membrane at 20 C. Across the plane of the membrane this sample had half the conductivity of Nafion 112 at 60 C.

  12. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  13. Oxygen Transport Across Space-Filling Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chen

    2005-03-01

    Space-filling fractal surfaces play a fundamental role in how organisms function and in how structure determines function at various levels. In this project we developed an efficient and powerful algorithm, rope-walk algorithm, for solving diffusion equations of transport of species across the space-filling fractal surface. We performed analytic computations of the oxygen current across the alveolar membranes in the lung, as a function of diffusion coefficient and membrane permeability, using the rope-walk algorithm, without adjustable parameters. The analytic calculation identifies the four cases as sharply delineated screening regimes and finds that the lung operates in the partial-screening regime, close to the transition to no screening, and in the no-screening regime, for respiration at rest and in exercise respectively. The gas exchange satisfies six criteria of optimal design: maximum current; minimum waste of surface area; minimum permeability; maximum fault tolerance; minimum waiting time and maximum current increase when going from rest to exercise. This extraordinary, multiply optimized performance is a direct consequence of the space-filling membrane architecture.

  14. From The Cover: Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-09-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied.

  15. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  16. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam Calihman; Andy Girard; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard Mackay; Tom Barton; Sara Rolfe

    2001-01-30

    membranes of this thickness. The sintered membranes were greater than 95% dense, but the phase purity decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The quantity of dopant incorporated into the perovskite phase was roughly constant, with excess dopant forming an additional phase. Composite materials with distinct ceramic and metallic phases, and thin film perovskites (100 {micro}m) also were successfully prepared, but have not yet been tested for hydrogen transport. Finally, porous platinum was identified as a excellent catalyst for evaluation of membrane materials, however, lower cost nickel catalyst systems are being developed.

  17. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants. PMID:25862648

  18. Enzymatic and transport characteristics of isolated snake renal brush-border membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Benyajati, S.; Dantzler, W.H. )

    1988-07-01

    Brush-border membranes (BBM) or proximal tubules were isolated from the kidney of the garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) by a procedure involving hypotonic lysis, Ca precipitation, and differential centrifugation. The isolated membranes were enriched 15-fold in brush-border enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) compared with whole kidney homogenates and were substantially free of other contaminating membranes. The yield of the BBM preparation was 40%. The BBM vesicular transport of several organic solutes was characterized by a rapid filtration technique at 25{degree}C. D-glucose, p-aminohippurate (PAH), and urate entered the same osmotically active space and binding was minimal. An uptake overshoot for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose by reptilian BBM was observed only in the presence of an inwardly directed NaCl gradient and was abolished by 0.1 mM phlorizin. Reptilian BBM exhibited Na-gradient-stimulated uptake of PAH (90 {mu}M) with an overshoot that was inhibited by other organic acids and by 4-acetamido-4{prime}-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid (SITS). In contrast, urate uptake appeared to be Na independent and not appreciably affected by other organic anions or SITS. The presence of specific transport systems for organic solutes in the isolated membrane preparation distinctly characterizes the BBM of reptilian kidney.

  19. Phosphatidylserine flipping enhances membrane curvature and negative charge required for vesicular transport

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Chi, Richard J.; Burd, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated protein transport between organelles of the secretory and endocytic pathways is strongly influenced by the composition and organization of membrane lipids. In budding yeast, protein transport between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and early endosome (EE) requires Drs2, a phospholipid translocase in the type IV P-type ATPase family. However, downstream effectors of Drs2 and specific phospholipid substrate requirements for protein transport in this pathway are unknown. Here, we show that the Arf GTPase-activating protein (ArfGAP) Gcs1 is a Drs2 effector that requires a variant of the ArfGAP lipid packing sensor (+ALPS) motif for localization to TGN/EE membranes. Drs2 increases membrane curvature and anionic phospholipid composition of the cytosolic leaflet, both of which are sensed by the +ALPS motif. Using mutant forms of Drs2 and the related protein Dnf1, which alter their ability to recognize phosphatidylserine, we show that translocation of this substrate to the cytosolic leaflet is essential for +ALPS binding and vesicular transport between the EE and the TGN. PMID:24019533

  20. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  1. Performance of a cross-flow humidifier with a high flux water vapor transport membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-01

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  2. An Arabidopsis peptide transporter is a member of a new class of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H Y; Song, W; Zhang, L; Naider, F; Becker, J M; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    An Arabidopsis peptide transport gene was cloned from an Arabidopsis cDNA library by functionally complementing a yeast peptide transport mutant. The Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter (AtPTR2) allowed growth of yeast cells on dipeptides and tripeptides but not peptides four residues and higher. The plant peptide transporter also conferred sensitivity to a number of ethionine-containing, toxic peptides of chain length three or less and restored the ability to take up radiolabeled dileucine at levels similar to that of the wild type. Dileucine uptake was reduced by the addition of a variety of growth-promoting peptides. The sequence of a cDNA insert of 2.8 kb indicated an open reading frame encoding a 610-amino acid polypeptide (67.5 kD). Hydropathy analysis predicted a highly hydrophobic protein with a number of potential transmembrane segments. At the amino acid level, the Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter shows 24.6, 28.5, and 45.2% identity to the Arabidopsis nitrate-inducible nitrate transporter (CHL1), the rabbit small intestine oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), and the yeast peptide transporter (Ptr2p), respectively, but little identity to other proteins known to be involved in peptide transport. Root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to ethionine-containing toxic peptides was inhibited, and growth was restored by the addition of certain peptides shown to compete with dileucine uptake in yeast expressing the Arabidopsis transport gene. Consistent with the observed inhibition of root growth by toxic peptides, the peptide transporter is expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. This study represents the characterization of a plant peptide transporter that is a member of a new class of related membrane transport proteins. PMID:7919993

  3. Enzymatic membranes for the selective transport of neutral molecules by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bernard; Couturier, Roger; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine; Maïsterrena, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The active and selective transport of glucose and glycerol was carried out using electrophoresis and artificial enzymatic membranes. These positively charged composite membranes carry, on the face adjacent to the donor compartment of an electrophoresis module, a specific kinase (hexokinase or glycerokinase) and, on the opposite face, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Phosphorylation of the neutral substrate (glucose or glycerol) on the donor side by the kinase generates a negatively charged phosphorylated substrate, whose transmembrane migration is promoted by an electric field and by the membrane's positive charge. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated substrate by ALP on the opposite face regenerates the neutral substrate, which accumulates in the receiver compartment of the electrophoresis module. Using an electrophoresis module specifically designed for this study, our experiments were carried out enabling glucose and glycerol to be concentrated approximately eight- and twelve-fold, respectively, in 8 h. PMID:18435500

  4. An overview of polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer for hydrogen production: Modeling and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdol Rahim, A. H.; Tijani, Alhassan Salami; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hanapi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer (PEME) is a candidate for advanced engineering technology. There are many polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) models that have been reported, but none regarding PEME. This paper presents state of the art mass transport models applied to PEME, a detailed literature review of these models and associate methods have been conducted. PEME models are typically developed using analytical, semi empirical and mechanistic techniques that are based on their state and spatial dimensions. Methods for developing the PEME models are introduced and briefly explained. Furthermore the model cell voltage of PEME, which consists of Nernst voltage, ohmic over potential, activation over potential, and diffusion over potential is discussed with focus on mass transport modeling. This paper also presents current issues encountered with PEME model.

  5. Ion transport through chemically induced pores in protein-free phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Anwar, Jamshed

    2007-11-29

    We address the possibility of being able to induce the trafficking of salt ions and other solutes across cell membranes without the use of specific protein-based transporters or pumps. On the basis of realistic atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that transmembrane ionic leakage can be initiated by chemical means, in this instance through addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a solvent widely used in cell biology. Our results provide compelling evidence that the small amphiphilic solute DMSO is able to induce transient defects (water pores) in membranes and to promote a subsequent diffusive pore-mediated transport of salt ions. The findings are consistent with available experimental data and offer a molecular-level explanation for the experimentally observed activities of DMSO solvent as an efficient penetration enhancer and a cryoprotectant, as well as an analgesic. Our findings suggest that transient pore formation by chemical means could emerge as an important general principle for therapeutics. PMID:17983219

  6. Ultra-thin Oxide Membranes: Synthesis and Carrier Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jai Sung

    focused ion beam milling, thin membranes of Ti xOy of 100-300 nm thickness have been created. TEM studies indicated polycrystallinity and presence of twins in the FIB-milled nanowalls. Compositional analysis in the transmission electron microscope also showed reduced content of oxygen, confirming non-stoichiometry. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of the nanowall showed semiconducting behavior with an activation energy different from that of TiO2 single crystals and was attributed to formation of TinO2n-1 phases after FIB processing. The CeO2 study involved high temperature conductivity studies on substrate-free self-supported nano-crystalline ceria membranes up to 800 K. Increasing conductivity with oxygen partial pressure directly opposing the behavior of thin film devices 'clamped' by substrate has been observed. This illustrate that the relaxed nature of free standing membranes, and increased surface to volume ratio enables more sensitive electrical response to oxygen adsorption which could have implications for their use in oxygen storage devices, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors. The work in this thesis advances the understanding of materials in freestanding membrane form and advances fabrication techniques that have not been explored before, having implications for sensors, actuators, SOFC, memristors, and physics of quasi-2D materials.

  7. Plasma membrane electron transport in pancreatic β-cells is mediated in part by NQO1.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Eisen, Timothy; Cline, Gary W; Smith, Peter J S; Heart, Emma

    2011-07-01

    Plasma membrane electron transport (PMET), a cytosolic/plasma membrane analog of mitochondrial electron transport, is a ubiquitous system of cytosolic and plasma membrane oxidoreductases that oxidizes cytosolic NADH and NADPH and passes electrons to extracellular targets. While PMET has been shown to play an important role in a variety of cell types, no studies exist to evaluate its function in insulin-secreting cells. Here we demonstrate the presence of robust PMET activity in primary islets and clonal β-cells, as assessed by the reduction of the plasma membrane-impermeable dyes WST-1 and ferricyanide. Because the degree of metabolic function of β-cells (reflected by the level of insulin output) increases in a glucose-dependent manner between 4 and 10 mM glucose, PMET was evaluated under these conditions. PMET activity was present at 4 mM glucose and was further stimulated at 10 mM glucose. PMET activity at 10 mM glucose was inhibited by the application of the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and various antioxidants. Overexpression of cytosolic NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) increased PMET activity in the presence of 10 mM glucose while inhibition of NQO1 by its inhibitor dicoumarol abolished this activity. Mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide elevated PMET activity. Regardless of glucose levels, PMET activity was greatly enhanced by the application of aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of the malate-aspartate shuttle. We propose a model for the role of PMET as a regulator of glycolytic flux and an important component of the metabolic machinery in β-cells. PMID:21505151

  8. Designing Mimics of Membrane Active Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sgolastra, Federica; deRonde, Brittany M.; Sarapas, Joel M.; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS As a semi-permeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) because of their unique properties. In this account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, it has been possible to generate scaffolds with biological potency superior to the natural analogs. In one case, a compound has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan)staph infections. Modern biophysical assays highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition leading to negative Gaussian curvature, a requirement for both pore formation and endosomal escape. The complexity of this interplay between lipids, bilayer components, and the scaffolds remains to be better resolved, but significant new insight has been provided. It is worthwhile to consider the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to ‘pore formation.’ More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or cell penetrating peptide, mimics. The combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium) rich side chains has produced an array of polymers with robust transduction (and delivery) activity. Being a new area, the fundamental interactions between these new scaffolds and the plasma membrane are just beginning to be understood. Negative Gaussian

  9. Direct Measurements of the Outer Membrane Stage of Ferric Enterobactin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Salete M.; Trinh, Vy; Pi, Hualiang; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2010-01-01

    When Gram-negative bacteria acquire iron, the metal crosses both the outer membrane (OM) and the inner membrane, but existing radioisotopic uptake assays only measure its passage through the latter bilayer, as the accumulation of the radionuclide in the cytoplasm. We devised a methodology that exclusively observes OM transport and used it to study the uptake of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) by Escherichia coli FepA. This technique, called postuptake binding, revealed previously unknown aspects of TonB-dependent transport reactions. The experiments showed, for the first time, that despite the discrepancy in cell envelope concentrations of FepA and TonB (∼35:1), all FepA proteins were active and equivalent in FeEnt uptake, with a maximum turnover number of ∼5/min. FepA-mediated transport of FeEnt progressed through three distinct phases with successively decreasing rates, and from its temperature dependence, the activation energy of the OM stage was 33–35 kcal/mol. The accumulation of FeEnt in the periplasm required the binding protein and inner membrane permease components of its overall transport system; postuptake binding assays on strains devoid of FepB, FepD, or FepG did not show uptake of FeEnt through the OM. However, fluorescence labeling data implied that FepA was active in the ΔfepB strain, suggesting that FeEnt entered the periplasm but then leaked out. Further experiments confirmed this futile cycle; cells without FepB transported FeEnt across the OM, but it immediately escaped through TolC. PMID:20335169

  10. Effect of External Electric Field on Substrate Transport of a Secondary Active Transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Yu, Li-Ying; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2016-08-22

    Substrate transport across a membrane accomplished by a secondary active transporter (SAT) is essential to the normal physiological function of living cells. In the present research, a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations under different electric field (EF) strengths was performed to investigate the effect of an external EF on the substrate transport of an SAT. The results show that EF both affects the interaction between substrate and related protein's residues by changing their conformations and tunes the timeline of the transport event, which collectively reduces the height of energy barrier for substrate transport and results in the appearance of two intermediate conformations under the existence of an external EF. Our work spotlights the crucial influence of external EFs on the substrate transport of SATs and could provide a more penetrating understanding of the substrate transport mechanism of SATs. PMID:27472561

  11. Transport of Water in Semicrystalline Block Copolymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Oparaji, Onyekachi

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO) is a semicrystalline block copolymer (BCP) with interesting properties. It is mechanically tough, amphiphilic, and has a polar phase. The mechanical toughness is due to the crystallinity of PEO and the high glass transition temperature of PS, as well as the morphological structure of the BCP. The polymer has high CO2, water, and salt solubility that derive from the polar PEO component. Potential applications include CO2 separation, water purification, and lithium air batteries. In all of the aforementioned applications, water transport is an important parameter. The presence of water can also affect thermal and mechanical properties. Water transport and thermal and mechanical properties of a lamellar PS- b-PEO copolymer have been measured as a function of water activity. Water transport can be affected by the heterogeneous nature of a semicrystalline BCP. Therefore, Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy has been employed, because water transport and polymer swelling can be measured simultaneously. The effect of BCP structure on transport has been investigated by comparing water transport in PS- b-PEO to a PEO homopolymer. The crystalline content of the PEO and the presence of glassy PS lamellae will be used to explain the transport results.

  12. Transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport in free-standing nanometer-sized polymer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Susanne; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2015-11-01

    The transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport of ions through thin polymer membranes has been investigated by recording single transport events via time-correlated single-particle detection. At the highest kinetic energies investigated, ballistic transport of potassium ions is observed with no discernible energy loss to the membrane. At the lowest kinetic energies investigated (several 100 eV) ions are demonstrated to lose the entire kinetic energy to the membrane. Transport there occurs by electrodiffusion. A transition regime is observed. The transition energy is shown to depend on the thickness of the membrane.

  13. Transport phenomena in membranes for PEMFC applications: an analytical approach to the calculation of membrane resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Francesco, M.; Arato, E.; Costa, P.

    The transport phenomena of mass and electrical charges play an important role in the proton exchange membrane utilised in fuel cell applications. The calculation of the membrane ion and water transfer is usually determined in two ways: one is a semi-empirical mode that can be experimentally set for any application and cannot be used in the prediction of the characteristics of new cells, and the other is a very complex mathematical approach that needs very long calculation times. In fact, the membrane mass transfer model can cause problems in the management of PEM stack models, by increasing calculation times and, above all, convergence problems. This work attempts to overcome this bottleneck using a novel approach. The validation of the new approach has been made by applying the model results to a PEM fuel cell model and by comparing the overall results to those in the literature. The resulting calculation time warranted the application of this model to a very complex stack simulation, resulting in good fit and reasonable computing times.

