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  1. Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed Decarboxylative C-H Activation: Versatile Routes to meta-Alkenylated Arenes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Y Phani; Bechtoldt, Alexander; Raghuvanshi, Keshav; Ackermann, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium(II) bis(carboxylate)s proved highly effective for two decarboxylative C-H alkenylation strategies. The decarboxylation proceeded efficiently at rather low temperatures. The unique versatility of the decarboxylative ruthenium(II) catalysis is reflected in the oxidative olefinations with alkenes as well as the redox-neutral hydroarylations of alkynes. PMID:26996920

  2. Effects of Lifestyle Interventions That Include a Physical Activity Component in Class II and III Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baillot, Aurélie; Romain, Ahmed J.; Boisvert-Vigneault, Katherine; Audet, Mélisa; Baillargeon, Jean Patrice; Dionne, Isabelle J.; Valiquette, Louis; Chakra, Claire Nour Abou; Avignon, Antoine; Langlois, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Background In class II and III obese individuals, lifestyle intervention is the first step to achieve weight loss and treat obesity-related comorbidities before considering bariatric surgery. A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were performed to assess the impact of lifestyle interventions incorporating a physical activity (PA) component on health outcomes of class II and III obese individuals. Methods An electronic search was conducted in 4 databases (Medline, Scopus, CINAHL and Sportdiscus). Two independent investigators selected original studies assessing the impact of lifestyle interventions with PA components on anthropometric parameters, cardiometabolic risk factors (fat mass, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism), behaviour modification (PA and nutritional changes), and quality of life in adults with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2. Estimates were pooled using a random-effect model (DerSimonian and Laird method). Heterogeneity between studies was assessed by the Cochran’s chi-square test and quantified through an estimation of the I². Results Of the 3,170 identified articles, 56 met our eligibility criteria, with a large majority of uncontrolled studies (80%). The meta-analysis based on uncontrolled studies showed significant heterogeneity among all included studies. The pooled mean difference in weight loss was 8.9 kg (95% CI, 10.2–7.7; p < 0.01) and 2.8 kg/m² in BMI loss (95% CI, 3.4–2.2; p < 0.01). Long-term interventions produced superior weight loss (11.3 kg) compared to short-term (7.2 kg) and intermediate-term (8.0 kg) interventions. A significant global effect of lifestyle intervention on fat mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides and fasting insulin was found (p<0.01), without significant effect on HDL-C and fasting blood glucose. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions incorporating a PA component can improve weight and various cardiometabolic risk factors in class II

  3. Southern Hemisphere SETI Survey - Five years of project META II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A.; Colomb, Fernando R.; Hurrell, E. E.; Olalde, Juan C.

    1997-01-01

    Project META II, a full-sky survey for artificial narrowband signals, has been conducted from one of the two 30-m radiotelescopes of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR). The search was performed near the 1420-MHz line of neutral hydrogen, using a 8.4 million channels Fourier spectrometer of 0.05-Hz resolution and 400-kHz instantaneous bandwidth. The observing frequency was corrected both for motions with respect to three astronomical inertial frames, and for the effect of the Earth's rotation, which provides a characteristic changing signature for narrowband signals of extraterrestrial origin. Among the 2 x 10 exp 13 spectral channels analyzed, 29 extra statistical narrowband events exceeding the average threshold of 1.7 x 10 exp -23 W/sq m were found. The strongest signals that survive culling for terrestrial interference lie in or near the galactic plane. A description of the project META II observing scheme and results is made, as well as a possible interpretation of the results using the Cordes Lazio-Sagan model based on interstellar scattering theory.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Changes in Brain Activity in Clinical Depression

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Susan M.; Crewther, Sheila G.; Carey, Leeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into neurobiological mechanisms of depression are increasingly being sought via brain imaging studies. Our aim was to quantitatively summarize overlap and divergence in regions of altered brain activation associated with depression under emotionally valenced compared to cognitively demanding task conditions, and with reference to intrinsic functional connectivity. We hypothesized differences reflective of task demands. A co-ordinate-based meta-analysis technique, activation likelihood estimation, was used to analyze relevant imaging literature. These studies compared brain activity in depressed adults relative to healthy controls during three conditions: (i) emotionally valenced (cognitively easy) tasks (n = 29); (ii) cognitively demanding tasks (n = 15); and (iii) resting conditions (n = 21). The meta-analyses identified five, eight, and seven significant clusters of altered brain activity under emotion, cognition, and resting conditions, respectively, in depressed individuals compared to healthy controls. Regions of overlap and divergence between pairs of the three separate meta-analyses were quantified. There were no significant regions of overlap between emotion and cognition meta-analyses, but several divergent clusters were found. Cognitively demanding conditions were associated with greater activation of right medial frontal and insula regions while bilateral amygdala was more significantly altered during emotion (cognitively undemanding) conditions; consistent with task demands. Overlap was present in left amygdala and right subcallosal cingulate between emotion and resting meta-analyses, with no significant divergence. Our meta-analyses highlight alteration of common brain regions, during cognitively undemanding emotional tasks and resting conditions but divergence of regions between emotional and cognitively demanding tasks. Regions altered reflect current biological and system-level models of depression and highlight the relationship

  5. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C–H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C–H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C–H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C–H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C–H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C–H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported. PMID:26813919

  6. Structure-activity relationships of aromatic diamines in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kalopissis, G

    1992-09-01

    Structure-activity relationships in the case of aromatic monoamines, diversely substituted on the ring, using the mutagenic activity in the Ames test were studied in part I. This part II is based on the same general principles but applied to phenylene diamines (ortho, para and meta) diversely substituted on the ring. PMID:1381475

  7. N-Acyl Amino Acid Ligands for Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed meta-C-H tert-Alkylation with Removable Auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Warratz, Svenja; Zell, Daniel; De Sarkar, Suman; Ishikawa, Eloisa Eriko; Ackermann, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    Acylated amino acid ligands enabled ruthenium(II)-catalyzed C-H functionalizations with excellent levels of meta-selectivity. The outstanding catalytic activity of the ruthenium(II) complexes derived from monoprotected amino acids (MPAA) set the stage for the first ruthenium-catalyzed meta-functionalizations with removable directing groups. Thereby, meta-alkylated anilines could be accessed, which are difficult to prepare by other means of direct aniline functionalizations. The robust nature of the versatile ruthenium(II)-MPAA was reflected by challenging remote C-H transformations with tertiary alkyl halides on aniline derivatives as well as on pyridyl-, pyrimidyl-, and pyrazolyl-substituted arenes. Detailed mechanistic studies provided strong support for an initial reversible C-H ruthenation, followed by a SET-type C-Hal activation through homolytic bond cleavage. Kinetic analyses confirmed this hypothesis through an unusual second-order dependence of the reaction rate on the ruthenium catalyst concentration. Overall, this report highlights the exceptional catalytic activity of ruthenium complexes derived from acylated amino acids, which should prove instrumental for C-H activation chemistry beyond remote functionalization. PMID:26418891

  8. Meta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Cooper, Pamela S.; Brown, Lori M.; Lusk, Sally L.

    2009-01-01

    Context Most adults do not achieve adequate physical activity. Despite the potential benefits of worksite health promotion, no previous comprehensive meta-analysis has summarized health and physical activity behavior outcomes from these programs. This comprehensive meta-analysis integrated the extant wide range of worksite physical activity intervention research. Evidence acquisition Extensive searching located published and unpublished intervention studies reported from 1969 through 2007. Results were coded from primary studies. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures, including moderator analyses, were completed in 2008. Evidence synthesis Effects on most variables were substantially heterogeneous because diverse studies were included. Standardized mean difference (d) effect sizes were synthesized across approximately 38,231 subjects. Significantly positive effects were observed for physical activity behavior (0.21), fitness (0.57), lipids (0.13), anthropometric measures (0.08), work attendance (0.19), and job stress (0.33). The significant effect size for diabetes risk (0.98) is more tentative given small sample sizes. Significant heterogeneity documents intervention effects varied across studies. The mean effect size for fitness corresponds to a difference between treatment minus control subjects' means on V02max of 3.5 mL/kg/min; for lipids, −0.2 on total cholesterol:HDL; and for diabetes risk, −12.6 mg/dL on fasting glucose. Conclusions These findings document that some workplace physical activity interventions can improve both health and important worksite outcomes. Effects were variable for most outcomes, reflecting the diversity of primary studies. Future primary research should compare interventions to confirm causal relationships and further explore heterogeneity. PMID:19765506

  9. A meta-analysis of active video games on health outcomes among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Chen, S; Pasco, D; Pope, Z

    2015-09-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes current literature concerning the effects of active video games (AVGs) on children/adolescents' health-related outcomes. A total of 512 published studies on AVGs were located, and 35 articles were included based on the following criteria: (i) data-based research articles published in English between 1985 and 2015; (ii) studied some types of AVGs and related outcomes among children/adolescents and (iii) had at least one comparison within each study. Data were extracted to conduct comparisons for outcome measures in three separate categories: AVGs and sedentary behaviours, AVGs and laboratory-based exercise, and AVGs and field-based physical activity. Effect size for each entry was calculated with the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software in 2015. Mean effect size (Hedge's g) and standard deviation were calculated for each comparison. Compared with sedentary behaviours, AVGs had a large effect on health outcomes. The effect sizes for physiological outcomes were marginal when comparing AVGs with laboratory-based exercises. The comparison between AVGs and field-based physical activity had null to moderate effect sizes. AVGs could yield equivalent health benefits to children/adolescents as laboratory-based exercise or field-based physical activity. Therefore, AVGs can be a good alternative for sedentary behaviour and addition to traditional physical activity and sports in children/adolescents. PMID:25943852

  10. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  11. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Li, Peng-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Yi, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are widely used drugs that are proven to reduce cardiovascular disease events; however, several recent meta-analyses yielded conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between ARB and cancer incidence, especially when ARB are combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI).We investigated the risk of cancer associated with ARB at different background ACEI levels.Search of PubMed and EMBASE (1966 to December 17, 2015) without language restriction.Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) had at least 12 months of follow-up data and reported cancer incidence was included.Study characteristics, quality, and risk of bias were assessed by 2 reviewers independently.Nineteen RCTs including 148,334 patients were included in this study. Random-effects model meta-analyses were used to estimate the risk ratio (RR) of cancer risk. No excessive cancer risk was observed in our analyses of ARB alone versus placebo alone without background ACEI use (risk ratio [RR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.18, P = 0.05); ARB alone versus ACEI alone (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.94-1.14, P = 0.50); ARB plus partial use of ACEI versus placebo plus partial use of ACEI (RR 0.97, 95%CI 0.90-1.04, P = 0.33); and ARB plus ACEI versus ACEI (RR 0.99, 95%CI 0.79-1.24, P = 0.95).Lack of long-term data, inadequate reporting of safety data, significant heterogeneity in underlying study populations, and treatment regimens.ARB have a neutral effect on cancer incidence in randomized trials. We observed no significant differences in cancer incidence when we compared ARB alone with placebo alone, ARB alone with ACEI alone, ARB plus partial use of ACEI with placebo plus partial use of ACEI, or ARB plus ACEI combination with ACEI. PMID:27149494

  12. Antimicrobial activity of meta-alkoxyphenylcarbamates containing substituted N-phenylpiperazine fragment

    PubMed Central

    Malík, Ivan; Bukovský, Marián; Andriamainty, Fils; Gališinová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, the basic esters of meta-alkoxyphenylcarbamic acid bearing variously substituted N-phenylpiperazine fragment were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, respectively. The most effective against Escherichia coli was found the compound 6d (MIC=195,3 μg/mL) bearing simultaneously para-fluoro substituent at the 4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl core and meta-methoxy side chain in the lipophilic part of the molecule. From whole analyzed set of the molecules the substance 8e with propoxy side chain forming meta-alkoxyphenylcarbamoyl fragment and lipophilic, sterically bulky meta-trifluoromethyl group attached at N-phenylpiperazine moiety was evaluated as the most active against Candida albicans (MIC=97,7 μg/mL). On the contrary, all investigated structures were practically inactive against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC>1000 μg/mL) PMID:24031913

  13. Health Activities Project (HAP), Trial Edition II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) trial edition (set II) are a teacher information folio and numerous student activity folios which center around the idea that students in grades 5-8 can control their own health and safety. Each student folio is organized into a Synopsis, Health Background, Materials, Setting Up, and Activities…

  14. Development and integration of high straightness flexure guiding mechanisms dedicated to the METAS watt balance Mark II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosandier, F.; Eichenberger, A.; Baumann, H.; Jeckelmann, B.; Bonny, M.; Chatagny, V.; Clavel, R.

    2014-04-01

    There is a firm will in the metrology community to redefine the kilogram in the International System of units by linking it to a fundamental physical constant. The watt balance is a promising way to link the mass unit to the Planck constant h. At the Federal Institute of Metrology METAS a second watt balance experiment is under development. A decisive part of the METAS Mark II watt balance is the mechanical linear guiding system. The present paper discusses the development and the metrological characteristics of two guiding systems that were conceived by the Laboratoire de Systèmes Robotiques of EPFL and built using flexure mechanical elements. Integration in the new setup is also described.

  15. Effect of layered composite meta-structures on the optical activity and ellipticity of structural biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, E. H.; Hor, Y. Li; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Liu, Y. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design layered composite meta-structures to investigate its' effect on the optical activity and circular dichroism (CD). The layered composite meta-structures consist of thin gammadion nanostructure with thickness λ/10, where λ is the incident wavelength. The layered meta-structures are alternate between a dielectric and gold (AU) material. Each layered composite meta-gammadion is arranged together in an array of pitch 700 nm. In the first case, 3 layers of meta-gammadion, with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) configuration are simulated with material properties from optical hand book. There are 3 modes in the CD spectrum, which can be characterized into Bloch CD mode and hybrid CD modes. Compared with the CD spectrum of whole structure of gammadion in gold with same total height, the CD of the MIM layered composite are larger. When the number layer increase to 5, it is observed that the CD is reduced by 30% and there is a red shift in the Bloch CD mode and a slight blue shift in the hybrid CD modes. By further increasing the number of layers to 7, we observed further CD increment and larger wavelength shift in the CD modes. The layered composite meta-gammadion is fabricated using template stripping method. Experimental results also show excellent agreement with the simulation results for CD and wavelength shift. We submerge the layered meta-gammadion into a solution of chiral molecules. The CD spectrum of the meta-gammadion shows a larger wavelength shift compared to pure metal structures. This indicate a more sensitive and robust detection of chiral molecules.

  16. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  17. Effectiveness of Physical Activity Interventions for Preschoolers: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Elliott S.; Tucker, Patricia; Burke, Shauna M.; Carron, Albert V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to examine the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on physical activity participation among preschoolers. A secondary purpose was to investigate the influence of several possible moderator variables (e.g., intervention length, location, leadership, type) on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  18. Physical Activity and School Engagement in Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Katherine B.; Parker, Philip D.; Van Zanden, Brooke; MacMillan, Freya; Astell-Burt, Thomas; Lonsdale, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits in youth; however, these benefits could extend further than health, into education. Our aim was to systematically review and combine in meta-analyses evidence concerning the association between physical activity and the dimensions of school engagement, including behavior (e.g.,…

  19. Meta-Analysis of Group Learning Activities: Empirically Based Teaching Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Teaching researchers commonly employ group-based collaborative learning approaches in Teaching of Psychology teaching activities. However, the authors know relatively little about the effectiveness of group-based activities in relation to known psychological processes associated with group dynamics. Therefore, the authors conducted a meta-analytic…

  20. Comparing Effects of Different Writing Activities on Reading Comprehension: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Michael; Simpson, Amy; Graham, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this review were to determine: (1) if different writing activities were more effective than others in improving students' reading comprehension, and (2) if obtained differences among writing activities was related to how reading comprehension was measured? Meta-analysis was used to examine these questions across studies involving…

  1. Behavioural Activation for Depression; An Update of Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness and Sub Group Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ekers, David; Webster, Lisa; Van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Richards, David; Gilbody, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. Method Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. Results Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD −0.74 CI −0.91 to −0.56, k = 25, N = 1088) and medication (SMD −0.42 CI −0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283). Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. Conclusions The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:24936656

  2. Altered resting-state functional activity in posttraumatic stress disorder: A quantitative meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Junran; Zhan, Wang; Li, Lei; Wu, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhu, Hongyan; Kemp, Graham J.; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Many functional neuroimaging studies have reported differential patterns of spontaneous brain activity in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the findings are inconsistent and have not so far been quantitatively reviewed. The present study set out to determine consistent, specific regional brain activity alterations in PTSD, using the Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping technique to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD that used either a non-trauma (NTC) or a trauma-exposed (TEC) comparison control group. Fifteen functional neuroimaging studies were included, comparing 286 PTSDs, 203 TECs and 155 NTCs. Compared with NTC, PTSD patients showed hyperactivity in the right anterior insula and bilateral cerebellum, and hypoactivity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); compared with TEC, PTSD showed hyperactivity in the ventral mPFC. The pooled meta-analysis showed hypoactivity in the posterior insula, superior temporal, and Heschl’s gyrus in PTSD. Additionally, subgroup meta-analysis (non-medicated subjects vs. NTC) identified abnormal activation in the prefrontal-limbic system. In meta-regression analyses, mean illness duration was positively associated with activity in the right cerebellum (PTSD vs. NTC), and illness severity was negatively associated with activity in the right lingual gyrus (PTSD vs. TEC). PMID:27251865

  3. Altered resting-state functional activity in posttraumatic stress disorder: A quantitative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Junran; Zhan, Wang; Li, Lei; Wu, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhu, Hongyan; Kemp, Graham J; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Many functional neuroimaging studies have reported differential patterns of spontaneous brain activity in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the findings are inconsistent and have not so far been quantitatively reviewed. The present study set out to determine consistent, specific regional brain activity alterations in PTSD, using the Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping technique to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD that used either a non-trauma (NTC) or a trauma-exposed (TEC) comparison control group. Fifteen functional neuroimaging studies were included, comparing 286 PTSDs, 203 TECs and 155 NTCs. Compared with NTC, PTSD patients showed hyperactivity in the right anterior insula and bilateral cerebellum, and hypoactivity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); compared with TEC, PTSD showed hyperactivity in the ventral mPFC. The pooled meta-analysis showed hypoactivity in the posterior insula, superior temporal, and Heschl's gyrus in PTSD. Additionally, subgroup meta-analysis (non-medicated subjects vs. NTC) identified abnormal activation in the prefrontal-limbic system. In meta-regression analyses, mean illness duration was positively associated with activity in the right cerebellum (PTSD vs. NTC), and illness severity was negatively associated with activity in the right lingual gyrus (PTSD vs. TEC). PMID:27251865

  4. Ligand-Enabled meta-C–H Activation Using a Transient Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Chen; Gong, Wei; Fang, Li-Zhen; Zhu, Ru-Yi; Li, Suhua; Engle, Keary M.; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Achieving site selectivity in C–H functionalization reactions is a significant challenge, especially when the target C–H bond is distant from existing functional groups.1–5 Coordination of a functional group to a metal catalyst is often a key driving force and control element in many important reactions including asymmetric hydrogenation,6 epoxidation7, 8, and lithiation9. Exploitation of this effect has led to the development of a broad range of directed C–H activation reactions.10–14 However, such C–H activation methods are limited to proximal C–H bonds, which are spatially and geometrically accessible from the directing functional group. Development of meta-selective C–H functionalizations remains a significant challenge.1–5,15–17 We recently developed a U- shaped template that can be used to overcome this constraint and have shown that it can be used to selectively activate remote meta-C–H bonds.1, 2 While this approach has proven applicable for a diverse set of substrates and catalytic transformations,3–5 the need for a covalently attached complex template is a significant drawback for synthetic applications. In this manuscript, we report an alternative approach, one that employs norbornene as a transient mediator to achieve meta-selective C–H activation with a simple and common ortho-directing group. The use of a newly developed pyridine-based ligand is crucial for relaying the palladium catalyst to the meta position by norbornene following initial ortho- C–H activation. Thus, this catalytic reaction demonstrates the feasibility of switching ortho-selectivity to meta-selectivity in C–H activation of the same substrate by catalyst control. PMID:25754328

  5. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  6. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  7. Phosphorylation-independent stimulation of DNA topoisomerase II alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Saijo, M; Tanaka, M; Enomoto, T

    1996-05-01

    It has been suggested that casein kinase II phosphorylates DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) in mouse FM3A cells, by comparison of phosphopeptide maps of topo II alpha labeled in intact cells and of topo II alpha phosphorylated by various kinases in vitro. The phosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by casein kinase II, which attached a maximum of two phosphate groups per topo II alpha molecule, had no effect on the activity of topo II alpha. Dephosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by potato acid phosphatase, which almost completely dephosphorylated the topo II alpha, did not reduce the activity of topo II alpha. The incubation itself, regardless of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation status, stimulated the enzyme activity in both reactions. Topo II alpha activity was stimulated by incubation in a medium containing low concentrations of glycerol but not in that containing high concentrations of glycerol, such as the 50% in which purified topo II alpha is stored. The stimulation of topo II alpha activity by incubation was dependent on the concentration of topo II alpha, requiring a relatively high concentration of topo II alpha. PMID:8631919

  8. A Meta-Analysis Summarizing the Effects of Pornography II: Aggression after Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Mike; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines by meta-analysis the effect that exposure to pornography produces on aggressive behavior under laboratory conditions considering a variety of possible moderating conditions. Demonstrates a homogeneous set of results showing that pictorial nudity reduces subsequent violent behavior, but that depictions of nonviolent sexual behavior and…

  9. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part II. Statistical Methods of Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies differs from the usual meta-analysis of therapeutic/interventional studies in that, it is required to simultaneously analyze a pair of two outcome measures such as sensitivity and specificity, instead of a single outcome. Since sensitivity and specificity are generally inversely correlated and could be affected by a threshold effect, more sophisticated statistical methods are required for the meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy. Hierarchical models including the bivariate model and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic model are increasingly being accepted as standard methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. We provide a conceptual review of statistical methods currently used and recommended for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. This article could serve as a methodological reference for those who perform systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. PMID:26576107

  10. Active heterodimers are formed from human DNA topoisomerase II alpha and II beta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Biersack, H; Jensen, S; Gromova, I; Nielsen, I S; Westergaard, O; Andersen, A H

    1996-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a nuclear enzyme essential for chromosome dynamics and DNA metabolism. In mammalian cells, two genetically and biochemically distinct topoisomerase II forms exist, which are designated topoisomerase II alpha and topoisomerase II beta. In our studies of human topoisomerase II, we have found that a substantial fraction of the enzyme exists as alpha/beta heterodimers in HeLa cells. The ability to form heterodimers was verified when human topoisomerases II alpha and II beta were coexpressed in yeast and investigated in a dimerization assay. Analysis of purified heterodimers shows that these enzymes maintain topoisomerase II specific catalytic activities. The natural existence of an active heterodimeric subclass of topoisomerase II merits attention whenever topoisomerases II alpha and II beta function, localization, and cell cycle regulation are investigated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8710863

  11. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  12. A novel meta-analytic approach: Mining frequent co-activation patterns in neuroimaging databases

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Julian; Zilles, Karl; Beierle, Christoph; Rottschy, Claudia; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, coordinate-based meta-analyses have become a powerful and widely used tool to study coactivity across neuroimaging experiments, a development that was supported by the emergence of large-scale neuroimaging databases like BrainMap. However, the evaluation of co-activation patterns is constrained by the fact that previous coordinate-based meta-analysis techniques like Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) and Multilevel Kernel Density Analysis (MKDA) reveal all brain regions that show convergent activity within a dataset without taking into account actual within-experiment co-occurrence patterns. To overcome this issue we here propose a novel meta-analytic approach named PaMiNI that utilizes a combination of two well-established data-mining techniques, Gaussian mixture modeling and the Apriori algorithm. By this, PaMiNI enables a data-driven detection of frequent co-activation patterns within neuroimaging datasets. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by means of several analyses on simulated data as well as a real application. The analyses of the simulated data show that PaMiNI identifies the brain regions underlying the simulated activation foci and perfectly separates the co-activation patterns of the experiments in the simulations. Furthermore, PaMiNI still yields good results when activation foci of distinct brain regions become closer together or if they are non-Gaussian distributed. For the further evaluation, a real dataset on working memory experiments is used, which was previously examined in an ALE meta-analysis and hence allows a cross-validation of both methods. In this latter analysis, PaMiNI revealed a fronto-parietal “core” network of working memory and furthermore indicates a left-lateralization in this network. Finally, to encourage a widespread usage of this new method, the PaMiNI approach was implemented into a publicly available software system. PMID:24365675

  13. Stuttering, Induced Fluency, and Natural Fluency: A Hierarchical Series of Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Kristin S.; Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as “neural signatures of stuttering” (Brown 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: 1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and 2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state). PMID:25463820

  14. Physical activity and risk of pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Gundula; Jochem, Carmen; Schmid, Daniela; Keimling, Marlen; Ricci, Cristian; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity may prevent pancreatic cancer by regulating body weight and decreasing insulin resistance, DNA damage, and chronic inflammation. Previous meta-analyses found inconsistent evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on pancreatic cancer but those studies did not investigate whether the association between physical activity and pancreatic cancer varies by smoking status, body mass index (BMI), or level of consistency of physical activity over time. To address these issues, we conducted an updated meta-analysis following the PRISMA guidelines among 30 distinct studies with a total of 10,501 pancreatic cancer cases. Random effects meta-analysis of cohort studies revealed a weak, statistically significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk for high versus low levels of physical activity (relative risk (RR) 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-0.98). By comparison, case-control studies yielded a stronger, statistically significant risk reduction (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94; p-difference by study design = 0.07). When focusing on cohort studies, physical activity summary risk estimates appeared to be more pronounced for consistent physical activity over time (RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.76-0.97) than for recent past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.90-1.01) or distant past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.79-1.15, p-difference by timing in life of physical activity = 0.36). Physical activity summary risk estimates did not differ by smoking status or BMI. In conclusion, physical activity is not strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk, and the relation is not modified by smoking status or BMI level. While overall findings were weak, we did find some suggestion of potential pancreatic cancer risk reduction with consistent physical activity over time. PMID:25773752

  15. LAT-1 activity of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Evan; Finke, Karissa; Zur, Arik A; Hansen, Logan; Heeren, Nathan; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-06-01

    The transporter protein Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1, SLC7A5) is responsible for transporting amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine as well as thyroid hormones, and it has been exploited as a drug delivery mechanism. Recently its role in cancer has become increasingly appreciated, as it has been found to be up-regulated in many different tumor types, and its expression levels have been correlated with prognosis. Substitution at the meta position of aromatic amino acids has been reported to increase affinity for LAT-1; however, the SAR for this position has not previously been explored. Guided by newly refined computational models of the binding site, we hypothesized that groups capable of filling a hydrophobic pocket would increase binding to LAT-1, resulting in improved substrates relative to parent amino acid. Tyrosine and phenylalanine analogs substituted at the meta position with halogens, alkyl and aryl groups were synthesized and tested in cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays to determine activity. Contrary to our initial hypothesis we found that lipophilicity was correlated with diminished substrate activity and increased inhibition of the transporter. The synthesis and SAR of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs is described. PMID:27106710

  16. Physical activity for cancer survivors: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel Y T; Hui, Bryant P H; Lee, Antoinette M; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Leung, Sharron S K; Cerin, Ester; Chan, Wynnie Y Y; Leung, Ivy P F; Taylor, Aliki J; Cheng, Kar-keung

    2012-01-01

    Objective To systematically evaluate the effects of physical activity in adult patients after completion of main treatment related to cancer. Design Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with data extraction and quality assessment performed independently by two researchers. Data sources Pubmed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar from the earliest possible year to September 2011. References from meta-analyses and reviews. Study selection Randomised controlled trials that assessed the effects of physical activity in adults who had completed their main cancer treatment, except hormonal treatment. Results There were 34 randomised controlled trials, of which 22 (65%) focused on patients with breast cancer, and 48 outcomes in our meta-analysis. Twenty two studies assessed aerobic exercise, and four also included resistance or strength training. The median duration of physical activity was 13 weeks (range 3-60 weeks). Most control groups were considered sedentary or were assigned no exercise. Based on studies on patients with breast cancer, physical activity was associated with improvements in insulin-like growth factor-I, bench press, leg press, fatigue, depression, and quality of life. When we combined studies on different types of cancer, we found significant improvements in body mass index (BMI), body weight, peak oxygen consumption, peak power output, distance walked in six minutes, right handgrip strength, and quality of life. Sources of study heterogeneity included age, study quality, study size, and type and duration of physical activity. Publication bias did not alter our conclusions. Conclusions Physical activity has positive effects on physiology, body composition, physical functions, psychological outcomes, and quality of life in patients after treatment for breast cancer. When patients with cancer other than breast cancer were also included, physical activity was associated with reduced BMI and body weight, increased peak oxygen consumption and peak power

  17. Prognostic Role of BRAF Mutation in Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer Receiving Curative Resection and Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Meta-Analysis Based on Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ying; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhong, Chenhan; Li, Dan; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Studies examining the prognostic value of the BRAF mutation on relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy so far showed discrepant results. Therefore, a meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed for clarification. Methods Randomized trials of stage II/III colorectal cancer treated with curative resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy were selected to conduct a meta-analysis. The necessary descriptive and statistical information such as hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from published survival data. Results Seven phase III randomized clinical trials (RCTs) including 1,035 BRAF mutation stage II/III CRC patients receiving curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. Overall, BRAF mutation resulted in poorer OS (HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.25–1.60; P < 0.00001), and poorer DFS (HR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.07–1.48, P = 0.006) compared with BRAF wild-type CRC. The prognostic role on RFS could not be elucidated in the meta-analysis because of limited data. Conclusions BRAF mutation was significantly related with shorter DFS and OS among stage II/III CRC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection. Its prognostic role for RFS needs to be further analyzed when more data is available. PMID:27138801

  18. Brain activations during pain: a neuroimaging meta-analysis of patients with pain and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Karin B; Regenbogen, Christina; Ohse, Margarete C; Frasnelli, Johannes; Freiherr, Jessica; Lundström, Johan N

    2016-06-01

    In response to recent publications from pain neuroimaging experiments, there has been a debate about the existence of a primary pain region in the brain. Yet, there are few meta-analyses providing assessments of the minimum cerebral denominators of pain. Here, we used a statistical meta-analysis method, called activation likelihood estimation, to define (1) core brain regions activated by pain per se, irrelevant of pain modality, paradigm, or participants and (2) activation likelihood estimation commonalities and differences between patients with chronic pain and healthy individuals. A subtraction analysis of 138 independent data sets revealed that the minimum denominator for activation across pain modalities and paradigms included the right insula, secondary sensory cortex, and right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Common activations for healthy subjects and patients with pain alike included the thalamus, ACC, insula, and cerebellum. A comparative analysis revealed that healthy individuals were more likely to activate the cingulum, thalamus, and insula. Our results point toward the central role of the insular cortex and ACC in pain processing, irrelevant of modality, body part, or clinical experience; thus, furthering the importance of ACC and insular activation as key regions for the human experience of pain. PMID:26871535

  19. Use of meta-analysis to combine candidate gene association studies: application to study the relationship between the ESR PvuII polymorphism and sow litter size

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Leopoldo

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the application of meta-analysis on livestock candidate gene effects. The PvuII polymorphism of the ESR gene is used as an example. The association among ESR PvuII alleles with the number of piglets born alive and total born in the first (NBA1, TNB1) and later parities (NBA, TNB) is reviewed by conducting a meta-analysis of 15 published studies including 9329 sows. Under a fixed effects model, litter size values were significantly lower in the "AA" genotype groups when compared with "AB" and "BB" homozygotes. Under the random effects model, the results were similar although differences between "AA" and "AB" genotype groups were not clearly significant for NBA and TNB. Nevertheless, the most noticeable result was the high and significant heterogeneity estimated among studies. This heterogeneity could be assigned to error sampling, genotype by environment interaction, linkage or epistasis, as referred to in the literature, but also to the hypothesis of population admixture/stratification. It is concluded that meta-analysis can be considered as a helpful analytical tool to synthesise and discuss livestock candidate gene effects. The main difficulty found was the insufficient information on the standard errors of the estimated genotype effects in several publications. Consequently, the convenience of publishing the standard errors or the concrete P-values instead of the test significance level should be recommended to guarantee the quality of candidate gene effect meta-analyses. PMID:15943920

  20. Meta-Coordination Activities: Exploring Articulation Work in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Coordination of distributed activities is central to organizational work. The effective functioning of organizations hinges on their ability to manage interdependencies both within (intra-) and between (inter-) various departments. However, more than just the management of these individual dependencies is required for smooth coordination in…

  1. Neuroimaging of reading intervention: a systematic review and activation likelihood estimate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barquero, Laura A; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278

  2. Neuroimaging of Reading Intervention: A Systematic Review and Activation Likelihood Estimate Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barquero, Laura A.; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E.

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278

  3. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modelling Revisited: Controlling for Activation Base Rates

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Robert; Rottschy, Claudia; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    Co-activation of distinct brain regions is a measure of functional interaction, or connectivity, between those regions. The co-activation pattern of a given region can be investigated using seed-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging data stored in databases such as BrainMap. This method reveals inter-regional functional connectivity by determining brain regions that are consistently co-activated with a given region of interest (the “seed”) across a broad range of experiments. In current implementations of this meta-analytic connectivity modelling (MACM), significant spatial convergence (i.e. consistent co-activation) is distinguished from noise by comparing it against an unbiased null-distribution of random spatial associations between experiments according to which all grey-matter voxels have the same chance of convergence. As the a priori probability of finding activation in different voxels markedly differs across the brain, computing such a quasi-rectangular null-distribution renders the detection of significant convergence more likely in those voxels that are frequently activated. Here, we propose and test a modified MACM approach that takes this activation frequency bias into account. In this new specific co-activation likelihood estimation (SCALE) algorithm, a null-distribution is generated that reflects the base rate of reporting activation in any given voxel and thus equalizes the a priori chance of finding across-study convergence in each voxel of the brain. Using four exemplary seed regions (right visual area V4, left anterior insula, right intraparietal sulcus, and subgenual cingulum), our tests corroborated the enhanced specificity of the modified algorithm, indicating that SCALE may be especially useful for delineating distinct core networks of co-activation. PMID:24945668

  4. Assessing human mirror activity with EEG mu rhythm: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nathan A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Yoo, Kathryn H; Bowman, Lindsay C; Cannon, Erin N; Vanderwert, Ross E; Ferrari, Pier F; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience is how the brain encodes others' actions and intentions. In recent years, a potential advance in our knowledge on this issue is the discovery of mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the nonhuman primate. These neurons fire to both execution and observation of specific types of actions. Researchers use this evidence to fuel investigations of a human mirror system, suggesting a common neural code for perceptual and motor processes. Among the methods used for inferring mirror system activity in humans are changes in a particular frequency band in the electroencephalogram (EEG) called the mu rhythm. Mu frequency appears to decrease in amplitude (reflecting cortical activity) during both action execution and action observation. The current meta-analysis reviewed 85 studies (1,707 participants) of mu that infer human mirror system activity. Results demonstrated significant effect sizes for mu during execution (Cohen's d = 0.46, N = 701) as well as observation of action (Cohen's d = 0.31, N = 1,508), confirming a mirroring property in the EEG. A number of moderators were examined to determine the specificity of these effects. We frame these meta-analytic findings within the current discussion about the development and functions of a human mirror system, and conclude that changes in EEG mu activity provide a valid means for the study of human neural mirroring. Suggestions for improving the experimental and methodological approaches in using mu to study the human mirror system are offered. PMID:26689088

  5. Structural and functional neural adaptations in obstructive sleep apnea: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Eickhoff, Simon B; Sepehry, Amir A; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Morrell, Mary J; Khazaie, Habibolah; Eickhoff, Claudia R

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common multisystem chronic disorder. Functional and structural neuroimaging has been widely applied in patients with OSA, but these studies have often yielded diverse results. The present quantitative meta-analysis aims to identify consistent patterns of abnormal activation and grey matter loss in OSA across studies. We used PubMed to retrieve task/resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry studies. Stereotactic data were extracted from fifteen studies, and subsequently tested for convergence using activation likelihood estimation. We found convergent evidence for structural atrophy and functional disturbances in the right basolateral amygdala/hippocampus and the right central insula. Functional characterization of these regions using the BrainMap database suggested associated dysfunction of emotional, sensory, and limbic processes. Assessment of task-based co-activation patterns furthermore indicated that the two regions obtained from the meta-analysis are part of a joint network comprising the anterior insula, posterior-medial frontal cortex and thalamus. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of right amygdala, hippocampus and insula in the abnormal emotional and sensory processing in OSA. PMID:27039344

  6. Coordinate-based (ALE) meta-analysis of brain activation in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Mahboobeh; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Eickhoff, Simon B; Petzke, Frank; Harris, Richard E; Montoya, Pedro; Burgmer, Markus

    2016-05-01

    There are an increasing number of neuroimaging studies that allow a better understanding of symptoms, neural correlates and associated conditions of fibromyalgia. However, the results of these studies are difficult to compare, as they include a heterogeneous group of patients, use different stimulation paradigms, tasks, and the statistical evaluation of neuroimaging data shows high variability. Therefore, this meta-analytic approach aimed at evaluating potential alterations in neuronal brain activity or structure related to pain processing in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients, using quantitative coordinate-based "activation likelihood estimation" (ALE) meta-analysis. 37 FMS papers met the inclusion criteria for an ALE analysis (1,264 subjects, 274 activation foci). A pooled ALE analysis of different modalities of neuroimaging and additional analyses according functional and structural changes indicated differences between FMS patients and controls in the insula, amygdala, anterior/mid cingulate cortex, superior temporal gyrus, the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, and lingual gyrus. Our analysis showed consistent results across FMS studies with potential abnormalities especially in pain-related brain areas. Given that similar alterations have already been demonstrated in patients with other chronic pain conditions and the lack of adequate control groups of chronic pain subjects in most FMS studies, it is not clear however, whether these findings are associated with chronic pain in general or are unique features of patients with FMS. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1749-1758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864780

  7. The association between physical activity and gastroesophageal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Gundula; Jochem, Carmen; Keimling, Marlen; Ricci, Cristian; Schmid, Daniela; Leitzmann, Michael Fred

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity may decrease gastroesophageal cancer risk through a reduction of oxidative stress and decreased chronic inflammation, yet few epidemiologic studies have been able to report a clear inverse association between physical activity and gastroesophageal cancer. Because no meta-analysis has investigated the relation of physical activity to gastroesophageal cancer, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines based on 24 studies with a total of 15,745 cases. When we compared high versus low physical activity levels and summarized associations according to anatomic site and tumor histology, risk reductions were evident for esophageal adenocarcinoma [relative risk (RR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.66-0.94], gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99) and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (RR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.62-0.84). The risk reduction for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (RR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.41-2.16) became statistically significant (RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46-0.96) after excluding an influential study. The test for heterogeneity by gastroesophageal cancer subtype was statistically non-significant (p-difference = 0.71). The RR of total gastroesophageal cancer for high versus low physical activity was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.74-0.90). A dose-response analysis of frequency of physical activity and total gastroesophageal cancer risk revealed that the greatest risk reduction was achieved among those engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity five times per week (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.58-0.79). Our results provide support for an inverse relation of physical activity, in particular exercise frequency, to gastroesophageal cancer risk. PMID:24705782

  8. The Effectiveness of Conservative Management for Acute Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) II: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wiangkham, Taweewat; Duda, Joan; Haque, Sayeed; Madi, Mohammad; Rushton, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of conservative management (except drug therapy) for acute Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) II. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) using a pre-defined protocol. Two independent reviewers searched information sources, decided eligibility of studies, and assessed risk of bias (RoB) of included trials. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by the other. A third reviewer mediated any disagreements throughout. Qualitative trial and RoB data were summarised descriptively. Quantitative syntheses were conducted across trials for comparable interventions, outcome measures and assessment points. Meta-analyses compared effect sizes with random effects, using STATA version 12. Data Sources PEDro, Medline, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library with manual searching in key journals, reference lists, British National Bibliography for Report Literature, Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information & Exchange, and National Technical Information Service were searched from inception to 15th April 2015. Active researchers in the field were contacted to determine relevant studies. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies RCTs evaluating acute (<4 weeks) WADII, any conservative intervention, with outcome measures important to the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health. Results Fifteen RCTs all assessed as high RoB (n=1676 participants) across 9 countries were included. Meta-analyses enabled 4 intervention comparisons: conservative versus standard/control, active versus passive, behavioural versus standard/control, and early versus late. Conservative intervention was more effective for pain reduction at 6 months (95%CI: -20.14 to -3.38) and 1-3 years (-25.44 to -3.19), and improvement in cervical mobility in the horizontal plane at <3 months (0.43 to 5.60) compared with standard/control intervention. Active intervention was effective

  9. Physical Activity Interventions with Healthy Minority Adults: Meta-Analysis of Behavior and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Phillips, Lorraine J.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chase, Jo-Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis is a systematic compilation of research focusing on various exercise interventions and their impact on the health and behavior outcomes of healthy African American, Hispanic, Native American, and Native Hawaiian adults. Comprehensive searching located published and unpublished studies. Random-effects analyses synthesized data to calculate effect sizes (ES) as a standardized mean difference (d) and variability measures. Data were synthesized across 21,151 subjects in 100 eligible samples. Supervised exercise significantly improved fitness (ES=.571–.584). Interventions designed to motivate minority adults to increase physical activity changed subsequent physical activity behavior (ES=.172–.312) and anthropometric outcomes (ES=.070–.124). Some ES should be interpreted in the context of limited statistical power and heterogeneity. Attempts to match intervention content and delivery with minority populations were inconsistently reported. Healthy minority adults experienced health improvements following supervised exercise. Interventions designed to motivate subjects to increase physical activity have limited magnitude heterogeneous effects. PMID:22643462

  10. Quantitative meta-analysis of neural activity in posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played a significant role in elucidating the neural underpinnings of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, a detailed understanding of the neural regions implicated in the disorder remains incomplete because of considerable variability in findings across studies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify consistent patterns of neural activity across neuroimaging study designs in PTSD to improve understanding of the neurocircuitry of PTSD. Methods We conducted a literature search for PET and fMRI studies of PTSD that were published before February 2011. The article search resulted in 79 functional neuroimaging PTSD studies. Data from 26 PTSD peer-reviewed neuroimaging articles reporting results from 342 adult patients and 342 adult controls were included. Peak activation coordinates from selected articles were used to generate activation likelihood estimate maps separately for symptom provocation and cognitive-emotional studies of PTSD. A separate meta-analysis examined the coupling between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala activity in patients. Results Results demonstrated that the regions most consistently hyperactivated in PTSD patients included mid- and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and when ROI studies were included, bilateral amygdala. By contrast, widespread hypoactivity was observed in PTSD including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the inferior frontal gyrus. Furthermore, decreased ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity was associated with increased amygdala activity. Conclusions These results provide evidence for a neurocircuitry model of PTSD that emphasizes alteration in neural networks important for salience detection and emotion regulation. PMID:22738125

  11. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Lorentzen, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-02-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task-related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta-analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task-related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task-related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between-group differences in task-related activity were retrieved in a sub-analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  12. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  13. Dysfunctional Activation of the Cerebellum in Schizophrenia: A Functional Neuroimaging Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    The cognitive dysmetria framework postulates that the deficits seen in schizophrenia are due to underlying cerebello-thalamo-cortical dysfunction. The cerebellum is thought to be crucial in the formation of internal models for both motor and cognitive behaviors. In healthy individuals there is a functional topography within the cerebellum. Alterations in the functional topography and activation of the cerebellum in schizophrenia patients may be indicative of altered internal models, providing support for this framework. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging meta-analysis, we investigated cerebellar activation across a variety of task domains affected in schizophrenia and in comparison to healthy controls. Our results indicate an altered functional topography in patients. This was especially apparent for emotion and working memory tasks, and may be related to deficits in these domains. Results suggest that an altered cerebellar functional topography in schizophrenia may be contributing to the many deficits associated with the disease, perhaps due to dysfunctional internal models. PMID:26392921

  14. Meta-Analysis of Patient Education Interventions to Increase Physical Activity among Chronically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Brown, Sharon A.; Brown, Lori M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis integrates primary research testing the effect of patient education to increase physical activity (PA) on behavior outcomes among adults with diverse chronic illnesses. Methods Extensive literature searching strategies located published and unpublished intervention studies that measured PA behavior outcomes. Primary study results were coded. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analytic procedures included moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,527 subjects from 213 samples in 163 reports. The overall mean weighted effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.45 (higher mean for treatment than control). This effect size is consistent with a difference of 48 minutes of PA per week or 945 steps per day. Preliminary moderator analyses suggest interventions were most effective when they targeted only PA behavior, used behavioral strategies (vs. cognitive strategies), and encouraged PA self-monitoring. Differences among chronic illnesses were documented. Individual strategies unrelated to PA outcomes included supervised exercise sessions, exercise prescription, fitness testing, goal setting, contracting, problem solving, barriers management, and stimulus/cues. PA outcomes were unrelated to gender, age, ethnicity, or socioeconomic distribution among samples. Conclusion These findings suggest that some patient education interventions to increase PA are effective, despite considerable heterogeneity in the magnitude of intervention effect. Practice Implications Moderator analyses are preliminary and provide suggestive evidence for further testing of interventions to inform practice. PMID:18023128

  15. Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) is a novel, potent inhibitor of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Lekowski, R; Collard, C D; Reenstra, W R; Stahl, G L

    2001-02-01

    Complement is an important mediator of vascular injury following oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that complement activation following endothelial oxidative stress is mediated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and activation of the lectin complement pathway. Here, we investigated whether nine plant lectins which have a binding profile similar to that of MBL competitively inhibit MBL deposition and subsequent complement activation following human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) oxidative stress. HUVEC oxidative stress (1% O(2), 24 hr) significantly increased Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) binding by 72 +/- 9% compared to normoxic cells. UEA-II inhibited MBL binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress. Further, MBL inhibited UEA-II binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress, suggesting a common ligand. UEA-II (< or = 100 micromol/L) did not attenuate the hemolytic activity, nor did it inhibit C3a des Arg formation from alternative or classical complement pathway-specific hemolytic assays. C3 deposition (measured by ELISA) following HUVEC oxidative stress was inhibited by UEA-II in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 10 pmol/L). UEA-II inhibited C3 and MBL co-localization (confocal microscopy) in a concentration-dependent manner on HUVEC following oxidative stress (IC(50) approximately 1 pmol/L). Finally, UEA-II significantly inhibited complement-dependent neutrophil chemotaxis, but failed to inhibit fMLP-mediated chemotaxis, following endothelial oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that UEA-II is a novel, potent inhibitor of human MBL deposition and complement activation following human endothelial oxidative stress. PMID:11266613

  16. Active and passive smoking and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Macacu, Alina; Autier, Philippe; Boniol, Mathieu; Boyle, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Studies on active and passive tobacco smoking and breast cancer have found inconsistent results. A meta-analysis of observational studies on tobacco smoking and breast cancer occurrence was conducted based on systematic searches for studies with retrospective (case-control) and prospective (cohort) designs. Eligible studies were identified, and relative risk measurements were extracted for active and passive tobacco exposures. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to compute summary relative risks (SRR). Heterogeneity of results between studies was evaluated using the (I (2)) statistics. For ever active smoking, in 27 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.10 (95 % CI [1.09-1.12]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 0 %). In 44 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.08 (95 % CI [1.02-1.14]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 59 %). SRRs for current active smoking were 1.13 (95 % CI [1.09-1.17]) in 27 prospective studies and 1.08 (95 % CI [0.97-1.20]) in 22 retrospective studies. The results were stable across different subgroup analyses, notably pre/post-menopause, alcohol consumption adjustments, including/excluding passive smokers from the referent group. For ever passive smoking, in 11 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.07 (95 % CI [1.02-1.13]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 1 %). In 20 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.30 (95 % CI [1.10-1.54]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 74 %). Too few prospective studies were available for meaningful subgroup analyses. There is consistent evidence for a moderate increase in the risk of breast cancer in women who smoke tobacco. The evidence for a moderate increase in risk with passive smoking is more substantial than a few years ago. PMID:26546245

  17. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II[S

    PubMed Central

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites. PMID:24875537

  18. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  19. Prognostic role of telomerase activity in gastric adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LÜ, MU-HAN; DENG, JIA-QI; CAO, YA-LING; FANG, DIAN-CHUN; ZHANG, YAO; YANG, SHI-MING

    2012-01-01

    Activation of telomerase is involved in carcinogenesis in most types of cancers. However, the prognostic value of telomerase activity (TA) in patients with gastric carcinoma (GC) remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between TA and the clinical outcome of GC. A meta-analysis of 18 studies (886 patients) was performed to evaluate the association between TA and metastasis-related parameters in GC patients by searching databases, including PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science databases, Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) (last search updated in October 2011). We used the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association between TA and metastasis of GC. Our analysis results indicated that high telomerase activity expression tended to be associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (866 patients) (OR=2.03, 95% CI 1.21–3.39, p=0.007), the depth of invasion (886 patients) (OR=1.87, 95% CI 1.30–2.70, p=0.0007), distant metastasis (407 patients) (OR=2.71, 95% CI 1.59–4.63, p=0.0002), tumor size (466 patients) (OR=2.14, 95% CI 1.31–3.50, p=0.002) and TNM stage (711 patients) (OR=2.39, 95% CI 1.30–4.41, p=0.005). However, high TA expression was not associated with the presence of histologic differentiation (791 patients) (OR=1.51, 95% CI 0.73–3.11, p=0.26). In conclusion, telomerase overexpression not only plays a key role in primary initiation, but also promotes invasion and metastatic progression of GC. These findings raise the possibility of using TA to screen for the prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:22969960

  20. Do Extra-Curricular Activities in Schools Improve Educational Outcomes? A Critical Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz

    2010-01-01

    Secondary schools tend to sponsor a large number of extra-curricular activities (ECA) yet little is known about their contribution to students' educational outcomes. This meta-analysis aims to determine what it is about ECA participation that supports positive educational outcomes. Furthermore, this study challenges the theoretical assumptions…

  1. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  2. Association between Estrogen Receptor-α Gene XbaI and PvuII Polymorphisms and Periodontitis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Rui-Xia; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Yan, Jin-Zhu; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background. Certain studies have previously explored the association between the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) gene polymorphisms and periodontitis susceptibility, although the current results are controversial. The present study, using meta-analysis, aimed to investigate the nature of the genetic susceptibility of the ER-α for developing periodontitis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang databases was conducted up to January 8, 2015. Statistical manipulation was performed using Stata version 13.0 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confident intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association in five genetic models. Results. A total of 17 eligible case-control studies from seven identified publications consisting of nine studies for the XbaI polymorphism and eight studies for the PvuII polymorphism were included in the meta-analysis. We found elevated risk of periodontitis in XbaI XX genotype carriers. Moreover, subgroup analyses demonstrated increased risk for chronic periodontitis of XbaI XX genotype carriers, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. No significant association was observed between PvuII polymorphism and periodontitis. Conclusion. Current evidence indicated that the homozygote (XX) genotype of ER-α gene XbaI polymorphism, but not PvuII mutation, may increase the risk of chronic periodontitis, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. PMID:26688601

  3. The effects of physical activity interventions on psychosocial outcomes in adolescents: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Anouk; Assink, Mark; van Vugt, Eveline; van der Put, Claudia; Stams, Geert Jan

