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Sample records for active metabolite dihydroartemisinin

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Ex Vivo Pharmacodynamic Antimalarial Activity of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Patients with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Vietnam ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dao Van Hoang; Nguyen, Quoc Phuc; Nguyen, Ngoa Dang; Le, Thuy Thi Thanh; Nguyen, The Duy; Dinh, Duy Ngoc; Nguyen, Thanh Xuan; Bui, Dai; Chavchich, Marina; Edstein, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to healthy subjects, malaria patients show a reduction in the mean oral clearance (1.19 versus 5.87 liters/h/kg of body weight) and apparent volume of distribution (1.47 versus 8.02 liters/kg) of dihydroartemisinin in Vietnamese patients following treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Artekin) for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum. Dihydroartemisinin is responsible for most of the ex vivo antimalarial activity of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. PMID:19528277

  2. Antiprotozoal, anticancer and antimicrobial activities of dihydroartemisinin acetal dimers and monomers

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Desmond; Galal, Ahmed M.; Gul, Waseem; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Jacob, Melissa R.; Ross, Samir A.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.

    2009-01-01

    Nine dihydroartemisinin acetal dimers (6–14) with diversely functionalized linker units were synthesized and tested for in vitro antiprotozoal, anticancer and antimicrobial activity. Compounds 6, 7 and 11 [IC50: 3.0–6.7 nM (D6) and 4.2–5.9 nM (W2)] were appreciably more active than artemisinin (1) [IC50: 32.9 nM (D6) and 42.5 nM (W2)] against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Compounds 10, 13 and 14 displayed enhanced anticancer activity in a number of cell lines compared to the control drug, doxorubicin. The antifungal activity of 7 and 12 against Cryptococcus neoformans (IC50: 0.16 and 0.55 μM, respectively) was also higher compared to the control drug, amphotericin B. The antileishmanial and antibacterial activities were marginal. A number of dihydroartemisinin acetal monomers (15–17) and a trimer (18) were isolated as byproducts from the dimer synthesis and were also tested for biological activity. PMID:19879765

  3. Effects of Dihydroartemisinin and Artemether on the Growth, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shoubing; Xu, Ziran

    2016-01-01

    Increased eutrophication in the recent years has resulted in considerable research focus on identification of methods for preventing cyanobacterial blooms that are rapid and efficient. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of dihydroartemisinin and artemether on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa and to elucidate its mode of action. Variations in cell density, chlorophyll a, soluble protein, malondialdehyde, extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR, rapid light curves, fast chlorophyll fluorescence curves on fluorescence intensity, and relative variable fluorescence) were evaluated by lab-cultured experiments. Our results demonstrated that both dihydroartemisinin and artemether inhibited the growth of M.aeruginosa by impairing the photosynthetic center in photosystem II and reducing extracellular APA, with a higher sensitivity exhibited toward artemether. The inhibitory effects of dihydroartemisinin on M.aeruginosa increased with concentration, and the maximum growth inhibitory rate was 42.17% at 24 mg·L-1 after 120h exposure, whereas it was 55.72% at 6 mg·L-1 artemetherafter 120h exposure. Moreover, the chlorophyll fluorescence was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) after 120h exposure to 12 and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin. Furthermore, after 120h exposure to 6 mg·L-1 artemether, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR and rETRmax showed a significant decrease (p<0.01) from initial values of 0.490, 0.516, 17.333, and 104.800, respectively, to 0. One-way analysis of variance showed that 6 mg·L-1 artemether and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin had significant inhibitory effects on extracellular APA (p<0.01). The results of this study would be useful to further studies to validate the feasibility of dihydroartemisinin and artemether treatment to inhibit overall cyanobacterial growth in water bodies, before this can be put into practice. PMID:27755566

  4. Dihydroartemisinin induces endothelial cell anoikis through the activation of the JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao; Guo, Ling; Zhou, Xia; Dong, Fengyun; Li, Liqun; Cheng, Zuowang; Xu, Yinghua; Liang, Jiyong; Xie, Qi; Liu, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is required for the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The anti-malarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA) demonstrates potent anti-angiogenic activity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. During the process of angiogenesis, endothelial cells migrating from existing capillaries may undergo programmed cell death after detaching from the extracellular matrix, a process that is defined as anchorage-dependent apoptosis or anoikis. In the present study, DHA-induced cell death was compared in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in suspension and attached to culture plates. In suspended HUVECs, the cell viability was decreased and apoptosis was increased with the treatment of 50 µM DHA for 5 h, while the same treatment did not affect the attached HUVECs. In addition, 50 µM DHA increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in suspended HUVECs, but not in attached HUVECs, for up to 5 h of treatment. The JNK inhibitor, SP600125, reversed DHA-induced cell death in suspended HUVECs, suggesting that the JNK pathway may mediate DHA-induced endothelial cell anoikis. The data from the present study indicates a novel mechanism for understanding the anti-angiogenic effects of DHA, which may be used as a component for chemotherapy. PMID:27602117

  5. Dihydroartemisinin exhibits antitumor activity toward hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chris Zhiyi; Zhang, Haitao; Yun, Jingping; Chen, George Gong; Lai, Paul Bo San

    2012-05-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on human cancer cells. However, its antitumor ability toward hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been studied. In this study, we demonstrated that DHA significantly inhibited HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo via inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The induction of p21 and the inhibition of cyclin B and CDC25C contributed to DHA-induced G2/M arrest. DHA-induced apoptosis was associated with mitochondrial membrane depolarization, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases, and DNA fragmentation. Activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, but not caspase 8, was detected in DHA-treated cells. Attenuation of apoptosis in cells pretreated with Z-VAD-FMK suggested the involvement of caspase cascade. Furthermore, p53 facilitated apoptosis caused by DHA. Bcl-2 family proteins were also responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis. DHA exposure decreased Mcl-1 expression but increased the levels of Noxa and active Bak. Bak was released from the Mcl-1/Bak complex due to the decline of Mcl-1. Further study revealed that Mcl-1 was rapidly degraded in DHA-treated cells and that DHA-induced apoptosis was largely inhibited by overexpression of Mcl-1 or RNAi-mediated decrease of Bak and Noxa. In a HCC-xenograft mouse model, the intraperitoneal injection of DHA resulted in significant inhibition of HCC xenograft tumors. Taken together, our data, for the first time, demonstrate the potential antitumor activity of DHA in HCC. PMID:22342732

  6. Dihydroartemisinin alleviates bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cell activation by interfering with the PDGF-βR/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Chen, Lianyun; Kong, Desong; Shao, Jiangjuan; Wu, Li; Zheng, Shizhong

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing responses in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is a pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis, is accompanied by enhanced expressions of a series of marker proteins and pro-fibrogenic signaling molecules. Artemisinin, a powerful antimalarial medicine, is extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., and can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the major active metabolite of artemisinin, is able to attenuate lung injury and fibrosis. However, the effect of DHA on liver fibrosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DHA on bile duct ligation-induced injury and fibrosis in rats. DHA improved the liver histological architecture and attenuated collagen deposition in the fibrotic rat liver. Experiments in vitro showed that DHA inhibited the proliferation of HSCs and arrested the cell cycle at the S checkpoint by altering several cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Moreover, DHA reduced the protein expressions of a-SMA, α1 (I) collagen and fibronectin, being associated with interference of the platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGF-βR)-mediated ERK pathway. These data collectively revealed that DHA relieved liver fibrosis possibly by targeting HSCs via the PDGF-βR/ERK pathway. DHA may be a therapeutic antifibrotic agent for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27038258

  7. Synthesis of a series of novel dihydroartemisinin monomers and dimers containing chalcone as a linker and their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Pathania, Anup Singh; Malik, Fayaz Ahmad; Bhakuni, Rajendra Singh; Verma, Ram Kishor

    2016-10-21

    A new series of monomer and dimer derivatives of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing substituted chalcones as a linker were synthesized and investigated for their cytotoxicity in human cancer cell lines HL-60 (leukemia), Mia PaCa-2 (pancreatic cancer), PC-3 (prostate cancer), LS180 (colon cancer) and HEPG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma). Some of these derivatives have greater antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in tested cell lines than parent compound DHA. The structures of the all compounds were confirmed by IR, (1)H NMR and mass spectral data. Among the new derivatives, compounds 8, 14, 15, 20 and 24 were found to be more active than parent DHA against tested human cancer cell lines. DHA derivatives were found to be most active in human leukemia cell lines with compounds 8, 14, 15, 20 and 24 showed IC50 values less than 1 μM for 48 h whereas DHA has IC50 value of 2 μM at same time period. The most potent compounds 8 with IC50 = 0.3 μM (at par with doxorubicin (IC50 = 0.3 μM)) and 15 with IC50 = 0.4 μM, of the series, six and three times active than DHA (with IC50 = 2 μM) respectively were selected for further mechanistic work in human leukemia HL-60 cells. PMID:27371926

  8. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  9. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway and production of type I interferon in spleen cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueqin; Xie, Zhijun; Liu, Fenfen; Han, Chunwen; Zhang, Dongyu; Wang, Dawei; Bao, Xi; Sun, Jing; Wen, Chengping; Fan, Yongsheng

    2014-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by various immunological abnormalities. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a metabolite of artemisinin, has been recently reported to exhibit immunosuppressive properties. The present study aims to determine the effects of DHA on spleen cell activation triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and investigate the effects of DHA on LPS-induced activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/interferon regulatory factor (IRF) signaling pathway. Spleen cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice were isolated, prepared and cultured. Cells were treated with LPS alone or LPS with DHA, and spleen cell proliferation was analyzed using MTS assay. Protein expressions of TLR4, IRF3, and IRF7 were analyzed by Western blot. IRF3 phosphorylation was also determined. Gene expression levels of IFN-α and IFN-β were measured using real-time PCR, and protein levels in cells' supernatants were determined by ELISA. DHA was found to inhibit LPS-induced spleen cell proliferation, decrease LPS-induced protein expression of TLR4, and inhibit IRF3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, LPS significantly induced IRF3 expression and slightly increased IRF7 expression in the nucleus of spleen cells, which was accompanied by enhanced IFN-α and IFN-β production. DHA inhibited the effects of LPS in spleen cells of MRL/lpr mice. Taken together, the data obtained reveal that DHA inhibits LPS-induced cell activation possibly by suppressing the TLR4/IRF/IFN pathway in spleen cells of MRL/lpr mice. These data suggest that DHA has the potential therapeutic utility for the treatment of SLE.

  10. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J; Charman, Susan A; Klonis, Nectarios; Tilley, Leann

    2016-08-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  11. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C.; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J.; Charman, Susan A.; Klonis, Nectarios

    2016-01-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  12. KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database for retrieving the relationships between metabolites and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Afendi, Farit Mochamad; Parvin, Aziza Kawsar; Ono, Naoaki; Tanaka, Ken; Hirai Morita, Aki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    Databases (DBs) are required by various omics fields because the volume of molecular biology data is increasing rapidly. In this study, we provide instructions for users and describe the current status of our metabolite activity DB. To facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between the metabolites of organisms and the chemical-level contribution of metabolites to human health, we constructed a metabolite activity DB known as the KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB. It comprises 9,584 triplet relationships (metabolite-biological activity-target species), including 2,356 metabolites, 140 activity categories, 2,963 specific descriptions of biological activities and 778 target species. Approximately 46% of the activities described in the DB are related to chemical ecology, most of which are attributed to antimicrobial agents and plant growth regulators. The majority of the metabolites with antimicrobial activities are flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. The metabolites with plant growth regulatory effects include plant hormones. Over half of the DB contents are related to human health care and medicine. The five largest groups are toxins, anticancer agents, nervous system agents, cardiovascular agents and non-therapeutic agents, such as flavors and fragrances. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB is integrated within the KNApSAcK Family DBs to facilitate further systematized research in various omics fields, especially metabolomics, nutrigenomics and foodomics. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB could also be utilized for developing novel drugs and materials, as well as for identifying viable drug resources and other useful compounds.

  13. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future.

  14. Photohemolytic activity of lichen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M E; Fernández, E; Quilhot, W; Lissi, E A

    1993-11-01

    Irradiation of pannarin 1'-chloropannarin and antranorin with 366 nm light leads to significant hemolysis in a red cell suspension. However, their mechanism of action is different. Hemolysis induced by pannarin and 1'chloropannarin increases in the presence of oxygen, whereas hemolysis induced by atranorin is higher in nitrogen-purged solutions. The effect of free radical scavengers, and the lack of effect of D2O in the medium, suggest that the hemolysis induced by pannarin and 1'chloropannarin is not mediated by (1)O2. Both the hemolytic and photohemolytic activities of the depsidones, particularly 1'-chloropannarin, increase when the temperature increases from 21 to 37 degrees C. PMID:8289110

  15. Photohemolytic activity of lichen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M E; Fernández, E; Quilhot, W; Lissi, E A

    1993-11-01

    Irradiation of pannarin 1'-chloropannarin and antranorin with 366 nm light leads to significant hemolysis in a red cell suspension. However, their mechanism of action is different. Hemolysis induced by pannarin and 1'chloropannarin increases in the presence of oxygen, whereas hemolysis induced by atranorin is higher in nitrogen-purged solutions. The effect of free radical scavengers, and the lack of effect of D2O in the medium, suggest that the hemolysis induced by pannarin and 1'chloropannarin is not mediated by (1)O2. Both the hemolytic and photohemolytic activities of the depsidones, particularly 1'-chloropannarin, increase when the temperature increases from 21 to 37 degrees C.

  16. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences.

  17. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences. PMID:26339647

  18. Solid dispersions of dihydroartemisinin in polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Muhammad Tayyab; Sunderland, Vivian Bruce

    2008-03-01

    In the present study the physicochemical characteristics of dihydroartemisinin, polyvinylpyrrolidone and their solid dispersions were evaluated at various proportions of drug and polyvinylpyrrolidone. These properties were investigated with X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, equilibrium solubility at twenty five and thirty seven degree centigrade. X-ray diffraction analysis detected that dihydroartemisinin became more amorphous as drug carrier ratio was enhanced in solid dispersions. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that there was a hydrogen bonding interaction between dihydroartemisinin and polyvinylpyrrolidone in all solid dispersions. These interactions reflected the changes in crystalline structures of dihydroartemisinin. The thermal behavior of dihydroartemisinin was unusual as it exhibited melting exotherm instead of endotherm. In solid dispersions containing varying contents of polyvinylpyrrolidone, enthalpy change and peak area were enhanced while melting onset temperature decreased with increase in polyvinylpyrrolidone proportion. This was attributed to a solid-state interaction. Equilibrium solubility of dihydroartemisinin increased sixty-fold due to induction of polyvinylpyrrolidone. When this solubility was compared among thirty-seven and twenty five degree centigrade in solid dispersions, it was up to seven times more at higher temperature. Physicochemical characteristics of solid dispersions containing drug carrier ratio of one: nine prepared in acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and tetrahydrofuran showed differences which indicated that properties of medium i.e. dielectric constant, dipole moment and structure, influenced the amount of amorphousness and related properties of dihydroartemisinin.

  19. Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Chung, G A; Skúlason, V G; Gissurarson, S R; Vilhelmsdóttir, M

    1998-04-01

    Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml. PMID:9795033

  20. The pharmaceutical death-ride of dihydroartemisinin.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Frans Herwig

    2010-01-01

    In the 2010 second edition of WHO's guidelines for the treatment of malaria, the relatively new fixed dose combination dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is included as one of the recommended artemisinin combination therapies. However, experimental testing demonstrates that, due to its intrinsic chemical instability, dihydroartemisinin is not suitable to be used in pharmaceutical formulations. In addition, data show that the currently available dihydroartemisinin preparations fail to meet the internationally accepted stability requirements. At a time when many efforts aim to ban counterfeit and substandard drugs from the malaria market, the obvious question rises how WHO and public-private partnerships, such as Medicine for Malaria venture (MMV), can support the production and marketing of anti-malarial drugs that do not even meet the International Pharmacopoeia requirements? PMID:20649950

  1. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  2. Role of active metabolites in the use of opioids.

    PubMed

    Coller, Janet K; Christrup, Lona L; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2009-02-01

    The opioid class of drugs, a large group, is mainly used for the treatment of acute and chronic persistent pain. All are eliminated from the body via metabolism involving principally CYP3A4 and the highly polymorphic CYP2D6, which markedly affects the drug's function, and by conjugation reactions mainly by UGT2B7. In many cases, the resultant metabolites have the same pharmacological activity as the parent opioid; however in many cases, plasma metabolite concentrations are too low to make a meaningful contribution to the overall clinical effects of the parent drug. These metabolites are invariably more water soluble and require renal clearance as an important overall elimination pathway. Such metabolites have the potential to accumulate in the elderly and in those with declining renal function with resultant accumulation to a much greater extent than the parent opioid. The best known example is the accumulation of morphine-6-glucuronide from morphine. Some opioids have active metabolites but at different target sites. These are norpethidine, a neurotoxic agent, and nordextropropoxyphene, a cardiotoxic agent. Clinicians need to be aware that many opioids have active metabolites that will become therapeutically important, for example in cases of altered pathology, drug interactions and genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Thus, dose individualisation and the avoidance of adverse effects of opioids due to the accumulation of active metabolites or lack of formation of active metabolites are important considerations when opioids are used.

  3. Dihydroartemisinin-induced inhibition of proliferation in BEL-7402 cells: an analysis of the mitochondrial proteome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Yang, Zhen; Lu, De-Zhao; Wo, Xing-De; Shi, Jia-Jie; Lin, Tao-Qi; Wang, Mi-Mi; Li, Yi; Tang, Li-Hua

    2012-08-01

    Artemisinin, the active ingredient of the Chinese medicinal herb Artemisia annua L., and its derivatives (ARTs) are currently widely used as anti-malarial drugs around the world. In this study, we found that dihydroartemisinin (DHA), one of the main active metabolites of ARTs, inhibited the proliferation of human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. To interpret the mechanisms involved, an analysis of the mitochondrial proteome was performed employing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Seven mitochondrial proteins including fumarate hydratase, 60 kDa heat shock protein, enoyl-CoA hydratase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, two subunits of ATP synthase and NADPH:adrenodoxin oxidoreductase were identified to be differentially expressed between the control and DHA-treated groups. Our results indicate that the imbalance of energy metabolism induced by DHA may contribute, at least in part, to its anti-cancer potential in BEL-7402 cells. PMID:22580600

  4. Medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites following conjugation.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Petroianu, Georg; Hosztafi, Sándor; Darvas, Ferenc; Csermely, Tamás; Adeghate, Ernest; Siddiq, Afshan; Tekes, Kornélia

    2013-10-01

    Authorities of Drug Administration in the United States of America approved about 5000 drugs for use in the therapy or management of several diseases. About two hundred of these drugs have active metabolites and the knowledge of their medicinal chemistry is important both in medical practice and pharmaceutical research. This review gives a detailed description of the medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites generated after conjugation. This review focused on glucuronide-, acetyl-, sulphate- and phosphate-conjugation of drugs, converting the drug into an active metabolite. This conversion essentially changed the lipophilicity of the drug.

  5. An investigation of the auto-induction of and gender-related variability in the pharmacokinetics of dihydroartemisinin in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisinin (QHS) and its derivatives dihydroartemisinin (DHA), artemether and artesunate have become the first-line anti-malarials in areas of multidrug resistance. Declining plasma concentrations during the repeated dosing have been reported for QHS, artemether and less convincingly for artesunate (ARS). However, there is limited information on whether the concentrations of their active metabolite DHA and its subsequent metabolites increased after multiple drug administrations. This study was designed to evaluate the potential auto-induction metabolism of DHA in animal species. The sex-specific effect on the pharmacokinetic profiles of DHA and its metabolites was studied. The pharmacokinetics of ARS, the prodrug of DHA, and its phase I/II metabolites were also investigated. Methods Two groups of rats received a single oral dose of DHA or ARS, and another two groups of rats were given oral doses of DHA or ARS once daily for five consecutive days. Plasma samples were analyzed for DHA, ARS and their phase I/II metabolites, using a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS) method. Results DHA, monohydroxylated DHA (M1) and the glucuronide of DHA (DHA-G) were detected in rat plasma after oral administration of DHA or ARS. Neither DHA nor its metabolites (M1 and DHA-G) changed significantly (P > 0.05) in AUC0-t after 5-day oral doses of DHA or ARS. Sex difference was observed for DHA and its metabolites (M1 and DHA-G), whereas its prodrug ARS did not show similar characteristics for the corresponding metabolites (DHA, M1 and DHA-G). Conclusions The results gave the direct evidence for the absence of auto-induction of phase I and phase II metabolism of DHA and ARS in rats. The sex effect existed for DHA but not for ARS, which could be caused by the sex-specific differences in absorption of DHA. PMID:23171067

  6. Secondary metabolites and insecticidal activity of Anemone pavonina.

    PubMed

    Varitimidis, Christos; Petrakis, Panos V; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of the crude extracts of the leaves and flowers of Anemone pavonina were evaluated on Pheidole pallidula ants and showed significant levels of activity. Bioassay-guided fractionations led to the isolation of the butenolide ranunculin (1) as the active principle. Chemical investigations of the extracts showed them to contain as major components the sitosterol glycopyranoside lipids 2-5 and the glycerides 6-8. The structures of the metabolites were elucidated, following acetylation and hydrolysis of the natural products, by interpretation of their NMR and mass spectral data. The uncommon lipid metabolites 2-8 were isolated for the first time from the genus Anemone and this is the first report of insecticidal activity of the Anemone metabolite ranunculin against ants.

  7. Mechanisms of Dihydroartemisinin and Dihydroartemisinin/Holotransferrin Cytotoxicity in T-Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xindong; Zhao, Chunting; Zhao, Hongguo; Huo, Lanfen

    2015-01-01

    The validated therapeutic effects of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in solid tumors have encouraged us to explore its potential in treating T-cell lymphoma. We found that Jurkat cells (a T-cell lyphoma cell line) were sensitive to DHA treatment with a IC50 of dihydroartemisinin. The cytotoxic effect of DHA in Jurkat cells showed a dose- and time- dependent manner. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effect of DHA was further enhanced by holotransferrin (HTF) due to the high expression of transferrin receptors in T-cell lymphoma. Mechanistically, DHA significantly increased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which led to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The DHA treatment also inhibited the expression of protumorgenic factors including VEGF and telomerase catalytic subunit. Our results have proved the therapeutic effect of DHA in T-cell lymphoma. Especially in combination with HTF, DHA may provide a novel efficient approach in combating the deadly disease. PMID:26502166

  8. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor evaluation of dihydroartemisinin-cinnamic acid ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cang-Cang; Deng, Ting; Fan, Meng-Lin; Lv, Wen-Bo; Liu, Ji-Hua; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel high efficiency and low toxicity antitumor agents, a series of dihydroartemisinin-cinnamic acid ester derivatives modified on C-12 and/or C-9 position (s) were synthesized and the in vitro antitumor activities against PC-3, SGC-7901, A549 and MDA-MB-435s cancer cell lines were assessed. The hybrids (3-36) were prepared by esterification of 9α-hydroxyl-dihydroartemisinin (9α-OH DHA), the biotransformation product of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), and cinnamic acid derivatives. Compound 17 (IC50 = 0.20 μM) was the most potent anti-proliferative agent against the human lung carcinoma A549 cells, although it displayed low cytotoxicity on normal hepatic L-02 cells. The mechanism of action of compound 17 was further investigated by analysis of cell apoptosis and intracellular ROS generation. The results indicated that both ROS and ferrous ion contributed to the compound 17-induced cell death. Meanwhile, high intracellular ferrous ion and endogenous oxidative stress in A549 cells made them easier to suffer to compound 17-induced apoptosis. Our promising findings indicated the compound 17 could stand as drug candidate against lung cancer for further investigation.