  14. An Integrated Field-Effect Microdevice for Monitoring Membrane Transport in Xenopus laevis Oocytes via Lateral Proton Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Schaffhauser, Daniel Felix; Patti, Monica; Goda, Tatsuro; Miyahara, Yuji; Forster, Ian Cameron; Dittrich, Petra Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    An integrated microdevice for measuring proton-dependent membrane activity at the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. By establishing a stable contact between the oocyte vitelline membrane and an ion-sensitive field-effect (ISFET) sensor inside a microperfusion channel, changes in surface pH that are hypothesized to result from facilitated proton lateral diffusion along the membrane were detected. The solute diffusion barrier created between the sensor and the active membrane area allowed detection of surface proton concentration free from interference of solutes in bulk solution. The proposed sensor mechanism was verified by heterologously expressing membrane transport proteins and recording changes in surface pH during application of the specific substrates. Experiments conducted on two families of phosphate-sodium cotransporters (SLC20 & SLC34) demonstrated that it is possible to detect phosphate transport for both electrogenic and electroneutral isoforms and distinguish between transport of different phosphate species. Furthermore, the transport activity of the proton/amino acid cotransporter PAT1 assayed using conventional whole cell electrophysiology correlated well with changes in surface pH, confirming the ability of the system to detect activity proportional to expression level. PMID:22792166

  15. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  16. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  17. QUANTUM DOT SINGLE MOLECULE TRACKING REVEALS A WIDE RANGE OF DIFFUSIVE MOTIONS OF MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    Crane, Jonathan M; Haggie, Peter M; Verkman, A S

    2009-03-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation. PMID:24386532

  18. Quantum dot single molecule tracking reveals a wide range of diffusive motions of membrane transport proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation.

  19. Glucose transport and microvillus membrane physical properties along the crypt-villus axis of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, J B; DeSouza, D; Goel, M; Thiesen, S

    1990-01-01

    Both transport function and microvillus membrane physical properties evolve as the enterocyte matures and migrates up the crypt-villus axis. We isolated enriched fractions of villus tip, mid-villus, and crypt enterocytes from which microvillus membrane vesicles were prepared. Using this material we characterized the alterations that occur in microvillus membrane fluidity as the rabbit enterocyte matures and correlated these with kinetic studies of glucose transport. With increasing maturity the microvillus membrane becomes more rigid due to both an increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and alterations in individual phospholipid subclasses. Maximal rates of glucose transport were greatest in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from mature cells. However, the glucose concentration producing half-maximal rates of transport (Km) was significantly lower in crypt microvillus membrane vesicles, suggesting that a distinct glucose transporter existed in crypt enterocytes. This distinction disappeared when differences between membrane lipid environments were removed. By fluidizing villus-tip microvillus membrane vesicles, in vitro, to levels seen in the crypt microvillus membrane, we observed a reduction in the Km of this transport system. These data suggest that the kinetic characteristics of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter are dependent upon its local membrane environment. Images PMID:2318967

  20. Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

  1. A Plasma Membrane Association Module in Yeast Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-07-29

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in silico analyses and mutational studies we found that the C-terminal sequences of Gap1, Bap2, Hip1, Tat1, Tat2, Mmp1, Sam3, Agp1, and Gnp1 are about 50 residues long, associate with the PM, and have features that discriminate them from the termini of organellar amino acid transporters. We show that this sequence (named PMasseq) contains an amphipathic α-helix and the FWC signature, which is palmitoylated by palmitoyltransferase Pfa4. Variations of PMasseq, found in different AAPs, lead to different mobilities and localization patterns, whereas the disruption of the sequence has an adverse effect on cell viability. We propose that PMasseq modulates the function and localization of AAPs along the PM. PMasseq is one of the most complex protein signals for plasma membrane association across species and can be used as a delivery vehicle for the PM. PMID:27226538

  2. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  3. Mass Transport in Nanocomposite Materials for Membrane Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, Michele; Puccini, Ilaria; Messori, Massimo; Grazia De Angelis, Maria; Sarti, Giulio C.

    2010-06-01

    The vapor transport properties of nanocomposite materials obtained with different techniques and based on a high free volume glassy polymer suitable for membrane separations, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP), have been determined and modeled. The simple mixing in solution of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles with PTMSP leads to mixed matrix membranes, which show higher free volume and higher values of diffusivity and permeability than the pure polymeric material. If a sol-gel route is followed, with PTMSP and Tetraethoxysylane (TEOS) as precursor of the silica phase, one obtains hybrid matrices characterized by lower vapor diffusion and sorption values with respect to the pure polymer. Although the trends observed are very regular functions of the silica content in the composite, none of the behavior observed obeys traditional models for composites permeability, such as the Maxwell's one. Both types of behaviors were modeled considering the variation of polymer fractional free volume induced by the inorganic phase: in the mixed matrices the poor interactions between silica and polymer chains favor the formation of nanovoids at the interface, increasing the free volume and the vapor diffusivity, while in the more interconnected hybrid matrices the inorganic domains act as constraints, reducing the volume occupied by the polymeric phase, which is naturally endowed with a very high excess free volume.

  4. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  5. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Swathirajan, S.

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  6. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  7. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs.

  8. Morphology and Proton Transport in Sulfonated Block Copolymer and Mesoporous Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Wong, David; Beers, Keith; Balsara, Nitash

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to understand the fundamentals of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), we have developed a series of poly(styrene-b-ethylene-b-styrene) (SES) membranes. The SES membranes were subsequently sulfonated to yield proton conducting S-SES membranes. We examine the effects of sulfonation level, temperature and thermal history on the morphology of S-SES membranes in both dry and hydrated states. The effects of these parameters on water uptake and proton transport characteristics of the membranes are also examined. Furthermore, building upon the strategy we deployed in sulfonating the SES membranes, we fabricated mesoporous S-SES membranes, with pores lined up with the proton conducting channels. These membranes have three distinct phases: structural block, proton-conducting block, and void. We examine the effects of pore size, domain structure and sulfonation level on water uptake and proton conductivity of the mesoporous PEMs at different temperatures. This work is funded by Department of Energy.

  9. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  11. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  12. SLC41A2 encodes a plasma-membrane Mg2+ transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Jaya; Nelson, Bruce; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    The TRPM7 (transient receptor potential melastatin 7) ion channel has been implicated in the uptake of Mg2+ into vertebrate cells, as elimination of TRPM7 expression through gene targeting in DT40 B-lymphocytes renders them unable to grow in the absence of supplemental Mg2+. However, a residual capacity of TRPM7-deficient cells to accumulate Mg2+ and proliferate when provided with supplemental Mg2+ suggests the existence of Mg2+ uptake mechanism(s) other than TRPM7. Evaluation of the expression of several members of the SLC41 (solute carrier family 41) family, which exhibit homology with the MgtE class of prokaryotic putative bivalent-cation transporters, demonstrated that one, SLC41A2 (solute carrier family 41 member 2), is expressed in both wild-type and TRPM7-deficient DT40 cells. Characterization of heterologously expressed SLC41A2 protein indicated that it is a plasma-membrane protein with an N-terminus-outside/C-terminus-inside 11-TM (transmembrane)-span topology, consistent with its functioning as a trans-plasma-membrane transporter. In contrast with a previous report of ion-channel activity associated with SLC41A2 expression in oocytes, investigation of whole cell currents in SLC41A2-expressing DT40 cells revealed no novel currents of any type associated with SLC41A2 expression. However, expression of SLC41A2 in TRPM7-deficient cells under the control of a doxycycline-inducible promoter was able to conditionally enhance their net uptake of 26Mg2+ and conditionally and dose-dependently provide them with the capacity to grow in the absence of supplemental Mg2+, observations strongly supporting a model whereby SLC41A2 directly mediates trans-plasma-membrane Mg2+ transport. Overall, our results suggest that SLC41A2 functions as a plasma-membrane Mg2+ transporter in vertebrate cells. PMID:16984228

  13. Ion transport in polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes: Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Tarek Rafic

    Diffusion of ions across thin membranes, whether polymeric or biological, is diverse and important field in science. In separation science, thin polymer films have potential application in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In this dissertation, ion transport on a recently discovered polymer thin films known as polyelectrolyte multilayer films is investigated. Unexpectedly, a polyelectrolyte multilayer membrane behaved unlike classical membranes and a new mechanism termed the "reluctant exchange" was proposed to explain their behavior. Ion transport in these membranes was studied electrochemically, using the rotating disc electrode voltammetry technique, to obtain flux characteristic of at least ten electroactive species The flux through membranes was found to be either a linear or nonlinear function of electrolyte concentration depending on the charge, the resonance form, and the membrane diffusion coefficient of the electroactive ion. The "reluctant exchange" lead to significant transport selectivity between ions, favoring species with lower charge. A triangular relation was established between the electroactive probe ions, the polyelectrolyte ion pair exchangers, and a variety of supporting electrolytes. In certain cases a blocking effect was detected, which was harnessed to study the effectiveness of these films at inhibiting pitting corrosion of stainless steel. Experimental analysis was extended to include in situ Attenuated Total Internal Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy that verified the linear dependence of the population of extrinsic sites and the independence of the concentration of the probe ions on the concentration of the external salt solution. Finally, owing to the difficulty of detecting the hops of active probe ions across the ion pair exchangers, a theoretical approach was proposed to understand the molecular dynamics of the "reluctant exchange" mechanism. A visualization of ion transport across the polyelectrolyte

  14. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. PMID:26582474

  15. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  16. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm-2), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes.

  17. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm(-2)), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes. PMID:26553245

  18. Role of liquid membrane phenomenon in the anti-bacterial activity of Cefuroxime Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, C.; Shankaraiah, M. M.; Venkatesh, J. S.; Setty, S. Ramachandra

    2010-01-01

    The role of liquid membrane phenomenon has been studied in the anti bacterial activity of cephalosporins i.e. Cefuroxime sodium. In our earlier publication [1] it was reported that hydraulic permeability data obtained to demonstrate the existence of liquid membrane in series with supporting membrane generated by Cefuroxime sodium. Transport of selected permeants (glucose, PABA, glycine, and ions like Mg++, NH4+, PO4-, Ca++, Na+, K+ and Cl-) through liquid membrane generated by Cefuroxime sodium in series with supporting membrane has been studied. The results indicated that the liquid membrane generated by Cefuroxime sodium inhibit the transport of various essential bio-molecules and permeants in to the cell. This modification in permeability of different permeants in the presence of the liquid membranes is likely to play significant role in the biological actions of Cefuroxime sodium. The anti-bacterial activity of Cefuroxime sodium further confirmed that the generation of liquid membrane by Cefuroxime sodium is also contributing for the antibacterial activity of them. PMID:24825969

  19. PVDF-HFP/ether-modified polysiloxane membranes obtained via airbrush spraying as active separators for application in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Seidel, S M; Jeschke, S; Vettikuzha, P; Wiemhöfer, H-D

    2015-08-01

    Improved hybrid polymer electrolyte membranes are introduced based on ether-modified polysiloxanes and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) yielding a safe separator membrane, which is able to be sprayed directly onto lithium ion battery active materials, with an active role for enhanced ion transport. PMID:26121633

  20. Biochemical requirements for the targeting and fusion of ER-derived transport vesicles with purified yeast Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In order for secretion to progress, ER-derived transport vesicles must target to, and fuse with the cis-Golgi compartment. These processes have been reconstituted using highly enriched membrane fractions and partially purified soluble components. The functionally active yeast Golgi membranes that have been purified are highly enriched in the cis- Golgi marker enzymes alpha 1,6 mannosyltransferase and GDPase. Fusion of transport vesicles with these membranes requires both GTP and ATP hydrolysis, and depends on cytosolic and peripheral membrane proteins. At least two protein fractions from yeast cytosol are required for the reconstitution of ER-derived vesicle fusion. Soluble fractions prepared from temperature-sensitive mutants revealed requirements for the Ypt1p, Sec19p, Sly1p, Sec7p, and Uso1 proteins. A model for the sequential involvement of these components in the targeting and fusion reaction is proposed. PMID:8636207

  1. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  2. Effect of nanoscale morphology on selective ethanol transport through block copolymer membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the effect of block copolymer domain size on transport of liquid mixtures through the membranes by presenting pervaporation data of an 8 wt% ethanol/water mixture through A-B-A and B-A-B triblock copolymer membranes. The A-block was chosen to facilitate ethanol transport while the B-blo...

  3. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  4. Expression of calcium transport proteins in the extraembryonic membranes of a viviparous snake, Virginia striatula.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Santiago P; Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W

    2012-06-01

    Yolk is the primary source of calcium for embryonic growth and development for most squamates, irrespective of mode of parity. The calcified eggshell is a secondary source for embryonic calcium in all oviparous eggs, but this structure is lost in viviparous lineages. Virginia striatula is a viviparous snake in which embryos obtain calcium from both yolk and placental transport of uterine calcium secretions. The developmental pattern of embryonic calcium acquisition in V. striatula is similar to that for oviparous snakes. Calbindin-D(28K) is a marker for epithelial calcium transport activity and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) provides the energy to catalyze the final step in calcium transport. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA was measured by immunoblotting in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois of a developmental series of V. striatula to test the hypothesis that these proteins mediate calcium transport to embryos. In addition, we compared the expression of calbindin-D(28K) in extraembryonic membranes of V. striatula throughout development to a previously published expression pattern in an oviparous snake to test the hypothesis that the ontogeny of calcium transport function is independent of reproductive mode. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) increased in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois coincident with calcium mobilization from yolk and uterine sources and with embryonic growth. The amount of PMCA in the chorioallantois did not change through development suggesting its expression is not rate limiting for calcium transport. The pattern of expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA confirms our initial hypothesis that these proteins mediate embryonic calcium uptake. In addition, the developmental pattern of calbindin-D(28K) expression in V. striatula is similar to that of an oviparous snake, which suggests that calcium transport mechanisms and their regulation are independent of reproductive mode. PMID:22821861

  5. Sirtuin Activation: A Role for Plasma Membrane in the Cell Growth Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the observation that impermeable oxidants can stimulate cell growth has not been satisfactorily explained. The discovery of sirtuins provides a logical answer to the puzzle. The NADH-dependent transplasma membrane electron transport system, which is stimulated by growth factors and interventions such as calorie restriction, can transfer electrons to external acceptors and protect against stress-induced apoptosis. We hypothesize that the activation of plasma membrane electron transport contributes to the cytosolic NAD+ pool required for sirtuin to activate transcription factors necessary for cell growth and survival. PMID:23033342

  6. Effect of UV light on different structural and transport parameters of cellophane membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Benavente, J.; Vazquez, M.I.; De Abajo, J.

    1996-01-01

    A comparative study of UV light influence on structural and transport parameters of cellophane membranes was made. Changes in the chemical structure and electrical behavior of cellophane membranes were considered by determining the hydraulic permeability, salt diffusion coefficient, and resistance values, as well as some geometrical parameters, for an untreated membrane and two differently UV-treated cellophane membranes. Differences in the characteristic parameters for the three samples showed that radiation mainly affected the membrane structure, while only small changes in membrane electrical behavior were determined.

  7. Hypothesis about the function of membrane-buried proline residues in transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, C J; Deber, C M

    1986-01-01

    In a survey of the bilayer-spanning regions of integral membrane proteins, membrane-buried proline residues were found in nearly all transport proteins examined, whereas membrane-buried regions of nontransport proteins were largely devoid of intramembranous proline residues. When amino acids from the complete sequences of representative sets of transport and nontransport membrane proteins were analyzed for the distribution of proline residues between aqueous vs. membranous domains, proline was shown to be selectively excluded from membranous domains of the nontransport proteins, in accord with expectation from energetic and structural considerations. In contrast, proline residues in transport proteins were evenly distributed between aqueous and membranous domains, consistent with the notion that functional membrane-buried proline residues are selectively included in transport proteins. As cis peptide bonds involving proline arise in proteins and have been implicated in protein dynamic processes, the cis-trans isomerization of an Xaa-Pro peptide bond (Xaa = unspecified amino acid) buried within the membrane--and the resulting redirection of the protein chain--is proposed to provide the reversible conformational change requisite for the regulation (opening/closing) of a transport channel. Parallel to this function, the relatively negative character of the carbonyl groups of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds may promote their participation as intramembranous liganding sites for positive species in proton/cation transport processes. PMID:3456574

  8. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R.; Allen, Frances I.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y. Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-01

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these `CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  9. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  10. Membrane transporters mediating root signalling and adaptive responses to oxygen deprivation and soil flooding.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Sergey; Shabala, Lana; Barcelo, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    This review provides a comprehensive assessment of a previously unexplored topic: elucidating the role that plasma- and organelle-based membrane transporters play in plant-adaptive responses to flooding. We show that energy availability and metabolic shifts under hypoxia and anoxia are critical in regulating membrane-transport activity. We illustrate the high tissue and time dependence of this regulation, reveal the molecular identity of transporters involved and discuss the modes of their regulation. We show that both reduced oxygen availability and accumulation of transition metals in flooded roots result in a reduction in the cytosolic K(+) pool, ultimately determining the cell's fate and transition to programmed cell death (PCD). This process can be strongly affected by hypoxia-induced changes in the amino acid pool profile and, specifically, ϒ-amino butyric acid (GABA) accumulation. It is suggested that GABA plays an important regulatory role, allowing plants to proceed with H2 O2 signalling to activate a cascade of genes that mediate plant adaptation to flooding while at the same time, preventing the cell from entering a 'suicide program'. We conclude that progress in crop breeding for flooding tolerance can only be achieved by pyramiding the numerous physiological traits that confer efficient energy maintenance, cytosolic ion homeostasis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) control and detoxification. PMID:24689809

  11. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer.