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity interventions are often implemented in the adolescent mental health care practice to prevent or treat psychosocial problems. To date, no systematic review of the effect of these physical activity interventions in adolescents has been conducted. In the current study, four multilevel meta-analyses were performed to assess the overall effect of physical activity interventions on externalizing problems, internalizing problems, self-concept, and academic achievement in adolescents. In addition, possible moderating factors were examined. In total, 57 studies reporting on 216 effect sizes were included, and the results showed significant small-to-moderate effects of physical activity interventions on externalizing problems (d=0.320), internalizing problems (d=0.316), self-concept (d=0.297), and academic achievement (d=0.367). Further, moderator analyses showed that outcome, study, sample, and intervention characteristics influenced the effects of physical activity interventions on psychosocial outcomes. Implications for theory and practice concerning the use of physical activity interventions in adolescent mental health care practice are discussed. PMID:27064552

  4. Angiotensin II and angiotensin II receptor blocker modulate the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tai, Ching-Tai; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Cheng-I; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (AIIRBs) have been shown to prevent atrial fibrillation. The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most important focus for the generation of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether angiotensin II or AIIRB may change the arrhythmogenic activity of the PVs. Conventional microelectrodes and whole-cell patch clamps were used to investigate the action potentials (APs) and ionic currents in isolated rabbit PV tissue and single cardiomyocytes before and after administering angiotensin II or losartan (AIIRB). In the tissue preparations, angiotensin II induced delayed after-depolarizations (1, 10, and 100 nM) and accelerated the automatic rhythm (10 and 100 nM). Angiotensin II (100 nM) prolonged the AP duration and increased the contractile force (10 and 100 nM). Losartan (1 and 10 μM) inhibited the automatic rhythm. Losartan (10 μM) prolonged the AP duration and reduced the contractile force (1 and 10 μM). Angiotensin II reduced the transient outward potassium current (Ito) but increased the L-type calcium, delayed rectifier potassium (IK), transient inward (Iti), pacemaker, and Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) currents in the PV cardiomyocytes. Losartan decreased the Ito, IK, Iti, and NCX currents. In conclusion, angiotensin II and AIIRB modulate the PV electrical activity, which may play a role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. PMID:16273119

  5. Meta-Analysis of Interventions to Increase Physical Activity among Cardiac Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Moore, Shirley M.; Nielsen, Paul J.; Brown, Lori M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Extensive primary research has tested interventions to increase physical activity (PA) among adults with cardiovascular disease. This meta-analysis integrates the extant research about how to increase PA in cardiac samples. Methods Extensive literature searching located published and unpublished intervention studies that measured PA outcomes. Results were coded from primary studies. Fixed-and random-effects meta-analytic procedures included moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 11,877 subjects from 79 eligible research reports. The overall mean PA effect size for 2-group comparisons was 0.35 (higher mean for treatment than control), which is consistent with a difference of 1984 kilocalories/week for treatment subjects versus 1615 for control subjects. The fitness effect size for 2-group comparisons was .17. Other statistically significantly positive 2-group effect sizes were .24 for quality of life and .23 for subsequent cardiac events. Effect sizes for anthropometric measures and blood pressure did not differ significantly from 0. Exploratory moderator analyses found large effect sizes for PA among studies that had (1) an exclusive focus on PA versus diverse health behaviors, (2) more contact between interventionists and subjects, (3) supervised exercise sessions, (4) fitness testing, (5) face-to-face encounters versus mediated intervention delivery, and (6) more minutes of activity per week. Effect sizes were unrelated to funding status, dissemination vehicle, gender distribution, or attrition rate. Conclusions These findings document that interventions can be effective in increasing PA among patients with cardiovascular diseases. Primary research should compare interventions in randomized trials to confirm causal relationships. PMID:18582959

  6. Angiotensin II activates different calcium signaling pathways in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dolgacheva, Lyudmila P; Turovskaya, Maria V; Dynnik, Vladimir V; Zinchenko, Valery P; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Davletov, Bazbek; Turovsky, Egor A

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important mammalian neurohormone involved in reninangiotensin system. Ang II is produced both constitutively and locally by RAS systems, including white fat adipocytes. The influence of Ang II on adipocytes is complex, affecting different systems of signal transduction from early Са(2+) responses to cell proliferation and differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, expression of adipokine-encoding genes and adipokine secretion. It is known that white fat adipocytes express all RAS components and Ang II receptors (АТ1 and АТ2). The current work was carried out with the primary white adipocytes culture, and Са(2+) signaling pathways activated by Ang II were investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses of differentiated adipocytes to Ang II were registered in cells with both small and multiple lipid inclusions. Using inhibitory analysis and selective antagonists, we now show that Ang II initiates periodic Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses by activating АТ1 and АТ2 receptors and involving branched signaling cascades: 1) Ang II → Gq → PLC → IP3 → IP3Rs → Ca(2+) 2) Gβγ → PI3Kγ → PKB 3) PKB → eNOS → NO → PKG 4) CD38 → cADPR → RyRs → Ca(2+) In these cascades, AT1 receptors play the leading role. The results of the present work open a perspective of using Ang II for correction of signal resistance of adipocytes often observed during obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26850364

  7. Task Performance and Meta-Cognitive Outcomes When Using Activity Workstations and Traditional Desks

    PubMed Central

    Pilcher, June J.; Baker, Victoria C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to compare the effects of light physical activity to sedentary behavior on cognitive task performance and meta-cognitive responses. Thirty-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants used a stationary bicycle with a desk top and a traditional desk while completing two complex cognitive tasks and measures of affect, motivation, morale, and engagement. The participants pedaled the stationary bicycle at a slow pace (similar in exertion to a normal walking pace) while working. The results indicated that cognitive task performance did not change between the two workstations. However, positive affect, motivation, and morale improved when using the stationary bicycle. These results suggest that activity workstations could be implemented in the work place and in educational settings to help decrease sedentary behavior without negatively affecting performance. Furthermore, individuals could experience a positive emotional response when working on activity workstations which in turn could help encourage individuals to choose to be more physical active during daily activities. PMID:27445921

  8. Task Performance and Meta-Cognitive Outcomes When Using Activity Workstations and Traditional Desks.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, June J; Baker, Victoria C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to compare the effects of light physical activity to sedentary behavior on cognitive task performance and meta-cognitive responses. Thirty-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants used a stationary bicycle with a desk top and a traditional desk while completing two complex cognitive tasks and measures of affect, motivation, morale, and engagement. The participants pedaled the stationary bicycle at a slow pace (similar in exertion to a normal walking pace) while working. The results indicated that cognitive task performance did not change between the two workstations. However, positive affect, motivation, and morale improved when using the stationary bicycle. These results suggest that activity workstations could be implemented in the work place and in educational settings to help decrease sedentary behavior without negatively affecting performance. Furthermore, individuals could experience a positive emotional response when working on activity workstations which in turn could help encourage individuals to choose to be more physical active during daily activities. PMID:27445921

  9. Postoperative radiotherapy and tumor recurrence after complete resection of stage II/III thymic tumor: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jietao; Sun, Xin; Huang, Letian; Xiong, Zhicheng; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Shuling; Han, Cheng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) is effective for reducing the recurrence risk in patients who received complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors has not been determined. A meta-analysis was performed by combining the results of all available controlled trials. Methods PubMed, Cochrane’s Library, and the Embase databases were searched for studies which compared the recurrence data for patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors assigned to an observing group, or a PORT group. A random effect model was applied to combine the results. Results Nineteen studies, all designed as retrospective cohort studies were included. These studies included 663 patients of PORT group and 617 patients of observing group. The recurrence rate for the patients in PORT group and observing group were 12.4% and 11.5%, respectively. Results of our study indicated that PORT has no significant influence on recurrent risk in patients with stage II or III thymic tumor after complete resection (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.55–1.90, P=0.96). When stratified by stages, our meta-analyses did not indicate any significant effects of PORT on recurrent outcomes in either the stage II or the stage III patients. Moreover, subsequent analysis limited to studies only including patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma also did not support the benefits of PORT on recurrent outcomes. Conclusion Although derived from retrospective cohort studies, current evidence did not support any benefit of PORT on recurrent risk in patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors. PMID:27524907

  10. The Relationship between Telomerase Activity and Clinicopathological Parameters in Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xue-Cheng; Ge, Lian-Ying; Lai, Hao; Qiu, Hai; Tang, Fan; Qin, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, accumulated research has found that the expression of telomerase activity (TA) was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) advancement, whereas the TA prognostic effect in CRC patients is still controversial. Aims: To investigate relationships between TA and CRC clinicopathological parameters. Study Design: Meta-analysis study. Methods: We searched published studies in databases, such as EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Ovid databases (last search updated to October 2014) by meeting specified search criteria. The quality of the included studies was usually evaluated and a meta-analysis was implemented by Stata 12.0 software. We used an odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate relationship strengths between TA and CRC clinicopathological parameters. Results: In total, 11 studies (715 patients) were included to assess the relation between TA and metastasis-related parameters in CRC patients. The results indicate that a senior TA expression was connected with the existence of lymph node metastasis (180 patients; OR=2.85, 95% CI=1.40–5.81, p=0.004), and tumor site (522 patients; OR=2.93, 95% CI=1.29–6.67, p=0.010). However, a senior TA expression was not connected with tumor size (137 patients; OR=1.57, 95% CI=0.71–3.47, p=0.267), histological differentiation (570 patients; OR=1.28, 95% CI=0.78–2.09, p=0.332), depth of invasion (57 patients; OR=3.76, 95% CI=0.61–23.04, p=0.152), distant metastasis (123 patients; OR=1.76, 95% CI=0.54–5.74, p=0.346), and clinical stage of the cancer (543 patients; OR=1.59, 95% CI=0.74–3.38, p=0.232). Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that a positive TA was correlated with lymph node metastasis progression and tumor site of the CRC but did not correlate with other important clinicopathological parameters. TA can play a useful part in the prognosis and treatment of CRC patients, but further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:26966620

  11. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  12. Workjobs II: Number Activities for Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta-Lorton, Mary

    This curriculum guide presents a program of 20 open-ended math activities to be used to supplement the math programs in kindergarten, first, or second grade classrooms. The program consists of child-oriented counters and gameboards used to explore the concept of number from counting to making up and solving addition and subtraction equations. Each…

  13. Activities in Developmental Physical Education; Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarnieri, Barbara; Sandeen, Cecile

    Presented in the curriculum guide are activities for a sequenced physical education program to be used with trainable mentally retarded students (TMR). Defined are teaching approaches such as station teaching. Reviewed are a brief history of adaptive physical education (APE), APE literature on TMR children, and local APE program development.…

  14. Meta-analysis of internet-delivered interventions to increase physical activity levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many internet-delivered physical activity behaviour change programs have been developed and evaluated. However, further evidence is required to ascertain the overall effectiveness of such interventions. The objective of the present review was to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-delivered interventions to increase physical activity, whilst also examining the effect of intervention moderators. A systematic search strategy identified relevant studies published in the English-language from Pubmed, Proquest, Scopus, PsychINFO, CINHAL, and Sport Discuss (January 1990 – June 2011). Eligible studies were required to include an internet-delivered intervention, target an adult population, measure and target physical activity as an outcome variable, and include a comparison group that did not receive internet-delivered materials. Studies were coded independently by two investigators. Overall effect sizes were combined based on the fixed effect model. Homogeneity and subsequent exploratory moderator analysis was undertaken. A total of 34 articles were identified for inclusion. The overall mean effect of internet-delivered interventions on physical activity was d = 0.14 (p = 0.00). Fixed-effect analysis revealed significant heterogeneity across studies (Q = 73.75; p = 0.00). Moderating variables such as larger sample size, screening for baseline physical activity levels and the inclusion of educational components significantly increased intervention effectiveness. Results of the meta-analysis support the delivery of internet-delivered interventions in producing positive changes in physical activity, however effect sizes were small. The ability of internet-delivered interventions to produce meaningful change in long-term physical activity remains unclear. PMID:22546283

  15. Food activities and identity maintenance in old age: a systematic review and meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Plastow, Nicola Ann; Atwal, Anita; Gilhooly, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Services provided to older people should be developed based on active ageing policies. Nutrition is one aspect of active ageing, but little is known about how food activities contribute to psychological well-being in later life. This is a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research that answers the question ‘What is known about the relationship between food activities and the maintenance of identities in old age?’. Methods: We followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines and used quality assessment parameters to complete a systematic review and narrative synthesis. Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, and PsycINFO databases were searched. Results: We initially identified 8016 articles, of which 167 full-text articles were screened for inclusion. Twenty-two articles were included in the review. There was moderate evidence from nine qualitative and two quantitative studies, of variable quality, that food activities contribute to the maintenance of women's gendered identities, the ethnic identities of men and women, and community identities. There was moderate evidence from 10 qualitative studies, of variable quality, that a change in food choice and deteriorating health changed food activity participation. These changes threatened identities. Most studies included both younger adults and older adults. Conclusion: In later life, there are many life experiences leading to change. Further research is needed to develop understanding of how identity and mental well-being are maintained, despite changes in everyday activities like cooking and eating. This may enable health care professionals to meet psychological needs alongside biological needs during nutritional interventions. PMID:25373998

  16. Behavioral activation interventions for well-being: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucchelli, Trevor G.; Kane, Robert T.; Rees, Clare S.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to increase well-being is to engage in valued and enjoyable activities. Behavioral activation (BA), an intervention approach most commonly associated with the treatment of depression, is consistent with this recommendation and can easily be adapted for non-clinical populations. This study reports on a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies to examine the effect of BA on well-being. Twenty studies with a total of 1353 participants were included. The pooled effect size (Hedges's g) indicated that the difference in well-being between BA and control conditions at posttest was 0.52. This significant effect, which is comparable to the pooled effect achieved by positive psychology interventions, was found for non-clinical participants and participants with elevated symptoms of depression. Behavioral activation would seem to provide a ready and attractive intervention for promoting the well-being of a range of populations in both clinical and non-clinical settings. PMID:20539837

  17. Effects of physical activity in telomere length: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mundstock, Eduardo; Zatti, Helen; Louzada, Fernanda Mattos; Oliveira, Suelen Goecks; Guma, Fátima T C R; Paris, Mariana Migliorini; Rueda, Angélica Barba; Machado, Denise Greff; Stein, Renato T; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sarria, Edgar E; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia M; Mattiello, Rita

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to assess the effects of exercise on telomeres length. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Scopus, LILACS, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science from inception to August 2014. All articles that assessed the effects of exercise in telomere length were included in this review. The search strategy used the following combinations of terms: telomere AND "motor activity" OR exercise OR "physical activity". Two reviewers, working independently, screened all titles and abstracts to identify studies that could meet inclusion criteria. Whenever possible, and if appropriate, we performed a random-effect meta-analysis of study outcomes. Thirty-seven original studies were included in this systematic review, including 41,230 participants. Twenty articles did not find statistically significant association, whereas 15 described a positive association. Two papers found an inverted "U" correlation. There is a tendency toward demonstrating an effect of exercise on telomere length. Few prospective studies were found, many studies did not reach statistical significance and there was an important methodological diversity. For this reason, a possible significant association between physical activity and telomere length remains an open question. PMID:25956165

  18. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during emotion recognition in social anxiety disorder: an activation likelihood meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hattingh, Coenraad J.; Ipser, J.; Tromp, S. A.; Syal, S.; Lochner, C.; Brooks, S. J.; Stein, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by abnormal fear and anxiety in social situations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a brain imaging technique that can be used to demonstrate neural activation to emotionally salient stimuli. However, no attempt has yet been made to statistically collate fMRI studies of brain activation, using the activation likelihood-estimate (ALE) technique, in response to emotion recognition tasks in individuals with SAD. Methods: A systematic search of fMRI studies of neural responses to socially emotive cues in SAD was undertaken. ALE meta-analysis, a voxel-based meta-analytic technique, was used to estimate the most significant activations during emotional recognition. Results: Seven studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis, constituting a total of 91 subjects with SAD, and 93 healthy controls. The most significant areas of activation during emotional vs. neutral stimuli in individuals with SAD compared to controls were: bilateral amygdala, left medial temporal lobe encompassing the entorhinal cortex, left medial aspect of the inferior temporal lobe encompassing perirhinal cortex and parahippocampus, right anterior cingulate, right globus pallidus, and distal tip of right postcentral gyrus. Conclusion: The results are consistent with neuroanatomic models of the role of the amygdala in fear conditioning, and the importance of the limbic circuitry in mediating anxiety symptoms. PMID:23335892

  20. Program Activity/Training Plans. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Detailed operational guidelines, training objectives, and learning activities are provided for the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II), which are designed to train students for immediate employment. The first of four reports covers Los Angeles Southwest College's computer programming trainee…

  1. The Autonomic Brain: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis for Central Processing of Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Karin; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is of paramount importance for daily life. Its regulatory action on respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, and many other systems is controlled by a number of structures in the CNS. While the majority of these nuclei and cortices have been identified in animal models, neuroimaging studies have recently begun to shed light on central autonomic processing in humans. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation to conduct a meta-analysis of human neuroimaging experiments evaluating central autonomic processing to localize (1) cortical and subcortical areas involved in autonomic processing, (2) potential subsystems for the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS, and (3) potential subsystems for specific ANS responses to different stimuli/tasks. Across all tasks, we identified a set of consistently activated brain regions, comprising left amygdala, right anterior and left posterior insula and midcingulate cortices that form the core of the central autonomic network. While sympathetic-associated regions predominate in executive- and salience-processing networks, parasympathetic regions predominate in the default mode network. Hence, central processing of autonomic function does not simply involve a monolithic network of brain regions, instead showing elements of task and division specificity. PMID:23785162

  2. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2007-11-17

    LBNL's GEOSEQ project is a key participant in the Frio IIbrine pilot studying geologic sequestration of CO2. During During theinjection phase of the Frio-II brine pilot, LBNL collected multiple datasets including seismic monitoring, hydrologic monitoring and geochemicalsampling. These data sets are summarized in this report including allCASSM (continuous active source seismic monitoring) travel time data,injection pressure and flow rate data and gaseous sampling and tracerdata. Additional results from aqueous chemistry analysis performed by theU. S. Geological Survey (USGS) are summarized. Post injectionmodification of the flow model for Frio II is shown. Thesemodificationsare intended to facilitate integration with the monitoring data andincorporation of model heterogeneity. Current activities of LBNL's GEOSEQproject related to the Frio II test are shown, including development of anew petrophysical model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoringdata and integration of this data with flow modeling.

  3. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  4. Do mass media campaigns improve physical activity? a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass media campaigns are frequently used to influence the health behaviors of various populations. There are currently no quantitative meta-analyses of the effect of mass media campaigns on physical activity in adults. Methods We searched six electronic databases from their inception to August 2012 and selected prospective studies that evaluated the effect of mass media campaigns on physical activity in adults. We excluded studies that did not have a proper control group or did not report the uncertainties of the effect estimates. Two reviewers independently screened the title/abstracts and full articles. We used random-effects models to pool effect estimates across studies for 3 selected outcomes. Results Nine prospective cohorts and before-after studies that followed-up 27,601 people over 8 weeks to 3 years met the inclusion criteria. Based on the pooled results from these studies, mass media campaigns had a significant effect on promoting moderate intensity walking (pooled relative risk (RR) from 3 studies=1.53, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.25 to 1.87), but did not help participants achieve sufficient levels of physical activity [4 studies pooled RR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.14)]. The apparent effect of media campaigns on reducing sedentary behavior (pooled RR=1.15, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.30) was lost when a relatively low-quality study with large effects was excluded in a sensitivity analysis. In subgroup analyses, campaigns that promoted physical activity as a ‘social norm’ seemed to be more effective in reducing sedentary behavior. Conclusion Mass media campaigns may promote walking but may not reduce sedentary behavior or lead to achieving recommended levels of overall physical activity. Further research is warranted on different campaign types and in low- and middle- income countries. PMID:23915170

  5. World War II Commemoration Committee: Fact Sheet and Suggested Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This packet suggests activities and events that school districts, schools, classes, and educational organizations can conduct to commemorate World War II. Suggestions are made to include local veterans, including those in veteran's and nursing homes and hospitals, and youth at every possible opportunity. Recognition can take the form of military…

  6. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  7. Mobile Phone Apps to Promote Weight Loss and Increase Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferré-Grau, Carme; Montaña-Carreras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no meta-analysis to date has assessed the efficacy of mobile phone apps to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies to compare the efficacy of mobile phone apps compared with other approaches to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies identified by a search of PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus from their inception through to August 2015. Two members of the study team (EG-F, GF-M) independently screened studies for inclusion criteria and extracted data. We included all controlled studies that assessed a mobile phone app intervention with weight-related health measures (ie, body weight, body mass index, or waist circumference) or physical activity outcomes. Net change estimates comparing the intervention group with the control group were pooled across studies using random-effects models. Results We included 12 articles in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Compared with the control group, use of a mobile phone app was associated with significant changes in body weight (kg) and body mass index (kg/m2) of -1.04 kg (95% CI -1.75 to -0.34; I2 = 41%) and -0.43 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.74 to -0.13; I2 = 50%), respectively. Moreover, a nonsignificant difference in physical activity was observed between the two groups (standardized mean difference 0.40, 95% CI -0.07 to 0.87; I2 = 93%). These findings were remarkably robust in the sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was shown. Conclusions Evidence from this study shows that mobile phone app-based interventions may be useful tools for weight loss. PMID:26554314

  8. Reinforcement Learning Models and Their Neural Correlates: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Poornima; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement learning describes motivated behavior in terms of two abstract signals. The representation of discrepancies between expected and actual rewards/punishments – prediction error – is thought to update the expected value of actions and predictive stimuli. Electrophysiological and lesion studies suggest that mesostriatal prediction error signals control behavior through synaptic modification of cortico-striato-thalamic networks. Signals in the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in representing expected value. To obtain unbiased maps of these representations in the human brain, we performed a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that employed algorithmic reinforcement learning models, across a variety of experimental paradigms. We found that the ventral striatum (medial and lateral) and midbrain/thalamus represented reward prediction errors, consistent with animal studies. Prediction error signals were also seen in the frontal operculum/insula, particularly for social rewards. In Pavlovian studies, striatal prediction error signals extended into the amygdala, while instrumental tasks engaged the caudate. Prediction error maps were sensitive to the model-fitting procedure (fixed or individually-estimated) and to the extent of spatial smoothing. A correlate of expected value was found in a posterior region of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, caudal and medial to the orbitofrontal regions identified in animal studies. These findings highlight a reproducible motif of reinforcement learning in the cortico-striatal loops and identify methodological dimensions that may influence the reproducibility of activation patterns across studies. PMID:25665667

  9. Reinforcement learning models and their neural correlates: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chase, Henry W; Kumar, Poornima; Eickhoff, Simon B; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y

    2015-06-01

    Reinforcement learning describes motivated behavior in terms of two abstract signals. The representation of discrepancies between expected and actual rewards/punishments-prediction error-is thought to update the expected value of actions and predictive stimuli. Electrophysiological and lesion studies have suggested that mesostriatal prediction error signals control behavior through synaptic modification of cortico-striato-thalamic networks. Signals in the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in representing expected value. To obtain unbiased maps of these representations in the human brain, we performed a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that had employed algorithmic reinforcement learning models across a variety of experimental paradigms. We found that the ventral striatum (medial and lateral) and midbrain/thalamus represented reward prediction errors, consistent with animal studies. Prediction error signals were also seen in the frontal operculum/insula, particularly for social rewards. In Pavlovian studies, striatal prediction error signals extended into the amygdala, whereas instrumental tasks engaged the caudate. Prediction error maps were sensitive to the model-fitting procedure (fixed or individually estimated) and to the extent of spatial smoothing. A correlate of expected value was found in a posterior region of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, caudal and medial to the orbitofrontal regions identified in animal studies. These findings highlight a reproducible motif of reinforcement learning in the cortico-striatal loops and identify methodological dimensions that may influence the reproducibility of activation patterns across studies. PMID:25665667

  10. Cortical Midline Structures and Autobiographical-Self Processes: An Activation-Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Helder F.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The autobiographical-self refers to a mental state derived from the retrieval and assembly of memories regarding one’s biography. The process of retrieval and assembly, which can focus on biographical facts or personality traits or some combination thereof, is likely to vary according to the domain chosen for an experiment. To date, the investigation of the neural basis of this process has largely focused on the domain of personality traits using paradigms that contrasted the evaluation of one’s traits (self-traits) with those of another person’s (other-traits). This has led to the suggestion that cortical midline structures (CMSs) are specifically related to self states. Here, with the goal of testing this suggestion, we conducted activation-likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses based on data from 28 neuroimaging studies. The ALE results show that both self-traits and other-traits engage CMSs; however, the engagement of medial prefrontal cortex is greater for self-traits than for other-traits, while the posteromedial cortex is more engaged for other-traits than for self-traits. These findings suggest that the involvement CMSs is not specific to the evaluation of one’s own traits, but also occurs during the evaluation of another person’s traits. PMID:24027520

  11. Serum Vitamin D Level and Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity: Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jin; Liu, Jian; Davies, Michael L.; Chen, Weiqian

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence from epidemiological studies concerning the relationship between serum vitamin D concentrations and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is inconsistent. This meta-analysis is aimed at determining the magnitude of the correlation between this common autoimmune disease and vitamin D, an important nutrient known to dampen adaptive immune responses. Methods Through multiple search strategies, relevant literature was identified and evaluated for quality before May 16 2015. Data extracted from eligible studies was synthesized to calculate pooled correlation coefficient (r), mean difference (MD) and odds ratio (OR). The Venice criteria were applied to assess the credibility of the evidence for each statistically significant association. Results A total of 24 reports involving 3489 patients were selected for analysis. RA patients had lower vitamin D levels than healthy controls (MD:-16.52 nmol/L, 95% confidence intervals [CI]:-18.85 to -14.19 nmol/L). There existed a negative relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level and disease activity index, e.g. 25OHD vs. Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28): r = -0.13, 95% CI -0.16 to -0.09; 25OHD vs. C-reactive protein: r = -0.12, 95% CI -0.23 to -0.00. Additionally, latitude-stratified subgroup analysis yielded a relatively stronger negative correlation between 25OHD and DAS28 in low-latitude areas. This inverse relationship also appeared more significant in developing countries than in developed countries. No publication bias was detected. Conclusion RA patients had lower vitamin D values than healthy controls. There was a negative association between serum vitamin D and RA disease activity. However, more strictly controlled studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26751969

  12. Novel Cage-Like Hexanuclear Nickel(II) Silsesquioxane. Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity in Oxidations with Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Yalymov, Alexey I; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Mandelli, Dalmo; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Es'kova, Marina A; Shubina, Elena S; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2016-01-01

    New hexanuclear nickel(II) silsesquioxane [(PhSiO1.5)12(NiO)₆(NaCl)] (1) was synthesized as its dioxane-benzonitrile-water complex (PhSiO1,5)12(NiO)₆(NaCl)(C₄H₈O₂)13(PhCN)₂(H₂O)₂ and studied by X-ray and topological analysis. The compound exhibits cylinder-like type of molecular architecture and represents very rare case of polyhedral complexation of metallasilsesquioxane with benzonitrile. Complex 1 exhibited catalytic activity in activation of such small molecules as light alkanes and alcohols. Namely, oxidation of alcohols with tert-butylhydroperoxide and alkanes with meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The oxidation of methylcyclohexane gave rise to the isomeric ketones and unusual distribution of alcohol isomers. PMID:27213319

  13. Correlation Between Brain Activation Changes and Cognitive Improvement Following Cognitive Remediation Therapy in Schizophrenia: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan-Yan; Wang, Ji-Jun; Yan, Chao; Li, Zi-Qiang; Pan, Xiao; Cui, Yi; Su, Tong; Liu, Tao-Sheng; Tang, Yun-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have indicated that cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) might improve cognitive function by changing brain activations in patients with schizophrenia. However, the results were not consistent in these changed brain areas in different studies. The present activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was conducted to investigate whether cognitive function change was accompanied by the brain activation changes, and where the main areas most related to these changes were in schizophrenia patients after CRT. Analyses of whole-brain studies and whole-brain + region of interest (ROI) studies were compared to explore the effect of the different methodologies on the results. Methods: A computerized systematic search was conducted to collect fMRI and PET studies on brain activation changes in schizophrenia patients from pre- to post-CRT. Nine studies using fMRI techniques were included in the meta-analysis. Ginger ALE 2.3.1 was used to perform meta-analysis across these imaging studies. Results: The main areas with increased brain activation were in frontal and parietal lobe, including left medial frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule in patients after CRT, yet no decreased brain activation was found. Although similar increased activation brain areas were identified in ALE with or without ROI studies, analysis including ROI studies had a higher ALE value. Conclusions: The current findings suggest that CRT might improve the cognition of schizophrenia patients by increasing activations of the frontal and parietal lobe. In addition, it might provide more evidence to confirm results by including ROI studies in ALE meta-analysis. PMID:26904993

  14. The neural bases of difficult speech comprehension and speech production: Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Adank, Patti

    2012-07-01

    The role of speech production mechanisms in difficult speech comprehension is the subject of on-going debate in speech science. Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) analyses were conducted on neuroimaging studies investigating difficult speech comprehension or speech production. Meta-analysis 1 included 10 studies contrasting comprehension of less intelligible/distorted speech with more intelligible speech. Meta-analysis 2 (21 studies) identified areas associated with speech production. The results indicate that difficult comprehension involves increased reliance of cortical regions in which comprehension and production overlapped (bilateral anterior Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS) and anterior Supplementary Motor Area (pre-SMA)) and in an area associated with intelligibility processing (left posterior MTG), and second involves increased reliance on cortical areas associated with general executive processes (bilateral anterior insulae). Comprehension of distorted speech may be supported by a hybrid neural mechanism combining increased involvement of areas associated with general executive processing and areas shared between comprehension and production. PMID:22633697

  15. Modular activation of Rho1 by GPCR signalling imparts polarized myosin II activation during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Stephen; Munjal, Akankshi; Philippe, Jean-Marc; Jha, Ankita; de las Bayonas, Alain Garcia; Saurin, Andrew J; Lecuit, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Polarized cell shape changes during tissue morphogenesis arise by controlling the subcellular distribution of myosin II. For instance, during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation, apical constriction and cell intercalation are mediated by medial-apical myosin II pulses that power deformations, and polarized accumulation of myosin II that stabilizes these deformations. It remains unclear how tissue-specific factors control different patterns of myosin II activation and the ratchet-like myosin II dynamics. Here we report the function of a common pathway comprising the heterotrimeric G proteins Gα12/13, Gβ13F and Gγ1 in activating and polarizing myosin II during Drosophila gastrulation. Gα12/13 and the Gβ13F/γ1 complex constitute distinct signalling modules, which regulate myosin II dynamics medial-apically and/or junctionally in a tissue-dependent manner. We identify a ubiquitously expressed GPCR called Smog required for cell intercalation and apical constriction. Smog functions with other GPCRs to quantitatively control G proteins, resulting in stepwise activation of myosin II and irreversible cell shape changes. We propose that GPCR and G proteins constitute a general pathway for controlling actomyosin contractility in epithelia and that the activity of this pathway is polarized by tissue-specific regulators. PMID:26780298

  16. Changes in physical activity behaviour and physical function after bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Herring, L Y; Stevinson, C; Davies, M J; Biddle, S Jh; Sutton, C; Bowrey, D; Carter, P

    2016-03-01

    Although physical activity performed after bariatric surgery is associated with enhanced weight loss outcomes, there is limited information on patients' physical activity behaviour in this context. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed pre-operative to post-operative changes in physical activity and physical function outcomes among obese adults undergoing bariatric surgery. A total of 50 studies met inclusion criteria with 26 papers reporting data for meta-analysis. Increases in both objectively recorded and self-reported physical activity at 12 months were demonstrated. Studies indicated that there was a shift towards a greater amount of active time, but of a lower intensity within the first 6 months of bariatric surgery, suggested by a reduction in moderate to vigorous physical activity but an increase in step count. A standardized mean difference (SMD) of 1.53 (95% CI: 1.02-2.04) based on nine studies indicated improved walking performance at 12 months. Similarly, analysis of five studies demonstrated increased musculoskeletal function at 3-6 months (SMD: 1.51; 95% CI: 0.60-2.42). No relationship was identified between changes in weight and walking performance post-surgery. More studies assessing physical activity, physical function and weight loss would help understand the role of physical activity in optimizing post-operative weight and functional outcomes. PMID:26783103

  17. A meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies on divergent thinking using activation likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Yang, Wenjing; Tong, Dandan; Sun, Jiangzhou; Chen, Qunlin; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhang, Meng; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    In this study, an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was used to conduct a quantitative investigation of neuroimaging studies on divergent thinking. Based on the ALE results, the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies showed that distributed brain regions were more active under divergent thinking tasks (DTTs) than those under control tasks, but a large portion of the brain regions were deactivated. The ALE results indicated that the brain networks of the creative idea generation in DTTs may be composed of the lateral prefrontal cortex, posterior parietal cortex [such as the inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) and precuneus (BA 7)], anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (BA 32), and several regions in the temporal cortex [such as the left middle temporal gyrus (BA 39), and left fusiform gyrus (BA 37)]. The left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46) was related to selecting the loosely and remotely associated concepts and organizing them into creative ideas, whereas the ACC (BA 32) was related to observing and forming distant semantic associations in performing DTTs. The posterior parietal cortex may be involved in the semantic information related to the retrieval and buffering of the formed creative ideas, and several regions in the temporal cortex may be related to the stored long-term memory. In addition, the ALE results of the structural studies showed that divergent thinking was related to the dopaminergic system (e.g., left caudate and claustrum). Based on the ALE results, both fMRI and structural MRI studies could uncover the neural basis of divergent thinking from different aspects (e.g., specific cognitive processing and stable individual difference of cognitive capability). PMID:25891081

  18. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  19. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:27289447

  20. The transcending benefits of physical activity for individuals with schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-ethnography.

    PubMed

    Soundy, Andy; Freeman, Paul; Stubbs, Brendon; Probst, Michel; Coffee, Pete; Vancampfort, Davy

    2014-12-15

    A systematic review and meta-ethnographic synthesis exploring the experiences of people with schizophrenia and healthcare professionals (HCPs) towards physical activity was undertaken. Major electronic databases were searched from inception until January 2014. Studies were eligible if they considered the experiences and perceptions of people with schizophrenia or the perceptions of HCPs towards physical activity. All included studies were synthesised within a meta-ethnographic approach, including completing a methodological quality assessment. The search strategy identified 106 articles, 11 of which were included in the final analysis. Eight articles considered patients׳ experiences and perceptions, and three articles considered the experiences and perceptions of HCPs. A total of 108 patients and 65 HCPs were included. Three main themes were identified: (1) the influence of identity, culture and the environment on physical activity engagement, (2) access and barriers to participation in physical activity, and (3) the benefits of engaging in physical activity. Aspects within the built, social and political environment as well as aspects of social cognition and perceptual biases influence participation in physical activity for individuals with schizophrenia. Specific recommendations for HCPs are given to help promote physical activity in this population group. PMID:25149128

  1. The effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with dementia: A meta-analysis of randomized control trials.

    PubMed

    Groot, C; Hooghiemstra, A M; Raijmakers, P G H M; van Berckel, B N M; Scheltens, P; Scherder, E J A; van der Flier, W M; Ossenkoppele, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-pharmacological therapies, such as physical activity interventions, are an appealing alternative or add-on to current pharmacological treatment of cognitive symptoms in patients with dementia. In this meta-analysis, we investigated the effect of physical activity interventions on cognitive function in dementia patients, by synthesizing data from 802 patients included in 18 randomized control trials that applied a physical activity intervention with cognitive function as an outcome measure. Post-intervention standardized mean difference (SMD) scores were computed for each study, and combined into pooled effect sizes using random effects meta-analysis. The primary analysis yielded a positive overall effect of physical activity interventions on cognitive function (SMD[95% confidence interval]=0.42[0.23;0.62], p<.01). Secondary analyses revealed that physical activity interventions were equally beneficial in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, SMD=0.38[0.09;0.66], p<.01) and in patients with AD or a non-AD dementia diagnosis (SMD=0.47[0.14;0.80], p<.01). Combined (i.e. aerobic and non-aerobic) exercise interventions (SMD=0.59[0.32;0.86], p<.01) and aerobic-only exercise interventions (SMD=0.41[0.05;0.76], p<.05) had a positive effect on cognition, while this association was absent for non-aerobic exercise interventions (SMD=-0.10[-0.38;0.19], p=.51). Finally, we found that interventions offered at both high frequency (SMD=0.33[0.03;0.63], p<.05) and at low frequency (SMD=0.64[0.39;0.89], p<.01) had a positive effect on cognitive function. This meta-analysis suggests that physical activity interventions positively influence cognitive function in patients with dementia. This beneficial effect was independent of the clinical diagnosis and the frequency of the intervention, and was driven by interventions that included aerobic exercise. PMID:26607411

  2. How Effective Are Active Videogames Among the Young and the Old? Adding Meta-analyses to Two Recent Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Crutzen, Rik; Lu, Amy Shirong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two recent systematic reviews have surveyed the existing evidence for the effectiveness of active videogames in children/adolescents and in elderly people. In the present study, effect sizes were added to these systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were performed. Materials and Methods: All reviewed studies were considered for inclusion in the meta-analyses, but only studies were included that investigated the effectiveness of active videogames, used an experimental design, and used actual health outcomes as the outcome measures (body mass index for children/adolescents [k=5] and functional balance for the elderly [k=6]). Results: The average effect of active videogames in children and adolescents was small and nonsignificant: Hedges' g=0.20 (95 percent confidence interval, −0.08 to 0.48). Limited heterogeneity was observed, and no moderator analyses were performed. For the effect of active videogames on functional balance in the elderly, the analyses revealed a medium-sized and significant effect of g=0.68 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.13–1.24). For the elderly studies, substantial heterogeneity was observed. Moderator analyses showed that there were no significant effects of using a no-treatment control group versus an alternative treatment control group or of using games that were especially created for health-promotion purposes versus off-the-shelf games. Also, intervention duration and frequency, sample size, study quality, and dropout did not significantly moderate the effect of active videogames. Conclusions: The results of these meta-analyses provide preliminary evidence that active videogames can have positive effects on relevant outcome measures in children/adolescents and elderly individuals. PMID:26192486

  3. Catalytically active lead(ii)-imidazolium coordination assemblies with diversified lead(ii) coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Naga Babu, Chatla; Suresh, Paladugu; Srinivas, Katam; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Sampath, Natarajan; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-05-10

    Five Pb(ii)-imidazolium carboxylate coordination assemblies with novel structural motifs were derived from the reaction between the corresponding flexible, semi flexible or rigid imidazolium carboxylic acid ligands and lead nitrate. The imidazolium linker present in these molecules likely plays a triple role such as the counter ion to balance the metal charge, the ligand being an integral part of the final product and the catalyst facilitating carbon-carbon bond formation reaction. These lead-imidazolium coordination assemblies exhibit, variable chemical and thermal stabilities, as well as catalytic activity. These newly prepared catalysts are highly active towards benzoin condensation reactions with good functional group tolerance. PMID:27093629

  4. The moderating impact of temporal separation on the association between intention and physical activity: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Máirtín S; Sharma, Rajeev; Andrews, Megan; Akter, Shahriar; Iverson, Donald; Caputi, Peter; Coltman, Tim; Safadi, Murad

    2016-07-01

    Previous meta-analyses have estimated that the intention-behaviour association in physical activity (PA) is large in magnitude. However, these prior meta-analyses have also revealed a large degree of heterogeneity, suggesting the presence of moderating variables. This study examines the impact of one such moderator, testing the hypothesis that the magnitude of the association between intention and behaviour decreases as the temporal separation between the two increases. A systematic literature search was used to identify published and unpublished studies that met the inclusion criteria. A random-effects meta-regression was conducted to test the study hypothesis. A total of 78 journal articles and 11 unpublished dissertations were identified, yielding 109 effect sizes. The mean number of weeks between the measurement of intention and behaviour was 5.4 (SD = 6.6, range = .43, 26). The average correlation between intention and behaviour was r = 0.51. In line with theoretical predictions, temporal separation was a significant moderator of the intention-behaviour correlation (B = -.014, p < .001) and explained 24% of the between-study variance. This result remained unchanged when entered simultaneously with several control variables. The results of this analysis have important implications both for researchers and for intervention designers aiming to increase rates of PA. PMID:26325473

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ 34C>G polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong-Liang; Li, Gai-Ling; Huang, Hui-Lian; Zhong, Jing; Dai, Li-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) gene polymorphism 34 C>G and colorectal cancer (CRC), a meta-analysis review was performed in this report. METHODS: A systematic literature search and selection of eligible relevant studies were carried out. Nine independent studies with a total number of 4533 cases and 6483 controls were included in the meta-analysis on the association between polymorphism 34 C>G and CRC. RESULTS: There was no evidence for the association between PPAR-γ 34 C>G and CRC if all of the subjects in the nine studies were included. However, CG + GG showed a marginally significant difference from CC (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.69-1.01, P = 0.07) in random-effect model. Stratified meta-analysis indicated that PPAR-γ 34 C>G was associated with colon cancer (OR = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.65-0.99, P = 0.04) in random-effect model, and the G allele decreased colon cancer risk. No significant association was observed between PPAR-γ 34 C>G and rectal cancer. CONCLUSION: PPAR-γ 34 C>G is associated with colon cancer risk, but not associated with CRC and rectal cancer risk. PMID:20440859

  6. Altered Hub Functioning and Compensatory Activations in the Connectome: A Meta-Analysis of Functional Neuroimaging Studies in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Mechelli, Andrea; Ginestet, Cedric; Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Edward T.; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background: Functional neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia have identified abnormal activations in many brain regions. In an effort to interpret these findings from a network perspective, we carried out a meta-analysis of this literature, mapping anatomical locations of under- and over-activation to the topology of a normative human functional connectome. Methods: We included 314 task-based functional neuroimaging studies including more than 5000 patients with schizophrenia and over 5000 controls. Coordinates of significant under- or over-activations in patients relative to controls were mapped to nodes of a normative connectome defined by a prior meta-analysis of 1641 functional neuroimaging studies of task-related activation in healthy volunteers. Results: Under-activations and over-activations were reported in a wide diversity of brain regions. Both under- and over-activations were significantly more likely to be located in hub nodes that constitute the “rich club” or core of the normative connectome. In a subset of 121 studies that reported both under- and over-activations in the same patients, we found that, in network terms, these abnormalities were located in close topological proximity to each other. Under-activation in a peripheral node was more frequently associated specifically with over-activation of core nodes than with over-activation of another peripheral node. Conclusions: Although schizophrenia is associated with altered brain functional activation in a wide variety of regions, abnormal responses are concentrated in hubs of the normative connectome. Task-specific under-activation in schizophrenia is accompanied by over-activation of topologically central, less functionally specialized network nodes, which may represent a compensatory response. PMID:26472684

  7. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  9. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  10. Activation of shallow dopants in II-VI compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-08-01

    The amphoteric native defect model is applied to the understanding of the variations in the dopant activation efficiency in II-VI compounds. It is shown that the location of the common energy reference, the Fermi level stabilization energy, relative to the band edges can be used to determine the doping induced reduction of the formation energy and the enhancement of the concentration of compensating native defects. The model is applied to the most extensively studied compound semiconductors as well as to ternary and quaternary alloys. The effects of the compound ionicity on the dopant activation are briefly discussed.

  11. DNA Binding and Antitumor Activity of α-Diimineplatinum(II) and Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Khosravi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The two water-soluble designed platinum(II) complex, [Pt(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3 (Oct-dtc = Octyldithiocarbamate and bpy = 2,2′ -bipyridine) and palladium(II) complex, [Pd(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity measurements, IR, 1H NMR, and electronic spectra studies. Studies of antitumor activity of these complexes against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been carried out. They show Ic50 values lower than that of cisplatin. The complexes have been investigated for their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and ethidium bromide displacement and gel filtration techniques. Both of these water-soluble complexes bound cooperatively and intercalatively to the CT-DNA at very low concentrations. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. PMID:22110410

  12. Automatic Detection of Student Mental Models during Prior Knowledge Activation in MetaTutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rus, Vasile; Lintean, Mihai; Azevedo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents several methods to automatically detecting students' mental models in MetaTutor, an intelligent tutoring system that teaches students self-regulatory processes during learning of complex science topics. In particular, we focus on detecting students' mental models based on student-generated paragraphs during prior knowledge…

  13. Dinitrogen activation upon reduction of a triiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yousoon; Sloane, Forrest T; Blondin, Geneviève; Abboud, Khalil A; García-Serres, Ricardo; Murray, Leslie J

    2015-01-26

    Reaction of a trinuclear iron(II) complex, Fe3 Br3 L (1), with KC8 under N2 leads to dinitrogen activation products (2) from which Fe3 (NH)3 L (2-1; L is a cyclophane bridged by three β-diketiminate arms) was characterized by X-ray crystallography. (1) H NMR spectra of the protonolysis product of 2 synthesized under (14) N2 and (15) N2 confirm atmospheric N2 reduction, and ammonia is detected by the indophenol assay (yield ∼30 %). IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and elemental analysis on 2 and 2-1 as well as the tri(amido)triiron(II) 3 and tri(methoxo)triiron 4 congeners support our assignment of the reduction product as containing protonated N-atom bridges. PMID:25504859

  14. The effects of Mozart's music on interictal activity in epileptic patients: systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Samaneh Sadat; Layegh, Parvaneh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Foroughipur, Mohsen; Shoeibi, Ali; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Mozart's music has been shown to have promising effects on nervous system functions. In this study, the effects of Mozart's work on epilepsy were reviewed. Articles were obtained from a variety of sources. The results of 12 studies were extracted. Three different meta-analyses were performed to examine (i) the percentage of patients who had changes in their interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) by music therapy; and the changes of IEDs (ii) during and (iii) after exposure to Mozart's music. Data analysis indicated that 84% of patients listening to Mozart's music showed a significant decrease in IEDs. In addition, IEDs were decreased during (31.24%) and after (23.74%) listening to Mozart's compositions. A noteworthy response to music therapy in patients with a higher intelligence quotient, generalized or central discharges, and idiopathic epilepsy was demonstrated. The effect of Mozart's music on epilepsy seems to be significant. However, more randomized control studies are needed to determine its clinical efficacy. PMID:24272274

  15. Physical activity and psychological well-being in advanced age: a meta-analysis of intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Netz, Yael; Wu, Meng-Jia; Becker, Betsy Jane; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2005-06-01

    A meta-analysis examined data from 36 studies linking physical activity to well-being in older adults without clinical disorders. The weighted mean-change effect size for treatment groups (d(C). = 0.24) was almost 3 times the mean for control groups (d(C). = 0.09). Aerobic training was most beneficial (d(C). = 0.29), and moderate intensity activity was the most beneficial activity level (d(C). = 0.34). Longer exercise duration was less beneficial for several types of well-being, though findings are inconclusive. Physical activity had the strongest effects on self-efficacy (d(C).= 0.38), and improvements in cardiovascular status, strength, and functional capacity were linked to well-being improvement overall. Social-cognitive theory is used to explain the effect of physical activity on well-being. PMID:16029091

  16. Effects of Stimulus Type and Strategy on Mental Rotation Network: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomasino, Barbara; Gremese, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We can predict how an object would look like if we were to see it from different viewpoints. The brain network governing mental rotation (MR) has been studied using a variety of stimuli and tasks instructions. By using activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis we tested whether different MR networks can be modulated by the type of stimulus (body vs. non-body parts) or by the type of tasks instructions (motor imagery-based vs. non-motor imagery-based MR instructions). Testing for the bodily and non-bodily stimulus axis revealed a bilateral sensorimotor activation for bodily-related as compared to non-bodily-related stimuli and a posterior right lateralized activation for non-bodily-related as compared to bodily-related stimuli. A top-down modulation of the network was exerted by the MR tasks instructions with a bilateral (preferentially sensorimotor left) network for motor imagery- vs. non-motor imagery-based MR instructions and the latter activating a preferentially posterior right occipito-temporal-parietal network. The present quantitative meta-analysis summarizes and amends previous descriptions of the brain network related to MR and shows how it is modulated by top-down and bottom-up experimental factors. PMID:26779003

  17. The active RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi. IV. The SPOT activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    1999-10-01

    A total of 6 new surface images of II Peg obtained for the years 1997 and 1998 confirms the recently revealed permanent active longitude structure. The lower limit of the active longitudes' lifetime is now extended up to 25 years. A new ``flip-flop'' phenomenon, redefined as a switch of the activity between the active longitudes, has started in summer of 1998. It coincides reasonably well with the moment predicted from the activity cycle of the star. This confirms definitely the cyclic behaviour of the activity of II Peg we recently discovered. Therefore, we assign numbers to the cycles of 4.65 yr since the earliest photoelectric observations of II Peg and define the active longitudes as ``odd'' and ``even'' corresponding to odd and even numbers of cycles. With such a definition, in late 1998 the 7th cycle began and the ``odd'' active longitude became more active. From the analysis of the spot area evolution within the active longitudes we conclude that the activity cycle is developed as a rearrangement of the nearly constant amount of the spot area between the active longitudes. We discuss the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon as a tracer of stellar activity and the role of the unseen secondary in establishing the cycle. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), La Palma, Spain; the 1.25m telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Ukraine; the Phoenix 10 robotic telescope, APT Observatory, Arizona, USA.}

  18. Altered Erythrocyte Glycolytic Enzyme Activities in Type-II Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Aniket V; Bhise, Sunita S; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Katyare, Surendra S

    2016-07-01

    The activity of enzymes of glycolysis has been studied in erythrocytes from type-II diabetic patients in comparison with control. RBC lysate was the source of enzymes. In the diabetics the hexokinase (HK) activity increased 50 % while activities of phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and aldolase (ALD) decreased by 37, 75 and 64 % respectively but were still several folds higher than that of HK. Hence, it is possible that in the diabetic erythrocytes the process of glycolysis could proceed in an unimpaired or in fact may be augmented due to increased levels of G6P. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was comparatively high in both the groups; the diabetic group showed 85 % increase. In control group the HK, PFK and ALD activities showed strong positive correlation with blood sugar level while PGI activity did not show any correlation. In the diabetic group only PFK activity showed positive correlation. The LDH activity only in the control group showed positive correlation with marginal increase with increasing concentrations of glucose. PMID:27382204

  19. Interleukin-6 and risk of colorectal cancer: results from the CLUE II cohort and a meta-analysis of prospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Kakourou, Artemisia; Koutsioumpa, Charalampia; Lopez, David S.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Bradwin, Gary; Rifai, Nader; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between prediagnostic inter-leukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer was evaluated in a nested case–control study and a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Methods Colorectal cancer cases (n = 173) and matched controls (n = 345) were identified between 1989 and 2000 among participants in the CLUE II cohort of Washington Country, Maryland. Matched odds ratios and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Results Participants in the highest third of plasma IL-6 concentration had a 2.48 times higher risk of colon cancer compared to participants in the bottom third (95 % CI 1.26–4.87; p-trend 0.02) after multivariate adjustment. This association did not differ according to the stage of disease, age, sex, or other potential modifying variables and remained statistically significant after adjustment for C-reactive protein concentrations. No statistically significant association was observed for rectal cancer risk. The meta-analysis of six prospective studies yielded an increased but borderline statistically significant risk of colon cancer per 1 U increase in naturally logarithm-transformed IL-6 (summary RR 1.22; 95 % CI 1.00–1.49; I2 46 %). An inverse association was noted for rectal cancer (RR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.54–0.88; I2 0 %), but there was evidence for small-study effects (p 0.02). Conclusion Our findings provide support for a modest positive association between IL-6 concentrations and colon cancer risk. More work is needed to determine whether IL-6 is a valid marker of colorectal inflammation and whether such inflammation contributes to colon and rectal cancer risk. PMID:26220152

  20. Casein kinase II stimulates rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Thomas M; Haldar, Dipak

    2002-09-01

    Rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase (mtGAT) possesses 14 consensus sites for casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylation. To study the functional relevance of phosphorylation to the activity of mtGAT, we treated isolated rat liver mitochondria with CKII and found that CKII stimulated mtGAT activity approximately 2-fold. Protein phosphatase-lambda treatment reversed the stimulation of mtGAT by CKII. Labeling of both solubilized and non-solubilized mitochondria with CKII and [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in a 32P-labeled protein of 85kDa, the molecular weight of mtGAT. Our findings suggest that CKII stimulates mtGAT activity by phosphorylation of the acyltransferase. The significance of this observation with respect to hormonal control of the enzyme is discussed. PMID:12207885

  1. The photospheric filling factor of the active binary II Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, G.; Rodonó, M.; Leto, G.; Cutispoto, G.