  10. Desbutyl-Lumefantrine Is a Metabolite of Lumefantrine with Potent In Vitro Antimalarial Activity That May Influence Artemether-Lumefantrine Treatment Outcome ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rina P. M.; Salman, Sam; Ilett, Kenneth F.; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Desbutyl-lumefantrine (DBL) is a metabolite of lumefantrine. Preliminary data from Plasmodium falciparum field isolates show greater antimalarial potency than, and synergy with, the parent compound and synergy with artemisinin. In the present study, the in vitro activity and interactions of DBL were assessed from tritium-labeled hypoxanthine uptake in cultures of the laboratory-adapted strains 3D7 (chloroquine sensitive) and W2mef (chloroquine resistant). The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for DBL against 3D7 and W2mef were 9.0 nM (95% confidence interval, 5.7 to 14.4 nM) and 9.5 nM (95% confidence interval, 7.5 to 11.9 nM), respectively, and those for lumefantrine were 65.2 nM (95% confidence interval, 42.3 to 100.8 nM) and 55.5 nM (95% confidence interval, 40.6 to 75.7 nM), respectively. An isobolographic analysis of DBL and lumefantrine combinations showed no interaction in either laboratory-adapted strain but mild synergy between DBL and dihydroartemisinin (sums of the fractional inhibitory concentrations of 0.92 [95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.98] and 0.94 [95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 0.99] for 3D7 and W2mef, respectively). Using a validated ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay and 94 day 7 samples from a previously reported intervention trial, the mean plasma DBL was 31.9 nM (range, 1.3 to 123.1 nM). Mean plasma DBL concentrations were lower in children who failed artemether-lumefantrine treatment than in those with an adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) (P = 0.053 versus P > 0.22 for plasma lumefantrine and the plasma lumefantrine-to-DBL ratio, respectively). DBL is more potent than the parent compound and mildly synergistic with dihydroartemisinin. These properties and the relationship between day 7 plasma concentrations and the ACPR suggest that it could be a useful alternative to lumefantrine as a part of artemisinin combination therapy. PMID:21199927

  11. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Artemether, Dihydroartemisinin, Lumefantrine, and Quinine in Pregnant Women with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, Frank; Dhorda, Mehul; Jullien, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.; Guerin, Philippe J.; Piola, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many drugs used in the treatment of malaria, usually resulting in lower drug exposures. This increases the risks of treatment failure, adverse outcomes for the fetus, and the development of resistance. The pharmacokinetic properties of artemether and its principal metabolite dihydroartemisinin (n = 21), quinine (n = 21), and lumefantrine (n = 26) in pregnant Ugandan women were studied. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in a nonpregnant control group (n = 17) were also studied. Frequently sampled patient data were evaluated with noncompartmental analysis. No significant correlation was observed between estimated gestational age and artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, or quinine exposures. Artemether/dihydroartemisinin and quinine exposures were generally low in these pregnant women compared to values reported previously for nonpregnant patients. Median day 7 lumefantrine concentrations were 488 (range, 30.7 to 3,550) ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 720 (339 to 2,150) ng/ml in nonpregnant women (P = 0.128). There was no statistical difference in total lumefantrine exposure or maximum concentration. More studies with appropriate control groups in larger series are needed to characterize the degree to which pregnant women are underdosed with current antimalarial dosing regimens. PMID:23917320

  12. Synthesis of Biologically Active Piperidine Metabolites of Clopidogrel: Determination of Structure and Analyte Development.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Scott A; Balasubramanian, Balu; Bonacorsi, Samuel; Cortes, Janet Caceres; Cao, Kevin; Chen, Bang-Chi; Dai, Jun; Decicco, Carl; Goswami, Animesh; Guo, Zhiwei; Hanson, Ronald; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lam, Patrick Y S; Li, Wenying; Mathur, Arvind; Maxwell, Brad D; Michaudel, Quentin; Peng, Li; Pudzianowski, Andrew; Qiu, Feng; Su, Shun; Sun, Dawn; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Vokits, Benjamin P; Wang, Bei; Wexler, Ruth; Wu, Dauh-Rurng; Zhang, Yingru; Zhao, Rulin; Baran, Phil S

    2015-07-17

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug anticoagulant with active metabolites that irreversibly inhibit the platelet surface GPCR P2Y12 and thus inhibit platelet activation. However, gaining an understanding of patient response has been limited due to imprecise understanding of metabolite activity and stereochemistry, and a lack of acceptable analytes for quantifying in vivo metabolite formation. Methods for the production of all bioactive metabolites of clopidogrel, their stereochemical assignment, and the development of stable analytes via three conceptually orthogonal routes are disclosed.

  13. Hsp90 Activity Modulation by Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Terracciano, Stefania; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra

    2015-09-01

    Hsp90 is an evolutionarily conserved adenosine triphosphate-dependent molecular chaperone and is one of the most abundant proteins in the cells (1-3 %). Hsp90 is induced when a cell undergoes various types of environmental stresses such as heat, cold, or oxygen deprivation. It is involved in the turnover, trafficking, and activity of client proteins, including apoptotic factors, protein kinases, transcription factors, signaling proteins, and a number of oncoproteins. Most of the Hsp90 client proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and survival, and include kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, transcription factors, and other proteins associated with almost all the hallmarks of cancer. Consistent with these diverse activities, genetic and biochemical studies have demonstrated the implication of Hsp90 in a range of diseases, including cancer, making this chaperone an interesting target for drug research.During the last few decades, plant secondary metabolites have been studied as a major source for lead compounds in drug discovery. Recently, several plant-derived small molecules have been discovered exhibiting inhibitory activity towards Hsp90, such as epigallocatechin gallate, gedunin, lentiginosine, celastrol, and deguelin. In this work, an overview of plant secondary metabolites interfering with Hsp90 activities is provided. PMID:26227505

  14. Stability of the Antimalarial Drug Dihydroartemisinin under Physiologically Relevant Conditions: Implications for Clinical Treatment and Pharmacokinetic and In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Parapini, Silvia; Olliaro, Piero; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinins are peroxidic antimalarial drugs known to be very potent but highly chemically unstable; they degrade in the presence of ferrous iron, Fe(II)-heme, or biological reductants. Less documented is how this translates into chemical stability and antimalarial activity across a range of conditions applying to in vitro testing and clinical situations. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is studied here because it is an antimalarial drug on its own and the main metabolite of other artemisinins. The behaviors of DHA in phosphate-buffered saline, plasma, or erythrocyte lysate at different temperatures and pH ranges were examined. The antimalarial activity of the residual drug was evaluated using the chemosensitivity assay on Plasmodium falciparum, and the extent of decomposition of DHA was established through use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection analysis. The role of the Fe(II)-heme was investigated by blocking its reactivity using carbon monoxide (CO). A significant reduction in the antimalarial activity of DHA was seen after incubation in plasma and to a lesser extent in erythrocyte lysate. Activity was reduced by half after 3 h and almost completely abolished after 24 h. Serum-enriched media also affected DHA activity. Effects were temperature and pH dependent and paralleled the increased rate of decomposition of DHA from pH 7 upwards and in plasma. These results suggest that particular care should be taken in conducting and interpreting in vitro studies, prone as their results are to experimental and drug storage conditions. Disorders such as fever, hemolysis, or acidosis associated with malaria severity may contribute to artemisinin instability and reduce their clinical efficacy. PMID:25918150

  15. Mutagenic activity of austocystins - secondary metabolites of Aspergillus ustus

    SciTech Connect

    Kfir, R.; Johannsen, E.; Vleggaar, R.

    1986-11-01

    Mycotoxins constitute a group of toxic secondary fungal metabolites. Fungi that produce these toxins frequently contaminate food and feed, creating a potential threat to human and animal health. Biological activities of mycotoxins include, amongst others: toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, which can be expressed with or without metabolic activation. Austocystins are similar in structure to aflatoxin B/sup 1/ and are probably synthesized in a similar manner. The Ames Salmonella test, a widely accepted method employed for the detection of mutagenic activity of various chemical compounds was used for testing the mutagenic activity of different mycotoxins. As aflatoxin B/sup 1/ was found by the Ames test to be highly mutagenic, the same test was applied for the study of possible mutagenicity of the austocystins. The mutagenic activity of these compounds was studied with and without metabolic activation using two tester strains of S. typhimurium, one capable of detecting frame shift mutation (strain TA98) and the other capable of detecting base pair substitution (strain TA100).

  16. Depsides: Lichen Metabolites Active against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thi Huyen; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Lalli, Claudia; Boustie, Joël; Samson, Michel

    2015-01-01

    A thorough phytochemical study of Stereocaulon evolutum was conducted, for the isolation of structurally related atranorin derivatives. Indeed, pilot experiments suggested that atranorin (1), the main metabolite of this lichen, would interfere with the lifecycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Eight compounds, including one reported for the first time (2), were isolated and characterized. Two analogs (5, 6) were also synthesized, to enlarge the panel of atranorin-related structures. Most of these compounds were active against HCV, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of about 10 to 70 µM, with depsides more potent than monoaromatic phenols. The most effective inhibitors (1, 5 and 6) were then added at different steps of the HCV lifecycle. Interestingly, atranorin (1), bearing an aldehyde function at C-3, inhibited only viral entry, whereas the synthetic compounds 5 and 6, bearing a hydroxymethyl and a methyl function, respectively, at C-3 interfered with viral replication. PMID:25793970

  17. Depsides: lichen metabolites active against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thi Huyen; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Lalli, Claudia; Boustie, Joël; Samson, Michel; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Le Seyec, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A thorough phytochemical study of Stereocaulon evolutum was conducted, for the isolation of structurally related atranorin derivatives. Indeed, pilot experiments suggested that atranorin (1), the main metabolite of this lichen, would interfere with the lifecycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Eight compounds, including one reported for the first time (2), were isolated and characterized. Two analogs (5, 6) were also synthesized, to enlarge the panel of atranorin-related structures. Most of these compounds were active against HCV, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of about 10 to 70 µM, with depsides more potent than monoaromatic phenols. The most effective inhibitors (1, 5 and 6) were then added at different steps of the HCV lifecycle. Interestingly, atranorin (1), bearing an aldehyde function at C-3, inhibited only viral entry, whereas the synthetic compounds 5 and 6, bearing a hydroxymethyl and a methyl function, respectively, at C-3 interfered with viral replication. PMID:25793970

  18. Biologically Active Metabolites Produced by the Basidiomycete Quambalaria cyanescens

    PubMed Central

    Stodůlková, Eva; Císařová, Ivana; Kolařík, Miroslav; Chudíčková, Milada; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Pavlů, Barbora; Černý, Jan; Flieger, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Four strains of the fungus Quambalaria cyanescens (Basidiomycota: Microstromatales), were used for the determination of secondary metabolites production and their antimicrobial and biological activities. A new naphthoquinone named quambalarine A, (S)-(+)-3-(5-ethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yliden)-5,7,8-trihydroxy-2-oxo-1,4-naphthoquinone (1), together with two known naphthoquinones, 3-hexanoyl-2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (named here as quambalarine B, 2) and mompain, 2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (3) were isolated. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography, NMR and MS spectrometry. Quambalarine A (1) had a broad antifungal and antibacterial activity and is able inhibit growth of human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and fungi co-occurring with Q. cyanescens in bark beetle galleries including insect pathogenic species Beauveria bassiana. Quambalarine B (2) was active against several fungi and mompain mainly against bacteria. The biological activity against human-derived cell lines was selective towards mitochondria (2 and 3); after long-term incubation with 2, mitochondria were undetectable using a mitochondrial probe. A similar effect on mitochondria was observed also for environmental competitors of Q. cyanescens from the genus Geosmithia. PMID:25723150

  19. Investigations of the effects of the antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX).

    PubMed

    Longo, Monica; Zanoncelli, Sara; Della Torre, Paola; Rosa, Francesco; Giusti, AnnaMaria; Colombo, Paolo; Brughera, Marco; Mazué, Guy; Olliaro, Piero

    2008-08-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are effective and safe drugs for treating malaria, but they are not recommended during the first trimester of pregnancy because of resorptions and abnormalities observed in animal reproduction studies. Previous studies in rats showed that artemisinin embryotoxicity derives from the depletion of primitive red blood cells (RBCs) over a narrow critical time window (gestation Days 9-14). In order to further investigate the susceptibility of primitive RBCs to artemisinins and to establish whether this susceptibility is species-specific or inherent to the compound, we studied dihydroartemisinin (DHA), both a drug in its own right and the main metabolite of current artemisinin derivatives in use, in the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). This model readily allows investigation and monitoring of primitive and definitive RBCs. Effects on frog larvae exposed to DHA for 48 h during early embryonic development, starting from 24 h post fertilization, were similar to those on rat embryos in terms of reduction in the number of primitive RBCs (clonally produced within the ventral blood island). In contrast, RBCs of older larvae (stage 47, produced at the definitive sites of hematopoiesis) were affected minimally and subsequently recovered. Compared to rat embryos, the frog larvae had no areas of necrosis but they shared similar heart defects. The mitochondrion appeared to be the main subcellular target, similar to observations in Plasmodium. These results implicate artemisinin-induced embryotoxicity through perturbation of metabolically active RBCs; whereas this mode of action does not appear to be species-specific, the stages of susceptibility varied between different species. The window of susceptibility and duration of exposure must be considered to evaluate the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:18394862

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following single- and multiple-dosing of oral artesunate in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The population pharmacokinetics of artesunate (AS) and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were studied in healthy subjects receiving single- or multiple-dosing of AS orally either in combination with pyronaridine (PYR) or as a monotherapy with or without food. Methods Data from 118 concentration-time profiles arising from 91 healthy Korean subjects were pooled from four Phase I clinical studies. Subjects received 2-5 mg/kg of single- and multiple-dosing of oral AS either in combination with PYR or as a monotherapy with or without food. Plasma AS and DHA were measured simultaneously using a validated liquid chromatography- mass spectrometric method with a lower limit of quantification of 1 ng/mL for both AS and DHA. Nonlinear mixed-effect modelling was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and variability (inter-individual and residual variability) parameter estimates. Results A novel parent-metabolite pharmacokinetic model consisting of a dosing compartment, a central compartment for AS, a central compartment and a peripheral compartment for DHA was developed. AS and DHA data were modelled simultaneously assuming stoichiometric conversion to DHA. AS was rapidly absorbed with a population estimate of absorption rate constant (Ka) of 3.85 h-1. The population estimates of apparent clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V2/F) for AS were 1190 L/h with 36.2% inter-individual variability (IIV) and 1210 L with 57.4% IIV, respectively. For DHA, the population estimates of apparent clearance (CLM/F) and central volume of distribution (V3/F) were 93.7 L/h with 28% IIV and 97.1 L with 30% IIV, respectively. The population estimates of apparent inter-compartmental clearance (Q/F) and peripheral volume of distribution (V4/F) for DHA were 5.74 L/h and 18.5 L, respectively. Intake of high-fat and high-caloric meal prior to the drug administration resulted in 84% reduction in Ka. Body weight impacted CLM/F, such that a unit change in weight resulted in 1

  1. Synthesis and Cytotoxicity of Two Active Metabolites of Larotaxel.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Li, Anping; Li, Minghua; Qiao, Yufeng; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two epimeric metabolites of Larotaxel were synthesized in eight steps from 10-DAB III as a commercial material and their structures were characterized using NMR and MS spectral data. The cytotoxicity of two metabolites was performed on breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, MX-1 and MDA-MB-231. It is remarkable that both of these two desired taxanes showed great potent cytotoxic effect. PMID:26830032

  2. A correlation between antioxidant activity and metabolite release during the blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Ku, Kang Mo; Kang, Daejung; Kim, Jong Sang; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS)-based metabolite profiling was applied to elucidate the correlation between metabolite release and antioxidant activity during water blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (CC). Some major metabolites showing differences between fresh CC and blanched CC (BCC) were selected by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) loading plots, and were identified as dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA), succinoyl-DCQA, and acetylmycosinol. By PLS regression analysis of the correlation between antioxidant components and effects, candidate antioxidative metabolites were predicted due to strong positive correlations with DCQA and succinoyl-DCQA, and by a relatively weak positive correlation with acetylmycosinol.

  3. Nobiletin metabolites: synthesis and inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase-9 production.

    PubMed

    Oshitari, Tetsuta; Okuyama, Yuji; Miyata, Yoshiki; Kosano, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideyo; Natsugari, Hideaki

    2011-08-01

    A divergent synthesis of nobiletin metabolites was developed through highly oxygenated acetophenone derivative. We used commercially available methyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate as a starting material for concise preparation of the key intermediate, 2'-hydroxy-3',4',5',6'-tetramethoxyacetophenone (I). These metabolites showed strong inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in human lens epithelial cells.

  4. Metabolic Dysregulation Induced in Plasmodium falciparum by Dihydroartemisinin and Other Front-Line Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Simon A; Chua, Hwa H; Nijagal, Brunda; Creek, Darren J; Ralph, Stuart A; McConville, Malcolm J

    2016-01-15

    Detailed information on the mode of action of antimalarial drugs can be used to improve existing drugs, identify new drug targets, and understand the basis of drug resistance. In this study we describe the use of a time-resolved, mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling approach to map the metabolic perturbations induced by a panel of clinical antimalarial drugs and inhibitors on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages. Drug-induced changes in metabolite levels in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes were monitored over time using gas chromatography-MS and liquid chromatography-MS and changes in specific metabolic fluxes confirmed by nonstationary [(13)C]-glucose labeling. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was found to disrupt hemoglobin catabolism within 1 hour of exposure, resulting in a transient decrease in hemoglobin-derived peptides. Unexpectedly, it also disrupted pyrimidine biosynthesis, resulting in increased [(13)C]-glucose flux toward malate production, potentially explaining the susceptibility of P. falciparum to DHA during early blood-stage development. Unique metabolic signatures were also found for atovaquone, chloroquine, proguanil, cycloguanil and methylene blue. We also show that this approach can be used to identify the mode of action of novel antimalarials, such as the compound Torin 2, which inhibits hemoglobin catabolism. PMID:26150544

  5. Therapeutic effects of dihydroartemisinin and transferrin against glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suk Hee; Kang, Seong Hee

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Artemisinin, a natural product isolated from Gaeddongssuk (artemisia annua L.) and its main active derivative, dihydroartemisinin (DHA), have long been used as antimalarial drugs. Recent studies reported that artemisinin is efficacious for curing diseases, including cancers, and for improving the immune system. Many researchers have shown the therapeutic effects of artemisinin on tumors such as breast cancer, liver cancer and kidney cancer, but there is still insufficient data regarding glioblastoma (GBM). Glioblastoma accounts for 12-15% of brain cancer, and the median survival is less than a year, despite medical treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of DHA and transferrin against glioblastoma (glioblastoma multiforme, GBM). MATERIALS/METHODS This study was performed through in vitro experiments using C6 cells. The toxicity dependence of DHA and transferrin (TF) on time and concentration was analyzed by MTT assay and cell cycle assay. Observations of cellular morphology were recorded with an optical microscope and color digital camera. The anti-cancer mechanism of DHA and TF against GBM were studied by flow cytometry with Annexin V and caspase 3/7. RESULTS MTT assay revealed that TF enhanced the cytotoxicity of DHA against C6 cells. An Annexin V immune-precipitation assay showed that the percentages of apoptosis of cells treated with TF, DHA alone, DHA in combination with TF, and the control group were 7.15 ± 4.15%, 34.3 ± 5.15%, 66.42 ± 5.98%, and 1.2 ± 0.15%, respectively. The results of the Annexin V assay were consistent with those of the MTT assay. DHA induced apoptosis in C6 cells through DNA damage, and TF enhanced the effects of DHA. CONCLUSION The results of this study demonstrated that DHA, the derivative of the active ingredient in Gaeddongssuk, is effective against GBM, apparently via inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by a pharmacological

  6. Bax translocation into mitochondria during dihydroartemisinin(DHA)-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-ying; Chen, Tong-sheng; Qu, Jun-Le

    2009-02-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activities and induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. This study was investigated in human lung adenocarconoma ASTC-a-1 cell line and aimed to determine whether the apoptotic process was mediated by Bax activation and translocation during DHA-induced apoptosis. In this study, DHA induced a time-dependent apoptotic cell death, which was assayed by Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) and Hoechst 33258 staining. Detection of Bax aggregation and translocation to mitochondria was observed in living cells which were co-transfected with GFP-Bax and Dsred-mito plasmid using confocal fluorescence microscope technique. Overall, these results demonstrated that Bax activation and translocation to mitochondria occurred during DHA-induced apoptosis.

  7. The Synthesis of Active Metabolites and Analogues of Vitamin D3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhimovich, R. I.

    1980-04-01

    The literature date on the synthesis of the active metabolites and analogues of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), which play an important role in regulating the homeostatis of calcium in the organism, are reviewed. The bibliography includes 150 references.

  8. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  9. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  10. Antiproliferative and hepatoprotective activity of metabolites from Corynebacterium xerosis against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ghosh, Soby; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the effective anticancer drugs from bacterial products, petroleum ether extract of Corynebacterium xerosis. Methods Antiproliferative activity of the metabolite has been measured by monitoring the parameters like tumor weight measurement, tumor cell growth inhibition in mice and survival time of tumor bearing mice, etc. Hepatoprotective effect of the metabolites was determined by observing biochemical, hematological parameters. Results It has been found that the petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite significantly decrease cell growth (78.58%; P<0.01), tumor weight (36.04 %; P<0.01) and increase the life span of tumor bearing mice (69.23%; P<0.01) at dose 100 mg/kg (i.p.) in comparison to those of untreated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing mice. The metabolite also alters the depleted hematological parameters like red blood cell, white blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb%), etc. towards normal in tumor bearing mice. Metabolite show no adverse effect on liver functions regarding blood glucose, serum alkaline phosphatases, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity and serum billirubin, etc. in normal mice. Histopathological observation of these mice organ does not show any toxic effect on cellular structure. But in the case of EAC bearing untreated mice these hematological and biochemical parameters deteriorate extremely with time whereas petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite receiving EAC bearing mice nullified the toxicity induced by EAC cells. Conclusion Study results reveal that metabolite possesses significant antiproliferative and hepatoprotective effect against EAC cells. PMID:25183099

  11. NO-Donor Dihydroartemisinin Derivatives as Multitarget Agents for the Treatment of Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Bertinaria, Massimo; Orjuela-Sanchez, Pamela; Marini, Elisabetta; Guglielmo, Stefano; Hofer, Anthony; Martins, Yuri C; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Gasco, Alberto; Fruttero, Roberta; Carvalho, Leonardo J M

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid products in which the dihydroartemisinin scaffold is combined with NO-donor furoxan and NONOate moieties have been synthesized and studied as potential tools for the treatment of cerebral malaria (CM). The designed products were able to dilate rat aorta strips precontracted with phenylephrine with a NO-dependent mechanism. All hybrid compounds showed preserved antiplasmodial activity in vitro and in vivo against Plasmodium berghei ANKA, comparable to artesunate and artemether. Hybrid 10, selected for additional studies, was capable of increasing survival of mice with late-stage CM from 27.5% to 51.6% compared with artemether. Artemisinin-NO-donor hybrid compounds show promise as potential new drugs for treating cerebral malaria. PMID:26367273

  12. Larvicidal activity of some secondary lichen metabolites against the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata Macquart (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Cetin, H; Tufan-Cetin, O; Turk, A O; Tay, T; Candan, M; Yanikoglu, A; Sumbul, H

    2012-01-01

    The larvicidal activity of some lichen metabolites, (+)-usnic acid, atranorin, 3-hydroxyphysodic acid and gyrophoric acid, against the second and third instar larvae of the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata were studied. All metabolites caused high larvicidal activities. When metabolites were compared on the basis of their LC(50) values, the order of increasing toxicity was as follows: gyrophoric acid (0.41 ppm) > (+)-usnic acid (0.48 ppm) > atranorin (0.52 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (0.97 ppm). However, when LC(90) values were compared, the order of toxicity was (+)-usnic acid (1.54 ppm) > gyrophoric acid (1.93 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (4.33 ppm) > atranorin (5.63 ppm). In conclusion, our results found that lichen secondary metabolites may have a promising role as potential larvicides.