    PubMed

    Köster, Darius Vasco; Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-03-22

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  13. Electrochemical instability of solvent membranes during electrodialytic cation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, V.N.; Kontush, A.S.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental data are reported concerning the uptake of water by solvent membranes during dialysis and electrodialysis when the solvent is nonaqueous and a macrocyclic carrier is present. Aspects of the electrochemical instability of solvent membranes are discussed, and particularly the discontinuous conductivity fluctuations and the three stages of development of electric breakdown. The cationic selectivity of the macrocyclic carrier, the amount of water present in the solvent membrane, and the character of electrochemical instability of the membrane are shown to be interrelated.

  14. The efficiency of membrane transport of vitamin B6 coupled to poly(ester amine) gene transporter and transfection in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shambhavi; Garg, Pankaj; Lim, Ki Taek; Kim, Jangho; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Cho, Chong-Su; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B6 (VB6) plays an essential role as a coenzyme in various cellular metabolic functions, including DNA biosynthesis for cellular growth and proliferation. VB6 is taken up by cells through facilitated diffusion via VB6 transporting membrane carrier (VTC). In this study, we demonstrated that the VB6-coupled poly(ester amine) (VBPEA) gene transporter utilizes this uptake mechanism, leading to enhanced vector transport inside the rapidly proliferating cancer cells with relatively high affinity. Physicochemical characterization, cell viability assays, and transfection studies showed VBPEA to meet the standards of a good transfection agent. Competitive inhibition of VBPEA uptake by its structural analog 4'-deoxypyridoxine hydrochloride revealed the involvement of VB6 specific transporting membrane carrier in VBPEA internalization in tumor cells. VBPEA elicit higher transfection levels in lung cancer cells than in normal lung cells, indicating that cancer cells which have a high demand for VB6, have a higher affinity for VB6-coupled vector. VB6 coupling to the gene transporter is important to enforce a high level of VTC-mediated endocytosis compared to VB6 alone. This system illustrated how understanding of the VB6 membrane transporter specificity allowed for the design of a VB6-coupled gene transporter with accelerated transfection activity in cancer cells owing to an advanced mode of internalization. PMID:23425622

  15. Glycaemia regulates the glucose transporter number in the plasma membrane of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakoudis, D; Ramlal, T; Rastogi, S; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1992-01-01

    The number of glucose transporters was measured in isolated membranes from diabetic-rat skeletal muscle to determine the role of circulating blood glucose levels in the control of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. Three experimental groups of animals were investigated in the post-absorptive state: normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic, hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic made normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic by phlorizin treatment. Hyperglycaemia caused a reversible decrease in total transporter number, as measured by cytochalasin B binding, in both plasma membranes and internal membranes of skeletal muscle. Changes in GLUT4 glucose transporter protein mirrored changes in cytochalasin B binding in plasma membranes. However, there was no recovery of GLUT4 levels in intracellular membranes with correction of glycaemia. GLUT4 mRNA levels decreased with hyperglycaemia and recovered only partially with correction of glycaemia. Conversely, GLUT1 glucose transporters were only detectable in the plasma membranes; the levels of this protein varied directly with glycaemia, i.e. in the opposite direction to GLUT4 glucose transporters. This study demonstrates that hyperglycaemia, in the absence of hypoinsulinaemia, is capable of down-regulating the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle, the major site of peripheral resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose transport in diabetes. Furthermore, correction of hyperglycaemia causes a complete restoration of the transport system in the basal state (determined by the transporter number in the plasma membrane), but possibly only an incomplete recovery of the transport system's ability to respond to insulin (since there is no recovery of GLUT4 levels in the intracellular membrane insulin-responsive transporter pool). Finally, the effect of hyperglycaemia is specific for glucose transporter isoforms, with GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins varying respectively in parallel and opposite directions to levels of

  16. Cocaine induction of dopamine transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Elmer, Lawrence W; Zhong, Huailing; Scheys, Joshua O; Zhang, Lian

    2002-02-01

    Several previous human postmortem experiments have detected an increase in striatal [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in chronic cocaine users. However, animal experiments have found considerable variability in DAT radioligand binding levels in brain after cocaine administration, perhaps caused by length and dose of treatment and type of radioligand used. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake would be increased by exposure to cocaine through alterations in DAT cellular trafficking, rather than increased protein synthesis. Experiments were conducted in stably hDAT-transfected N2A cells and assessed the dose response and time course of cocaine effects on [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the DAT, [(3)H]dopamine uptake, measures of DAT protein and mRNA, as well as DAT subcellular location. Cocaine doses of 10(-6) M caused statistically significant increases in [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake after 12 and 3 h, respectively. Despite these increases in DAT function, there was no change in DAT total protein or mRNA. Immunofluorescence and biotinylation experiments indicated that cocaine treatment induced increases in plasma membrane DAT immunoreactivity and intracellular decreases. The present model system may further our understanding of regulatory alterations in DAT radioligand binding and function caused by cocaine exposure. PMID:11809869

  17. Proton Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan; Tyagi, Madhu; Reimer, Jeffrey; Segalman, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Nanostructured block copolymer/ionic liquid mixtures are of interest for creating membranes having high proton conductivity coupled with high thermal stability. In these mixtures, it is anticipated that nanoconfinement to block copolymer domains will affect ionic liquid proton transport properties. Using pulsed-field gradient NMR and quasi-elastic neutron scattering, this relationship has been investigated for mixtures of poly(styrene-b- 2-vinylpyridine) (S2VP) with ionic liquids composed of imidazole and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (HTFSI), where the ionic liquids selectively reside in the P2VP domains of the block copolymer. Proton mobility is highest in the neat ionic liquids when there is an excess of imidazole compared to HTFSI due to proton hopping between hydrogen-bonded imidazoles. As predicted, the amount of proton hopping can be tuned by nanoconfinement, as evidenced by the finding that a lamellar mixture of an imidazole- excess ionic liquid with S2VP has greater proton mobility than a corresponding disordered mixture of the ionic liquid with P2VP homopolymer.

  18. Electro- and Magneto-Modulated Ion Transport through Graphene Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    The control of ion trans-membrane transport through graphene oxide (GO) membranes is achieved by electric and magnetic fields. Electric field can either increase or decrease the ion transport through GO membranes depending on its direction, and magnetic field can enhance the ion penetration monotonically. When electric field is applied across GO membrane, excellent control of ion fluidic flows can be done. With the magnetic field, the effective anchoring of ions is demonstrated but the modulation of the ion flowing directions does not occur. The mechanism of the electro- and magneto-modulated ion trans-membrane transport is investigated, indicating that the electric fields dominate the ion migration process while the magnetic fields tune the structure of nanocapillaries within GO membranes. Results also show that the ion selectivity of GO membranes can be tuned with the electric fields while the transport of ions can be enhanced synchronously with the magnetic fields. These excellent properties make GO membranes promising in areas such as field-induced mass transport control and membrane separation. PMID:25347969

  19. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  20. Membrane Transporters and Folate Homeostasis; Intestinal Absorption, Transport into Systemic Compartments and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongbao; Matherly, Larry H.; Goldman, I. David

    2013-01-01

    Folates, the generic term for the family of B vitamins, are derived entirely from dietary sources, and are key one-carbon donors required for de novo nucleotide and methionine synthesis. These highly hydrophilic molecules utilize genetically distinct and functionally diverse transport systems to enter cells: the reduced folate carrier (RFC), the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), and the folate receptors. Each plays a unique role in mediating folate transport across epithelia and into systemic tissues. With the recent discovery of the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption, and the clarification of the genetic basis for the autosomal recessive disorder, hereditary folate malabsorption, involving loss-of-function mutations in PCFT protein, it is now possible to piece together how these folate transporters contribute, both individually and collectively, to folate homeostasis in humans. This review focuses on the physiological roles of these major folate transporters with a brief consideration of their impact on the pharmacological activities of antifolates. PMID:19173758

  1. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  2. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  3. Microchamber Device for Detection of Transporter Activity of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to detect the transporter activity of intact adherent cells using a microchamber device. When adherent cells are seeded onto the poly-di-methyl siloxane substrate having microchambers with openings smaller than the size of a cell, the cells form a confluent layer that covers the microchambers, creating minute, confined spaces. As substances exported across the cell membrane accumulate, transporter activity can be detected by observing the fluorescence intensity increase in the microchamber. We tested the microchamber device with HeLa cells over-expressing MDR1, an ATP-binding cassette transporter, and succeeded in detecting the transport of fluorescence-conjugated paclitaxel, the anti-cancer drug, at the single-cell level. PMID:25853126

  4. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  5. Energetics of active transport processes.

    PubMed

    Essig, A; Caplan, S R

    1968-12-01

    Discussions of active transport usually assume stoichiometry between the rate of transport J(+) and the metabolic rate J(r). However, the observation of a linear relationship between J(+) and J(r) does not imply a stoichiometric relationship, i.e., complete coupling. Since coupling may possibly be incomplete, we examine systems of an arbitrary degree of coupling q, regarding stoichiometry as a limiting case. We consider a sodium pump, with J(+) and J(r) linear functions of the electrochemical potential difference, -X(+), and the chemical affinity of the metabolic driving reaction, A. The affinity is well defined even for various complex reaction pathways. Incorporation of a series barrier and a parallel leak does not affect the linearity of the composite observable system. The affinity of some region of the metabolic chain may be maintained constant, either by large pools of reactants or by regulation. If so, this affinity can be evaluated by two independent methods. Sodium transport is conveniently characterized by the open-circuit potential (Deltapsi)(I=0) and the natural limits, level flow (J(+))(X+=0), and static head X(0) (+) = (X(+))(J+=0). With high degrees of coupling -X(0) (+)/F approaches the electromotive force E(Na) (Ussing); -X(0) (+)/F cannot be identified with ((RT/F) ln f)(X+=0), where f is the flux ratio. The efficiency eta = -J(+)X(+)/J(r)A is of significance only when appreciable energy is being converted from one form to another. When either J(+) or -X(+) is small eta is low; the significant parameters are then the efficacies epsilon(J+) = J(+)/J(r)A and epsilon(X+) = -X(+)/J(r)A, respectively maximal at level flow and static head. Leak increases both J(+) and epsilon(J+) for isotonic saline reabsorption, but diminishes -X(0) (+) and epsilon(Xfemale symbol). Electrical resistance reflects both passive parameters and metabolism. Various fundamental relations are preserved despite coupling of passive ion and water flows. PMID:5713453

  6. Membrane Transport of Singlet Oxygen Monitored by Dipole Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Valerij S.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efficiency of photodynamic reactions depends on 1), the penetration depth of the photosensitizer into the membrane and 2), the sidedness of the target. Molecules which are susceptible to singlet oxygen (1O2) experience less damage when separated from the photosensitizer by the membrane. Since 1O2 lifetime in the membrane environment is orders of magnitude longer than the time required for nonexcited oxygen (O2) to cross the membrane, this observation suggests that differences between the permeabilities or membrane partition of 1O2 and O2 exist. We investigated this hypothesis by releasing 1O2 at one side of a planar membrane while monitoring the kinetics of target damage at the opposite side of the same membrane. Damage to the target, represented by dipole-modifying molecules (phloretin or phlorizin), was indicated by changes in the interleaflet dipole potential difference Δϕb. A simple analytical model allowed estimation of the 1O2 interleaflet concentration difference from the rate at which Δϕb changed. It confirmed that the lower limit of 1O2 permeability is ∼2 cm/s; i.e., it roughly matches O2 permeability as predicted by Overton's rule. Consequently, the membrane cannot act as a barrier to 1O2 diffusion. Differences in the reaction rates at the cytoplasmic and extracellular membrane leaflets may be attributed only to 1O2 quenchers inside the membrane. PMID:18931253

  7. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  8. Sar1 GTPase Activity Is Regulated by Membrane Curvature*♦

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Michael G.; Mela, Ioanna; Wang, Lei; Henderson, Robert M.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2016-01-01

    The majority of biosynthetic secretory proteins initiate their journey through the endomembrane system from specific subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum. At these locations, coated transport carriers are generated, with the Sar1 GTPase playing a critical role in membrane bending, recruitment of coat components, and nascent vesicle formation. How these events are appropriately coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Sar1 acts as the curvature-sensing component of the COPII coat complex and highlight the ability of Sar1 to bind more avidly to membranes of high curvature. Additionally, using an atomic force microscopy-based approach, we further show that the intrinsic GTPase activity of Sar1 is necessary for remodeling lipid bilayers. Consistent with this idea, Sar1-mediated membrane remodeling is dramatically accelerated in the presence of its guanine nucleotide-activating protein (GAP), Sec23-Sec24, and blocked upon addition of guanosine-5′-[(β,γ)-imido]triphosphate, a poorly hydrolysable analog of GTP. Our results also indicate that Sar1 GTPase activity is stimulated by membranes that exhibit elevated curvature, potentially enabling Sar1 membrane scission activity to be spatially restricted to highly bent membranes that are characteristic of a bud neck. Taken together, our data support a stepwise model in which the amino-terminal amphipathic helix of GTP-bound Sar1 stably penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, promoting local membrane deformation. As membrane bending increases, Sar1 membrane binding is elevated, ultimately culminating in GTP hydrolysis, which may destabilize the bilayer sufficiently to facilitate membrane fission. PMID:26546679

  9. Transport of silver(I) ion through a supported liquid membrane using bathocuproine as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Takashi

    1998-04-01

    The active transport of silver ions through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing bathocuproine (4,7-diphenyl-2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) as a carrier was investigated under various experimental conditions. The magnitude of the permeation velocity of metallic ions through the SLM was in the order Ag{sup +} > Cd{sup 2+} {much_gt} Zn{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} when nitrite ion was used as the pairing ion species that is cotransported with metallic ion. The permeation velocity of silver(I) ions through an SLM was dependent on the concentrations of the silver ion, bathocuproine, and nitrite ion. An equation for the transport of silver ions, consisting of three important factors, i.e., the concentrations of metallic ion, carrier, and pairing ion species, was derived.

  10. Charge transport in the electrospun nanofiber composite membrane's three-dimensional fibrous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGostin, Matthew B.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Myles, Timothy D.; Cassenti, Brice N.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a Fiber Network (FN) ion transport model is developed to simulate the three-dimensional fibrous microstructural morphology that results from the electrospinning membrane fabrication process. This model is able to approximate fiber layering within a membrane as well as membrane swelling due to water uptake. The discrete random fiber networks representing membranes are converted to resistor networks and solved for current flow and ionic conductivity. Model predictions are validated by comparison with experimental conductivity data from electrospun anion exchange membranes (AEM) and proton exchange membranes (PEM) for fuel cells as well as existing theories. The model is capable of predicting in-plane and thru-plane conductivity and takes into account detailed membrane characteristics, such as volume fraction, fiber diameter, fiber conductivity, and membrane layering, and as such may be used as a tool for advanced electrode design.