    1999-12-01

    UBV and JHK photometry of the active single-lined binary II Peg, we performed in 1995, is presented. A method to determine the fraction of the photosphere covered by spots (filling factor) and to check the accuracy of generally assumed values of photospheric parameters has been developed. The procedure is based on the comparison between multiband fluxes and low resolution synthetic spectra weighted on the base of the spot filling factor and scaled with the ratio between the star radius and distance (R/d), so that we can also estimate the R/d ratio. A chi 2 fit has been performed for II Peg observations close to the light maximum and minimum by assuming reliable values of the photospheric parameters. Although a unique solution cannot be reached, we found clear indication for a spot filling factor at light maximum >= 40%. We find that the same set of parameters that gives us the best fit solutions at light maximum also provides the best fit at light minimum. The resulting solutions are consistent with the observed amplitude of the photometric wave, and with the commonly accepted value of R, unspotted V magnitude and spectral classification for II Pegasi.

  2. Reducing occupational sedentary time: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence on activity-permissive workstations.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, M; Eakin, E G; Straker, L; Owen, N; Dunstan, D W; Reid, N; Healy, G N

    2014-10-01

    Excessive sedentary time is detrimentally linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. Studies have been investigating the use of activity-permissive workstations to reduce sedentary time in office workers, a highly sedentary target group. This review systematically summarizes the evidence for activity-permissive workstations on sedentary time, health-risk biomarkers, work performance and feasibility indicators in office workplaces. In July 2013, a literature search identified 38 relevant peer-reviewed publications. Key findings were independently extracted by two researchers. The average intervention effect on sedentary time was calculated via meta-analysis. In total, 984 participants across 19 field-based trials and 19 laboratory investigations were included, with sample sizes ranging from n = 2 to 66 per study. Sedentary time, health-risk biomarkers and work performance indicators were reported in 13, 23 and 23 studies, respectively. The pooled effect size from the meta-analysis was -77 min of sedentary time/8-h workday (95% confidence interval = -120, -35 min). Non-significant changes were reported for most health- and work-related outcomes. Studies with acceptability measures reported predominantly positive feedback. Findings suggest that activity-permissive workstations can be effective to reduce occupational sedentary time, without compromising work performance. Larger and longer-term randomized-controlled trials are needed to understand the sustainability of the sedentary time reductions and their longer-term impacts on health- and work-related outcomes. PMID:25040784

  3. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  4. Normal protein content but abnormally inhibited enzyme activity in muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Zierz, Stephan

    2014-04-15

    The biochemical consequences of the disease causing mutations of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are still enigmatic. Therefore, CPT II was characterized in muscle biopsies of nine patients with genetically proven muscle CPT II deficiency. Total CPT activity (CPT I+CPT II) of patients was not significantly different from that of controls. Remaining activities upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton X-100 were significantly reduced in patients. Immunohistochemically CPT II protein was predominantly expressed in type-I-fibers with the same intensity in patients as in controls. Western blot showed the same CPT II staining intensity ratio in patients and controls. CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations estimated by ELISA were not significantly different in patients and in controls. Citrate synthase activity in patients was significantly increased. Total CPT activity significantly correlated with both CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations in patients and controls. This implies (i) that normal total CPT activity in patients with muscle CPT II deficiency is not due to compensatory increase of CPT I activity and that (ii) the mutant CPT II is enzymatically active. The data further support the notion that in muscle CPT II deficiency enzyme activity and protein content are not reduced, but rather abnormally inhibited when fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:24602495

  5. The antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Michael L; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R; Bolhuis, Albert

    2014-11-01

    Biofilm-related bacterial infections pose a significant problem, as they are generally more tolerant to antibiotics and the immune system. Development of novel compounds with antibiofilm activity is therefore paramount. In this study we have analysed metal complexes of the general structure [M(IL)(AL)](2+) (where IL represents functionalised 1,10-phenanthrolines and AL represents 1S,2S- or 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane) and [Cu(IL)3](2+). Antimicrobial activity was tested on a number of bacterial strains, showing that copper(II) compounds were active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, albeit that activity was generally higher for the former. The antibiofilm activity was then determined against a clinical isolate of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Strikingly, the copper complexes tested showed significant activity against biofilms, and were better in the removal of biofilms than vancomycin, an antibiotic that is currently used in the treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:25124857

  6. Stimulus Complexity and Categorical Effects in Human Auditory Cortex: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Fabienne; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Toussaint, Alain; Belin, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the functional organization of human auditory cortex typically examine responses to different sound categories. An alternative approach is to characterize sounds with respect to their amount of variation in the time and frequency domains (i.e., spectral and temporal complexity). Although the vast majority of published studies examine contrasts between discrete sound categories, an alternative complexity-based taxonomy can be evaluated through meta-analysis. In a quantitative meta-analysis of 58 auditory neuroimaging studies, we examined the evidence supporting current models of functional specialization for auditory processing using grouping criteria based on either categories or spectro-temporal complexity. Consistent with current models, analyses based on typical sound categories revealed hierarchical auditory organization and left-lateralized responses to speech sounds, with high speech sensitivity in the left anterior superior temporal cortex. Classification of contrasts based on spectro-temporal complexity, on the other hand, revealed a striking within-hemisphere dissociation in which caudo-lateral temporal regions in auditory cortex showed greater sensitivity to spectral changes, while anterior superior temporal cortical areas were more sensitive to temporal variation, consistent with recent findings in animal models. The meta-analysis thus suggests that spectro-temporal acoustic complexity represents a useful alternative taxonomy to investigate the functional organization of human auditory cortex. PMID:21833294

  7. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia: A Meta-analysis and Our Studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain.The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases.Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords "hypertension" or "pre-eclampsia," "angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody," and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015.Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale with some modifications.Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis.Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19-62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20-7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively).The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data and the language limitation during

  8. Enhanced dewaterability of waste activated sludge by Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Deng, Yongchao; Wang, Liqun; Yi, Kaixin; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-01

    The effect of Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate (Fe(II)-PMS) oxidation on the waste activated sludge (WAS) dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. The capillary suction time (CST), specific resistance to filterability (SRF) of sludge and water content (WC) of dewatered sludge cake were chosen as the main parameters to evaluate the sludge dewaterability. Experimental results showed that Fe(II)-PMS effectively disintegrated sludge and improved sludge dewaterability. High CST and SRF reduction (90% and 97%) was achieved at the optimal conditions of PMS (HSO5(-)) 0.9mmol/gVSS, Fe(II) 0.81mmol/gVSS, and pH 6.8. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy before and after Fe(II)-PMS oxidation were determined to explain the enhanced dewatering mechanism. The release of EPS-bound water induced by the destruction of EPS was the primary reason for the improvement of sludge dewaterability during Fe(II)-PMS oxidation. PMID:26851897

  9. Is physical activity a part of who I am? A review and meta-analysis of identity, schema and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Kaushal, Navin; Quinlan, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Two parallel literatures on the physical activity (PA) identity and schema constructs have the potential to supplement traditional social cognitive approaches used for PA promotion. The purpose of this paper was to review schema/identity research and appraise its relationship with PA via meta-analysis followed by thematic analyses of its correlates, as well as its proposed mechanisms on PA. Eligible studies were from English, peer-reviewed published articles that examined identity and/or schema in the context of PA. Searches were completed in June 2015 in five databases. Sixty-two independent data-sets (32 available for meta-analysis), primarily of modest quality, were identified. Results of the random effects meta-analysis showed that the point-estimate between identity/schema and behaviour was r = .44 (CI = .39-.48), and invariant to selected study characteristics. Thematic review showed that identity/schema was associated with commitment, ability, affective judgments, identified/integrated regulation and social comparison and predicted intention, self-regulatory efficacy, and self-regulation strategy use. It had reliable evidence as a moderator of the intention-behavior relationship, was associated with increases in the speed of processing of relevant information and created negative affect under hypothetical identity-behavior discrepant situations. While this initial research is promising, more rigorous research designs, including interventions to increase identity/schema, are warranted. PMID:26805431

  10. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = −.20] and active (SMD = −0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = −1.06) and anxiety (SMD = −1.24). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. PMID:27165967

  11. Antiviral activity of platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes of pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Varadinova, T; Kovala-Demertzi, D; Rupelieva, M; Demertzis, M; Genova, P

    2001-04-01

    A heterocyclic compound, pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (HFoTsc), and its six metal coordinated bound complexes, three with platinum (II) and three with palladium (II), were studied for their activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in cultured cells. According to their cytotoxicity the compounds were divided into two groups. Group I (cytotoxic compounds) included all three palladium complexes and [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2, with maximum non-toxic concentration (MNC) of 1-10 micromol/l and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 20-100 micromol/l. Group 2 (low cytotoxic compounds) with MNC of 100 micromol/l and CC50 of 548-5820 micromol/l included compounds in the following order: [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2activity. IC50 and SI values of HFoTsc increased in parallel with the duration of action in HSV-1-infected cells. All three platinum complexes as well as [Pd(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 and [Pd(FoTsc)2] inhibited HSV- I infection following a structure-activity relationship but only [Pt(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 expressed a significant selectivity comparable to that of HFoTsc. However, [PdCl(FoTsc)] acting 48 hrs gave a higher infectious HSV-1 titer (170%) compared to control (100%, no compound). PMID:11719987

  12. Synthesis, Characterization and Antiproliferative Activity of the Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) Complexes of 2-(4-Thiazolyl)Benzimidazole (Thiabendazole)

    PubMed Central

    Glowiak, Tadeusz; Opolski, Adam; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    Complexes of 2-(4-thiazolyi)benzimidazole (thiabendazole, THBD) with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(ll) of general formula ML2(NO3)2 H2O and complexes of Pd(II) and Pt(II) of general formula ML2Cl2 H2O have been obtained and characterized by elemental analyses, IR and far IR spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The X-ray crystal structure of the copper(II) complex has been determined. The in vitro cell proliferation inhibitory activity of these compounds was examined against human cancer cell lines A 549 (lung carcinoma), HCV-29 T (urinary bladder carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast cancer), T47D (breast cancer), MES-SA (uterine carcinoma) and HL-60 (promyelocytic leukemia). Pt-THBD has been found to exhibit an antileukemic activity of the HL-60 line cells matching that of an arbitrary criterion. PMID:18475995

  13. Binuclear Rhodium(II) Complexes With Selective Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bień, M; Lachowicz, T M; Rybka, A; Pruchnik, F P; Trynda, L

    1997-01-01

    Binuclear rhodium(II) complexes [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] {R = H, Me; N-N = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)} and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) (R = Me, Et;) have been synthesized and their structure and properties have been studied by electronic, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of these complexes against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus has been investigated. The most active antibacterial agents against E. coli were [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) {R = H and Me} which were considerably more active than the appropriate nitrogen ligands. The complexes show low activity against S. aureus. The activity of the complexes [Rh(2)(OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](OOCR)(2) against E. coli decreases in the series: R=H congruent withCH(3)>C(2)H(5)>C(3)H(7) congruent withC(4)H(9). The reverse order was found in the case of S. aureus. PMID:18475773

  14. Effect of school-based physical activity interventions on body mass index in children: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kevin C.; Kuramoto, Lisa K.; Schulzer, Michael; Retallack, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing at an alarming rate. Many local governments have enacted policies to increase physical activity in schools as a way to combat childhood obesity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of school-based physical activity interventions on body mass index (BMI) in children. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to September 2008. We also hand-searched relevant journals and article reference lists. We included randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials that had objective data for BMI from before and after the intervention, that involved school-based physical activity interventions and that lasted for a minimum of 6 months. Results Of 398 potentially relevant articles that we identified, 18 studies involving 18 141 children met the inclusion criteria. The participants were primarily elementary school children. The study duration ranged from 6 months to 3 years. In 15 of these 18 studies, there was some type of co-intervention. Meta-analysis showed that BMI did not improve with physical activity interventions (weighted mean difference –0.05 kg/m2, 95% confidence interval –0.19 to 0.10). We found no consistent changes in other measures of body composition. Interpretation School-based physical activity interventions did not improve BMI, although they had other beneficial health effects. Current population-based policies that mandate increased physical activity in schools are unlikely to have a significant effect on the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. PMID:19332753

  15. Transcription activation at class II CRP-dependent promoters: the role of different activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodius, V A; West, D M; Webster, C L; Busby, S J; Savery, N J

    1997-01-01

    Transcription activation by the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) at Class II promoters is dependent on direct interactions between two surface-exposed activating regions (AR1 and AR2) and two contact sites in RNA polymerase. The effects on transcription activation of disrupting either AR1 or AR2 have been measured at different Class II promoters. AR2 but not AR1 is essential for activation at all the Class II promoters that were tested. The effects of single positive control substitutions in AR1 and AR2 vary from one promoter to another: the effects of the different substitutions are contingent on the -35 hexamer sequence. Abortive initiation assays have been used to quantify the effects of positive control substitutions in each activating region on the kinetics of transcription initiation at the Class II CRP- dependent promoter pmelRcon. At this promoter, the HL159 substitution in AR1 results in a defect in the initial binding of RNA polymerase whilst the KE101 substitution in AR2 reduces the rate of isomerization from the closed to the open complex. PMID:9016561

  16. In vitro studies of the loss of antibacterial activity of oxytetracycline in presence of Ca(II) or Mg(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Naz, S; Khan, K A; Zubairi, S A

    1996-07-01

    The results of a comparative study, which evaluated the in vitro effect on the antibacterial activity of oxytetracycline (OTC, CAS 79-57-2) in presence of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions suggest that susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus pumilis and Bacillus subtilis to OTC is reduced in presence of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions. As the ratio of concentration of Ca(II)/Mg(II) to OTC was increased, antibacterial activity of OTC declined. In addition to the difference observed between the antibacterial effect of pure OTC and its Ca(II)/Mg(II) complexes, it was found that decline in antibacterial activity is greater for Mg(II)-OTC complex than Ca(II)-OTC complex for the same concentration of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions. PMID:8842342

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and biological activities of N4O2 Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Amin, Kr. Mohammad Yusuf; Lateef, Abdul

    The Schiff base ligand, bis(indoline-2-one)triethylenetetramine (L) obtained from condensation of triethylenetetramine and isatin was used to synthesize the complexes of type, [ML]Cl2 [M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)]. L was characterized on the basis of the results of elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectroscopic studies. The stoichiometry, bonding and stereochemistries of complexes were ascertained on the basis of results of elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility values, molar conductance and various spectroscopic studies. EPR, UV-vis and magnetic moments revealed an octahedral geometry for complexes. L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity. Analgesic activity of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes was also tested in rats by tail flick method. Both complexes were found to possess good antibacterial and moderate analgesic activity.

  18. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Adinarayana Reddy, S.; Reddy, Y. P.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  19. Angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C polymorphism increases the risk of pregnancy hypertensive disorders: Evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, LuShun; Yang, HanQi; Qin, HaoJie; Zhang, Kui

    2014-06-01

    Pregnancy hypertensive disorders (PHDs) are considered to be a multifactorial and multisystemic disorder with a genetic predisposition. Alterations in the renin-angiotensin system are considered to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of the PHDs. However, results from published studies on the association between the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) A1166C (rs5186) gene polymorphism and the risk of PHDs are conflicting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether an association exists between AT1R A1166C gene polymorphism and PHDs in epidemiologic studies. We searched the PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biomedicine Literature (CBM) databases from their inception to July 2012. A total of 18 case-control studies, including a total of 1635 cases and 1934 controls, were available for this analysis. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the C allele and the AC/CC genotypes with PHDs in an overall comparison. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the results suggested that the C allele and the AC/CC genotypes were associated with risk of PHDs in Asians. Our findings indicate that the AT1R gene 1166C allele and the AC/CC genotypes were positively associated with the PHDs, especially in Asians. However, well-designed multicenter studies with a larger sample size should be conducted to confirm the results. PMID:23223091

  20. Residential construction demonstration project, Cycle II: Active ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of the performance of natural and mechanical ventilation in Pacific Northwest homes. The analysis was part of Cycle II of the Residential Construction Demonstration Project, sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Since 1986, the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) has sponsored the collection of data on energy efficient homes in the Pacific Northwest that comply with these new standards and requirements. Cycle II of RCDP was conducted between September 1987 and April 1990. It concentrated on energy innovations in homes built to the Super Good Cents specification. All of the test homes have electric heat and mechanical ventilation systems. Seven different types of active ventilation systems are represented in the homes. Three of these system types are equipped with heat recovery devices, and are represented in approximately a quarter of the test homes. The potential for both natural and mechanical ventilation was measured. Potential structural leakage was measured by blower door testing. Flow rate and operating time of mechanical ventilation systems were measured with flow hoods and hour meters. Actual ventilation was measured by using a passive tracer gas technique for several weeks during the heating season and at times of normal occupancy.

  1. Residential construction demonstration project, Cycle II: Active ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report documents the analysis of the performance of natural and mechanical ventilation in Pacific Northwest homes. The analysis was part of Cycle II of the Residential Construction Demonstration Project, sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Since 1986, the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) has sponsored the collection of data on energy efficient homes in the Pacific Northwest that comply with these new standards and requirements. Cycle II of RCDP was conducted between September 1987 and April 1990. It concentrated on energy innovations in homes built to the Super Good Cents specification. All of the test homes have electric heat and mechanical ventilation systems. Seven different types of active ventilation systems are represented in the homes. Three of these system types are equipped with heat recovery devices, and are represented in approximately a quarter of the test homes. The potential for both natural and mechanical ventilation was measured. Potential structural leakage was measured by blower door testing. Flow rate and operating time of mechanical ventilation systems were measured with flow hoods and hour meters. Actual ventilation was measured by using a passive tracer gas technique for several weeks during the heating season and at times of normal occupancy.

  2. The Effects of Workplace Physical Activity Programs on Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Silva, Isabel; Teixeira, Pedro M; Santos, Rute; Abreu, Sandra; Moreira, Carla; Mota, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of physical activity (PA) interventions at the workplace to reduce musculoskeletal pain among employees and assesses the effect size of these programs using meta-analysis. Four databases (i.e., PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane) were searched for research trials, which included comparison groups of employees that assessed PA programs, musculoskeletal pain, and health-related behaviors, published between January 1990 and March 2013. The meta-analysis estimates of standardized mean differences (Hedges' g) present significant evidence of less general pain (g = -.40 with a 95% confidence interval [CI] = [-0.78, -0.02]) and neck and shoulder pain (g = -.37 with a 95% CI = [-0.63, -0.12]) in intervention groups. The few studies of low back pain and arm, elbow, wrist, hand, or finger pain did not present sufficient statistically significant evidence. Consistent evidence demonstrates that workplace PA interventions significantly reduce general musculoskeletal pain and neck and shoulder pain. More studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of work-related PA interventions for arm, elbow, wrist, hand or finger, and low back pain. PMID:27147634

  3. Physical activity in the treatment of Post-traumatic stress disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Simon; Vancampfort, Davy; Steel, Zachary; Newby, Jill; Ward, Philip B; Stubbs, Brendon

    2015-12-15

    People with PTSD experience high levels of cardiovascular disease and comorbid mental health problems. Physical activity (PA) is an effective intervention in the general population. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of PA on PTSD. We searched major electronic databases from inception till 03/2015 for RCTs of PA interventions among people with PTSD. A random effects meta-analysis calculating hedges g was conducted. From a potential of 812 hits, four unique RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n=200, mean age of participants 34-52 years). The methodological quality of included trials was satisfactory, and no major adverse events were reported. PA was significantly more effective compared to control conditions at decreasing PTSD and depressive symptoms among people with PTSD. There was insufficient data to investigate the effect on anthropometric or cardiometabolic outcomes. Results suggest that PA may be a useful adjunct to usual care to improve the health of people with PTSD. Although there is a relative paucity of data, there is reason to be optimistic for including PA as an intervention for people with PTSD, particularly given the overwhelming evidence of the benefits of PA in the general population. Robust effectiveness and implementation studies are required. PMID:26500072

  4. Effects of hydrogen bonding on internal conversion of GFP-like chromophores. II. The meta-amino systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Wen; Huang, Guan-Jhih; Hsu, Hung-Yu; Prabhakar, Ch; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2013-03-01

    To rationalize the efficient quenching of the fluorescence and the Z → E photoisomerization of m-ABDI, the meta-amino analogue of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore, in protic solvents, the femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence and transient infrared (TRIR) spectra of m-ABDI in CD3CN, CH3OH, and CD3OD are determined. For solutions in CD3CN, the fluorescence decay lifetime is ∼7.9 ns and IR absorption lines near 1513, 1531, 1557, and 1613 cm(-1) of m-ABDI in its electronically excited state were observed with a decay time >5 ns. For solutions in CH3OH, the fluorescence decay is double exponential with time constants of ∼16 and 62 ps. In addition to IR absorption lines of m-ABDI in its electronically excited state with a decay time of ∼16 ps, new features near 1513, 1532, 1554, and 1592 cm(-1) were observed to have a rise time of ∼19 ps and a decay constant of ∼58 ps, indicating formation of an intermediate. The assignments for the IR spectra of the ground and excited states were assisted with DFT and TDDFT calculations, respectively. We conclude that the torsion of the exocyclic C═C bond (the τ torsion) is responsible for the nonradiative decay of electronically excited m-ABDI in CD3CN. However, in CH3OH and CD3OD, the solute-solvent hydrogen bonding (SSHB) interactions diminish significantly the barrier of the τ torsion and induce a new pathway that competes successfully with the τ torsion, consistent with the efficient fluorescence quenching and the diminished yield for Z → E photoisomerization. The new pathway is likely associated with excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) from the solvent to m-ABDI, particularly the carbonyl group, and generates an intermediate (ESPT*) that is weakly fluorescent. PMID:23402432

  5. Role of yoga for patients with type II diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Jagannathan, Aarti; Philip, Mariamma; Thulasi, Arun; Angadi, Praveen; Raghuram, Nagarathna

    2016-04-01

    To understand the role and efficacy of yoga in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, this meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic data bases searched were PubMed/Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, IndMED, CENTRAL, Cochrane library, CamQuest and CamBase till December 17, 2014. Eligible outcomes were fasting blood sugar (FBS), post prandial blood sugar (PPBS) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HBA1C). Randomized controlled trials and controlled trials were eligible. Studies focussing only on relaxation or meditation or multimodal intervention were not included. A total of 17 RCTs were included for review. Data from research articles on patients, methods, interventions- control and results were extracted. Mean and standard deviations were utilized for calculating standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval. Heterogeneity was assessed with the help of I(2) statistics. χ(2) was used to rule out the effects of heterogeneity due to chance alone. Beneficial effects of yoga as an add-on intervention to standard treatment in comparison to standard treatment were observed for FBS [Standardized Mean Difference (SMD) -1.40, 95%CI -1.90 to -0.90, p˂0.00001]; PPBS [SMD -0.91, 95%CI -1.34 to -0.48, p˂0.0001] as well as HBA1C [SMD -0.64, 95%CI -0.97 to -0.30, p˂0.0002]. But risk of bias was overall high for included studies. With this available evidence, yoga can be considered as add-on intervention for management of diabetes. PMID:27062957

  6. The active RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi. II. Surface images for 1992-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    1998-12-01

    Using new high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations carried out in 1992-1996, nine surface images of II Peg are obtained. The inversion technique applied is the recently developed Occamian approach, which does not put any artificial constraints on the solution and provides an error analysis of the solution. The surface imaging is applied to Ca{ i, Fe{ i, and Ni{ i lines simultaneously, a number of blending atomic and molecular lines being included into the line list. Two high-latitude active regions are found to dominate in all seasons, which determine the spectroscopic and photometric variability. No cool polar cap is seen. The positions of the spots are constantly migrating to earlier orbital phases with approximately the same rate. This motion of the spot configuration means a shorter rotational period, which is just about the mean photometric period. The mean longitude separation between the active regions is about 180°. This is considered as two active longitudes. The largest of the two spots seems to be close to the central meridian, i.e. tends to be faced toward the secondary. In 1994 it changed its position from one active longitude to another, showing the effect of switching the activity between the longitudes. based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), La Palma, Spain; the McMath telescope of the National Solar Observatory, USA; the 2.6 m and 1.25 m telescopes of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Ukraine; the 2m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory, Rozhen, Bulgaria; the 2m telescope of the Pic du Midi Observatory, France

  7. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  8. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohd F.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m2/g and 0.17 cm2/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  9. Active interlock for the NSLS-II damping wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Willeke, F.

    2012-07-01

    The NSLS-II is a 3rd generation light source with ultra-low beam emittance that is currently under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Because the power of the synchrotron radiation from the damping wiggler (DW) is about 64 kW, a slight mis-steer can result in severe damage to the vacuum chamber. To avoid such problems, an active interlock system is being considered. The system dumps the beam when it departs from the predefined safe window in the phase space. In this paper, we present simple geometric arguments from which we define the safe window on the basis of betatron amplitudes. This window can be applied to any DW around the ring. For the entrance of the wiggler, we obtained window of Δx=±8.4 mm, Δx'=±429 μrad and Δy=±2.1 mm, Δy'=±449 μrad.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareem, Abdul; Zafar, Hina; Sherwani, Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2014-10-01

    An effective series of 18 membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of the type [MLX2], where X = Cl or NO3 have been synthesized by template condensation reaction of oxalyl dihydrazide with dibenzoylmethane and metal salt in 2:2:1 molar ratio. The formation of macrocyclic framework, stereochemistry and their overall geometry have been characterized by various physico-chemical studies viz., elemental analysis, electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), I.R, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TGA/DTA studies. These studies suggest formation of octahedral macrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II). The molar conductance values suggest nonelectrolytic nature for all the complexes. Thermogravimatric analysis shows that all the complexes are stable up to 600 °C. All these complexes have been tested against different human cancer cell lines i.e. human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep3B), human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) and normal cells (PBMC). The newly synthesized 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes during in vitro anticancer evaluation, displayed moderate to good cytotoxicity on liver (Hep3B), cervical (HeLa) and breast (MCF7) cancer cell lines, respectively. The most effective anticancer cadmium complex (C34H28N10CdO10) was found to be active with IC50 values, 2.44 ± 1.500, 3.55 ± 1.600 and 4.82 ± 1.400 in micro-molar on liver, cervical and breast cancer cell lines, respectively.

  11. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  12. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  13. Activation analysis of the PULSAR-II fusion power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The PULSAR-II pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes a blanket made of the vanadium alloy, V-5Cr-5Ti, and cooled with liquid lithium. The shield is made of a mixture of the low activation austenitic steel (Tenelon) and vanadium. The blanket is assumed to be replaced every 5.6 full power years (FPY) and the shield is assumed to stay in place for 30 FPY. The activity induced in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is higher than the activity induced in the shield after 30 FPY. At shutdown, the blanket and shield activities are 2678 MCi and 1747 MCi, respectively. One year after shutdown the shield activity drops to 18 MCi compared to 84 MCi for the blanket. The total decay heat generated in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is 34.7 MW and drops to 17.6 MW within an hour. At shutdown, 25.3 MW of decay heat are generated in the shield, dropping to only 0.1 MW within the first year. One week after shutdown, the values of the integrated decay heat are 1770 GJ for the blanket and 469 GJ for the shield. The radwaste classification of the reactor structure is evaluated according to both the NRC 10CFR61 and Fetter waste disposal concentration limits. After 5.6 years of irradiation, the blanket will only qualify for Class C low level waste. After 30 years of operation, the shield will also qualify for disposal as Class C waste. Only remote maintenance will be allowed inside the containment building.

  14. Treatment Effects of Removable Functional Appliances in Pre-Pubertal and Pubertal Class II Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Primožič, Jasmina; Franchi, Lorenzo; Contardo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment effects of removable functional appliances in Class II malocclusion patients according to the pre-pubertal or pubertal growth phase has yet to be clarified. Objectives To assess and compare skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of removable functional appliances in Class II malocclusion treatment between pre-pubertal and pubertal patients. Search methods Literature survey using the Medline, SCOPUS, LILACS and SciELO databases, the Cochrane Library from inception to May 31, 2015. A manual search was also performed. Selection criteria Randomised (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials with a matched untreated control group. No restrictions were set regarding the type of removable appliance whenever used alone. Data collection and analysis For the meta-analysis, cephalometric parameters on the supplementary mandibular growth were the main outcomes, with other cephalometric parameters considered as secondary outcomes. Risk of bias in individual and across studies were evaluated along with sensitivity analysis for low quality studies. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals for annualised changes were computed according to a random model. Differences between pre-pubertal and pubertal patients were assessed by subgroup analyses. GRADE assessment was performed for the main outcomes. Results Twelve articles (but only 3 RCTs) were included accounting for 8 pre-pubertal and 7 pubertal groups. Overall supplementary total mandibular length and mandibular ramus height were 0.95 mm (0.38, 1.51) and 0.00 mm (-0.52, 0.53) for pre-pubertal patients and 2.91 mm (2.04, 3.79) and 2.18 mm (1.51, 2.86) for pubertal patients, respectively. The subgroup difference was significant for both parameters (p<0.001). No maxillary growth restrain or increase in facial divergence was seen in either subgroup. The GRADE assessment was low for the pre-pubertal patients, and generally moderate for the pubertal patients. Conclusions Taking into account the limited quality and

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some new VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based NNO Schiff base derived from 2-aminothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanithi, M.; Kodimunthiri, D.; Rajarajan, M.; Tharmaraj, P.

    2011-11-01

    Coordination compounds of VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminothiazole with 3-formyl chromone were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass, EPR, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Cu(II) complex possesses tetrahedrally distorted square planar geometry whereas Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The VO(IV) complex shows square pyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of Cu (II) complex showed a well defined redox couple Cu(II)/Cu(I) with quasireversible nature. The antimicrobial activity against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger was screened and compared to the activity of the ligand. Emission spectrum was recorded for the ligand and the metal(II) complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured and found to have one fourth of the activity of urea. The SEM image of the copper(II) complex implies that the size of the particles is 2 μm.

  16. Function of redox-active tyrosine in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-06-01

    Water oxidation at photosystem II Mn-cluster is mediated by the redox-active tyrosine Y(Z). We calculated the redox potential (E(m)) of Y(Z) and its symmetrical counterpart Y(D), by solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The calculated E(m)(Y( )/Y(-)) were +926 mV/+694 mV for Y(Z)/Y(D) with the Mn-cluster in S2 state. Together with the asymmetric position of the Mn-cluster relative to Y(Z/D), differences in H-bond network between Y(Z) (Y(Z)/D1-His(190)/D1-Asn(298)) and Y(D) (Y(D)/D2-His(189)/D2-Arg(294)/CP47-Glu(364)) are crucial for E(m)(Y(Z/D)). When D1-His(190) is protonated, corresponding to a thermally activated state, the calculated E(m)(Y(Z)) was +1216 mV, which is as high as the E(m) for P(D1/D2). We observed deprotonation at CP43-Arg(357) upon S-state transition, which may suggest its involvement in the proton exit pathway. E(m)(Y(D)) was affected by formation of P(D2)(+) (but not P(D1)(+)) and sensitive to the protonation state of D2-Arg(180). This points to an electrostatic link between Y(D) and P(D2). PMID:16513785

  17. Truancy, grade point average, and sexual activity: a meta-analysis of risk indicators for youth substance use.

    PubMed

    Hallfors, Denise; Vevea, Jack L; Iritani, Bonita; Cho, HyunSan; Khatapoush, Shereen; Saxe, Leonard

    2002-05-01

    Society increasingly holds schools responsible for the effectiveness of health promotion activities, such as drug abuse prevention efforts funded through the federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools program. Consequently, school districts use student surveys as a method for assessing trends and evaluating effects of programs on behavior. Because cost and practical concerns often preclude consistent population-based school survey sampling, risk indicators can provide an essential tool in analyzing needs assessment and program evaluation data. In this paper, three risk measures associated with substance use were selected from among commonly used school surveys. These measures--truancy, grade point average, and recent sexual intercourse--were compared, using meta-analysis techniques, to assess the reliability of risk measures across different survey instruments, different communities, and different points in time. Truancy was judged superior, because of its strong predictive value, particularly among younger students, and because rates can be compared to school records to assess sampling validity over time. PMID:12109176

  18. Localising semantic and syntactic processing in spoken and written language comprehension: an Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Jennifer M; Vitello, Sylvia; Woollams, Anna M; Adank, Patti

    2015-02-01

    We conducted an Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to identify brain regions that are recruited by linguistic stimuli requiring relatively demanding semantic or syntactic processing. We included 54 functional MRI studies that explicitly varied the semantic or syntactic processing load, while holding constant demands on earlier stages of processing. We included studies that introduced a syntactic/semantic ambiguity or anomaly, used a priming manipulation that specifically reduced the load on semantic/syntactic processing, or varied the level of syntactic complexity. The results confirmed the critical role of the posterior left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG) in semantic and syntactic processing. These results challenge models of sentence comprehension highlighting the role of anterior LIFG for semantic processing. In addition, the results emphasise the posterior (but not anterior) temporal lobe for both semantic and syntactic processing. PMID:25576690

  19. The Solar Ultraviolet Spectrum Estimated Using the Mg II K Index and Ca II K disk Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    As part of a program to estimate the solar spectrum backward in time to the early twentieth century, we have generated fits to UV spectral irradiance measurements (150 - 410 nm) as a function of two solar activity proxies, the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, or Mg II index, and the total Ca II K disk activity derived from ground based observations. In addition, irradiance spectra at shorter wavelengths (1 - 150 nm) where used to generate fits to the Mg II core-to-wing ratio alone. Two sets of spectra were used in these fitting procedures. The fits at longer wavelengths (150 to 410 nm) were based on the high resolution spectra taken by the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS). Spectra measured by the Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite were used for the fits at wavelengths from 1 to 150 nm. To generate fits between solar irradiance and solar proxies, this study uses the above irradiance data, the NOAA composite Mg II index, and daily Ca II K disk activity determined from images measured by Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). Among the results of this study is an estimated relationship between the fraction of the disk with enhanced Ca II K activity and the Mg II index, an upper bound of the average solar UV spectral irradiance during periods of pure quiet sun as was believed to be present during the Maunder Minimum, and results indicating that more than 60 % of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) variability occurs between 150 and 400nm. In this presentation we will discuss the results of this study and the implications for estimating UV spectra for use in long-term climate models.

  20. Highly active, chemo- and regioselective Yb(II) and Sm(II) catalysts for the hydrophosphination of styrene with phenylphosphine.

    PubMed

    Basalov, Ivan V; Dorcet, Vincent; Fukin, Georgy K; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann; Trifonov, Alexander A

    2015-04-13

    Stable heteroleptic amido Yb(II) and Sm(II) complexes bearing aminoether-phenolate ligands and devoid of coordinated solvent have been structurally characterized. They afford highly active, chemoselective and, in the case of monoadditions, 100 % anti-Markovnikov regiospecific catalysts (down to 0.04 mol % loading) for the hydrophosphination of styrene with PhPH2 under mild conditions. PMID:25760678

  1. 78 FR 41785 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Implementation of Title I/II Program... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,573. Abstract: The Implementation of Title I/II...

  2. Default network activation during episodic and semantic memory retrieval: A selective meta-analytic comparison.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongkeun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether and to what extent the default network subregions involved in episodic memory (EM) and semantic memory (SM) processes overlap or are separated from one another. This study addresses this issue through a controlled meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies involving healthy participants. Various EM and SM task paradigms differ widely in the extent of default network involvement. Therefore, the issue at hand cannot be properly addressed without some control for this factor. In this regard, this study employs a two-stage analysis: a preliminary meta-analysis to select EM and SM task paradigms that recruit relatively extensive default network regions and a main analysis to compare the selected task paradigms. Based on a within-EM comparison, the default network contributed more to recollection/familiarity effects than to old/new effects, and based on a within-SM comparison, it contributed more to word/pseudoword effects than to semantic/phonological effects. According to a direct comparison of recollection/familiarity and word/pseudoword effects, each involving a range of default network regions, there were more overlaps than separations in default network subregions involved in these two effects. More specifically, overlaps included the bilateral posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex, left inferior parietal lobule, and left anteromedial prefrontal regions, whereas separations included only the hippocampal formation and the parahippocampal cortex region, which was unique to recollection/familiarity effects. These results indicate that EM and SM retrieval processes involving strong memory signals recruit extensive and largely overlapping default network regions and differ mainly in distinct contributions of hippocampus and parahippocampal regions to EM retrieval. PMID:26562053

  3. Meta-Teaching: Meaning and Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaoduan

    2013-01-01

    Meta-teaching is the knowledge and reflection on teaching based on meta-ideas. It is the teaching about teaching, a teaching process with practice consciously guided by thinking, inspiring teachers to teach more effectively. Meta-teaching is related to the knowledge, inspection and amendment of teaching activities in terms of their design,…

  4. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  5. The use of actigraphy in the monitoring of sleep and activity in ADHD: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    De Crescenzo, Franco; Licchelli, Serena; Ciabattini, Marco; Menghini, Deny; Armando, Marco; Alfieri, Paolo; Mazzone, Luigi; Pontrelli, Giuseppe; Livadiotti, Susanna; Foti, Francesca; Quested, Digby; Vicari, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. There is an increasing need to find objective measures and markers of the disorder in order to assess the efficacy of the therapies and to improve follow-up strategies. Actigraphy is an objective method for recording motor activity and sleep parameters that has been used in many studies in ADHD. Our meta-analysis aimed to assess the current evidence on the role of actigraphy in both the detection of changes in motor activity and in sleep patterns in ADHD. A systematic review was carried out to find studies comparing children with unmedicated ADHD versus controls, using actigraphic measures as an outcome. The primary outcome measures were "sleep duration" and daytime "activity mean". As secondary outcome measures we analyzed "sleep onset latency", "sleep efficiency" and "wake after sleep onset". Twenty-four studies comprising 2179 children were included in this review. We show evidence that ADHD compared to typically developing children present a higher mean activity during structured sessions, a similar sleep duration, and a moderately altered sleep pattern. This study highlights the role of actigraphy as an objective tool for the ambulatory monitoring of sleep and activity in ADHD. PMID:26163053

  6. Crystal structure, DFT, spectroscopic and biological activity evaluation of analgin complexes with Co(ii), Ni(ii) and Cu(ii).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ahmed M

    2014-11-14

    Reaction of analgin (NaL) with Co(ii), Ni(ii) and Cu(ii) salts in ethanol affords complexes of the type [ML2], which were characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, UV-Vis, EPR, TG/DTA, magnetic susceptibility and conductance measurements. The copper(ii) complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic Pbca space group. Analgin behaves as a mono-negatively tridentate ligand via pyrazolone O, sulfonate O and tertiary amino groups. The interaction of the tertiary nitrogen with M(n+) ions is the main factor which determines the stability of complexes as revealed from natural bond orbital analysis data, where the binding energy of [ML2] decreases with an increase in the bond length of the M-N bond. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were applied in order to realize the electronic structures and to explain the related experimental observations. The anti-bacterial activity was studied on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Coordination of analgin to Ni(ii) and Cu(ii) leads to a significant increase in its antibacterial activity as compared with the Co(ii) complex. PMID:25231028

  7. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  8. Neural networks involved in adolescent reward processing: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Merav H; Jedd, Kelly; Luciana, Monica

    2015-11-15

    Behavioral responses to, and the neural processing of, rewards change dramatically during adolescence and may contribute to observed increases in risk-taking during this developmental period. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest differences between adolescents and adults in neural activation during reward processing, but findings are contradictory, and effects have been found in non-predicted directions. The current study uses an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach for quantitative meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies to: (1) confirm the network of brain regions involved in adolescents' reward processing, (2) identify regions involved in specific stages (anticipation, outcome) and valence (positive, negative) of reward processing, and (3) identify differences in activation likelihood between adolescent and adult reward-related brain activation. Results reveal a subcortical network of brain regions involved in adolescent reward processing similar to that found in adults with major hubs including the ventral and dorsal striatum, insula, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Contrast analyses find that adolescents exhibit greater likelihood of activation in the insula while processing anticipation relative to outcome and greater likelihood of activation in the putamen and amygdala during outcome relative to anticipation. While processing positive compared to negative valence, adolescents show increased likelihood for activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and ventral striatum. Contrasting adolescent reward processing with the existing ALE of adult reward processing reveals increased likelihood for activation in limbic, frontolimbic, and striatal regions in adolescents compared with adults. Unlike adolescents, adults also activate executive control regions of the frontal and parietal lobes. These findings support hypothesized elevations in motivated activity during adolescence. PMID:26254587

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  10. Testing the association of novel meta-analysis-derived diabetes risk genes with type II diabetes and related metabolic traits in Asian Indian Sikhs.

    PubMed

    Sanghera, Dharambir K; Been, Latonya; Ortega, Lyda; Wander, Gurpreet S; Mehra, Narinder K; Aston, Christopher E; Mulvihill, John J; Ralhan, Sarju

    2009-03-01

    A recent meta-analysis on three genome-wide association (GWA) scans identified six loci (NOTCH2, THADA, ADAMTS9, JAZF1, CDC123/CAMKID and TSPAN8/LGRS) highly associated with type II diabetes (T2D) in Caucasians. This investigation seeks to confirm this association with diabetes and related metabolic traits in Khatri Sikh diabetics of North India. We genotyped highly significant variants from each locus in a case-control cohort consisting of 680 T2D cases and 637 normoglycemic (NG) controls. Only CDC123/CAMKID (rs12779790) replicated earlier evidence of association with T2D under a dominant model (odds ratio (OR): 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.57; P=0.031) during initial testing. However, we could not confirm this association using multiple testing corrections. In a multiple linear-regression analysis, the same variant in the CDC123/CAMKID revealed a marked decrease in fasting insulin levels among 'G' (risk) allele carriers independently in NG controls (P=0.030) and in T2D cases (P=0.009), as well as in the combined sample (P=0.003) after adjusting for covariates. Evidence of impaired beta-cell function was also observed among 'G' (risk) allele carriers in T2D cases (P=0.008) and in a combined cohort (P=0.026). Our data could not confirm the role of the remaining variants with risk either for T2D or quantitative phenotypes measuring insulin secretion or insulin resistance. These findings suggest that CDC123/CAMKID could be a major risk factor for the development of T2D in Sikhs by affecting beta-cell function. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the role of recently emerging loci in this high-risk population from the South Asian subcontinent. PMID:19247373

  11. Comparison of the characteristics and mechanisms of Hg(II) sorption by biochars and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Schierz, Ariette; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2016-02-01

    Two biochars were produced from bagasse and hickory chips (referred to as BB and HCB, respectively) and evaluated for their sorption ability of Hg(II) in aqueous solution. A commercial activated carbon (AC) which is commonly used for Hg(II) removal was included for comparison. Both biochars showed higher sorption capacities than AC, following the trend of BB>HCB>AC. The sorption of Hg(II) by BB and AC was mainly attributed to the formation of (COO)2Hg(II) and (O)2Hg(II). As a result, the adsorption capacity of Hg(II) by BB decreased 17.6% and 37.6% after COOH and OH were blocked, respectively and that of Hg(II) by AC decreased 6.63% and 62.2% for COOH and OH hindered, respectively. However, blocking the function groups had little effect on the Hg removal by HCB since sorption of Hg(II) by HCB was mainly resulted from the π electrons of CC and CO induced Hg-π binding. Further X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the possibility of reduction of the Hg(II) to Hg(I) by phenol groups or π electrons during the removal of Hg(II) by both biochars. In conclusion, biochar is more effective than activated carbon in removing Hg(II) and there exists a high potential that biochar can be a substitute of activated carbon for removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:26520810

  12. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, D V; Shukla, K; Tsukamoto, T

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.4.17.21) is a zinc metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate in the nervous system. Inhibition of GCPII has the potential to reduce extracellular glutamate and represents an opportune target for treating neurological disorders in which excess glutamate is considered pathogenic. Furthermore, GCPII was found to be identical to a tumor marker, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and has drawn significant interest as a diagnostic and/or therapeutic target in oncology. Over the past 15 years, tremendous efforts have been made in the discovery of potent GCPII inhibitors, particularly those with phosphorus-, urea- and thiol-based zinc binding groups. In addition, significant progress has been made in understanding the three-dimensional structural characteristics of GCPII in complex with various ligands. The purpose of this review article is to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of GCPII inhibitors reported to date, which are classified on the basis of their zinc-binding group. SAR and crystallographic data are evaluated in detail for each of these series to highlight the future challenges and opportunities to identify clinically viable GCPII inhibitors. PMID:22304717

  14. A meta-analysis synthesizing the effects of pesticides on swim speed and activity of aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shuman-Goodier, Molly E; Propper, Catherine R

    2016-09-15

    Pesticide contaminants are ubiquitous in aquatic environments and pose a threat to biodiversity. Pesticides also have diverse mechanisms of action that make it difficult to identify impacts on exposed wildlife. Behavioral measures represent an important link between physiological and ecological processes, and are often used to generalize sub-lethal effects of pesticide exposure. In order to bridge the toxicological and behavioral literature, and identify chemical classes that denote the largest threat, we conducted a meta-analysis summarizing the effects of pesticides on swim speed and activity of aquatic vertebrates. We found that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides reduced the swim speed of exposed amphibians and fish by 35%, and reduced overall activity by 72%. There were also differences in the magnitude of this effect across chemical classes, which likely reflect underlying physiological processes. Pyrethroids, carbamates, and organophosphates all produced a large decrease in swim speed, where as phosphonoglycines and triazines showed no overall effect. Pyrethroids, carbamates, organophosphates, organochlorines, and organotins also produced a large decrease in activity, while phosphonoglycines had no overall effect, and triazines had the opposite effect of increasing activity. Our results indicate that even sub-lethal concentrations of pesticides have a strong effect on critical behaviors of aquatic vertebrates, which can affect fitness and alter species interactions. We expect our synthesis can be used to identify chemical classes producing the largest sub-lethal effects for further research and management. PMID:27261557

  15. The neural network for tool-related cognition: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of 70 neuroimaging contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Ryo; Pobric, Gorana; Saito, Satoru; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to recognize and use a variety of tools is an intriguing human cognitive function. Multiple neuroimaging studies have investigated neural activations with various types of tool-related tasks. In the present paper, we reviewed tool-related neural activations reported in 70 contrasts from 56 neuroimaging studies and performed a series of activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to identify tool-related cortical circuits dedicated either to general tool knowledge or to task-specific processes. The results indicate the following: (a) Common, task-general processing regions for tools are located in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and ventral premotor cortex; and (b) task-specific regions are located in superior parietal lobule (SPL) and dorsal premotor area for imagining/executing actions with tools and in bilateral occipito-temporal cortex for recognizing/naming tools. The roles of these regions in task-general and task-specific activities are discussed with reference to evidence from neuropsychology, experimental psychology and other neuroimaging studies. PMID:27362967

  16. Dyslexic brain activation abnormalities in deep and shallow orthographies: A meta-analysis of 28 functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anna; Kronbichler, Martin; Richlan, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    We used coordinate-based meta-analysis to objectively quantify commonalities and differences of dyslexic functional brain abnormalities between alphabetic languages differing in orthographic depth. Specifically, we compared foci of under- and overactivation in dyslexic readers relative to nonimpaired readers reported in 14 studies in deep orthographies (DO: English) and in 14 studies in shallow orthographies (SO: Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish). The separate meta-analyses of the two sets of studies showed universal reading-related dyslexic underactivation in the left occipitotemporal cortex (including the visual word form area (VWFA)). The direct statistical comparison revealed higher convergence of underactivation for DO compared with SO in bilateral inferior parietal regions, but this abnormality disappeared when foci resulting from stronger dyslexic task-negative activation (i.e., deactivation relative to baseline) were excluded. Higher convergence of underactivation for DO compared with SO was further identified in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) pars triangularis, left precuneus, and right superior temporal gyrus, together with higher convergence of overactivation in the left anterior insula. Higher convergence of underactivation for SO compared with DO was found in the left fusiform gyrus, left temporoparietal cortex, left IFG pars orbitalis, and left frontal operculum, together with higher convergence of overactivation in the left precentral gyrus. Taken together, the findings support the notion of a biological unity of dyslexia, with additional orthography-specific abnormalities and presumably different compensatory mechanisms. The results are discussed in relation to current functional neuroanatomical models of developmental dyslexia. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2676-2699, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061464

  17. Muscle Activity Onset Prior to Landing in Patients after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Daniel; Rada, Isabel; Brau, Amélie; Gette, Paul; Seil, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Muscle activation during landing is paramount to stabilise lower limb joints and avoid abnormal movement patterns. Delayed muscle activity onset measured by electromyography (EMG) has been suggested to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to test the hypothesis if ACL-injured patients display different results for muscle onset timing during standard deceleration tasks compared to healthy control participants. PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched over the period from January 1980 to February 2015, yielding a total of 1461 citations. Six studies meeting inclusion criteria underwent quality assessment, data extraction and re-computing procedures for the meta-analysis. The quality was rated “moderate” for 2 studies and “poor” for 4. Patients included and procedures used were highly heterogeneous. The tasks investigated were single leg hopping, decelerating from running or walking, tested on a total of 102 ACL-injured participants and 86 controls. EMG analyses of the muscles vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral and medial hamstrings revealed trivial and non-significant standardised mean differences (SMD<0.20; p>0.05) between patients and control participants. Furthermore, no differences were found between the contralateral leg of patients and controls for muscle activity onset of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (SMD<0.20; p>0.05). Based on 3 studies, the involved legs of ACL-injured patients showed overall earlier muscle activity onset compared to control participants for the medial gastrocnemius (SMD = 0.5; p = 0.05). Similar results were found for the lateral gastrocnemius (SMD = 2.1; p<0.001), with a greater effect size but based only on a single study. We conclude that there are no differences between leg muscles of ACL-injured patients and healthy controls regarding the muscle activity onset during landing. However

  18. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular) and lysates (intracellular) blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:21915376

  19. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, structural and spectral characterization and DFT calculations of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek A; Shaaban, Ibrahim A; Farag, Rabei S; Zoghaib, Wajdi M; Afifi, Mahmoud S

    2015-01-25

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC) have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, mass spectrometry, infrared (4000-200 cm(-1)), UV-Visible (200-1100 nm), (1)H NMR and ESR spectroscopy as well as TGA analysis. The molar conductance measurements in DMSO imply non-electrolytic complexes, formulated as [M(APC)2Cl2] where M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II). The infrared spectra of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes indicate a bidentate type of bonding for APC through the exocyclic amino and adjacent pyrimidine nitrogen as donors whereas APC coordinated to Pd(II) ion as a monodentated ligand via a pyrimidine nitrogen donor. The magnetic measurements and the electronic absorption spectra support distorted octahedral geometries for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes however a square planar complex was favored for the Pd(II) complex (C2h skeleton symmetry). In addition, we carried out B3LYP and ω-B97XD geometry optimization at 6-31G(d) basis set except for Pd(II) where we implemented LanL2DZ/6-31G(d) combined basis set. The computational results favor all trans geometrical isomers where amino N, pyrimidine N and Cl are trans to each other (structure 1). Finally, APC and its divalent metal ion complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity, and the synthesized complexes were found to be more potent antimicrobial agents than APC against one or more microbial species. PMID:25105264

  20. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, structural and spectral characterization and DFT calculations of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Tarek A.; Shaaban, Ibrahim A.; Farag, Rabei S.; Zoghaib, Wajdi M.; Afifi, Mahmoud S.