  13. Larvicidal activity of some secondary lichen metabolites against the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata Macquart (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Cetin, H; Tufan-Cetin, O; Turk, A O; Tay, T; Candan, M; Yanikoglu, A; Sumbul, H

    2012-01-01

    The larvicidal activity of some lichen metabolites, (+)-usnic acid, atranorin, 3-hydroxyphysodic acid and gyrophoric acid, against the second and third instar larvae of the mosquito Culiseta longiareolata were studied. All metabolites caused high larvicidal activities. When metabolites were compared on the basis of their LC(50) values, the order of increasing toxicity was as follows: gyrophoric acid (0.41 ppm) > (+)-usnic acid (0.48 ppm) > atranorin (0.52 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (0.97 ppm). However, when LC(90) values were compared, the order of toxicity was (+)-usnic acid (1.54 ppm) > gyrophoric acid (1.93 ppm) > 3-hydroxyphysodic acid (4.33 ppm) > atranorin (5.63 ppm). In conclusion, our results found that lichen secondary metabolites may have a promising role as potential larvicides. PMID:21452097

  14. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  15. Garlic sprouting is associated with increased antioxidant activity and concomitant changes in the metabolite profile.

    PubMed

    Zakarova, Alexandra; Seo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Shin, Jung-Hye; Cho, Kye Man; Lee, Choong Hwan; Kim, Jong-Sang

    2014-02-26

    Although garlic (Allium sativum) has been extensively studied for its health benefits, sprouted garlic has received little attention. We hypothesized that sprouting garlic would stimulate the production of various phytochemicals that improve health. Ethanolic extracts from garlic sprouted for different periods had variable antioxidant activities when assessed with in vitro assays, including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity assay and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Extracts from garlic sprouted for 5 days had the highest antioxidant activity, whereas extracts from raw garlic had relatively low antioxidant activity. Furthermore, sprouting changed the metabolite profile of garlic: the metabolite profile of garlic sprouted for 5-6 days was distinct from the metabolite profile of garlic sprouted for 0-4 days, which is consistent with the finding that garlic sprouted for 5 days had the highest antioxidant activity. Therefore, sprouting may be a useful way to improve the antioxidant potential of garlic.

  16. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites.

  17. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites. PMID:27506419

  18. In vitro antioxidative activity of (-)-epicatechin glucuronide metabolites present in human and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Osakabe, Naomi; Yasuda, Akiko; Baba, Seigo; Tokunaga, Takashi; Kondo, Kazuo; Osawa, Toshihiko; Terao, Junji

    2004-12-01

    Recently we identified four conjugated glucuronide metabolites of epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (E3'G), 4'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (4'ME3'G), (-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (E7G) and 3'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (3'ME7G) from plasma and urine. E3'G and 4'ME3'G were isolated from human urine, while E7G and 3'ME7G were isolated from rats that had received oral administration of (-)-epicatechin (Natsume et al. (2003), Free Radic. Biol. Med. 34,840-849). It has been suggested that these metabolites possess considerable in vivo activity, and therefore we carried out a study to compare the antioxidant activities of the metabolites with that of the parent compound. This was achieved by measuring superoxide scavenging activity, reduction of plasma TBARS production and reduced susceptibility of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation. (-)-Epicatechin was found to have more potent antioxidant activity than the conjugated glucuronide metabolites. Both (-)-epicatechin and E7G had marked antioxidative properties with respect to superoxide radical scavenging activity, plasma oxidation induced by 2,2'-azobis-(2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and LDL oxidation induced by copper ions or 2,2'-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (MeO-AMVN). In contrast, the other metabolites had light antioxidative activities over the range of physiological concentrations found in plasma.

  19. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  20. Evaluation of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites for anthelmintic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. L. Vijaya; Thippeswamy, B.; Kuppust, I. L.; Naveenkumar, K. J.; Shivakumar, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the anthelmintic acivity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites. Materials and Methods: The successive solvent extractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol. The solvent extracts were tested for anthelmintic activity against Pheretima posthuma at 20 mg/ml concentration. The time of paralysis and time of death of the worms was determined for all the extracts. Albendazole was taken as a standard reference and sterile water as a control. Results: All the sample extracts showed significant anthelmintic activity in paralyzing the worms comparable with that of the standard drug. The time of death exhibited by BP metabolites was close to the time exhibited by standard. Conclusion: The study indicates both bacteria Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus have anthelmintic activity indicating potential metabolites in them. PMID:25598639

  1. Curcumin Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evidences in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats Support the Antidiabetic Activity to Be via Metabolite(s)

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Vânia Ortega; Campos, Michel Leandro; Arcaro, Carlos Alberto; Assis, Renata Pires; Baldan-Cimatti, Helen Mariana; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Kettelhut, Isis Carmo; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the curcumin concentration in rat plasma by liquid chromatography and investigates the changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of streptozotocin-diabetic rats treated with curcumin-enriched yoghurt. The analytical method for curcumin detection was linear from 10 to 500 ng/mL. The Cmax⁡ and the time to reach Cmax⁡ (tmax⁡) of curcumin in plasma were 3.14 ± 0.9 μg/mL and 5 minutes (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and 0.06 ± 0.01 μg/mL and 14 minutes (500 mg/kg, p.o.). The elimination half-time was 8.64 ± 2.31 (i.v.) and 32.70 ± 12.92 (p.o.) minutes. The oral bioavailability was about 0.47%. Changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were investigated in four groups: normal and diabetic rats treated with yoghurt (NYOG and DYOG, resp.) and treated with 90 mg/kg/day curcumin incorporated in yoghurt (NC90 and DC90, resp.). After 15 days of treatment, the glucose tolerance and the insulin sensitivity were significantly improved in DC90 rats in comparison with DYOG, which can be associated with an increase in the AKT phosphorylation levels and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscles. These findings can explain, at least in part, the benefits of curcumin-enriched yoghurt to diabetes and substantiate evidences for the curcumin metabolite(s) as being responsible for the antidiabetic activity. PMID:26064170

  2. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations ± standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700 ± 1000 ng L−1, 2100 ± 1700 ng L−1, carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480 ± 380 ng L−1, 360 ± 400 ng L−1, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400 ± 1300 ng L−1, 1800 ± 2300 ng L−1. Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that

  3. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the "Supply Problem".

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nelson G M; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors' opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities.

  4. Antifeedant Activity of Ginkgo biloba Secondary Metabolites against Hyphantria cunea Larvae: Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Fang; Feng, Yuqian

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a typical relic plant that rarely suffers from pest hazards. This study analyzed the pattern of G. biloba pest hazards in Beijing; tested the antifeedant activity of G. biloba extracts, including ginkgo flavonoids, ginkgolide, and bilobalide, against Hyphantria cunea larvae; determined the activities of glutathione transferase (GSTs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE) and mixed-functional oxidase (MFO), in larvae after feeding on these G. biloba secondary metabolites; and screened for effective botanical antifeedants in the field. In this study, no indicators of insect infestation were found for any of the examined leaves of G. biloba; all tested secondary metabolites showed significant antifeedant activity and affected the activity of the four larval detoxifying enzymes. Ginkgolide had the highest antifeedant activity and the most significant effect on the detoxifying enzymes (P<0.05). Spraying leaves with G. biloba extracts or ginkgolide both significantly repelled H. cunea larvae in the field (P<0.05), although the former is more economical and practical. This study investigated the antifeedant activity of G. biloba secondary metabolites against H. cunea larvae, and the results provide new insights into the mechanism of G. biloba pest resistance. This study also developed new applications of G. biloba secondary metabolites for effective pest control. PMID:27214257

  5. Antifeedant Activity of Ginkgo biloba Secondary Metabolites against Hyphantria cunea Larvae: Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Ren, Lili; Chen, Fang; Feng, Yuqian; Luo, Youqing

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a typical relic plant that rarely suffers from pest hazards. This study analyzed the pattern of G. biloba pest hazards in Beijing; tested the antifeedant activity of G. biloba extracts, including ginkgo flavonoids, ginkgolide, and bilobalide, against Hyphantria cunea larvae; determined the activities of glutathione transferase (GSTs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE) and mixed-functional oxidase (MFO), in larvae after feeding on these G. biloba secondary metabolites; and screened for effective botanical antifeedants in the field. In this study, no indicators of insect infestation were found for any of the examined leaves of G. biloba; all tested secondary metabolites showed significant antifeedant activity and affected the activity of the four larval detoxifying enzymes. Ginkgolide had the highest antifeedant activity and the most significant effect on the detoxifying enzymes (P<0.05). Spraying leaves with G. biloba extracts or ginkgolide both significantly repelled H. cunea larvae in the field (P<0.05), although the former is more economical and practical. This study investigated the antifeedant activity of G. biloba secondary metabolites against H. cunea larvae, and the results provide new insights into the mechanism of G. biloba pest resistance. This study also developed new applications of G. biloba secondary metabolites for effective pest control. PMID:27214257

  6. [Influence of Microbial Metabolites of Phenolic Nature on the Activity of Mitochondrial Enzymes].

    PubMed

    Fedotcheva, N I; Litvinova, E G; Osipov, A Aa; Olenin, A Yu; Moroz, V V; Beloborodova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of microbial metabolites of phenolic nature on the activity of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in isolated mitochondria, and determine metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle as potential biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction in the blood of patients with sepsis. It is shown that microbial metabolites of phenolic nature have an inhibitory effect on the activity of dehydrogenases, determined by the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol and nitroblue tetrazolium in liver mitochondria and liver homogenates. This effect is more pronounced in oxidation of the NAD-dependent substrates than succinate oxidation, and at lower concentrations of microbial metabolites than inhibition of respiration. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry it was found that the content of the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites in the blood of patients with sepsis decreased compared to healthy donors. The data obtained show that the microbial phenolic acids can contribute significantly to the dysfunction of mitochondria and suppression of general metabolism, characteristic of these pathologies. PMID:26841505

  7. Estrogenic activities of diuron metabolites in female Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Thiago Scremin Boscolo; Boscolo, Camila Nomura Pereira; Felício, Andreia Arantes; Batlouni, Sergio Ricardo; Schlenk, Daniel; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2016-03-01

    Some endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter the estrogenic activities of the organism by directly interacting with estrogen receptors (ER) or indirectly through the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Recent studies in male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) indicated that diuron may have anti-androgenic activity augmented by biotransformation. In this study, the effects of diuron and three of its metabolites were evaluated in female tilapia. Sexually mature female fish were exposed for 25 days to diuron, as well as to its metabolites 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA), 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DCPU) and 3,4-dichlorophenyl-N-methylurea (DCPMU), at concentrations of 100 ng/L. Diuron metabolites caused increases in E2 plasma levels, gonadosomatic indices and in the percentage of final vitellogenic oocytes. Moreover, diuron and its metabolites caused a decrease in germinative cells. Significant differences in plasma concentrations of the estrogen precursor and gonadal regulator17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17α-OHP) were not observed. These results show that diuron metabolites had estrogenic effects potentially mediated through enhanced estradiol biosynthesis and accelerated the ovarian development of O. niloticus females.

  8. Phytol metabolites are circulating dietary factors that activate the nuclear receptor RXR.

    PubMed Central

    Kitareewan, S; Burka, L T; Tomer, K B; Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Stevens, R D; Forman, B M; Mais, D E; Heyman, R A; McMorris, T; Weinberger, C

    1996-01-01

    RXR is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in cell signaling by pairing with a host of other receptors. Previously, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) was defined as a potent RXR activator. Here we describe a unique RXR effector identified from organic extracts of bovine serum by following RXR-dependent transcriptional activity. Structural analyses of material in active fractions pointed to the saturated diterpenoid phytanic acid, which induced RXR-dependent transcription at concentrations between 4 and 64 microM. Although 200 times more potent than phytanic acid, 9cRA was undetectable in equivalent amounts of extract and cannot be present at a concentration that could account for the activity. Phytanic acid, another phytol metabolite, was synthesized and stimulated RXR with a potency and efficacy similar to phytanic acid. These metabolites specifically displaced [3H]-9cRA from RXR with Ki values of 4 microM, indicating that their transcriptional effects are mediated by direct receptor interactions. Phytol metabolites are compelling candidates for physiological effectors, because their RXR binding affinities and activation potencies match their micromolar circulating concentrations. Given their exclusive dietary origin, these chlorophyll metabolites may represent essential nutrients that coordinate cellular metabolism through RXR-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8856661

  9. Antioxidant activities of isoflavones and their biological metabolites in a liposomal system.

    PubMed

    Arora, A; Nair, M G; Strasburg, G M

    1998-08-15

    Genistein and daidzein, the two major soy isoflavones, principally occur in nature as their glycosylated or methoxylated derivatives, which are cleaved in the large intestine to yield the free aglycones and further metabolites. The objective of this study was to compare the antioxidant activities of genistein and daidzein with their glycosylated and methoxylated derivatives and also those of their human metabolites. The abilities of these compounds to inhibit lipid peroxidation in a liposomal system were evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy, and structural criteria that enhance antioxidant activity were established. The peroxidation initiators employed in the study were Fe(II) and Fe(III) metal ions and aqueous-phase, azo-derived peroxyl radicals. Both the parent isoflavonoids and their metabolites were more effective at suppressing metal-ion-induced peroxidations than the peroxyl-radical-induced peroxidation. Antioxidant activities for the isoflavone metabolites were comparable to or superior to those for the parent compounds. Equol and its 4-hydroxy and 5-hydroxy derivatives were the most potent antioxidants in the study, suggesting that absence of the 2, 3-double bond and the 4-oxo group on the isoflavone nucleus enhances antioxidant activity. Additionally, the number and position of hydroxyl groups were determining factors for isoflavonoid antioxidant activity, with hydroxyl substitution being of utmost importance at the C-4' position, of moderate importance at the C-5 position, and of little significance at the C-7 position. PMID:9705203

  10. Chemical and biological investigation of N-hydroxy-valdecoxib: An active metabolite of valdecoxib.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Péter; Fodor, Tamás; Varga, Agnes Kis; Czugler, Mátyás; Gere, Anikó; Fischer, János

    2008-05-01

    The inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes plays an important role in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. N-Hydroxy-4-(5-methyl-3-phenylisoxazol-4-yl)benzenesulfonamide (3)-a primary metabolite of the highly selective COX-2 inhibitor valdecoxib-was synthesized and stabilized as its monohydrate (3a.H(2)O). The anti-inflammatory properties of 3a.H(2)O were investigated in carrageenan-induced edema and in acute and chronic pain models. Based on our biological investigation, we conclude that N-hydroxy-valdecoxib 3a is an active metabolite of valdecoxib.

  11. Rapidly Probing Antibacterial Activity of Graphene Oxide by Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolite Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Hou, Jian; Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Jin, Yulong; Wang, Jianing; He, Qing; Zhao, Rui; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as anti-bacteria agents has aroused great attention. To investigate the antibacterial activity and antibacterial mechanism of nanomaterials from a molecular perspective is important for efficient developing of nanomaterial antibiotics. In the current work, a new mass spectrometry-based method was established to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by the metabolite fingerprinting of microbes. The mass spectra of extracted metabolites from two strains DH5α and ATCC25922 were obtained before and after the incubation with nanomaterials respectively. Then principal component analysis (PCA) of these spectra was performed to reveal the relationship between the metabolism disorder of microbes and bactericidal activity of GO. A parameter “D” obtained from PCA scores was proposed that is capable to quantitatively evaluate the antibacterial activity of GO in concentration and time-dependent experiments. Further annotation of the fingerprinting spectra shows the variabilities of important metabolites such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and glutathione. This metabolic perturbation of E. coli indicates cell membrane destruction and oxidative stress mechanisms for anti-bacteria activity of graphene oxide. It is anticipated that this mass spectrometry-based metabolite fingerprinting method will be applicable to other antibacterial nanomaterials and provide more clues as to their antibacterial mechanism at molecular level. PMID:27306507

  12. Molecular complexes of cocaine, its active metabolites and some other stimulants with thiamine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L

    1976-10-01

    Cocaine, its pharmacologically active metabolites, norcocaine benzoylnorecgonine, benzoylecgonine and other central nervous system stimulants e.g. dextrococaine, nicotine, caffeine and p-hydroxy norephedrine formed molecular complexes with thiamine. The possible implications of such an interaction are discussed. PMID:10608

  13. CHARACTERIZATION ADN BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM ARMILLARIA TABESCENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethyl acetate extracts from liquid cultures of Armillaria tabescens showed good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analyses of extract constituents led to the isolation and identification of two new co...

  14. Novel Multiarm Polyethylene glycol-Dihydroartemisinin Conjugates Enhancing Therapeutic Efficacy in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Wang, Luying; Deng, Lihong; Liu, Jing; Lei, Jiandu; Li, Dan; He, Jing

    2014-07-01

    The clinical application of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) has been hampered due to its poor water-solubility. To overcome this hurdle, we devised a novel polymer-drug conjugate, multiarm polyethylene glycol-dihydroartemisinin (PEG-DHA), made by linking DHA with multiarm polyethylene glycol. Herein, we investigated PEG-DHA on chemical structure, hydrolysis, solubility, hemolysis, cell cytotoxicity in vitro, and efficacy in vivo. The PEG-DHA conjugates have showed moderate drug loadings (2.82 ~ 8.14 wt%), significantly good water-solubilities (82- ~ 163-fold of DHA), excellent in vitro anticancer activities (at concentrations >=8 μg/ml, showed only 15-20% cell viability) with potency similar to that of native DHA, and long blood circulation half-time (5.75- ~ 16.75-fold of DHA). Subsequent tumor xenograft assays demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect of PEG-DHA on inhibition of tumor growth compared with native DHA. The novel PEG-DHA conjugates can not only improve the solubility and efficacy of DHA but also show the potential of scale-up production and clinical application.

  15. Benzenediol lactones: a class of fungal metabolites with diverse structural features and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiyun; Mao, Hongqiang; Huang, Qian; Dong, Jinyan

    2015-06-01

    Benzenediol lactones are a structurally variable family of fungal polyketide metabolites possessing a macrolide core structure fused into a resorcinol aromatic ring. These compounds are widespread in fungi mainly in the genera such as Aigialus, Cochliobolus, Curvularia, Fusarium, Humicola, Lasiodiplodia, Penicillium and Pochonia etc. Most of these fungal metabolites were reported to possess several interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxicities, nematicidal properties, inhibition of various kinases, receptor agonists, anti-inflammatory activities, heat shock response and immune system modulatory activities etc. This review summarizes the research on the isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activities of the benzenediol lactones, along with some available structure-activity relationships, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structure or stereochemistry, published up to the year of 2014. More than 190 benzenediol lactones are described, and over 300 references cited. PMID:25559850

  16. Secondary Metabolites Produced by an Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis sydowiana and Their 20S Proteasome Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuekui; Kim, Soonok; Liu, Changheng; Shim, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have attracted attention due to their functional diversity. Secondary metabolites produced by Pestalotiopsis sydowiana from a halophyte, Phragmites communis Trinus, were investigated. Eleven compounds, including four penicillide derivatives (1-4) and seven α-pyrone analogues (5-10) were isolated from cultures of P. sydowiana. The compounds were identified based on spectroscopic data. The inhibitory activities against the 20S proteasome were evaluated. Compounds 1-3, 5, and 9-10 showed modest proteasome inhibition activities, while compound 8 showed strong activity with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.3 μM. This is the first study on the secondary metabolites produced by P. sydowiana and their proteasome inhibitory activities. The endophytic fungus P. sydowiana might be a good resource for proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27447600

  17. Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Algal-Derived Endophytic Fungi: Chemical Diversity and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Xin; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2016-06-01

    Marine algal-derived endophytic fungi have attracted considerable attention in the most recent two decades due to their prolific production of structurally diverse secondary metabolites with various biological activities. This review summarizes a total of 182 natural products isolated from marine algal-derived endophytic fungi in the past two decades. The emphasis is on the unique chemical diversity of these metabolic products, together with relevant biological activities.

  18. The effect of aspartame metabolites on human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) with neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in human erythrocyte membranes after incubation with the sum of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (met) and aspartic acid (aspt), or with each one separately. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from 12 healthy individuals and were incubated with ASP hydrolysis products for 1 h at 37 degrees C. AChE was measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of membranes with ASP metabolites corresponding with 34 mg/kg, 150 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of ASP consumption resulted in an enzyme activity reduction by -33%, -41%, and -57%, respectively. Met concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.60 mM, and 0.80 mM decreased the enzyme activity by -20%, -32% or -40%, respectively. Aspt concentrations 2.80 mM, 7.60 mM or 10.0 mM inhibited membrane AChE activity by -20%, -35%, and -47%, respectively. Phe concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.35 mM or 0.50mM reduced the enzyme activity by -11%, -33%, and -35%, respectively. Aspt or Phe concentrations 0.82 mM or 0.07 mM, respectively, did not alter the membrane AChE activity. It is concluded that low concentrations of ASP metabolites had no effect on the membrane enzyme activity, whereas high or toxic concentrations partially or remarkably decreased the membrane AChE activity, respectively. Additionally, neurological symptoms, including learning and memory processes, may be related to the high or toxic concentrations of the sweetener metabolites.