  11. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  12. Small Molecule Membrane Transporters in the Mammalian Podocyte: A Pathogenic and Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Zennaro, Cristina; Artero, Mary; Di Maso, Vittorio; Carraro, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The intriguingly complex glomerular podocyte has been a recent object of intense study. Researchers have sought to understand its role in the pathogenesis of common proteinuric diseases such as minimal change disease and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis. In particular, considerable effort has been directed towards the anatomic and functional barrier to macromolecular filtration provided by the secondary foot processes, but little attention has been paid to the potential of podocytes to handle plasma proteins beyond the specialization of the slit diaphragm. Renal membrane transporters in the proximal tubule have been extensively studied for decades, particularly in relation to drug metabolism and elimination. Recently, uptake and efflux transporters for small organic molecules have also been found in the glomerular podocyte, and we and others have found that these transporters can engage not only common pharmaceuticals but also injurious endogenous and exogenous agents. We have also found that the activity of podocyte transporters can be manipulated to inhibit pathogen uptake and efflux. It is conceivable that podocyte transporters may play a role in disease pathogenesis and may be a target for future drug development. PMID:25411800

  13. Nanodiamond-Mediated Intercellular Transport of Proteins through Membrane Tunneling Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Chandra Prakash; Mohan, Nitin; Chang, Che-Wei; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Recently discovered tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are capable of creating intercellular communication pathways through which transport of proteins and other cytoplasmic components occurs. Intercellular transport is related to many diseases and nanotubes are potentially useful as drug-delivery channels for cancer therapy. Here, we apply fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) as a photostable tracker, as well as a protein carrier, to illustrate the transport events in TNTs of human cells. Proteins, including bovine serum albumin and green fluorescent protein, are first coated on 100-nm FNDs by physical adsorption and then single-particle tracking of the bioconjugates in the transient membrane connections is carried out by fluorescence microscopy. Stop-and-go and to-and-fro motions mediated by molecular motors are found for the active transport of protein-loaded FNDs trapped in the endosomal vehicles of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T). Quantitative analysis of the heterotypical transport between HEK293T and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by flow cytometry confirm the formation of open-ended nanotubes between them, despite that their TNTs differ in structural components. Our results demonstrate the promising applications of this novel carbon-based nanomaterial for intercellular delivery of biomolecular cargo down to the single-particle level. PMID:26479149

  14. Integrating Membrane Transport with Male Gametophyte Development and Function through Transcriptomics1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Kevin W.; Honys, David; Ward, John M.; Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Nawrocki, Eric P.; Hirschi, Kendal D.; Twell, David; Sze, Heven

    2006-01-01

    Male fertility depends on the proper development of the male gametophyte, successful pollen germination, tube growth, and delivery of the sperm cells to the ovule. Previous studies have shown that nutrients like boron, and ion gradients or currents of Ca2+, H+, and K+ are critical for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular identities of transporters mediating these fluxes are mostly unknown. As a first step to integrate transport with pollen development and function, a genome-wide analysis of transporter genes expressed in the male gametophyte at four developmental stages was conducted. Approximately 1,269 genes encoding classified transporters were collected from the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome. Of 757 transporter genes expressed in pollen, 16% or 124 genes, including AHA6, CNGC18, TIP1.3, and CHX08, are specifically or preferentially expressed relative to sporophytic tissues. Some genes are highly expressed in microspores and bicellular pollen (COPT3, STP2, OPT9), while others are activated only in tricellular or mature pollen (STP11, LHT7). Analyses of entire gene families showed that a subset of genes, including those expressed in sporophytic tissues, was developmentally regulated during pollen maturation. Early and late expression patterns revealed by transcriptome analysis are supported by promoter∷β-glucuronidase analyses of CHX genes and by other methods. Recent genetic studies based on a few transporters, including plasma membrane H+ pump AHA3, Ca2+ pump ACA9, and K+ channel SPIK, further support the expression patterns and the inferred functions revealed by our analyses. Thus, revealing the distinct expression patterns of specific transporters and unknown polytopic proteins during microgametogenesis provides new insights for strategic mutant analyses necessary to integrate the roles of transporters and potential receptors with male gametophyte development. PMID:16607029

  15. Integrating Membrane Transport with Male Gametophyte Development and Function through Transcriptomics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bock KW; D Honys; JM. Ward; S Padmanaban; EP Nawrocki; KD Hirschi; D Twell; H Sze

    2006-01-01

    Male fertility depends on the proper development of the male gametophyte, successful pollen germination, tube growth and delivery of the sperm cells to the ovule. Previous studies have shown that nutrients like boron, and ion gradients or currents of Ca2+, H+, and K+ are critical for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular identities of transporters mediating these fluxes are mostly unknown. As a first step to integrate transport with pollen development and function, a genome-wide analysis of transporter genes expressed in the male gametophyte at four developmental stages was conducted. About 1269 genes encoding classified transporters were collected from the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Of 757 transporter genes expressed in pollen, 16% or 124 genes, including AHA6, CNGC18, TIP1.3 and CHX08, are specifically or preferentially expressed relative to sporophytic tissues. Some genes are highly expressed in microspores and bicellular pollen (COPT3, STP2, OPT9); while others are activated only in tricellular or mature pollen (STP11, LHT7). Analyses of entire gene families showed that a subset of genes, including those expressed in sporophytic tissues, were developmentally-regulated during pollen maturation. Early and late expression patterns revealed by transcriptome analysis are supported by promoter::GUS analyses of CHX genes and by other methods. Recent genetic studies based on a few transporters, including plasma membrane H+ pump AHA3, Ca2+ pump ACA9, and K+ channel SPIK, further support the expression patterns and the inferred functions revealed by our analyses. Thus, revealing the distinct expression patterns of specific transporters and unknown polytopic proteins during microgametogenesis provides new insights for strategic mutant analyses necessary to integrate the roles of transporters and potential receptors with male gametophyte development.

  16. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  17. Effects of tetrandrine on calcium transport, protein fluorescences and membrane fluidity of sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lan-Ying; Chen, Xi; Tian, Xiao-Li; Yu, Xiao-Hong

    2000-01-01

    To understand whether the molecular mechanism of Tetrandrine (Tet)'s pharmacological effects is concerned with sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport so as to be involved in myocardial contractility, we observed the effects of Tet on calcium transport and membrane structure of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SR) and rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (CSR).Calcium uptake was monitored with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. Protein conformation and fluorescence polarization were measured by fluospectrophotometric method and membrane lipids labelled with fluorescence probes for SR, respectively.128 μmol l−1 Tet reduced the initial rate of calcium uptake to 59% of control 6 min after reaction. Tet un-competitively inhibited SR Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activity, causing the stoichiometric ratio of SR Ca2+/ATP to decrease to 1.43 from 2.0 of control.Inhibitory rates on SR Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase by Tet were reduced from 60% in the absence of phosphate to 50% in the presence of phosphate and reduced from 92% in 1 mmol l−1 ATP to 60% in 5 mmol l−1 ATP.Tet markedly reduced SR intrinsic protein fluorescence, while it slightly decreased the thiol(SH)-modified protein fluorescence of SR labelled with N-(3-pyrene)-maleimide.Tet slightly increased fluorescence polarization in the middle and deep layers of SR membrane lipids labelled with 7- or 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (AS) probes, whereas it did not change that of SR labelled with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatrine (DPH).These results revealed that prevention of SR calcium uptake by Tet was due to inhibition of the SR calcium pump Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase, changes in spatial conformation of the pumps protein molecules and a decrease in the extent of motion of membrane lipid molecules, thus altering the regulation of [Ca2+]i and myocardial contractility. PMID:11015304

  18. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Richard Treglio; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard Blair; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs

    2004-07-26

    During this quarter, work was focused on testing layered composite membranes under varying feed stream flow rates at high pressure. By optimizing conditions, H{sub 2} permeation rates as high as 423 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -2} at 440 C were measured. Membrane stability was investigated by comparison to composite alloy membranes. Permeation of alloyed membranes showed a strong dependence on the alloying element. Impedance analysis was used to investigate bulk and grain boundary conductivity in cermets. Thin film cermet deposition procedures were developed, hydrogen dissociation catalysts were evaluated, and hydrogen separation unit scale-up issues were addressed.

  19. Membrane transport systems and the biodegradation potential and pathogenicity of genus Rhodococcus

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.; Costa, Sofia S.; Fernandes, Pedro; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodococcus genus contains species with remarkable ability to tolerate toxic compounds and to degrade a myriad of substrates. These substrates have to cross a distinctive cell envelope dominated by mycolic acids anchored in a scaffold of arabinogalactan covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan, and a cellular membrane with phospholipids, whose composition in fatty acids can be rapidly altered in response to environmental conditions. The hydrophobic nature of the cell envelope facilitates the entrance of hydrophobic molecules but some substrates require active transport systems. Additionally, toxic compounds may also be extruded by energy spending efflux systems. In this review, physiological evidences of the use of transport systems by Rhodococcus strains and genomic studies that corroborate their existence are presented and discussed. The recently released complete genomes of several Rhodococcus strains will be the basis for an in silico correlation analysis between the efflux pumps present in the genome and their role on active transport of substrates. These transport systems will be placed on an integrative perspective of the impact of this important genus on biotechnology and health, ranging from bioremediation to antibiotic and biocide resistance. PMID:24772091

  20. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava. PMID:26547558

  1. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  2. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-12-31

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA{sup {minus}} + nH{sup +}), driven by both the pH gradient and membrane voltage. Such a symport should be highly accumulative, however, with a lipophilic weak acid such as IAA, net diffusive efflux of IAAH whenever IAAHI{sub i} > IAAH{sub o} would constitute a leak. (3) A third model sees a pH change driven IAA uptake and saturable symport enhanced by internal binding sites. Following pH gradient-driven accumulation of IAA, the anion may bind to an intravesicular site, permitting further uptake of IAA. NPA, by blocking anion efflux, enhances this binding. We have reported that membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues are a good system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin.

  3. Nonequilibrium fluctuations, traveling waves, and instabilities in active membranes.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Toner, J; Prost, J

    2000-04-10

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g., proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case involves a spontaneous, pump-driven undulation of the membrane, with clumping of the proteins in regions of high activity. PMID:11019123

  4. Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes for high flux gas transport.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangil; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Haibin; Sholl, David S; Marand, Eva

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple, fast, and practical route to vertically align carbon nanotubes on a porous support using a combination of self-assembly and filtration methods. The advantage of this approach is that it can be easily scaled up to large surface areas, allowing the fabrication of membranes for practical gas separation applications. The gas transport properties of thus constructed nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes are analogous to those of carbon nanotube membranes grown by chemical vapor deposition. This paper shows the first data for transport of gas mixtures through carbon nanotube membranes. The permeation of gas mixtures through the membranes exhibits different properties than those observed using single-gas experiments, confirming that non-Knudsen transport occurs. PMID:17685662

  5. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  6. Construction of a multilayer planar membrane applicable to ion-transport measurement.

    PubMed

    Setaka, M; Yano, M; Kwan, T; Shimizu, H

    1979-08-01

    Multilayer planar membranes applicable to ion-transport measurements were constructed from egg yolk lecithin, egg yolk lecithin-cholesterol mixture, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine between two tightly stretched cellulose sheets. While most of the phospholipids in the membranes were found by a spin label technique to be uniformly oriented with their long hydrocarbon chains perpendicular to the surfaces of the cellulose sheets, a small fraction of phospholipids were isotropically oriented in multilayer membranes. The amount of phospholipids with isotropic orientations decreased with increasing content of cholesterol in membranes and became zero in membranes of egg yolk lecithin-cholesterol mixture (molar ratio of 1: 0.67). The degree of orientation, S, of uniformly oriented phospholipids in membranes was also increased by adding cholesterol to the membranes. The orientation of phospholipids in membranes was rather stable in distilled water and in aqueous calcium chloride (1, 10, 100 mM), while a marked disordering of oriented phospholipids was induced in a aqueous solutions containing thymol, isopropanol, or butanol beyond certain specific concentrations. The membranes can be used for measurements of calcium permeation. An appreciable barrier function to calcium permeation was detected with these multilayer planar membranes as compared with control experiments using only cellulose sheets as membranes. A preliminary investigation suggested that changes in the orientational structure of phospholipids in the multilayer planar membranes are correlated with permeability properties of the membranes. PMID:225307

  7. Gβ1γ2 activates phospholipase A2-dependent Golgi membrane tubule formation

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Marie E.; Brown, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins transduce the ligand binding of transmembrane G protein coupled receptors into a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, heterotrimeric Gβγ subunit signaling at the Golgi complex has been shown to regulate the formation of vesicular transport carriers that deliver cargo from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. In addition to vesicles, membrane tubules have also been shown to mediate export from the Golgi complex, which requires the activity of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme activity. Through the use of an in vitro reconstitution assay with isolated Golgi complexes, we provide evidence that Gβ1γ2 signaling also stimulates Golgi membrane tubule formation. In addition, we show that an inhibitor of Gβγ activation of PLA2 enzymes inhibits in vitro Golgi membrane tubule formation. Additionally, purified Gβγ protein stimulates membrane tubules in the presence of low (sub-threshold) cytosol concentrations. Importantly, this Gβγ stimulation of Golgi membrane tubule formation was inhibited by treatment with the PLA2 antagonist ONO-RS-082. These studies indicate that Gβ1γ2 signaling activates PLA2 enzymes required for Golgi membrane tubule formation, thus establishing a new layer of regulation for this process. PMID:25019068

  8. Nonlinear Dielectric Spectroscopy as an Indirect Probe of Metabolic Activity in Thylakoid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Palanisami, Akilan; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Widger, William R.; Miller, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NDS) is a non-invasive probe of cellular metabolic activity with potential application in the development of whole-cell biosensors. However, the mechanism of NDS interaction with metabolic membrane proteins is poorly understood, partly due to the inherent complexity of single cell organisms. Here we use the light-activated electron transport chain of spinach thylakoid membrane as a model system to study how NDS interacts with metabolic activity. We find protein modification, as opposed to membrane pump activity, to be the dominant source of NDS signal change in this system. Potential mechanisms for such protein modifications include reactive oxygen species generation and light-activated phosphorylation. PMID:25586698

  9. Energy- and temperature-dependent transport of integral proteins to the inner nuclear membrane via the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Tomoyuki; Schirmer, Eric C.; Nishimoto, Takeharu; Gerace, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Resident integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) are synthesized as membrane-integrated proteins on the peripheral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported to the INM throughout interphase using an unknown trafficking mechanism. To study this transport, we developed a live cell assay that measures the movement of transmembrane reporters from the ER to the INM by rapamycin-mediated trapping at the nuclear lamina. Reporter constructs with small (<30 kD) cytosolic and lumenal domains rapidly accumulated at the INM. However, increasing the size of either domain by 47 kD strongly inhibited movement. Reduced temperature and ATP depletion also inhibited movement, which is characteristic of membrane fusion mechanisms, but pharmacological inhibition of vesicular trafficking had no effect. Because reporter accumulation at the INM was inhibited by antibodies to the nuclear pore membrane protein gp210, our results support a model wherein transport of integral proteins to the INM involves lateral diffusion in the lipid bilayer around the nuclear pore membrane, coupled with active restructuring of the nuclear pore complex. PMID:15611332

  10. ABC transporters in CSCs membranes as a novel target for treating tumor relapse

    PubMed Central

    Zinzi, Laura; Contino, Marialessandra; Cantore, Mariangela; Capparelli, Elena; Leopoldo, Marcello; Colabufo, Nicola A.

    2014-01-01

    CSCs are responsible for the high rate of recurrence and chemoresistance of different types of cancer. The current antineoplastic agents able to inhibit bulk replicating cancer cells and radiation treatment are not efficacious toward CSCs since this subpopulation has several intrinsic mechanisms of resistance. Among these mechanisms, the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters family and the activation of different signaling pathways (such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hedgehog, Notch, Akt/PKB) are reported. Therefore, considering ABC transporters expression on CSCs membranes, compounds able to modulate MDR could induce cytotoxicity in these cells disclosing an exciting and alternative strategy for targeting CSCs in tumor therapy. The next challenge in the cure of cancer relapse may be a multimodal strategy, an approach where specific CSCs targeting drugs exert simultaneously the ability to circumvent tumor drug resistance (ABC transporters modulation) and cytotoxic activity toward CSCs and the corresponding differentiated tumor cells. The efficacy of suggested multimodal strategy could be probed by using several scaffolds active toward MDR pumps on CSCs isolated by tumor specimens. PMID:25071581

  11. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  12. Ist2 in the Yeast Cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum Promotes Trafficking of the Amino Acid Transporter Bap2 to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Wendelin; Meese, Klaus; Seedorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The equipment of the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with specific nutrient transporters is highly regulated by transcription, translation and protein trafficking allowing growth in changing environments. The activity of these transporters depends on a H+ gradient across the plasma membrane generated by the H+-ATPase Pma1. We found that the polytopic membrane protein Ist2 in the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for efficient leucine uptake during the transition from fermentation to respiration. Experiments employing tandem fluorescence timer protein tag showed that Ist2 was necessary for efficient trafficking of newly synthesized leucine transporter Bap2 from the ER to the plasma membrane. This finding explains the growth defect of ist2Δ mutants during nutritional challenges and illustrates the important role of physical coupling between cortical ER and plasma membrane. PMID:24416406

  13. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  14. Apical and basal membrane ion transport mechanisms in bovine retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D P; Miller, S S

    1991-04-01

    1. Intracellular voltage recordings using conventional and double-barrelled chloride-selective microelectrodes have been used to identify several transport mechanisms at the apical and basolateral membranes of the isolated bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid preparation. Intracellular recordings were obtained from two cell populations, melanotic (pigmented) and amelanotic (non-pigmented). The electrical properties of these two populations are practically identical. For melanotic cells the average apical resting membrane potential (VA) is -61 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 49 cells, thirty-three eyes). For these cells the ratio of apical to basolateral membrane resistance (a) was 0.22 +/- 0.02. The mean transepithelial voltage and resistance were 6 +/- 1 mV and 138 +/- 7 omega cm2, respectively. 2. The apical membrane, which faces the distal retina, contains a Ba(2+)-inhibitable K+ conductance and a ouabain-inhibitable, electrogenic Na(+)-K+ pump. In addition it contains a bumetanide-sensitive mechanism, the putative Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporter. The basolateral membrane contains a DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid)-inhibitable chloride channel. The relative conductances of the apical and basolateral membranes to K+ and Cl- are TK approximately 0.9 and TCl approximately 0.7, respectively. 3. The ouabain-induced fast phase of apical membrane depolarization (0-30 s) was used to calculate the equivalent resistances of the apical (RA) and basolateral (RB) cell membranes, as well as the paracellular or shunt resistance (RS). They are: 3190 +/- 400, 17920 +/- 2730 and 2550 +/- 200 omega (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9 tissues), respectively. From these data the equivalent electromotive forces (EMF) at the apical (EA) and basolateral (EB) membranes were also calculated. They are: -69 +/- 5.0 and -24 +/- 5.0 mV, respectively. 4. Intracellular Cl- activity (aiCl) was measured using double-barreled ion-selective microelectrodes. In the steady state