    2015-01-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC) have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, mass spectrometry, infrared (4000-200 cm-1), UV-Visible (200-1100 nm), 1H NMR and ESR spectroscopy as well as TGA analysis. The molar conductance measurements in DMSO imply non-electrolytic complexes, formulated as [M(APC)2Cl2] where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II). The infrared spectra of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes indicate a bidentate type of bonding for APC through the exocyclic amino and adjacent pyrimidine nitrogen as donors whereas APC coordinated to Pd(II) ion as a monodentated ligand via a pyrimidine nitrogen donor. The magnetic measurements and the electronic absorption spectra support distorted octahedral geometries for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes however a square planar complex was favored for the Pd(II) complex (C2h skeleton symmetry). In addition, we carried out B3LYP and ω-B97XD geometry optimization at 6-31G(d) basis set except for Pd(II) where we implemented LanL2DZ/6-31G(d) combined basis set. The computational results favor all trans geometrical isomers where amino N, pyrimidine N and Cl are trans to each other (structure 1). Finally, APC and its divalent metal ion complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity, and the synthesized complexes were found to be more potent antimicrobial agents than APC against one or more microbial species.

  1. Sequential methods for random-effects meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Julian P T; Whitehead, Anne; Simmonds, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although meta-analyses are typically viewed as retrospective activities, they are increasingly being applied prospectively to provide up-to-date evidence on specific research questions. When meta-analyses are updated account should be taken of the possibility of false-positive findings due to repeated significance tests. We discuss the use of sequential methods for meta-analyses that incorporate random effects to allow for heterogeneity across studies. We propose a method that uses an approximate semi-Bayes procedure to update evidence on the among-study variance, starting with an informative prior distribution that might be based on findings from previous meta-analyses. We compare our methods with other approaches, including the traditional method of cumulative meta-analysis, in a simulation study and observe that it has Type I and Type II error rates close to the nominal level. We illustrate the method using an example in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21472757

  2. Interactions of the anticancer antibiotic altromycin B with copper(II), palladium(II) and platinum(II) ions and in vitro activity of the formed complexes.

    PubMed

    Nikolis, Nikolaos; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Fiallo, Marina M L

    2002-04-10

    Interaction of the anticancer antibiotic altromycin B with Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) ions was studied using 1H-NMR, EPR, electronic absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results derived from NMR studies where that the Pt(II) and Pd(II) ions interact with the nitrogen atom of the dimethylamino group of the C(10)-disaccharide, while the C(2)-epoxide group does not participate and remains intact. Cu(II) ions interact in a different way with altromycin B as was concluded by EPR and circular dichroism spectra. Altromycin B coordinates to the Cu(II) ions via the oxygen atoms of the C(11) phenolic and the C(12) carbonyl group while the nitrogen atom does not participate in the complexation. The presence of these metal ions improves the stability of altromycin B in solution. These complexes were studied in vitro against K562 leukemia sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant cells and GLC4 lung tumor cells, sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant. The activity of the complexes compared to the free drug is improved against resistant cells and is affected moderately against sensitive cells. Finally, 20% of platinum added as altromycin B metal complex entered GLC4 cells. PMID:11931973

  3. Event-related fMRI studies of false memory: An Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Kyle A; Dennis, Nancy A

    2016-01-29

    Over the last two decades, a wealth of research in the domain of episodic memory has focused on understanding the neural correlates mediating false memories, or memories for events that never happened. While several recent qualitative reviews have attempted to synthesize this literature, methodological differences amongst the empirical studies and a focus on only a sub-set of the findings has limited broader conclusions regarding the neural mechanisms underlying false memories. The current study performed a voxel-wise quantitative meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimation to investigate commonalities within the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature studying false memory. The results were broken down by memory phase (encoding, retrieval), as well as sub-analyses looking at differences in baseline (hit, correct rejection), memoranda (verbal, semantic), and experimental paradigm (e.g., semantic relatedness and perceptual relatedness) within retrieval. Concordance maps identified significant overlap across studies for each analysis. Several regions were identified in the general false retrieval analysis as well as multiple sub-analyses, indicating their ubiquitous, yet critical role in false retrieval (medial superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal cortex). Additionally, several regions showed baseline- and paradigm-specific effects (hit/perceptual relatedness: inferior and middle occipital gyrus; CRs: bilateral inferior parietal cortex, precuneus, left caudate). With respect to encoding, analyses showed common activity in the left middle temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex. No analysis identified a common cluster of activation in the medial temporal lobe. PMID:26683385

  4. Tackling the multifunctional nature of Broca's region meta-analytically: Co-activation-based parcellation of area 44

    PubMed Central

    Clos, Mareike; Amunts, Katrin; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoarchitectonic area 44 of Broca's region in the left inferior frontal gyrus is known to be involved in several functional domains including language, action and music processing. We investigated whether this functional heterogeneity is reflected in distinct modules within cytoarchitectonically defined left area 44 using meta-analytic connectivity-based parcellation (CBP). This method relies on identifying the whole-brain co-activation pattern for each area 44 voxel across a wide range of functional neuroimaging experiments and subsequently grouping the voxels into distinct clusters based on the similarity of their co-activation patterns. This CBP analysis revealed that five separate clusters exist within left area 44. A post-hoc functional characterization and functional connectivity analysis of these five clusters was then performed. The two posterior clusters were primarily associated with action processes, in particular with phonology and overt speech (posterior-dorsal cluster) and with rhythmic sequencing (posterior-ventral cluster). The three anterior clusters were primarily associated with language and cognition, in particular with working memory (anterior-dorsal cluster), with detection of meaning (anterior-ventral cluster) and with task switching/cognitive control (inferior frontal junction cluster). These five clusters furthermore showed specific and distinct connectivity patterns. The results demonstrate that left area 44 is heterogeneous, thus supporting anatomical data on the molecular architecture of this region, and provide a basis for more specific interpretations of activations localized in area 44. PMID:23791915

  5. How Much Neighborhood Parks Contribute to Local Residents’ Physical Activity in the City of Los Angeles: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Raaen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Objective To quantify the contribution of neighborhood parks to population-level, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Method We studied park use in 83 neighborhood parks in Los Angeles between 2003 and 2014 using systematic observation and surveys of park users and local residents. We observed park use at least 3–4 times per day over 4–7 clement days. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate total, age group and gender-specific park use and total MVPA time in parks. Results An average park measuring 10 acres and with 40,000 local residents in a one-mile radius accrued 5,301 hours of use (SE=1,083) during one week, with 35% (1,850 hours) spent in MVPA and 12% (635 hours) spent in vigorous physical activity (VPA). As much as a 10.7-fold difference in weekly MVPA hours was estimated across study parks. Parks’ main contribution to population-level MVPA is for males, teenagers, and residents living within a half mile. Conclusion Neighborhood parks contribute substantially to population MVPA. The contribution may depend less on size and facilities than on “demand goods” – programming and activities--that draw users to a park. PMID:25199733

  6. A critical appraisal of the evidence for using cardiotocography plus ECG ST interval analysis for fetal surveillance in labor. Part II: the meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Per; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Kessler, Jörg; Tendal, Britta; Yli, Branka M; Devoe, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    We appraised the methodology, execution and quality of the five published meta-analyses that are based on the five randomized controlled trials which compared cardiotocography (CTG)+ST analysis to cardiotocography. The meta-analyses contained errors, either created de novo in handling of original data or from a failure to recognize essential differences among the randomized controlled trials, particularly in their inclusion criteria and outcome parameters. No meta-analysis contained complete and relevant data from all five randomized controlled trials. We believe that one randomized controlled trial excluded in two of the meta-analyses should have been included, whereas one randomized controlled trial that was included in all meta-analyses, should have been excluded. After correction of the uncovered errors and exclusion of the randomized controlled trial that we deemed inappropriate, our new meta-analysis showed that CTG+ST monitoring significantly reduces the fetal scalp blood sampling usage (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.47–0.88), total operative delivery rate (0.93; 0.88–0.99) and metabolic acidosis rate (0.61; 0.41–0.91). PMID:24797318

  7. Coordination behavior of tetraaza [N4] ligand towards Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and anticancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Boraey, Hanaa A.

    2012-11-01

    Novel eight Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes with [N4] ligand (L) i.e. 2-amino-N-{2-[(2-aminobenzoyl)amino]ethyl}benzamide have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral, thermal (TG/DTG), magnetic, and molar conductivity measurements. On the basis of IR, mass, electronic and EPR spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been proposed for Co(II), Ni(II) complexes and Cu(II) chloride complex, square-pyramidal for Cu(I) bromide complex. For Cu(II) nitrate complex (6), Pd(II) complex (8) square planar geometry was proposed. The EPR data of Cu(II) complexes in powdered form indicate dx2-y2 ground state of Cu(II) ion. The antitumor activity of the synthesized ligand and some selected metal complexes has been studied. The palladium(II) complex (8) was found to display cytotoxicity (IC50 = 25.6 and 41 μM) against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and human hepatocarcinoma HEPG2 cell line.

  8. Coordination behavior of tetraaza [N₄] ligand towards Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    El-Boraey, Hanaa A

    2012-11-01

    Novel eight Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes with [N(4)] ligand (L) i.e. 2-amino-N-{2-[(2-aminobenzoyl)amino]ethyl}benzamide have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral, thermal (TG/DTG), magnetic, and molar conductivity measurements. On the basis of IR, mass, electronic and EPR spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been proposed for Co(II), Ni(II) complexes and Cu(II) chloride complex, square-pyramidal for Cu(I) bromide complex. For Cu(II) nitrate complex (6), Pd(II) complex (8) square planar geometry was proposed. The EPR data of Cu(II) complexes in powdered form indicate d(x2-y2) ground state of Cu(II) ion. The antitumor activity of the synthesized ligand and some selected metal complexes has been studied. The palladium(II) complex (8) was found to display cytotoxicity (IC(50)=25.6 and 41 μM) against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and human hepatocarcinoma HEPG2 cell line. PMID:22765944

  9. A model for evaluation of faculty members’ activities based on meta-evaluation of a 5-year experience in medical school

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Aeen; Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Jalili, Mohammad; Valian, Hossein Keshavarz

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a global interest for deploying faculty members’ activities evaluation systems, however implementing a fair and reliable system is a challenging issue. In this study, the authors devised a model for evaluation of faculty members’ activities with regard to their viewpoints and meta-evaluation standards. Materials and Methods: The reliability of the current faculty members’ activities metrics system was investigated in Medical School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Then authors conducted semi-structured interviews regarding meta-evaluation standards and designed a questionnaire based on interviews’ results which were delivered to faculty members. Finally, they extracted the components of the model regarding interviews’ content analysis and questionnaire's factor analysis and finalized them in a focus group session with experts. Results: Reliability of the current system was 0.99 (P < 0.05). The final model had six dimensions (mission alignment, accuracy, explicit, satisfaction, appropriateness, and constructiveness) derived from factor analysis of the questionnaire and nine factors (consensus, self-reporting, web-based system, evaluation period, minimum expectancies, analysis intervals, verifiers, flexibility, and decision making) obtained via qualitative content analysis of the interviews. Conclusion: In this study, the authors presented a model for faculty members’ activities evaluation based on meta-evaluation of the existing system. The model covered conceptual and executive aspects. Faculty members’ viewpoints were the core component of this model, so it would be acceptable in a medical school to use the model for evaluating their activities. PMID:26600831

  10. ISS Update: H-II Transfer Vehicle Activities

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with NASA astronaut Cady Coleman about the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStati...

  11. Uptake, p53 Pathway Activation, and Cytotoxic Responses for Co(II) and Ni(II) in Human Lung Cells: Implications for Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) ions display similar chemical properties and act as hypoxia mimics in cells. However, only soluble Co(II) but not soluble Ni(II) is carcinogenic by inhalation. To explore potential reasons for these differences, we examined responses of human lung cells to both metals. We found that Co(II) showed almost 8 times higher accumulation than Ni(II) in H460 cells but caused a less efficient activation of the transcriptional factor p53 as measured by its accumulation, Ser15 phosphorylation, and target gene expression. Unlike Ni(II), Co(II) was ineffective in downregulating the p53 inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Co(II)-treated cells continued DNA replication at internal doses that caused massive apoptosis by Ni(II). Apoptosis and the overall cell death by Co(II) were delayed and weaker than by Ni(II). Inhibition of caspases but not programmed necrosis pathways suppressed Co(II)-induced cell death. Knockdown of p53 produced 50%–60% decreases in activation of caspases 3/7 and expression of 2 most highly upregulated proapoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA by Co(II). Overall, p53-mediated apoptosis accounted for 55% cell death by Co(II), p53-independent apoptosis for 20%, and p53/caspase-independent mechanisms for 25%. Similar to H460, normal human lung fibroblasts and primary human bronchial epithelial cells had several times higher accumulation of Co(II) than Ni(II) and showed a delayed and weaker caspase activation by Co(II). Thus, carcinogenicity of soluble Co(II) could be related to high survival of metal-loaded cells, which permits accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. High cytotoxicity of soluble Ni(II) causes early elimination of damaged cells and is expected to be cancer suppressive. PMID:24068677

  12. Where does brain neural activation in aesthetic responses to visual art occur? Meta-analytic evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M; Barbetti, S; Piccardi, L; Guariglia, C; Ferlazzo, F; Giannini, A M; Zaidel, D W

    2016-01-01

    Here we aimed at finding the neural correlates of the general aspect of visual aesthetic experience (VAE) and those more strictly correlated with the content of the artworks. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to 47 fMRI experiments described in 14 published studies. We also performed four separate ALE analyses in order to identify the neural substrates of reactions to specific categories of artworks, namely portraits, representation of real-world-visual-scenes, abstract paintings, and body sculptures. The general ALE revealed that VAE relies on a bilateral network of areas, and the individual ALE analyses revealed different maximal activation for the artworks' categories as function of their content. Specifically, different content-dependent areas of the ventral visual stream are involved in VAE, but a few additional brain areas are involved as well. Thus, aesthetic-related neural responses to art recruit widely distributed networks in both hemispheres including content-dependent brain areas of the ventral visual stream. Together, the results suggest that aesthetic responses are not independent of sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processes. PMID:26619805

  13. Can cognitive models explain brain activation during word and pseudoword reading? A meta-analysis of 36 neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J S H; Rastle, Kathleen; Davis, Matthew H

    2013-07-01

    Reading in many alphabetic writing systems depends on both item-specific knowledge used to read irregular words (sew, yacht) and generative spelling-sound knowledge used to read pseudowords (tew, yash). Research into the neural basis of these abilities has been directed largely by cognitive accounts proposed by the dual-route cascaded and triangle models of reading. We develop a framework that enables predictions for neural activity to be derived from cognitive models of reading using 2 principles: (a) the extent to which a model component or brain region is engaged by a stimulus and (b) how much effort is exerted in processing that stimulus. To evaluate the derived predictions, we conducted a meta-analysis of 36 neuroimaging studies of reading using the quantitative activation likelihood estimation technique. Reliable clusters of activity are localized during word versus pseudoword and irregular versus regular word reading and demonstrate a great deal of convergence between the functional organization of the reading system put forward by cognitive models and the neural systems activated during reading tasks. Specifically, left-hemisphere activation clusters are revealed reflecting orthographic analysis (occipitotemporal cortex), lexical and/or semantic processing (anterior fusiform, middle temporal gyrus), spelling-sound conversion (inferior parietal cortex), and phonological output resolution (inferior frontal gyrus). Our framework and results establish that cognitive models of reading are relevant for interpreting neuroimaging studies and that neuroscientific studies can provide data relevant for advancing cognitive models. This article thus provides a firm empirical foundation from which to improve integration between cognitive and neural accounts of the reading process. PMID:23046391

  14. Synthesis, molecular docking and evaluation of antifungal activity of Ni(II),Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of porphyrin core macromolecular ligand.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvashi; Malla, Ali Mohammad; Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Bukhari, Mohd Nadeem; Bhat, Sneha; Anayutullah, Syed; Hashmi, Athar Adil

    2016-04-01

    Porphyrin core dendrimeric ligand (L) was synthesized by Rothemund synthetic route in which p-hydroxy benzaldehyde and pyrrole were fused together. The prepared ligand was complexed with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions, separately. Both the ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, UV-Vis, (1)HNMR). Square planar geometries were proposed for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) ions in cobalt, Nickel and copper complexes, respectively on the basis of UV-Vis spectroscopic data. The ligand and its complex were screened on Candida albicans (ATCC 10231), Aspergillus fumigatus (ATCC 1022), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (ATCC 9533) and Pencillium marneffei by determining MICs and inhibition zones. The activity of the ligand and its complexes was found to be in the order: CuL ˃ CoL ≈ NiL ˃ L. Detection of DNA damage at the level of the individual eukaryotic cell was observed by commet assay. Molecular docking technique was used to understand the ligand-DNA interactions. From docking experiment, we conclude that copper complex interacts more strongly than rest two. PMID:26911647

  15. Rapid activation of hippocampal casein kinase II during long-term potentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Charriaut-Marlangue, C; Otani, S; Creuzet, C; Ben-Ari, Y; Loeb, J

    1991-01-01

    Several studies suggest that protein kinase C and type II Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase are activated during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). We now report that casein kinase II (CK-II), which is present in high concentration in the hippocampus, is also activated in the CA1 region during LTP. CK-II activity increased within 2 min after a train of high-frequency electrical stimulations and reached a maximum (2-fold increase) 5 min later before returning to baseline value. The stimulated protein kinase activity, which was blocked by a selective antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, exhibited specific properties of CK-II, including phosphorylation of the specific substrates of CK-II, marked inhibition by a low heparin concentration, and the use of GTP as a phosphate donor. CK-II activity was also selectively and rapidly augmented in another form of LTP produced by bath application of tetraethylammonium; this LTP (called LTPk) is Ca2+ dependent but N-methyl-D-aspartate independent. Phosphorylation of casein that was not inhibited by heparin (i.e., casein kinase I) remained unchanged. We suggest that an increase in CK-II activity is important in LTP induction. Images PMID:1946443

  16. Copper(II)-catalyzed reactions of activated aromatics.

    PubMed

    Puzari, A; Baruah, J B

    2000-04-21

    The catalytic reaction of cis-bisglycinato copper(II) monohydrate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide leads to hydroxylation of phenol to give catechol and hydroquinone (1:1.2 ratio) in good yield. 2,6-Dimethylphenol can be hydroxylated by hydrogen peroxide and a catalytic amount of cis-bisglycinato copper(II) monohydrate to give an aggregate of 1,4-dihydroxy-2,6-dimethylbenzene and 2,6-dimethylphenol. A similar reaction of o-cresol gives 2,5-dihydroxytoluene. The reactivity of cis-bisglycinato copper(II) monohydrate in hydrogen peroxide with o-cresol is 4.5 times faster than that of a similar reaction by trans-bisglycinato copper(II) monohydrate. A catalytic reaction of cis-bisglycinato copper(II) monohydrate with aniline in aqueous hydrogen peroxide gives polyanilines in the form of pernigraniline with different amounts of Cu(OH)2 attached to them. The two major components of polyanilines obtained have Mn values of 1040 and 1500, respectively. Resistance of films of these polyanilines increases with temperatures from 40 degrees C to a maximum value at 103 degrees C and then decreases in the region of 103-150 degrees C, showing the property of a thermolectric switch. The aggregate prepared from hydroxylation of 2,6-dimethylphenol shows a similar property in the region of 30-180 degrees C. PMID:10789445

  17. Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium study and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of polydentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shehata, Mohamed R; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Barakat, Mohammad H

    2012-10-01

    Schiff base ligand, 1,4-bis[(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)propyl]piperazine (BHPP), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR and UV-vis) studies. The ground state of BHPP ligand was investigated using the BUILDER module of MOE. Metal complexes are formed in the 1:1 (M:L) ratio as found from the elemental analysis and found to have the general formula [ML]·nH(2)O, where M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=BHPP. In all the studied complexes, the (BHPP) ligand behaves as a hexadentate divalent anion with coordination involving the two azomethine nitrogen's, the two nitrogen atoms of piperazine ring and the two deprotonated phenolic OH-groups. The magnetic and spectral data indicates octahedral geometry of metal(II) complexes. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria and fungi. They were found to be more active against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Protonation constants of (BHPP) ligand and stability constants of its Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium nitrate. It has been observed that the protonated Schiff base ligand (BHPP) have four protonation constants. The divalent metal ions Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) form 1:1 complexes. PMID:22935596

  18. Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium study and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of polydentate Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shehata, Mohamed R.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Barakat, Mohammad H.

    2012-10-01

    Schiff base ligand, 1,4-bis[(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)propyl]piperazine (BHPP), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR and UV-vis) studies. The ground state of BHPP ligand was investigated using the BUILDER module of MOE. Metal complexes are formed in the 1:1 (M:L) ratio as found from the elemental analysis and found to have the general formula [ML]·nH2O, where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L = BHPP. In all the studied complexes, the (BHPP) ligand behaves as a hexadentate divalent anion with coordination involving the two azomethine nitrogen's, the two nitrogen atoms of piperazine ring and the two deprotonated phenolic OH-groups. The magnetic and spectral data indicates octahedral geometry of metal(II) complexes. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria and fungi. They were found to be more active against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Protonation constants of (BHPP) ligand and stability constants of its Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium nitrate. It has been observed that the protonated Schiff base ligand (BHPP) have four protonation constants. The divalent metal ions Cu2+, Ni2+ and Co2+ form 1:1 complexes.

  19. Cu(2+) inhibits photosystem II activities but enhances photosystem I quantum yield of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-08-01

    Responses of photosystem I and II activities of Microcystis aeruginosa to various concentrations of Cu(2+) were simultaneously examined using a Dual-PAM-100 fluorometer. Cell growth and contents of chlorophyll a were significantly inhibited by Cu(2+). Photosystem II activity [Y(II)] and electron transport [rETRmax(II)] were significantly altered by Cu(2+). The quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)] decreased by 29 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. On the contrary, photosystem I was stable under Cu(2+) stress and showed an obvious increase of quantum yield [Y(I)] and electron transport [rETRmax(I)] due to activation of cyclic electron flow (CEF). Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was enhanced by 17 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. The contribution of linear electron flow to photosystem I [Y(II)/Y(I)] decreased with increasing Cu(2+) concentration. Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was negatively correlated with the maximal photosystem II photochemical efficiency (F v/F m). In summary, photosystem II was the major target sites of toxicity of Cu(2+), while photosystem I activity was enhanced under Cu(2+) stress. PMID:24920130

  20. Angiotensin II Stimulation of DPP4 Activity Regulates Megalin in the Proximal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya; Zuberek, Marcin; Duta, Cornel; Meuth, Alex; Sowers, James R; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Nistala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a marker of incipient kidney injury in many disorders, including obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that megalin, a receptor endocytotic protein in the proximal tubule, is downregulated in obese mice, which was prevented by inhibition of dipeptidyl protease 4 (DPP4). Obesity is thought to be associated with upregulation of intra-renal angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT₁R) and Ang II suppresses megalin expression in proximal tubule cells in vitro. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II will suppress megalin protein via activation of DPP4. We used Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) infusion in mice and Ang II (10(-8) M) treatment of T35OK-AT₁R proximal tubule cells to test our hypothesis. Ang II-infused mouse kidneys displayed increases in DPP4 activity and decreases in megalin. In proximal tubule cells, Ang II stimulated DPP4 activity concurrent with suppression of megalin. MK0626, a DPP4 inhibitor, partially restored megalin expression similar to U0126, a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor and AG1478, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Similarly, Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation was suppressed with MK0626 and Ang II-induced DPP4 activity was suppressed by U0126. Therefore, our study reveals a cross talk between AT₁R signaling and DPP4 activation in the regulation of megalin and underscores the significance of targeting DPP4 in the prevention of obesity related kidney injury progression. PMID:27213360

  1. Angiotensin II Stimulation of DPP4 Activity Regulates Megalin in the Proximal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Aroor, Annayya; Zuberek, Marcin; Duta, Cornel; Meuth, Alex; Sowers, James R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Nistala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a marker of incipient kidney injury in many disorders, including obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that megalin, a receptor endocytotic protein in the proximal tubule, is downregulated in obese mice, which was prevented by inhibition of dipeptidyl protease 4 (DPP4). Obesity is thought to be associated with upregulation of intra-renal angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) and Ang II suppresses megalin expression in proximal tubule cells in vitro. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II will suppress megalin protein via activation of DPP4. We used Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) infusion in mice and Ang II (10−8 M) treatment of T35OK-AT1R proximal tubule cells to test our hypothesis. Ang II-infused mouse kidneys displayed increases in DPP4 activity and decreases in megalin. In proximal tubule cells, Ang II stimulated DPP4 activity concurrent with suppression of megalin. MK0626, a DPP4 inhibitor, partially restored megalin expression similar to U0126, a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor and AG1478, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Similarly, Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation was suppressed with MK0626 and Ang II-induced DPP4 activity was suppressed by U0126. Therefore, our study reveals a cross talk between AT1R signaling and DPP4 activation in the regulation of megalin and underscores the significance of targeting DPP4 in the prevention of obesity related kidney injury progression. PMID:27213360

  2. Synthesis, structural and biochemical activity studies of a new hexadentate Schiff base ligand and its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Co(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekcioglu, Pinar; Karabocek, Nevin; Karabocek, Serdar; Emirik, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    A new Schiff base ligand (H2L) and its metal complexes have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic moment and spectral studies. The comparative in-vitro antimicrobial activities against various pathogens with reference to known antibiotics activity under the standard control of different concentrations revealed that the metal complexes (6-8) showed enhanced antimicrobial activities in general as compared to free ligand. As an exception, the free ligand showed better activity against Trichoderma. The antifungal activity experiments were performed in triplicate. The order of biochemical activity for metal complexes were observed as in the following. CuL > CoL > NiL, which is exactly same as the order of stability constants of these complexes. Additionally, we performed DFT and TD-DFT calculation for free ligand and Cu(II) complex to support the experimental data. The geometries of the Cu(II) complex have been optimized using the B3LYP level of theory. The theoretical calculations confirm that the copper (II) center exhibits a distorted square pyramidal geometry which is favored by experimental results.

  3. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  4. How Does Physical Activity Intervention Improve Self-Esteem and Self-Concept in Children and Adolescents? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingli; Wu, Lang; Ming, Qingsen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis for the effects of physical activity intervention on self-esteem and self-concept in children and adolescents, and to identify moderator variables by meta-regression. Design A meta-analysis and meta-regression. Method Relevant studies were identified through a comprehensive search of electronic databases. Study inclusion criteria were: (1) intervention should be supervised physical activity, (2) reported sufficient data to estimate pooled effect sizes of physical activity intervention on self-esteem or self-concept, (3) participants’ ages ranged from 3 to 20 years, and (4) a control or comparison group was included. For each study, study design, intervention design and participant characteristics were extracted. R software (version 3.1.3) and Stata (version 12.0) were used to synthesize effect sizes and perform moderation analyses for determining moderators. Results Twenty-five randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and 13 non-randomized controlled trial (non-RCT) studies including a total of 2991 cases were identified. Significant positive effects were found in RCTs for intervention of physical activity alone on general self outcomes (Hedges’ g = 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.14 to 0.45; p = 0.001), self-concept (Hedges’ g = 0.49, 95%CI: 0.10 to 0.88, p = 0.014) and self-worth (Hedges’ g = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.13 to 0.49, p = 0.005). There was no significant effect of intervention of physical activity alone on any outcomes in non-RCTs, as well as in studies with intervention of physical activity combined with other strategies. Meta-regression analysis revealed that higher treatment effects were associated with setting of intervention in RCTs (β = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.55, p = 0.013). Conclusion Intervention of physical activity alone is associated with increased self-concept and self-worth in children and adolescents. And there is a stronger association with school-based and gymnasium

  5. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and antiproliferative activity in vitro of platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes with 6-mercaptopurine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łakomska, Iwona; Pazderski, Leszek; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Pełczyńska, Marzena; Nasulewicz, Anna; Opolski, Adam; Szłyk, Edward

    2004-11-01

    A series of Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with 6-mercaptopurine (6-Hmp) of formulae Pd(6-Hmp) 2Cl 2 ( 1), Pd(6-mp) 2·2H 2O ( 2), Pt(6-mp) 2·2H 2O ( 3), Pt(6-mp)(dmso)Cl ( 4) was synthesized and studied by IR, far-IR, 1H, 13C, 15N NMR. ( 1) has an ionic character and consists of distinct [Pd(6-Hmp) 2] 2+ cations and uncoordinated Cl - anions, whereas ( 2,3) are neutral species with central atoms bis-chelated by the deprotonated 6-mp - ligands. NMR studies suggest that S and N(7) are the complexation sites, while far-IR spectra indicate the square-planar geometry of Pd(II) or Pt(II). In ( 4) the Pt(II) atom is coordinated by one chelating 6-mp - anion, S-bonded dmso molecule and a terminal chloride. The antiproliferative activity in vitro of ( 2-4) was tested against human leukaemia HL-60 cells, being exhibited for ( 2) at the level ca. six times lower than in case of cisplatin.

  6. Activated rat T cells synthesize and express functional major histocompatibility class II antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Broeren, C P; Wauben, M H; Lucassen, M A; Van Meurs, M; Van Kooten, P J; Boog, C J; Claassen, E; Van Eden, W

    1995-01-01

    In the present report, we studied the presence and functional significance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen on rat T cells. Most rat T-cell lines cultured in vitro were found to be MHC class II+. Also, these T-cell lines were shown to synthesize MHC class II molecules. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric double stainings for T-cell receptor (TCR) and MHC class II showed that in vivo as well a large proportion of T cells was MHC class II+. The immunohistochemical staining of spleen sections enabled us to characterize the MHC class II+ and MHC class II- T cells. It was shown that resting T cells in vivo were MHC class II-. In contrast, activated T cells, as determined by their localization in the marginal zone of the spleen, proved to be MHC class II+. Finally, T-cell clones were found to be able to present peptidic antigens, but could only poorly present more complex exogenous antigens, probably due to inefficient uptake of such antigens. These features would endow activated rat T cells with the capacity to present cell-specific self-proteins, such as TCR, to regulatory CD4+ MHC class II-restricted T cells, as was described by our group elsewhere. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7750994

  7. The Effectiveness of Interventions on Sustained Childhood Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jamie; Scarborough, Peter; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased physical activity (PA) has been associated with a reduction in non-communicable disease risk factors and outcomes. However, interventions to increase childhood PA typically produce small to negligible effects. Recent reviews are limited due to lack of post-intervention follow-up measurement. This review aimed to examine measured effects at least six months post-intervention. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, SportDiscus and Google Scholar between 1st January 1991 and 1st November 2014 for controlled studies reporting six-month post-intervention measurement for children aged 5 to 18 years. 14 studies met inclusion criteria; 12 reported moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) (n = 5790) and 10 reported total PA (TPA) (n = 4855). We calculated overall effect estimates and 95% CI’s using random effects modelling with inverse variance weighting. Mean difference was calculated for MVPA, with standardised mean difference calculated to TPA due to measurement variation. Meta-regression assessed heterogeneity by continuous level variables. Negligible mean difference in MVPA existed in favour of the intervention group, amounting to 1.47 (95% CI -1.88, 4.82) mins/day compared to controls, while no difference was recorded on TPA. Sub-group analyses revealed males (2.65 mins/day: 95% CI 2.03, 3.27) reported higher levels of MVPA than females (-0.42 mins/day: 95% CI -7.77, 6.94), community settings (2.67 mins/day: 95% CI 2.05, 3.28) were more effective than school settings (1.70 mins/day: 95% CI -4.84, 8.25), and that treatment (4.47 mins/day: 95% CI -0.81, 9.76) demonstrated greater effects than population approaches (1.03 mins/day: 95% CI -2.54, 4.60). Meta-regression revealed no significant differences by factor on pooled effects. Significant heterogeneity existed between studies and potential for small study effects was present. Conclusions Improved PA levels subsequent to intervention were not maintained six

  8. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs. PMID:27439620

  9. In-vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activity of cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes with furanylmethyl- and thienylmethyl-dithiolenes: [1, 3-dithiole- 2-one and 1,3-dithiole-2-thione].

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Shaikh, Ali U; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2006-12-01

    Some antibacterial and antifungal furanylmethyl-and thienylmethyl dithiolenes and, their Co(II), Cu(II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) complexes have been synthesized, characterized and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexeneri, and two Gram-positive; Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains, and for in-vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glaberata. All compounds showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. The metal complexes, however, were shown to possess better activity as compared to the simple ligands. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in-vitro cytotoxic properties. PMID:17252947

  10. Leisure-time physical activity and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Huai, Pengcheng; Han, Huiju; Reilly, Kathleen Heather; Guo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jiyu; Xu, Aiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Published articles reported controversial results about the association between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and risk of type 2 diabetes. A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies was conducted to explore the effect of LTPA on the incidence of type 2 diabetes. PubMed and Embase databases were searched from its inception to June 13, 2014. Fixed or random effects models were used to calculate the pooled effect sizes based on between-study heterogeneity that was examined by the Q test and I (2) statistic. A total of eight studies, including 296,395 participants and 10,815 incident cases, were included in this study. Both high-level LTPA [high vs. low: hazard ratio (HR) 0.69, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.78] and moderate-level LTPA (moderate vs. low: HR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.70-0.89) were associated with decreased incidence of type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, LTPA was significantly associated with decreased risk of diabetes; high-level LTPA is more beneficial in decreasing the incidence of type 2 diabetes than moderate-level LTPA. PMID:26481473

  11. Efficacy of theory-based interventions to promote physical activity. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Gourlan, M; Bernard, P; Bortolon, C; Romain, A J; Lareyre, O; Carayol, M; Ninot, G; Boiché, J

    2016-01-01

    Implementing theory-based interventions is an effective way to influence physical activity (PA) behaviour in the population. This meta-analysis aimed to (1) determine the global effect of theory-based randomised controlled trials dedicated to the promotion of PA among adults, (2) measure the actual efficacy of interventions against their theoretical objectives and (3) compare the efficacy of single- versus combined-theory interventions. A systematic search through databases and review articles was carried out. Our results show that theory-based interventions (k = 82) significantly impact the PA behaviour of participants (d = 0.31, 95% CI [0.24, 0.37]). While moderation analyses revealed no efficacy difference between theories, interventions based on a single theory (d = 0.35; 95% CI [0.26, 0.43]) reported a higher impact on PA behaviour than those based on a combination of theories (d = 0.21; 95% CI [0.11, 0.32]). In spite of the global positive effect of theory-based interventions on PA behaviour, further research is required to better identify the specificities, overlaps or complementarities of the components of interventions based on relevant theories. PMID:25402606

  12. Physical activity interventions in children and young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, H; Blake, H; Tennyson, R; Randell, T L; Glazebrook, C

    2014-01-01

    Aims To synthesize evidence from randomized and non-randomized studies of physical activity interventions in children and young people with Type 1 diabetes so as to explore clinically relevant health outcomes and inform the promotion of physical activity. Method We conducted a search of CINAHL Plus, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, SportDiscus and Web of Science between October and December 2012. Eligible articles included subjects aged ≤18 years with Type 1 diabetes and a physical activity intervention that was more than a one-off activity session. Physiological, psychological, behavioural or social outcomes were those of interest. Results A total of 26 articles (10 randomized and 16 non-randomized studies), published in the period 1964–2012, were reviewed. Although there was heterogeneity in study design, methods and reporting, 23 articles reported at least one significant beneficial health outcome at follow-up. Meta-analyses of these studies showed potential benefits of physical activity on HbA1c (11 studies, 345 participants, standardized mean difference -0.52, 95% CI -0.97 to -0.07; P = 0.02), BMI (four studies, 195 participants, standardized mean difference -0.41, 95% CI -0.70 to -0.12; P = 0.006) and triglycerides (five studies, 206 participants, standardized mean difference -0.70, 95% CI -1.25 to -0.14; P = 0.01).The largest effect size was for total cholesterol (five studies, 206 participants, standardized mean difference -0.91, 95% CI -1.66 to -0.17; P = 0.02). Conclusions Physical activity is important for diabetes management and has the potential to delay cardiovascular disease, but there is a lack of studies that are underpinned by psychological behaviour change theory, promoting sustained physical activity and exploring psychological outcomes. There remains a lack of knowledge of how to promote physical activity in people with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:24965376

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  14. Effects of exercise and training on natural killer cell counts and cytolytic activity: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J; Shek, P N

    1999-09-01

    Meta-analysis techniques have been used to accumulate data from 94 studies describing the natural killer (NK) cell response of some 900 volunteers to acute and chronic exercise. NK cell numbers have been indicated in terms of CD3-CD16+CD56+, CD16+ or CD56+ phenotypes, and cytolytic activity has been expressed per 10,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in terms of lytic units. Acute exercise has been categorised as sustained moderate (50 to 65% of aerobic power), sustained vigorous (>75% of aerobic power), brief maximal or 'supramaximal', prolonged, eccentric or resistance, and repeated exercise. In general, there was a marked increase in NK cell count at the end of exercise, probably attributable to a catecholamine-mediated demargination of cells. Following exercise, cell counts dropped to less than half of normal levels for a couple of hours but, except in unusual circumstances (e.g. prolonged, intense and stressful exercise), normal resting values are restored within 24 hours. If activity is both prolonged and vigorous, the decrease in NK cell counts and cytolytic activity may begin during the exercise session. Although the usual depression of NK cell count seems too brief to have major practical importance for health, there could be a cumulative adverse effect on immunosurveillance and health experience in athletes who induce such changes several times per week. There is a weak suggestion of an offsetting increase in resting NK cell counts and cytolytic action in trained individuals, and this merits further exploration in studies where effects of recent training sessions are carefully controlled. PMID:10541441

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, Spectral Studies and Antifungal Activity of Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) Complexes with 2-(4- Sulphophenylazo)-1,8-Dihydroxy-3,6-Napthalene Disulphonic Acid Trisodium Salt

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gajanan; Narang, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of the type Na6[M(HL)2(H2O)2], where M= Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and Na3H2L= 2-(4-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxy 3,6 naphthalene disulphonic acid trisodium salt, have been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical (elemental analyses, solubility, electrolytic conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement) and spectral (UV-Visible, IR, ESR, powder x-ray diffraction) techniques for their structure and studied for their antifungal activity against ten fungi. The anionic 1:2 metal:ligand complexes show octahedral geometry around M(II), a significant antifungal activity against Curvularia lunata and Alternaria triticina and a moderate activity against Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, Alternaria solanae, Curvularia species, Helminthosporium oryzae, Collectotrichum capsici, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium udum. PMID:18365101

  16. Alkyl sulfonic acide hydrazides: Synthesis, characterization, computational studies and anticancer, antibacterial, anticarbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Ozdemir, Ummuhan; İlbiz, Firdevs; Balaban Gunduzalp, Ayla; Ozbek, Neslihan; Karagoz Genç, Zuhal; Hamurcu, Fatma; Tekin, Suat

    2015-11-01

    Methane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3SO2NHNH2 (1), ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2SO2NHNH2 (2), propane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (3) and butane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (4) have been synthesized as homologous series and characterized by using elemental analysis, spectrophotometric methods (1H-13C NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS). In order to gain insight into the structure of the compounds, we have performed computational studies by using 6-311G(d, p) functional in which B3LYP functional were implemented. The geometry of the sulfonic acide hydrazides were optimized at the DFT method with Gaussian 09 program package. A conformational analysis of compounds were performed by using NMR theoretical calculations with DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level of theory by applying the (GIAO) approach. The anticancer activities of these compounds on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line investigated by comparing IC50 values. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Bacillus cereus NRRL-B-3711, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 70063 by using the disc diffusion method. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II enzyme (hCA II) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values. The biological activity screening shows that butane sulfonic acide hydrazide (4) has more activity than the others against tested breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, Gram negative/Gram positive bacteria and carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) isoenzyme.

  17. An investigation into the origin of the biased agonism associated with the urotensin II receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Diego; Merlino, Francesco; Limatola, Antonio; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Campiglia, Pietro; Novellino, Ettore; Grieco, Paolo; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    The urotensin II receptor (UTR) has long been studied mainly for its involvement in the cardiovascular homeostasis both in health and disease state. Two endogenous ligands activate UTR, i.e. urotensin II (U-II) and urotensin II-related peptide (URP). Extensive expression of the two ligands uncovers the diversified pathophysiological effects mediated by the urotensinergic system such as cardiovascular disorders, smooth muscle cell proliferation, renal disease, diabetes, and tumour growth. As newly reported, U-II and URP have distinct effects on transcriptional activity, cell proliferation, and myocardial contractile activities supporting the idea that U-II and URP interact with UTR in a distinct manner (biased agonism). To shed light on the origin of the divergent activities of the two endogenous ligands, we performed a conformational study on URP by solution NMR in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle solution and compared the obtained NMR structure of URP with that of hU-II previously determined. Finally, we undertook docking studies between URP, hU-II, and an UT receptor model. PMID:25694247

  18. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans...

  19. 77 FR 60124 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II API DMFs Under GDUFA.'' Under the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), holders of certain drug master files, namely, Type II active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) drug master files (DMFs) that are referenced......

  20. Over-expression and characterization of active recombinant rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II using baculovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T M; Mann, W R; Dragland, C J; Anderson, R C; Nemecek, G M; Bell, P A

    1995-01-01

    The cDNA encoding rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) was heterologously expressed using a recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. Unlike Escherichia coli, the baculovirus-infected insect cells expressed mostly soluble active recombinant CPT-II (rCPT-II). CPT activity from crude lysates of recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells was maximal between 50 and 72 h post-infection, with a peak specific activity of 100-200 times that found in the mock- or wild-type-infected control lysates. Milligram quantities (up to 1.8 mg/l of culture) of active rCPT-II were chromatographically purified from large-scale cultures of insect cells infected with the recombinant baculovirus. The rCPT-II was found to be: (1) similar in size to the native rat liver enzyme (approximately 70 kDa) as judged by SDS/PAGE; (2) immunoreactive with a polyclonal serum raised against rat liver CPT-II; and (3) not glycosylated. Kinetic analysis of soluble rCPT-II revealed Km values for carnitine and palmitoyl-CoA of 950 +/- 27 microM and 34 +/- 5.6 microM respectively. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7626037

  1. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War...

  3. Meta-Analyses of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Activity, Gene Ala-9Val Polymorphism, and the Risk of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Fang; Cao, Bing; Xu, Mei-Yan; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Yan, Lai-Lai; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jing-Yu; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Schizophrenia is a complex and disabling psychiatric disorder, and tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a severe adverse drug effect occurring in 20% to 40% of schizophrenic patients chronically treated with typical neuroleptics. Previous studies suggested that the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity was associated with the development of schizophrenia. Ala-9Val polymorphism, a functional polymorphism of MnSOD gene, has been reported to be related to the risk of schizophrenia and TD. However, these studies did not lead to consistent results. We performed meta-analyses aiming to assess the association between MnSOD activity and schizophrenia, as well as the association of MnSOD Ala-9Val polymorphism with schizophrenia and TD in schizophrenic patients. We search for the literature on MnSOD and schizophrenia in English or Chinese published up to May 1, 2015 on PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Databases, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medical and Wanfang databases. Two investigators independently reviewed retrieved literature and evaluated eligibility. Discrepancy was resolved by consensus with a third reviewer. Data were pooled using fixed-effect or random-effect models. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the MnSOD activity. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for Ala-9Val genotype and allele frequencies. There were 6, 6, and 10 studies entering 3 parts of meta-analyses, respectively. The MnSOD activity of patients was significantly lower than that of controls (SMD = −0.94; 95% CI: −1.76, −0.12; P = 0.025). No significant associations of Ala-9Val genotypes (OR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.33; P = 0.109) and alleles (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.20; P = 0.361) with the risk of schizophrenia were observed. We also did not reveal significant associations of the genotypes (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.02; P = 0.075) and alleles (OR = 0

  4. Behavioural physical activity interventions in participants with lower-limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Wilby; Kluzek, Stefan; Roberts, Nia; Richards, Justin; Arden, Nigel; Leeson, Paul; Newton, Julia; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess effectiveness of osteoarthritis interventions to promote long-term physical activity behaviour change. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis. Protocol registration PROSPERO CRD4201300444 5 (http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/). Study selection Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing physical activity interventions with placebo, no/or minimal intervention in community-dwelling adults with symptomatic knee or hip osteoarthritis. Primary outcomes were change in physical activity or cardiopulmonary fitness after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Data extraction Outcomes were measures of physical activity (self-reported and objectively measured) and cardiovascular fitness. Standard mean differences between postintervention values were used to describe the effect sizes. Results 27 984 titles were screened and 180 papers reviewed in full. Eleven RCTs satisfied inclusion criteria, total study population of 2741 participants, mean age 62.2. The commonest reasons for study exclusion were follow-up less than 6 months and no physical activity measures. The majority of included interventions implement an arthritis self-management programme targeting coping skills and self-efficacy. Seven studies used self-report measures, the pooled effect of these studies was small with significant heterogeneity between studies (SMD 0.22 with 95% CI −0.11 to 0.56, z=1.30 (p=0.19) I2 statistic of 85%). Subgroup analysis of 6–12 month outcome reduced heterogeneity and increased intervention effect compared to control (SMD 0.53, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.65, z=8.84 (p<0.00001) I2 of 66%). Conclusions Arthritis self-management programmes achieve a small but significant improvement in physical activity in the short term. Effectiveness of intervention declines with extended follow-up beyond 12 months with no significant benefit compared to control. The small number of studies (11 RCTs) limited ability to define effective delivery methods. Investigation of

  5. The influence of motor expertise on the brain activity of motor task performance: A meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the influence of long-term motor training on the brain activity of motor processes, but the findings are inconsistent. To clarify how acquiring motor expertise induces cortical reorganization during motor task performance, the current study conducted a quantitative meta-analysis on 26 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that investigate motor task performance in people with long-term motor training experience (e.g., athletes, musicians, and dancers) and control participants. Meta-analysis of the brain activation in motor experts and novices showed similar effects in the bilateral frontal and parietal regions. The meta-analysis on the contrast between motor experts and novices indicated that experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) than did novices in motor execution and prediction tasks. In motor observation tasks, experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9) and left precentral gyrus (BA 6) than novices. On the contrary, novices had stronger effects in the right motor areas and basal ganglia as compared with motor experts. These results indicate that motor experts have effect increases in brain areas involved in action planning and action comprehension, and suggest that intensive motor training might elaborate the motor representation related to the task performance. PMID:25450866

  6. The Fe II Emission in Active Galactic Nuclei: Excitation Mechanisms and Location of the Emitting Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinello, M.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity of binuclear Co(II), Cu(II) and mononuclear Ni(II) complexes of bulky multi-dentate thiosemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abd Al-Gader, I. M.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    The chelation behavior of 9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracene-11,12-dicarbonyl) bis (N-ethylhydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (H6ETS)(1) towards Co2+, Ni2+and Cu2+ have been studied. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acts as a bi- and/or mono-negative multi-dentate. The isolated Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are square-planar while the Co(II) is tetrahedral. EPR spectrum of Cu(II) complex confirmed simulated an axial spin-Hamiltonian exhibiting a four-line pattern with nitrogen super-hyperfine couplings originating from imine hydrazinic nitrogen atoms and possess a significant amount of tetrahedral distortion leading to a pseudo-square-planar geometry with unpaired electron has d ground state. Also, the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters were determined. Furthermore, the title compounds were investigated for their antibacterial activity using inhibition zone diameter and for DNA degradation, superoxide-scavenging activity as well as hydroxyl radicals that generated by the oxidation of cytochrome c in L-ascorbic acid/CuSO4-cytochrome c system.