  19. Interruption of the MEK/ERK signaling cascade promotes dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Budhraja, Amit; Cheng, Senping; Liu, E-Hu; Huang, Cheng; Chen, Jieping; Yang, Zailin; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    Artemisinin, the active principle of the Chinese medicinal herb Artemisia annua, and its derivatives (i.e. dihydroartemisinin, DHA) were reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the functional role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MEK)/Extracellular signal-regulated protein Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade in dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells in vitro and anti-leukemic activity in vivo. Human leukemia cells were treated with DHA in dose- and time-dependent manners, after which apoptosis, caspase activation, Mcl-1 expression, and cell signaling pathways were evaluated. Parallel studies were performed in AML and ALL primary human leukemia cells. In vivo anti-leukemic activity mediated by DHA was also investigated using U937 xenograft mouse model. Exposure of DHA resulted in a pronounced increase in apoptosis in both transformed and primary human leukemia cells but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. DHA-induced apoptosis was accompanied by caspase activation, cytochrome c release, Mcl-1 down-regulation, as well as MEK/ERK inactivation. Pretreatment with MEK inhibitor PD98059, which potentiated DHA-mediated MEK and ERK inactivation, intensified DHA-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, enforced expression of a constitutively active MEK1 attenuated DHA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, DHA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse U937 xenograft was associated with induction of apoptosis and inactivation of ERK. The findings in the present study showed that DHA-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells in vitro and exhibited an anti-leukemic activity in vivo through a process that involves MEK/ERK inactivation, Mcl-1 down-regulation, culminating in cytochrome c release and caspase activation. PMID:21336837

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Dihydroartemisinin and Piperaquine in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, Marcus J.; McGready, Rose; Phyo, Aung Phae; Lindegardh, Niklas; Tarning, Joel; Laochan, Natthapon; Than, Hla Hla; Mu, Oh; Win, Aye Kyi; Singhasivanon, Pratap; White, Nicholas; Nosten, François

    2011-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is a fixed-dose artemisinin-based combination treatment. Some antimalarials have altered pharmacokinetics in pregnancy. Pregnant women in the 2nd or 3rd trimester and matched nonpregnant women with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated with a total of 6.4 mg/kg of body weight dihydroartemisinin and 51.2 mg/kg piperaquine once daily for 3 days. Venous blood samples were drawn at prespecified time points over 9 weeks. Plasma dihydroartemisinin and piperaquine concentrations were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Piperaquine and dihydroartemisinin pharmacokinetics were well described. There were no significant differences in total piperaquine exposure (P = 0.80) or drug exposure during the terminal elimination phase (72 h to infinity) (P = 0.64) between the two groups. The apparent volume of distribution of piperaquine was significantly smaller (602 liters/kg versus 877 liters/kg) in pregnant women than in nonpregnant women (P = 0.0057), and the terminal elimination half-life was significantly shorter (17.8 days versus 25.6 days; P = 0.0023). Dihydroartemisinin exposure after the first dose was significantly lower (844 h × ng/ml versus 1,220 h × ng/ml, P = 0.0021) in pregnant women, but there were no significant differences in total dihydroartemisinin exposure or maximum concentrations between the two groups. There were no significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between the second and third trimester. These results obtained through noncompartmental analysis suggest that in the treatment of falciparum malaria, there are no clinically important differences in the pharmacokinetics of dihydroartemisinin or piperaquine between pregnant and nonpregnant women. However, a more detailed analysis using population pharmacokinetic modeling is needed to fully investigate the differences found for some of the pharmacokinetic parameters, such as the terminal half-life. PMID:21947392

  1. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Babalwa; Gathu, Michael; Donegan, Sarah; Olliaro, Piero L; Sinclair, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. This review aims to assist the decision-making of malaria control programmes by providing an overview of the relative effects of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-P) versus other recommended ACTs. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of DHA-P compared to other ACTs for treating uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in adults and children. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS, and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) up to July 2013. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials comparing a three-day course of DHA-P to a three-day course of an alternative WHO recommended ACT in uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trials for eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. We analysed primary outcomes in line with the WHO 'Protocol for assessing and monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy’ and compared drugs using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Secondary outcomes were effects on gametocytes, haemoglobin, and adverse events. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 27 trials, enrolling 16,382 adults and children, and conducted between 2002 and 2010. Most trials excluded infants aged less than six months and pregnant women. DHA-P versus artemether-lumefantrine In Africa, over 28 days follow-up, DHA-P is superior to artemether-lumefantrine at preventing further parasitaemia (PCR-unadjusted treatment failure: RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.39, nine trials, 6200 participants, high quality evidence), and although PCR-adjusted treatment failure was below 5% for both ACTs, it was consistently lower

  2. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  3. Biotransformation of green tea polyphenols and the biological activities of those metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joshua D; Sang, Shengmin; Yang, Chung S

    2007-01-01

    Green tea ( Camellia sinensis, Theaceae) and its major polyphenol constituents, the catechins, have been reported to have many health benefits including the prevention of cancer and heart disease. Many mechanisms of action have been proposed based on in vitro models; however, the importance of most of these mechanisms remains to be determined in vivo. The bioavailability and biotransformation of tea catechins play a key role in determining the importance of various mechanisms in vivo. Likewise, the biological activity and bioavailability of tea catechin metabolites, an understudied area, are important in understanding the potential beneficial effects of tea. In this article, we review the data available on the biotransformation of the tea catechins and the limited data set available on the biological activities of the catechin metabolites. Careful interpretation of available data, carefully designed animal experiments, and integration of bioavailability and biological activity data are needed if the disease preventive activity of tea is to be understood. We hope this article will spark research efforts on some of the important questions regarding tea polyphenol bioavailability, biotransformation, and the biological activities of tea catechin metabolites. PMID:17963356

  4. Global metabolite analysis of the land snail Theba pisana hemolymph during active and aestivated states.

    PubMed

    Bose, U; Centurion, E; Hodson, M P; Shaw, P N; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2016-09-01

    The state of metabolic dormancy has fascinated people for hundreds of years, leading to research exploring the identity of natural molecular components that may induce and maintain this state. Many animals lower their metabolism in response to high temperatures and/or arid conditions, a phenomenon called aestivation. The biological significance for this is clear; by strongly suppressing metabolic rate to low levels, animals minimize their exposure to stressful conditions. Understanding blood or hemolymph metabolite changes that occur between active and aestivated animals can provide valuable insights relating to those molecular components that regulate hypometabolism in animals, and how they afford adaptation to their different environmental conditions. In this study, we have investigated the hemolymph metabolite composition from the land snail Theba pisana, a remarkably resilient mollusc that displays an annual aestivation period. Using LC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we have identified those hemolymph metabolites that show significant changes in relative abundance between active and aestivated states. We show that certain metabolites, including some phospholipids [e.g. LysoPC(14:0)], and amino acids such as l-arginine and l-tyrosine, are present at high levels within aestivated snails. Further investigation of our T. pisana RNA-sequencing data elucidated the entire repertoire of phospholipid-synthesis genes in the snail digestive gland, as a precursor towards future comparative investigation between the genetic components of aestivating and non-aestivating species. In summary, we have identified a large number of metabolites that are elevated in the hemolymph of aestivating snails, supporting their role in protecting against heat or desiccation. PMID:27318654

  5. Global metabolite analysis of the land snail Theba pisana hemolymph during active and aestivated states.

    PubMed

    Bose, U; Centurion, E; Hodson, M P; Shaw, P N; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2016-09-01

    The state of metabolic dormancy has fascinated people for hundreds of years, leading to research exploring the identity of natural molecular components that may induce and maintain this state. Many animals lower their metabolism in response to high temperatures and/or arid conditions, a phenomenon called aestivation. The biological significance for this is clear; by strongly suppressing metabolic rate to low levels, animals minimize their exposure to stressful conditions. Understanding blood or hemolymph metabolite changes that occur between active and aestivated animals can provide valuable insights relating to those molecular components that regulate hypometabolism in animals, and how they afford adaptation to their different environmental conditions. In this study, we have investigated the hemolymph metabolite composition from the land snail Theba pisana, a remarkably resilient mollusc that displays an annual aestivation period. Using LC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we have identified those hemolymph metabolites that show significant changes in relative abundance between active and aestivated states. We show that certain metabolites, including some phospholipids [e.g. LysoPC(14:0)], and amino acids such as l-arginine and l-tyrosine, are present at high levels within aestivated snails. Further investigation of our T. pisana RNA-sequencing data elucidated the entire repertoire of phospholipid-synthesis genes in the snail digestive gland, as a precursor towards future comparative investigation between the genetic components of aestivating and non-aestivating species. In summary, we have identified a large number of metabolites that are elevated in the hemolymph of aestivating snails, supporting their role in protecting against heat or desiccation.

  6. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through the mitochondria-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Sun, Luhaoran; Zhou, Jin; Yang, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in various cancer cells, including colorectal cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying its antitumor activity in colorectal cancer remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated DHA-induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro. The results showed that DHA treatment significantly reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA induced G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptotic cell death, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that DHA decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential; activated the caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9; and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria were observed. Strikingly, the free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine or the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly prevented DHA-induced apoptotic cell death. Taken together, we concluded that DHA-triggered apoptosis in HCT-116 cells occurs through the ROS-mediated mitochondria-dependent pathway. Our data suggest that DHA has great potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:24519064

  7. Inhibitory effect of dihydroartemisinin against phorbol ester-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Yang, Ji Hye; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., has recently been shown to possess antitumor activity in various cancer cells. However, the effect of anti-inflammatory potentials of DHA in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells has not been studied. The present study investigated the effect of COX-2 and molecular mechanisms by DHA in PMA stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. DHA dose-dependently decreased PMA-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production, as well as COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Additionally, DHA decreased luciferase activity of COX-2 regulation-related transcription factors including NF-κB, AP-1, C/EBP and CREB. DHA also remarkably reduced PMA-induced p65, C/EBPβ, c-jun and CREB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, DHA evidently inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation of AKT and the MAP Kinases, such as ERK, JNK and p38. Taken together, our data indicated that DHA effectively attenuates COX-2 production via down-regulation of AKT and MAPK pathway, revealing partial molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of DHA. PMID:23429041

  8. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of lichen metabolites as potential preservatives.

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Bloomfield, S F; Hylands, P J

    1985-01-01

    Antimicrobial screening of several lichen species and subsequent isolation and structure elucidation of active compounds revealed that the hydrolysis products of certain lichen metabolites, i.e., depsides, were active against gram-negative bacteria and fungi as well as gram-positive bacteria. The active constituents isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum and Peltigera aphthosa were identified, respectively, as methyl beta-orsellinate and a mixture of methyl and ethyl orsellinates. MIC determinations indicated that activity of these compounds was superior to that of the commonly used preservative agents methyl and propyl p-hydroxybenzoates and was of the same order as that of chlorocresol. PMID:3834834

  10. Microbiome-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Agonist and Antagonist Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Sridharan, Gautham; Lee, Kyongbum; Davidson, Laurie A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S.; Alaniz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolites indole, indole-3-acetate, and tryptamine were identified in mouse cecal extracts and fecal pellets by mass spectrometry. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist and antagonist activities of these microbiota-derived compounds were investigated in CaCo-2 intestinal cells as a model for understanding their interactions with colonic tissue, which is highly aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)–responsive. Activation of Ah-responsive genes demonstrated that tryptamine and indole 3-acetate were AHR agonists, whereas indole was an AHR antagonist that inhibited TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)–induced CYP1A1 expression. In contrast, the tryptophan metabolites exhibited minimal anti-inflammatory activities, whereas TCDD decreased phorbol ester-induced CXCR4 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4] gene expression, and this response was AHR dependent. These results demonstrate that the tryptophan metabolites indole, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate modulate AHR-mediated responses in CaCo-2 cells, and concentrations of indole that exhibit AHR antagonist activity (100–250 μM) are detected in the intestinal microbiome. PMID:24563545

  11. Reproductive activity in the peninsular pronghorn determined from excreted gonadal steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Holland, Jeff; Eng, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Fecal hormone monitoring was employed to better define annual patterns of reproductive steroid metabolites from a breeding pair of peninsular pronghorn (Antilocapra americana peninsularis) maintained at the Los Angeles Zoo. Notably in the female, increased excretion of estrogen metabolites occurred during the breeding season (Jun-Aug), and a biphasic pattern in progestagen activity was measured during gestation. Of additional interest, a preterm increase in estrogen that continued for an additional 64 days post partum. Male androgen activity correlated with the female estrogen patterns, with a single successful copulation occurring during the breeding season; interestingly however, the male exhibited no reproductive behaviors during the female's preterm/post partum estrogen increase. These data are the first reproductive steroid profiles for the peninsular pronghorn and provide valuable insight that will aid efforts that link the species' reproductive physiology with conservation management. PMID:25652944

  12. Plants used in traditional medicine: extracts and secondary metabolites exhibiting antileishmanial activity.

    PubMed

    Passero, Luiz Felipe Domingues; Laurenti, Marcia D; Santos-Gomes, Gabriela; Soares Campos, Bruno Luiz; Sartorelli, Patricia; Lago, Joao Henrique G

    2014-01-01

    Plants and their extracts have been used traditionally against different pathologies, and in some poor regions they are the only therapeutic source for treatments. Moreover, the identification of specific active secondary metabolites can be account for amelioration of clinical status of suffering individual. A series of ethnopharmacological surveys conducted in Brazil recorded the traditional use of plants against different pathologies and interestingly, some of them presented antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo, possibly due to their immunostimulatory, healing and microbicidal properties. Of note, Leishmania parasites can alter patient's immunological status, leading to the development of extensive skin and/or visceral alterations. Therefore, the extracts or secondary metabolites presented in plants that might be capable of improving the pathological conditions can be attractive candidates in the development of new chemotherapeuticals against leishmaniosis.

  13. A comparison of cocaine and its metabolite norcocaine: effects on locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, P J; Rosen, G M; Nemeroff, C B

    1987-03-01

    Intraventricular and intraperitoneal administration of cocaine and its metabolite norcocaine were studied in adult male rats. Norcocaine (10-100 micrograms) had no behavioral activity following central infusion but proved to be toxic at high doses (50-100 mg/kg) when given peripherally. Cocaine at high doses (100 micrograms), produced possible hypoactivity after central injections but produced significant hyperactivity after peripheral administration (20 mg/kg).

  14. Differential effects of furnidipine and its active metabolites in rat isolated working heart.

    PubMed

    Krzemiński, Tadeusz F; Hudziak, Damian; Sielańczyk, Andrzej W; Porc, Maurycy; Kedzia, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    1,4,-dihydropyridines, belonging to the class of "privileged structures", are known to protect the heart from stunning, ischemia and ventricular arrhythmias and mainly used in hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the continuous infusion of parent drug, furnidipine, with its two active metabolites (M-2; M-3) in rat isolated working heart model, where the following parameters were measured and calculated: heart rate, preload pressure, aortic systolic and diastolic pressures (AoD), as well as +/-dP/dt, aortic (AF) and coronary flow (CF), oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures and pH values in pulmonary effluent, myocardial oxygen consumption. At first, the optimal vasodilatatory dose of M-2 was estimated and afterwards it was compared with equivalent doses of both remaining substances. The strongest vasodilatatory effects were observed after the lowest dose of M-2 was used (10(-7) M), at the same time being without marked influence on pressure parameters. The pro-drug evoked significantly weaker influence on both flows. Furthermore, furnidipine significantly reduced AoD and AF in comparison to control as well as +dP/dt in comparison to the initial values, while M-2 did not. Both metabolites caused a significant CF increase, but M-3 additionally the AoS and AoD decrease in comparison to the control. Regarding clear differences in the measured parameters between the pro-drug and its metabolites found, the obtained results allow to claim that the metabolites vs. furnidipine possess a beneficial influence. The distinct flow shift from aorta into the coronaries was observed only after M-2 and to a lesser extent--M-3. The cardio-depressant potency of both metabolites is overcome by advantageous vasodilatatory effect. M-2, being a final product, easier to control and at the same time a precursor of the new chemical class of therapeutics, is promising as a cardio-protective agent.

  15. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  16. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces ferroptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Renyu; Zhang, Ziheng; Chen, Lingfeng; Zhou, Yunfang; Zou, Peng; Feng, Chen; Wang, Li; Liang, Guang

    2016-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, exhibits a wide range of biological roles including a highly efficient and specific anti-tumor activity. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of DHA on head and neck carcinoma cells and elucidate the potential mechanisms. We used five head and neck carcinoma cell lines and two non-tumorigenic normal epithelial cell lines to achieve our goals. Cells were exposed to DHA and subjected to cellular activity assays including viability, cell cycle analysis, cell death, and angiogenic phenotype. Our results show that DHA causes cell cycle arrest which is mediated through Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). We also demonstrate that DHA induces ferroptosis and apoptosis in head and neck carcinoma cells. Lastly, our results show that DHA alters the angiogenic phenotype of cancer cells by reducing the expression of angiogenic factors and the ability of cancer cells to support endothelial cell tubule formation. Our study suggests that DHA specifically causes head and neck cancer cell death through contribution from both ferroptosis and apoptosis. DHA may represent an effective strategy in head and neck cancer treatment.

  17. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  18. Enhanced apoptotic effects of dihydroartemisinin-aggregated gelatin and hyaluronan nanoparticles on human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Teong, Benjamin; Chen, I-Fen; Chang, Shwu Jen; Gao, Jimin; Kuo, Shyh-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., has anticancer properties. Due to poor water solubility, poor oral activity, and a short plasma half-life, large doses of DHA have to be injected to achieve the necessary bioavailability. This study examined increasing DHA bioavailability by encapsulating DHA within gelatin (GEL) or hyaluronan (HA) nanoparticles via an electrostatic field system. Observations from transmission electron microscopy show that DHA in GEL and HA nanoparticles formed GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates that were approximately 30-40 nm in diameter. The entrapment efficiencies for DHA were approximately 13 and 35% for the GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates, respectively. The proliferation of A549 cells was inhibited by the GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates. Fluorescent annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide (PI) staining displayed low background staining with annexin V-FITC or PI on DHA-untreated cells. In contrast, annexin V-FITC and PI stains dramatically increased when the cells were incubated with GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates. These results suggest that DHA-aggregated GEL and HA nanoparticles exhibit higher anticancer proliferation activities than DHA alone in A549 cells most likely due to the greater aqueous dispersion after hydrophilic GEL or HA nanoparticles aggregation. These results demonstrate that DHA can aggregate with nanoparticles in an electrostatic field environment to form DHA nanosized aggregates. PMID:24039154

  19. Biological activity of secondary metabolites produced by a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2002-01-01

    Biological activity of secondary metabolites produced by a plant-growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens was evaluated. The strain produced antibiotics phenazine (PHE), 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (PHL) and siderophore pyoverdin (PYO) in standard King's B and succinic acid media, respectively. After extraction, PYO was identified by comparing the UV-spectra and moss-green color development after 'diazotized sulfanilic acid' (DSA) spray in TLC. PHE and PHL were identified by comparing standard compounds on TLC and orange-color development immediately after DSA spray. In vitro antibiosis study of the metabolites revealed their antibacterial and antifungal activity against bacterial test organisms Corynebacterium sp., Mycobacterium phlei and M. smegmatis and test fungi Fusarium moniliforme, F. oxysporum, F. semitectum, F. solani and Rhizoctonia solani. A statistically significantly higher plant growth was recorded in siderophore-amended plantlets under gnotobiotic conditions whereas PHE and PHL did not show any plant-growth-promoting activity. These results support the importance of the secondary metabolites produced by the strain P. fluorescens in enhancing plant growth and in controlling fungal and bacterial pathogens. PMID:12422510

  20. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and mass balance of radiolabeled dihydroartemisinin in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisa H; Li, Qigui; Zhang, Jing; Weina, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Background Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a powerful anti-malarial drug, has been used as monotherapy and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for more than decades. So far, however, the tissue distribution and metabolic profile of DHA data are not available from animal and humans. Methods Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, mass balance, and elimination of [14C] DHA have been studieded in rats following a single intravenous administration. Protein binding was performed with rat and human plasma. Drug concentrations were obtained up to 192 hr from measurements of total radioactivity and drug concentration to determine the contribution by the parent and metabolites to the total dose of drug injected from whole blood, plasma, urine and faecal samples. Results Drug was widely distributed after 1 hr and rapidly declined at 24 hr in all tissues except spleen until 96 hrs. Only 0.81% of the total radioactivity was detected in rat brain tissue. DHA revealed a high binding capacity with both rat and human plasma proteins (76–82%). The concentration of total radioactivity in the plasma fraction was less than 25% of that in blood total. Metabolism of DHA was observed with high excretion via bile into intestines and approximately 89–95% dose of all conjugations were accounted for in blood, urine and faeces. However, the majority of elimination of [14C] DHA was through urinary excretion (52% dose). The mean terminal half-lives of plasma and blood radioactivity (75.57–122.13 h) were significantly prolonged compared with that of unchanged DHA (1.03 h). Conclusion In rat brain, the total concentration of [14C] was 2-fold higher than that in plasma, indicating the radioactivity could easily penetrate the brain-blood barrier. Total radioactivity distributed in RBC was about three- to four-fold higher than that in plasma, suggesting that the powerful anti-malarial potency of DHA in the treatment of blood stage malaria may relate to the high RBC binding. Biliary excretion

  1. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the "Supply Problem".

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nelson G M; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors' opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  2. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the “Supply Problem”

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors’ opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  3. Secondary metabolites from the South China Sea invertebrates: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Guo, Yue-Wei; Gu, Yucheng

    2006-01-01

    The increasing demand for new lead compounds in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries has driven scientists to search for new sources of bioactive natural products. Marine invertebrates are a rich source of novel, bioactive secondary metabolites and they have attracted a great deal of attention from scientists in the fields of chemistry, pharmacology, ecology, and molecular biology. During the past 25 years, many complex and structurally unique secondary metabolites have been isolated from the invertebrates inhabiting the South China Sea. These metabolites are responsible for various bioactivities such as anti-tumor, anti-inflammation and antioxidant activities, and/or they act on the cardiovascular system. This review will focus on the marine natural product chemistry of invertebrates from the South China Sea, aiming to give the reader a brief view of the compounds isolated from these invertebrates, as well as their biological activities. The article covers the literature published during the period from the beginning of 1980 to the end of 2005, with 340 citations and 811 compounds from invertebrates from the South China Sea, including sponges, coelenterates, molluscs and echinoderms.

  4. Lipopeptaibol metabolites of tolypocladium geodes: total synthesis, preferred conformation, and membrane activity.

    PubMed

    Rainaldi, Mario; Moretto, Alessandro; Peggion, Cristina; Formaggio, Fernando; Mammi, Stefano; Peggion, Evaristo; Galvez, José Antonio; Díaz-de-Villegas, Maria Dolores; Cativiela, Carlos; Toniolo, Claudio

    2003-08-01

    We have synthesized by solution methods and characterized the lipopeptaibol metabolite LP237-F8 extracted from the fungus Tolypocladium geodes and five selected analogues with the Etn-->Aib or Etn-->Nva replacement at position 8 and/or a triple Gln-->Glu(OMe) replacement at positions 5, 6, and 9 (Etn=Calpha-ethylnorvaline, Aib=alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, Nva=norvaline). Conformation analysis, performed by FT-IR absorption, NMR, and CD techniques, strongly supports the view that the six terminally blocked decapeptides are highly helical in solution. Helix topology and amphiphilic character are responsible for their remarkable membrane activity. At position 8 the combination of high hydrophobicity and Calpha tetrasubstitution, as in the Etn-containing LP237-F8 metabolite, has a positive effect on membrane interaction.