  15. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter by HIV Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haichuan; Hu, Tao; Foti, Robert S; Pan, Yongmei; Swaan, Peter W; Wang, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a major uptake-2 monoamine transporter that shares extensive substrate and inhibitor overlap with organic cation transporters 1-3 (OCT1-3). Currently, there are no PMAT-specific inhibitors available that can be used in in vitro and in vivo studies to differentiate between PMAT and OCT activities. In this study, we showed that IDT307 (4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide), a fluorescent analog of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), is a transportable substrate for PMAT and that IDT307-based fluorescence assay can be used to rapidly identify and characterize PMAT inhibitors. Using the fluorescent substrate-based assays, we analyzed the interactions of eight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) with human PMAT and OCT1-3 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with individual transporters. Our data revealed that PMAT and OCTs exhibit distinct sensitivity and inhibition patterns toward HIV PIs. PMAT is most sensitive to PI inhibition whereas OCT2 and OCT3 are resistant. OCT1 showed an intermediate sensitivity and a distinct inhibition profile from PMAT. Importantly, lopinavir is a potent PMAT inhibitor and exhibited >120 fold selectivity toward PMAT (IC₅₀ = 1.4 ± 0.2 µM) over OCT1 (IC₅₀ = 174 ± 40 µM). Lopinavir has no inhibitory effect on OCT2 or OCT3 at maximal tested concentrations. Lopinavir also exhibited no or much weaker interactions with uptake-1 monoamine transporters. Together, our results reveal that PMAT and OCTs have distinct specificity exemplified by their differential interaction with HIV PIs. Further, we demonstrate that lopinavir can be used as a selective PMAT inhibitor to differentiate PMAT-mediated monoamine and organic cation transport from those mediated by OCT1-3. PMID:26285765

  16. Effect of plasma membrane fluidity on serotonin transport by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Block, E.R.; Edwards, D. )

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of plasma membrane fluidity of lung endothelial cells on serotonin transport, porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were incubated for 3 h with either 0.1 mM cholesterol hemisuccinate, 0.1 mM cis-vaccenic acid, or vehicle (control), after which plasma membrane fluidity and serotinin transport were measured. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure fluidity in the plasma membrane. Serotonin uptake was calculated from the disappearance of ({sup 14}C)-serotonin from the culture medium. Cholesterol decreased fluidity in the subpolar head group and central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and decreased serotonin transport, whereas cis-vaccenic acid increased fluidity in the central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and also increased serotonin transport. Cis-vaccenic acid had no effect of fluidity in the subpolar head group region of the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that the physical state of the central and midacyl chains within the pulmonary artery endothelial cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer modulates transmembrane transport of serotonin by these cells.

  17. Na+/H+ Exchange Activity in the Plasma Membrane of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Schumaker, Karen S.

    2003-01-01

    In plants, Na+/H+ exchangers in the plasma membrane are critical for growth in high levels of salt, removing toxic Na+ from the cytoplasm by transport out of the cell. The molecular identity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger in Arabidopsis (SOS1) has recently been determined. In this study, immunological analysis provided evidence that SOS1 localizes to the plasma membrane of leaves and roots. To characterize the transport activity of this protein, purified plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from leaves of Arabidopsis. Na+/H+ exchange activity, monitored as the ability of Na to dissipate an established pH gradient, was absent in plants grown without salt. However, exchange activity was induced when plants were grown in 250 mm NaCl and increased with prolonged salt exposure up to 8 d. H+-coupled exchange was specific for Na, because chloride salts of other monovalent cations did not dissipate the pH gradient. Na+/H+ exchange activity was dependent on Na (substrate) concentration, and kinetic analysis indicated that the affinity (apparent Km) of the transporter for Na+ is 22.8 mm. Data from two experimental approaches supports electroneutral exchange (one Na+ exchanged for one proton): (a) no change in membrane potential was measured during the exchange reaction, and (b) Na+/H+ exchange was unaffected by the presence or absence of a membrane potential. Results from this research provide a framework for future studies into the regulation of the plant plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and its relative contribution to the maintenance of cellular Na+ homeostasis during plant growth in salt. PMID:12805632

  18. Active Trans-Plasma Membrane Water Cycling in Yeast Is Revealed by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane water transport is a crucial cellular phenomenon. Net water movement in response to an osmotic gradient changes cell volume. Steady-state exchange of water molecules, with no net flux or volume change, occurs by passive diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer and passage through membrane proteins. The hypothesis is tested that plasma membrane water exchange also correlates with ATP-driven membrane transport activity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Longitudinal 1H2O NMR relaxation time constant (T1) values were measured in yeast suspensions containing extracellular relaxation reagent. Two-site-exchange analysis quantified the reversible exchange kinetics as the mean intracellular water lifetime (τi), where τi−1 is the pseudo-first-order rate constant for water efflux. To modulate cellular ATP, yeast suspensions were bubbled with 95%O2/5%CO2 (O2) or 95%N2/5%CO2 (N2). ATP was high during O2, and τi−1 was 3.1 s−1 at 25°C. After changing to N2, ATP decreased and τi−1 was 1.8 s−1. The principal active yeast ion transport protein is the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Studies using the H+-ATPase inhibitor ebselen or a yeast genetic strain with reduced H+-ATPase found reduced τi−1, notwithstanding high ATP. Steady-state water exchange correlates with H+-ATPase activity. At volume steady state, water is cycling across the plasma membrane in response to metabolic transport activity. PMID:22261073

  19. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-04-30

    During this quarter long term and high pressure hydrogen separation experiments were performed on Eltron's composite layered membranes. Membranes were tested at 400 C and a 300 psig feed stream with 40% hydrogen for up to 400 continuous hours. In addition membranes were tested up to 1000 psig as demonstration of the ability for this technology to meet DOE goals. Progress was made in the development of new hydrogen separation cermets containing high permeability metals. A sulfur tolerant catalyst deposition technique was optimized and engineering work on mechanical and process & control reports was continued.

  20. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2004-10-21

    During this quarter, work was focused on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes in a one hundred percent permeate environment. Permeation data was also collected on cermets as a function of thickness. A thin film deposition procedure was used to deposit dense thin BCY/Ni onto a tubular porous support. Thin film tubes were then tested for permeation at ambient pressure. Process flow diagrams were prepared for inclusion of hydrogen separation membranes into IGCC power plants under varying conditions. Finally, membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation experiments were performed.

  1. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Jim Fisher; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-01-28

    During this quarter work was continued on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes under a variety of conditions. Membrane permeation was tested up to 100 hours at constant pressure, temperature, and flow rates. In addition, design parameters were completed for a scale-up hydrogen separation demonstration unit. Evaluation of microstructure and effect of hydrogen exposure on BCY/Ni cermet mechanical properties was initiated. The fabrication of new cermets containing high permeability metals is reported and progress in the preparation of sulfur resistant catalysts is discussed. Finally, a report entitled ''Criteria for Incorporating Eltron's Hydrogen Separation Membranes into Vision 21 IGCC Systems and FutureGen Plants'' was completed.

  2. Transport of pure components in pervaporation through a microporous silica membrane.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ben; Dekeyzer, Sofie; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2005-03-24

    The pervaporation mechanism of pure components through a commercial microporous silica membrane was studied by performing experiments using water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and n-propanol in the 40-80 degrees C temperature range. Experimental fluxes were correlated to feed temperature and viscosity. It was found that the permeation mechanism obeys the adsorption-diffusion description, covering both the microscopic models based on configurational (micropore) diffusion and on activated surface diffusion. The contribution of convection was negligible. Size parameters for the permeating molecules such as molecular weight, kinetic diameter, and effective diameter, which are expected to have an influence on diffusion, did not correlate with the flux, thus strongly emphasizing the importance of sorption as the rate-determining step for transport in the pervaporation process. This was confirmed by correlating parameters reflecting polarity with flux: an exponential relation between the Hansen polarity (especially the hydrogen bonding component) and the flux was observed. A similar correlation was found between the dielectric constant and the flux. Furthermore, the flux increases in the same direction as the hydrophilicity of the pure components (log P). The effects of membrane surface tension and contact angles are less outspoken, but experiments performed on glass supported and silica supported membrane top layers suggest an important influence of the sublayers on the flux. PMID:16863187

  3. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  4. Decoupling Mechanical and Ion Transport Properties in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas D.

    Polymer electrolytes are mixtures of a polar polymer and salt, in which the polymer replaces small molecule solvents and provides a dielectric medium so that ions can dissociate and migrate under the influence of an external electric field. Beginning in the 1970s, research in polymer electrolytes has been primarily motivated by their promise to advance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, such as lithium ion batteries, flexible organic solar cells, and anhydrous fuel cells. In particular, polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) can improve both safety and energy density by eliminating small molecule, volatile solvents and enabling an all-solid-state design of electrochemical cells. The outstanding challenge in the field of polymer electrolytes is to maximize ionic conductivity while simultaneously addressing orthogonal mechanical properties, such as modulus, fracture toughness, or high temperature creep resistance. The crux of the challenge is that flexible, polar polymers best-suited for polymer electrolytes (e.g., poly(ethylene oxide)) offer little in the way of mechanical robustness. Similarly, polymers typically associated with superior mechanical performance (e.g., poly(methyl methacrylate)) slow ion transport due to their glassy polymer matrix. The design strategy is therefore to employ structured electrolytes that exhibit distinct conducting and mechanically robust phases on length scales of tens of nanometers. This thesis reports a remarkably simple, yet versatile synthetic strategy---termed polymerization-induced phase separation, or PIPS---to prepare PEMs exhibiting an unprecedented combination of both high conductivity and high modulus. This performance is enabled by co-continuous, isotropic networks of poly(ethylene oxide)/ionic liquid and highly crosslinked polystyrene. A suite of in situ, time-resolved experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism by which this network morphology forms, and it appears to be tied to the

  5. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  6. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm4+ > Spd3+ > Put2+. On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K+-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H+ pumps and Ca2+ pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca2+ influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment. PMID:24795739

  7. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangala; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-07-29

    During this quarter catalyst stability studies were performed on Eltron's composite layered membranes. In addition, permeation experiments were performed to determine the effect of crystallographic orientation on membrane performance. Sintering conditions were optimized for preparation of new cermets containing high permeability metals. Theoretical calculations were performed to determine potential sulfur tolerant catalysts. Finally, work was continued on mechanical and process & control documentation for a hydrogen separation unit.

  8. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-(14C)ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-(14C)ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(3H(G))glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels.

  9. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Last, Nicholas B; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes. Cell-penetrating peptides are natural or engineered short sequences that can spontaneously translocate across a membrane. Despite these differences in classification, many similarities in sequence, structure, and activity suggest that peptides from all three classes act through a small, common set of physical principles. Namely, these peptides alter the Brownian properties of phospholipid bilayers, enhancing the sampling of intrinsic fluctuations that include membrane defects. A complete energy landscape for such systems can be described by the innate membrane properties, differential partition, and the associated kinetics of peptides dividing between surface and defect regions of the bilayer. The goal of this review is to argue that the activities of these membrane-active families of peptides simply represent different facets of what is a shared energy landscape. PMID:23649542

  10. Studies of ion transport through a liquid membrane by using crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, A.G. , Trivandrum ); Noguchi, H.; Yoshio, Masaki )

    1991-01-01

    Studies on ion transport through a liquid membrane system composed of two extraction processes have been carried out. Kinetic models based on extraction processes with consideration of the controlled parameters were developed for mediated ion transport through liquid membranes, especially those using crown ethers as the ion carrier. A study of the concentration change in the receiving or source phase envisages the determination of the equilibrium constant by a kinetic method corresponding to the chemical reaction at the interface as well as the maximum initial flux through the membrane. The equilibrium constant values determined by the kinetic process were checked by the solvent extraction method.

  11. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  12. Active sodium transport and the electrophysiology of rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, S G; Frizzell, R A; Nellans, H N

    1977-05-12

    The electrophysiologic properties of rabbit colonic epithelial cells were investigated employing microelectrode techniques. Under open-circuit conditions, the transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) averaged 20 mV, serosa positive, and the intracellular electrical potential (psimc) averaged -32 mV, cell interior negative with respect to the mucosal solution; under short-circuit conditions, psimc averaged -46 mV. The addition of amiloride to the mucosal solution abolishes the transepithelial PD and active Na transport, and psimc is hyperpolarized to an average value of -53 mV. These results indicate that Na entry into the mucosal cell is a conductive process which, normally, depolarized psimc. The data obtained were interpreted using a double-membrane equivalent electrical circuit model of the "active Na transport pathway" involving two voltage-independent electromotive forces (emf's) and two voltage-independent resistances arrayed in series. Our observations are consistent with the notions that: (a) The emf's and resistances across the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes are determined predominantly by the emf (64 mV) and resistance of the Na entry process and the emf (53 mV) and resistance of the process responsible for active Na extrusion across the baso-lateral membranes: that is, the electrophysiological properties of the cell appear to be determined solely by the properties and processes responsible for transcellular active Na transport. The emf of the Na entry process is consistent with the notion that the Na activity in the intracellular transport pool is approximately one-tenth that in the mucosal solution or about 14 mM. (b) In the presence of amiloride, the transcellular conductance is essentially abolished and the total tissue conductance is the result of ionic diffusion through paracellular pathways. (c) The negative intracellular potential (with respect to the mucosal solution) is due primarily to the presence of a low resistance

  13. Polyamines cause plasma membrane depolarization, activate Ca2+-, and modulate H+-ATPase pump activity in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Velarde-Buendía, Ana María; Bose, Jayakumar; Fuglsang, Anja T; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-06-01

    Polyamines regulate a variety of cation and K(+) channels, but their potential effects on cation-transporting ATPases are underexplored. In this work, noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation and conventional microelectrode techniques were applied to study the effects of polyamines on Ca(2+) and H(+) transport and membrane potential in pea roots. Externally applied spermine or putrescine (1mM) equally activated eosin yellow (EY)-sensitive Ca(2+) pumping across the root epidermis and caused net H(+) influx or efflux. Proton influx induced by spermine was suppressed by EY, supporting the mechanism in which Ca(2+) pump imports 2 H(+) per each exported Ca(2+). Suppression of the Ca(2+) pump by EY diminished putrescine-induced net H(+) efflux instead of increasing it. Thus, activities of Ca(2+) and H(+) pumps were coupled, likely due to the H(+)-pump inhibition by intracellular Ca(2+). Additionally, spermine but not putrescine caused a direct inhibition of H(+) pumping in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Spermine, spermidine, and putrescine (1mM) induced membrane depolarization by 70, 50, and 35 mV, respectively. Spermine-induced depolarization was abolished by cation transport blocker Gd(3+), was insensitive to anion channels' blocker niflumate, and was dependent on external Ca(2+). Further analysis showed that uptake of polyamines but not polyamine-induced cationic (K(+)+Ca(2+)+H(+)) fluxes were a main cause of membrane depolarization. Polyamine increase is a common component of plant stress responses. Activation of Ca(2+) efflux by polyamines and contrasting effects of polyamines on net H(+) fluxes and membrane potential can contribute to Ca(2+) signalling and modulate a variety of transport processes across the plasma membrane under stress. PMID:24723394

  14. Unique battery with an active membrane separator having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels and a method making the same

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Ruscic, Katarina J.; Sears, Devin N.; Smith, Luis J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2012-02-21

    The invention relates to a unique battery having an active, porous membrane and method of making the same. More specifically the invention relates to a sealed battery system having a porous, metal oxide membrane with uniform, physicochemically functionalized ion channels capable of adjustable ionic interaction. The physicochemically-active porous membrane purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  15. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  16. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  17. Calixarene-Mediated Liquid Membrane Transport of Choline Conjugates 2: Transport of Drug-Choline Conjugates and Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Birendra Babu; Roshandel, Sahar; Fujii, Ayu

    2015-01-01

    Lower rim carboxylic acid calix[n]arenes and upper rim phosphonic acid functionalized calix[4]arenes effect selective transport of distinct molecular payloads through a liquid membrane. The secret to this success lies in the attachment of a receptor-complementary handle. We find that the trimethylammonium ethylene group present in choline is a general handle for the transport of drug and drug-like species. Furthermore, neurotransmitters possessing ionizable amine termini are also transported. Some limitations to this strategy have been uncovered as payloads become increasingly lipophilic. These developments reveal new approaches to synthetic receptor-mediated selective small molecule transport in vesicular and cellular systems. PMID:26161035

  18. Hydrogen transport through tubular membranes of palladium-coated tantalum and niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, R.E.; Kinney, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Palladium-based membranes have been used for decades in hydrogen extraction because of their high permeability and good surface properties and because palladium, like all metals, is 100% selective for hydrogen transport. The authors describe experiments with hydrogen-extraction membranes made of palladium-coated niobium and tantalum heat-exchanger tubers. The cost was about $45/ft of 3/8 inch tubular membrane, and the fluxes were as high as 0.001 47 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa{sup 1/2} at 420 C. The main transport resistance is in the refractory metal substrate. Durability tests showed a 15% reduction in flux for 31 days of continuous membrane operation. Assuming durability is maintained for at least 1 year, this price and flux should allow competitive application for hydrogen recovery in petrochemical plants and for membrane reactors.