  8. Charge Requirements of Lipid II Flippase Activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Emily K.; Tan, Wee Boon; Joseph, Hildy

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an extracytoplasmic glycopeptide matrix essential for the integrity of the envelope of most bacteria. The PG building block is a disaccharide-pentapeptide that is synthesized as a lipid-linked precursor called lipid II. The translocation of the amphipathic lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is required for subsequent incorporation of the disaccharide-pentapeptide into PG. In Escherichia coli, the essential inner membrane protein MurJ is the lipid II flippase. Previous studies showed that 8 charged residues in the central cavity region of MurJ are crucial for function. Here, we completed the functional analysis of all 57 charged residues in MurJ and demonstrated that the respective positive or negative charge of the 8 aforementioned residues is required for proper MurJ function. Loss of the negative charge in one of these residues, D39, causes a severe defect in MurJ biogenesis; by engineering an intragenic suppressor mutation that restores MurJ biogenesis, we found that this charge is also essential for MurJ function. Because of the low level of homology between MurJ and putative orthologs from Gram-positive bacteria, we explored the conservation of these 8 charged residues in YtgP, a homolog from Streptococcus pyogenes. We found that only 3 positive charges are similarly positioned and essential in YtgP; YtgP possesses additional charged residues within its predicted cavity that are essential for function and conserved among Gram-positive bacteria. From these data, we hypothesize that some charged residues in the cavity region of MurJ homologs are required for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport. PMID:25225268

  9. Charge requirements of lipid II flippase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Butler, Emily K; Tan, Wee Boon; Joseph, Hildy; Ruiz, Natividad

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an extracytoplasmic glycopeptide matrix essential for the integrity of the envelope of most bacteria. The PG building block is a disaccharide-pentapeptide that is synthesized as a lipid-linked precursor called lipid II. The translocation of the amphipathic lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is required for subsequent incorporation of the disaccharide-pentapeptide into PG. In Escherichia coli, the essential inner membrane protein MurJ is the lipid II flippase. Previous studies showed that 8 charged residues in the central cavity region of MurJ are crucial for function. Here, we completed the functional analysis of all 57 charged residues in MurJ and demonstrated that the respective positive or negative charge of the 8 aforementioned residues is required for proper MurJ function. Loss of the negative charge in one of these residues, D39, causes a severe defect in MurJ biogenesis; by engineering an intragenic suppressor mutation that restores MurJ biogenesis, we found that this charge is also essential for MurJ function. Because of the low level of homology between MurJ and putative orthologs from Gram-positive bacteria, we explored the conservation of these 8 charged residues in YtgP, a homolog from Streptococcus pyogenes. We found that only 3 positive charges are similarly positioned and essential in YtgP; YtgP possesses additional charged residues within its predicted cavity that are essential for function and conserved among Gram-positive bacteria. From these data, we hypothesize that some charged residues in the cavity region of MurJ homologs are required for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport. PMID:25225268

  10. Orientation of functional activating regions in the Escherichia coli CRP protein during transcription activation at class II promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R M; Rhodius, V A; Bell, A I; Kolb, A; Busby, S J

    1996-01-01

    At class II CRP-dependent promoters the DNA site for CRP overlaps the DNA site for RNA polymerase, covering the -35 region. Transcription activation at class II CRP- dependent promoters requires a contact between an activating region in the upstream subunit of the bound CRP dimer and a contact site in the C-terminal domain of the alpha-subunit of RNA polymerase. Transcription activation is suppressed by amino acid substitutions in the activating region, but activation can be restored by second site substitutions at K52 or E96. These substitutions identify two separate regions on the surface of CRP that appear to be able to interact with RNA polymerase specifically at class II promoters. Using the method of 'oriented heterodimers' we show that these alternative activating regions are functional in the downstream subunit of the bound CRP dimer. PMID:8604346

  11. Educacion al Aire Libre: Libro de Actividades II = Outdoor Education: Student Activity Book II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Alma Flor, Comp.; And Others

    Divided into four sections, the book includes activities for students to do before camp, on the way to camp, at camp, and after camp. Activities to do before camp include writing proverbs, tongue twisters, riddles, poems, and stories. Activities to do on the way to camp include singing songs and reading a map. The words to the following songs are…

  12. Synthesis, characterization and biocidal activity of some transition metal(II) complexes with isatin salicylaldehyde acyldihydrazones.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod P; Singh, Shweta; Singh, Divya P

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II) complexes with two new unsymmetrical ligands, isatin salicylaldehyde oxalic acid dihydrazide (isodh) and isatin salicylaldehyde malonic acid dihydrazide (ismdh) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic moments, electronic, NMR, ESR and IR spectral studies. The isodh acts as a dibasic tetra dentate ligand bonding through two >C=N-, a deprotonated phenolate and deprotonated indole enolate groups to the metal. The ismdh ligand shows monobasic tetra dentate behaviour in bonding with metal ion through two >C=N-, indole >C=O and a deprotonated phenolate group. The electronic spectral data suggest 4-coordinate square planar geometry for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of isodh, whereas, 6-coordinate octahedral structure for the ismdh complexes. The ESR studies also indicate a square planar and distorted octahedral environment around Cu(II) for isodh and ismdh complexes, respectively. Most of the metal complexes show better antifungal activity than the standard and a significant antibacterial activity against various fungi and bacteria. PMID:21679052

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, DNA interaction and biological activities of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Wakiel, Nadia A.; El-Ghamry, Hoda; Fathalla, Shaimaa K.

    2014-11-01

    Manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol have been synthesized. The structure of complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements and spectral (IR, 1H NMR, EI-mass, UV-Vis and ESR), and thermal studies. The results showed that the chloro and nitrato Cu(II) complexes have octahedral geometry while Ni(II), Co(II) and Mn(II) complexes in addition to acetato Cu(II) complex have tetrahedral geometry. The possible structures of the metal complexes have been computed using the molecular mechanic calculations using the hyper chem. 8.03 molecular modeling program to confirm the proposed structures. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the thermal decomposition steps were calculated from the TG curves. The binding modes of the complexes with DNA have been investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration. The results showed that the mode of binding of the complexes to DNA is intercalative or non-intercalative binding modes. Schiff base and its metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pesudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Asperigllus flavus and Mucer) and yeast (Candida albicans and Malassezia furfur).

  14. Binuclear cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and palladium(II) complexes of a new Schiff-base as ligand: Synthesis, structural characterization, and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeta, B.; Shravankumar, K.; Reddy, P. Muralidhar; Ravikrishna, E.; Sarangapani, M.; Reddy, K. Krishna; Ravinder, V.

    2010-11-01

    A binucleating new Schiff-base ligand with a phenylene spacer, afforded by the condensation of glycyl-glycine and o-phthalaldehyde has been served as an octadentate N 4O 4 ligand in designing some binuclear complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and palladium(II). The binding manner of the ligand to the metal and the composition and geometry of the metal complexes were examined by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, magnetic moments, IR, 1H, 13C NMR, ESR and electronic spectroscopies, and TGA measurements. There are two different coordination/chelation environments present around two metal centers of each binuclear complex. The composition of the complexes in the coordination sphere was found to be [M 2(L)(H 2O) 4] (where M = Co(II) and Ni(II)) and [M 2(L)] (where M = Cu(II) and Pd(II)). In the case of Cu(II) complexes, ESR spectra provided further information to confirm the binuclear structure and the presence of magnetic interactions. All the above metal complexes have shown moderate to good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Performance of Spent Mushroom Farming Waste (SMFW) Activated Carbon for Ni (II) Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desa, N. S. Md; Ghani, Z. Ab; Talib, S. Abdul; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of a low cost agricultural waste of spent mushroom farming waste (SMFW) activated carbon for Ni(II) removal was investigated. The batch adsorption experiments of adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time, metal concentration, and temperature were determined. The samples were shaken at 125 rpm, filtered and analyzed using ICP-OES. The fifty percent of Ni(II) removal was obtained at 0.63 g of adsorbent dosage, pH 5-6 (unadjusted), 60 min contact time, 50 mg/L Ni(II) concentration and 25 °C temperature. The evaluated SMFW activated carbon showed the highest performance on Ni(II) removal compared to commercial Amberlite IRC86 resin and zeolite NK3. The result indicated that SMFW activated carbon is a high potential cation exchange adsorbent and suitable for adsorption process for metal removal. The obtained results contribute toward application of developed SMFW activated carbon in industrial pilot study.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of Cu(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(II), and UO2(VI) complexes with a new Schiff Base hydrazone: O-hydroxyacetophenone-7-chloro-4-quinoline hydrazone.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaalan, Nora H

    2011-01-01

    The Schiff base hydrazone ligand HL was prepared by the condensation reaction of 7-chloro-4-quinoline with o-hydroxyacetophenone. The ligand behaves either as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tridentate and contain ONN coordination sites. This was accounted for be the presence in the ligand of a phenolic azomethine and imine groups. It reacts with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), UO(2) (VI) and Fe(II) to form either mono- or binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, NMR, Mass, and UV-Visible spectra. The magnetic moments and electrical conductance of the complexes were also determined. The Co(II), Ni(II) and UO(2) (VI) complexes are mononuclear and coordinated to NO sites of two ligand molecules. The Cu(II) complex has a square-planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral, the Ni(II) complex is octahedral while the UO(2) (VI) complex has its favoured heptacoordination. The Co(II), Mn(II) complexes and also other Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes, which were obtained in the presence of Li(OH) as deprotonating agent, are binuclear and coordinated via the NNNO sites of two ligand molecules. All the binuclear complexes have octahedral geometries and their magnetic moments are quite low compared to the calculated value for two metal ions complexes and thus antiferromagnetic interactions between the two adjacent metal ions. The ligand HL and metal complexes were tested against a strain of Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli), and fungi (Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited high antibacterial activities. PMID:21996717

  17. DNA binding and topoisomerase II inhibitory activity of water-soluble ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok Ranjan; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2007-12-10

    Water-soluble piano-stool arene ruthenium complexes based on 1-(4-cyanophenyl)imidazole (CPI) and 4-cyanopyridine (CNPy) with the formulas [(eta6-arene)RuCl2(L)] (L = CPI, eta6-arene = benzene (1), p-cymene (2), hexamethylbenzene (3); L = CNPy, eta6-arene = benzene (4), p-cymene (5), hexamethylbenzene (6)) have been prepared by our earlier methods. The molecular structure of [(eta6-C6Me6)RuCl2(CNPy)] (6) has been determined crystallographically. Analogous rhodium(III) complex [(eta5-C5Me5)RhCl2(CPI)] (7) has also been prepared and characterized. DNA interaction with the arene ruthenium complexes and the rhodium complex has been examined by spectroscopic and gel mobility shift assay; condensation of DNA and B-->Z transition have also been described. Arene ruthenium(II) and EPh3 (E = P, As)-containing arene ruthenium(II) complexes exhibited strong binding behavior, however, rhodium(III) complexes were found to be Topo II inhibitors with an inhibition percentage of 70% (7) and 30% (7a). Furthermore, arene ruthenium complexes containing polypyridyl ligands also act as mild Topo II inhibitors (10%, 3c and 40%, 3d) in contrast to their precursor complexes. Complexes 4-6 also show significant inhibition of beta-hematin/hemozoin formation activity. PMID:18001110

  18. The effect of copper(II), iron(II) sulphate, and vitamin C combinations on the weak antimicrobial activity of (+)-catechin against Staphylococcus aureus and other microbes.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew C; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Gould, Simon W J; Fielder, Mark D; Naughton, Declan P; Kelly, Alison F

    2012-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to improve the activity of plant compounds with low antimicrobial efficacy. (+)-Catechin, a weak antimicrobial tea flavanol, was combined with putative adjuncts and tested against different species of bacteria. Copper(II) sulphate enhanced (+)-catechin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis or Escherichia coli. Attempts to raise the activity of (+)-catechin against two unresponsive species, S. aureus and E. coli, with iron(II) sulphate, iron(III) chloride, and vitamin C, showed that iron(II) enhanced (+)-catechin against S. aureus, but not E. coli; neither iron(III) nor combined iron(II) and copper(II), enhanced (+)-catechin activity against either species. Vitamin C enhanced copper(II) containing combinations against both species in the absence of iron(II). Catalase or EDTA added to active samples removed viability effects suggesting that active mixtures had produced H(2)O(2)via the action of added metal(II) ions. H(2)O(2) generation by (+)-catechin plus copper(II) mixtures and copper(II) alone could account for the principal effect of bacterial growth inhibition following 30 minute exposures as well as the antimicrobial effect of (+)-catechin-iron(II) against S. aureus. These novel findings about a weak antimicrobial flavanol contrast with previous knowledge of more active flavanols with transition metal combinations. Weak antimicrobial compounds like (+)-catechin within enhancement mixtures may therefore be used as efficacious agents. (+)-Catechin may provide a means of lowering copper(II) or iron(II) contents in certain crop protection and other products. PMID:23138340

  19. Geeks, meta-Geeks, and gender trouble: activism, identity, and low-power FM radio.

    PubMed

    Dunbar-Hester, Christina

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, I consider the activities of a group of individuals who tinker with and build radio hardware in an informal setting called 'Geek Group'. They conceive of Geek Group as a radical pedagogical activity, which constitutes an aspect of activism surrounding citizen access to low-power FM radio. They are also concerned with combating the gendered nature of hardware skills, yet in spite of their efforts men tend to have more skill and familiarity with radio hardware than women. Radio tinkering has a long history as a masculine undertaking and a site of masculine identity construction. I argue that this case represents an interplay between geek, activist, and gendered identities, all of which are salient for this group, but which do not occur together without some tension. PMID:18831131

  20. Physical Activity and Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eijkemans, Marianne; Mommers, Monique; Draaisma, Jos M. Th.; Thijs, Carel; Prins, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This review aims to give an overview of available published evidence concerning the association between physical activity and asthma in children, adolescents and adults. Methods We included all original articles in which both physical activity and asthma were assessed in case-control, cross-sectional or longitudinal (cohort) studies. Excluded were studies concerning physical fitness, studies in athletes, therapeutic or rehabilitation intervention studies such as physical training or exercise in asthma patients. Methodological quality of the included articles was assessed according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results A literature search was performed until June 2011 and resulted in 6,951 publications derived from PubMed and 1,978 publications from EMBASE. In total, 39 studies met the inclusion criteria: 5 longitudinal studies (total number of subjects n = 85,117) with physical activity at baseline as exposure, and asthma incidence as outcome. Thirty-four cross-sectional studies (n = 661,222) were included. Pooling of the longitudinal studies showed that subjects with higher physical activity levels had lower incidence of asthma (odds ratio 0.88 (95% CI: 0.77–1.01)). When restricting pooling to the 4 prospective studies with moderate to good study quality (defined as NOS≥5) the pooled odds ratio only changed slightly (0.87 (95% CI: 0.77–0.99)). In the cross-sectional studies, due to large clinical variability and heterogeneity, further statistical analysis was not possible. Conclusions The available evidence indicates that physical activity is a possible protective factor against asthma development. The heterogeneity suggests that possible relevant effects remain hidden in critical age periods, sex differences, or extremes of levels of physical activity (e.g. sedentary). Future longitudinal studies should address these issues. PMID:23284646

  1. Improving vagal activity ameliorates cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II: in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ning; Lu, Yi; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yong-hua; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is characterized by overactivity of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and withdrawal of vagal activity. We hypothesized that improving vagal activity could attenuate cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vivo and in vitro. Rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction (AAC) with or without pyridostigmine (PYR) (31 mg/kg/d). After 8 weeks, PYR significantly decreased Ang II level, AT1 protein expression, and collagen deposition in cardiac tissue and improved heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac function, which were abolished by atropine. In vitro, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) with Ang II (10−7 M) increased cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and secretory properties, which were significantly diminished by acetylcholine (ACh, 10−6 M). Subsequently, Ang II significantly increased collagen type I expression as well as metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression and activity. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression and Smad3 phosphorylation presented a similar trend. Notably, the knockdown of the acetylcholine M2 receptor by siRNA could abolish ACh anti-fibrotic action. These data implicated cholinesterase inhibitor can increase vagal activity and reduce local Ang II level, and ACh inhibit Ang II pro-fibrotic effects. Our findings suggested that the parasympathetic nervous system can serve as a promising target for cardiac remodeling treatment. PMID:26596640

  2. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  3. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  4. DNA Binding, Cleavage and Antibacterial Activity of Mononuclear Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) Complexes Derived from Novel Benzothiazole Schiff Bases.

    PubMed

    Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Kumar, Marri Pradeep; Tejaswi, Somapangu; Rambabu, Aveli; Shivaraj

    2016-07-01

    A series of novel bivalent metal complexes M(L1)2 and M(L2)2 where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and L1 = 2-((benzo [d] thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4-bromophenol [BTEMBP], L2 = 1-((benzo [d] thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl) naphthalen-2-ol [BTEMNAPP] were synthesized. All the compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, SEM, Mass, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, ESR, spectral data and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Based on the analytical and spectral data four-coordinated square planar geometry is assigned to all the complexes. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. It is observed that these binary complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA by an intercalation mode. DNA cleavage efficacy of these complexes was tested in presence of H2O2 and UV light by gel electrophoresis and found that all the complexes showed better nuclease activity. Finally the compounds were screened for antibacterial activity against few pathogens and found that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than their free ligands. PMID:27165038

  5. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  6. META-ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL ( PAL ) DATA FOR U.S. YOUTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes analytical research undertaken by EMRB staff to obtain age- and gender-specific distributions of Physical Activity Level (PAL) values for children measured in studies published between 1990-2004 in the clinical nutrition and exercise physiology literatures. ...

  7. Effect of Pedometer-Based Physical Activity Interventions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Marshall, Simon J.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Lee, Jin-Oh

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) improves mental health and reduces the risk of a number of adverse health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease mortality, hypertension, colon cancer, and diabetes mellitus. Many studies with different strategies have been conducted to increase the level of PA for people of all ages. One of many strategies…

  8. Diet and Physical Activity Interventions to Prevent or Treat Obesity in South Asian Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tamara; Smith, Sarah; Bhopal, Raj; Kasim, Adetayo; Summerbell, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The metabolic risks associated with obesity are greater for South Asian populations compared with White or other ethnic groups, and levels of obesity in childhood are known to track into adulthood. Tackling obesity in South Asians is therefore a high priority. The rationale for this systematic review is the suggestion that there may be differential effectiveness in diet and physical activity interventions in South Asian populations compared with other ethnicities. The research territory of the present review is an emergent, rather than mature, field of enquiry, but is urgently needed. Thus the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the effectiveness of diet and physical activity interventions to prevent or treat obesity in South Asians living in or outside of South Asia and to describe the characteristics of effective interventions. Methods: Systematic review of any type of lifestyle intervention, of any length of follow-up that reported any anthropometric measure for children or adults of South Asian ethnicity. There was no restriction on the type of comparator; randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and before-after studies were included. A comprehensive search strategy was implemented in five electronic databases: ASSIA, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Embase, Medline and Social Sciences Citation Index. The search was limited to English language abstracts published between January 2006 and January 2014. References were screened; data extraction and quality assessment were carried out by two reviewers. Results are presented in narrative synthesis and meta-analysis. Results: Twenty-nine studies were included, seven children, 21 adult and one mixed age. No studies in children under six were identified. Sixteen studies were conducted in South Asia, ten in Europe and three in USA. Effective or promising trials include physical activity interventions in South Asian men in Norway and South Asian school

  9. The peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-gamma agonists as therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huawei; Shang, Yuping; Jiang, Ling; Shi, Tian-lu; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and there is no effective therapy for it. Peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) agonists is a promising therapeutic approach for AD and has been widely studied recently, but no consensus was available up to now. To clarify this point, a meta-analysis was performed. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central database, PUBMED, Springer Link database, SDOS database, CBM, CNKI and Wan fang database by December 2014. Standardized mean difference (SMD), relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to assess the strength of the novel therapeutics for AD and mild-to-moderate AD. A total of nine studies comprising 1314 patients and 1311 controls were included in the final meta-analysis. We found the effect of PPAR-γ agonists on Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) scores by using STATA software. There was no evidence for obvious publication bias in the overall meta-analysis. There is insufficient evidence of statistically incognition of AD and mild-to-moderate AD patients have been improved who were treated with PPAR-γ agonists in our research. However, PPAR-γ agonists may be a promising therapeutic approach in future, especially pioglitazone, with large-scale randomized controlled trials to confirm. PMID:26001206

  10. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3−/− but not in mGluR2−/− mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity. PMID:21628565

  11. Class II HDAC Inhibition Hampers Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation by Induction of MicroRNA-29

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Inge; Eysackers, Nathalie; Onyema, Oscar O.; Van Beneden, Katrien; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Odenthal, Margarete; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of a quiescent vitamin A storing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) to a matrix producing, contractile myofibroblast-like activated HSC is a key event in the onset of liver disease following injury of any aetiology. Previous studies have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in the phenotypical changes occurring during stellate cell activation in liver and pancreas. Aims In the current study we investigate the role of class II HDACs during HSC activation. Methods We characterized the expression of the class II HDACs freshly isolated mouse HSCs. We inhibited HDAC activity by selective pharmacological inhibition with MC1568, and by repressing class II HDAC gene expression using specific siRNAs. Results Inhibition of HDAC activity leads to a strong reduction of HSC activation markers α-SMA, lysyl oxidase and collagens as well as an inhibition of cell proliferation. Knock down experiments showed that HDAC4 contributes to HSC activation by regulating lysyl oxidase expression. In addition, we observed a strong up regulation of miR-29, a well-known anti-fibrotic miR, upon treatment with MC1568. Our in vivo work suggests that a successful inhibition of class II HDACs could be promising for development of future anti-fibrotic compounds. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of MC1568 has enabled us to identify a role for class II HDACs regulating miR-29 during HSC activation. PMID:23383282

  12. Impact of statin therapy on plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Catena, Cristiana; Ray, Kausik K; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J; Reiner, Željko; Sechi, Leonardo A; Colussi, GianLuca

    2016-07-01

    Elevated plasma levels of the pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory factor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Beyond their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been shown to modulate plasma PAI-1 levels but evidence from individual randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is controversial. Therefore, we aimed to assess the potential effects of statin therapy on plasma PAI-1 concentration through a meta-analysis of RCTs. We searched Medline and SCOPUS databases (up to October 3, 2014) to identify RCTs investigating the effect of statin therapy on plasma PAI-1 concentrations. We performed random-effects meta-analysis and assessed heterogeneity (I² test, subgroup and sensitivity analyses) and publication bias (funnel plot, Egger and "trim and fill" tests). Sixteen RCTs (comprising 19 treatment arms) were included and pooled analyses showed a significant effect of statins in reducing plasma PAI-1 concentrations (weighted mean difference WMD: -15.72 ng/ml, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: -25.01, -6.43,). In subgroup analysis, this effect remained significant in with lipophilic statins (atorvastatin and simvastatin) (WMD: -21.32 ng/ml, 95 % CI: -32.73, -9.91, I²=99 %) and particularly atorvastatin (WMD: -20.88 ng/mL, 95 % CI: -28.79, -12.97, I2=97 %). In the meta-regression analysis, the impact of statins on PAI-1 did not correlate with the administered dose, duration of treatment and changes in plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Finally, evidence of publication bias was observed. In conclusion, taking into account the limit of heterogeneity between studies, the present meta-analysis suggests that statin therapy (mainly atorvastatin) significantly lowers plasma PAI-1 concentrations. PMID:27009446

  13. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  14. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity. PMID:26213934

  15. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  16. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  17. Anticancer activity and DNA-binding investigations of the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes with coumarin derivative.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Taofeng; Wang, Yuan; Ding, Weiliang; Xu, Jun; Chen, Ruhua; Xie, Jing; Zhu, Wenjiao; Jia, Lei; Ma, Tieliang

    2015-03-01

    Two new copper(II) (2) and nickel(II) (3) complexes with a new coumarin derivative have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The DNA-binding activities of the two complexes have been investigated by spectrometric titrations, ethidium bromide displacement experiments, CD (circular dichroism) spectral analysis, and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the two complexes, especially the complex 2, can strongly bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT--DNA). The intrinsic binding constants Kb of the complexes with CT-DNA are 2.99 × 10(5) and 0.61 × 10(5) for 2 and 3, respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of the two complexes are also determined by MTT assay. The results show that the drugs designed here have significant cytotoxic activity against the human hepatic (HepG2), human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60), and human prostate (PC3) cell lines. Cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/PI flow cytometry, and the results show that the two copper complexes can induce apoptosis of the three human tumor cells. In conclusions, the two complexes show considerable cytotoxic activity against the three human cancer and induce apoptosis of the threes. PMID:25141910

  18. Synthesis, topoisomerase I and II inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity, and structure-activity relationship study of 2-phenyl- or hydroxylated 2-phenyl-4-aryl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Kadayat, Tara Man; Song, Chanju; Shin, Somin; Magar, Til Bahadur Thapa; Bist, Ganesh; Shrestha, Aarajana; Thapa, Pritam; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo; Lee, Eung-Seok

    2015-07-01

    A series of novel twenty-eight rigid 2-phenyl- or hydroxylated 2-phenyl-4-aryl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridines were synthesized and evaluated for their topoisomerase inhibitory activity as well as their cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. Generally, hydroxylated compounds (16-18, 22-25, and 29-31) containing furyl or thienyl moiety at 4-position of central pyridine exhibited strong topoisomerase I and II inhibitory activity compared to positive control, camptothecin and etoposide, respectively, in low micromolar range. Structure-activity relationship study revealed that indenopyridine compounds with hydroxyl group at 2-phenyl ring in combination with furyl or thienyl moiety at 4-position are important for topoisomerase inhibition. Compounds (22-25) which contain hydroxyl group at meta position of the 2-phenyl ring at 2-position and furanyl or thienyl substitution at 4-position of indenopyridine, showed concrete correlations between topo I and II inhibitory activity, and cytotoxicity against evaluated human cancer cell lines. PMID:26022080

  19. [Molluscacide activity of a mixture of 6-n-alkyl salicylic acids (anacardic acid) and 2 of its complexes with copper (II) and lead (II)].

    PubMed

    Mendes, N M; de Oliveira, A B; Guimarães, J E; Pereira, J P; Katz, N

    1990-01-01

    The molluscicide activity of hexanic extract from Anacardium occidentale L. (cashew) nut shell, of copper (II) complex, of lead (II) complex and anacardic acid has been compared in the laboratory in an attempt to obtain better stability than anacardic acid. This was obtained from the hexanic extract of the cashew nut shell by precipitation with lead (II) hydroxide or cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide or (II) cupric hydroxide followed by treatment of lead (II) complex with a diluted solution of sulfuric acid. Ten products of the mixture obtained were tested on adults snails of Biomphalaria glabrata at 1 to 10 ppm. The most active products were copper (II) complex, obtained by cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide, and anacardic acid (sodium hydroxide) which presented activity at 4 ppm. The anacardic acid's lead content was above the limits accepted by the United States standards. PMID:2133588

  20. Conservation II. Science Activities in Energy. [Student's and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to the conservation of energy. Eleven student activities using art, economics, arithmetic, and other skills and disciplines help teachers directly involve students in exploring scientific questions and making…

  1. Active-passive airborne ocean color measurement. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reported here for the first time is the use of a single airborne instrument to make concurrent measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentration by (1) laser-induced fluorescence, (2) passive upwelling radiance, and (3) solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Results from field experiments conducted with the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the New York Bight demonstrate the capability of a single active-passive instrument to perform new and potentially important ocean color studies related to (1) active lidar validation of passive ocean color in-water algorithms, (2) chlorophyll a in vivo fluorescence yield variability, (3) calibration of active multichannel lidar systems, (4) effect of sea state on passive and active ocean color measurements, (5) laser/solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence investigations, and (6) subsequent improvement of satellite-borne ocean color scanners. For validation and comparison purposes a separate passive ocean color sensor was also flown along with the new active-passive sensor during these initial field trials.

  2. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L.; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs. PMID:27362418

  3. Synthesis, spectral characterization, solution equilibria, in vitro antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes with Schiff base derived from 5-bromosalicylaldehyde and 2-aminomethylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Eldebss, Taha M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Schiff base namely 2-aminomethylthiophenyl-4-bromosalicylaldehyde (ATS)(4-bromo-2-(thiophen-2-yl-imino)methylphenol) and its metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, ESR and thermal analysis (TGA). The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio of the formula [ML 2], where M represents Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated Schiff base. IR spectra show that ATS is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner through azomethine-N and phenolic-oxygen groups. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria. A cytotoxicity of the compounds against colon (HCT116) and larynx (HEP2) cancer cells have been studied. Protonation constants of (ATS) ligand and stability constants of its Cu 2+, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% (v/v) DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M NaNO 3.

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization, solution equilibria, in vitro antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes with Schiff base derived from 5-bromosalicylaldehyde and 2-aminomethylthiophene.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Eldebss, Taha M A

    2011-09-01

    Schiff base namely 2-aminomethylthiophenyl-4-bromosalicylaldehyde (ATS)(4-bromo-2-(thiophen-2-yl-imino)methylphenol) and its metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, ESR and thermal analysis (TGA). The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio of the formula [ML2], where M represents Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated Schiff base. IR spectra show that ATS is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner through azomethine-N and phenolic-oxygen groups. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria. A cytotoxicity of the compounds against colon (HCT116) and larynx (HEP2) cancer cells have been studied. Protonation constants of (ATS) ligand and stability constants of its Cu2+, Co2+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% (v/v) DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M NaNO3. PMID:21705267

  5. Fibrates increase human apolipoprotein A-II expression through activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Vu-Dac, N; Schoonjans, K; Kosykh, V; Dallongeville, J; Fruchart, J C; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1995-01-01

    In view of the evidence linking plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels to a protective effect against coronary artery disease and the widespread use of fibrates in the treatment of hyperlipidemia, the goal of this study was to analyze the influence of fibrates on the expression of apolipoprotein (apo) A-II, a major protein constituent of HDL. Administration of fenofibrate (300 mg/d) to 16 patients with coronary artery disease resulted in a marked increase in plasma apo A-II concentrations (0.34 +/- 0.11 to 0.45 +/- 0.17 grams/liter; P < 0.01). This increase in plasma apo A-II was due to a direct effect on hepatic apo A-II production, since fenofibric acid induced apo A-II mRNA levels to 450 and 250% of control levels in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells respectively. The induction in apo A-II mRNA levels was followed by an increase in apo A-II secretion in both cell culture systems. Transient transfection experiments of a reporter construct driven by the human apo A-II gene promoter indicated that fenofibrate induced apo A-II gene expression at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, several other peroxisome proliferators, such as the fibrate, Wy-14643, and the fatty acid, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), also induced apo A-II gene transcription. Unilateral deletions and site-directed mutagenesis identified a sequence element located in the J-site of the apo A-II promoter mediating the responsiveness to fibrates and fatty acids. This element contains two imperfect half sites spaced by 1 oligonucleotide similar to a peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). Cotransfection assays showed that the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) transactivates the apo A-II promoter through this AII-PPRE. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that PPAR binds to the AII-PPRE with an affinity comparable to its binding affinity to the acyl coA oxidase (ACO)-PPRE. In conclusion, in humans fibrates increase

  6. Synthesis, characterization, molecular modeling and antioxidant activity of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) and its zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Ghazy, S. E.; Radwan, A. H.

    2012-08-01

    A new series of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-visible, mass and 1H NMR) as well as magnetic and thermal measurements. The data revealed that the ligand acts a monobasic hexadentate, neutral tri- and monodentate in Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes, respectively. An octahedral geometry is proposed for Zn(II) complex, a trigonal bi-pyramid for Cd(II) complex and a tetrahedral one for Hg(II) complex. The bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO and charges on the atoms have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes using material studio program. Kinetic parameters were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been screened. H2APC showed moderate antioxidant activity using ABTS and DPPH methods. With respect to erythrocyte hemolysis and in vitro Ehrlich ascites assay, H2APC exhibited the potent antioxidative activity followed by Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes while Hg(II) complex showed very weak activity.

  7. Salvicine, a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, exerts its potent anticancer activity by ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ling-hua; Ding, Jian

    2007-09-01

    Salvicine is a novel diterpenoid quinone compound obtained by structural modification of a natural product lead isolated from a Chinese herb with potent growth inhibitory activity against a wide spectrum of human tumor cells in vitro and in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Salvicine has also been found to have a profound cytotoxic effect on multidrug-resisitant (MDR) cells. Moreover, Salvicine significantly reduced the lung metastatic foci of MDA-MB-435 orthotopic xenograft. Recent studies demonstrated that salvicine is a novel non-intercalative topoisomerase II (Topo II) poison by binding to the ATPase domain, promoting DNA-Topo II binding and inhibiting Topo II-mediated DNA relegation and ATP hydrolysis. Further studies have indicated that salcivine-elicited ROS plays a central role in salvicine-induced cellular response including Topo II inhibition, DNA damage, circumventing MDR and tumor cell adhesion inhibition. PMID:17723179

  8. A Meta-Analysis of 25 Years of Mood-Creativity Research: Hedonic Tone, Activation, or Regulatory Focus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baas, Matthijs; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 102 effect sizes reflecting the relation between specific moods and creativity. Effect sizes overall revealed that positive moods produce more creativity than mood-neutral controls (r = 0.15), but no significant differences between negative moods and mood-neutral controls (r = -0.03) or between positive and negative…

  9. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  14. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  15. Effect of Vitamin D Receptor Activators on Glomerular Filtration Rate: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D receptor activators (VDRAs) can protect against mineral bone disease, but they are reported to elevate serum creatinine (SCr) and may also reduce glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of VDRAs on kidney function and adverse events. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched for RCTs that evaluate vitamin D receptor activators (alfacalcidol, calcitriol, doxercalciferol, falecalcitriol, maxacalcitol and paricalcitol) up to March 2015. Results We included 31 studies, all of which were performed between 1976 and 2015, which enrolled 2621 patients. Patients receiving VDRAs had lower eGFR (weighted mean difference WMD -1.29 mL/min /1.73 m2, 95% CI -2.42 to -0.17) and elevated serum creatinine (WMD 7.03 μmol/L, 95% CI 0.61 to 13.46) in sensitivity analysis excluding studies with dropout rate more than 30%. Subgroup analysis of the 5 studies that not use SCr-based measures did not indicated lower GFR in the VDRAs group(WMD -0.97 mL/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI -4.85 to 2.92). Compared with control groups, there was no difference in all-cause mortality (relative risk RR 1.41, 95% CI 0.58 to 3.80), cardiovascular disease (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.71), and severe adverse events (RR 1.15, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.77) for the VDRAs groups. Episodes of hypercalcemia (RR 3.29, 95% CI 2.02 to 5.38) were more common in the VDRAs group than in the control group. Conclusions Administration of VDRAs increased serum creatinine levels. Subgroup analysis of studies that did not use SCr-based measures did not indicate a lower GFR in the VDRA group. Future studies with non-SCr-based measures are needed to assess whether the mild elevations of serum creatinine are of clinical significance. PMID:26812502

  16. Meta-analysis of primary target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Uski, J Oskari; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. Results In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. Conclusion An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection. PMID:17650321

  17. Meditation-related activations are modulated by the practices needed to obtain it and by the expertise: an ALE meta-analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fregona, Sara; Skrap, Miran; Fabbro, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The brain network governing meditation has been studied using a variety of meditation practices and techniques practices eliciting different cognitive processes (e.g., silence, attention to own body, sense of joy, mantras, etc.). It is very possible that different practices of meditation are subserved by largely, if not entirely, disparate brain networks. This assumption was tested by conducting an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of meditation neuroimaging studies, which assessed 150 activation foci from 24 experiments. Different ALE meta-analyses were carried out. One involved the subsets of studies involving meditation induced through exercising focused attention (FA). The network included clusters bilaterally in the medial gyrus, the left superior parietal lobe, the left insula and the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG). A second analysis addressed the studies involving meditation states induced by chanting or by repetition of words or phrases, known as “mantra.” This type of practice elicited a cluster of activity in the right SMG, the SMA bilaterally and the left postcentral gyrus. Furthermore, the last analyses addressed the effect of meditation experience (i.e., short- vs. long-term meditators). We found that frontal activation was present for short-term, as compared with long-term experience meditators, confirming that experts are better enabled to sustain attentional focus, rather recruiting the right SMG and concentrating on aspects involving disembodiment. PMID:23316154

  18. Basic mechanisms of RNA polymerase II activity and alteration of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23022618

  19. Starspot activity on the RS CVn-type binary II Pegasi during 1999-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S.-H.; Tan, H.-S.; Wang, X.-B.; Shan, H.-G.

    2003-07-01

    By means of Doppler imaging, new high-resolution spectroscopic observations of II Peg, carried out in three observing seasons from 1999 to 2001, were analyzed. The lines FeI6430.844 Å and CaI6439.075 Å were chosen as map lines, and three surface maps of II Peg were obtained. The results demonstrate that the main features of these surface maps are high-latitude active regions around 60° and no polar cap is seen in the maps. The surface patterns of II Peg show large changes, the largest scale active regions appear in July-Aug. 1999 and then they become small and separated in Feb. 2000. The active longitude switches to another hemisphere in Nov.-Dec. 2001 from the one in Feb. 2000. Such spot evolution is not consistent with the activity cycle derived previously.

  20. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological activities of Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes with benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Ramesh, G. N.; Jagadeesh, M.; Reddy, Y. P.; Chalapathi, P. V.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2011-06-01

    Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone have been synthesized and characterized by the investigations of electronic and EPR spectra and X-ray diffraction. Based on the spectral studies, an octahedral geometry is assigned for the Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes. X-ray powder diffraction studies reveal that Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes have triclinic crystal lattices. The unit cell parameters of the Mn(II) complex are a = 11.0469 Å, b = 6.2096 Å, c = 7.4145 Å, α = 90.646°, β = 95.127°, γ = 104.776°, V = 489.7 Å 3 and those of Co(II) complex are a = 9.3236 Å, b = 10.2410 Å, c = 7.8326 Å, α = 90.694°, β = 99.694°, γ = 100.476°, V = 724.2 Å 3. When the free ligand and its metal complexes are subjected to antibacterial activity, the metal complexes are proved to be more active than the ligand. However with regard to in vitro antioxidant activity, the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its metal(II) complexes.

  1. Activity of phosphino palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ntombenhle H; Elkhadir, Afag Y F; Gordhan, Bhavna G; Kana, Bavesh D; Darkwa, James; Meyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is currently complicated by increased prevalence of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of drug candidates that offer the simultaneous management of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) would be of great benefit in the holistic treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the highest global prevalence of HIV-TB coinfection. Bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylpalladium(II) chloride (1), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylplatinum(II) chloride (2), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylpalladium(II) chloride (3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylplatinum(II) (4) were investigated for the inhibition of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral protease. The complexes were subsequently assessed for biological potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using broth microdilution. Complex (3) showed the most significant and competitive inhibition of HIV-1 protease (p = 0.014 at 100 µM). Further studies on its in vitro effects on whole virus showed reduced viral infectivity by over 80 % at 63 µM (p < 0.05). In addition, the complex inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at an MIC of 5 µM and was non-toxic to host cells at all active concentrations (assessed by tetrazolium dye and real time cell electronic sensing). In vitro evidence is provided here for the possibility of utilizing a single metal-based compound for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and TB. PMID:27246555

  2. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section B--Electrical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Six learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of electrical systems in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these six units: (1) basic electrical theory, (2) battery service, (3) starting system, (4)…

  3. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section A--Engine Rebuilding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Eight learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of engine rebuilding in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these eight units: (1) engine condition evaluation; (2) engine removal; (3) engine…

  4. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section C--Drive Train.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Five learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of drive train in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these five units: (1) clutch assembly, (2) standard transmission, (3) drive lines, (4) rear axle,…

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of nifuroxazide and analogs. II.

    PubMed

    Tavares, L C; Chisté, J J; Santos, M G; Penna, T C

    1999-09-01

    Nifuroxazyde and six analogs were synthesized by varying the substitute from the para-position of the benzenic ring and the heteroatom of the heterocyclic ring. The MIC of seven resultant compounds was determined by serial dilutions, testing the ATCC 25923 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant increase in the anti-microbial activity of thyophenic analogs, as compared with furanic and pyrrholic analogs, was observed. In addition, unlike the cyano and hydroxyl groups, the acetyl group promoted anti-microbial activity. PMID:10622109

  6. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  7. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  8. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Occupational Exposure to Agricultural Pesticide Chemical Groups and Active Ingredients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schinasi, Leah; Leon, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes results from a systematic review and a series of meta-analyses of nearly three decades worth of epidemiologic research on the relationship between non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and occupational exposure to agricultural pesticide active ingredients and chemical groups. Estimates of associations of NHL with 21 pesticide chemical groups and 80 active ingredients were extracted from 44 papers, all of which reported results from analyses of studies conducted in high-income countries. Random effects meta-analyses showed that phenoxy herbicides, carbamate insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides and the active ingredient lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, were positively associated with NHL. In a handful of papers, associations between pesticides and NHL subtypes were reported; B cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicides and the organophosphorus herbicide glyphosate. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicide exposure. Despite compelling evidence that NHL is associated with certain chemicals, this review indicates the need for investigations of a larger variety of pesticides in more geographic areas, especially in low- and middle-income countries, which, despite producing a large portion of the world’s agriculture, were missing in the literature that were reviewed. PMID:24762670

  9. Co(II) and Cd(II) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: Synthesis, Structural Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L1) and N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L2) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L1 and L2 were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)2]Cl2 (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L1 or L2) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G−) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands. PMID:24027449

  10. Palladium(II) and platinum(II) derivatives of benzothiazoline ligands: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and antispermatogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Krishna; Singh, R. V.; Fahmi, Nighat

    2011-01-01

    A series of Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with two N ∩S donor ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and 6-nitro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline, have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chlorides (PdCl 2 and PtCl 2) with ligands in 1:2 molar ratios. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, melting point determinations and a combination of electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques for structure elucidation. In order to evaluate the effect of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial activity against the various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes have shown to be more antimicrobial against the microbial species as compared to free ligands. One of the ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and its corresponding palladium and platinum complexes have been tested for their antifertility activity in male albino rats. The marked reduction in sperm motility and density resulted in infertility by 62-90%. Significant alterations were found in biochemical parameters of reproductive organs in treated animals as compared to control group. It is concluded that all these effects may finally impair the fertility of male rats.

  11. The coactivator dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate basal transcription mediated by CREB.

    PubMed

    Felinski, E A; Quinn, P G

    2001-11-01

    A specific TATA binding protein-associated factor (TAF), dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135, interacts with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through its constitutive activation domain (CAD), which recruits a polymerase complex and activates transcription. The simplest explanation is that the TAF is a coactivator, but several studies have questioned this role of TAFs. Using a reverse two-hybrid analysis in yeast, we previously mapped the interaction between dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) and CREB to conserved hydrophobic amino acid residues in the CAD. That mapping was possible only because CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast, where all TAFs are conserved, except for the TAF recognizing CREB. To test whether CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast because it lacks a coactivator, we fused dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) to the TATA binding protein domain of the yeast scaffolding TAF, yTAF(II)130. Transformation of yeast with this hybrid TAF conferred activation by the CAD, indicating that interaction with yTFIID is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate transcription. The hybrid TAF did not mediate activation by VP16 or vitamin D receptor, each of which interacts with TFIIB, but not with dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308). Enhancement of transcription activation by dTAF(II)110 in mammalian cells required interaction with both the CAD and TFIID and was inhibited by mutation of core hydrophobic residues in the CAD. These data demonstrate that dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 acts as a coactivator to recruit TFIID and polymerase and that this mechanism of activation is conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:11687654

  12. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  13. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, You-Dong; Liu, Yi-Yun; Ren, Yi-Fei; Liang, Zi-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Li-Bo; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke. Methods Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger’s test were obtained to detect publication bias. Results We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate. Conclusions This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA. PMID:27387385

  14. Removal of Lead (II) Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Murat; Ucar, Suat; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay

    2013-01-01

    The removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II) ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II) ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. PMID:23853528

  15. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  16. Corticospinal activity during dual tasking: a systematic review and meta-analysis of TMS literature from 1995 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Corp, Daniel T; Lum, Jarrad A G; Tooley, Gregory A; Pearce, Alan J

    2014-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted across studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate corticospinal excitability and inhibition in response to a dual task (DT). Quantitative analysis was performed on eleven controlled studies that had included healthy participants over the age of 18 years. Results showed a small effect size for increased corticospinal excitability for DT conditions (SMD=0.207; p=.217, and a small effect size (SMD=-0.253) demonstrating a significant decrease in corticospinal inhibition for DT conditions (p=.019). Meta-regression demonstrated that neither age, task type, or task prioritisation accounted for the high variability in effect sizes between studies. A number of possible sources of within study bias are identified, which reduced the level of evidence for study findings. The results show overall changes in corticospinal responses between ST and DT conditions; however further research is necessary to investigate variables that could account for differences in corticospinal responses between studies. PMID:24705270

  17. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Hardik; Patel, Sejal; Patel, Ghanshyam; Paranjape, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg) treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ‘analysis of variance’ test followed by post hoc Tukey's test, with significant level of P < 0.05. Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property. PMID:24948860

  18. Active sites residues of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT-II).

    PubMed Central

    Nic a'Bháird, N; Yankovskaya, V; Ramsay, R R

    1998-01-01

    The carnitine acyltransferases which catalyse the reversible transfer of fatty acyl groups between carnitine and coenzyme A have been proposed to contain a catalytic histidine. Here, the chemical reactivity of active site groups has been used to demonstrate differences between the active sites of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II (CPT-II). Treatment of CPT-II with the histidine-selective reagent, diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), resulted in simple linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reversal of the inhibition by hydroxylamine and the pKa (7.1) of the modified residue indicated that the residue was a histidine. The order of the inactivation kinetics showed that 1mol of histidine was modified per mol of CPT-II.When COT was treated with DEPC the kinetics of inhibition were biphasic with an initial rapid loss of activity followed by a slower loss of activity. The residue reacting in the faster phase of inhibition was not a histidine but possibly a serine. The modification of this residue did not lead to complete loss of activity suggesting that a direct role in catalysis is unlikely. It was deduced that the residue modified by DEPC in the slower phase was a lysine and indeed fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB) inactivated COT with linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The COT peptide containing the FDNB-labelled lysine was isolated and sequenced. Alignment of this sequence placed it 10 amino acids downstream of the putative active-site histidine. PMID:9480926

  19. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  20. CCD Echelle observations of the active RS CVn system II Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1987-08-01

    Optical spectra were obtained of II Peg on eight different nights in 1984 and 1985 to assess the strength and variability of surface activity indicators in this very active RS CVn system. These cross-dispersed echelle spectra covered the range from 390 nm to 900 to 900 nm at a resolution of 12,000. EMission was seen in the first four Balmer lines, in the Ca II infrared triplet, Ca II H lines, and in one observation, in He I D3. The ratio of energy emitted in the H-alpha line to that in H-beta is similar to that in solar prominences, except during enhancements when the ratio decreases toward values more typical of solar flares. The H-alpha lines varied both in strength and in profile. There were slight variations in the Ca II infrared triplet lines. Exposure levels were too weak to assess the variations in H-gamma, H-delta, or Ca II H. Relative to comparison star spectra, the TiO bands at 896 nm and 710 nm were slightly deeper in II Peg, which is indicative of cool spots.

  1. Application of calcium peroxide activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex in trichloroethylene degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Fu, Xiaori; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the application of calcium peroxide (CP) activated with Fe(II) chelated by (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) to enhance trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in aqueous solution. It was indicated that EDDS prevented soluble iron from precipitation, and the optimum molar ratio of Fe(II)/EDDS to accelerate TCE degradation was 1/1. The influences of initial TCE, CP and Fe(II)-EDDS concentration were also investigated. The combination of CP and Fe(II)-EDDS complex rendered the efficient degradation of TCE at near neutral pH range. Chemical probe and scavenger tests identified that TCE degradation mainly owed to the oxidation of HO while O2(-) promoted HO generation. Cl(-), HCO3(-) and humic acid were found to inhibit CP/Fe(II)-EDDS performance on different levels. In conclusion, the application of CP activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex is a promising technology in chemical remediation of groundwater, while further research in practical implementation is needed. PMID:27351899

  2. Composite Mg II solar activity index for solar cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of version 1.0 of the composite MG II solar activity index data set, it is shown that the change in the 27-day running average of the Mg II index from solar maximum to solar minimum is about 8 percent for solar cycle 21 and about 9 percent for solar cycle 22 through January 1992. Scaling factors based on the short-term variations in the Mg II index and solar irradiance data sets are developed for each instrument to estimate solar variability at mid-UV and near-UV wavelengths. A set of composite scale factors are derived for use with the present composite MG index. Near 205 cm, where solar irradiance variations are important for stratospheric chemistry, the estimated change in irradiance during solar cycle 22 is about 10 +/- 1 percent using the composite Mg II index (version 1.0) and scale factors.

  3. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Lipoprotein ApoC-II activation of lipoprotein lipase. Modulation by apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, I J; Scheraldi, C A; Yacoub, L K; Saxena, U; Bisgaier, C L

    1990-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) contained in chylomicrons requires the presence of a cofactor, apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. The physiological mechanism by which chylomicrons gain apoC-II necessary for LPL activation in whole plasma is not known. Using a gum arabic stabilized TG emulsion, activation of LPL by lipoprotein apoC-II was studied. Hydrolysis of TG by LPL was greater in the presence of serum than with addition of either high density lipoproteins (HDL) or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). LPL activation by either VLDL or HDL increased with addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction of plasma. A similar increase in LPL activity by addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction together with HDL or VLDL was observed when another TG emulsion (Intralipid) or TG-rich lipoproteins from an apoC-II deficient subject were used as a substrate. Human apoA-IV, apoA-I, apoE, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein were assessed for their ability to increase LPL activity in the presence of VLDL. At and below physiological concentrations, only apoA-IV increased LPL activity. One hundred percent of LPL activity measured in the presence of serum was achieved using VLDL plus apoA-IV. In the absence of an apoC-II source, apoA-IV had no effect on LPL activity. Removal of greater than 80% of the apoA-IV from the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma by incubation with Intralipid markedly reduced its ability to activate LPL in the presence of VLDL or HDL. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that incubation of the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma with HDL and the TG emulsion caused increased transfer of apoC-II to the emulsion and association of apoA-IV with HDL. Our studies demonstrate that apoA-IV increases LPL activation in the presence of lipoproteins. We hypothesize that apoA-IV is required for efficient release of apoC-II from either HDL or VLDL, which then allows for LPL-mediated hydrolysis of TG in nascent

  5. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT. PMID:26461310

  6. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide scolopendrasin ii from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeong, Mihye; Kang, Dong-Chul; Lee, In Hee; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2013-10-28

    The centipede Scolopendra subpinipes mutilans is a medicinally important arthropod species. However, its transcriptome is not currently available and transcriptome analysis would be useful in providing insight into a molecular level approach. Hence, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of S. subpinipes mutilans using next-generation sequencing. We generated a novel peptide (scolopendrasin II) based on a SVM algorithm, and biochemically evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of scolopendrasin II against various microbes. Scolopendrasin II showed antibacterial activities against gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains, including the yeast Candida albicans and antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria, as determined by a radial diffusion assay and colony count assay without hemolytic activity. In addition, we confirmed that scolopendrasin II bound to the surface of bacteria through a specific interaction with lipoteichoic acid and a lipopolysaccharide, which was one of the bacterial cell-wall components. In conclusion, our results suggest that scolopendrasin II may be useful for developing peptide antibiotics. PMID:23801249

  8. Human biliverdin reductase, a previously unknown activator of protein kinase C betaII.

    PubMed

    Maines, Mahin D; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Gibbs, Peter E M

    2007-03-16

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), a dual specificity kinase (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is, as protein kinase C (PKC) betaII, activated by insulin and free radicals (Miralem, T., Hu, Z., Torno, M. D., Lelli, K. M., and Maines, M. D. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 17084-17092; Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Shen, J., Torno, M. D., Kravets, A., Hu, Z., and Maines, M. D. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 7109-7114). Here, by using 293A cells co-transfected with pcDNA3-hBVR and PKC betaII plasmids, we report the co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins and co-purification in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay. hBVR and PKC betaII, but not the reductase and PKC zeta, transphosphorylated in assay systems supportive of activity of only one of the kinases. PKC betaII K371R mutant protein ("kinase-dead") was also a substrate for hBVR. The reductase increased the Vmax but not the apparent Km values of PKC betaII for myelin basic protein; activation was independent of phospholipids and extended to the phosphorylation of S2, a PKC-specific substrate. The increase in substrate phosphorylation was blocked by specific inhibitors of conventional PKCs and attenuated by sihBVR. The effect of the latter could be rescued by subsequent overexpression of hBVR. To a large extent, the activation was a function of the hBVR N-terminal chain of valines and intact ATP-binding site and the cysteine-rich C-terminal segment. The cobalt protoporphyrin-activated hBVR phosphorylated a threonine in a peptide corresponding to the Thr500 in the human PKC betaII activation loop. Neither serine nor threonine residues in peptides corresponding to other phosphorylation sites of the PKC betaII nor PKC zeta activation loop-derived peptides were substrates. The phosphorylation of Thr500 was confirmed by immunoblotting of hBVR.PKC betaII immunocomplex. The potential biological relevance of the hBVR activation of PKC betaII was suggested by the finding that in cells transfected with the PKC betaII, h

  9. Type II p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are regulated by an autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hak; Davis, Matthew J; Chen, Catherine; Lou, Hua Jane; Gao, Jia; Zhang, Rong; Krauthammer, Michael; Halaban, Ruth; Schlessinger, Joseph; Turk, Benjamin E; Boggon, Titus J

    2012-10-01

    The type II p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key effectors of RHO-family GTPases involved in cell motility, survival, and proliferation. Using a structure-guided approach, we discovered that type II PAKs are regulated by an N-terminal autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate motif centered on a critical proline residue, and that this regulation occurs independently of activation loop phosphorylation. We determined six X-ray crystal structures of either full-length PAK4 or its catalytic domain, that demonstrate the molecular basis for pseudosubstrate binding to the active state with phosphorylated activation loop. We show that full-length PAK4 is constitutively autoinhibited, but mutation of the pseudosubstrate releases this inhibition and causes increased phosphorylation of the apoptotic regulation protein Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) antagonist causing cell death and cellular morphological changes. We also find that PAK6 is regulated by the pseudosubstrate region, indicating a common type II PAK autoregulatory mechanism. Finally, we find Src SH3, but not β-PIX SH3, can activate PAK4. We provide a unique understanding for type II PAK regulation. PMID:22988085

  10. Sequence specific inhibition of human type II phospholipase A2 enzyme activity by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, C F; Chiang, M Y; Wilson-Lingardo, L; Wyatt, J R

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were identified which directly inhibited human type II phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. The minimum pharmacophore common to all oligonucleotides which inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity consisted of two sets of three or more consecutive guanosine residues in a row. These oligonucleotides appear to form G quartets resulting in the formation of oligonucleotide aggregates. Additionally, a phosphorothioate backbone was required to be effective inhibitors of type II PLA2. The activity of one oligodeoxynucleotide, IP 3196 (5'-GGGTGGGTATAGAAGGGCTCC-3') has been characterized in more detail. IP 3196 inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity when the substrate was presented in the form of a phospholipid bilayer but not when presented in the form of a mixed micelle with anionic detergents. Human type II PLA2 was 50-fold more sensitive to inhibition by IP 3196 than venom and pancreatic type I enzymes. These data demonstrate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides can specifically inhibit human type II PLA2 enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. PMID:8065936

  11. Quantitative meta-analysis of fMRI and PET studies reveals consistent activation in fronto-striatal-parietal regions and cerebellum during antisaccades and prosaccades

    PubMed Central

    Jamadar, Sharna D.; Fielding, Joanne; Egan, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    The antisaccade task is a classic task of oculomotor control that requires participants to inhibit a saccade to a target and instead make a voluntary saccade to the mirror opposite location. By comparison, the prosaccade task requires participants to make a visually-guided saccade to the target. These tasks have been studied extensively using behavioral oculomotor, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging in both non-human primates and humans. In humans, the antisaccade task is under active investigation as a potential endophenotype or biomarker for multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders. A large and growing body of literature has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the neural correlates of the antisaccade and prosaccade tasks. We present a quantitative meta-analysis of all published voxel-wise fMRI and PET studies (18) of the antisaccade task and show that consistent activation for antisaccades and prosaccades is obtained in a fronto-subcortical-parietal network encompassing frontal and supplementary eye fields (SEFs), thalamus, striatum, and intraparietal cortex. This network is strongly linked to oculomotor control and was activated to a greater extent for antisaccade than prosaccade trials. Antisaccade but not prosaccade trials additionally activated dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. We also found that a number of additional regions not classically linked to oculomotor control were activated to a greater extent for antisaccade vs. prosaccade trials; these regions are often reported in antisaccade studies but rarely commented upon. While the number of studies eligible to be included in this meta-analysis was small, the results of this systematic review reveal that antisaccade and prosaccade trials consistently activate a distributed network of regions both within and outside the classic definition of the oculomotor network. PMID:24137150

  12. Effect of axial coordination on the electronic structure and biological activity of dirhodium(II,II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Lutterman, Daniel A; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    The reactivities toward biomolecules of a series of three dirhodium(II,II) complexes that possess an increasing number of accessible axial coordination sites are compared. In cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)2]2+ (1; np=1,8-naphthyridine) both axial sites are available for coordination, whereas for cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)(pynp)]2+ (2; pynp=2-(2-pyridyl)1,8-naphthyridine) and cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(pynp)2]2+ (3) the bridging pynp ligand blocks one and two of the axial coordination sites in the complexes, respectively. The electronic absorption spectra of the complexes are consistent with strong metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions at low energy and ligand-centered peaks localized on the np and/or pynp ligands in the UV and near-UV regions. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were used to aid in the assignments. The three complexes exhibit metal-centered oxidations and reductions, localized on the aromatic ligands. The ability of the complexes to stabilize duplex DNA and to inhibit transcription in vitro is greatly affected by the availability of an open axial coordination site. The present work shows that open axial coordination sites on the dirhodium complexes are necessary for biological activity. PMID:17685607

  13. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4

  14. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  15. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization and antioxidant activity studies of a bidentate Schiff base, 5-methyl thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde-carbohydrazone and its Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinath, Y.; Harikishore Kumar Reddy, D.; Naresh Kumar, B.; Apparao, Ch.; Seshaiah, K.