  5. Microbial transformation of (+)-nootkatone and the antiproliferative activity of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Łysek, Agnieszka; Janeczko, Tomasz; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2011-04-01

    Six metabolites were obtained as a result of microbial transformation of (+)-nootkatone (1) by the fungal strains: Botrytis, Didymosphaeria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium and Fusarium. Their structure were established as (+)-(4R,5S,7R,9R)-9α-hydroxynootkatone (2), (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-13-hydroxynootkatone (3) and (+)-(4R,5S,7R,9R,11S)-11,12-epoxy-9α-hydroxynootkatone (4), (+)-(4R,5S,7R,11S)-11,12-epoksynootkatone (5), (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-11,12-dihydroxynootkatone (6) and (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-7,11,12-trihydroxynootkatone (7) on the basis of their spectral data. Two products: (4) and (7) were not previously reported in the literature. The antiproliferative activity of (+)-nootkatone (1) and isolated metabolites (2-7) of its biotransformation has been evaluated. PMID:21377882

  6. p8 attenuates the apoptosis induced by dihydroartemisinin in cancer cells through promoting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sang-Sang; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zeng; Lou, Xiao-E; Zhou, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activities in a variety of cancer cells, but DHA alone are not effective enough for cancer therapy. In this study we found the stress-regulated protein p8 was obviously increased after DHA treatment in several cancer cells, which further to induce autophagy by the upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related protein ATF4 and CHOP. Furthermore, when we silenced p8 by siRNA in cancer cells, the apoptosis induced by DHA were notably increased, whereas the overexpression of p8 in cancer cells leaded to the resistance to DHA-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we found the inhibition of autophagy with chloroquine (CQ) can enhance the anticancer effect of DHA both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we found that p8-mediated autophagy attenuates DHA-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, which provides evidence to support the use p8 as a cancer therapeutic target, and suggests that the combination treatment with DHA and autophagy inhibitor might be an effective cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:25891535

  7. Dihydroartemisinin supresses inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycine-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongxia; Yuan, Wendan; Lv, Changjun; Li, Naie; Liu, Tongshen; Wang, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Qiu, Xueshan; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a respiratory disease with a high mortality rate and its pathogenesis involves multiple mechanisms including epithelial cell injury, fibroblast proliferation, inflammation, and collagen coagulation. The treatment regimens still fail to recover this disease. We have previously found that dihydroartemisinin inhibits the development of pulmonary fibrosis in rats. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms of dihydroartemisinin in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The experimental rats were divided into six groups as normal saline control group (NS group), bleomycin group (BLM group), dihydroartemisinin-1, -2, or -3 group (DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group) and dexamethasone group (DXM group). In BLM group, rats were treated with intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. NS group received the same volume of saline instead of bleomycin. In DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group, in addition to intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, respectively, dihydroartemisinin (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg daily) was administrated by intraperitoneal instillation. In DXM group, rats were treated with intraperitoneal instillation of dexamethasone as control. Immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcription PCR and western blot were used for detecting the expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α, α-SMA and NF-κB in lung tissues. What’s more, morphological change and collagen deposition were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. Collagen synthesis was detected by hydroxyproline chromatometry. Results showed that dihydroartemisinin significantly decreased the amount of inflammatory cytokines and collagen synthesis, and inhibited fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.001). This study provides experimental evidence that dihydroartemisinin could decrease cytokines, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis. PMID:25973011

  8. Evaluation of the pharmacological activity of the major mexiletine metabolites on skeletal muscle sodium currents

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, M; De Luca, A; Rana, F; Cavalluzzi, M M; Catalano, A; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Conte Camerino, D

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mexiletine (Mex), an orally effective antiarrhythmic agent used to treat ventricular arrhythmias, has also been found to be effective for myotonia and neuropathic pain. It is extensively metabolized in humans but little information exists about the pharmacodynamic properties of its metabolites. Experimental approach: To determine their contribution to the clinical activity of Mex, p-hydroxy-mexiletine (PHM), hydroxy-methyl-mexiletine (HMM), N-hydroxy-mexiletine (NHM) (phase I reaction products) and N-carbonyloxy β-D-glucuronide (NMG) (phase II reaction product) were tested on sodium currents (INa) of frog skeletal muscle fibres. Sodium currents were elicited with depolarizing pulses from different holding potentials (HP=−140, −100, −70 mV) and stimulation frequencies (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz) using the vaseline-gap voltage-clamp method. Key results: All the hydroxylated derivatives blocked the sodium channel in a voltage- and use-dependent manner. The PHM, HMM and NHM metabolites were up to 10-fold less effective than the parent compound. However, HMM showed a greater use-dependent behaviour (10 Hz), compared to Mex and the other metabolites. Similar to Mex, these products behaved as inactivating channel blockers. Conjugation with glucuronic acid (NMG) resulted in almost complete abolition of the pharmacological activity of the parent compound. Conclusions and Implications: Thus, although less potent, the phase I metabolites tested demonstrated similar pharmacological behaviour to Mex and might contribute to its clinical profile. PMID:16921388

  9. Antimicrobial activity of secondary metabolites from Streptomyces sp. K15, an endophyte in Houttuynia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huabao; Yang, Chunping; Ke, Tao; Zhou, Miaomiao; Li, Zhaojun; Zhang, Min; Gong, Guoshu; Hou, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    We isolated Streptomyces sp. K15 from the root tissue of Houttuynia cordata Thunb and found that some of its secondary metabolites exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, we separated, purified and identified the major active ingredient to be 2-pyrrol formic acid by using silica gel column chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR analysis of the spectral data. 2-Pyrrol formic acid critically inhibited the growth of some phytopathogenic bacteria. Therefore, it has potential value in agricultural applications. PMID:25675117

  10. Triterpenoid resinous metabolites from the genus Boswellia: pharmacological activities and potential species-identifying properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The resinous metabolites commonly known as frankincense or olibanum are produced by trees of the genus Boswellia and have attracted increasing popularity in Western countries in the last decade for their various pharmacological activities. This review described the pharmacological specific details mainly on anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-bacterial and apoptosis-regulating activities of individual triterpenoid together with the relevant mechanism. In addition, species-characterizing triterpenic markers with the methods for their detection, bioavailability, safety and other significant properties were reviewed for further research. PMID:24028654

  11. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi--Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Čvančarová, Monika; Moeder, Monika; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    A group of white rot fungi (Irpex lacteus, Panus tigrinus, Dichomitus squalens, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus) was investigated for the biodegradation of norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The selected fluoroquinolones were readily degraded almost completely by I. lacteus and T. versicolor within 10 and 14 d of incubation in liquid medium, respectively. The biodegradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses indicated that the fungi use similar mechanisms to degrade structurally related antibiotics. The piperazine ring of the molecules is preferably attacked via either substitution or/and decomposition. In addition to the degradation efficiency, attention was devoted to the residual antibiotic activities estimated using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Only I. lacteus was able to remove the antibiotic activity during the course of the degradation of NOR and OF. The product-effect correlations evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) enabled elucidation of the participation of the individual metabolites in the residual antibacterial activity. Most of the metabolites correlated with the antibacterial activity, explaining the rather high residual activity remaining after the biodegradation. PCA of ligninolytic enzyme activities indicated that manganese peroxidase might participate in the degradation.

  12. Identification of metabolites from an active fraction of Cajanus cajan seeds by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tekale, Satishkumar S; Jaiwal, Bhimrao V; Padul, Manohar V

    2016-11-15

    Antioxidants are important food additives which prolong food storage due to their protective effects against oxidative degradation of foods by free radicals. However, the synthetic antioxidants show toxic properties. Alternative economical and eco-friendly approach is screening of plant extract for natural antioxidants. Plant phenolics are potent antioxidants. Hence, in present study Cajanus cajan seeds were analyzed for antioxidant activity, Iron chelating activity and total phenolic content. The antioxidant activity using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging assay showed 71.3% inhibition and 65.8% Iron chelating activity. Total 37 compounds including some short peptides and five major abundant compounds were identified in active fraction of C. cajan seeds. This study concludes that C. cajan seeds are good source of antioxidants and Iron chelating activity. Metabolites found in C. cajan seeds which remove reactive oxygen species (ROS), may help to alleviate oxidative stress associated dreaded health problem like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27283694

  13. Urolithins, ellagic acid-derived metabolites produced by human colonic microflora, exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-03-01

    Urolithins A and B (hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives) are colonic microflora metabolites recently proposed as biomarkers of human exposure to dietary ellagic acid derivatives. Molecular models suggest that urolithins could display estrogenic and/or antiestrogenic activity. To this purpose, both urolithins and other known phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, resveratrol, and enterolactone) were assayed to evaluate the capacity to induce cell proliferation on the estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as well as the ability to bind to alpha- and beta-estrogen receptors. Both urolithins A and B showed estrogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner even at high concentrations (40 microM), without antiproliferative or toxic effects, whereas the other phytoestrogens inhibited cell proliferation at high concentrations. Overall, urolithins showed weaker estrogenic activity than the other phytoestrogens. However, both urolithins displayed slightly higher antiestrogenic activity (antagonized the growth promotion effect of 17-beta-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner) than the other phytoestrogens. The IC(50) values for the ERalpha and ERbeta binding assays were 0.4 and 0.75 microM for urolithin A; 20 and 11 microM for urolithin B; 3 and 0.02 for genistein; and 2.3 and 1 for daidzein, respectively; no binding was detected for resveratrol and enterolactone. Urolithins A and B entered into MCF-7 cells and were metabolized to yield mainly urolithin-sulfate derivatives. These results, together with previous studies regarding absorption and metabolism of dietary ellagitannins and ellagic acid in humans, suggest that the gut microflora metabolites urolithins are potential endocrine-disrupting molecules, which could resemble other described "enterophytoestrogens" (microflora-derived metabolites with estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity). Further research is warranted to evaluate the possible role of ellagitannins and ellagic acid as dietary "pro-phytoestrogens".

  14. Comparison of the circulating metabolite profile of PF-04991532, a hepatoselective glucokinase activator, across preclinical species and humans: potential implications in metabolites in safety testing assessment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Litchfield, John; Bergman, Arthur; Atkinson, Karen; Kazierad, David; Gustavson, Stephanie M; Di, Li; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2015-02-01

    A previous report from our laboratory disclosed the identification of PF-04991532 [(S)-6-(3-cyclopentyl-2-(4-trifluoromethyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)propanamido)nicotinic acid] as a hepatoselective glucokinase activator for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lack of in vitro metabolic turnover in microsomes and hepatocytes from preclinical species and humans suggested that metabolism would be inconsequential as a clearance mechanism of PF-04991532 in vivo. Qualitative examination of human circulating metabolites using plasma samples from a 14-day multiple ascending dose clinical study, however, revealed a glucuronide (M1) and monohydroxylation products (M2a and M2b/M2c) whose abundances (based on UV integration) were greater than 10% of the total drug-related material. Based on this preliminary observation, mass balance/excretion studies were triggered in animals, which revealed that the majority of circulating radioactivity following the oral administration of [¹⁴C]PF-04991532 was attributed to an unchanged parent (>70% in rats and dogs). In contrast with the human circulatory metabolite profile, the monohydroxylated metabolites were not detected in circulation in either rats or dogs. Available mass spectral evidence suggested that M2a and M2b/M2c were diastereomers derived from cyclopentyl ring oxidation in PF-04991532. Because cyclopentyl ring hydroxylation on the C-2 and C-3 positions can generate eight possible diastereomers, it was possible that additional diastereomers may have also formed and would need to be resolved from the M2a and M2b/M2c peaks observed in the current chromatography conditions. In conclusion, the human metabolite scouting study in tandem with the animal mass balance study allowed early identification of PF-04991532 oxidative metabolites, which were not predicted by in vitro methods and may require additional scrutiny in the development phase of PF-04991532.

  15. Solid-Phase Extraction of Sulfur Mustard Metabolites Using an Activated Carbon Fiber Sorbent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    A novel solid-phase extraction method using activated carbon fiber (ACF) was developed and validated. ACF has a vast network of pores of varying sizes and microporous structures that result in rapid adsorption and selective extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites according to the pH of eluting solvents. ACF could not only selectively extract thiodiglycol and 1-methylsulfinyl-2-[2-(methylthio)-ethylsulfonyl]ethane eluting a 9:1 ratio of dichloromethane to acetone, and 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethane] and 1,1'-sulfonylbis- [2-S-(N-acetylcysteinyl)ethane] eluting 3% hydrogen chloride in methanol, but could also eliminate most interference without loss of analytes during the loading and washing steps. A sample preparation method has been optimized for the extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites from human urine using an ACF sorbent. The newly developed extraction method was applied to the trace analysis of metabolites of sulfur mustard in human urine matrices in a confidence-building exercise for the analysis of biomedical samples provided by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. PMID:26364317

  16. Oxidative metabolism of ferrocene analogues of tamoxifen: characterization and antiproliferative activities of the metabolites.

    PubMed

    Richard, Marie-Aude; Hamels, Didier; Pigeon, Pascal; Top, Siden; Dansette, Patrick M; Lee, Hui Zhi Shirley; Vessières, Anne; Mansuy, Daniel; Jaouen, Gérard

    2015-06-01

    Ferrociphenols have been found to have high antiproliferative activity against estrogen-independent breast cancer cells. The rat and human liver microsome-mediated metabolism of three compounds of the ferrocifen (FC) family, 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC1), 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-(phenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC2), and 1-[4-(3-dimethylaminopropoxy)phenyl]-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC3), was studied. Three main metabolite classes were identified: quinone methides (QMs) deriving from two-electron oxidation of FCs, cyclic indene products (CPs) deriving from acid-catalyzed cyclization of QMs, and allylic alcohols (AAs) deriving from hydroxylation of FCs. These metabolites are generated by cytochromes P450 (P450s), as shown by experiments with either N-benzylimidazole as a P450 inhibitor or recombinant human P450s. Such P450-dependent oxidation of the phenol function and hydroxylation of the allylic CH2 group of FCs leads to the formation of QM and AA metabolites, respectively. Some of the new ferrociphenols obtained in this study were found to exhibit remarkable antiproliferative effects toward MDA-MB-231 hormone-independent breast cancer cells.

  17. Linear glandular trichomes of Helianthus (Asteraceae): morphology, localization, metabolite activity and occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbrenner, Anna-Katharina; Horakh, Silke; Spring, Otmar

    2013-01-01

    Capitate glandular trichomes of sunflower are well investigated, but detailed studies are lacking for the linear glandular trichomes (LGT), a second type of physiologically active plant hair present on the surface of sunflowers. Light, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy as well as histochemical staining were used to investigate the structure and metabolite deposition of LGT. Consisting of 6–11 linearly arranged cells, LGT were found on the surface of most plant organs of Helianthus annuus. They were associated with the leaf vascular system, and also occurred along petioles, stems and the abaxial surface of chaffy bracts, ray and disc florets. The highest density was found on the abaxial surface of phyllaries. Phenotypically similar LGT were common in all species of the genus, but also occurred in most other genera of the Helianthinae so far screened. Brownish and fluorescent metabolites of an as yet unknown chemical structure, together with terpenoids, were produced and stored in apical cells of LGT. The deposition of compounds gradually progressed from the tip cell to the basal cells of older trichomes. This process was accompanied by nucleus degradation in metabolite-accumulating cells. The localization of these trichomes on prominent plant parts of the apical bud and the capitulum combined with the accumulation of terpenoids and other as yet unknown compounds suggests a chemo-ecological function of the LGT in plant–insect or plant–herbivore interaction.

  18. Biotransformation of dianabol with the filamentous fungi and β-glucuronidase inhibitory activity of resulting metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naik T; Zafar, Salman; Noreen, Shagufta; Al Majid, Abdullah M; Al Othman, Zeid A; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim; Atta-ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2014-07-01

    Biotransformation of the anabolic steroid dianabol (1) by suspended-cell cultures of the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella elegans and Macrophomina phaseolina was studied. Incubation of 1 with C. elegans yielded five hydroxylated metabolites 2-6, while M. phaseolina transformed compound 1 into polar metabolites 7-11. These metabolites were identified as 6β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (2), 15α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (3), 11α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (4), 6β,12β,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (5), 6β,15α,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (6), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,6-dione (7), 7β,17β,-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (8), 15β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (9), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,11-dione (10), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (11). Metabolite 3 was also transformed chemically into diketone 12 and oximes 13, and 14. Compounds 6 and 12-14 were identified as new derivatives of dianabol (1). The structures of all transformed products were deduced on the basis of spectral analyses. Compounds 1-14 were evaluated for β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibitory activity. Compounds 7, 13, and 14 showed a strong inhibition of β-glucuronidase enzyme, with IC50 values between 49.0 and 84.9 μM. PMID:24755238

  19. Select steroid hormone glucuronide metabolites can cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Frick, Morin M.; Zhang, Yingning; Maier, Steven F.; Sammakia, Tarek; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that several classes of glucuronide metabolites, including the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide and the ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide, cause toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signalling in vitro and enhanced pain in vivo. Steroid hormones, including estrogens and corticosterone, are also metabolized through glucuronidation. Here we demonstrate that in silico docking predicts that corticosterone, corticosterone-21-glucuronide, estradiol, estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide all dock with the MD-2 component of the TLR4 receptor complex. In addition to each docking with MD-2, the docking of each was altered by pre-docking with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. As agonist versus antagonist activity cannot be determined from these in silico interactions, an in vitro study was undertaken to clarify which of these compounds can act in an agonist fashion. Studies using a cell line transfected with TLR4, necessary co-signaling molecules, and a reporter gene revealed that only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide increased reporter gene product, indicative of TLR4 agonism. Finally, in in vivo studies, each of the 5 drugs was injected intrathecally at equimolar doses. In keeping with the in vitro results, only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide caused enhanced pain. For both compounds, pain enhancement was blocked by the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, evidence for the involvement in TLR4 in the resultant pain enhancement. These findings have implications for several chronic pain conditions, including migraine and tempromandibular joint disorder, in which pain episodes are more likely in cycling females when estradiol is decreasing and estradiol metabolites are at their highest. PMID:25218902

  20. Potent antibacterial activity of halogenated metabolites from Malaysian red algae, Laurencia majuscula (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales).

    PubMed

    Vairappan, Charles S

    2003-07-01

    Red algae genus Laurencia (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales) are known to produce a wide range of chemically interesting secondary halogenated metabolites. This investigation delves upon extraction, isolation, structural elucidation and antibacterial activity of inherently available secondary metabolites of Laurencia majuscula Harvey collected from two locations in waters of Sabah, Malaysia. Two major halogenated compounds, identified as elatol (1) and iso-obtusol (2) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined from their spectroscopic data such as IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and optical rotation. Antibacterial bioassay against human pathogenic bacteria was conducted using disc diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) method. Elatol (1) inhibited six species of bacteria, with significant antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus epidermis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Salmonella sp. while iso-obtusol (2) exhibited antibacterial activity against four bacterial species with significant activity against K. pneumonia and Salmonella sp. Elatol (1) showed equal and better antibacterial activity compared with tested commercial antibiotics while iso-obtusol (2) only equaled the potency of commercial antibiotics against K. pneumonia and Salmonella sp. Further tests conducted using dilution method showed both compounds as having bacteriostatic mode of action against the tested bacteria. PMID:12919806

  1. Low water activity induces the production of bioactive metabolites in halophilic and halotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2010-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  2. Comparative evaluation of two Trichoderma harzianum strains for major secondary metabolite production and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Vivek; Kumar, Jitendra; Rana, Virendra S; Sati, Om P; Walia, S

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to identify the major secondary metabolite, produced by two Trichoderma harzianum strains (T-4 and T-5) with their antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi using poison food technique. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to column chromatography using n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol gradually. Chromatographic separation of ethyl acetate extract of T. harzianum (T-4) resulted in the isolation and identification of palmitic acid (1), 1,8-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone (2), 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (3), 2(5H)-furanone (4), stigmasterol (5) and β-sitosterol (6), while T. harzianum (T-5) gave palmitic acid (1), 1-hydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone (7), δ-decanolactone (8), 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (3), ergosterol (9), harzianopyridone (10) and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trihydroxyanthraquinone (11) as major metabolites. Among compounds screened for antifungal activity, compound 10 was found to be most active (EC50 35.9-50.2 μg mL(-1)). In conclusion, the present investigation provided significant information about antifungal activity and compounds isolated from two different strains of T. harzianum obtained from two different Himalayan locations. PMID:25248548

  3. Endophytic Streptomyces in the traditional medicinal plant Arnica montana L.: secondary metabolites and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wardecki, Tina; Brötz, Elke; De Ford, Christian; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-08-01

    Arnica montana L. is a medical plant of the Asteraceae family and grows preferably on nutrient poor soils in mountainous environments. Such surroundings are known to make plants dependent on symbiosis with other organisms. Up to now only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were found to act as endophytic symbiosis partners for A. montana. Here we identified five Streptomyces strains, microorganisms also known to occur as endophytes in plants and to produce a huge variety of active secondary metabolites, as inhabitants of A. montana. The secondary metabolite spectrum of these strains does not contain sesquiterpene lactones, but consists of the glutarimide antibiotics cycloheximide and actiphenol as well as the diketopiperazines cyclo-prolyl-valyl, cyclo-prolyl-isoleucyl, cyclo-prolyl-leucyl and cyclo-prolyl-phenylalanyl. Notably, genome analysis of one strain was performed and indicated a huge genome size with a high number of natural products gene clusters among which genes for cycloheximide production were detected. Only weak activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was revealed, but the extracts showed a marked cytotoxic activity as well as an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis and Fusarium verticillioides. Altogether, our results provide evidence that A. montana and its endophytic Streptomyces benefit from each other by completing their protection against competitors and pathogens and by exchanging plant growth promoting signals with nutrients.