  19. NEURONAL ACTIVITY REGULATES GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER DYNAMICS IN DEVELOPING ASTROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Benediktsson, A.M.; Marrs, G.S.; Tu, J.C.; Worley, P.F.; Rothstein, J.D.; Bergles, D.E.; Dailey, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain a low ambient level of glutamate in the CNS and shape the activation of glutamate receptors at synapses. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and localization of transporters near sites of glutamate release are poorly understood. Here we examined the subcellular distribution and dynamic remodeling of the predominant glutamate transporter GLT-1 (EAAT2) in developing hippocampal astrocytes. Immunolabeling revealed that endogenous GLT-1 is concentrated into discrete clusters along branches of developing astrocytes that were apposed preferentially to synapsin-1 positive synapses. GFP-GLT-1 fusion proteins expressed in astrocytes also formed distinct clusters that lined the edges of astrocyte processes, as well as the tips of filopodia and spine-like structures. Time-lapse 3D confocal imaging in tissue slices revealed that GFP-GLT-1 clusters were dynamically remodeled on a timescale of minutes. Some transporter clusters moved within developing astrocyte branches as filopodia extended and retracted, while others maintained stable positions at the tips of spine-like structures. Blockade of neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin reduced both the density and perisynaptic localization of GLT-1 clusters. Conversely, enhancement of neuronal activity increased the size of GLT-1 clusters and their proximity to synapses. Together, these findings indicate that neuronal activity influences both the organization of glutamate transporters in developing astrocyte membranes and their position relative to synapses. PMID:22052455

  20. Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with different types and granulation of magnetic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasowska, Monika; Strzelewicz, Anna; Rybak, Aleksandra; Dudek, Gabriela; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-06-01

    Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with dispersed magnetic powder were investigated. The study mainly focused on diffusion, which is one of the transport mechanisms. The transport properties depend on many parameters like: polymeric matrix used, type of powder, its amount and granulation. The structure of the pattern formed by magnetic particles in the membrane matrix was studied. Description of the system was based on the phenomenological and molecular (random walk on a fractal lattice) approaches. Two parameters were calculated: the fractal dimension of random walk dw, and the fractal dimension of membrane structure df. The knowledge of both parameters made it possible to use the generalized equation of diffusion on the fractal structure obtained by Metzler et al. The research was carried out to determine the influence of magnetic powder granulation on the transport properties. The results showed that the random walk within the membranes of the smallest magnetic powder granulation was of the most subdiffusive character. Detailed investigation and quantitative description of gas transport through the membranes enables designing the membranes to be used in air oxygen enrichment.

  1. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  2. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  3. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. PMID:25482845

  4. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  5. The role of Na/+/ in transport processes of bacterial membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Until recently it was generally held that transport in bacteria was linked exclusively to proton circulation, in contrast to most eucaryotic systems, which depended on Na(+) circulation. The present review is intended to trace recent developments which have led to the discarding of this idea. The discussion covers transport of Na(+) and other cations, effects of Na(+) and Na(+) gradients on metabolite transport, properties of Na(+)-dependent transport carriers, and evolutionary considerations of Na(+) transport. It is now apparent that the transport of Na(+) is an important part of energy metabolism in bacteria, and that Na(+) gradients as well as H(+) gradients are used in these systems for the conservation and transmission of energy. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the evolution of Na/K systems, and it is presently difficult to decide between them.

  6. Insulin-stimulated plasma membrane fusion of Glut4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles is regulated by phospholipase D1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M; Hou, June Chunqiu; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Frohman, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insulin signaling, and traffics with Glut4 to exocytic sites. Increasing PLD1 activity facilitates glucose uptake, whereas decreasing PLD1 activity is inhibitory. Diminished PA production does not substantially hinder trafficking of the vesicles or their docking at the plasma membrane, but it does impede fusion-mediated extracellular exposure of the transporter. The fusion block caused by RNA interference-mediated PLD1 deficiency is rescued by exogenous provision of a lipid that promotes fusion pore formation and expansion, suggesting that the step regulated by PA is late in the process of vesicle fusion. PMID:15772157

  7. Defining key roles for auxiliary proteins in an ABC transporter that maintains bacterial outer membrane lipid asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Shuhua; Ercan, Bilge; Torta, Federico; Fong, Zhen Yang; Wong, Hui Yi Alvina; Wenk, Markus R; Chng, Shu-Sin

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipid asymmetry is critical for the function of the outer membrane (OM) as a selective permeability barrier, but how it is established and maintained is poorly understood. Here, we characterize a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter in Escherichia coli that provides energy for maintaining OM lipid asymmetry via the transport of aberrantly localized phospholipids (PLs) from the OM to the inner membrane (IM). We establish that the transporter comprises canonical components, MlaF and MlaE, and auxiliary proteins, MlaD and MlaB, of previously unknown functions. We further demonstrate that MlaD forms extremely stable hexamers within the complex, functions in substrate binding with strong affinity for PLs, and modulates ATP hydrolytic activity. In addition, MlaB plays critical roles in both the assembly and activity of the transporter. Our work provides mechanistic insights into how the MlaFEDB complex participates in ensuring active retrograde PL transport to maintain OM lipid asymmetry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19042.001 PMID:27529189

  8. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Scott R. Morrison; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard Blair; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs

    2004-04-26

    During this quarter, work was focused on testing layered composite membranes under varying feed stream flow rates at high pressure. By optimizing conditions, H{sub 2} permeation rates in excess of 400 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -2} at 440 C were measured. Membrane stability was characterized by repeated thermal and pressure cycling. The effect of cermet grain size on permeation was determined. Finally, progress is summarized on thin film cermet fabrication, catalyst development, and H{sub 2} separation unit scale up.

  9. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  10. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Transport of endocannabinoids across the plasma membrane and within the cell.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    Endocannabinoids are readily accumulated from the extracellular space by cells. Although their uptake properties have the appearance of a process of facilitated diffusion, it is by no means clear as to whether there is a plasma membrane transporter dedicated to this task. Intracellular carrier proteins that shuttle the endocannabinoid anandamide from the plasma membrane to its intracellular targets such as the metabolic enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, have been identified. These include proteins with other primary functions, such as fatty-acid-binding proteins and heat shock protein 70, and possibly a fatty acid amide hydrolase-like anandamide transporter protein. Thus, anandamide uptake can be adequately described as a diffusion process across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular carrier-mediated transport to effector molecules, catabolic enzymes and sequestration sites, although it is recognized that different cells are likely to utilize different mechanisms of endocannabinoid transport depending upon the utility of the endocannabinoid for the cell in question. PMID:23441874

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Harold A. Wright; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangala; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-10-31

    During this quarter composite layered membrane size was scaled-up and tested for permeation performance. Sintering conditions were optimized for a new cermet containing a high permeability metal and seals were developed to allow permeability testing. Theoretical calculations were performed to determine potential sulfur tolerant hydrogen dissociation catalysts. Finally, work was finalized on mechanical and process & control documentation for a hydrogen separation unit.

  13. Membrane Protein Transport in Photoreceptors: The Function of PDEδ

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This lecture details the elucidation of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEδ), discovered 25 years ago by Joe Beavo at the University of Washington. PDEδ, once identified as a fourth PDE6 subunit, is now regarded as a promiscuous prenyl-binding protein and important chaperone of prenylated small G proteins of the Ras superfamily and prenylated proteins of phototransduction. Alfred Wittinghofer's group in Germany showed that PDEδ forms an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich fold that is closely related in structure to other lipid-binding proteins, for example, Uncoordinated 119 (UNC119) and RhoGDI. His group cocrystallized PDEδ with ARL (Arf-like) 2GTP, and later with farnesylated Rheb (ras homolog expressed in brain). PDEδ specifically accommodates farnesyl and geranylgeranyl moieties in the absence of bound protein. Germline deletion of the Pde6d gene encoding PDEδ impeded transport of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) and PDE6 to outer segments, causing slowly progressing, recessive retinitis pigmentosa. A rare PDE6D null allele in human patients, discovered by Tania Attié-Bitach in France, specifically impeded trafficking of farnesylated phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) 5-phosphatase (INPP5E) to cilia, causing severe syndromic ciliopathy (Joubert syndrome). Binding of cargo to PDEδ is controlled by Arf-like proteins, ARL2 and ARL3, charged with guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP). Arf-like proteins 2 and 3 are unprenylated small GTPases that serve as cargo displacement factors. The lifetime of ARL3GTP is controlled by its GTPase-activating protein, retinitis pigmentosa protein 2 (RP2), which accelerates GTPase activity up to 90,000-fold. RP2 null alleles in human patients are associated with severe X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Germline deletion of RP2 in mouse, however, causes only a mild form of XLRP. Absence of RP2 prolongs the activity of ARL3GTP that, in turn, impedes PDE6δ–cargo interactions and trafficking of prenylated protein to the outer

  14. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressurea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  15. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  16. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids. PMID:25568329

  17. Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Lee, Jeseung; Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

  18. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  19. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L.; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  20. Linear coupling of alignment with transport in a polymer electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Park, Jong Keun; Moore, Robert B.; Madsen, Louis A.

    2011-07-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) selectively transport ions and polar molecules in a robust yet formable solid support. Tailored PEMs allow for devices such as solid-state batteries,‘artificial muscle’ actuators and reverse-osmosis water purifiers. Understanding how PEM structure and morphology relate to mobile species transport presents a challenge for designing next-generation materials. Material length scales from subnanometre to 1 μm (refs , ) influence bulk properties such as ion conductivity and water transport. Here we employ multi-axis pulsed-field-gradient NMR (ref. ) to measure diffusion anisotropy, and 2H NMR spectroscopy and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to probe orientational order as a function of water content and of membrane stretching. Strikingly, transport anisotropy linearly depends on the degree of alignment, signifying that membrane stretching affects neither the nanometre-scale channel dimensions nor the defect structure,causing only domain reorientation. The observed reorientation of anisotropic domains without perturbation of the inherent nematic-like domain character parallels the behaviour of nematic elastomers, promises tailored membrane conduction and potentially allows understanding of tunable shape-memory effects in PEM materials. This quantitative understanding will drive PEM design efforts towardsoptimal membrane transport, thus enabling more efficient polymeric batteries, fuel cells, mechanical actuators and water purification.

  1. Fluorimetric Methods for Analysis of Permeability, Drug Transport Kinetics, and Inhibition of the ABCB1 Membrane Transporter.

    PubMed

    Armada, Ana; Martins, Célia; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1, ABCB1) is an energy-dependent efflux pump that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters, and has been associated with drug resistance in eukaryotic cells. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is related to an increased expression and function of the ABCB1 (P-gp) efflux pump that often causes chemotherapeutic failure in cancer. Modulators of this efflux pump, such as the calcium channel blocker verapamil (VP) and cyclosporine A (CypA), can reverse the MDR phenotype but in vivo studies have revealed disappointing results due to adverse side effects. Currently available methods are unable to visualize and assess in a real-time basis the effectiveness of ABCB1 inhibitors on the uptake and efflux of ABCB1 substrates. However, predicting and testing ABCB1 modulation activity using living cells during drug development are crucial. The use of ABCB1-transfected mouse T-lymphoma cell line to study the uptake/efflux of fluorescent probes like ethidium bromide (EB), rhodamine 123 (Rh-123), and carbocyanine dye DiOC2, in the presence and absence of potential inhibitors, is currently used in our laboratories to evaluate the ability of a drug to inhibit ABCB1-mediated drug accumulation and efflux. Here we describe and compare three in vitro methods, which evaluate the permeability, transport kinetics of fluorescent substrates, and inhibition of the ABCB1 efflux pump by drugs of chemical synthesis or extracted from natural sources, using model cancer cell lines overexpressing this transporter, namely (1) real-time fluorimetry that assesses the accumulation of ethidium bromide, (2) flow cytometry, and (3) fluorescent microscopy using rhodamine 123 and DiOC2. PMID:26910071

  2. Molecular biology of K+ transport across the plant cell membrane: what do we learn from comparison between plant species?

    PubMed

    Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Daly, Meriem; Khan, Imran; Fizames, Cécile; Sentenac, Hervé

    2014-05-15

    Cloning and characterizations of plant K(+) transport systems aside from Arabidopsis have been increasing over the past decade, favored by the availability of more and more plant genome sequences. Information now available enables the comparison of some of these systems between species. In this review, we focus on three families of plant K(+) transport systems that are active at the plasma membrane: the Shaker K(+) channel family, comprised of voltage-gated channels that dominate the plasma membrane conductance to K(+) in most environmental conditions, and two families of transporters, the HAK/KUP/KT K(+) transporter family, which includes some high-affinity transporters, and the HKT K(+) and/or Na(+) transporter family, in which K(+)-permeable members seem to be present in monocots only. The three families are briefly described, giving insights into the structure of their members and on functional properties and their roles in Arabidopsis or rice. The structure of the three families is then compared between plant species through phylogenic analyses. Within clusters of ortologues/paralogues, similarities and differences in terms of expression pattern, functional properties and, when known, regulatory interacting partners, are highlighted. The question of the physiological significance of highlighted differences is also addressed. PMID:24666983

  3. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  4. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K(+) transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K(+) required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporte...

  5. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K+ transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K+ required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporters (...

  6. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2002-04-30

    Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

  7. Membrane Transport Processes Analyzed by a Highly Parallel Nanopore Chip System at Single Protein Resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein transport on the single protein level still evades detailed analysis, if the substrate translocated is non-electrogenic. Considerable efforts have been made in this field, but techniques enabling automated high-throughput transport analysis in combination with solvent-free lipid bilayer techniques required for the analysis of membrane transporters are rare. This class of transporters however is crucial in cell homeostasis and therefore a key target in drug development and methodologies to gain new insights desperately needed. The here presented manuscript describes the establishment and handling of a novel biochip for the analysis of membrane protein mediated transport processes at single transporter resolution. The biochip is composed of microcavities enclosed by nanopores that is highly parallel in its design and can be produced in industrial grade and quantity. Protein-harboring liposomes can directly be applied to the chip surface forming self-assembled pore-spanning lipid bilayers using SSM-techniques (solid supported lipid membranes). Pore-spanning parts of the membrane are freestanding, providing the interface for substrate translocation into or out of the cavity space, which can be followed by multi-spectral fluorescent readout in real-time. The establishment of standard operating procedures (SOPs) allows the straightforward establishment of protein-harboring lipid bilayers on the chip surface of virtually every membrane protein that can be reconstituted functionally. The sole prerequisite is the establishment of a fluorescent read-out system for non-electrogenic transport substrates. High-content screening applications are accomplishable by the use of automated inverted fluorescent microscopes recording multiple chips in parallel. Large data sets can be analyzed using the freely available custom-designed analysis software. Three-color multi spectral fluorescent read-out furthermore allows for unbiased data discrimination into different

  8. ΔpH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Chang; Bush, Daniel R.