    2013-01-01

    A new Schiff base bidentate ligand (L), 5-methyl thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde-carbohydrazone and its metal (Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) complexes with general stoichiometry [M(L)2X2] (where X = Cl) were synthesized. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, ESR spectral analyses, and molar conductance studies. The molar conductance data revealed that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra showed that ligand (L) is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with N and O donor sites of the azomethine-N, and carbonyl-O. ESR and UV-Vis spectral data showed that the geometrical structure of the complexes are Orthorhombic. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the ligand and its complexes was determined by hydroxyl radical scavenging, DPPH, NO, reducing power methods in vitro. The obtained IC50 value of the DPPH activity for the copper complex (IC50 = 66.4 μm) was higher than other compounds. Microbial assay of the above complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Rhizocotonia bataticola and Alternaria alternata showed that copper complex exhibited higher activity than the other complexes.

  17. [Impact of the activation of intention to perform physical activity in type II diabetics: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marco Antonio Vieira; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Claro, Anielle Fabiane Buoso; Agondi, Rúbia de Freitas; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease among the adult Brazilian population, and one that can be controlled by interventions such as physical activity, among others. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the impact of a traditional motivational strategy, associated with the activation of intention theory, on adherence to physical activity in patients with type II, diabetes mellitus who are part of the Unified Health System (SUS). Participants were divided into a control group (CG) and an intervention group (IG). In both groups, the traditional motivational strategy was applied, but the activation of intention strategy was only applied to the IG Group. After a two-month follow-up, statistically significant differences were verified between the groups, related to the practice of walking (p = 0.0050), number of days per week (p = 0.0076), minutes per day (p = 0.0050) and minutes walking per week (p = 0.0015). At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in abdominal circumference (p = 0.0048) between the groups were observed. The conclusion drawn is that the activation of intention strategy had greater impact on adherence to physical activity and reduction in abdominal circumference in type II diabetics, than traditional motivational strategy. PMID:25760127

  18. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  19. Structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia as revealed by voxel-based morphometric MRI: an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The results of multiple studies on the association between antipsychotic use and structural brain changes in schizophrenia have been assessed only in qualitative literature reviews to date. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on this association to quantitatively synthesize the findings of these studies. Methods A systematic computerized literature search was carried out through MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases aiming to identify all VBM studies addressing this question and meeting predetermined inclusion criteria. All studies reporting coordinates representing foci of structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic use were meta-analyzed by using the activation likelihood estimation technique, currently the most sophisticated and best-validated tool for voxel-wise meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies. Results Ten studies (five cross-sectional and five longitudinal) met the inclusion criteria and comprised a total of 548 individuals (298 patients on antipsychotic drugs and 250 controls). Depending on the methodologies of the selected studies, the control groups included healthy subjects, drug-free patients, or the same patients evaluated repeatedly in longitudinal comparisons (i.e., serving as their own controls). A total of 102 foci associated with structural alterations were retrieved. The meta-analysis revealed seven clusters of areas with consistent structural brain changes in patients on antipsychotics compared to controls. The seven clusters included four areas of relative volumetric decrease in the left lateral temporal cortex [Brodmann area (BA) 20], left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44), superior frontal gyrus extending to the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), and right rectal gyrus (BA 11), and three areas of relative volumetric increase in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24), left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24) and right putamen

  20. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schasfer, Jeffra; Rocks, Sara; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, Francois M

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

  1. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  2. Is II-Pegasi HD224085 a New Spot-Cycle Activity Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohusz, E.; Udalski, A.

    New observations of II Pegasi (HD 224085) are presented. They are used together with the earlier ones to study the photometric period variations. Basing on the spot model the photometric period changes can be explained by solar-like spot activity with the period 8-10 years.

  3. T & I--Brick Masonry II. Kit No. 80. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Lloyd

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on brick masonry II are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  4. 77 FR 1084 - Agency Information Collection Activities Under Review; Title II of the Americans With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities Under Review; Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990/Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection under review...

  5. From Synthesis to Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial and Scavenging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    The Pd (II) complexes with a series of halosubstituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) have been synthesized and characterized with different spectroscopic technique such as FTIR, UV/Vis, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. Their molecular sustainability in different solvents such as DMSO, DMSO : H2O, and DMSO : PBS at physiological condition (pH 7.2) was determined by UV/Vis spectrophotometer. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the complexes were investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes and two different fungi indicated their significant biological potential. Additionally, their antioxidant activity has been analyzed with DPPH• free radical through spectrophotometric method and the result inferred them as an antioxidant. The stronger antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the synthesized complexes suggested them as a stronger antimicrobial agent. Our study advances the biological importance of palladium (II) amine complexes in the field of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. PMID:27119023

  6. From Synthesis to Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial and Scavenging Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    The Pd (II) complexes with a series of halosubstituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) have been synthesized and characterized with different spectroscopic technique such as FTIR, UV/Vis, LCMS, (1)H, and (13)C NMR. Their molecular sustainability in different solvents such as DMSO, DMSO : H2O, and DMSO : PBS at physiological condition (pH 7.2) was determined by UV/Vis spectrophotometer. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the complexes were investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes and two different fungi indicated their significant biological potential. Additionally, their antioxidant activity has been analyzed with DPPH(•) free radical through spectrophotometric method and the result inferred them as an antioxidant. The stronger antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the synthesized complexes suggested them as a stronger antimicrobial agent. Our study advances the biological importance of palladium (II) amine complexes in the field of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. PMID:27119023

  7. The effectiveness of multi-component goal setting interventions for changing physical activity behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Desmond; Harden, Samantha M; Zumbo, Bruno D; Sylvester, Benjamin D; Kaulius, Megan; Ruissen, Geralyn R; Dowd, A Justine; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Drawing from goal setting theory (Latham & Locke, 1991; Locke & Latham, 2002; Locke et al., 1981), the purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of multi-component goal setting interventions for changing physical activity (PA) behaviour. A literature search returned 41,038 potential articles. Included studies consisted of controlled experimental trials wherein participants in the intervention conditions set PA goals and their PA behaviour was compared to participants in a control group who did not set goals. A meta-analysis was ultimately carried out across 45 articles (comprising 52 interventions, 126 effect sizes, n = 5912) that met eligibility criteria using a random-effects model. Overall, a medium, positive effect (Cohen's d(SE) = .552(.06), 95% CI = .43-.67, Z = 9.03, p < .001) of goal setting interventions in relation to PA behaviour was found. Moderator analyses across 20 variables revealed several noteworthy results with regard to features of the study, sample characteristics, PA goal content, and additional goal-related behaviour change techniques. In conclusion, multi-component goal setting interventions represent an effective method of fostering PA across a diverse range of populations and settings. Implications for effective goal setting interventions are discussed. PMID:26445201

  8. The relationship between physical activity and sleep from mid adolescence to early adulthood. A systematic review of methodological approaches and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christin; Kalak, Nadeem; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) is considered an effective, non-pharmacological approach to improve sleep. However, the accurate measurement of PA and sleep among adolescents is fraught with challenges. Additionally, comparing the results of different studies is often difficult due to the diversity of assessment tools, analyses and data reporting procedures used. While previous reviews have considered variables that may confound this relationship, this systematic review examines the variations in measurement methods. Based on this overview, a meta-analysis was performed to assess possible influences of the various approaches on effect sizes. Twenty-one studies were included in the systematic review, of which 12 were appropriate for meta-analysis. For this, four subgroups were formed: subjective PA and subjective sleep, objective PA and subjective sleep, subjective PA and objective sleep, and objective PA and objective sleep. The majority of studies used subjective measures, often with unknown reliability or validity. Few studies employed objective tools to measure sleep. The results suggest that adolescents with higher subjective and objective PA are more likely to experience good sleep subjectively and objectively. More studies employing subjective and objective measures for both PA and sleep are needed. Researchers should take into account several assessment factors unique to the adolescent population. PMID:26447947

  9. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyar, Saliha; Adem, Şevki

    2014-10-01

    We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex.

  10. Calcineurin inhibitors may be a reasonable alternative to cyclophosphamide in the induction treatment of active lupus nephritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, MIN; LI, MIN; HE, WEI; WANG, BIN; GU, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Although the accepted standard of care during the induction treatment of active lupus nephritis (LN) has been cyclophosphamide (CYC), recent trials suggest that calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), which include cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (TAC), may be just as, or even more, effective and less toxic than CYC. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the clinical effects of CNIs on active LN compared with those of CYC. In the present study, clinical trials that compared CNIs with CYC in the induction therapy of active LN were searched in the Cochrane Library, Ovid and PubMed databases. The clinical data on renal remission and side-effects were collected and analyzed. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. As a result, six controlled trials involving 265 patients were included in the meta-analysis, four of which compared TAC (treatment group) with CYC (control group), and the other two compared CsA (treatment group) with CYC (control group). CNIs were superior to CYC for higher complete remission (RR=1.56, 95% CI 1.14–2.15, Z=2.74, P=0.006) and better overall response/total remission (RR=1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.42, Z=2.87, P=0.004) and had fewer side-effects. Among the CNIs, TAC demonstrated more favorable results than CsA. Therefore, it was concluded that CNIs may be a reasonable alternative to CYC in the induction treatment of active LN. However, large-scale, multicenter, well-designed clinical trials should be adopted to further confirm this conclusion. PMID:24926363

  11. Zn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) complexes of tridentate asymmetrical Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, characterization, properties and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Mustafa; Koçak, Nuriye; Erdenay, Damla; Arslan, Uğur

    2013-02-01

    New asymmetrical tridentate Schiff base ligands were synthesized using 1,2-phenylenediamine, 4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine, 2-hydroxy-1-napthaldehyde, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were synthesised and characterized by using FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, XRD, ESR, elemental analysis and fluorescence studies. The antimicrobial activity of the ligands and their metal complexes were studied against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 25923, Streptococcus mutans RSHM 676, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The determination of the antibacterial activity was done using the broth microdilution methods. In general, it has been determined that the studied compounds have MIC values similar to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It has been found that Ni, Pb, Zn derivatives of HL1A and ZnL2A has lower MIC values than ampicillin for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain.

  12. Pyridinium derivatives of histamine are potent activators of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II and VII.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati; Scozzafava, Andrea; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ilies, Marc A

    2011-04-21

    A series of positively-charged derivatives has been prepared by reaction of histamine with substituted pyrylium salts. These pyridinium histamine derivatives were investigated as activators of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely the human isoforms hCA I, II and VII. Activities from the subnanomolar to the micromolar range were detected for these compounds as activators of the three isoforms, confirming the validity of current and previous designs. The substitution pattern at the pyridinium ring was the main factor influencing activity, the three isoforms showing different structural requirements for good activity, related with the number of pyridinium substituting groups and their nature, among various alkyl, phenyl and para-substituted styryl moieties. We were successful in identifying nanomolar potent and selective activators for each isozyme and also activators with a relatively good activity against all isozymes tested--valuable lead compounds for physiology and pathology studies involving these isozymes. PMID:21369613

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Pantothenol against Staphylococci Possessing a Prokaryotic Type II Pantothenate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chohnan, Shigeru; Murase, Misa; Kurikawa, Kota; Higashi, Kodai; Ogata, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenol is a provitamin of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) that is widely used in healthcare and cosmetic products. This analog of pantothenate has been shown to markedly inhibit the phosphorylation activity of the prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase of Staphylococcus aureus, which catalyzes the first step of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. Since type II enzymes are found exclusively in staphylococci, pantothenol suppresses the growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus, which inhabit the skin of humans. Therefore, the addition of this provitamin to ointment and skincare products may be highly effective in preventing infections by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24759689

  14. THE PREVALENCE OF NARROW OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION LINES IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo; Wang Tinggui; Wang Huiyuan; Zhou Hongyan; Ho, Luis C.; Fan Xiaohui

    2010-10-01

    From detailed spectral analysis of a large sample of low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we demonstrate-statistically for the first time-that narrow optical Fe II emission lines, both permitted and forbidden, are prevalent in type 1 AGNs. Remarkably, these optical lines are completely absent in type 2 AGNs, across a wide luminosity range, from Seyfert 2 galaxies to type 2 quasars. We suggest that the narrow Fe II-emitting gas is confined to a disk-like geometry in the innermost regions of the narrow-line region on physical scales smaller than the obscuring torus.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of pantothenol against staphylococci possessing a prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase.

    PubMed

    Chohnan, Shigeru; Murase, Misa; Kurikawa, Kota; Higashi, Kodai; Ogata, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenol is a provitamin of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) that is widely used in healthcare and cosmetic products. This analog of pantothenate has been shown to markedly inhibit the phosphorylation activity of the prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase of Staphylococcus aureus, which catalyzes the first step of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. Since type II enzymes are found exclusively in staphylococci, pantothenol suppresses the growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus, which inhabit the skin of humans. Therefore, the addition of this provitamin to ointment and skincare products may be highly effective in preventing infections by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24759689

  16. Atg1-mediated myosin II activation regulates autophagosome formation during starvation-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hong-Wen; Wang, Yu-Bao; Wang, Shiu-Lan; Wu, Mei-Hsuan; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2011-02-16

    Autophagy is a membrane-mediated degradation process of macromolecule recycling. Although the formation of double-membrane degradation vesicles (autophagosomes) is known to have a central role in autophagy, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. The serine/threonine kinase Atg1 has a key role in the induction of autophagy. In this study, we show that overexpression of Drosophila Atg1 promotes the phosphorylation-dependent activation of the actin-associated motor protein myosin II. A novel myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-like protein, Spaghetti-squash activator (Sqa), was identified as a link between Atg1 and actomyosin activation. Sqa interacts with Atg1 through its kinase domain and is a substrate of Atg1. Significantly, myosin II inhibition or depletion of Sqa compromised the formation of autophagosomes under starvation conditions. In mammalian cells, we found that the Sqa mammalian homologue zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) and myosin II had a critical role in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy and mammalian Atg9 (mAtg9) trafficking when cells were deprived of nutrients. Our findings provide evidence of a link between Atg1 and the control of Atg9-mediated autophagosome formation through the myosin II motor protein. PMID:21169990

  17. The upstream activator CTF/NF1 and RNA polymerase II share a common element involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Xiao, H; Greenblatt, J; Friesen, J D

    1994-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of a heptapeptide with the consensus YSPTSPS. It has been shown that the heptapeptide repeat interacts directly with the general transcription factor TFIID. We report here that the CTD activates transcription when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. More importantly, we find that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of the CCAAT-box-binding factor CTF/NF1 contains a sequence with striking similarity to the heptapeptide repeats of the CTD. We show that this CTD-like motif is essential for the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain of CTF/NF1. Deletion of and point mutations in this CTD-like motif abolish the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain, while natural CTD repeats from RNA polymerase II are fully functional in place of the CTD-like motif. We further show that the proline-rich activation domain of CTF/NF1 interacts directly with the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP), and that a mutation in the CTD-like motif that abolishes transcriptional activation reduces the affinity of the proline-rich domain for TBP. These results demonstrate that a class of proline-rich activator proteins and RNA polymerase II possess a common structural and functional component which can interact with the same target in the general transcription machinery. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanisms of transcriptional activation in eucaryotes. Images PMID:8029001

  18. DNA intercalation, topoisomerase II inhibition and cytotoxic activity of the plant alkaloid neocryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Bailly, C; Laine, W; Baldeyrou, B; De Pauw-Gillet, M C; Colson, P; Houssier, C; Cimanga, K; Van Miert, S; Vlietinck, A J; Pieters, L

    2000-06-01

    Cryptolepine and neocryptolepine are two indoloquinoline alkaloids isolated from the roots of the African plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. Both drugs have revealed antibacterial and antiparasitic activities and are strongly cytotoxic to tumour cells. We have recently shown that cryptolepine can intercalate into DNA and stimulates DNA cleavage by human topoisomerase II. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action and cytotoxicity of neocryptolepine, which differs from the parent isomer only by the orientation of the indole unit with respect to the quinoline moiety. The biochemical and physicochemical results presented here indicate that neocryptolepine also intercalates into DNA, preferentially at GC-rich sequences, but exhibits a reduced affinity for DNA compared with cryptolepine. The two alkaloids interfere with the catalytic activity of human topoisomerase II but the poisoning activity is slightly more pronounced with cryptolepine than with its isomer. The data provide a molecular basis to account for the reduced cytotoxicity of neocryptolepine compared with the parent drug. PMID:11049087

  19. Nona-copper(II)-containing 18-tungsto-8-arsenate(III) exhibits antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Zhang, Dongdi; Yang, Lu; Ma, Pengtao; Si, Yanan; Kortz, Ulrich; Niu, Jingyang; Wang, Jingping

    2013-06-01

    The nona-Cu(II)-containing tungstoarsenate(III) [H4{Cu(II)9As(III)6O15(H2O)6}(α-As(III)W9O33)2](8-) (1a) has been synthesized and characterized. Polyanion 1a comprises a unique, cylindrical {Cu(II)9As(III)6O15(H2O)6}(6+) cluster, which forms a large central cavity and is capped on either end by an [α-As(III)W9O33](9-) capping group. It exhibits remarkable activity against K562 leukaemia cells, as well as induces HepG2 cell apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23628910

  20. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Modulation of casein kinase II activity by the polar head group of an insulin-sensitive glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed

    Alemany, S; Puerta, J; Guadaño, A; Mato, J M

    1990-03-25

    A phospho-oligosaccharide, whose production is stimulated by insulin, modulated the activity of partially purified casein kinase II. Whereas at 2 microM the phospho-oligosaccharide stimulated casein kinase II 1.3-fold, higher concentrations of this molecule were inhibitory. 50% inhibition of the enzyme was obtained at 15 microM phospho-oligosaccharide. This biphasic effect of the phospho-oligosaccharide on casein kinase II activity was observed using as substrate both casein or the specific peptide for casein kinase II, Arg-Arg-Arg-Glu-Glu-Glu-Thr-Glu-Glu-Glu. The effect of the phospho-oligosaccharide on casein kinase II was still observed after gel filtration. Deamination of the phospho-oligosaccharide with nitrous acid abolished both the activation and the inhibition of casein kinase II. The glycophospholipid precursor of the phospho-oligosaccharide did not affect casein kinase II activity. Moreover, modulation of casein kinase II activity was not observed with other compounds structurally related to the phospho-oligosaccharide, when used in the micro-molar range. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the phospho-oligosaccharide that mimics and might mediate some of the actions of insulin modulates casein kinase II activity in vitro. PMID:2138621

  2. Modulation of heparin cofactor II activity by histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefsen, D M; Pestka, C A

    1985-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II is a plasma protein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate. We have determined the effects of two glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins, i.e., histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4, on these reactions. Inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and heparin was completely prevented by purified histidine-rich glycoprotein at the ratio of 13 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram heparin. In contrast, histidine-rich glycoprotein had no effect on inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and dermatan sulfate at ratios of less than or equal to 128 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram dermatan sulfate. Removal of 85-90% of the histidine-rich glycoprotein from plasma resulted in a fourfold reduction in the amount of heparin required to prolong the thrombin clotting time from 14 s to greater than 180 s but had no effect on the amount of dermatan sulfate required for similar anti-coagulant activity. In contrast to histidine-rich glycoprotein, purified platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate at the ratio of 2 micrograms platelet factor 4/micrograms glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, the supernatant medium from platelets treated with arachidonic acid to cause secretion of platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of heparin or dermatan sulfate. We conclude that histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 can regulate the antithrombin activity of heparin cofactor II. Images PMID:3838317

  3. In search of meta-knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Development of an Intelligent Information System (IIS) involves application of numerous artificial intelligence (AI) paradigms and advanced technologies. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in an IIS that can automatically collect, classify, store and retrieve data, as well as develop, manipulate and restructure knowledge regarding the data and its application (Campbell et al., 1987, p.3). This interest stems in part from a NASA initiative in support of the interagency Global Change Research program. NASA's space data problems are so large and varied that scientific researchers will find it almost impossible to access the most suitable information from a software system if meta-information (metadata and meta-knowledge) is not embedded in that system. Even if more, faster, larger hardware is used, new innovative software systems will be required to organize, link, maintain, and properly archive the Earth Observing System (EOS) data that is to be stored and distributed by the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) (Dozier, 1990). Although efforts are being made to specify the metadata that will be used in EOSDIS, meta-knowledge specification issues are not clear. With the expectation that EOSDIS might evolve into an IIS, this paper presents certain ideas on the concept of meta-knowledge and demonstrates how meta-knowledge might be represented in a pixel classification problem.

  4. DNA/RNA binding and anticancer/antimicrobial activities of polymer-copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmipraba, Jagadeesan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dhivya, Rajakumar; Vignesh, Sivanandham; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; James, Rathinam Arthur

    2013-05-01

    Water soluble polymer-copper(II) complexes with various degrees of coordination in the polymer chain were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible and EPR spectra. The DNA/RNA binding behavior of these polymer-copper(II) complexes was examined by UV-visible absorption, emission and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods, and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The binding of the polymer-copper(II) complexes with DNA/RNA was mainly through intercalation but some amount of electrostatic interaction was also observed. This binding capacity increased with the degree of coordination of the complexes. The polymer-copper(II) complex having the highest degree of coordination was subjected to analysis of cytotoxic and antimicrobial properties. The cytotoxicity study indicated that the polymer-copper(II) complexes affected the viability of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cells, and the cells responded to the treatment with mostly through apoptosis although a few cells succumbed to necrosis. The antimicrobial screening showed activity against some human pathogens.

  5. Binuclear biologically active Co(II) complexes with octazamacrocycle and aliphatic dicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasković, S. B.; Vučković, G.; Antonijević-Nikolić, M.; Stanojković, T.; Gojgić-Cvijović, G.

    2012-12-01

    Four new cationic Co(II) complexes with N,N',N'',N'''-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tpmc) and dianion of one the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids: butanedioic acid (succinic) acid = succH2, pentanedioic (glutaric) acid = gluH2, hexanedioic acid (adipic) acid = adipH2 or decanedioic acid (sebacic) acid = sebH2 of general formula [Co2(L)(tpmc)](ClO4)2ṡxY, L2- = succ, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = glu, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = adip, x = 1.5, Y = H2O; L = seb, x = 1, Y = CH3CN were isolated. The composition and charge are proposed based on elemental analyses (C, H, N) and electrical conductivity measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR spectral data and magnetic moments were in accordance with high-spin Co(II) state. It is proposed that in all complexes Co(II) is hexa-coordinated out of cyclam ring and that both carboxylic groups from dicarboxylate bridge participate in coordination. Oxygens from one group are most likely bonded to the same Co(II) ion thus forming a four-membered ring. The in vitro antibacterial/antiproliferative activities of the complexes were in some cases enhanced compared with the simple Co(II) salt and free ligands, tested as controls.

  6. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  7. NO EVIDENCE FOR A SYSTEMATIC Fe II EMISSION LINE REDSHIFT IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sulentic, Jack W.; Marziani, Paola; Zamfir, Sebastian; Meadows, Zachary A. E-mail: paola.marziani@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: Zachary.A.Meadows@uwsp.edu

    2012-06-10

    We test the recent claim by Hu et al. that Fe II emission in type 1 active galactic nuclei shows a systematic redshift relative to the local source rest frame and broad-line H{beta}. We compile high signal-to-noise median composites using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra from both the Hu et al. sample and our own sample of the 469 brightest DR5 spectra. Our composites are generated in bins of FWHM H{beta} and Fe II strength as defined in our 4D Eigenvector 1 formalism. We find no evidence for a systematic Fe II redshift and consistency with previous assumptions that Fe II shift and width (FWHM) follow H{beta} shift and FWHM in virtually all sources. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Fe II emission (quasi-ubiquitous in type 1 sources) arises from a broad-line region with geometry and kinematics the same as that producing the Balmer lines.

  8. Interaction with biomacromolecules and antiproliferative activities of Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) complexes of demethylcantharate and 2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Lin, Qiu-Yue; Hu, Wan-Li; Song, Wen-Ji; Shen, Shu-Ting; Gui, Pan

    2013-06-01

    Three new transition metal complexes [Mn2(DCA)2(bipy)2]·5H2O (1), [M2(DCA)2(bipy)2(H2O)]·10H2O(M=Ni(II)(2);Zn(II)(3)), (DCA=demethylcantharate, 7-oxabicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,3-dicarboxylate, C8H8O5) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, infrared spectra and X-ray diffraction techniques. Each metal ion was six-coordinated in complexes. Complex 1 has a Mn2O2 center. Complexes 2 and 3 have asymmetric binuclear structure. Great amount of intermolecular hydrogen-bonding and π-π(*) stacking interactions were formed in these complex structures. The DNA-binding properties of complexes were investigated by electronic absorption spectra and viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants Kb/(Lmol(-1)) were 1.71×10(4) (1), 2.62×10(4) (2) and 1.59×10(4) (3) at 298 K. The complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) strongly through static quenching. The protein binding constants Ka/(L mol(-1)) were 7.27×10(4) (1), 4.55×10(4) (2) and 7.87×10(4) L mol(-1) (3) and binding site was one. The complexes bind more tightly with DNA and BSA than with ligands. Complexes 1 and 3 had stronger inhibition ratios than Na2(DCA) against human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) lines and human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3) lines in vitro. Complex 3 showed the strongest antiproliferative activity against SMMC-7721 (IC50=29.46±2.12 μmol L(-1)) and MGC80-3 (IC50=27.02±2.38 μmol L(-1)), which shows potential in anti-cancer drug development. PMID:23557779

  9. Interaction with biomacromolecules and antiproliferative activities of Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) complexes of demethylcantharate and 2,2'-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Lin, Qiu-Yue; Hu, Wan-Li; Song, Wen-Ji; Shen, Shu-Ting; Gui, Pan

    2013-06-01

    Three new transition metal complexes [Mn2(DCA)2(bipy)2]·5H2O (1), [M2(DCA)2(bipy)2(H2O)]·10H2O(M = Ni(II)(2);Zn(II)(3)), (DCA = demethylcantharate, 7-oxabicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,3-dicarboxylate, C8H8O5) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, infrared spectra and X-ray diffraction techniques. Each metal ion was six-coordinated in complexes. Complex 1 has a Mn2O2 center. Complexes 2 and 3 have asymmetric binuclear structure. Great amount of intermolecular hydrogen-bonding and π-π* stacking interactions were formed in these complex structures. The DNA-binding properties of complexes were investigated by electronic absorption spectra and viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants Kb/(L mol-1) were 1.71 × 104 (1), 2.62 × 104 (2) and 1.59 × 104 (3) at 298 K. The complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) strongly through static quenching. The protein binding constants Ka/(L mol-1) were 7.27 × 104 (1), 4.55 × 104 (2) and 7.87 × 104 L mol-1 (3) and binding site was one. The complexes bind more tightly with DNA and BSA than with ligands. Complexes 1 and 3 had stronger inhibition ratios than Na2(DCA) against human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) lines and human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3) lines in vitro. Complex 3 showed the strongest antiproliferative activity against SMMC-7721 (IC50 = 29.46 ± 2.12 μmol L-1) and MGC80-3 (IC50 = 27.02 ± 2.38 μmol L-1), which shows potential in anti-cancer drug development.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vitro Cytotoxic Activities of Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives and Their Palladium (II) and Platinum (II) Complexes against Various Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hernándeza, Wilfredo; Paz, Juan; Vaisberg, Abraham; Spodine, Evgenia; Richter, Rainer; Beyer, Lothar

    2008-01-01

    The palladium (II) bis-chelate Pd (L1−3)2 and platinum (II) tetranuclear Pt4(L4)4 complexes of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized, and characterized by elemental analysis and IR, FAB(+)-mass and NMR (1H, 13C) spectroscopy. The complex Pd(L2)2 [HL2 = m-CN-benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone] shows a square-planar geometry with two deprotonated ligands (L) coordinated to PdII through the nitrogen and sulphur atoms in a transarrangement, while the complex Pt4(L4)4 [HL4 = 4-phenyl-1-benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone] has a tetranuclear geometry with four tridentate ligands coordinated to four PtII ions through the carbon (aromatic ring), nitrogen, and sulphur atoms where the ligands are deprotonated at the NH group. The in vitro antitumor activity of the ligands and their complexes was determined against different human tumor cell lines, which revealed that the palladium (II) and platinum (II) complexes are more cytotoxic than their ligands with IC50 values at the range of 0.07–3.67 μM. The tetranuclear complex Pt4(L4)4, with the phenyl group in the terminal amine of the ligand, showed higher antiproliferative activity (CI50 = 0.07–0.12 μM) than the other tested palladium (II) complexes. PMID:19148285

  11. A coordinate-based ALE functional MRI meta-analysis of brain activation during verbal fluency tasks in healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The processing of verbal fluency tasks relies on the coordinated activity of a number of brain areas, particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes of the left hemisphere. Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural networks subserving verbal fluency functions have yielded divergent results especially with respect to a parcellation of the inferior frontal gyrus for phonemic and semantic verbal fluency. We conducted a coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on brain activation during the processing of phonemic and semantic verbal fluency tasks involving 28 individual studies with 490 healthy volunteers. Results For phonemic as well as for semantic verbal fluency, the most prominent clusters of brain activation were found in the left inferior/middle frontal gyrus (LIFG/MIFG) and the anterior cingulate gyrus. BA 44 was only involved in the processing of phonemic verbal fluency tasks, BA 45 and 47 in the processing of phonemic and semantic fluency tasks. Conclusions Our comparison of brain activation during the execution of either phonemic or semantic verbal fluency tasks revealed evidence for spatially different activation in BA 44, but not other regions of the LIFG/LMFG (BA 9, 45, 47) during phonemic and semantic verbal fluency processing. PMID:24456150

  12. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Kondeti, Bhargav; Tu, Chingkuang; Maupin, C. Mark; Silverman, David N.; McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3 −, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O) in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type) of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II) can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-­methylimidazole, 2-­methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole) have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the ‘in’ and ‘out’ rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations) the activity of H64A CA II. PMID:25075329

  13. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Type II p21-Activated Kinase, PAK6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ha, Byung Hak; Lou, Hua Jane; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Rong; Calderwood, David A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effectors of Rho-family small GTPases. The PAK family consists of two groups, type I and type II, which have different modes of regulation and signaling. PAK6, a type II PAK, influences behavior and locomotor function in mice and has an ascribed role in androgen receptor signaling. Here we show that PAK6 has a peptide substrate specificity very similar to the other type II PAKs, PAK4 and PAK5 (PAK7). We find that PAK6 catalytic activity is inhibited by a peptide corresponding to its N-terminal pseudosubstrate. Introduction of a melanoma-associated mutation, P52L, into this peptide reduces pseudosubstrate autoinhibition of PAK6, and increases phosphorylation of its substrate PACSIN1 (Syndapin I) in cells. Finally we determine two co-crystal structures of PAK6 catalytic domain in complex with ATP-competitive inhibitors. We determined the 1.4 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with the type II PAK inhibitor PF-3758309, and the 1.95 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with sunitinib. These findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of PAK6 and may facilitate development of PAK6 targeted therapies. PMID:24204982

  14. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) rs1801282 C>G polymorphism is associated with cancer susceptibility in asians: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Heping; Tang, Weifeng; Kang, Mingqiang; Liu, Tianyun; Guo, Zengqing; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is related to inflammation and plays an important role in the development of cancer. PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism might influence the risk of cancer by regulating production of PPARG gene. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to explore the association of PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. An extensive search of PubMed and Embase databases for all relevant publications was carried out. A total of 38 publications with 16,844 cancer cases and 23,736 controls for PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism were recruited in our study. Our results indicated that PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants were associated with an increased cancer risk in Asian populations and gastric cancer. In summary, the findings suggest that PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism may play a crucial role in malignant transformation and the development of cancer. PMID:26550180

  16. Transthoracic versus abdominal-transhiatal resection for treating Siewert type II/III adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Cai, Jun; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the differences in short and long-term outcomes about the transthoracic (TH) and abdominal-transhiatal (TH) approaches for treating esophagogastric junction (AEG). A systematic review of PubMed, EMbase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and CBMdisc was performed. All original articles comparing TH with TA were included in the study. Meta-analysis was conducted using odd ratios (OR) and weighted mean differences (WMDs).Thirteen studies including 2489 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, with 1050 patients underwent TA and 1437 patients underwent TH were pooled for this study. There were no significant difference between two approaches concerning duration of operation, blood loss, anastomotic leakage and positive of proximal incisal margin. Lymph node excised also showed no significant differences between two procedures in RCTs while in TA group of Non-RCTs, the number of lymph node dissection is higher. TH approach was associated with a longer length of hospital stay and had higher incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular complications and early postoperative mortality. Overall analysis of 1, 3, 5-year survival showed no significant difference between two approaches. Based on the study, TA approach had a positive impact than TH for AEG with respect to respiratory and cardiovascular complications, hospital stay and early mortality rates. There were no significant differences between the two approaches for long-term survival. Therefore, two surgical approaches are acceptable, and the elders with poor cardiopulmonary function, we recommended TA approach for treating it. PMID:26770310

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 regulates the class II transactivator.

    PubMed

    Voong, Lilien N; Slater, Allison R; Kratovac, Sebila; Cressman, Drew E

    2008-04-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class II genes is necessary for proper antigen presentation and induction of an immune response. This expression is initiated by the class II transactivator, CIITA. The establishment of the active form of CIITA is controlled by a series of post-translational events, including GTP binding, ubiquitination, and dimerization. However, the role of phosphorylation is less clearly defined as are the consequences of phosphorylation on CIITA activity and the identity of the kinases involved. In this study we show that the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) interact directly with CIITA, targeting serine residues in the amino terminus of the protein, including serine 288. Inhibition of this phosphorylation by dominant-negative forms of ERK or by treatment of cells with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 resulted in the increase in CIITA-mediated gene expression from a class II promoter, enhanced the nuclear concentration of CIITA, and impaired its ability to bind to the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 activity had little effect on serine-to-alanine mutant forms of CIITA. These data suggest a model whereby ERK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of CIITA down-regulates CIITA activity by priming it for nuclear export, thus providing a means for cells to tightly regulate the extent of antigen presentation. PMID:18245089

  18. Association of physical activity with cognition, metacognition and academic performance in children and adolescents: a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Pesce, Caterina; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Pardo-Guijarro, María Jesús; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Schools provide a relevant context for improving children's and adolescents’ physical and mental health by increasing physical activity during school hours and/or beyond. The interest in the relationship between physical activity programmes and cognition during development has recently increased, with evidence suggesting a positive association. We present a protocol of systematic reviews and meta-analysis of intervention studies that, by determining the effects of chronic physical exercise on children's and adolescents’ cognitive and metacognitive functions, cognitive life skills, academic behaviours and achievement, aims to ensure procedural objectivity and transparency, and maximise the extraction of relevant information to inform policy development. Methods This protocol is guided by Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) and by the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook. Databases to be utilised for a thorough selection of the pertinent literature are MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, PsycINFO and ERIC. Selection is proposed to encompass an international and a national publication level, with inclusion of experimental studies written in English or in Spanish, respectively. Also, relevant references included in the selected studies will be considered suitable for review as supplemental sources. We present an integrated approach to the methodological quality assessment of the selected studies, including the Jadad Scale for the assessment of the quality of randomised controlled trials and the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies for pre–post studies and non-randomised controlled trials. The pre–post interventions mean differences will be the primary indicator of the intervention outcome. Statistical analysis A subgroup analysis is proposed based on cognitive functions and their neural correlates

  19. The active site of RNA polymerase II participates in transcript cleavage within arrested ternary complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, M D; Izban, M G; Luse, D S

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II may become arrested during transcript elongation, in which case the ternary complex remains intact but further RNA synthesis is blocked. To relieve arrest, the nascent transcript must be cleaved from the 3' end. RNAs of 7-17 nt are liberated and transcription continues from the newly exposed 3' end. Factor SII increases elongation efficiency by strongly stimulating the transcript cleavage reaction. We show here that arrest relief can also occur by the addition of pyrophosphate. This generates the same set of cleavage products as factor SII, but the fragments produced with pyrophosphate have 5'-triphosphate termini. Thus, the active site of RNA polymerase II, in the presence of pyrophosphate, appears to be capable of cleaving phosphodiester linkages as far as 17 nt upstream of the original site of polymerization, leaving the ternary complex intact and transcriptionally active. Images PMID:8058756

  20. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Z H; Rauf, A

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity. PMID:18472896

  1. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Abdur

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity PMID:18472896

  2. The effectiveness of regular leisure-time physical activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Lee-Wen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hwu, Yueh-Juen; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Li-Li; Chang, Pi-Ying

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of different types of regular leisure-time physical activities and pooled the effect sizes of those activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes compared with routine care. This review included randomized controlled trials from 1960 to May 2014. A total of 10 Chinese and English databases were searched, following selection and critical appraisal, 18 randomized controlled trials with 915 participants were included. The standardized mean difference was reported as the summary statistic for the overall effect size in a random effects model. The results indicated yoga was the most effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Meta-analysis also revealed that the decrease in HbA1c levels of the subjects who took part in regular leisure-time physical activities was 0.60% more than that of control group participants. A higher frequency of regular leisure-time physical activities was found to be more effective in reducing HbA1c levels. The results of this review provide evidence of the benefits associated with regular leisure-time physical activities compared with routine care for lowering HbA1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26822261

  3. Angiotensin II and canonical transient receptor potential-6 activation stimulate release of a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-activating factor from mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Abkhezr, Mousa; Dryer, Stuart E

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) in podocytes plays an important role in progression of HIV nephropathy and in collapsing forms of glomerulonephritis. Here, we have observed that application of 100 nM angiotensin II (Ang II) to cultured podocytes for 6-24 hours causes a marked increase in the phosphorylation of STAT3 on tyrosine Y705 but has no effect on phosphorylation at serine S727. By contrast, Ang II treatment of short periods (20-60 minutes) caused a small but consistent suppression of tyrosine phosphylation of STAT3. A similar biphasic effect was seen after treatment with the diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), an agent that causes activation of Ca(2+)-permeable canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) channels in podocytes. The stimulatory effects of Ang II on STAT3 phosphorylation were abolished by small-interfering RNA knockdown of TRPC6 and also by inhibitors of the Ca(2+)-dependent downstream enzymes calcineurin and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. The stimulatory effects of Ang II appear to be mediated by secretion and accumulation of an unknown factor into the surrounding medium, as they are no longer detected when medium is replaced every 2 hours even if Ang II is continuously present. By contrast, the inhibitory effect of Ang II on STAT3 phosphorylation persists with frequent medium changes. Experiments with neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies suggest that the STAT3 stimulatory factor secreted from podocytes is not interleukin-6, but also suggest that this factor exerts its actions through a receptor system that requires glycoprotein 130. PMID:24850910

  4. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 in angiotensin-II-induced renal Tgfß-activated kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Mia, Sobuj; Castor, Tatsiana; Musculus, Katharina; Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-II is a key factor in renal fibrosis. Obstructive nephropathy induces an isoform shift from catalytic Ampkα2 towards Ampkα1 which contributes to signaling involved in renal tissue injury. The present study explored whether the Ampkα1 isoform contributes to the renal effects of angiotensin-II. To this end, angiotensin-II was infused by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic minipumps in gene-targeted mice lacking functional Ampkα1 (Ampkα1(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Ampkα1(+/+)). Western blotting and qRT-PCR were employed to determine protein abundance and mRNA levels, respectively, in renal tissue. In Ampkα1(+/+) mice, angiotensin-II increased renal Ampkα1 protein expression without significantly modifying renal Ampkα2 protein expression. The renal phosphorylated Ampkα (Thr(172)) protein abundance was not affected by angiotensin-II in neither genotypes, but was significantly lower in Ampkα1(-/-) mice than Ampkα1(+/+) mice. Angiotensin-II increased the phosphorylation of Tak1 (Ser(412)) in renal tissue of Ampkα1(+/+) mice, an effect virtually absent in the Ampkα1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, angiotensin-II treatment significantly increased renal protein and mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSma) as well as Tak1-target gene expression: Cox2, Il6 and Pai1 in Ampkα1(+/+) mice, all effects significantly less pronounced in Ampkα1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, angiotensin-II up-regulates the Ampkα1 isoform in renal tissue. Ampkα1 participates in renal Tak1 activation and Tak1-dependent signaling induced by angiotensin-II. PMID:27230958

  5. A Palladium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Activation Cascade Sequence for Polyheterocycle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen P; Booker-Milburn, Kevin I

    2015-05-26

    Polyheterocycles are found in many natural products and are useful moieties in functional materials and drug design. As part of a program towards the synthesis of Stemona alkaloids, a novel palladium(II)-catalyzed C-H activation strategy for the construction of such systems has been developed. Starting from simple 1,3-dienyl-substituted heterocycles, a large range of polycyclic systems containing pyrrole, indole, furan and thiophene moieties can be synthesized in a single step. PMID:25872492

  6. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge. PMID:23201694

  7. Subdomain II of α-Isopropylmalate Synthase Is Essential for Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zilong; Wu, Jian; Lin, Wei; Wang, Jin; Yan, Han; Zhao, Wei; Ma, Jun; Ding, Jianping; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The committed step of leucine biosynthesis, converting acetyl-CoA and α-ketoisovalerate into α-isopropylmalate, is catalyzed by α-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS), an allosteric enzyme subjected to feedback inhibition by the end product l-leucine. We characterized the short form IPMS from Leptospira biflexa (LbIPMS2), which exhibits a catalytic activity comparable with that of the long form IPMS (LbIPMS1) and has a similar N-terminal domain followed by subdomain I and subdomain II but lacks the whole C-terminal regulatory domain. We found that partial deletion of the regulatory domain of LbIPMS1 resulted in a loss of about 50% of the catalytic activity; however, when the regulatory domain was deleted up to Arg-385, producing a protein that is almost equivalent to the intact LbIPMS2, about 90% of the activity was maintained. Moreover, in LbIPMS2 or LbIPMS1, further deletion of several residues from the C terminus of subdomain II significantly impaired or completely abolished the catalytic activity, respectively. These results define a complete and independently functional catalytic module of IPMS consisting of both the N-terminal domain and the two subdomains. Structural comparison of LbIPMS2 and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis IPMS revealed two different conformations of subdomain II that likely represent two substrate-binding states related to cooperative catalysis. The biochemical and structural analyses together with the previously published hydrogen-deuterium exchange data led us to propose a conformation transition mechanism for feedback inhibition mediated by subdomains I and II that might associated with alteration of the binding affinity toward acetyl-CoA. PMID:25128527

  8. Macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, superoxide scavenging activity and DNA-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.

    2012-05-01

    A new series of nickel(II) complexes with the tetraaza macrocyclic ligand have been synthesized as possible functional models for nickel-superoxide dismutase enzyme. The reaction of 5-amino-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-4-carbaldehyde (AMPC) with itself in the presence of nickel(II) ion yields, the new macrocyclic cationic complex, [NiL(NO3)2], containing a ligand composed of the self-condensed AMPC (4 mol) bound to a single nickel(II) ion. A series of metathetical reactions have led to the isolation of a number of newly complexes of the types [NiL]X2; X = ClO4 and BF4, [NiLX2], X = Cl and Br (Scheme 1). Structures and characterizations of these complexes were achieved by several physicochemical methods namely, elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductivity, and spectral (IR and UV-Vis) measurements. The electrochemical properties and thermal behaviors of these chelates were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) techniques. A distorted octahedral stereochemistry has been proposed for the six-coordinate nitrato, and halogeno complexes. For the four-coordinate, perchlorate and fluoroborate, complex species a square-planar geometry is proposed. The measured superoxide dismutase mimetic activities of the complexes indicated that they are potent NiSOD mimics and their activities are compared with those obtained previously for nickel(II) complexes. The probable mechanistic implications of the catalytic dismutation of O2rad - by the synthesized nickel(II) complexes are discussed. The DNA-binding properties of representative complexes [NiLCl2] and [NiL](PF4)2 have been investigated by the electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. The results obtained suggest that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode and the binding affinity for DNA follows the order: [NiLCl2] □ [NiL](PF4)2.

  9. Copper(II) complexes with pyrazole derivatives - Synthesis, crystal structure, DFT calculations and cytotoxic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupcewicz, Bogumiła; Ciolkowski, Michal; Karwowski, Boleslaw T.; Rozalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Lorenz, Ingo-Peter; Mayer, Peter; Budzisz, Elzbieta

    2013-11-01

    The series of pyrazole derivatives (1a-4a) were used as bidentate N,N' ligands to obtain neutral Cu(II) complexes of ML2Cl2 type (1b-4b). The molecular structures of ligand 1a and Cu(II) complex 4b were determined by X-ray crystallography and theoretical DFT calculations. In this study, three functionals B3LYP, BP86 and mPW1PW91 with different basis sets and two effective core potentials Los Alamos and Stuttgart/Dresden were performed. The DFT study disclosed the usefulness of BP86 functional with SDD-ECP for Cu(II) ion and dedicated D95 basis set for other non-transition metal atoms, with the exclusion of Cl for which 6-31++G(2df,2pd) were used. The structural analysis shows that the presence of phenyl substituent in a pyrazole ring contributed to Cu-N bond elongation, which can result in different reactivity of complexes 1b and 3b. The cytotoxicity of the obtained compounds was evaluated on three cancer cells lines: HL-60, NALM-6 and WM-115. The complexes have exhibited similar moderate antiproliferative activity. All the complexes, except for 1b, were found to be more active against three cancer cell lines than uncomplexed pyrazoles. The lipophilicity and electrochemical properties of ligands and complexes was also studied. For complexes with ligand 1a and 3a only one reduction process at the metal centre occurs (Cu(II) → Cu(I)) with oxidization of Cu(I)-Cu(II) in the backward step.