  4. Potent Antidiabetic Activity and Metabolite Profiling of Melicope Lunu-ankenda Leaves.

    PubMed

    Al-Zuaidy, Mizher Hezam; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Ismail, Amin; Mohamed, Suhaila; Abdul Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Mumtaz, Muhammad Waseem; Salleh, Syafiq Zikri

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is normally characterized by chronic hyperglycemia associated with disturbances in the fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism. There is an increasing trend of using natural products instead of synthetic agents as alternative therapy for disorders due to their fewer side effects. In this study, antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of different Melicope lunu-ankenda (ML) ethanolic extracts were evaluated using inhibition of α-glucosidase and 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging activity, respectively; whereas, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UHPLC-MS/MS) techniques were used for metabolite profiling of ML leaf extracts at different concentrations of ethanol and water. Sixty percent of ethanolic ML extract showed highest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme (IC50 of 37 μg/mL) and DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 of 48 μg/mL). Antidiabetic effect of ML extracts was also evaluated in vivo and it was found that the high doses (400 mg/Kg BW) of ML extract exhibited high suppression in fasting blood glucose level by 62.75%. The metabolites responsible for variation among ML samples with variable ethanolic levels have been evaluated successfully using (1) H-NMR-based metabolomics. The principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares(PLS) analysis scores depicted clear and distinct separations into 4 clusters representing the 4 ethanolic concentrations by PC1 and PC2, with an eigenvalue of 69.9%. Various (1) H-NMR chemical shifts related to the metabolites responsible for sample difference were also ascribed. The main bioactive compounds identified attributing toward the separation included: isorhamnetin, skimmianine, scopoletin, and melicarpinone. Hence, ML may be used as promising medicinal plant for the development of new functional foods, new generation antidiabetic drugs, as a single entity phytomedicine or in

  5. Potent Antidiabetic Activity and Metabolite Profiling of Melicope Lunu-ankenda Leaves.

    PubMed

    Al-Zuaidy, Mizher Hezam; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Ismail, Amin; Mohamed, Suhaila; Abdul Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Mumtaz, Muhammad Waseem; Salleh, Syafiq Zikri

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is normally characterized by chronic hyperglycemia associated with disturbances in the fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism. There is an increasing trend of using natural products instead of synthetic agents as alternative therapy for disorders due to their fewer side effects. In this study, antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of different Melicope lunu-ankenda (ML) ethanolic extracts were evaluated using inhibition of α-glucosidase and 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging activity, respectively; whereas, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UHPLC-MS/MS) techniques were used for metabolite profiling of ML leaf extracts at different concentrations of ethanol and water. Sixty percent of ethanolic ML extract showed highest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme (IC50 of 37 μg/mL) and DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 of 48 μg/mL). Antidiabetic effect of ML extracts was also evaluated in vivo and it was found that the high doses (400 mg/Kg BW) of ML extract exhibited high suppression in fasting blood glucose level by 62.75%. The metabolites responsible for variation among ML samples with variable ethanolic levels have been evaluated successfully using (1) H-NMR-based metabolomics. The principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares(PLS) analysis scores depicted clear and distinct separations into 4 clusters representing the 4 ethanolic concentrations by PC1 and PC2, with an eigenvalue of 69.9%. Various (1) H-NMR chemical shifts related to the metabolites responsible for sample difference were also ascribed. The main bioactive compounds identified attributing toward the separation included: isorhamnetin, skimmianine, scopoletin, and melicarpinone. Hence, ML may be used as promising medicinal plant for the development of new functional foods, new generation antidiabetic drugs, as a single entity phytomedicine or in

  6. The effect of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities on erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Nowacka-Krukowska, Hanna; Bukowska, Bożena

    2014-05-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is used all over the world to protect agricultural and horticultural crops. According to initial reports, glyphosate has been considered to be safe for humans and animals; nevertheless, recent investigations had proven its toxicity. Extensive use of glyphosate and the conviction of its low toxicity leads to a situation in which it is used in excessive amounts in agriculture. That is why, we have investigated the effect of the most commonly used pesticide: glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity (in vitro) in human erythrocytes, which is biochemically similar to acetylcholinesterase present in neural synapses. The analysis of noxious effects of metabolites and impurities of pesticides seems to be very important to evaluate toxicological risk that is associated with the effect of pesticide formulations (requirement of the EU regulations 1107/200/EC). The erythrocytes were incubated with xenobiotics at concentrations range from 0.01 to 5 mM for 1 and 4 h. Statistically significant decrease in AChE activity (about 20%) was observed only at high concentrations of the compounds (0.25-5 mM), which enter body only as a result of acute poisoning. There were no statistically significant differences in the effect of the investigated compounds, while the changes caused by them were similar after 1 and 4 h incubation. The investigated metabolites and impurities did not cause stronger changes in AChE activity than glyphosate itself. It may be concluded that the compounds studied (used in the concentrations that are usually determined in the environment) do not disturb function of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase. PMID:24780534

  7. Green Tea Catechin Metabolites Exert Immunoregulatory Effects on CD4(+) T Cell and Natural Killer Cell Activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Won, Yeong-Seon; Yang, Xue; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Yamashita, Shuya; Hara, Aya; Takagaki, Akiko; Goto, Keiichi; Nanjo, Fumio; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-05-11

    Tea catechins, such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), have been shown to effectively enhance immune activity and prevent cancer, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Green tea catechins are instead converted to catechin metabolites in the intestine. Here, we show that these green tea catechin metabolites enhance CD4(+) T cell activity as well as natural killer (NK) cell activity. Our data suggest that the absence of a 4'-hydroxyl on this phenyl group (B ring) is important for the effect on immune activity. In particular, 5-(3',5'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (EGC-M5), a major metabolite of EGCG, not only increased the activity of CD4(+) T cells but also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in vivo. These data suggest that EGC-M5 might show immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27112424

  8. [The pharmacokinetics of the dipeptide analog of piracetam with nootropic activity GVS-111 and of its basic metabolites].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Zherdev, V P; Dvorianinov, A A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A; Rozantsev, G G; Seredenin, S B

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a new nootropic dipeptide analog of piracetam-N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine (GWS-111) and its main metabolites were studied in rats by means of high performance liquid chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography. The compound under study showed a greater resistance to an enzymatic effect than natural neuropeptides. In addition to an unchanged compound three of its metabolites were found in the blood plasma of the rats. One of them, cyclo-Pro-Gly was an active metabolite of GWS-111. PMID:9206571

  9. CSF levels of receptor-active endorphins in schizophrenic patients: correlations with symptomatology and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lindström, L H; Besev, G; Gunne, L M; Terenius, L

    1986-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of an opioid receptor-active, chromatographically separated endorphin fraction (Fraction I) were measured in 45 schizophrenic patients and 18 healthy volunteers. Significantly increased levels of Fraction I differentiated the patient group from controls, with no difference being found between newly admitted untreated and chronic previously neuroleptic-treated subjects. Fraction I levels did not correlate with age, weight, height, duration of illness, total time hospitalized, or age when symptoms first appeared. No differences were found between patients with or without a family history of schizophrenia. Fraction I levels were negatively correlated with "hallucinations" and "indecision" on the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Increased levels of Fraction I were associated with low levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid in drug-free schizophrenics. This relationship was not present after neuroleptic treatment or in healthy controls. No relationship was found between Fraction I and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Neuroleptic treatment did not significantly change Fraction I levels; when only patients above the control range were considered, however, a significant decrease was observed. The data support our previous hypothesis of an increased opioid activity in schizophrenia and further indicate a concomitant dysfunction of brain endorphin and dopamine activity in schizophrenic patients.

  10. Baicalin, a metabolite of baicalein with antiviral activity against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Ehsan; Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chik, Zamri; Yueh, Andrew; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis, is the main metabolite of baicalein released following administration in different animal models and human. We previously reported the antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus (DENV). Here, we examined the anti-DENV properties of baicalin in vitro, and described the inhibitory potentials of baicalin at different steps of DENV-2 (NGC strain) replication. Our in vitro antiviral experiments showed that baicalin inhibited virus replication at IC50 = 13.5 ± 0.08 μg/ml with SI = 21.5 following virus internalization by Vero cells. Baicalin exhibited virucidal activity against DENV-2 extracellular particles at IC50 = 8.74 ± 0.08 μg/ml and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 18.07 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Our findings showed that baicalin as the main metabolite of baicalein exerting in vitro anti-DENV activity. Further investigations on baicalein and baicalin to deduce its antiviral therapeutic effects are warranted. PMID:24965553

  11. Chlorotriazine herbicides and metabolites activate an ACTH-dependent release of corticosterone in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Laws, Susan C; Hotchkiss, Michelle; Ferrell, Janet; Jayaraman, Saro; Mills, Lesley; Modic, Walker; Tinfo, Nicole; Fraites, Melanie; Stoker, Tammy; Cooper, Ralph

    2009-11-01

    Previously, we reported that atrazine (ATR) alters steroidogenesis in male Wistar rats resulting in elevated serum corticosterone (CORT), progesterone, and estrogens. The increase in CORT indicated that this chlorotriazine herbicide may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This study characterizes the temporal changes in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), CORT, and P4 in male Wistar rats following a single dose of ATR (0, 5, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg), simazine (SIM; 188 mg/kg), propazine (PRO; 213 mg/kg), or primary metabolites, deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 4, 10, 40, 80, and 160 mg/kg), deethylatrazine (DEA; 173 mg/kg), and diamino-s-chlorotriazine (DACT; 3.37, 33.7, 67.5, and 135 mg/kg). The maximum dose for each chemical was the molar equivalent of ATR (200 mg/kg). Significant increases in plasma ACTH were observed within 15 min, following exposure to ATR, SIM, PRO, DIA, or DEA. Dose-dependent elevations in CORT and progesterone were also observed at 15 and 30 min post-dosing with these compounds indicating an activation of adrenal steroidogenesis. Measurement of the plasma concentrations of the parent compounds and metabolites confirmed that ATR, SIM, and PRO are rapidly metabolized to DACT. Although DACT had only minimal effects on ACTH and steroid release, dosing with this metabolite resulted in plasma DACT concentrations that were 60-fold greater than that observed following an equimolar dose of ATR and eightfold greater than equimolar doses of DIA or DEA, indicating that DACT is not likely the primary inducer of ACTH release. Thus, the rapid release of ACTH and subsequent activation of adrenal steroidogenesis following a single exposure to ATR, SIM, PRO, DIA, or DEA may reflect chlorotriazine-induced changes at the level of the brain and/or pituitary.

  12. Antifungal, Phytotoxic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Metabolites from Epichloë bromicola, a Fungus Obtained from Elymus tangutorum Grass.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Nan, Zhi-Biao; Gao, Kun; Song, Hui; Tian, Pei; Zhang, Xing-Xu; Li, Chun-Jie; Xu, Wen-Bo; Li, Xiu-Zhang

    2015-10-14

    The development of high-quality herbage is an important aspect of animal husbandry. Inoculating beneficial fungi onto inferior grass is a feasible strategy for producing new varieties of high-quality herbage. Epichloë bromicola is a candidate fungus that is isolated from Elymus tangutorum. A total of 17 metabolites, 1-17, were obtained from E. bromicola, and their biological activities were assayed. Metabolite 1 exhibited antifungal activities against Alternaria alternata, Fusarium avenaceum, Bipolaris sorokiniana, and Curvularia lunata. EC50 values ranged from 0.7 to 5.3 μM, which were better than the positive control, chlorothalonil. Metabolite 8 displayed obvious phytotoxic effects toward Lolium perenne and Poa crymophila seedlings, and it was as active as glyphosate. None of these isolated metabolites displayed cytotoxicity against Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. The IC50 values were greater than 100 μM, and the metabolites increased the growth of the cells at a concentration of 12.5 μM. The bioassay indicated that E. bromicola may be a beneficial fungus for producing new varieties of herbage with various resistances. Additionally, metabolite 7, 3-(2'-(4″-hydroxyphenyl)acetoxy)-2S-methylpropanoic acid, is a new natural product, and its stereochemistry was determined by means of optical rotation computation and chemical reactions. PMID:26395226

  13. Antifungal, Phytotoxic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Metabolites from Epichloë bromicola, a Fungus Obtained from Elymus tangutorum Grass.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Nan, Zhi-Biao; Gao, Kun; Song, Hui; Tian, Pei; Zhang, Xing-Xu; Li, Chun-Jie; Xu, Wen-Bo; Li, Xiu-Zhang

    2015-10-14

    The development of high-quality herbage is an important aspect of animal husbandry. Inoculating beneficial fungi onto inferior grass is a feasible strategy for producing new varieties of high-quality herbage. Epichloë bromicola is a candidate fungus that is isolated from Elymus tangutorum. A total of 17 metabolites, 1-17, were obtained from E. bromicola, and their biological activities were assayed. Metabolite 1 exhibited antifungal activities against Alternaria alternata, Fusarium avenaceum, Bipolaris sorokiniana, and Curvularia lunata. EC50 values ranged from 0.7 to 5.3 μM, which were better than the positive control, chlorothalonil. Metabolite 8 displayed obvious phytotoxic effects toward Lolium perenne and Poa crymophila seedlings, and it was as active as glyphosate. None of these isolated metabolites displayed cytotoxicity against Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. The IC50 values were greater than 100 μM, and the metabolites increased the growth of the cells at a concentration of 12.5 μM. The bioassay indicated that E. bromicola may be a beneficial fungus for producing new varieties of herbage with various resistances. Additionally, metabolite 7, 3-(2'-(4″-hydroxyphenyl)acetoxy)-2S-methylpropanoic acid, is a new natural product, and its stereochemistry was determined by means of optical rotation computation and chemical reactions.

  14. Understanding the interactions between metabolites isolated from Achyrocline satureioides in relation to its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Joray, Mariana Belén; Palacios, Sara María; Carpinella, María Cecilia

    2013-02-15

    As part of our ongoing research on the antibacterial activity of Achyrocline satureioides, this study seeks to better understand the interactions between the metabolites isolated from this plant. For this purpose, the combined effect of 23-methyl-6-O-desmethylauricepyrone (1), quercetin (2) and 3-O-methylquercetin (3), obtained through bioguided fractionation from A. satureioides ethanol extract, was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In first place, the antibacterial effect of the combination of flavonols 2 and 3 was assessed, as these showed individual effectiveness lower than or equal to that of the fraction from which they were obtained. When the flavonols were applied together at concentrations below their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, a synergistic effect (FICI<0.30) against S. aureus was observed. In addition, compounds 2 and 3 in combination reduced 1000 times the MIC of compound 1, showing a clear synergistic interaction (FICI<0.15) in treatments against the Gram (+) bacterium. The most active combination against E. coli showed an additive interaction (FICI<0.62) between the three assayed compounds 1-3. These results indicated the existence of concerted action between these metabolites, evidence of the importance of the synergistic interactions between the components of plant-derived extracts for the control of pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Urinary metabolites of isorhynchophylline in rats and their neuroprotective activities in the HT22 cell assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangfang; Qi, Wen; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W.; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isorhynchophylline is one of the major alkaloids from the Uncaria hook possessing the effects of lowered blood pressure, vasodilatation and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. However, the metabolic pathway of isorhynchophylline has not been fully reported yet. In this paper, the metabolism of isorhynchophylline was investigated in rats. Five metabolites were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and identified by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR and CD experiments. Three new compounds were identified as 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide (M1), 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro isorhynchophylline (M2) and 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid (M4) together with two known compounds isorhynchophylline (M0) and rhynchophylline (M3). Possible metabolic pathways of isorhynchophylline are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for all the metabolites showed that isorhynchophylline (M0) exhibited potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M1–M4. Our present study is important to further understand its metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:24910000

  16. In vitro metabolism of pyripyropene A and ACAT inhibitory activity of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohtawa, Masaki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pyripyropene A (PPPA, 1) of fungal origin, a selective inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), proved orally active in atherogenic mouse models. The in vitro metabolites of 1 in liver microsomes and plasma of human, rabbit, rat and mouse were analyzed by ultra fast liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In the liver microsomes from all species, successive hydrolysis occurred at the 1-O-acetyl residue, then at the 11-O-acetyl residue of 1, while the 7-O-acetyl residue was resistant to hydrolysis. Furthermore, dehydrogenation of the newly generated 11-alcoholic hydroxyl residue occurred in human and mouse-liver microsomes, while oxidation of the pyridine ring occurred in human and rabbit liver microsomes. On the other hand, hydrolysis of the 7-O-acetyl residue proceeded only in the mouse plasma. These data indicated that the in vitro metabolic profiles of 1 have subtle differences among animal species. All of the PPPA metabolites observed in liver microsomes and plasma markedly decreased ACAT2 inhibitory activity. These findings will help us to synthesize new PPPA derivatives more effective in in vivo study than 1. PMID:25005817

  17. Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Activity of Extracts of Ferula heuffelii Griseb. ex Heuff. and Its Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Ivan; Petrović, Silvana; Milenković, Marina; Stanojković, Tatjana; Nikolić, Dejan; Krunić, Aleksej; Niketić, Marjan

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of isolates (CHCl3 and MeOH extracts and selected metabolites) obtained from the underground parts of the Balkan endemic plant Ferula heuffelii Griseb. ex Heuff. were assessed. The CHCl3 and MeOH extracts exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity, being more pronounced against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria, especially against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=12.5 μg/ml for both extracts) and Micrococcus luteus (MIC=50 and 12.5 μg/ml, resp.). Among the tested metabolites, (6E)-1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,7,11-trimethyl-3-vinyldodeca-6,10-dien-1-one (2) and (2S*,3R*)-2-[(3E)-4,8-dimethylnona-3,7-dien-1-yl]-2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2,3-dimethylfuro[3,2-c]coumarin (4) demonstrated the best antimicrobial activity. Compounds 2 and 4 both strongly inhibited the growth of M. luteus (MIC=11.2 and 5.2 μM, resp.) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC=22.5 and 10.5 μM, resp.) and compound 2 additionally also the growth of Bacillus subtilis (MIC=11.2 μM). The cytotoxic activity of the isolates was tested against three human cancer cell lines, viz., cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa), chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562), and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The CHCl3 extract exhibited strong cytotoxic activity against all cell lines (IC50 <11.0 μg/ml). All compounds strongly inhibited the growth of the K562 and HeLa cell lines. Compound 4 exhibited also a strong activity against the MCF-7 cell line, comparable to that of cisplatin (IC50 =22.32±1.32 vs. 18.67±0.75μM). PMID:26460563

  18. Seasonal profiles of ovarian activity in Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) based on urinary hormone metabolite analyses.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, K; Göritz, F; Vargas, A; Dehnhard, M

    2009-07-01

    The Iberian Lynx Ex-Situ Conservation Programme is an essential part of a co-ordinated action plan to conserve the most endangered felid species of the world. Successful captive breeding demands reliable methods for reproduction monitoring including reliable non-invasive pregnancy diagnosis. During a 3-year study, urine samples from six captive Iberian lynx females were obtained (one non-pregnant, one pseudo-pregnant and 11 pregnant cycles). Progesterone, pregnanediol and oestradiol were determined in urinary extracts and relevant urinary oestrogen metabolites were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Urinary progestins did not follow the typical pregnancy-related course of felids. In the lynx, we failed to demonstrate an urinary progestin elevation during pregnancy. In contrast, urinary oestrogens increased from 3.8 +/- 0.6 to 8.6 +/- 0.5 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.001) during the pregnancy. A comparison of pseudo-pregnant with pregnant cycles revealed a further increase of oestrogens caused by implantation (p < 0.05). In one female, which refused to mate, no difference was estimated between oestrogens levels during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Almost 10-fold higher oestrogen concentrations were measured in urines of females that shared enclosures with males. HPLC analysis of oestrogens in urine samples collected from Iberian lynx during the pregnancy revealed that lynx urine is composed of two polar oestrogen metabolites in addition to oestrone and minor amounts of oestradiol. Oestrone was detectable in all urinary extracts (8-12% of metabolites), whereas oestradiol was elevated only during late pregnancy (18%). Thus, seasonal luteal activity in Iberian lynx can be monitored by urinary oestrogens. The increase of urinary oestradiol during late pregnancy might indicate an oestradiol secretion by the lynx placenta.

  19. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of piperaquine and 97-63, the active metabolite of CDRI 97-78, in rat plasma and its application in interaction study.

    PubMed

    Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Taneja, Isha; Raju, Kanumuri Siva Rama; Gayen, Jiaur Rahman; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin combination is the latest addition to the repertoire of ACTs recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for treatment of falciparum malaria. Due to the increasing resistance to artemisinin derivatives, CSIR-CDRI has developed a prospective short acting, trioxane antimalarial derivative, CDRI 97-78. In the present study, a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantification of piperaquine (PPQ) and 97-63, the active metabolite of CDRI 97-78 found in vivo, was developed and validated in 100 μL rat plasma using halofantrine as internal standard. PPQ and 97-63 were separated using acetonitrile:methanol (50:50, v/v) and ammonium formate buffer (10 mM, pH 4.5) in the ratio of 95:5(v/v) as mobile phase under isocratic conditions at a flow rate of 0.65 mL/min on Waters Atlantis C18 (4.6 × 50 mm, 5.0 µm) column. The extraction recoveries of PPQ and 97-63 ranged from 90.58 to 105.48%, while for the internal standard, it was 94.27%. The method was accurate and precise in the linearity range 3.9-250 ng/mL for both the analytes, with a correlation coefficient (r) of ≥ 0.998. The intra- and inter-day assay precision ranged from 2.91 to 8.45% and; intra- and inter-day assay accuracy was between 92.50 and 110.20% for both the analytes. The method was successfully applied to study the effect of oral co-administration of PPQ on the pharmacokinetics of CDRI 97-78 in Sprague-dawley rats and vice versa. The co-administration of CDRI 97-78 caused significant decrease in AUC0-∞ of PPQ from 31.52 ± 2.68 to 14.84 ± 4.33 h*µg/mL. However, co-administration of PPQ did not have any significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of CDRI 97-78. PMID:25975936

  20. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced.

  1. Isophosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of ifosfamide with activity against murine tumours comparable to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed Central

    Struck, R. F.; Dykes, D. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Suling, W. J.; Trader, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Isophosphoramide mustard was synthesized and was found to demonstrate activity essentially comparable to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide against L1210 and P388 leukaemia. Lewis lung carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma 16/C, ovarian sarcoma M5076, and colon tumour 6A, in mice and Yoshida ascitic sarcoma in rats. At doses less than, or equivalent to, the LD10, isophosphoramide mustard retained high activity against cyclophosphamide-resistant L1210 and P388 leukaemias, but was less active against intracerebrally-implanted P388 leukaemia while cyclophosphamide produced a 4 log10 tumour cell reduction. It was also less active (one log10 lower cell kill) than cyclophosphamide against the B16 melonoma. Metabolism studies on ifosfamide in mice identified isophosphoramide mustard in blood. In addition, unchanged drug, carboxyifosfamide, 4-ketoifosfamide, dechloroethyl cyclophosphamide, dechloroethylifosfamide, and alcoifosfamide were identified. The latter 4 metabolites were also identified in urine from an ifosfamide-treated dog. In a simulated in vitro pharmacokinetic experiment against L1210 leukaemia in which drugs were incubated at various concentrations for various times, both 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and isophosphoramide mustard exhibited significant cytoxicity at concentration times time values of 100-1000 micrograms X min ml-1, while acrolein was significantly cytotoxic at 10 micrograms X min ml-1. Treatment of mice with drug followed by L1210 cells demonstrated a shorter duration of effective levels of cytotoxic activity for isophosphoramide mustard and phosphoramide mustard in comparison with cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide. Isophosphoramide mustard and 2-chloroethylamine, a potential hydrolysis product of isophosphoramide mustard and carboxyifosfamide, were less mutagenic in the standard Ames test than the 2 corresponding metabolites of cyclophosphamide [phosphoramide mustard and bis(2-chloroethyl)amine]. PMID:6821629

  2. Biotransformation of bisphenol AF to its major glucuronide metabolite reduces estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yang, Yunjia; Yang, Yi; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF), an endocrine disrupting chemical, can induce estrogenic activity through binding to estrogen receptor (ER). However, the metabolism of BPAF in vivo and the estrogenic activity of its metabolites remain unknown. In the present study, we identified four metabolites including BPAF diglucuronide, BPAF glucuronide (BPAF-G), BPAF glucuronide dehydrated and BPAF sulfate in the urine of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BPAF-G was further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). After treatment with a single dose of BPAF, BPAF was metabolized rapidly to BPAF-G, as detected in the plasma of SD rats. Biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G was confirmed with human liver microsomes (HLM), and Vmax of glucuronidation for HLM was 11.6 nmol/min/mg. We also found that BPAF glucuronidation could be mediated through several human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) including UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, among which UGT2B7 showed the highest efficiency of glucuronidation. To explain the biological function of BPAF biotransformation, the estrogenic activities of BPAF and BPAF-G were evaluated in ER-positive breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cells. BPAF significantly stimulates ER-regulated gene expression and cell proliferation at the dose of 100 nM and 1 μM in breast cancer cells. However, BPAF-G did not show any induction of estrogenic activity at the same dosages, implying that formation of BPAF-G is a potential host defense mechanism against BPAF. Based on our study, biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G can eliminate BPAF-induced estrogenic activity, which is therefore considered as reducing the potential threat to human beings. PMID:24349450

  3. In-stream attenuation of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their metabolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Ferrar, Imma; Ryan, Joseph N.; Thurman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In-stream attenuation was determined for 14 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites. Lagrangian sampling, which follows a parcel of water as it moves downstream, was used to link hydrological and chemical transformation processes. Wastewater loading of neuro-active compounds varied considerably over a span of several hours, and thus a sampling regime was used to verify that the Lagrangian parcel was being sampled and a mechanism was developed to correct measured concentrations if it was not. In-stream attenuation over the 5.4-km evaluated reach could be modeled as pseudo-first-order decay for 11 of the 14 evaluated neuro-active pharmaceutical compounds, illustrating the capacity of streams to reduce conveyance of neuro-active compounds downstream. Fluoxetine and N-desmethyl citalopram were the most rapidly attenuated compounds (t1/2 = 3.6 ± 0.3 h, 4.0 ± 0.2 h, respectively). Lamotrigine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxy-carbamazepine, and carbamazepine were the most persistent (t1/2 = 12 ± 2.0 h, 12 ± 2.6 h, 21 ± 4.5 h, respectively). Parent compounds (e.g., buproprion, carbamazepine, lamotrigine) generally were more persistent relative to their metabolites. Several compounds (citalopram, venlafaxine, O-desmethyl-venlafaxine) were not attenuated. It was postulated that the primary mechanism of removal for these compounds was interaction with bed sediments and stream biofilms, based on measured concentrations in stream biofilms and a column experiment using stream sediments.