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid transport into plasma membrane vesicles isolated from mature sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv Great Western) leaves was investigated. The transport of alanine, leucine, glutamine, glutamate, isoleucine, and arginine was driven by a trans-membrane proton concentration difference. ΔpH-Dependent alanine, leucine, glutamine, and glutamate transport exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and double-reciprocal plots of the data were linear with apparent Km values of 272, 346, 258, and 1981 micromolar, respectively. These results are consistent with carrier mediated transport. ΔpH-Dependent isoleucine and arginine transport exhibited biphasic kinetics, suggesting these amino acids may be transported by at least two transport systems. Symport mediated alanine transport was electrogenic as demonstrated by the effect of membrane potential (ΔΨ) on ΔpH-dependent flux. In the absence of significant charge compensation, a low rate of alanine transport was observed. When ΔΨ was held at 0 millivolt with symmetric potassium concentrations and valinomycin, the rate of flux was stimulated fourfold. In the presence of a negative ΔΨ, alanine transport increased sixfold. These results are consistent with an electrogenic transport process which results in a net flux of positive charge into the vesicles. The effect of changing ΔΨ on the kinetics of alanine transport altered Vmax with no apparent change in Km. Amino acid transport was inhibited by the protein modifier diethyl pyrocarbonate, but was insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulfonic acid, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, phenylglyoxal, and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Four amino acid symport systems, two neutral, one acidic, and one basic, were resolved based on inter-amino acid competition experiments. One neutral system appears to be active for all neutral amino acids while the second exhibited a low affinity for isoleucine, threonine, valine, and proline

  9. Transport of 3-bromopyruvate across the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Soszyński, Mirosław; Ułaszewski, Stanisław; Ko, Young; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    3-Bromopyruvic acid (3-BP) is a promising anticancer compound because it is a strong inhibitor of glycolytic enzymes, especially glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The Warburg effect means that malignant cells are much more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. Potential complications of anticancer therapy with 3-BP are side effects due to its interaction with normal cells, especially erythrocytes. Transport into cells is critical for 3-BP to have intracellular effects. The aim of our study was the kinetic characterization of 3-BP transport into human erythrocytes. 3-BP uptake by erythrocytes was linear within the first 3 min and pH-dependent. The transport rate decreased with increasing pH in the range of 6.0-8.0. The Km and Vm values for 3-BP transport were 0.89 mM and 0.94 mmol/(l cells x min), respectively. The transport was inhibited competitively by pyruvate and significantly inhibited by DIDS, SITS, and 1-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Flavonoids also inhibited 3-BP transport: the most potent inhibition was found for luteolin and quercetin. PMID:24715475

  10. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  11. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  12. Bioinformatic Analyses of Integral Membrane Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genome of the Planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Paparoditis, Philipp; Vastermark, Ake; Le, Andrew J.; Fuerst, John A.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na+-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na+-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na+-NDH), a Na+ efflux decarboxylase, two Na+-exporting ABC pumps, two Na+-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na+:H+ antiporters and two K+:H+ antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H+-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in β-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica. PMID:23969110

  13. A Minireview: Usefulness of Transporter-Targeted Prodrugs in Enhancing Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2016-09-01

    Orally administered drugs are categorized into 4 classes depending on the solubility and permeability in a Biopharmaceutics Classification System. Prodrug derivatization is one of feasible approaches in modifying the physicochemical properties such as low solubility and low permeability without changing the in vivo pharmacological action of the parent drug. In this article, prodrug-targeted solute carrier (SLC) transporters were searched randomly by PubMed. Collected SLC transporters are amino acid transporter 1, bile acid transporter, carnitine transporter 2, glucose transporter 1, peptide transporter 1, vitamin C transporter 1, and multivitamin transporter. The usefulness of transporter-targeted prodrugs was evaluated in terms of membrane permeability, stability under acidic condition, and conversion to the parent drug. Among prodrugs collected, peptide transporter-targeted prodrugs exhibited the highest number, and some prodrugs such as valaciclovir and valganciclovir are clinically available. ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), reduces the intestinal absorption of lipophilic P-gp substrate drugs, and SLC transporter-targeted prodrugs of P-gp substrate drugs circumvented the P-gp-mediated efflux transport. Thus, SLC transporter-targeted prodrug derivatization seems to be feasible approach to increase the oral bioavailability by overcoming various unwanted physicochemical properties of orally administered drugs, although the effect of food on prodrug absorption should be taken into consideration. PMID:27321236

  14. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  15. Drug membrane transporters and CYP3A4 are affected by hypericin, hyperforin or aristoforin in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Šemeláková, M; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2016-07-01

    Our previous results have shown that the combination of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy (HY-PDT) at sub-optimal dose with hyperforin (HP) (compounds of Hypericum sp.), or its stable derivative aristoforin (AR) stimulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to antitumour activity. This enhanced oxidative stress evoked the need for an explanation for HY accumulation in colon cancer cells pretreated with HP or AR. Generally, the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics is limited by drug resistance related to the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in tumour cells. Therefore, the impact of non-activated hypericin (HY), HY-PDT, HP and AR on cell membrane transporter systems (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1-MRP1/ABCC1, Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-MRP2/ABCC2, Breast cancer resistance protein - BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein-P-gp/ABCC1) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) was evaluated. The different effects of the three compounds on their expression, protein level and activity was determined under specific PDT light (T0+, T6+) or dark conditions (T0- T6-). We found that HP or AR treatment affected the protein levels of MRP2 and P-gp, whereas HP decreased MRP2 and P-gp expression mostly in the T0+ and T6+ conditions, while AR decreased MRP2 in T0- and T6+. Moreover, HY-PDT treatment induced the expression of MRP1. Our data demonstrate that HP or AR treatment in light or dark PDT conditions had an inhibitory effect on the activity of individual membrane transport proteins and significantly decreased CYP3A4 activity in HT-29 cells. We found that HP or AR significantly affected intracellular accumulation of HY in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that HY, HP and AR might affect the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs, through interaction with membrane transporters and CYP3A4. PMID:27261575

  16. Transport Properties of Multivalent Cations in Nafion-117 Membrane with Mixed Ionic Composition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Agarwal, Chhavi; Goswami, A

    2015-08-20

    The transport characteristics of multivalent cations like Ba(2+) and Eu(3+) have been studied in bi-ionic form of the Nafion-117 membrane. The membranes have been prepared by loading different proportions of H(+)-Ba(2+)/Mg(2+)-Ba(2+)/Ba(2+)-Eu(3+)/H(+)-Eu(3+)/Na(+)-Eu(3+). The cationic compositions of the membranes have been determined from the measured ion exchange isotherms. Results show that the self-diffusion coefficient of Ba(2+) (D(Ba)) in H-Ba/Mg-Ba systems as well as the self-diffusion coefficient of Eu(3+) (D(Eu)) in H-Eu/Na-Eu systems are strongly dependent on the membrane ionic compositions and decreased continuously with increasing concentration of the highly hydrated ions (H(+)/Na(+)/Mg(2+)) in the membrane. Increase in the proportion of H(+)/Na(+)/Mg(2+) ions in the membrane increases the effective charge on the membrane matrix. This causes stronger electrostatic interaction of the less hydrated multivalent ions (Ba(2+)/Eu(3+)) with the membrane matrix charges, which ultimately results in their slower self-diffusion coefficients. The higher the valence, the stronger the electrostatic interaction is with the fixed ionic charges; hence, in general, D(Eu) is affected more as compared to D(Ba). On the basis of the free-volume theory for polymers, the effective interaction potential (Φ) of the Ba(2+) with the fixed ionic sites in the membrane has been calculated and found to be on the order of approximately millivolts. The higher the proportion of hydrated ion in the membrane, the higher the Φ is and the stronger the ion pair formation is with the fixed ionic sites in the membrane. However, in the Ba-Eu system, as the electrostatic interactions of the two ions with the membrane matrix are close, D(Ba) and D(Eu) are independent of the membrane ionic composition. The ionic composition dependence of D(Ba) in the H-Ba system is reflected in the transport rate of Ba(2+), showing the importance of such measurements in understanding the transport

  17. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  18. Chaotic electroconvection near ion-selective membranes: investigation of transport dynamics from a 3D DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzgalski, Clara; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the transport dynamics of an electrokinetic instability that occurs when ions are driven from bulk fluids to ion-selective membranes due to externally applied electric fields. This phenomenon is relevant to a wide range of electrochemical applications including electrodialysis for fresh water production. Using data from our 3D DNS, we show how electroconvective instability, arising from concentration polarization, results in a chaotic flow that significantly alters the net ion transport rate across the membrane surface. The 3D DNS results, which fully resolve the spatiotemporal scales including the electric double layers, enable visualization of instantaneous snapshots of current density directly on the membrane surface, as well as analysis of transport statistics such as concentration variance and fluctuating advective fluxes. Furthermore, we present a full spectral analysis revealing broadband spectra in both concentration and flow fields and deduce the key parameter controlling the range of contributing scales.

  19. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26619924

  20. Projection structure and molecular architecture of OxlT, a bacterial membrane transporter

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Jürgen A.W.; Sarker, Rafiquel; Hirai, Teruhisa; Shi, Dan; Milne, Jacqueline L.S.; Maloney, Peter C.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2001-01-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents the largest collection of evolutionarily related members within the class of membrane ‘carrier’ proteins. OxlT, a representative example of the MFS, is an oxalate-transporting membrane protein in Oxalobacter formigenes. From an electron crystallographic analysis of two-dimensional crystals of OxlT, we have determined the projection structure of this membrane transporter. The projection map at 6 Å resolution indicates the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in each monomer of OxlT, with one set of six helices related to the other set by an approximate internal two-fold axis. The projection map reveals the existence of a central cavity, which we propose to be part of the pathway of oxalate transport. By combining information from the projection map with related biochemical data, we present probable models for the architectural arrangement of transmembrane helices in this protein superfamily. PMID:11500368

  1. Experimental determination of the transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Newman, J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    The transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane over a wide range of water contents is determined experimentally using a concentration cell. The transport number of water, the ratio f[sup m][sub o]/Z[sub o], is about 1.4 for a membrane equilibrated with saturated water vapor at 25[degrees]C, decreases slowly as the membrane is dehydrated, and falls sharply toward zero as the concentration of water approaches zero. In this paper, the relationship between the transference number, the transport number, and the electro-osmotic drag coefficient is presented, and their relevance to water management is solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cells is discussed. Results are compared with other data available in the literature and with the theoretical maximum.

  2. Influence of hydrogen chemisorption kinetics on the interpretation of hydrogen transport through iron membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.; Taslami, A.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of a specific surface reaction on the transport of gas-phase hydrogen through iron membranes has been investigated on the basis of model calculations. The surface reaction involves an adsorbed molecular hydrogen precursor between the gas phase and the dissociated chemisorbed state. The calculations demonstrate that the surface reaction for the H2/Fe system makes significant contributions to the time delay associated with the transient hydrogen transport through iron membranes, even under conditions where the steady-state hydrogen transport is independent of the surface reaction. These contributions to the time delay are interpreted in terms of an effective diffusivity, which is a function of the pressure on the entrance side and the thickness of the membrane.

  3. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  4. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  5. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  6. Effect of counter- and co-ions on the structural transport parameters of sulfoacid cationite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, O. A.; Falina, I. V.; Kononenko, N. A.; Demin, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion permeability and specific electroconductivity of MK-40 sulfoacid cationite and Nafion 425 membranes are studied experimentally in NaOH, NaCl, and HCl solutions with various concentrations. The resulting concentration dependences of the electrodiffusion characteristics and data on the nonexchange sorption of the electrolytes are used to calculate the structural transport parameters of the membranes in terms of a two-phase conduction model. Analysis of a set of parameters, including the electroconductivity and diffusion permeability of the membrane gel phase, the volume fractions of the conductive phases, and a parameter that reflects their relative positions, the Donnan constant, and the diffusion coefficients of counter and co-ions in the membrane gel phase reveals the effect the nature of counter- and co-ions has on the electrodiffusion, structural, and sorption characteristics of sulfoacid cationite membranes with different types of structure.

  7. Electrochemical performance and transport properties of a Nafion membrane in a hydrogen-bromine cell environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of a hydrogen-bromine energy storage system is highly dependent upon the characteristics and performance of the ion-exchange membrane utilized as a half-cell separator. The electrochemical performance and transport properties of a duPont Nafion membrane in an aqueous HBr-Br2 environment were investigated. Membrane conductivity data are presented as a function of HBr concentration and temperature for the determination of ohmic voltage losses across the membrane in an operational cell. Diffusion-controlled bromine permeation rates and permeabilities are presented as functions of solution composition and temperature. Relationships between the degree of membrane hydration and the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. The solution chemistry of an operational hydrogen-bromine cell undergoing charge from 45% HBr to 5% HBr is discussed, and, based upon the experimentally observed bromine permeation behavior, predicted cell coulombic losses due to bromine diffusion through the membrane are presented as a function of the cell state-of-charge.

  8. Characteristics of glutamine transport in dog jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bulus, N M; Abumrad, N N; Ghishan, F K

    1989-07-01

    The present study characterizes glutamine transport across brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from dog jejunum. The purity of these vesicles was demonstrated by a 20-fold enrichment of leucine aminopeptidase, a marker for BBM. Glutamine uptake was found to occur into an osmotically active space with no membrane binding and to exhibit temperature and pH dependence (optimal uptake at pH 7-7.5). Glutamine uptake was driven by an inwardly directed Na+ gradient with a distinct overshoot not observed under K+ gradient. Lithium could not substitute for Na+ as a stimulator of glutamine uptake. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was not inhibited by methylaminoisobutyric acid, a typical substrate for system A, and was found to be electrogenic and saturable with a Km of 0.97 +/- 0.58 mM and a Vmax of 3.93 +/- 0.99 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. A Na+-glutamine coupling ratio of 1:1 could be demonstrated by a plot of Hill transformation. Na+-independent glutamine uptake was found to be electroneutral and saturable with a Km of 3.70 +/- 0.66 mM and a Vmax of 2.70 +/- 1.55 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. Inhibition studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-dependent as well as a Na+-independent carrier for glutamine uptake. We conclude that glutamine uptake across dog BBMV occurs via two transport systems: a Na+-dependent high-affinity system similar to the neutral brush-border system and a Na+-independent lower-affinity system similar to system L. PMID:2750912

  9. Modeling VOC Sorption and Transport in Glassy Polymeric Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Maria Grazia; Olivieri, Luca; Sarti, G. C.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we evaluated the sorption, diffusion and permeation of a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (acetone, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, ethanol, methanol, chloroform and toluene) into glassy polymers of increasing fractional free volume (FFV): Polycarbonate (PC), Amorphous Teflon AF1600 and AF2400, poly-trimethylsilyl norbornene (PTMSN) and poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP). Based on some experimental data of sorption and diffusion, and on theoretical and empirical models for the solubility and diffusion coefficients, the permeability for vapor/N2 mixtures was evaluated. These parameters are useful for the membrane separation processes and for other applications such as chemical sensors. The ideal separation factors of glassy polymeric membranes versus mixtures of VOCs and N2 were estimated at various pressures and compositions and at 25° C. The selectivity vs. permeability maps for the mixtures considered were plotted, showing that some of these materials show potentially the same selective ability of rubbery polymeric films. In particular it is shown that, the higher the FFV, the better the vapor/gas selectivity.

  10. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUELS PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Stewart Schesnack; Scott Morrison; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2003-07-31

    Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report presents hydrogen permeation data during long term tests and tests at high pressure in addition to progress with cermet, ceramic/ceramic, and thin film membranes.

  11. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub–10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub–10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems. PMID:26933689

  12. Active membranes studied by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Giahi, A; El Alaoui Faris, M; Bassereau, P; Salditt, T

    2007-08-01

    In view of recent theories of "active" membranes, we have studied multilamellar phospholipid membrane stacks with reconstituted transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) under different illumination conditions by X-ray scattering. The light-active protein is considered as an active constituent which drives the system out of equilibrium and is predicted to change the collective fluctuation properties of the membranes. Using X-ray reflectivity, X-ray non-specular (diffuse) scattering, and grazing incidence scattering, we find no detectable change in the scattering curves when changing the illumination condition. In particular the intermembrane spacing d remains constant, after eliminating hydration-related artifacts by design of a suitable sample environment. The absence of any observable non-equilibrium effects in the experimental window is discussed in view of the relevant parameters and recent theories. PMID:17712523

  13. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  14. Proline transport by brush-border membrane vesicles of lobster antennal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, R.D.; Wong, R.K.; Huse, S.M.; Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Purified brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of lobster antennal gland labyrinth and bladder were separately formed by a magnesium precipitation technique. L-(3H)proline uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane NaCl gradient (outside (o) greater than inside (i)) to a greater extent in BBMV from labyrinth than those from the bladder. Detailed study of the labyrinth proline-transport processes revealed a specific dependence on NaCl, with negligible stimulatory effects by NaSCN, Na-gluconate, or KCl. A transmembrane proton gradient (o greater than i) was without stimulatory effect on proline transport. A transmembrane potential difference alone, in the presence of equilibrated NaCl and L-(3H)proline, led to net influx of the labeled amino acid, suggesting that the uptake process was electrogenic and capable of bringing about the net transfer of positive charge to the vesicle interior. Although a transmembrane Na gradient alone, in the presence of equilibrated Cl and L-(3H)proline, was able to bring about the net influx of the amino acid, a transmembrane Cl gradient alone under Na- and L-(3H)proline-equilibrated conditions was not, suggesting that only the Na gradient could energize the carrier process through cotransport, while the anion served an essential activating role. Proline influx by these vesicles occurred by the combination of at least one saturable Michaelis-Menten carrier system (apparent Kt = 0.37 mM; apparent JM = 1.19 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1) and apparent diffusion (P = 0.33 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1). Static head analysis of the transport process suggested a cotransport stoichiometry of 2 Na:1 proline with essential activation by Cl ion.