  10. Impaired ergosterol biosynthesis mediated fungicidal activity of Co(II) complex with ligand derived from cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Shiekh, Rayees A; Raja, Vaseem; Wani, Waseem A; Behbehani, Jawad M

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have used aldehyde function of cinnamaldehyde to synthesize N, N'-Bis (cinnamaldehyde) ethylenediimine [C20H20N2] and Co(II) complex of the type [Co(C40H40N4)Cl2]. The structures of the synthesized compounds were determined on the basis of physiochemical analysis and spectroscopic data ((1)H NMR, FTIR, UV-visible and mass spectra) along with molar conductivity measurements. Anticandidal activity of cinnamaldehyde its ligand [L] and Co(II) complex was investigated by determining MIC80, time-kill kinetics, disc diffusion assay and ergosterol extraction and estimation assay. Ligand [L] and Co(II) complex are found to be 4.55 and 21.0 folds more efficient than cinnamaldehyde in a liquid medium. MIC80 of Co(II) complex correlated well with ergosterol inhibition suggesting ergosterol biosynthesis to be the primary site of action. In comparison to fluconazole, the test compounds showed limited toxicity against H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts. In confocal microscopy propidium iodide (PI) penetrates the yeast cells when treated with MIC of metal complex, indicating a disruption of cell membrane that results in imbibition of dye. TEM analysis of metal complex treated cells exhibited notable alterations or damage to the cell membrane and the cell wall. The structural disorganization within the cell cytoplasm was noted. It was concluded that fungicidal activity of Co(II) complex originated from loss of membrane integrity and a decrease in ergosterol content is only one consequence of this. PMID:26806515

  11. Serum Anticholinergic Activity and Cognitive and Functional Adverse Outcomes in Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Salahudeen, Mohammed Saji; Chyou, Te-yuan; Nishtala, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies have reported associations between serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) and decline in cognitive performance, delirium, and functional impairment. The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore and quantify associations between SAA and adverse cognitive and functional outcomes in older people. Materials and Methods A literature search in Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and IPA from 1946–2014 was completed. The primary outcomes of interest were cognitive and functional adverse outcomes associated with SAA in older people aged 55 years and above. The Cochrane Risk-Bias assessment tool was used to assess bias in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the quality of non-RCTs. Meta-analyses were conducted for RCTs and cohort studies separately. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 tests. Results The primary electronic literature search identified a total of 1559 records in the 4 different databases. On the basis of full-text analysis, 33 studies that met the inclusion criteria. The review included 4 RCTs, 5 prospective cohort studies, 3 longitudinal cohort studies, 17 cross-sectional studies, and 4 case-control studies. Twenty-four of the retrieved studies examined an association between SAA and cognitive outcomes, 2 studies examined an association with SAA and functional outcomes and 8 studies examined associations between SAA and both cognitive, and functional outcomes. The meta-analysis on 4 RCTs showed no association with higher SAA and cognitive performance (I2 = 89.38%, H2 = 25.53 and p-value = <0.05) however, the pooled data from 4 observational studies showed elevated SAA was associated with reduced cognitive performance (I2 = 0.00%, H2 = 3.37 and p-value = 0.34). Conclusion This systematic review summarises the limitations of the SAA on predicting cognitive and functional outcomes in older people. SAA measured by receptor bioassay is flawed and its use in older people with multimorbidity and

  12. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor constitutive activation: from molecular mechanisms to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Christophe; Clauser, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Mutations activating the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor are important to identify and characterize because they give access to the activation mechanisms of this G protein coupled receptor and help to characterize the signaling pathways and the potential pathophysiology of this receptor. The different constitutively activated mutations of the AT(1) receptor are mostly localized in transmembrane domains (TM) and their characterization demonstrated that release of intramolecular constraints and movements among these TM are a necessary step for receptor activation. These mutations constitutively activate Gq linked signaling pathways, receptor internalization and maybe the G protein-independent signaling pathways. Expression of such mutations in mice is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, but such natural mutations have not been identified in human pathology. PMID:19061936

  13. Binding and activation of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient macrophages by staphylococcal exotoxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from C2D transgenic mice deficient in the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins were used to identify binding sites for superantigens distinct from the MHC class II molecule. Iodinated staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and exfoliative toxins A and B (ETA and ETB) bound to C2D macrophages in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner. All four toxins increased F-actin concentration within 30 s of their addition to C2D macrophages, indicating that signal transduction occurred in response to toxin in the absence of class II MHC. Furthermore, ETA, ETB, SEA, and, to a lesser extent, SEB induced C2D macrophages to produce interleukin 6. Several molecular species on C2D macrophages with molecular masses of 140, 97, 61, 52, 43, and 37 kDa bound SEA in immunoprecipitation experiments. These data indicate the presence of novel, functionally active toxin binding sites on murine macrophages distinct from MHC class II molecules.

  14. PTK7 regulates myosin II activity to orient planar polarity in the mammalian auditory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jianyi; Andreeva, Anna; Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Cheng, Amy; Lu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a key regulator of epithelial morphogenesis, including neural tube closure and the orientation of inner ear sensory hair cells, and is mediated by a conserved noncanonical Wnt pathway. Ptk7 is a novel vertebrate-specific regulator of PCP, yet the mechanisms by which Ptk7 regulates mammalian epithelial PCP remain poorly understood. Results Here we show that, in the mammalian auditory epithelium, Ptk7 is not required for membrane recruitment of Dishevelled 2; Ptk7 and Frizzled3/Frizzled6 receptors act in parallel and have opposing effects on hair cell PCP. Mosaic analysis identified a requirement of Ptk7 in neighboring supporting cells for hair cell PCP. Ptk7 and the noncanonical Wnt pathway differentially regulate a contractile myosin II network near the apical surface of supporting cells. We provide evidence that this apical myosin II network exerts polarized contractile tension on hair cells to align their PCP, as revealed by asymmetric junctional recruitment of vinculin, a tension-sensitive actin binding protein. In Ptk7 mutants, compromised myosin II activity resulted in loss of planar asymmetry and reduced junctional localization of vinculin. By contrast, vinculin planar asymmetry and stereociliary bundle orientation were restored in Fz3−/−; Ptk7−/− double mutants. Conclusions These findings suggest that PTK7 acts in conjunction with the noncanonical Wnt pathway to orient epithelial PCP through modulation of myosin-II based contractile tension between supporting cells and hair cells. PMID:22560610

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of phthalimide derivatives of Cu(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingappa, Y.; Rao, S. Sreenivasa; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.; Rao, P. Sambasiva

    The Cu(II) complex of phthalimide-o-aminophenylenediamine has been synthesized by a template method. The complex is characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and electronic and EPR spectral techniques. The electronic spectra reveal four coordinations for the Cu(II) ion with the ligand. The evaluated spin-Hamiltonian parameters from the EPR spectrum are g|D2.2041, g⊥D2.0263 and A|D166×10-4 cm-1 and A⊥D46×10-4 cm-1E By correlating EPR and electronic data, the calculated bonding parameters are α2D0.7132, αD0.8445, α'D0.6073 and ?. These bonding parameters suggest a moderate covalent nature of the Cu(II) ion with the ligand. Antimicrobial activities of this Cu(II) complex against six bacterial isolates like Bacillus faecalis, Escherichia coil, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae are determined.

  16. Nickel(II) adsorption onto biomass based activated carbon obtained from sugarcane bagasse pith.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, K Anoop; Sreejalekshmi, K G; Baiju, R S

    2011-11-01

    Bioavailability of Nickel in the form of hydrated Nickel(II) attributes to its toxicological effects and hence its removal from aqueous solution is of great concern. Adsorption is used as an efficient technique for the removal of Nickel(II), hereafter Ni(II), from water and wastewaters. Activated carbon obtained from sugarcane bagasse pith (SBP-AC), a waste biomass collected from juice shops in Sarkara Devi Temple, Chirayinkeezhu, Trivandrum, India during annual festival, is used as adsorbent in the study. The process of adsorption is highly dependent on solution pH, and maximum removal occurs in the pH range of 4.0-8.0. Moreover, the amount of Ni(II) adsorbed onto SBP-AC increased with the time increase and reached equilibrium at 4h. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium data were analyzed for determining the best fit kinetic and isotherm models. The overall study reveals the potential value of steam pyrolysed SBP-AC as a possible commercial adsorbent in wastewater treatment strategies. PMID:21924900

  17. Middeck Active Control Experiment Reflight (MACE II): lessons learned and reflight status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninneman, Ronald R.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    2000-06-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is sponsoring the Middeck Active Control Experiment Reflight (MACE II) Program. MACE II is a manned space experiment that evaluates the capabilities of adaptive control of flexible structures in the zero-g environment of the space shuttle's Middeck. MACE II has grown out of lessons learned from the original MACE flight and from AFRL sponsored structural control experiments. Previous experiments required extensive testing and 'tuning' for their particular test environment to meet their performance expectations. Such a process is too inefficient to be seriously considered for operational systems, especially space-based systems where access is limited. MACE II takes the next logical step by evaluating the capability of adaptive structural control algorithms AFRL has assembled a team of five small businesses and universities to develop and evaluate several adaptive control methodologies. In addition, AFRL has recruited a second science team led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to evaluate control system for time-varying and geometrically nonlinear systems. This paper is an overview of the AFRL science team only.

  18. Synthesis, DNA-binding, photocleavage, cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Jun; Zeng, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Hong-Liang; He, Li-Xin; Wu, Fu-Hai

    2010-02-01

    Two new ligands maip (1a), paip (1b) with their ruthenium (II) complexes [Ru(bpy)(2)(maip)](ClO(4))(2) (2a) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(paip)](ClO(4))(2) (2b) have been synthesized and characterized. The results show that complexes 2a and 2b interact with DNA through intercalative mode. The cytotoxicity of these compounds has been evaluated by MTT assay. The experiments on antioxidant activity show that these compounds exhibit good antioxidant activity against hydroxyl radical (OH). PMID:19932529

  19. Chromospherically active stars. II - HD 82558, a young single BY Draconis variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John L.; Goodrich, Bret D.; Palmer, Leigh Hunter

    1986-01-01

    It is presently noted that the HD 82558 chromospherically active star is a young and rapidly rotating K2 V single BY Draconis variable with very strong far-UV emission features and an H-alpha line filled to the continuum level by emission. HD 82558 has constant velocity and is not a member of the Hyades Supercluster. Its light curve behavior, which appears to have been stable for several hundred rotation cycles, is reminiscent of that of the young, rapidly rotating, single K V variable H II 1883 in the Pleiades; this stability may be characteristic of young, single, chromospherically active stars.

  20. Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Hip Replacement for Active Elderly Patients with Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures: A Meta-Analysis of 8 Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiqiong; Fu, Dong; Chen, Kai; Li, Guodong; Cai, Zhengdong; Shi, Yan; Yin, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Background Displaced fracture of the femoral neck has been a common clinical problem, especially in aged patients. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of randomized clinical trials assessing the results of hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in patients undergoing either alternative using meta-analysis. Methods A literature search for randomized clinical trials was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013 with no restrictions. Additional relevant articles were referred as source of information by way of manual searches on major orthopedic journals. Upon the search, two authors independently evaluated study quality and relevant data was extracted. Results A total of 8 studies with 983 patients were included in this meta-analysis. After pooling the available data, a significant dominance of Harris hip score was found for total hip replacement compared with hemiarthroplasty (SMD: −7.11, 95%:−10.70,−3.53) one year postoperatively and the advantage kept over (SMD: −6.91, 95%:−12.98, −0.85) two years after surgery. A trend toward a higher dislocation rate was found in total hip replacement group (RR: 0.46, 95%: 0.21, 1.02), of which the difference was considered insignificant. The risk of revision in group hemiarthroplasty appeared to be more than two folds higher than that after total hip replacement (RR: 4.14, 95%CI: 2.09, 8.19). Conclusion Even though there is a higher rate of dislocation after total hip replacement, this disadvantage could be accounted for, on the basis of a better functional score and the lower revision rate. However, from the results, it stands to reason that total hip replacement should be strongly suggested in elderly active patients with femoral neck fracture. PMID:24854195

  1. Inhibitory Activities of Gatifloxacin (AM-1155), a Newly Developed Fluoroquinolone, against Bacterial and Mammalian Type II Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Yasue, Tokutaro; Hosaka, Masaki; Oomori, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    We determined the inhibitory activities of gatifloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus topoisomerase IV, Escherichia coli DNA gyrase, and HeLa cell topoisomerase II and compared them with those of several quinolones. The inhibitory activities of quinolones against these type II topoisomerases significantly correlated with their antibacterial activities or cytotoxicities (correlation coefficient [r] = 0.926 for S. aureus, r = 0.972 for E. coli, and r = 0.648 for HeLa cells). Gatifloxacin possessed potent inhibitory activities against bacterial type II topoisomerases (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 13.8 μg/ml for S. aureus topoisomerase IV; IC50 = 0.109 μg/ml for E. coli DNA gyrase) but the lowest activity against HeLa cell topoisomerase II (IC50 = 265 μg/ml) among the quinolones tested. There was also a significant correlation between the inhibitory activities of quinolones against S. aureus topoisomerase IV and those against E. coli DNA gyrase (r = 0.969). However, the inhibitory activity against HeLa cell topoisomerase II did not correlate with that against either bacterial enzyme. The IC50 of gatifloxacin for HeLa cell topoisomerase II was 19 and was more than 2,400 times higher than that for S. aureus topoisomerase IV and that for E. coli DNA gyrase. These ratios were higher than those for other quinolones, indicating that gatifloxacin possesses a higher selectivity for bacterial type II topoisomerases. PMID:9756776

  2. Apolipoprotein C-II deficiency syndrome. Clinical features, lipoprotein characterization, lipase activity, and correction of hypertriglyceridemia after apolipoprotein C-II administration in two affected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Baggio, G; Manzato, E; Gabelli, C; Fellin, R; Martini, S; Enzi, G B; Verlato, F; Baiocchi, M R; Sprecher, D L; Kashyap, M L

    1986-01-01

    Two patients (brother and sister, 41 and 39 yr of age, respectively) have been shown to have marked elevation of plasma triglycerides and chylomicrons, decreased low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), a type I lipoprotein phenotype, and a deficiency of plasma apolipoprotein C-II (apo C-II). The male patient had a history of recurrent bouts of abdominal pain often accompanied by eruptive xanthomas. The female subject, identified by family screening, was asymptomatic. Hepatosplenomegaly was present in both subjects. Analytical and zonal ultracentrifugation revealed a marked increase in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins including chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins, a reduction in LDL, and the presence of virtually only the HDL3 subfraction. LDL were heterogeneous with the major subfraction of a higher hydrated density than that observed in plasma lipoproteins of normal subjects. Apo C-II levels, quantitated by radioimmunoassay, were 0.13 mg/dl and 0.12 mg/dl, in the male and female proband, respectively. A variant of apo C-II (apo C-IIPadova) with lower apparent molecular weight and more acidic isoelectric point was identified in both probands by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The marked hypertriglyceridemia and elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins were corrected by the infusion of normal plasma or the injection of a biologically active synthesized 44-79 amino acid residue peptide fragment of apo C-II. The reduction in plasma triglycerides after the injection of the synthetic apo C-II peptide persisted for 13-20 d. These results definitively established that the dyslipoproteinemia in this syndrome is due to a deficiency of normal apo C-II. A possible therapeutic role for replacement therapy of apo C-II by synthetic or recombinant apo C-II in those patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent pancreatitis may be possible in the future. Images PMID:3944267

  3. Synthesis and application of surface-imprinted activated carbon sorbent for solid-phase extraction and determination of copper (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jingwen; Wang, Yanbin; Wei, Yajun

    2014-01-01

    A new Cu(II)-imprinted amino-functionalized activated carbon sorbent was prepared by a surface imprinting technique for selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of Cu(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Experimental conditions for effective adsorption of Cu(II) were optimized with respect to different experimental parameters using static and dynamic procedures in detail. Compared with non-imprinted sorbent, the ion-imprinted sorbent had higher selectivity and adsorption capacity for Cu(II). The maximum static adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent for Cu(II) was 26.71 and 6.86 mg g-1, respectively. The relatively selectivity factor values (αr) of Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Ni(II), Cu(II)/Co(II) and Cu(II)/Pb(II) were 166.16, 50.77, 72.26 and 175.77, respectively, which were greater than 1. Complete elution of the adsorbed Cu(II) from Cu(II)-imprinted sorbent was carried out using 2 mL of 0.1 mol L-1 EDTA solution. The relative standard deviation of the method was 2.4% for eleven replicate determinations. The method was validated for the analysis by two certified reference materials (GBW 08301, GBW 08303), the results obtained is in good agreement with standard values. The developed method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace copper in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. The effect of continuous Zn (II) exposure on the organic degradation capability and soluble microbial products (SMP) of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-chao; Liu, Yan; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Yan, Yang-wei; Dai, Rui-hua; Zha, Xiao-song; Wang, Cheng-shan

    2013-01-15

    This study describes the change of organic degradation capability and soluble microbial products (SMP) generated in activated sludge under continuous exposure to Zn (II) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In 338 days of operation, the added Zn (II) concentrations were gradually increased from 50 to 100, 200, 400 to 600 and 800 mg/L. Results showed that after adaptation, the activated sludge could endure 400mg/L Zn (II) without showing evident reduction in organic degradation ability (92±1% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in stable state). However, when 600 and 800 mg/L Zn (II) were applied, the effluent water quality significantly deteriorated. Meanwhile, under increasing Zn (II) concentrations, the SMP content in the activated sludge, together with its main biochemical constituents, first increased slightly below 400mg/L of Zn (II), then rose sharply under 600 and 800 mg/L Zn (II). Furthermore, a close correlation was found between SMP content and effluent soluble COD in both the Experimental Reactor and Control Reactor. In addition, the Zn (II) concentrations in the effluent and SMP extraction liquid were further analyzed and discussed to reveal the role that SMP constituents played in defense and resistance to the toxicity of Zn (II). PMID:23183340

  5. cis-bis(pyridine)platinum(II) organoamides with unexpected growth inhibition properties and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Webster, L K; Deacon, G B; Buxton, D P; Hillcoat, B L; James, A M; Roos, I A; Thomson, R J; Wakelin, L P; Williams, T L

    1992-09-01

    The platinum(II) organoamides [Pt(NRCH2)2L2] (L = pyridine (py), R = p-HC6F4, C6F5,p-IC6F4,p-CIC6F4,p-C6F5C6F4; L = 4-methylpyridine, R = p-HC6F4) and [Pt(NRCH2CH2NR')(py)2] (R = p-HC6F4, R' = C6F5, p-BrC6F4, or p-MeC6F4) inhibit the growth of murine L1210 leukemia cells in culture with ID50 values for continuous exposure in the range 0.6-2.7 microM. Representative complexes are also active against L1210 cells in 2-h pulse exposures, as well as against the cisplatin-resistant variant L1210/DDP and human colonic carcinoma cell lines HT 29 and BE. Three complexes [Pt(NRCH2)2L2] (R = p-HC6F4, C6F5, or p-IC6F4) have good activity (T/C greater than or equal to 180%) against P388 leukemia in mice, and all other compounds tested are active except when R = p-C6F5C6F4, L = py. Although the molecular basis of the biological activity of these complexes is not known, the observation of good activity for amineplatinum(II) compounds with no hydrogen substituents on the nitrogen donor atoms introduces a new factor in the anticancer behavior of platinum(II) complexes. PMID:1527784

  6. Urotensin II((4-11)) Azasulfuryl Peptides: Synthesis and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Francesco; Yousif, Ali M; Billard, Étienne; Dufour-Gallant, Julien; Turcotte, Stéphane; Grieco, Paolo; Chatenet, David; Lubell, William D

    2016-05-26

    Cyclic azasulfuryl (As) peptide analogs of the urotensin II (UII, 1, H-Glu-Thr-Pro-Asp-c[Cys-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-Cys]-Val-OH) fragment 4-11 were synthesized to explore the influences of backbone structure on biological activity. N-Aminosulfamides were inserted as surrogates of the Trp(7) and Lys(8) residues in the biologically relevant Trp-Lys-Tyr triad. A combination of solution- and solid-phase methods were used to prepare novel UII((4-11)) analogs 6-11 by routes featuring alkylation of azasulfuryl-glycine tripeptide precursors to install various side chains. The pharmacological profiles of derivatives 6-11 were tested in vitro using a competitive binding assay and ex vivo using a rat aortic ring bioassay. Although the analogs exhibited weak affinity for the urotensin II receptor (UT) without agonistic activity, azasulfuryl-UII((4-11)) derivatives 7-9 reduced up to 50% of the effects of UII and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) without affecting their potency. PMID:27140209

  7. Strong variable linear polarization in the cool active star II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Lisa; Kochukhov, Oleg; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic fields of cool active stars are currently studied polarimetrically using only circular polarization observations. This provides limited information about the magnetic field geometry since circular polarization is only sensitive to the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Reconstructions of the magnetic field topology will therefore not be completely trustworthy when only circular polarization is used. On the other hand, linear polarization is sensitive to the transverse component of the magnetic field. By including linear polarization in the reconstruction the quality of the reconstructed magnetic map is dramatically improved. For that reason, we wanted to identify cool stars for which linear polarization could be detected at a level sufficient for magnetic imaging. Four active RS CVn binaries, II Peg, HR 1099, IM Peg, and σ Gem were observed with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Mean polarization profiles in all four Stokes parameters were derived using the multi-line technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD). Not only was linear polarization successfully detected in all four stars in at least one observation, but also, II Peg showed an extraordinarily strong linear polarization signature throughout all observations. This qualifies II Peg as the first promising target for magnetic Doppler imaging in all four Stokes parameters and, at the same time, suggests that other such targets can possibly be identified.

  8. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  9. Fast isolation of highly active photosystem II core complexes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Gai; Xu, Tian-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Chun-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Purification of photosystem II (PSII) core complexes is a time-consuming and low-efficiency process. In order to isolate pure and active PSII core complexes in large amounts, we have developed a fast method to isolate highly active monomeric and dimeric PSII core complexes from spinach leaves by using sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. By using a vertical rotor the process was completed significantly faster compared with a swing-out rotor. In order to keep the core complexes in high activity, the whole isolation procedure was performed in the presence of glycine betain and pH at 6.3. The isolated pigment-protein complexes were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, absorption spectroscopy, 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that this method is a better choice for quick and efficient isolation of functionally active PSII core complexes. PMID:20738723

  10. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jugal V; Gajera, Sanjay B; Patel, Mohan N

    2014-11-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities. PMID:25467683

  11. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  12. Preparation of ferrous chelate of hairtail (Trichiurus haumela) protein hydrolysate (Fe(II)-HPH) and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huimin; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Tian; Deng, Shanggui

    The preparation of a ferrous chelate of hairtail (Trichiurus haumela) protein hydrolysate (Fe(II)-HPH) and its antibacterial activity were studied. The optimal conditions of hydrolysis by papain and ferrous chelation were obtained by single-factor experiments and orthogonal test, with the antibacterial activities as the index. In addition, the antibacterial activity of Fe(II)-HPH was evaluated using the Plackett-Burman design. The orthogonal test results showed that Fe(II)-HPH had an antibacterial activity of 98.3% under a temperature of 40 °C at pH 6.5 for an enzymolysis duration of eight hours in the presence of 20,000 U/g of enzyme. The Plackett-Burman design analysis showed that the three most significant factors (P < 0.05) influencing the antibacterial activity of Fe(II)-HPH were pH, the concentration (mg/mL), and presence of magnesium sulfate.

  13. Methadone maintenance treatment programme reduces criminal activity and improves social well-being of drug users in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hua-Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chow, Eric P F; Li, Tong; Xian, Yun; Lu, Yi-Hua; Tian, Tian; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been implemented in China since 2004 and has expanded into a nationwide programme. This study aims to evaluate changes in social functioning, family relations and drug-related criminal behaviour among MMT clients in China. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Both English and Chinese literature databases, including PubMed, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Journals Database (CQVIP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang Data, were comprehensively searched over the period 2004–2014 for studied indicators. Study selection, quality assessment and data extraction were conducted according to the PRISMA (preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses) Statement. Meta-analyses were conducted using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Biostat software. Results Thirty-eight articles were included in this review (1 in English and 37 in Chinese). The self-reported arrest rate decreased from 13.1% (95% CI 9.1% to 18.5%) at baseline to 3.4% (95% CI 1.5% to 7.7%) and 4.3% (95% CI 1.6% to 11.4%) after 6 and 12 months of MMT intervention, respectively. The rate of drug selling decreased from 7.6% (95% CI 3.8% to 14.8%) at baseline to 1.9% (95% CI 0.6% to 6.2%) and 3.0% (95% CI 1.0% to 8.9%) after 6 and 12 months of intervention, respectively. Similarly, the rates of selling sex for drugs and drug-related crime decreased from 5.3% (95% CI 2.4% to 11.1%) and 9.9% (95% CI 6.8% to 14.2%) at baseline to 1.1% (95% CI 0.5% to 2.3%) and 3.4% (95% CI 2.5% to 4.5%) at 6 months, then to 0.8% (95% CI 0.3% to 1.9%) and 3.4% (95% CI 0.8% to 13.1%) at 12 months after treatment initiation, respectively. In contrast, the rate of employment of clients and the proportion of clients having a good relationship with their family increased substantially from 26.4% (95% CI 22.9% to 30.1%) and 37.9% (95% CI 32.0% to 44.2%) to 41.6% (95% CI 36.6% to 48.0%) and 59.6% (95% CI 48.1% to 70

  14. Association between 25(OH)D Level, Ultraviolet Exposure, Geographical Location, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; Yang, Jun; Yu, Weilai; Li, Dejian; Xiang, Zun; Lin, Yiming; Yu, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the vitamin D levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze the relationship between IBD and 25(OH)D, sun exposure, and latitude, and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency affects the severity of IBD. Methods We searched the PubMed, EBSCO, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between 25(OH)D, sun exposure, latitude, and IBD through November 1, 2014, without language restrictions. Studies that compared 25(OH)D levels between IBD patients and controls were selected for inclusion in the meta-analysis. We calculated pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) and odds ratios (ORs). Results Thirteen case-control studies investigating CD and 25(OH)D levels were included, and eight studies part of above studies also investigated the relationship between UC and 25(OH)D. Both CD patients (SMD: 0.26 nmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.09–0.42 nmol/L) and UC patients (SMD: 0.5 nmol/L, 95% CI: 0.15–0.85 nmol/L) had lower levels of 25(OH)D than controls. In addition, CD patients and UC patients were 1.95 times (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.48–2.57) and 2.02 times (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.13–3.60) more likely to be 25(OH)D deficient than controls. We also included 10 studies investigating the relationship between CD activity and vitamin D. Results showed that patients with active CD (CD Activity Index≥150) were more likely to have low vitamin D levels. In addition, whether low sun exposure and high latitude were related to a high morbidity of CD need to be provided more evidence. Conclusion Our study shows that IBD patients have lower vitamin D levels. For active CD patients, vitamin D levels were low. These findings suggest that vitamin D may play an important role in the development of IBD, although a direct association could not be determined in our study. PMID:26172950

  15. Physical Activity Attenuates the Influence of FTO Variants on Obesity Risk: A Meta-Analysis of 218,166 Adults and 19,268 Children

    PubMed Central

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Qi, Lu; Brage, Soren; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sonestedt, Emily; Demerath, Ellen; Ahmad, Tariq; Mora, Samia; Kaakinen, Marika; Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Holzapfel, Christina; Autenrieth, Christine S.; Hyppönen, Elina; Cauchi, Stéphane; He, Meian; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kumari, Meena; Stančáková, Alena; Meidtner, Karina; Balkau, Beverley; Tan, Jonathan T.; Mangino, Massimo; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Song, Yiqing; Zillikens, M. Carola; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Johansson, Stefan; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Wu, Ying; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Zimmermann, Esther; Rivera, Natalia V.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Stringham, Heather M.; Silbernagel, Günther; Kanoni, Stavroula; Feitosa, Mary F.; Snitker, Soren; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Metter, Jeffery; Larrad, Maria Teresa Martinez; Atalay, Mustafa; Hakanen, Maarit; Amin, Najaf; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Grøntved, Anders; Hallmans, Göran; Jansson, John-Olov; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kähönen, Mika; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Nolan, John J.; Palla, Luigi; Pedersen, Oluf; Pérusse, Louis; Renström, Frida; Scott, Robert A.; Shungin, Dmitry; Sovio, Ulla; Tammelin, Tuija H.; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Lakka, Timo A.; Uusitupa, Matti; Rios, Manuel Serrano; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bouchard, Claude; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Fu, Mao; Walker, Mark; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Dedoussis, George V.; Fritsche, Andreas; Ohlsson, Claes; Boehnke, Michael; Bandinelli, Stefania; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Isomaa, Bo; Njølstad, Pål R.; Florez, Jose C.; Liu, Simin; Ness, Andy; Spector, Timothy D.; Tai, E. Shyong; Froguel, Philippe; Boeing, Heiner; Laakso, Markku; Marmot, Michael; Bergmann, Sven; Power, Chris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Chasman, Daniel; Ridker, Paul; Hansen, Torben; Monda, Keri L.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hu, Frank B.; Groop, Leif C.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ekelund, Ulf; Franks, Paul W.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The FTO gene harbors the strongest known susceptibility locus for obesity. While many individual studies have suggested that physical activity (PA) may attenuate the effect of FTO on obesity risk, other studies have not been able to confirm this interaction. To confirm or refute unambiguously whether PA attenuates the association of FTO with obesity risk, we meta-analyzed data from 45 studies of adults (n = 218,166) and nine studies of children and adolescents (n = 19,268). Methods and Findings All studies identified to have data on the FTO rs9939609 variant (or any proxy [r2>0.8]) and PA were invited to participate, regardless of ethnicity or age of the participants. PA was standardized by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable (physically inactive versus active) in each study. Overall, 25% of adults and 13% of children were categorized as inactive. Interaction analyses were performed within each study by including the FTO×PA interaction term in an additive model, adjusting for age and sex. Subsequently, random effects meta-analysis was used to pool the interaction terms. In adults, the minor (A−) allele of rs9939609 increased the odds of obesity by 1.23-fold/allele (95% CI 1.20–1.26), but PA attenuated this effect (pinteraction  = 0.001). More specifically, the minor allele of rs9939609 increased the odds of obesity less in the physically active group (odds ratio  = 1.22/allele, 95% CI 1.19–1.25) than in the inactive group (odds ratio  = 1.30/allele, 95% CI 1.24–1.36). No such interaction was found in children and adolescents. Conclusions The association of the FTO risk allele with the odds of obesity is attenuated by 27% in physically active adults, highlighting the importance of PA in particular in those genetically predisposed to obesity. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:22069379

  16. What are the most effective techniques in changing obese individuals’ physical activity self-efficacy and behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Increasing self-efficacy is generally considered to be an important mediator of the effects of physical activity interventions. A previous review identified which behaviour change techniques (BCTs) were associated with increases in self-efficacy and physical activity for healthy non-obese adults. The aim of the current review was to identify which BCTs increase the self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour of obese adults. A systematic search identified 61 comparisons with obese adults reporting changes in self-efficacy towards engaging in physical activity following interventions. Of those comparisons, 42 also reported changes in physical activity behaviour. All intervention descriptions were coded using Michie et al’s (2011) 40 item CALO-RE taxonomy of BCTs. Meta-analysis was conducted with moderator analyses to examine the association between whether or not each BCT was included in interventions, and size of changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour. Overall, a small effect of the interventions was found on self-efficacy (d = 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.29, p < 0.001) and a medium sized effect on physical activity behaviour (d = 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.63, p < 0.001). Four BCTs were significantly associated with positive changes in self-efficacy; ‘action planning’, ‘time management’, ‘prompt self-monitoring of behavioural outcome’ and ‘plan social support/social change’. These latter two BCTs were also associated with positive changes in physical activity. An additional 19 BCTs were associated with positive changes in physical activity. The largest effects for physical activity were found where interventions contained ‘teach to use prompts/cues’, ‘prompt practice’ or ‘prompt rewards contingent on effort or progress towards behaviour’. Overall, a non-significant relationship was found between change in self-efficacy and change in physical activity (Spearman’s Rho = −0.18 p

  17. What are the most effective techniques in changing obese individuals' physical activity self-efficacy and behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olander, Ellinor K; Fletcher, Helen; Williams, Stefanie; Atkinson, Lou; Turner, Andrew; French, David P

    2013-01-01

    Increasing self-efficacy is generally considered to be an important mediator of the effects of physical activity interventions. A previous review identified which behaviour change techniques (BCTs) were associated with increases in self-efficacy and physical activity for healthy non-obese adults. The aim of the current review was to identify which BCTs increase the self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour of obese adults. A systematic search identified 61 comparisons with obese adults reporting changes in self-efficacy towards engaging in physical activity following interventions. Of those comparisons, 42 also reported changes in physical activity behaviour. All intervention descriptions were coded using Michie et al's (2011) 40 item CALO-RE taxonomy of BCTs. Meta-analysis was conducted with moderator analyses to examine the association between whether or not each BCT was included in interventions, and size of changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour. Overall, a small effect of the interventions was found on self-efficacy (d = 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.29, p < 0.001) and a medium sized effect on physical activity behaviour (d = 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.63, p < 0.001). Four BCTs were significantly associated with positive changes in self-efficacy; 'action planning', 'time management', 'prompt self-monitoring of behavioural outcome' and 'plan social support/social change'. These latter two BCTs were also associated with positive changes in physical activity. An additional 19 BCTs were associated with positive changes in physical activity. The largest effects for physical activity were found where interventions contained 'teach to use prompts/cues', 'prompt practice' or 'prompt rewards contingent on effort or progress towards behaviour'. Overall, a non-significant relationship was found between change in self-efficacy and change in physical activity (Spearman's Rho = -0.18 p = 0.72). In summary, the

  18. Inhibition of topoisomerase II α activity and induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by semi-synthetic andrographolide analogues.

    PubMed

    Nateewattana, Jintapat; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsook, Sakkasem; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Dutta, Suman; Jariyawat, Surawat; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2013-04-01

    Topoisomerase II α enzyme plays a critical role in DNA replication process. It controls the topologic states of DNA during transcription and is essential for cell proliferation. Human DNA topoisomerase II α (hTopo II α) is a promising chemotherapeutic target for anticancer agents against a variety of cancer types. In the present study, andrographolide and its structurally modified analogues were investigated for their inhibitory activities on hTopo II α enzyme. Five out of nine andrographolide analogues potently reduced hTopo II α activity and inhibited cell proliferation in four mammalian cell lines (Hela, CHO, BCA-1 and HepG2 cells). IC50 values for cytotoxicity of analogues 3A.1, 3A.2, 3A.3, 1B and 2C were 4 to 7 μM. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that both core structure of andrographolide and silicon based molecule of functional group were important for the inhibition of hTopo II α activity whereas position C-19 of analogues was required for anti-proliferation. In addition, the analogue 2C at 10 μM concentration inhibited hTopo II α, and induced apoptosis with nuclear fragmentation and formation of apoptotic bodies in HepG2 cells. The analogue 2C may, therefore, have a therapeutic potential as effective anticancer agent targeting the hTopo II α functions. PMID:22899371

  19. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  20. Spectroscopic observations of the surface-active binary II Pegasi /HD 224085/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, B. W.; Noah, P. V.

    1980-06-01

    Spectroscopy of the surface-active binary II Peg (HD 224085) shows the H-alpha emission feature to be variable in equivalent width (EW) by a factor of ten on time scales of several days. Most of the EW variability is in phase with the stellar rotation period, suggesting strong localization of H-alpha emitting regions. However, sudden, flare-like enhancements of H-alpha are seen which exhibit decay times of days. Echelle spectrograms of the H-alpha profile show a noticeable red asymmetry, reminiscent of the emission profile exhibited by the RS CVn binary V711 Tau (HR 1099). An interpretation of the behavior of II Peg in the context of BY Dra or pre-main-sequence variability does not appear to be necessary.

  1. Possible chromospheric activity cycles in II Peg, UX Ari and V711 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2009-02-01

    We study the Mount Wilson indices we obtained indirectly from IUE high and low resolution spectra of the RS CVn-type systems II Peg (K2IV), UX Ari (K0IV+G5V) and V711 Tau (K1IV+G5V), extensively observed by IUE from 1978 to 1996. We analyze the activity signatures, which correspond to the primary star, with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. From the analysis of V711 Tau data, we found a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of 18 years and a shorter ~3 year cycle, which could be associated to a chromospheric flip-flop cycle. The data of II Peg also suggest a chromospheric cycle of ~21 years and a flip-flop cycle of ~9 years. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of ~6 years for UX Ari.

  2. Characterization and biological activities of two copper(II) complexes with dipropylenetriamine and diamine as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Noaimi, Mousa; Choudhary, Mohammad I.; Awwadi, Firas F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Yousuf, Sammer; Sawafta, Ashraf; Warad, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dipn)(Nsbnd N)]Br2(1-2) [dipn = dipropylenetriamine, Nsbnd N = ethylenediamine (en) (1) and propylenediamine (pn) (2)], have been synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Crystal structure for 2 shows a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion with one solvate water molecule. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative assays were conducted to evaluate the biological activities of these complexes. The complexes exhibit a promising antimicrobial effect against an array of microbes at 200 μg/mL concentration. The antiproliferative assay shows a high potential of these complexes to target Human keratinocyte cell line with IC50 values of 155 and 152 μM. The absorption spectrum of 2 in water was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  3. Molecular mechanism of L-DNase II activation and function as a molecular switch in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, Alicia; Leprêtre, Chloé; Padrón-Barthe, Laura; Chahory, Sabine; Martin, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of caspase activation counts as one of the most important finds in the biochemistry of apoptosis. However, targeted disruption of caspases does not impair every type of apoptosis. Other proteases can replace caspases and several so called "caspase independent" pathways are now described. Here we review our current knowledge on one of these pathways, the LEI/L-DNase II. It is a serine protease-dependent pathway and its key event is the transformation of LEI (leukocyte elastase inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor) into L-DNase II (an endonuclease). The molecular events leading to this change of enzymatic function as well as the cross-talk and interactions of this molecule with other apoptotic pathway, including caspases, are discussed. PMID:18761000

  4. Reduced topoisomerase II activity in multidrug-resistant human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Eijdems, E. W.; de Haas, M.; Timmerman, A. J.; Van der Schans, G. P.; Kamst, E.; de Nooij, J.; Astaldi Ricotti, G. C.; Borst, P.; Baas, F.

    1995-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines often have a compound phenotype, combining reduced drug accumulation with a decrease in topoisomerase II. We have analysed alterations in topoisomerase II in MDR derivatives of the human lung cancer cell line SW-1573. Selection with doxorubicin frequently resulted in reduced topo II alpha mRNA and protein levels, whereas clones selected with vincristine showed normal levels of topo II alpha. No alterations of topo II beta levels were detected. To determine the contribution of topo II alterations to drug resistance, topo II activity was analysed by the determination of DNA breaks induced by the topo II-inhibiting drug 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methane-sulphon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in living cells, as m-AMSA is not affected by the drug efflux mechanism in the SW-1573 cells. The number of m-AMSA-induced DNA breaks correlated well (r = 0.96) with in vitro m-AMSA sensitivity. Drug sensitivity, however, did not always correlate with reduced topo II mRNA or protein levels. In one of the five doxorubicin-selected clones m-AMSA resistance and a reduction in m-AMSA-induced DNA breaks were found in the absence of reduced topo II protein levels. Therefore, we assume that post-translational modifications of topo II also contribute to drug resistance in SW-1573 cells. These results suggest that methods that detect quantitative as well as qualitative alterations of topo II should be used to predict the responsiveness of tumours to cytotoxic agents. The assay we used, which measures DNA breaks as an end point of topo II activity, could be a good candidate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7819046

  5. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase directly inhibits HER2 activation of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphorylation/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Since human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has a similar molecular structure to EGFR, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II also inhibits HER2 activation. The human gastric cancer cell line HGC‑27 was infected with an adenoviral construct encoding cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio)guanosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (8‑pCPT‑cGMP) to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of HER2. Co‑immunoprecipitation was performed in order to determine the binding between PKG II and HER2. In addition, a QuikChange Lightning Site‑Directed Mutagenesis kit was used to mutate threonine 686 of HER2 to glutamic acid or alanine. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of HER2. Increasing the PKG II activity of HGC‑27 cells through infection with Ad‑PKG II and stimulation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP inhibited the EGF‑induced tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of HER2. PKG II bound directly with HER2 and caused phosphorylation of threonine 686. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to alanine, which could not be phosphorylated by PKG II, the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of HER2 was eradicated. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to glutamic acid, which mimicked the phosphorylation of this site, treatment with EGF had no stimulating effect on tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of the mutant HER2. The results suggested that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced activation of HER2 through binding with and causing threonine 686 phosphorylation of this oncogenic protein. PMID:26676300

  6. Surface Alteration of Activated Carbon for Detoxification of Copper (ii) from Industrial Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutto, Sadaf; Khan, M. Nasiruddin

    2013-04-01

    The low-cost modified activated carbons were prepared from Thar and Lakhra (Pakistan) coals by activation with sulfuric acid and further modified with citric, tartaric and acetic acids for the selective adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The original carbon obtained from activated Thar and Lakhra coals at pH 3.0 displayed significant adsorption capacity for lead and insignificant capacity values (0.880 and 0.830 mgṡg-1) for copper. However, after modification with citric, tartaric and acetic acid the copper adsorption capacities enhanced in the range of 5.56-21.85 and 6.05-44.61 times, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherms were used to elucidate the observed sorption phenomena. The isotherm equilibrium data was well fitted by the Langmuir and sufficiently fitted to the Freundlich models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) inferred that the investigated adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Based on the results, it was concluded that the surface alteration with citric and tartaric acid, Thar and Lakhra activated carbons had significant potential for selective removal of copper(II) from industrial wastewater.

  7. Cooperative activation of the T-type CaV3.2 channel: interaction between Domains II and III.

    PubMed

    Demers-Giroux, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdin, Benoîte; Sauvé, Rémy; Parent, Lucie

    2013-10-11

    T-type CaV3 channels are important mediators of Ca(2+) entry near the resting membrane potential. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for channel activation. Homology models based upon the high-resolution structure of bacterial NaV channels predict interaction between the S4-S5 helix of Domain II (IIS4-S5) and the distal S6 pore region of Domain II (IIS6) and Domain III (IIIS6). Functional intra- and inter-domain interactions were investigated with a double mutant cycle analysis. Activation gating and channel kinetics were measured for 47 single mutants and 20 pairs of mutants. Significant coupling energies (ΔΔG(interact) ≥ 1.5 kcal mol(-1)) were measured for 4 specific pairs of mutants introduced between IIS4-S5 and IIS6 and between IIS4-S5 and IIIS6. In agreement with the computer based models, Thr-911 in IIS4-S5 was functionally coupled with Ile-1013 in IIS6 during channel activation. The interaction energy was, however, found to be stronger between Val-907 in IIS4-S5 and Ile-1013 in IIS6. In addition Val-907 was significantly coupled with Asn-1548 in IIIS6 but not with Asn-1853 in IVS6. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the S4-S5 and S6 helices from adjacent domains are energetically coupled during the activation of a low voltage-gated T-type CaV3 channel. PMID:23970551

  8. Effects of polyaromatic hydrocarbons on photosystem II activity in pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Lankin, Anton V; Vasilyeva, Galina K; Luybimov, Valery Yu; Semenova, Galina N; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The acute effects of three typical polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene (Naph), phenanthrene (Phen) and fluoranthene (Flu) on photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) in detached leaves of 3-week-old pea plants were studied. The leaves were exposed in water with PAHs under white light for 0.5-72 h. The activity of PSII was examined by prompt and delayed chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence. The effects of PAHs depended on their concentration and exposure time. This dependency was more significant in the presence of chemical stressors (Triton X-100 or acetone) or under high intensity irradiance. Increased content of PAHs and long-term exposure (24-72 h) led to significant reduction of the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) of PS II, changes in the polyphasic fluorescence induction (OJIP), and to decreasing amplitudes of fast and slow components of delayed Chl a fluorescence. The damage of PSII depended on water solubility of a given type of PAHs, their concentration and exposure time. During short-time exposure the compound with highest water-solubility - naphthalene - revealed the strongest effect. During long-time exposure the compounds with low water-solubility -Phen, Flu-revealed the strongest effect as the corresponding PAH accumulates in the thylakoids especially when the solution is oversaturated containing a solid phase. The reduction of PSII activity at the presence of naphthalene (30 mg L(-1)) was accompanied by transient generation of H2O2 as well as swelling of thylakoids and distortion of cell plasma membranes, which was indicated by electron microscopy images. Distortion of thylakoid membranes due to accumulation of PAHs as well as the development of oxidative stress seems to be the main pathways of PAHs influencing the photochemical activity of PS II. PMID:24637130

  9. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt. PMID:15525798

  10. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activities and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of new arylsulfonylhydrazone and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Ümmühan Özmen; Arslan, Fatma; Hamurcu, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    Ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide ( esh: CH 3CH 2SO 2NHNH 2) derivatives as 5-methylsalicyl-aldehydeethanesulfonylhydrazone ( 5msalesh), 5-methyl-2-hydroxyacetophenoneethane sulfonylhydrazone ( 5mafesh) and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes have been synthesized for the first time. The structure of these compounds has been investigated by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, LC/MS, UV-vis spectrophotometric method, magnetic susceptibility, thermal studies and conductivity measurements. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus magaterium and Gram negative bacteria; Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli by using the microdilution broth method. The biological activity screening showed that ligands have more activity than complexes against the tested bacteria. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been investigated by comparing IC 50 and Ki values and it has been found that 5msalesh and its complexes have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than other compounds.

  11. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in pancreatic islets. Temporal dissociation of kinase activation and insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Babb, E L; Tarpley, J; Landt, M; Easom, R A

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that glucose activates the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in isolated rat pancreatic islets in a manner consistent with a role of this enzyme in the regulation of insulin secretion [Wenham, Landt and Easom (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 4947-4952]. In the current study, the muscarinic agonist, carbachol, has been shown to induce the conversion of CaM kinase II into a Ca(2+)-independent, autonomous form indicative of its activation. Maximal activation (2-fold) was achieved by 15 s, followed by a rapid return to basal levels by 1 min. This response was primarily the result of the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores since it was not affected by a concentration (20 microM) of verapamil that completely prevented the activation of CaM kinase II by glucose. Surprisingly, carbachol added prior to, or simultaneously with, glucose attenuated nutrient activation of CaM kinase II. This effect was mimicked by cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) and thapsigargin, suggesting its mediation by phospholipase C and the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. In contrast, carbachol, CCK-8 and thapsigargin markedly potentiated glucose (12 mM)-induced insulin secretion. These results suggest that CaM kinase II activation can be temporally dissociated from insulin secretion but do not exclude the potential dependence of insulin exocytosis on CaM kinase II-mediated protein phosphorylation. PMID:8694759

  12. Ternary complexes of copper(II) and cobalt(II) involving nitrite/pyrazole and tetradentate N4-coordinate ligand: Synthesis, characterization, structures and antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Ankita; Sadhu, Mehul H.; Kumar, Sujit Baran

    2015-12-01

    Five new mononuclear mixed ligand complexes of the type [Cu(NCCH3)(dbdmp)](ClO4)2, [M(ONO)(dbdmp)]ClO4, [M(pz) (dbdmp)](ClO4)2 where M = Cu(II) and Co(II), pz = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole and dbdmp = N,N-diethyl-N‧,N‧-bis((3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)ethane-1,2-diamine have been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopy studies. The crystal structures of three copper(II) complexes [Cu(NCCH3)(dbdmp)](ClO4)2, [Cu(ONO)(dbdmp)]ClO4 and [Cu(pz)(dbdmp)](ClO4)2 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Structural analyses reveal the geometry of [Cu(pz)(dbdmp)](ClO4)2 is distorted square pyramidal and other two copper(II) complexes have distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. Molecular composition of cobalt(II) complexes have been determined by mass spectral data. The EPR spectra of copper(II) complexes in frozen acetonitrile solution exhibit axial spectra, characteristic of dx2-y2 ground state. Electrochemical studies of copper(II) complexes using glassy carbon as working electrode in acetonitrile solution show Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple with quasi reversible electron transfer versus Ag/Ag+ reference electrode. Antimicrobial activity of all the synthesized complexes were investigated against two Gram positive and two Gram negative bacterial strains.

  13. Potent and specific inhibition of the biological activity of the type-II transmembrane serine protease matriptase by the cyclic microprotein MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Gray, K; Elghadban, S; Thongyoo, P; Owen, K A; Szabo, R; Bugge, T H; Tate, E W; Leatherbarrow, R J; Ellis, V

    2014-08-01

    Matriptase is a type-II transmembrane serine protease involved in epithelial homeostasis in both health and disease, and is implicated in the development and progression of a variety of cancers. Matriptase mediates its biological effects both via as yet undefined substrates and pathways, and also by proteolytic cleavage of a variety of well-defined protein substrates, several of which it shares with the closely-related protease hepsin. Development of targeted therapeutic strategies will require discrimination between these proteases. Here we have investigated cyclic microproteins of the squash Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin-inhibitor family (generated by total chemical synthesis) and found MCoTI-II to be a high-affinity (Ki 9 nM) and highly selective (> 1,000-fold) inhibitor of matriptase. MCoTI-II efficiently inhibited the proteolytic activation of pro-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by matriptase but not by hepsin, in both purified and cell-based systems, and inhibited HGF-dependent cell scattering. MCoTI-II also selectively inhibited the invasion of matriptase-expressing prostate cancer cells. Using a model of epithelial cell tight junction assembly, we also found that MCoTI-II could effectively inhibit the re-establishment of tight junctions and epithelial barrier function in MDCK-I cells after disruption, consistent with the role of matriptase in regulating epithelial integrity. Surprisingly, MCoTI-II was unable to inhibit matriptase-dependent proteolytic activation of prostasin, a GPI-anchored serine protease also implicated in epithelial homeostasis. These observations suggest that the unusually high selectivity afforded by MCoTI-II and its biological effectiveness might represent a useful starting point for the development of therapeutic inhibitors, and further highlight the role of matriptase in epithelial maintenance. PMID:24696092

  14. Urotensin II Promotes Vagal-Mediated Bradycardia by Activating Cardiac-Projecting Parasympathetic Neurons of Nucleus Ambiguus

    PubMed Central

    Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Rabinowitz, Joseph E.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Koch, Walter J.; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin II (U-II) is a cyclic undecapeptide that regulates cardiovascular function at central and peripheral sites. The functional role of U-II nucleus ambiguus, a key site controlling cardiac tone, has not been established, despite the identification of U-II and its receptor at this level. We report here that U-II produces an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in retrogradely labeled cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus via two pathways: (i) Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor; and (ii) Ca2+ influx through P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. In addition, U-II depolarizes cultured cardiac parasympathetic neurons. Microinjection of increasing concentrations of U-II into nucleus ambiguus elicits dose-dependent bradycardia in conscious rats, indicating the in vivo activation of the cholinergic pathway controlling the heart rate. Both the in vitro and in vivo effects were abolished by the urotensin receptor antagonist, urantide. Our findings suggest that, in addition, to the previously reported increase in sympathetic outflow, U-II activates cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus, which may contribute to cardioprotection. PMID:24521102

  15. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H J; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Willems, Rob J L; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-07-29

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic constructs that display potent inhibition of bacterial growth, with activities approaching that of nisin itself. Most notable was the activity observed against clinically relevant bacterial strains including MRSA and VRE. Experiments with membrane models indicate that these constructs operate via a lipid II-mediated mode of action without causing pore formation. A lipid II-dependent mechanism of action is further supported by antagonization assays wherein the addition of lipid II was found to effectively block the antibacterial activity of the nisin-derived lipopeptides. PMID:26122963

  16. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay.