  4. Continuing hunt for endophytic actinomycetes as a source of novel biologically active metabolites.

    PubMed

    Masand, Meeta; Jose, Polpass Arul; Menghani, Ekta; Jebakumar, Solomon Robinson David

    2015-12-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens and persistent agrochemicals mount the detrimental threats against human health and welfare. Exploitation of beneficial microorganisms and their metabolic inventions is most promising way to tackle these two problems. Since the successive discoveries of penicillin and streptomycin in 1940s, numerous biologically active metabolites have been discovered from different microorganisms, especially actinomycetes. In recent years, actinomycetes that inhabit unexplored environments have received significant attention due to their broad diversity and distinctive metabolic potential with medical, agricultural and industrial importance. In this scenario, endophytic actinomycetes that inhabit living tissues of plants are emerging as a potential source of novel bioactive compounds for the discovery of drug leads. Also, endophytic actinomycetes are considered as bio-inoculants to improve crop performance through organic farming practices. Further efforts on exploring the endophytic actinomycetes associated with the plants warrant the likelihood of discovering new taxa and their metabolites with novel chemical structures and biotechnological importance. This mini-review highlights the recent achievements in isolation of endophytic actinomycetes and an assortment of bioactive compounds.

  5. Atrazine and its main metabolites alter the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yueyi; Zhu, Zhihong; Yang, Enlu; Feng, Xiayan; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and its main chlorometabolites, i.e., diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), deisopropylatrazine (DIP), and deethylatrazine (DE), have been widely detected in aquatic systems near agricultural fields. However, their possible effects on aquatic animals are still not fully understood. In this study, it was observed that several developmental endpoints such as the heart beat, hatchability, and morphological abnormalities were influenced by ATZ and its metabolites in different developmental stages. In addition, after 5 days of exposure to 30, 100, 300 μg L(-1) ATZ and its main chlorometabolites, the swimming behaviors of larval zebrafish were significantly disturbed, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were consistently inhibited. Our results also demonstrate that ATZ and its main chlorometabolites are neuroendocrine disruptors that impact the expression of neurotoxicity-related genes such as Ache, Gap43, Gfap, Syn2a, Shha, Mbp, Elavl3, Nestin and Ngn1 in early developmental stages of zebrafish. According to our results, it is possible that not only ATZ but also its metabolites (DACT, DIP and DE) have the same or even more toxic effects on different endpoints of the early developmental stages of zebrafish.

  6. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (+)-longicyclene.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kazuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-08-25

    In this study, biotransformation of (+)-longicyclene (1) by Aspergillus niger (NBRC 4414) and the suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, compound 1 was converted to three new terpenoids, (-)-(10R)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (2), (+)-(10S)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (3), and (+)-10-oxo-longicyclic acid (4) by A. niger , and their conversion rates were 27, 23, and 30%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramide and AFB1 in the umu test. Compounds 1-4 were hardly showing a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS responses in S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 against furylfuramid. However, metabolites showed a suppressive effect against AFB1. Compound 4 had gene expression by chemical mutagen AFB1, was suppressed 53% at <1.0 mM, and was the most effective compound in this experiment. PMID:20662538

  7. L-Cysteine and glutathione restore the reduction of rat hippocampal Na+, K+-ATPase activity induced by aspartame metabolites.

    PubMed

    Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Angelogianni, Panagoula; Liapi, Charis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-07-31

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) ingestion in neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities after incubation with ASP or each of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (MeOH) and aspartic acid (asp) separately. Suckling rat hippocampal homogenates or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were incubated with ASP metabolites. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of hippocampal or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with ASP concentrations (expected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) after ASP consumption of 34, 150 or 200mg/kg resulted in hippocampal enzyme activity reduction of 26%, 50% or 59%, respectively, whereas pure enzyme was remarkably stimulated. Moreover, incubation with hippocampal homogenate of each one of the corresponding in the CSF ASP metabolites related to the intake of common, high/abuse doses of the sweetener, inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, while pure enzyme was activated. Hippocampal Mg(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. Addition of l-cysteine (cys) or reduced glutathione (GSH) in ASP mixtures, related with high/toxic doses of the sweetener, completely or partially restored the inactivated membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whereas the activated pure enzyme activity returned to normal. CSF concentrations of ASP metabolites related to common, abuse/toxic doses of the additive significantly reduced rat hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pure enzyme was activated. Cys or GSH completely or partially restored both enzyme activities.

  8. The antitumor activity study of ginsenosides and metabolites in lung cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng-Yuan; Shang, Wen-Qing; Yu, Jia-Jun; Sun, Qian; Li, Ming-Qing; Sun, Jian-Song

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng and its components exert various biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, and antitumor activity. Ginsenosides are the main biological components of ginseng. Protopanaxadiol (PPD) and protopanaxatriol (PPT) are two metabolites of ginsenosides. However, the difference between these compounds in anti-lung cancer is unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor activity of PPD, PPT, Ginsenosides-Rg3 (G-Rg3) and Ginsenosides-Rh2 (G-Rh2) in lung cancer cell. After treatment with cisplatin, PPD, PPT, G-Rg3 or G-Rh2, the viability, apoptosis level and invasiveness of lung cell lines (A549 cell, a lung adenocarcinoma cell line and SK-MES-1 cell, a lung squamous cell line) in vitro were analyzed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), Annexin V/PI apoptosis and Matrigel invasion assays, respectively. Here we found that all these compounds led to significant decreases of viability and invasiveness and an obvious increase of apoptosis of A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. Among these, the viability of SK-MES-1 cell treated with PPT was decreased to 66.8%, and this effect was closest to Cisplatin. G-Rg3 had the highest stimulatory effect on apoptosis, and PTT had the highest inhibitory effect on cell invasiveness in A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. These results indicate that both ginsenosides and two metabolites have antitumor activity on lung cancer cell in vitro. However, PPT is more powerful for inhibiting the viability and invasiveness of lung cancer cell, especially lung squamous cell. G-Rg3 has the best pro-apoptosis effects. This study provides a scientific basis for potential therapeutic strategies targeted to lung cancer by further structure modification. PMID:27186294

  9. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  10. Metabolites in safety testing assessment in early clinical development: a case study with a glucokinase activator.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Litchfield, John; Atkinson, Karen; Eng, Heather; Amin, Neeta B; Denney, William S; Pettersen, John C; Goosen, Theunis C; Di, Li; Lee, Esther; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2014-11-01

    The present article summarizes Metabolites in Safety Testing (MIST) studies on a glucokinase activator, N,N-dimethyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide (PF-04937319), which is under development for the treatment of type 2 diametes mellitus. Metabolic profiling in rat, dog, and human hepatocytes revealed that PF-04937319 is metabolized via oxidative (major) and hydrolytic pathways (minor). N-Demethylation to metabolite M1 [N-methyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide] was the major metabolic fate of PF-04937319 in human (but not rat or dog) hepatocytes, and was catalyzed by CYP3A and CYP2C isoforms. Qualitative examination of circulating metabolites in humans at the 100- and 300-mg doses from a 14-day multiple dose study revealed unchanged parent drug and M1 as principal components. Because M1 accounted for 65% of the drug-related material at steady state, an authentic standard was synthesized and used for comparison of steady-state exposures in humans and the 3-month safety studies in rats and dogs at the no-observed-adverse-effect level. Although circulating levels of M1 were very low in beagle dogs and female rats, adequate coverage was obtained in terms of total maximal plasma concentration (∼7.7× and 1.8×) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; 3.6× and 0.8× AUC) relative to the 100- and 300-mg doses, respectively, in male rats. Examination of primary pharmacology revealed M1 was less potent as a glucokinase activator than the parent drug (compound PF-04937319: EC50 = 0.17 μM; M1: EC50 = 4.69 μM). Furthermore, M1 did not inhibit major human P450 enzymes (IC50 > 30 μM), and was negative in the Salmonella Ames assay, with minimal off-target pharmacology, based on CEREP broad ligand profiling. Insights gained from this analysis should lead to a more efficient and focused development plan for fulfilling MIST requirements with

  11. Anticancer activity and mechanism investigation of beauvericin isolated from secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-wen; Lin, Yong-cheng; She, Zhi-gang; Lin, Min-ting; Chen, Pin-xian; Zhang, Jian-ye

    2015-01-01

    One known cyclic peptide, beauvericin, was isolated from the secondary metabolites of mangrove endophytic fungi Fusarium sp. (No. DZ27) in South China Sea. Its structure was determined by spectral analyses and comparisons with reference data from literatures. Beauvericin inhibited growth of KB and KBv200 cells potently with IC50 values of 5.76 ± 0.55 and 5.34 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, beauvericin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway, including decrease of relative oxygen species generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, activation of Caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Additionally, regulation of Bcl-2 or Bax was not involved in the apoptosis induced by beauvericin in KB and KBv200 cells. PMID:25641103

  12. Isolation, antimicrobial activity, and metabolites of fungus Cladosporium sp. associated with red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Qin, Song; Li, Fuchao; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Cladosporium sp. isolate N5 was isolated as a dominant fungus from the healthy conchocelis of Porphyra yezoensis. In the re-infection test, it did not cause any pathogenic symptoms in the alga. Twenty-one cultural conditions were chosen to test its antimicrobial activity in order to obtain the best condition for large-scale fermentation. Phenylacetic acid, p-hydroxyphenylethyl alcohol, and L-beta-phenyllactic acid were isolated from the crude extract as strong antimicrobial compounds and they are the first reported secondary metabolites for the genus Cladosporium. In addition, the Cladosporium sp. produced the reported Porphyra yezoensis growth regulators phenylacetic acid and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. No cytotoxicity was found in the brine shrimp lethality test, which indicated that the environmental-friendly Cladosporium sp. could be used as a potential biocontrol agent to protect the alga from pathogens.

  13. Secondary metabolites from Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) and the vasorelaxant activity of cryptolepinone.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Otemberg Souza; Gomes, Roosevelt Albuquerque; Tomaz, Anna Cláudia de Andrade; Fernandes, Marianne Guedes; das Graças Mendes, Leônidas; de Fátima Agra, Maria; Braga, Valdir Andrade; de Fátima Vanderlei de Souza, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The phytochemical study of Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) led to the isolation through chromatographic techniques of eleven secondary metabolites: sitosterol (1a) and stigmasterol (1b), sitosterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2a) and stigmasterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2b), phaeophytin A (3), 17³-ethoxypheophorbide A (4), 13²-hydroxy phaeophytin B (5), 17³-ethoxypheophorbide B (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone (7), cryptolepinone (8) and a salt of cryptolepine (9). Their structures were identified by ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR using one- and two-dimensional techniques. In addition, the vasorelaxant activity of cryptolepinone in rat mesenteric artery rings is reported herein for the first time.

  14. Anticancer activity and mechanism investigation of beauvericin isolated from secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-wen; Lin, Yong-cheng; She, Zhi-gang; Lin, Min-ting; Chen, Pin-xian; Zhang, Jian-ye

    2015-01-01

    One known cyclic peptide, beauvericin, was isolated from the secondary metabolites of mangrove endophytic fungi Fusarium sp. (No. DZ27) in South China Sea. Its structure was determined by spectral analyses and comparisons with reference data from literatures. Beauvericin inhibited growth of KB and KBv200 cells potently with IC50 values of 5.76 ± 0.55 and 5.34 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, beauvericin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway, including decrease of relative oxygen species generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, activation of Caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Additionally, regulation of Bcl-2 or Bax was not involved in the apoptosis induced by beauvericin in KB and KBv200 cells.

  15. Biotransformation of finasteride by Ocimum sanctum L., and tyrosinase inhibitory activity of transformed metabolites: experimental and computational insights.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sajid; Nisar, Muhammad; Iriti, Marcello; Shah, Mohammad Raza; Mahmud, Maqsood; Ali, Ihsan; Khan, Inamullah

    2014-12-01

    Transformation of Finasteride (I) by cell suspension cultures of Ocimum sanctum L. was investigated. Fermentation of compound (I) with O. sanctum afforded three oxidized derivatives, 16β-hydroxyfinasteride (II), 11α-hydroxyfinasteride (III) and 15β-hydroxyfinasteride (IV). Among these metabolites, compound (II) was a new metabolite. Compound (I) and its derivatives were studied for their tyrosinase inhibition assay. All test compounds exhibited significant activity compared to standard drug kojic acid, with compound IV being the most potent member with an IC50 of 1.87μM. Molecular docking revealed significant molecular interactions behind the potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity of the tested compounds. PMID:25159102

  16. Metabolite fingerprinting of pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) embryos to assess active pathways during oil synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsogtbaatar, Enkhtuul; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; Sonera, Marcos Corchado; Alonso, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.), a plant naturalized to North America, accumulates high levels of erucic acid in its seeds, which makes it a promising biodiesel and industrial crop. The main carbon sinks in pennycress embryos were found to be proteins, fatty acids, and cell wall, which respectively represented 38.5, 33.2, and 27.0% of the biomass at 21 days after pollination. Erucic acid reached a maximum of 36% of the total fatty acids. Together these results indicate that total oil and erucic acid contents could be increased to boost the economic competitiveness of this crop. Understanding the biochemical basis of oil synthesis in pennycress embryos is therefore timely and relevant to guide future breeding and/or metabolic engineering efforts. For this purpose, a combination of metabolomics approaches was conducted to assess the active biochemical pathways during oil synthesis. First, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiling of intracellular metabolites highlighted three main families of compounds: organic acids, amino acids, and sugars/sugar alcohols. Secondly, these intermediates were quantified in developing pennycress embryos by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Finally, partitional clustering analysis grouped the intracellular metabolites that shared a similar pattern of accumulation over time into eight clusters. This study underlined that: (i) sucrose might be stored rather than cleaved into hexoses; (ii) glucose and glutamine would be the main sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; and (iii) glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin cycle were active in developing pennycress embryos. PMID:25711705

  17. Contribution of phlA and some metabolites of fluorescent pseudomonads to antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Afsharmanesh, H; Ahmadzadeh, M; Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Javan-Nikkhah, M; Ghazanfari, K

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas species are an important group of PGPR that suppress fungal root and seedling disease by production of antifungal metabolites such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG), pyoluteorin, pyrolinitrin, siderophores and HCN. The compound 2,4-DAPG is a major determinant in biocontrol of plant pathogens. A 7.2 kbp chromosomal DNA region, carrying DAPG biosynthetic genes (phlA, phlC, phlB, phlD, phIE and phlF). Detecting the ph1 genes make them an ideal marker gene for 2,4-DAPG-producing fluorescent pseudomonad's. In this study we detected ph1A gene (that convert MAPG to 2,4-DAPG) using PCR assay with primers phlA-1r and phlA- f that enabled amplification of phlA sequences from fluorescent pseudomonad's from ARDRA group 1 and 3. We could detect phlA gene in P. fluorescens strains CHAO, Pf-44, Pf-1, Pf-2, Pf-3, Pf-17, Pf-62 and Pf-64, native isolates of Iran. The efficacy of this method for rapid assay characterizing rhizosphere population of 2,4-DAPG producing bacteria from soil of different area of Iran is in progress. We used a collection of 48 fluorescent pseudomonas strains in vitro, with known biological control activity against some soil born phytopathogenic fungi such as, Macrophomina phaseoli, Rhizoctonia solani Vericillium dahlia, Phytophthora nicotiana, Pythium spp. and Fusarium spp. and the potential to produce known secondary metabolites such as protease. Strains Pf-1, Pf-2, Pf-3, Pf-17, Pf-33 and Pf-44 showed the best antifungal activity against all fungi used in this study. Thirty-eight of 48 strains produced protease. The ability to rapidly characterize populations of 2,4-DAPG producers will greatly enhance our understanding of their role in the suppression of root disease. PMID:16637170

  18. Colon cancer chemopreventive effects of baicalein, an active enteric microbiome metabolite from baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Chen, Lina; Anderson, Samantha; Lu, Fang; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-11-01

    Baicalin is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, which is a commonly used herbal medicine in many Asian countries. After oral ingestion, intestinal microbiota metabolism may change parent compound's structure and its biological activities. However, whether baicalin can be metabolized by enteric microbiota and the related anticancer activity is not clear. In this study, using human enteric microbiome incubation and HPLC analysis, we observed that baicalin can be quickly converted to baicalein. We compared the antiproliferative effects of baicalin and baicalein using a panel of human cancer cell lines, including three human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. In vitro antiproliferative effects on CRC cells were verified using an in vivo xenograft nude mouse model. Baicalin showed limited antiproliferative effects on some of these cancer cell lines. Baicalein, however, showed significant antiproliferative effects in all the tested cancer cell lines, especially on HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. In vivo antitumor results supported our in vitro data. We demonstrated that baicalein exerts potent S phase cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects in HCT-116 cells. Baicalein induced the activation of caspase 3 and 9. The in silico modeling suggested that baicalein forms hydrogen bonds with residues Ser251 and Asp253 at the active site of caspase 3, while interactions with residues Leu227 and Asp228 in caspase 9 through its hydroxyl groups. Data from this study suggested that baicalein is a potent anticancer metabolite derived from S. baicalensis. Enteric microbiota play a key role in the colon cancer chemoprevention of S. baicalensis.

  19. Assessment of the Potential Biological Activity of Low Molecular Weight Metabolites of Freshwater Macrophytes with QSAR

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Elena V.; Krylova, Julia V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on the assessment of the spectrum of biological activities (antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial) with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) for the major components of three macrophytes widespread in the Holarctic species of freshwater, emergent macrophyte with floating leaves, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., and two species of submergent macrophyte groups, Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton obtusifolius (Mert. et Koch), for the discovery of their ecological and pharmacological potential. The predicted probability of anti-inflammatory or antineoplastic activities above 0.8 was observed for twenty compounds. The same compounds were also characterized by high probability of antifungal and antibacterial activity. Six metabolites, namely, hexanal, pentadecanal, tetradecanoic acid, dibutyl phthalate, hexadecanoic acid, and manool, were a part of the major components of all three studied plants, indicating their high ecological significance and a certain universalism in their use by various species of water plants for the implementation of ecological and biochemical functions. This report underlines the role of identified compounds not only as important components in regulation of biochemical and metabolic pathways and processes in aquatic ecological systems, but also as potential pharmacological agents in the fight against different diseases. PMID:27200207

  20. Antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the lichen Xanthoria parietina and its secondary metabolite parietin.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Loppi, Stefano; Di Santi, Annalisa; Nebbioso, Angela; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Paoli, Luca; De Ruberto, Francesca; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia; Bontempo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus) Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances.

  1. Assessment of the Potential Biological Activity of Low Molecular Weight Metabolites of Freshwater Macrophytes with QSAR.

    PubMed

    Kurashov, Evgeny A; Fedorova, Elena V; Krylova, Julia V; Mitrukova, Galina G

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on the assessment of the spectrum of biological activities (antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial) with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) for the major components of three macrophytes widespread in the Holarctic species of freshwater, emergent macrophyte with floating leaves, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., and two species of submergent macrophyte groups, Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton obtusifolius (Mert. et Koch), for the discovery of their ecological and pharmacological potential. The predicted probability of anti-inflammatory or antineoplastic activities above 0.8 was observed for twenty compounds. The same compounds were also characterized by high probability of antifungal and antibacterial activity. Six metabolites, namely, hexanal, pentadecanal, tetradecanoic acid, dibutyl phthalate, hexadecanoic acid, and manool, were a part of the major components of all three studied plants, indicating their high ecological significance and a certain universalism in their use by various species of water plants for the implementation of ecological and biochemical functions. This report underlines the role of identified compounds not only as important components in regulation of biochemical and metabolic pathways and processes in aquatic ecological systems, but also as potential pharmacological agents in the fight against different diseases. PMID:27200207

  2. Antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the lichen Xanthoria parietina and its secondary metabolite parietin.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Loppi, Stefano; Di Santi, Annalisa; Nebbioso, Angela; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Paoli, Luca; De Ruberto, Francesca; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia; Bontempo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus) Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances. PMID:25860944

  3. Antiproliferative, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of the Lichen Xanthoria parietina and Its Secondary Metabolite Parietin

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Loppi, Stefano; Di Santi, Annalisa; Nebbioso, Angela; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Paoli, Luca; De Ruberto, Francesca; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia; Bontempo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus) Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances. PMID:25860944

  4. Radical-scavenging activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Yokoe, Ichiro

    2004-07-01

    To clarify the radical-scavenging activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a food additive, stoichiometric factors (n) and inhibition rate constants (kinh) were determined for 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) and its metabolites 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-Q), 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHA-CHO) and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxy-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadiene-1-one (BHT-OOH). Values of n and kinh were determined from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) monitoring of the polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) initiated by 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) at 70 degrees C in the presence or absence of antioxidants (BHT-related compounds). The n values declined in the order BHT (1-2) > BHT-CHO, BHT-OOH (0.1-0.3) > BHT-Q ( approximately 0). The n value for BHT with AIBN was approximately 1.0, suggesting dimerization of BHT. The kinh values declined in the order BHT-Q ((3.5-4.6) x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT-OOH (0.7-1.9 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT-CHO ((0.4-1.7 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT ((0.1-0.2 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)). The kinh for metabolites was greater than that for the parent BHT. Growing MMA radicals initiated by BPO were suppressed much more efficiently by BHT or BHT-Q compared with those initiated by AIBN. BHT was effective as a chain-breaking antioxidant. PMID:15172835

  5. Structural Characterization of a Therapeutic Anti-Methamphetamine Antibody Fragment: Oligomerization and Binding of Active Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines and monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for treatment of (+)-methamphetamine (METH) abuse are in late stage preclinical and early clinical trial phases, respectively. These immunotherapies work as pharmacokinetic antagonists, sequestering METH and its metabolites away from sites of action in the brain and reduce the rewarding and toxic effects of the drug. A key aspect of these immunotherapy strategies is the understanding of the subtle molecular interactions important for generating antibodies with high affinity and specificity for METH. We previously determined crystal structures of a high affinity anti-METH therapeutic single chain antibody fragment (scFv6H4, KD = 10 nM) in complex with METH and the (+) stereoisomer of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or “ecstasy”). Here we report the crystal structure of scFv6H4 in homo-trimeric unbound (apo) form (2.60Å), as well as monomeric forms in complex with two active metabolites; (+)-amphetamine (AMP, 2.38Å) and (+)-4-hydroxy methamphetamine (p-OH-METH, 2.33Å). The apo structure forms a trimer in the crystal lattice and it results in the formation of an intermolecular composite beta-sheet with a three-fold symmetry. We were also able to structurally characterize the coordination of the His-tags with Ni2+. Two of the histidine residues of each C-terminal His-tag interact with Ni2+ in an octahedral geometry. In the apo state the CDR loops of scFv6H4 form an open conformation of the binding pocket. Upon ligand binding, the CDR loops adopt a closed formation, encasing the drug almost completely. The structural information reported here elucidates key molecular interactions important in anti-methamphetamine abuse immunotherapy. PMID:24349338

  6. Radical-scavenging activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Yokoe, Ichiro

    2004-07-01

    To clarify the radical-scavenging activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a food additive, stoichiometric factors (n) and inhibition rate constants (kinh) were determined for 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) and its metabolites 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-Q), 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHA-CHO) and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxy-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadiene-1-one (BHT-OOH). Values of n and kinh were determined from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) monitoring of the polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) initiated by 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) at 70 degrees C in the presence or absence of antioxidants (BHT-related compounds). The n values declined in the order BHT (1-2) > BHT-CHO, BHT-OOH (0.1-0.3) > BHT-Q ( approximately 0). The n value for BHT with AIBN was approximately 1.0, suggesting dimerization of BHT. The kinh values declined in the order BHT-Q ((3.5-4.6) x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT-OOH (0.7-1.9 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT-CHO ((0.4-1.7 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)) > BHT ((0.1-0.2 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1)). The kinh for metabolites was greater than that for the parent BHT. Growing MMA radicals initiated by BPO were suppressed much more efficiently by BHT or BHT-Q compared with those initiated by AIBN. BHT was effective as a chain-breaking antioxidant.