  15. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  16. The Major Myelin-Resident Protein PLP Is Transported to Myelin Membranes via a Transcytotic Mechanism: Involvement of Sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Ozgen, Hande; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Nomden, Anita; Plat, Annechien; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Myelin membranes are sheet-like extensions of oligodendrocytes that can be considered membrane domains distinct from the cell's plasma membrane. Consistent with the polarized nature of oligodendrocytes, we demonstrate that transcytotic transport of the major myelin-resident protein proteolipid protein (PLP) is a key element in the mechanism of myelin assembly. Upon biosynthesis, PLP traffics to myelin membranes via syntaxin 3-mediated docking at the apical-surface-like cell body plasma membrane, which is followed by subsequent internalization and transport to the basolateral-surface-like myelin sheet. Pulse-chase experiments, in conjunction with surface biotinylation and organelle fractionation, reveal that following biosynthesis, PLP is transported to the cell body surface in Triton X-100 (TX-100)-resistant microdomains. At the plasma membrane, PLP transiently resides within these microdomains and its lateral dissipation is followed by segregation into 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS)-resistant domains, internalization, and subsequent transport toward the myelin membrane. Sulfatide triggers PLP's reallocation from TX-100- into CHAPS-resistant membrane domains, while inhibition of sulfatide biosynthesis inhibits transcytotic PLP transport. Taking these findings together, we propose a model in which PLP transport to the myelin membrane proceeds via a transcytotic mechanism mediated by sulfatide and characterized by a conformational alteration and dynamic, i.e., transient, partitioning of PLP into distinct membrane microdomains involved in biosynthetic and transcytotic transport. PMID:25368380

  17. Myosin 1b Regulates Amino Acid Transport by Associating Transporters with the Apical Plasma Membrane of Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Komaba, Shigeru; Coluccio, Lynne M.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATers) in the brush border of the apical plasma membrane (APM) of renal proximal tubule (PT) cells mediate amino acid transport (AAT). We found that the membrane-associated class I myosin myosin 1b (Myo1b) localized at the apical brush border membrane of PTs. In opossum kidney (OK) 3B/2 epithelial cells, which are derived from PTs, expressed rat Myo1b-GFP colocalized in patched microvilli with expressed mouse V5-tagged SIT1 (SIT1-V5), which mediates neutral amino acid transport in OK cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of opossum Myo1b-specific shRNA resulted in knockdown (kd) of Myo1b expression, less SIT1-V5 at the APM as determined by localization studies, and a decrease in neutral AAT as determined by radioactive uptake assays. Myo1b kd had no effect on Pi transport or noticeable change in microvilli structure as determined by rhodamine phalloidin staining. The studies are the first to define a physiological role for Myo1b, that of regulating renal AAT by modulating the association of AATers with the APM. PMID:26361046

  18. The Balance of Fluid and Osmotic Pressures across Active Biological Membranes with Application to the Corneal Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The movement of fluid and solutes across biological membranes facilitates the transport of nutrients for living organisms and maintains the fluid and osmotic pressures in biological systems. Understanding the pressure balances across membranes is crucial for studying fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in living systems, and is an area of active research. In this study, a set of enhanced Kedem-Katchalsky (KK) equations is proposed to describe fluxes of water and solutes across biological membranes, and is applied to analyze the relationship between fluid and osmotic pressures, accounting for active transport mechanisms that propel substances against their concentration gradients and for fixed charges that alter ionic distributions in separated environments. The equilibrium analysis demonstrates that the proposed theory recovers the Donnan osmotic pressure and can predict the correct fluid pressure difference across membranes, a result which cannot be achieved by existing KK theories due to the neglect of fixed charges. The steady-state analysis on active membranes suggests a new pressure mechanism which balances the fluid pressure together with the osmotic pressure. The source of this pressure arises from active ionic fluxes and from interactions between solvent and solutes in membrane transport. We apply the proposed theory to study the transendothelial fluid pressure in the in vivo cornea, which is a crucial factor maintaining the hydration and transparency of the tissue. The results show the importance of the proposed pressure mechanism in mediating stromal fluid pressure and provide a new interpretation of the pressure modulation mechanism in the in vivo cornea. PMID:26719894

  19. The Balance of Fluid and Osmotic Pressures across Active Biological Membranes with Application to the Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The movement of fluid and solutes across biological membranes facilitates the transport of nutrients for living organisms and maintains the fluid and osmotic pressures in biological systems. Understanding the pressure balances across membranes is crucial for studying fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in living systems, and is an area of active research. In this study, a set of enhanced Kedem-Katchalsky (KK) equations is proposed to describe fluxes of water and solutes across biological membranes, and is applied to analyze the relationship between fluid and osmotic pressures, accounting for active transport mechanisms that propel substances against their concentration gradients and for fixed charges that alter ionic distributions in separated environments. The equilibrium analysis demonstrates that the proposed theory recovers the Donnan osmotic pressure and can predict the correct fluid pressure difference across membranes, a result which cannot be achieved by existing KK theories due to the neglect of fixed charges. The steady-state analysis on active membranes suggests a new pressure mechanism which balances the fluid pressure together with the osmotic pressure. The source of this pressure arises from active ionic fluxes and from interactions between solvent and solutes in membrane transport. We apply the proposed theory to study the transendothelial fluid pressure in the in vivo cornea, which is a crucial factor maintaining the hydration and transparency of the tissue. The results show the importance of the proposed pressure mechanism in mediating stromal fluid pressure and provide a new interpretation of the pressure modulation mechanism in the in vivo cornea. PMID:26719894

  20. Tunable Surface Hydrophobicity and Fluid Transport through Nanoporous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph H. J.

    There are more than three billion people across the globe that struggle to obtain clean drinkable water. One of the most promising avenues for generating potable water is through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Both solutions require a semipermeable membrane that prohibits passage of unwanted solute particles but allows passage of the solvent. Atomically thin two-dimensional membranes based on porous graphene show great promise as semipermeable materials, but modeling fluid flow on length scales between the microscopic (nanometer and smaller) and macroscopic (micron and larger) regimes presents formidable challenges. This thesis explores both equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of this problem and develops new methodology for simulating systems away from thermal equilibrium. First, we hypothesize that there is a wetting penalty for water as it tries to breach a sheet of graphene that should be naturally hydrophobic. By using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the hydrophobicity depends sensitively on the degree of electrical doping, offering an opportunity to tune the hydrophobic effect of graphene using small amounts of doping. The wetting contact angle, a measure of hydrophobicity, changes dramatically with the voltage applied to single layer graphene. We find that the sensitivity of the hydrophobic effect to voltage depends not on hydrogen bonding motifs at the interface between graphene and water, but instead on a phenomenon known as electrowetting. The theory of electrowetting predicts that the difference in surface tensions that defines the contact angle is quartic in the voltage, rather than quadratic, as it would be in bilayer graphene or in a two-dimensional metal. To explore the nonequilibrium aspects of fluid passage through atomically thin membranes, we developed a molecular dynamics methodology for simulating fluid flow at constant flux based on Gauss's principle of least constraint. This method develops microscopic

  1. Transport of water and solutes in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David

    2009-03-01

    The polyamide active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes used for water purification are real-world examples of nanoscale functional materials: the active layer is only ˜100 nm thick. Because the active layer is formed by a process of interfacial polymerization, the structure and composition of the membrane is highly inhomogeneous and even such basic physical and chemical properties as the atomic density, swelling in water, the distribution of charged species between water and membrane, and the mobility of water and ions, are poorly understood. We are using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the composition, roughness, and thickness of the membrane; reveal the surprisingly high solubility of salt ions in the polymer active layer; analyze the acid-base chemistry of charged functional groups; and determine the degree of polymer cross-linking. Measurements of mass-uptake and adsorption-induced mechanical stress of membranes in humid air enable us to determine the water solubility, specific volume of water, and the mechanical strength of the membrane. Comparisons between these equilibrium data and the permeability of the membrane to water and salts show that the mobility of water molecules in the membrane approaches the mobility of bulk water, and that the rejection of salt ions is accomplished by low mobility, not low solubility. My collaborators in this work are Xijing Zhang, Orlando Coronell, and Prof. Benito Mariñas.

  2. Two-compartment behavior during transport of folate compounds in L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.H.; Dembo, M.; Sirotnak, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of (/sup 3/H) 1,L 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, (/sup 3/H) folic acid, and (/sup 3/H)methotrexate by L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles exhibited multicompartmental behavior. Two separate vesicular compartments (parallel relationship) of approximately equal volume were revealed during measurements of influx and efflux. Flux in one compartment was rapid, saturable, highly temperature-sensitive, and inhibited by pCMBS. Flux in the other compartment exhibited all of the characteristics of passive diffusion. These results imply that our plasma membrane vesicle preparations consist of a mixture of two functional species. Transport of folate into one of these species occurs by passive diffusion alone, whereas transport into the other kind of vesicle occurs by both passive diffusion and carrier-facilitated transport.

  3. Salt transport properties of model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Kathleen; Chan, Edwin; Stafford, Gery; Stafford, Christopher

    With the increasing shortage of clean water, efficient purification technologies including membrane separations are becoming critical. The main requirement of reverse osmosis in particular is to maximize water permeability while minimizing salt permeability. Such performance optimization has typically taken place through trial and error approaches. In this work, key salt transport metrics are instead measured in model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As shown previously, EIS can provide both the membrane resistance Rm and membrane capacitance Cm, with Rm directly related to salt permeability. The membranes are fabricated in a molecular layer by layer approach, which allows for control over such parameters as thickness, surface and bulk chemistry, and network geometry/connectivity. Rm, and therefore salt permeability, follows the expected trends with thickness and membrane area but shows unusual behavior when the network geometry is systematically varied. By connecting intrinsic material properties such as the salt permeability with macroscopic performance measures we can begin to establish design rules for improving membrane efficiency and facilitate the creation of next-generation separation membranes.

  4. Transport of chromium(VI) through a supported liquid membrane containing tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.C.; Huang, C.C.; Chen, D.H.

    1998-09-01

    In this study the transport of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions of pH 2--4 through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in kerosene as a mobile carrier was investigated. The transport flux of Cr(VI) increased with an increase in the concentrations of Cr(VI) in the feed phase and of TOPO in the membrane phase, but with a decrease in pH of the feed phase. Considering the equilibria of various Cr(VI) species in the aqueous phase and of the Cr(VI)-TOPO complexes formed in the membrane phase, a permeation model including the aqueous film diffusion of HCrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} toward the membrane, the interfacial chemical reaction between them and TOPO, and the membrane diffusion of the Cr(VI)-TOPO complexes ({ovr H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}{center_dot}(TOPO)} and {ovr H{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}(TOPO){sub 3}}) was proposed to describe the transport of Cr(VI) through the SLM. By best fitting the transport flux equations of Cr(VI) with the experimental data using the Rosenbrock method, the apparent mass-transfer coefficients of HCrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} across the aqueous film, and those of {ovr H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}{center_dot}(TOPO)} and {ovr H{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}(TOPO){sub 3}} across the membrane phase, were obtained. This work helps to clarify the transport mechanism of Cr(VI) through an SLM.

  5. Enhanced Wettability and Transport Control of Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membranes with Grafted Polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Kearney, Logan T; Wang, Ruocun; Howarter, John A

    2015-11-11

    End-functionalized poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-silane) was synthesized with reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and attached to both polysulfone ultrafiltration (UF) and polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes through a nonimpairing, one-step grafting to approach in order to improve membrane surface wettability with minimal impact on membrane transport performance. After PAA grafting, composition and morphology changes on the membrane surface were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Static contact angle on PAA grafted membranes exhibited an increase in surface hydrophilicity and hence a potential enhancement in antifouling performance. The native contact angle on the polysulfone membrane systems was 86° and was reduced to 24° after modification, while the polyamide film contact angle decreased from 58° to 25°. The PAA layer endowed the porous UF membrane with dynamic control over the permeability and selectivity through the manipulation of the solution pH. The UF membrane with a 35 nm average pore size displayed a 115% increase in flux when the contact solution was changed from pH 11 to pH 3. This effect was diminished to 70% and 32% as the average pore size decreased to 20 and 10 nm, respectively. Modified RO membranes displayed no reduction in membrane performance indicating that the underlying materials were unaffected by the modification environment or added polymer. Model polyamide and polysulfone surfaces were reacted with the PAA-silane inside a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to help inform the deposition behavior for the respective membrane chemistries. PMID:26484936

  6. Polymer Dynamics Effects on Solute Transport in Hairy Nanoparticle Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenning, Eileen; Bilchak, Connor; Durning, Christopher; Benicewicz, Brian; Sokolov, Alexei; Kumar, Sanat

    Molecular transport measurements in matrix-free grafted nanoparticle (MFGNP) films have shown remarkable enhancement of permeability and ideal selectivity of small condensable molecules and simple gases over the neat polymer melts and conventional, dispersed nanoparticle composites. Films comprised of covalently-attached poly(methyl acrylate) PMA chains to the surface of 14nm silica particles self-assemble into ordered arrays, and we postulate this structure plays an important role in regulating solute transport. This self-assembly creates interstitial spaces between the nanoparticle cores, which the polymer chains can only fill by stretching. Here we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), rheology and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) to probe polymer chain and segmental dynamics and investigate this hypothesis of chain stretching in MFGNP materials. We found that grafting slows both chain and segmental relaxation, and increases fragility, indicating that the chains are more ``frustrated'' in the grafted systems. We propose that the effects of the chain/surface interactions on chain dynamics leads to an increase in available free volume and thus enhances transport properties in MFGNP systems. Special thanks to the NSF GRFP and the DOE SCGSR programs.

  7. Transport properties of proton-exchange membranes: Effect of supercritical-fluid processing and chemical functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Ayazo

    NafionRTM membranes commonly used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), are tipically limited by high methanol permeability (also known as the cross-over limitation). These membranes have phase segregated sulfonated ionic domains in a perfluorinated backbone, which makes processing challenging and limited by phase equilibria considerations. This study used supercritical fluids (SCFs) as a processing alternative, since the gas-like mass transport properties of SCFs allow a better penetration into the membranes and the use of polar co-solvents influenced their morphology, fine-tuning the physical and transport properties in the membrane. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity were performed to the NafionRTM membranes processed with SCFs at 40ºC and 200 bar and the co-solvents as: acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropyl alcohol, HPLC-grade water, acetic acid, cyclohexanone. The results obtained for the permeability data were of the order of 10 -8-10-9 cm2/s, two orders of magnitude lower than unprocessed Nafion. Proton conductivity results obtained using AC impedance electrochemical spectroscopy was between 0.02 and 0.09 S/cm, very similar to the unprocessed Nafion. SCF processing with ethanol as co-solvent reduced the methanol permeability by two orders of magnitude, while the proton conductivity was only reduced by 4%. XRD analysis made to the treated samples exhibited a decreasing pattern in the crystallinity, which affects the transport properties of the membrane. Also, SAXS profiles of the Nafion membranes processed were obtained with the goal of determining changes produced by the SCF processing in the hydrophilic domains of the polymer. With the goal of searching for new alternatives in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) triblock copolymer of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) and poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) SEBS were studied. These sulfonated tri-block copolymers had lower methanol permeabilities, but also lower proton

  8. Identification of the glucose transporter in mammalian cell membranes using an /sup 125/(I)-forskolin photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoho, A.; Wadzinski, B.; Shanahan, M.

    1987-05-01

    The glucose transporter has been identified in a variety of mammlian cell membranes using a carrier-free photoactivatable radioiodinated derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-0-succinyldeacetyl-forskolin, (I-125)IAPS-Fsk, at 1-10 nM. The membranes which have been photolabeled with (I-125)IAPS-Fsk are: rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes, rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes, human placental membranes, and wild type S49 lymphoma cell membranes. The glucose transporter in rat cardiac sarcolemmal membranes and rat cortex and cerebellum synaptic membranes was determined to be 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Photolysis of human placental membranes and S49 lymphoma membranes with (I-125)IAPS-Fsk followed by SDS-PAGE indicated specific derivatization of a broad band (45-55 kDa) in placental membranes and a narrower band (45 kDa) in the S49 lymphoma membranes. Digestion of the (I-125)IPAS-Fsk labelled placental and S49 lymphoma membranes with endo-B-galactosidase showed a reduction in the apparent molecular weight of the radiolabelled band to 40 kDa. Trypsinization of labelled placental and lymphoma membranes produced an 18 kDa radiolabelled proteolytic fragment. (I-125)IAPS-Fsk is a highly effective probe for identifying low levels of glucose transporters in mammalian tissues.

  9. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  10. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state (2)H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of

  11. Identification of Membrane Protein Associated with Sucrose Transport I