  17. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan N; Patel, Chintan R; Joshi, Hardik N

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay. PMID:22750339

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure and antifungal activity of a divalent cobalt(II) complex with uniconazole.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Jie; Ren, Guoyu; Qin, Baofu; Ma, Haixia

    2016-06-01

    Azole compounds have attracted commercial interest due to their high bactericidal and plant-growth-regulating activities. Uniconazole [or 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pent-1-en-3-ol] is a highly active 1,2,4-triazole fungicide and plant-growth regulator with low toxicity. The pharmacological and toxicological properties of many drugs are modified by the formation of their metal complexes. Therefore, there is much interest in exploiting the coordination chemistry of triazole pesticides and their potential application in agriculture. However, reports of complexes of uniconazole are rare. A new cobalt(II) complex of uniconazole, namely dichloridotetrakis[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl-κN(4))pent-1-en-3-ol]cobalt(II), [CoCl2(C15H18ClN3O)4], was synthesized and structurally characterized by element analysis, IR spectrometry and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The crystal structural analysis shows that the Co(II) atom is located on the inversion centre and is coordinated by four uniconazole and two chloride ligands, forming a distorted octahedral geometry. The hydroxy groups of an uniconazole ligands of adjacent molecules form hydrogen bonds with the axial chloride ligands, resulting in one-dimensional chains parallel to the a axis. The complex was analysed for its antifungal activity by the mycelial growth rate method. It was revealed that the antifungal effect of the title complex is more pronounced than the effect of fungicide uniconazole for Botryosphaeria ribis, Wheat gibberellic and Grape anthracnose. PMID:27256696

  19. P-selectin increases angiotensin II-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GAIZHEN; LIANG, BIN; SONG, XIAOSU; BAI, RUI; QIN, WEIWEI; SUN, XU; LU, YAN; BIAN, YUNFEI; XIAO, CHUANSHI

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P-selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P-selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet-derived P-selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin knockout (P-sel KO) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross-transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P-sel KO mice. P-selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P-sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P-sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels were decreased in the P-sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P-sel KO mice, the number of Mac-2 (galectin-3)- and TGF-β1-positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P-sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF-β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P-selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II-induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  20. Glycosidase- and β-lactamase-like activity of dinuclear copper(II) patellamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Eisenschmidt, Annika; Kipper, Nora; Schießl, Jasmin

    2016-06-01

    Prochloron, a blue-green algae belonging to ancient prokaryotes, produces, like other cyanobacteria, cyclic pseudo-peptides, which are also found in its obligate symbiont ascidiae (Lissoclinum patellum). Although research has focused for some time on the putative metabolic function of these cyclic peptides, to date it is still not understood. Their role might be connected to the increased concentrations of divalent metal ions, especially Cu(II), found in ascidiae. Dinuclear copper(II) complexes of cyclic pseudo-peptides revealed a broad hydrolytic capacity, including carboanhydrase and phosphatase activity. This study reports their β-lactamase as well as α- and β-glycosidase activity with kcat=(11.34±0.91)ˑ10(-4)s(-1) for β-lactamase, kcat=(1.55±0.13)ˑ10(-4)s(-1) for α-glycosidase and kcat=(1.22±0.09)ˑ10(-4)s(-1) for β-glycosidase activity. PMID:26921720

  1. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects.

    PubMed

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B; Krenc, Agata K; Meyers, David J; Rock, Ronald S; Anders, Robert A; Freel Meyers, Caren L; Robinson, Douglas N

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  2. The active binary star II Pegasi with it BeppoSAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Pallavicini, R.; Mewe, R.; Poretti, E.

    2000-03-01

    II Peg is an ideal target to study stellar activity and flares, since intense and long lasting flares have been frequently detected from this system at all wavelengths. We report here about a BeppoSAX observation of II Peg. We followed the system for ~ 19 hours on December 5 and 6 1997 with BeppoSAX and the X-ray light curve resembles the typical behavior of a decay phase of a long-lasting flare. The spectral analysis shows that the II Peg X-ray spectrum is described by a two-temperature components, with the two dominant temperatures centered in the range of 9-11 and 24-26 MK. The derived coronal metal abundance is low ( Z ~ 0.2 Z_sun) compared to recent determinations of the photospheric abundance (Z ~ 0.6 Z_sun). Some possible explanations for this phenomenology are reviewed. As for most other stellar coronal sources observed with BeppoSAX, we find that in order to fit the BeppoSAX spectra an interstellar column density about a factor ten higher than previously determined is required.

  3. PROGRESS ON INSERTION DEVICE RELATED ACTIVITIES AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D. A.; He, P.; Rank, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2010-05-23

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the construction stage. A new insertion device (ID) magnetic measurement facility (MMF) is being set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory in order to satisfy the stringent requirement on the magnetic field measurement of IDs. ISO-Class7 temperature stabilized clean room is being constructed for this purpose. A state-of-the-art Hall probe bench and integrated field measurement system will be installed therein. IDs in the project baseline scope include six damping wigglers, two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), three 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU. Three-pole wigglers with peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of bending magnet radiation at the NSLS. Future plans includes: (1) an in-vacuum magnetic measurement system, (2) use of PrFeB magnet for improved cryo undulator, (3) development of advanced optimization program for sorting and shimming of IDs, (4) development of a closed loop He gas refrigerator, (5) switchable quasi-periodic EPU. Design features of the baseline devices, IDMMF and the future plans for NSLS-II ID activities are described.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA interaction and anticancer activity of tridentate copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan-Ying; Du, Ke-Jie; Wang, Jin-Quan; Liang, Jie-Wen; Kou, Jun-Feng; Hou, Xiao-Juan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Chao, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Three new tridentate copper(II) complexes [Cu(dthp)Cl(2)] (1) (dthp=2,6-di(thiazol-2-yl)pyridine), [Cu(dmtp)Cl(2)] (2) (dmtp=2,6-di(5-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)pyridine) and [Cu(dtp)Cl(2)] (3) (dtp=2,6-di(4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)pyridine) have been synthesized and characterized. Crystal structure of complex 1 shows that the complex existed as distorted square pyramid with five co-ordination sites occupied by the tridentate ligand and the two chlorine anions. Ethidium bromide displacement assay, viscosity measurements, circular dichroism studies and cyclic voltammetric experiments suggested that these complexes bound to DNA via an intercalative mode. Three Cu(II) complexes were found to efficiently cleave DNA in the presence of sodium ascorbate, and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and hydrogen peroxide were proved to contribute to the DNA cleavage process. They exhibited anticancer activity against HeLa, Hep-G2 and BEL-7402 cell lines. Nuclear chromatin cleavage has also been observed with AO/EB staining assay and the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). The results demonstrated that three Cu(II) complexes cause DNA damage that can induce the apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells. PMID:23186647

  5. FUSE Cycle 3 Program CO22: Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly(beta) emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, a Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  6. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects

    PubMed Central

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B.; Krenc, Agata K.; Meyers, David J.; Rock, Ronald S.; Anders, Robert A.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  7. Biosorption of toxic lead (II) ions using tomato waste (Solanum lycopersicum) activated by NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permatasari, Diah; Heraldy, Eddy; Lestari, Witri Wahyu

    2016-02-01

    This research present to uptake lead (II) ion from aqueous solutions by activated tomato waste. Biosorbent were characterized by applying Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Surface Area Analyzer (SAA). The biosorption investigated with parameters including the concentration of NaOH, effects of solution pH, biosorbent dosage, contact time,and initial metal concentration. Experimental data were analyzed in terms of two kinetic model such us the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied todescribe the biosorption process. According to the experiment, the optimum concentration of NaOH was achieved at 0.1 M. The maximum % lead (II) removal was achieved at pH 4 with 94.5%. Optimum biosorbentdosage were found as 0.1 g/25 mL solution while optimum contact time were found at 75 minutes. The results showed that the biosorption processes of Lead (II) followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Langmuir adsorption isotherm was found fit the adsorption data with amaximum capacity of 24.079 mg/g with anadsorption energy of 28.046 kJ/mol.

  8. Biosorption of lead (II) ions by NaOH-activated apple (Malus domestica) juice residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimurti, Devita Dwi; Heraldy, Eddy; Lestari, Witri Wahyu

    2016-02-01

    This research studied the removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions using NaOH-activated apple (Malus domestica) juice residue. Biosorbent was characterized with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer (FTIR), and Surface Area Analyzer (SAA). The effects of biosorbent dosage, pH, contact time and initial metal ion concentration had been investigated in batch-adsorption method. The biosorption kinetic data were analyzed by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. Freundlich and Langmuir's isotherm were used to describe the biosorption process. The optimum conditions of Pb(II) adsorption was observed at 60 min of contact time, pH 4, and 0.1 g biosorbent dosage in 25 ml solution. The biosorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, resulted biosorption constant rate of 0.184 g.mg-1.min-1. The Langmuir isotherm model exhibited the best fit to experimental data. The maximum biosorption capacity of Pb(II) determined according to the Langmuir model was 90.90 mg.g-1 at 302 K, with the adsorption energy of 26.429 kJ.mol-1.

  9. Ethanol alters angiotensin II stimulated mitogen activated protein kinase in hepatocytes: agonist selectivity and ethanol metabolic independence.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y; Shukla, S D

    2000-06-23

    Angiotensin II activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p42 and p44) in rat hepatocytes exposed to ethanol and the relevance of ethanol metabolism on this activation was investigated. Hepatocytes, isolated from rat liver, were treated with or without ethanol for 24 h. Angiotensin II, vasopressin, insulin, serum and epinephrine significantly increased hepatocyte MAPK activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) had little effect on MAPK activation. Interestingly, among the above agonists, which activated hepatocyte MAPK, ethanol exposure potentiated only angiotensin II and epinephrine-stimulated MAPK. Thus, potentiation of MAPK by ethanol exhibited agonist selectivity. In contrast to several other cells, there was prevalence of p42 over p44 MAPK band in hepatocytes. Angiotensin II treatment caused a rapid activation (peak 5 min) of MAPK followed by a decrease to basal levels in 30 min. Exposure with 100 mM ethanol potentiated the angiotensin II stimulated MAPK activity. This potentiation was partially blocked by pertussis toxin suggesting it to be a G-protein-dependent event. Treatment of the hepatocytes with pyrazole (an inhibitor of ethanol metabolism) or acetaldehyde (an ethanol metabolite) had no effect on potentiation. Thus, ethanol potentiation of hepatocyte MAPK is agonist-selective and independent of ethanol metabolism. PMID:10862821

  10. Zero-g experiments with a He II active phase separator for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denner, H. D.; Klipping, G.; Lueders, K.; Ruppert, U.; Stahnke, F.; Szuecs, Z.; Elleman, D.; Petrac, D.

    1984-01-01

    An active phase separator (APS) for temperature control of He II space cooling systems was tested in a zero-g environment during a series of parabolic flights on a NASA KC 135 aircraft. The APS provides for liquid-gas separation and features an annular gap, a downstream heat exchanger and an upstream ball closure. The apparatus was operated during acceleration and floating and in two different heat load situations. The tests confirmed that adequate mass flow rates could be maintained using a vacuum pump to simulate space vacuum and that residual liquid could be evaporated from the heat exchanger after closing a ball valve to seal off flows.

  11. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  12. Fe II EMISSION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: THE ROLE OF TOTAL AND GAS-PHASE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, Gregory A.; Ludwig, Randi R.; Salviander, Sarah E-mail: randi@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2010-10-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have Fe II emission from the broad-line region (BLR) that differs greatly in strength from object to object. We examine the role of the total and gas-phase iron abundance in determining Fe II strength. Using AGN spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.35, we measure the Fe/Ne abundance of the narrow-line region (NLR) using the [Fe VII]/[Ne V] line intensity ratio. We find no significant difference in the abundance of Fe relative to Ne in the NLR as a function of Fe II/H{beta}. However, the [N II]/[S II] ratio increases by a factor of 2 with increasing Fe II strength. This indicates a trend in N/S abundance ratio, and by implication in the overall metallicity of the NLR gas, with increasing Fe II strength. We propose that the wide range of Fe II strength in AGN largely results from the selective depletion of Fe into grains in the low ionization portion of the BLR. Photoionization models show that the strength of the optical Fe II lines varies almost linearly with gas-phase Fe abundance, while the ultraviolet Fe II strength varies more weakly. Interstellar depletions of Fe can be as large as 2 orders of magnitude, sufficient to explain the wide range of optical Fe II strength in AGNs. This picture is consistent with the similarity of the BLR radius to the dust sublimation radius and with indications of Fe II emitting gas flowing inward from the dusty torus.

  13. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen. PMID:21667986

  14. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes of Salan-Type Ligand Containing Ester Groups: Synthesis, Characterization, Electrochemical Properties, and In Vitro Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jeslin Kanaga Inba, P.; Annaraj, B.; Thalamuthu, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A salen ligand on reduction and N-alkylation affords a novel [N2O2] chelating ligand containing ester groups [L = diethyl-2,2′-(propane-1,3-diylbis((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzyl)azanediyl))diacetate]. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by NMR and HPLC chromatograms. Its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by a combination of elemental analysis, IR, NMR, UV-Vis, and mass spectral data, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The magnetic moments, UV-Vis, and EPR spectral studies support square planar geometry around the Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions. A tetrahedral geometry is observed in four-coordinate zinc with bulky N-alkylated salan ligand. The redox properties of the copper complex were examined in DMSO by cyclic voltammetry. The voltammograms show quasireversible process. The interaction of metal complexes with CT DNA was investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration, ethidium bromide displacement assay, cyclic voltammetry methods, and agarose gel electrophoresis. The apparent binding constant values suggest moderate intercalative binding modes between the complexes and DNA. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials of the synthesized compounds were also determined. PMID:23983672

  15. Plantar Pressure in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Active Foot Ulceration, Previous Ulceration and No History of Ulceration: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Methods Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Results Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290–0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303–1.221, p = 0.001, respectively). Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181– 0.753, p = 0.001). Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. Conclusions Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy

  16. Palladium(II) complexes with tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, structure, reactions and cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Pruchnik, Hanna; Lis, Tadeusz; Latocha, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Aleksandra; Pruchnik, Florian P

    2016-03-01

    Water soluble and air stable P(RCOOH)3 (R=C2H4) (TCEP) is an efficient reducing agent used in biochemistry to break S-S bond in peptides, proteins and other compounds containing S-S bonds. The similarity between the coordination chemistry of Pd(II) and Pt(II) led to the investigations of antitumor activity of palladium(II) compounds however the Pd(II) complexes with TCEP were not investigated. New palladium(II) complexes with (TCEP): trans-[PdCl2(TCEP)2] (1) and trans-[Pd2(μ-Cl)2Cl2(TCEP)2] (2) were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C, (31)P NMR, IR and ESI-MS spectroscopic techniques. Complexes are stable in non-aqueous DMSO and DMF. In aqueous solutions Cl ligands are substituted by COO groups of phosphines. Complex 2, after crystallization from water gives polymeric compound with bridging phosphine ligand [PdCl{P(RCOO-κO-μ-O')(RCOOH)2-κP}] (3). Structures of trans-[PdCl2{P(RCOOD)3}2] (1a), trans-[Pd2(μ-Cl)2PdCl2{P(RCOOD)3}2] (2a), and [PdCl{P(RCOO-κO-μ-O')(RCOOD)2-κP}]n (3a) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. NMR and ESI-MS spectra reveal that [PdP2(RCOO-κO)2(RCOO)n(RCOOH)4-n](n)(-) complexes are formed in aqueous solution of 1. Geometry optimization in the gas phase at the B3LYP/3-21G** level indicated that complex 2 with butterfly structure is more stable than that with coplanar coordination. In aqueous solution of 2, the main products [Pd2{P(RCOO-κO-μ-O')(RCOO-κO)(RCOOH)}2] and [Pd{P(RCOO-κO)2(RCOOH)}(H2O)] exist in equilibrium which depends on temperature: content of mononuclear compound increases as the temperature is raised. Complexes 1 and 2 are active agents against melanoma and breast cancer cells. PMID:26710241

  17. Ru(0) and Ru(II) nitrosyl pincer complexes: structure, reactivity, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Eran; Iron, Mark A; Zhang, Jing; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable interest in ruthenium carbonyl pincer complexes and their substantial catalytic activity, there has been relatively little study of the isoelectronic ruthenium nitrosyl complexes. Here we describe the synthesis and reactivity of several complexes of this type as well as the catalytic activity of complex 6. Reaction of the PNP ligand (PNP = 2,6-bis((t)Bu2PCH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(PPh3)2 yielded the Ru(II) complex 3. Chloride displacement by BAr(F-) (BAr(F-) = tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)borate) gave the crystallographicaly characterized, linear NO Ru(II) complex 4, which upon treatment with NaBEt3H yielded the Ru(0) complexes 5. The crystallographically characterized Ru(0) square planar complex 5·BF4 bears a linear NO ligand located trans to the pyridilic nitrogen. Further treatment of 5·BF4 with excess LiOH gave the crystallographicaly characterized Ru(0) square planar, linear NO complex 6. Complex 6 catalyzes the dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters, reaching full conversion under air or under argon. Reaction of the PNN ligand (PNN = 2-((t)Bu2PCH2)-6-(Et2NCH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 in ethanol gave an equilibrium mixture of isomers 7a and 7b. Further treatment of 7a + 7b with 2 equivalent of sodium isopropoxide gave the crystallographicaly characterized, bent-nitrosyl, square pyramidal Ru(II) complex 8. Complex 8 was also synthesized by reaction of PNN with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 and Et3N in ethanol. Reaction of the "long arm" PN(2)N ligand (PN(2)N = 2-((t)Bu2PCH2-)-6-(Et2NCH2CH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 in ethanol gave complex 9, which upon treatment with 2 equiv of sodium isopropoxide gave complex 10. Complex 10 was also synthesized directly by reaction of PN(2)N with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 and a base in ethanol. A noteworthy aspect of these nitrosyl complexes is their preference for the Ru(0) oxidization state over Ru(II). This preference is observed with both aromatized and dearomatized pincer ligands, in

  18. Studies examining the relationship between the chemical structure of protoxin II and its activity on voltage gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Musza, Laszlo L; Blake, Paul R; Kyle, Donald J

    2014-08-14

    The aqueous solution structure of protoxin II (ProTx II) indicated that the toxin comprises a well-defined inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) backbone region and a flexible C-terminal tail region, similar to previously described NaSpTx III tarantula toxins. In the present study we sought to explore the structure-activity relationship of the two regions of the ProTx II molecule. As a first step, chimeric toxins of ProTx II and PaTx I were synthesized and their biological activities on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels were investigated. Other tail region modifications to this chimera explored the effects of tail length and tertiary structure on sodium channel activity. In addition, the activity of various C-terminal modifications of the native ProTx II was assayed and resulted in the identification of protoxin II-NHCH3, a molecule with greater potency against Nav1.7 channels (IC50=42 pM) than the original ProTx II. PMID:25026046

  19. Effects of adsorbents and copper(II) on activated sludge microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor treatment process.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2003-10-31

    Wastewater treatment systems employing simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes have proven to be effective in treating toxic pollutants present in industrial wastewater. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of Cu(II) and the efficacy of the powdered activated carbon (PAC) and activated rice husk (ARH) in reducing the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms. The ARH was prepared by treatment with concentrated nitric acid for 15 h at 60-65 degrees C. The sequencing batch reactor (SBR) systems were operated with FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE modes in the ratio of 0.5:3.5:1:0.75:0.25 for a cycle time of 6 h. The Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 90 and 85%, respectively, in the SBR system containing 10 mg/l Cu(II) with the addition of 143 mg/l PAC or 1.0 g PAC per cycle. In the case of 715 mg/l ARH or 5.0 g ARH per cycle addition, the Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 85 and 92%, respectively. ARH can be used as an alternate adsorbent to PAC in the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation wastewater treatment process for the removal of Cu(II). The specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and kinetic studies show that the addition of PAC and ARH reduce the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms. PMID:14573344

  20. Age-Dependent Decrease of Mitochondrial Complex II Activity in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amy; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial theory of aging remains one of the most widely accepted aging theories and implicates mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction with subsequent increasing free radical generation. Recently, complex II of the electron transport chain appears to be more important than previously thought in this process, suggested predominantly by nonhuman studies. We investigated the relationship between complex II and aging using human skin as a model tissue. The rate of complex II activity per unit of mitochondria was determined in fibroblasts and keratinocytes cultured from skin covering a wide age range. Complex II activity significantly decreased with age in fibroblasts (P = 0.015) but not in keratinocytes. This was associated with a significant decline in transcript expression (P = 0.008 and P = 0.001) and protein levels (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.005) of the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A and subunit B catalytic subunits of complex II, respectively. In addition, there was a significant decrease in complex II activity with age (P = 0.029) that was specific to senescent skin cells. There was no decrease in complex IV activity with increasing age, suggesting possible locality to complex II. PMID:26829036

  1. Conserved motifs II to VI of DNA helicase II from Escherichia coli are all required for biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Deng, E; Baugh, L R; Hamilton, C M; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1997-01-01

    There are seven conserved motifs (IA, IB, and II to VI) in DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli that have high homology among a large family of proteins involved in DNA metabolism. To address the functional importance of motifs II to VI, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to replace the charged amino acid residues in each motif with alanines. Cells carrying these mutant alleles exhibited higher UV and methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity, increased rates of spontaneous mutagenesis, and elevated levels of homologous recombination, indicating defects in both the excision repair and mismatch repair pathways. In addition, we also changed the highly conserved tyrosine(600) in motif VI to phenylalanine (uvrD309, Y600F). This mutant displayed a moderate increase in UV sensitivity but a decrease in spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that DNA helicase II may have different functions in the two DNA repair pathways. Furthermore, a mutation in domain IV (uvrD307, R284A) significantly reduced the viability of some E. coli K-12 strains at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:9393722

  2. Novel platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of thiosemicarbazones derived from 5-substitutedthiophene-2-carboxaldehydes and their antiviral and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Karaküçük-İyidoğan, Ayşegül; Taşdemir, Demet; Oruç-Emre, Emine Elçin; Balzarini, Jan

    2011-11-01

    A series of thiosemicarbazones and their platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes have been synthesized. The chemical structures of ligands and their complexes were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS spectra, elemental analysis and TGA. The antiviral and cytotoxic activities of all compounds have been tested. Results of broad antiviral evaluation showed that none of the compounds evaluated endowed with anti-DNA or -RNA virus activity at subtoxic concentrations except for the palladium complex 1b. This compound exhibited slightly selective inhibition against cytomegalovirus. The platinum complex 4a exhibited the best cytostatic activities against human cervix carcinoma. Ligands 2, 4 and 5 showed cytostatic potential. The palladium complexes were in general less cytostatic than the corresponding platinum complexes or unliganded congeners. PMID:21993152

  3. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  4. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. PMID:26051077

  5. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively. PMID:27451188

  6. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  7. Inclusion complexation with β-cyclodextrin derivatives alters photodynamic activity and biodistribution of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin.

    PubMed

    Yankovsky, Igor; Bastien, Estelle; Yakavets, Ilya; Khludeyev, Ivan; Lassalle, Henri-Pierre; Gräfe, Susanna; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Zorin, Vladimir

    2016-08-25

    Application of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chorin (mTHPC) one of the most effective photosensitizer (PS) in photodynamic therapy of solid tumors encounters several complications resulting from its insolubility in aqueous medium. To improve its solubility and pharmacokinetic properties, two modified β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) methyl-β-cyclodextrin (M-β-CD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (Hp-β-CD) were proposed. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of β-CDs on mTHPC behavior at various stages of its distribution in vitro and in vivo. For this purpose, we have studied the influence of the β-CDs on mTHPC binding to the serum proteins, its accumulation, distribution and photodynamic efficiency in HT29 cells. In addition, the processes of mTHPC biodistribution in HT29 tumor bearing mice after intravenous injection of PS alone or with the β-CDs were compared. Interaction of mTHPC with studied β-CDs leads to the formation of inclusion complexes that completely abolishes its aggregation after introduction into serum. It was demonstrated that the β-CDs have a concentration-dependent effect on the process of mTHPC distribution in blood serum. At high concentrations, β-CDs can form inclusion complexes with mTHPC in the blood that can have a significant impact on PS distribution out of the vascular system in solid tissues. Besides, the β-CDs increase diffusion movement of mTHPC molecules that can significantly accelerate the delivery of PS to the targets cells and tissues. In vivo study confirms the fact that the use of β-CDs allows to modify mTHPC distribution processes in tumor bearing animals that is reflected in the decreased level of PS accumulation in skin and muscles, as well as in the increased PS accumulation in tumor. Further studies are underway to verify the optimal protocols of mTHPC/β-CD formulation for photodynamic therapy. PMID:27320407

  8. The Effects of Physical Activity and Physical Fitness on Children's Achievement and Cognitive Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedewa, Alicia L.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2011-01-01

    It is common knowledge that physical activity leads to numerous health and psychological benefits. However, the relationship between children's physical activity and academic achievement has been debated in the literature. Some studies have found strong, positive relationships between physical activity and cognitive outcomes, while other studies…

  9. Interferon-γ Induces Major Histocompatibility Class II Transactivator (CIITA) That Mediates Collagen Repression and Major Histocompatibility Class II Activation by Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Giovanna; Miller, Janice; Wang, Lin; Smith, Barbara D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis is responsible for plaque instability through alterations in extracellular matrix. Previously, we demonstrated that major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) transactivator (CIITA) in a complex with regulatory factor for X box 5 (RFX5) is a crucial protein mediating interferon (IFN)-γ–induced repression of collagen type I gene transcription in fibroblasts. This article demonstrates that, in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), IFN-γ dramatically increases the expression of CIITA isoforms III and IV, with no increase in expression of CIITA isoform I. Expression of CIITA III and IV correlates with decreased collagen type I and increased MHC II gene expression. Exogenous expression of CIITA I, III, and IV, in transiently transfected SMCs, represses collagen type I promoters (COL1A1 and COL1A2) and activates MHC II promoter. Levels of CIITA and RFX5 increase in the nucleus of cells treated with IFN-γ. Moreover, simvastatin lowers the IFN-γ–induced expression of RFX5 and MHC II in addition to repressing collagen expression. However, simvastatin does not block the IFN-γ–induced expression of CIITA III and IV, suggesting a CIITA-independent mechanism. This first demonstration that RFX5 and CIITA isoforms are expressed in SMCs after IFN-γ stimulation suggest that CIITA could be a key factor in plaque stability in atherosclerosis. PMID:16439692

  10. Structure-activity relationship study of angiotensin II analogs in terms of β-arrestin-dependent signaling to aldosterone production.

    PubMed

    Valero, Thairy Reyes; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Jafferjee, Malika; Rengo, Giuseppe; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; McDonald, Patricia; Koch, Walter J; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2016-04-01

    The known angiotensin II (AngII) physiological effect of aldosterone synthesis and secretion induction, a steroid hormone that contributes to the pathology of postmyocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF), is mediated by both Gq/11 proteins and β-arrestins, both of which couple to the AngII type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) of adrenocortical zona glomerulosa (AZG) cells. Over the past several years, AngII analogs with increased selectivity ("bias") toward β-arrestin-dependent signaling at the AT1R have been designed and described, starting with SII, the gold-standard β-arrestin-"biased" AngII analog. In this study, we examined the relative potencies of an extensive series of AngII peptide analogs at relative activation of G proteins versus β-arrestins by the AT1R. The major structural difference of these peptides from SII was their varied substitutions at position 5, rather than position 4 of native AngII. Three of them were found biased for β-arrestin activation and extremely potent at stimulating aldosterone secretion in AZG cells in vitro, much more potent than SII in that regard. Finally, the most potent of these three ([Sar(1), Cys(Et)(5), Leu(8)]-AngII, CORET) was further examined in post-MI rats progressing to HF and overexpressing adrenal β-arrestin1 in vivo. Consistent with the in vitro studies, CORET was found to exacerbate the post-MI hyperaldosteronism, and, consequently, cardiac function of the post-MI animals in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that increasing the size of position 5 of the AngII peptide sequence results in directly proportional increases in AT1R-dependent β-arrestin activation. These findings provide important insights for AT1R pharmacology and future AngII-targeted drug development. PMID:27069636

  11. Self-Shielding Correlation of Foil Activation Neutron Spectra Analysis by SAND-II.

    2008-11-21

    Version 00 SELFS-3 corrects for the influence of the self-shielding effect in neutron spectrum determinations by means of the multifoil activation method. It is used in combination with the SAND-II program for unfolding the responses of an irradiated set of activation detectors in 620 groups. The program SELFS can calculate a corrected 620 group cross section data set for specified reactions used in the SAND-II library, and for specified foil thicknesses. This procedure requires nomore » additional assumption on the shape of the neutron spectrum and on other experimental conditions, but only some foil characteristics (reaction type, material composition, foil thickness). Application of this procedure is possible when multigroup unfolding programs are used with suitably small energy intervals. This code system was developed in the 1970’s at Reactor Centrum Nederland, Petten, The Netherlands, and was contributed to RSICC through the NEA Data Bank. No changes were made to the package when it was released by RSICC in 2008. Modifications will be required to run SELFS-3 on current computer systems.« less

  12. Dynamo Sensitivity in Solar Analogs with 50 Years of Ca II H & K Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun has a steady 11-year cycle in magnetic activity most well-known by the rising and falling in the occurrence of dark sunspots on the solar disk in visible bandpasses. The 11-year cycle is also manifest in the variations of emission in the Ca II H & K line cores, due to non-thermal (i.e. magnetic) heating in the lower chromosphere. The large variation in Ca II H & K emission allows for study of the patterns of long-term variability in other stars thanks to synoptic monitoring with the Mount Wilson Observatory HK photometers (1966-2003) and Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (1994-present). Overlapping measurements for a set of 27 nearby solar-analog (spectral types G0-G5) stars were used to calibrate the two instruments and construct time series of magnetic activity up to 50 years in length. Precise properties of fundamental importance to the dynamo are available from Hipparcos, the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and CHARA interferometry. Using these long time series and measurements of fundamental properties, we do a comparative study of stellar "twins" to explore the sensitivity of the stellar dynamo to small changes to structure, rotation, and composition. We also compare this sample to the Sun and find hints that the regular periodic variability of the solar cycle may be rare among its nearest neighbors in parameter space.

  13. Antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory of Class II hydrophobin from wild strain Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Khalesi, Mohammadreza; Jahanbani, Raheleh; Riveros-Galan, David; Sheikh-Hassani, Vahid; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Sahihi, Mehdi; Winterburn, James; Derdelinckx, Guy; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-01

    There are several possible uses of the Class II hydrophobin HFBII in clinical applications. To fully understand and exploit this potential however, the antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory potential of this protein need to be better understood and have not been previously reported. In this study, the Class II hydrophobin HFBII was produced by the cultivation of wild type Trichoderma reesei. The crude hydrophobin extract obtained from the fermentation process was purified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and the identity of the purified HFBII verified by MALDI-TOF (molecular weight: 7.2kDa). Subsequently the antioxidant activities of different concentrations of HFBII (0.01-0.40mg/mL) were determined. The results show that for HFBII concentrations of 0.04mg/mL and upwards the protein significantly reduced the presence of ABTS(+) radicals in the medium, the IC50 value found to be 0.13mg/mL. Computational modeling highlighted the role of the amino acid residues located in the conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the surface of the HFBII molecule and the interactions with the aromatic rings of ABTS. The ACE-inhibitory effect of HFBII was found to occur from 0.5mg/mL and upwards, making the combination of HFBII with strong ACE-inhibitors attractive for use in the healthcare industry. PMID:27211298

  14. Self-Shielding Correlation of Foil Activation Neutron Spectra Analysis by SAND-II.

    SciTech Connect

    KONDO, IKUO

    2008-11-21

    Version 00 SELFS-3 corrects for the influence of the self-shielding effect in neutron spectrum determinations by means of the multifoil activation method. It is used in combination with the SAND-II program for unfolding the responses of an irradiated set of activation detectors in 620 groups. The program SELFS can calculate a corrected 620 group cross section data set for specified reactions used in the SAND-II library, and for specified foil thicknesses. This procedure requires no additional assumption on the shape of the neutron spectrum and on other experimental conditions, but only some foil characteristics (reaction type, material composition, foil thickness). Application of this procedure is possible when multigroup unfolding programs are used with suitably small energy intervals. This code system was developed in the 1970’s at Reactor Centrum Nederland, Petten, The Netherlands, and was contributed to RSICC through the NEA Data Bank. No changes were made to the package when it was released by RSICC in 2008. Modifications will be required to run SELFS-3 on current computer systems.

  15. Identification of the N-glycosylation sites on glutamate carboxypeptidase II necessary for proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Barinka, Cyril; Sácha, Pavel; Sklenár, Jan; Man, Petr; Bezouska, Karel; Slusher, Barbara S; Konvalinka, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a membrane peptidase expressed in the prostate, central and peripheral nervous system, kidney, small intestine, and tumor-associated neovasculature. The GCPII form expressed in the central nervous system, termed NAALADase, is responsible for the cleavage of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) yielding free glutamate in the synaptic cleft, and is implicated in various pathologic conditions associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. The prostate form of GCPII, termed prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is up-regulated in cancer and used as an effective prostate cancer marker. Little is known about the structure of this important pharmaceutical target. As a type II membrane protein, GCPII is heavily glycosylated. In this paper we show that N-glycosylation is vital for proper folding and subsequent secretion of human GCPII. Analysis of the predicted N-glycosylation sites also provides evidence that these sites are critical for GCPII carboxypeptidase activity. We confirm that all predicted N-glycosylation sites are occupied by an oligosaccharide moiety and show that glycosylation at sites distant from the putative catalytic domain is critical for the NAAG-hydrolyzing activity of GCPII calling the validity of previously described structural models of GCPII into question. PMID:15152093

  16. Synthesis, characterization and properties of some divalent metal(II) complexes: Their electrochemical, catalytic, thermal and antimicrobial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tümer, Mehmet; Ekinci, Duygu; Tümer, Ferhan; Bulut, Akif

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we synthesized the amine compound 2-(2-aminoethyliminomethyl)phenol (H 3A) as the starting material, and then we prepared the polydentate Schiff base ligands from the reactions of the amine compound (H 3A) with phtaldialdehyde (H 2L), 4-methyl-2,6-di-formlyphenol (H 3L 1) and 4- t-butyl-2,6-di-formylphenol (H 3L 2) in the ethanol solution. Moreover, the complexes Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Sn(II) of the ligands H 2L, H 3L 1 and H 3L 2 have been prepared. All compounds have been characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. In addition, the magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements have been made. The catalytic properties of the mono- and binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes have been studied on the 3,5-di- tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) and ascorbic acid (aa) as a substrate. The oxidative C-C coupling properties of the Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes have been investigated on the sterically hindered 2,6-di- tert-butylphenol (dtbp). The antimicrobial activity properties of the ligands and their mono- and binuclear complexes have been studied against the bacteria and fungi. The results have been compared to the antibacterial and fungi drugs. The TGA curves show that the decomposition takes place in three steps for all complexes. Electrochemical properties of the complexes Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been investigated for the first time in acetonitrile by cyclic voltammetry.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  18. Cooperative metal-ligand assisted E/Z isomerization and cyano activation at Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of arylhydrazones of active methylene nitriles.

    PubMed

    Mahmudov, Kamran T; Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Sabbatini, Alessandra; Drew, Michael G B; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Pettinari, Claudio; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2014-09-15

    New (E/Z)-2-(2-(1-cyano-2-methoxy-2-oxoethylidene)hydrazinyl)benzoic acid (H2L(4)) and known sodium 2-(2-(dicyanomethylene)hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonate (NaHL(1)), 2-(2-(dicyano-methylene)hydrazinyl)benzoic acid (H2L(2)), and sodium (E/Z)-2-(2-(1-cyano-2-methoxy-2-oxoethylidene)hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonate (NaHL(3)) were used in the template synthesis of a series of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes [Cu(H2O)2L(1a)]·H2O (1), [Cu(H2O)(3-pyon)L(1b)]·H2O (2), [Cu(H2O)(4-pyon)L(1b)] (3), [Co(H2O)((CH3)2NCHO)(μ-L(2a))]2·(CH3)2NCHO (4), [Cu3(μ3-OH)(NO3)(CH3OH)(μ2-X)3(μ2-HL(3))] (5), [Cu(H2O)(py)L(3)]·H2O (6), [Cu(H2O)2(μ-L(4))]6·6H2O (7), [Cu(2-cnpy(b))2(L(1b))2]·2H2O (8), [Cu(2-cnpy(a))2(L(1a))2]·2H2O (9), and [Cu(H2O)(4-cnpy)(L(1a))2] (10), where 3-pyon = 1-(pyridin-3-yl)ethanone, 4-pyon = 1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethanone, py = pyridine, HX = syn-2-pyridinealdoxime, 4-cnpy = 4-cyanopyridine; 2-cnpy(a), 2-cnpy(b), L(1a), L(1b), L(2a) are the ligands derived from nucleophilic attack of methanol (a) or water (b) on a cyano group of 2-cyanopyridine (2-cnpy), L(1) or L(2), respectively, giving the corresponding iminoesters (2-cnpy(a), L(1a) or L(2a)) or carboxamides (2-cnpy(b) or L(1b)). An auxiliary ligand, namely syn-2-pyridinealdoxime or pyridine, acting cooperatively with the metal ion (Cu(II) in this case), induced an E/Z isomerization of the H2L(4) ligand; the E- and Z-isomers were isolated separately and fully characterized (compounds 9 and 10, respectively). A one-pot activation of nitrile groups in different molecules was achieved in the syntheses of 8 and 9. Complexes 1-10 are catalyst precursors for the solvent-free microwave (MW)-assisted selective oxidation of secondary alcohols to the corresponding ketones, with typical yields in the 29-99% range (TOFs up to 4.94 × 10(3) h(-1)) after 30 min of MW irradiation. PMID:25148569

  19. Active transcription and essential role of RNA polymerase II at the centromere during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, F. Lyn; Marshall, Owen J.; Saffery, Richard; Won Kim, Bo; Earle, Elizabeth; Choo, K. H. Andy; Wong, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the centromeric regions has been reported to occur in G1 and S phase in different species. Here, we investigate whether transcription also occurs and plays a functional role at the mammalian centromere during mitosis. We show the presence of actively transcribing RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and its associated transcription factors, coupled with the production of centromere satellite transcripts at the mitotic kinetochore. Specific inhibition of RNAPII activity during mitosis leads to a decrease in centromeric α-satellite transcription and a concomitant increase in anaphase-lagging cells, with the lagging chromosomes showing reduced centromere protein C binding. These findings demonstrate an essential role of RNAPII in the transcription of α-satellite DNA, binding of centromere protein C, and the proper functioning of the mitotic kinetochore. PMID:22308327

  20. LWRS II&C Industry and Regulatory Engagement Activities for FY 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas

    2011-09-01

    To ensure broad industry support and coordination for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Controls (II&C) Systems Technologies research pathway, an engagement process will be continually pursued with nuclear asset owners, vendors, and suppliers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the major industry support organizations of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Nuclear asset owner engagement is a necessary and enabling activity to obtain data and accurate characterization of long-term operational challenges, assess the suitability of proposed research for addressing long-term needs, and gain access to data and representative infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure success of the proposed research and development (R&D) activities. Engagement with vendors and suppliers will ensure that vendor expectations and needs can be translated into requirements that can be met through technology commercialization.

  1. Orally active glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibitor 2-MPPA attenuates dizocilpine-induced prepulse inhibition deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Yuto; Fujita, Yuko; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-01-31

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) is a glial enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Abnormalities in glutamate neurotransmission are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In this study, we examined the effects of a novel, orally active GCP II inhibitor, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), on the prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits after administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dizocilpine. Oral administration of 2-MPPA (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) significantly attenuated dizocilpine (0.1mg/kg)-induced PPI deficits in mice, in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the efficacy of 2-MPPA on dizocilpine-induced PPI deficits was significantly antagonized by pretreatment with the selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist LY341495 (1.0mg/kg). In the same model, however, the selective group II mGluR agonist LY354740 (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg) significantly attenuated dizocilpine-induced PPI deficits at only one dose and prepulse intensity. Our findings suggest that GCP II inhibition may be useful therapeutic strategy for schizophrenia. From a mechanistic perspective, while increased NAAG and activation of group II mGluRs may contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of 2-MPPA, it is likely that additional pharmacological activities are also involved. PMID:21093418

  2. Msn2p/Msn4p act as a key transcriptional activator of yeast cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase II.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Cha, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Yong-Soo; Kim, Won-Cheol; Kim, Il-Han

    2002-04-01

    We observed that the transcription of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase type II (cTPx II) (YDR453C) is regulated in response to various stresses (e.g. oxidative stress, carbon starvation, and heat-shock). It has been suggested that both transcription-activating proteins, Yap1p and Skn7p, regulate the transcription of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress. However, a dramatic loss of transcriptional response to various stresses in yeast mutant strains lacking both Msn2p and Msn4p suggests that the transcription factors act as a principal transcriptional activator. In addition to two Yap1p response elements (YREs), TTACTAA and TTAGTAA, the presence of two stress response elements (STREs) (CCCCT) in the upstream sequence of cTPx II also suggests that Msn2p/Msn4p could control stress-induced expression of cTPx II. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of site-directed mutagenesis of the putative STREs (STRE1 and STRE2) and YREs (TRE1 and YRE2) in terms of the activity of a lacZ reporter gene under control of the cTPx II promoter indicates that STRE2 acts as a principal binding element essential for transactivation of the cTPx II promoter. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter was exponentially increased after postdiauxic growth. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter is greatly increased by rapamycin. Deletion of Tor1, Tor2, Ras1, and Ras2 resulted in a considerable induction when compared with their parent strains, suggesting that the transcription of cTPx II is under negative control of the Ras/cAMP and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that cTPx II is a target of Msn2p/Msn4p transcription factors under negative control of the Ras-protein kinase A and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Furthermore, the accumulation of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress and during the postdiauxic shift suggests an important antioxidant role in stationary phase yeast cells

  3. Subneurotoxic copper(II)-induced NF-κB-dependent microglial activation is associated with mitochondrial ROS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuqin; Yu, Fengxiang; Gong, Ping; Qiu, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Yongyao; Li, Juan; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2014-04-15

    Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and the associated neuronal damage play critical roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Evidence shows an elevated concentration of extracellular copper(II) in the brains of these disorders, which may contribute to neuronal death through direct neurotoxicity. Here we explored whether extracellular copper(II) triggers microglial activation. Primary rat microglia and murine microglial cell line BV-2 cells were cultured and treated with copper(II). The content of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide in the medium was determined. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide was quantified by a fluorometric assay with Amplex Red. Mitochondrial superoxide was measured by MitoSOX oxidation. At subneurotoxic concentrations, copper(II) treatment induced a dose- and time-dependent release of TNF-α and nitric oxide from microglial cells, and caused an indirect, microglia-mediated neurotoxicity that was blocked by inhibition of TNF-α and nitric oxide production. Copper(II)-initiated microglial activation was accompanied with reduced IкB-α expression as well as phosphorylation and translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and was blocked by NF-κB inhibitors (BAY11-7082 and SC-514). Moreover, copper(II) treatment evoked a rapid release of hydrogen peroxide from microglial cells, an effect that was not affected by NADPH oxidase inhibitors. N-acetyl-cysteine, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), abrogated copper(II)-elicited microglial release of TNF-α and nitric oxide and subsequent neurotoxicity. Importantly, mitochondrial production of superoxide, paralleled to extracellular release of hydrogen peroxide, was induced after copper(II) stimulation. Our findings suggest that extracellular copper(II) at subneurotoxic concentrations could trigger NF-κB-dependent microglial activation and subsequent neurotoxicity. NADPH oxidase-independent, mitochondria-derived ROS may be involved in this activation. PMID

  4. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, molecular modeling and docking studies of complexes 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.; Ammar, Reda A. A.; Elhenawy, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    A new series of complexes of 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide (HL) with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) have been prepared and characterized by different physical techniques. The IR spectra of the prepared complexes were suggested that the ligand behaves as a tri-dentate ligand through the carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen atoms (ONO). Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal octahedral geometry for all complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the ML2 composition of complexes. The EPR spectra of Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes support the mononuclear structure. The crystal field splitting, Racah repulsion and nephelauxetic parameters and determined from the electronic spectra of the complexes. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The geometry of the metal complexes has been optimized with the help of molecular modeling. The biological activity of these compounds against various fungi has been investigated.

  5. Sex moderates the association between symptoms of anxiety, but not obsessive compulsive disorder, and error-monitoring brain activity: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jason S; Moran, Tim P; Kneip, Chelsea; Schroder, Hans S; Larson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in cognition and emotion are particularly active areas of research. Much of this work, however, focuses on mean-level differences between the sexes on cognitive and/or emotional variables in isolation. In this article, we are primarily concerned with how sex affects associations between cognition and emotion, or cognition-emotion interactions. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to shed light on a gap in our understanding of how sex affects the relationship between error monitoring, a core component of cognitive control, and anxiety. Using meta-analysis, we show that the relationship between symptoms of anxiety and a neurophysiological marker of error monitoring-the error-related negativity (ERN)-is significantly greater in women than men such that women, but not men, with higher levels of anxiety show a larger ERN. This sex difference held true across studies of anxiety-specific symptoms but not studies of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. These findings underscore the need to consider sex in studies of anxiety and the ERN as well as support growing evidence indicating that obsessive-compulsive problems are distinguishable from other anxiety-specific problems across multiple levels of analysis. Overall, we conclude that ignoring sex in studies of cognition-emotion interactions is unacceptable. Rather, future research that continues to tackle questions related to sex differences in associations between cognition and emotion will more likely lead to advancements in basic and applied sciences of relevance to health and human behavior. PMID:26681614

  6. DNA binding and anticancer activity of novel cyclometalated platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Roghayeh; Yousefi, Reza; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes anticancer activity and DNA binding properties of two cyclometalated platinum (II) complexes with non-leaving lipophilic ligands; deprotonated 2-phenylpryidine (ppy): C1 and deprotonated benzo[h] quinolone (bhq): C2. Both complexes demonstrate significant anticancer activity and were capable to stimulate Caspase-III activity in Jurkat cancer cells. The results of Acridine orange/Ethidium bromide(AO/EtB), along with those of Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes can induce apoptosis in the cancer cells. Moreover, C1 with flexible chemical structure indicates considerably higher anticancer activity than C2 which possesses a higher structural rigidity. Additionally, C2 represents a complex which is in part inducing cancer cell death due to the cell injury (necrosis). The absorption spectra of DNA demonstrate a hypochromic effect in the presence of increasing concentration of these complexes, reflecting DNA structural alteration after drug binding. Also, EtB competition assay and docking results revealed partial intercalation and DNA groove binding for the metal complexes. Overall, from the therapeutic point of view, ppy containing platinum complex (C1) is a favored anticancer agent, because it induces signaling cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells, and lacks the necrotic effect. PMID:25482721

  7. Modulation of phase-II enzyme activities in benzene treated ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Yeshvandra; Rana, S V S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of ovariectomy on phase II enzymes viz. glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) in liver and kidney of female rats treated with benzene. The results showed the significant decrease of the GST and GPX activity in benzene treated rats after ovariectomy. However progesterone supplementation stimulated the activity of GST and GPX in liver and kidney of benzene treated non ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats. Progesterone supplementation to benzene treated ovariectomized rats helps to gain in CAT activity. Our results on DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis also confirmed our findings on antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that lack of protective progesterone against benzene toxicity is reflected in alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities. However progesterone therapy to benzene treated ovariectomized rats results in activating the antioxidant defence system. Since female workers are engaged in industrial sector, these results are important from occupational health point of view. Benzene exposure affects their reproductive health. Nevertheless, it could be modulated by suitable hormonal therapy. PMID:21787707

  8. Photoproduction of Hydrogen by Sulfur-Deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants with Impaired Photosystem II Photochemical Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, V. V.; Kosourov, S.; Krendeleva, T. E.; Semin, B. K.; Kukarskikh, G. P.; Rubin, A. B.; Sayre, R. T.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Seibert, M.

    2007-01-01

    Photoproduction of H2 was examined in a series of sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii D1-R323 mutants with progressively impaired PSII photochemical activity. In the R323H, R323D, and R323E D1 mutants, replacement of arginine affects photosystem II (PSII) function, as demonstrated by progressive decreases in O2-evolving activity and loss of PSII photochemical activity. Significant changes in PSII activity were found when the arginine residue was replaced by negatively charged amino acid residues (R323D and R323E). However, the R323H (positively charged or neutral, depending on the ambient pH) mutant had minimal changes in PSII activity. The R323H, R323D, and R323E mutants and the pseudo-wild-type (pWt) with restored PSII function were used to study the effects of sulfur deprivation on H2-production activity. All of these mutants exhibited significant changes in the normal parameters associated with the H2-photoproduction process, such as a shorter aerobic phase, lower accumulation of starch, a prolonged anaerobic phase observed before the onset of H2-production, a shorter duration of H2-production, lower H2 yields compared to the pWt control, and slightly higher production of dark fermentation products such as acetate and formate. The more compromised the PSII photochemical activity, the more dramatic was the effect of sulfur deprivation on the H2-production process, which depends both on the presence of residual PSII activity and the amount of stored starch.

  9. Photoproduction of hydrogen by sulfur-deprived C. reinhardtii mutants with impaired photosystem II photochemical activity.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Valeria V; Kosourov, Sergey; Krendeleva, Tatiana E; Semin, Boris K; Kukarskikh, Galina P; Rubin, Andrei B; Sayre, Richard T; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Photoproduction of H2 was examined in a series of sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii D1-R323 mutants with progressively impaired PSII photochemical activity. In the R323H, R323D, and R323E D1 mutants, replacement of arginine affects photosystem II (PSII) function, as demonstrated by progressive decreases in O2-evolving activity and loss of PSII photochemical activity. Significant changes in PSII activity were found when the arginine residue was replaced by negatively charged amino acid residues (R323D and R323E). However, the R323H (positively charged or neutral, depending on the ambient pH) mutant had minimal changes in PSII activity. The R323H, R323D, and R323E mutants and the pseudo-wild-type (pWt) with restored PSII function were used to study the effects of sulfur deprivation on H2-production activity. All of these mutants exhibited significant changes in the normal parameters associated with the H2-photoproduction process, such as a shorter aerobic phase, lower accumulation of starch, a prolonged anaerobic phase observed before the onset of H2-production, a shorter duration of H2-production, lower H2 yields compared to the pWt control, and slightly higher production of dark fermentation products such as acetate and formate. The more compromised the PSII photochemical activity, the more dramatic was the effect of sulfur deprivation on the H2-production process, which depends both on the presence of residual PSII activity and the amount of stored starch. PMID:17701084

  10. Histone II-A stimulates glucose-6-phosphatase and reveals mannose-6-phosphatase activities without permeabilization of liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    St-Denis, J F; Annabi, B; Khoury, H; van de Werve, G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities was investigated in relation to microsomal membrane permeability. It was found that glucose-6-phosphatase activity in histone II-A-pretreated liver microsomes was stimulated to the same extent as in detergent-permeabilized microsomes, and that the substrate specificity of the enzyme for glucose 6-phosphate was lost in histone II-A-pretreated microsomes, as [U-14C]glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis was inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate and [U-14C]mannose 6-phosphate hydrolysis was increased. The accumulation of [U-14C]glucose from [U-14C]glucose 6-phosphate into untreated microsomes was completely abolished in detergent-treated vesicles, but was increased in histone II-A-treated microsomes, accounting for the increased glucose-6-phosphatase activity, and demonstrating that the microsomal membrane was still intact. The stimulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities by histone II-A was found to be reversed by EGTA. It is concluded that the effects of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase are not caused by the permeabilization of the microsomal membrane. The measurement of mannose-6-phosphatase latency to evaluate the intactness of the vesicles is therefore inappropriate. PMID:7646448

  11. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  12. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  13. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War