  7. Anti-microfouling activity of lipidic metabolites from the invasive brown alga Sargassum muticum (Yendo) Fensholt.

    PubMed

    Plouguerné, Erwan; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios; Hellio, Claire; Kraffe, Edouard; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie

    2010-02-01

    The purification of the chloroform extract from the brown invasive macroalga Sargassum muticum, through a series of chromatographic separations, yielded 12 fractions that were tested against strains of bacteria, microalgae, and fungi involved in marine biofilm formation. The chemical composition of four (a, c, g, and k) out of the six fractions that exhibited anti-microfouling activity was investigated. Fraction a contained saturated and unsaturated linear hydrocarbons (C12-C27). Arachidonic acid was identified as the major metabolite in fraction c whereas fraction g contained mainly palmitic, linolenic, and palmitoleic acids. Fraction k was submitted to further purification yielding the fraction kAcaF1e that was composed of galactoglycerolipids, active against the growth of two of the four bacterial strains (Shewanella putrefaciens and Polaribacter irgensii) and all tested fungi. These promising results, in particular the isolation and the activity of galactoglycerolipids, attest the potential of the huge biomass of S. muticum as a source of new environmentally friendly antifouling compounds. PMID:19468792

  8. Alteration of decreased plasma NO metabolites and platelet NO synthase activity by paroxetine in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Chrapko, Wendy; Jurasz, Paul; Radomski, Marek W; Archer, Stephen L; Newman, Stephen C; Baker, Glen; Lara, Nathalie; Le Mellédo, Jean-Michel

    2006-06-01

    Although major depression (MD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been conclusively linked in the literature, the mechanism associating MD and CVD is yet undetermined. The purpose of this paper is to further investigate a potential mechanism involving nitric oxide (NO) and to examine the effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine on NO production by both platelets and the endothelium. In total, 17 subjects with MD and 12 healthy controls (HCs) with no known history of cardiovascular illness completed the study. Paroxetine was administered to both the MD patients and HCs over an 8-week period, and then medication was discontinued. Blood samples were taken at various times throughout paroxetine treatment and after discontinuation. Plasma NO metabolite (NOx) levels were measured by a chemiluminescence method. Platelet endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity was examined through the conversion of L-[14C]arginine to L-[(14)C]citrulline. Data were analyzed using t-tests and a linear mixed effects model. Baseline levels of both plasma NOx and platelet NOS activity were significantly lower in subjects with MD compared to HCs. Throughout paroxetine treatment, plasma NOx levels increased in both HCs and MD patients. However, platelet eNOS activity decreased in HCs, while no statistically significant change was evidenced in MD patients. These data suggest that, in MD patients, decreased peripheral production of NO, a potential contributor to increased cardiovascular risk, is modified by administration of the antidepressant paroxetine. PMID:16319917

  9. Antifungal activity of metabolites of the endophytic fungus Trichoderma brevicompactum from garlic

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Xuping; Zhan, Xiaohuan; Ma, Zheng; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Chuanxi

    2014-01-01

    The endophytic fungus strain 0248, isolated from garlic, was identified as Trichoderma brevicompactum based on morphological characteristics and the nucleotide sequences of ITS1-5.8S- ITS2 and tef1. The bioactive compound T2 was isolated from the culture extracts of this fungus by bioactivity-guided fractionation and identified as 4β-acetoxy-12,13- epoxy-Δ9-trichothecene (trichodermin) by spectral analysis and mass spectrometry. Trichodermin has a marked inhibitory activity on Rhizoctonia solani, with an EC50 of 0.25 μgmL−1. Strong inhibition by trichodermin was also found for Botrytis cinerea, with an EC50 of 2.02 μgmL−1. However, a relatively poor inhibitory effect was observed for trichodermin against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (EC50 = 25.60 μgmL−1). Compared with the positive control Carbendazim, trichodermin showed a strong antifungal activity on the above phytopathogens. There is little known about endophytes from garlic. This paper studied in detail the identification of endophytic T. brevicompactum from garlic and the characterization of its active metabolite trichodermin. PMID:24948941

  10. Seasonal variability of Chelidonium majus L. secondary metabolites content and antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Z. Dragana; Stankovic, S. Milan; Topuzovic, D. Marina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the total phenolic content, concentration of flavonoids and antioxidant activity in extracts of the plant Chelidonium majus L. during different phenological stages (stage of rosette, the initial flowering stage, the stage of fully formed flowers and stage of fruits formation). Five different extracts of the whole plant, for each phase, were obtained by extraction with water, methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. The concentration of total phenolic content was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu´s reagent and obtained values were the highest in the rosette stage (60.96 mg GA/g). The concentration of flavonoids was the highest in the initial stage of flowering (291.58 mg RU/g). The antioxidant activity was determined in vitro using DPPH reagent. The highest antioxidant activity was expressed in the rosette stage (50.72 mg/ml). Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the concentrations of secondary metabolites in Ch. majus depend on the phenological stage of the plant. PMID:27047313

  11. Cytotoxic, Antiangiogenic and Antitelomerase Activity of Glucosyl- and Acyl- Resveratrol Prodrugs and Resveratrol Sulfate Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Falomir, Eva; Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Martí-Centelles, Rosa; Dupont, Alexia; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Carda, Miguel; Morales, Juan C

    2016-07-15

    Resveratrol (RES) is a natural polyphenol with relevant and varied biological activity. However, its low bioavailability and rapid metabolism to its glucuronate and sulfate conjugates has opened a debate on the mechanisms underlying its bioactivity. RES prodrugs are being developed to overcome these problems. We have synthesized a series of RES prodrugs and RES sulfate metabolites (RES-S) and evaluated their biological activities. RES glucosylated prodrugs (RES-Glc) were more cytotoxic in HT-29 and MCF-7 cells than RES itself whereas RES-S showed similar or higher cytotoxicity than RES. VEGF production was decreased by RES-Glc, and RES-disulfate (RES-diS) diminished it even more than RES. Finally, RES-Glc and RES-diS inhibited hTERT gene expression to a higher extent than RES. In conclusion, resveratrol prodrugs are promising candidates as anticancer drugs. In addition, RES-S showed distinct biological activity, thus indicating they are not simply RES reservoirs. PMID:27147200

  12. Effect of Competition on the Production and Activity of Secondary Metabolites in Aspergillus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secondary metabolites are of intense interest to humans due to their pharmaceutical and/or toxic properties. Aspergillus species secrete these metabolites by themselves and in the presence of other fungal species. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among different Aspergillu...

  13. Phelligridimer A, a highly oxygenated and unsaturated 26-membered macrocyclic metabolite with antioxidant activity from the fungus Phellinus igniarius.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Su-Juan; Mo, Shun-Yan; Li, Shuai; Yang, Yong-Chun; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2005-10-13

    [structure: see text] A highly oxygenated and unsaturated 26-membered macrocyclic metabolite, phelligridimer A (1), has been isolated from the Chinese medicinal fungus Phellinus igniarius. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic methods. A possible biogenesis of 1 mediated by the fungal metabolite hispidin was postulated. Phelligridimer A showed antioxidant activity (IC50 of 10.2 microM) but was inactive to several human cancer cell lines (IC50 > 50 microM) and enzymes PTP1B (IC50 > 25 microM) and thrombin (IC50 > 10 microM). PMID:16209522

  14. Increased active metabolite formation explains the greater platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to high-dose clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher D; Li, Ying Grace; Small, David S; Ernest, C Steven; Farid, Nagy A; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Brandt, John T; Salazar, Daniel E; Winters, Kenneth J

    2007-11-01

    Prasugrel pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics after a 60-mg loading dose (LD) and daily 10-mg maintenance doses (MD) were compared in a 3-way crossover study to clopidogrel 600-mg/75-mg and 300-mg/75-mg LD/MD in 41 healthy, aspirin-free subjects. Each LD was followed by 7 days of daily MD and a 14-day washout period. Inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed by turbidometric aggregometry (20 and 5 microM ADP). Prasugrel 60-mg achieved higher mean IPA (54%) 30 minutes post-LD than clopidogrel 300-mg (3%) or 600-mg (6%) (P < 0.001) and greater IPA by 1 hour (82%) and 2 hours (91%) than the 6-hour IPA for clopidogrel 300-mg (51%) or 600-mg (69%) (P < 0.01). During MD, IPA for prasugrel 10-mg (78%) exceeded that of clopidogrel (300-mg/75-mg, 56%; 600-mg/75-mg, 52%; P < 0.001). Active metabolite area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-tlast) after prasugrel 60-mg (594 ng.hr/mL) was 2.2 times that after clopidogrel 600-mg. Prasugrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast was consistent with dose-proportionality from 10-mg to 60-mg, while clopidogrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast exhibited saturable absorption and/or metabolism. In conclusion, greater exposure to prasugrel's active metabolite results in faster onset, higher levels, and less variability of platelet inhibition compared with high-dose clopidogrel in healthy subjects. PMID:18030066

  15. EFFECTS OF METHOPRENE, ITS METABOLITES, AND BREAKDOWN PRODUCTS ON RETINOID-ACTIVATED PATHWAYS IN TRANSFECTED CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoprene is a terpene-based insecticide designed to act as an agonist of insect juvenile hormone, which is essential for the transition from larval to adult forms in some metamorphic insects. Recent evidence suggests that a methoprene metabolite, methoprene acid, activates a ve...

  16. Anti-rheumatoid Activity of Secondary Metabolites Produced by Endophytic Chaetomium globosum

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Azeem, Ahmed M.; Zaki, Sherif M.; Khalil, Waleed F.; Makhlouf, Noha A.; Farghaly, Lamiaa M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-rheumatoid activity of secondary metabolites produced by endophytic mycobiota in Egypt. A total of 27 endophytic fungi were isolated from 10 dominant medicinal plant host species in Wadi Tala, Saint Katherine Protectorate, arid Sinai, Egypt. Of those taxa, seven isolates of Chaetomium globosum (CG1–CG7), being the most frequent taxon, were recovered from seven different host plants and screened for production of active anti-inflammatory metabolites. Isolates were cultivated on half – strength potato dextrose broth for 21 days at 28°C on a rotatory shaker at 180 rpm, and extracted in ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. The probable inhibitory effects of both extracts against an adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model were examined and compared with the effects of methotrexate (MTX) as a standard disease-modifying anti-rheumatoid drug. Disease activity and mobility scoring of AIA, histopathology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to evaluate probable inhibitory roles. A significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the severity of arthritis was observed in both the methanolic extract of CG6 (MCG6) and MTX treatment groups 6 days after treatment commenced. The average arthritis score of the MCG6 treatment group was (10.7 ± 0.82) compared to (13.8 ± 0.98) in the positive control group. The mobility score of the MCG6 treatment group (1.50 ± 0.55) was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (3.33 ± 0.82). In contrast, the ethyl acetate extract of CG6 (EACG6) treatment group showed no improvements in arthritis and mobility scores in AIA model rats. Histopathology and TEM findings confirmed the observation. Isolate CG6 was subjected to sequencing for confirmation of phenotypic identification. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1–5.8 s – ITS2 rDNA sequences obtained were compared with those deposited in the GenBank Database and registered with accession number KC

  17. Cinnabarinic acid, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, activates type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, F; Lionetto, L; Molinaro, G; Bertrand, H O; Acher, F; Ngomba, R T; Notartomaso, S; Curini, M; Rosati, O; Scarselli, P; Di Marco, R; Battaglia, G; Bruno, V; Simmaco, M; Pin, J P; Nicoletti, F; Goudet, C

    2012-05-01

    Cinnabarinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway that meets the structural requirements to interact with glutamate receptors. We found that cinnabarinic acid acts as a partial agonist of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors, with no activity at other mGlu receptor subtypes. We also tested the activity of cinnabarinic acid on native mGlu4 receptors by examining 1) the inhibition of cAMP formation in cultured cerebellar granule cells; 2) protection against excitotoxic neuronal death in mixed cultures of cortical cells; and 3) protection against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice after local infusion into the external globus pallidus. In all these models, cinnabarinic acid behaved similarly to conventional mGlu4 receptor agonists, and, at least in cultured neurons, the action of low concentrations of cinnabarinic acid was largely attenuated by genetic deletion of mGlu4 receptors. However, high concentrations of cinnabarinic acid were still active in the absence of mGlu4 receptors, suggesting that the compound may have off-target effects. Mutagenesis and molecular modeling experiments showed that cinnabarinic acid acts as an orthosteric agonist interacting with residues of the glutamate binding pocket of mGlu4. Accordingly, cinnabarinic acid did not activate truncated mGlu4 receptors lacking the N-terminal Venus-flytrap domain, as opposed to the mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC). Finally, we could detect endogenous cinnabarinic acid in brain tissue and peripheral organs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Levels increased substantially during inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that cinnabarinic acid is a novel endogenous orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors endowed with neuroprotective activity. PMID:22311707

  18. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of motesanib and its active metabolite, M4, in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Lu, Jian-Feng; Hsu, Cheng-Pang

    2015-11-01

    Motesanib is a small molecule and potent multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. Population pharmacokinetic (POPPK) modeling of motesanib and M4, an active metabolite, was performed to assess sources of variability in cancer patients. The analysis included data collected from 451 patients from 8 clinical trials with oral doses of motesanib ranging from 25 to 175 mg, either once daily or twice daily. The POPPK analyses were performed using nonlinear mixed-effect models with a sequential approach. Covariate effects of demographics and other baseline characteristics were assessed with stepwise covariate modeling. A 2-compartment model with food effect on absorption parameters fitted the PK data of motesanib well. The effects albumin and sex on apparent clearance (CL/F) of motesanib were statistically significant. The albumin effect was more important but remained below a 25% difference. A 1-compartment model fitted PK data of M4 well. Effects of race (Asian vs non-Asian) and dosing frequency were identified as statistically significant covariates on the CL/F of M4. The maximum effect of albumin would result in less than 25% change in motesanib CL/F and as such would not warrant any dosing adjustment. However, faster elimination of M4 in Asian patients requires further investigation. PMID:27137719

  19. Anticancer Activities of Protopanaxadiol- and Protopanaxatriol-Type Ginsenosides and Their Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Shui, Yan-Mei; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, most anticancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial, and botanical sources, but the low success rates of chemotherapies and the development of multidrug resistance emphasize the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against cancer. Ginseng types, including Asian ginseng, American ginseng, and notoginseng, have been used traditionally to treat various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, antioxidative, and antitumor activities. Accumulating reports have shown that ginsenosides, the major active component of ginseng, were helpful for tumor treatment. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PDS) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol saponins (PTS) are two characteristic types of triterpenoid saponins in ginsenosides. PTS holds capacity to interfere with crucial metabolism, while PDS could affect cell cycle distribution and prodeath signaling. This review aims at providing an overview of PTS and PDS, as well as their metabolites, regarding their different anticancer effects with the proposal that these compounds might be potent additions to the current chemotherapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:27446225

  20. Microbial communication leading to the activation of silent fungal secondary metabolite gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Netzker, Tina; Fischer, Juliane; Weber, Jakob; Mattern, Derek J.; König, Claudia C.; Valiante, Vito; Schroeckh, Volker; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms form diverse multispecies communities in various ecosystems. The high abundance of fungal and bacterial species in these consortia results in specific communication between the microorganisms. A key role in this communication is played by secondary metabolites (SMs), which are also called natural products. Recently, it was shown that interspecies “talk” between microorganisms represents a physiological trigger to activate silent gene clusters leading to the formation of novel SMs by the involved species. This review focuses on mixed microbial cultivation, mainly between bacteria and fungi, with a special emphasis on the induced formation of fungal SMs in co-cultures. In addition, the role of chromatin remodeling in the induction is examined, and methodical perspectives for the analysis of natural products are presented. As an example for an intermicrobial interaction elucidated at the molecular level, we discuss the specific interaction between the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus with the soil bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus, which provides an excellent model system to enlighten molecular concepts behind regulatory mechanisms and will pave the way to a novel avenue of drug discovery through targeted activation of silent SM gene clusters through co-cultivations of microorganisms. PMID:25941517

  1. Anticancer Activities of Protopanaxadiol- and Protopanaxatriol-Type Ginsenosides and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Shui, Yan-Mei; Wan, Jian-Bo; Gao, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, most anticancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial, and botanical sources, but the low success rates of chemotherapies and the development of multidrug resistance emphasize the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against cancer. Ginseng types, including Asian ginseng, American ginseng, and notoginseng, have been used traditionally to treat various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, antioxidative, and antitumor activities. Accumulating reports have shown that ginsenosides, the major active component of ginseng, were helpful for tumor treatment. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PDS) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol saponins (PTS) are two characteristic types of triterpenoid saponins in ginsenosides. PTS holds capacity to interfere with crucial metabolism, while PDS could affect cell cycle distribution and prodeath signaling. This review aims at providing an overview of PTS and PDS, as well as their metabolites, regarding their different anticancer effects with the proposal that these compounds might be potent additions to the current chemotherapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:27446225

  2. Colon cancer chemopreventive effects of baicalein, an active enteric microbiome metabolite from baicalin

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHONG-ZHI; ZHANG, CHUN-FENG; CHEN, LINA; ANDERSON, SAMANTHA; LU, FANG; YUAN, CHUN-SU

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, which is a commonly used herbal medicine in many Asian countries. After oral ingestion, intestinal micro-biota metabolism may change parent compound's structure and its biological activities. However, whether baicalin can be metabolized by enteric microbiota and the related anti-cancer activity is not clear. In this study, using human enteric microbiome incubation and HPLC analysis, we observed that baicalin can be quickly converted to baicalein. We compared the antiproliferative effects of baicalin and baicalein using a panel of human cancer cell lines, including three human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. In vitro antiproliferative effects on CRC cells were verified using an in vivo xenograft nude mouse model. Baicalin showed limited antiproliferative effects on some of these cancer cell lines. Baicalein, however, showed significant antiproliferative effects in all the tested cancer cell lines, especially on HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. In vivo antitumor results supported our in vitro data. We demonstrated that baicalein exerts potent S phase cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects in HCT-116 cells. Baicalein induced the activation of caspase 3 and 9. The in silico modeling suggested that baicalein forms hydrogen bonds with residues Ser251 and Asp253 at the active site of caspase 3, while interactions with residues Leu227 and Asp228 in caspase 9 through its hydroxyl groups. Data from this study suggested that baicalein is a potent anticancer metabolite derived from S. baicalensis. Enteric microbiota play a key role in the colon cancer chemoprevention of S. baicalensis. PMID:26398706

  3. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  4. An Invasive Plant Promotes Its Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbioses and Competitiveness through Its Secondary Metabolites: Indirect Evidence from Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W. H.; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1–3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts. PMID:24817325

  5. An invasive plant promotes its arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and competitiveness through its secondary metabolites: indirect evidence from activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W H; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1-3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts. PMID:24817325

  6. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  7. Metabolite profiling of red and white pitayas (Hylocereus polyrhizus and Hylocereus undatus) for comparing betalain biosynthesis and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Ho; Lee, Sunmin; Heo, Do Yeon; Kim, Young-Suk; Cho, Somi Kim; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2014-08-27

    Metabolite profiling of red and white pitayas (Hylocereus polyrhizus and Hylocereus undatus) was performed using gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry with multivariate analysis. Different species and parts of pitayas (red peel, RP; white peel, WP; red flesh, RF; and white flesh, WF) were clearly separated by partial least-squares discriminate analysis. Furthermore, betalain-related metabolites, such as betacyanins and betaxanthins, or their precursors were described on the basis of their metabolites. The results of antioxidant activity tests [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)], total phenolic contents (TPC), total flavonoid contents (TFC), and total betacyanin contents (TBC) showed the following: RP ≥ WP > RF > WF. TPC, TFC, TBC, and betalain-related metabolites were higher in the peel than in the flesh and suggested to be the main contributors to antioxidant activity in pitayas. Therefore, peels as well as pulp of pitaya could beneficially help in the food industry.

  8. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration and tube-like formation by dihydroartemisinin in murine lymphatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Chen, Zheng-Tang; Gao, Jian-Fei

    2007-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a semisynthesized agent from the artemisinin first extracted from the Chinese plant Artemisia annua. Previous studies have shown that artemisinin derivates, apart from their antimalarial activity, possess antitumor, antiangiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present investigation, DHA was found to have a potent ability in influencing lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) behavior. Murine LECs were isolated from benign lymphangiomas induced by intraperitoneal injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant and identified by indirect immunofluorescence assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to examine the expression of the specific marker VEGFR-3/Flt-4. When LECs were treated with DHA at 10 microg/ml, the growth of LECs was inhibited, and LECs showed typical apoptotic morphological features, with a higher apoptotic rate as compared with the controls. DHA also exerted a significant inhibitory effect on migration and tube-like formation of LECs in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative RT-PCR further showed that DHA remarkably downregulated the expression of antiapoptotic bcl-2 mRNA, but upregulated that of the proapoptotic gene bax mRNA. In addition, DHA could strongly attenuate the mRNA and protein levels of VEGFR-3/Flt-4. In summary, these findings indicate that DHA may be useful as a potential lymphangiogenesis inhibitor under induction of cell apoptosis, inhibition of the migration, and formation of tube-like structures in LECs. PMID:17622766

  9. Mass spectrometric determination of cocaine and its biologically active metabolite, norcocaine, in human urine.

    PubMed

    Jindal, S P; Lutz, T; Vestergaard, P

    1978-12-01

    A gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay has been developed for the determination of cocaine and its pharmacologically active metabolite, norcocaine, in human urine. [2H3]Cocaine and [2H3]norcocaine were used as internal standards. The assay utilizes selective focusing to monitor in a gas chromatographic effluent the molecular ions of cocaine, [2H3]cocaine and the fragment ions of trifluoroacetylated norcocaine, [2H3]norcocaine generated by electron impact ionization. The assay can measure 2 ng ml-1 each of cocaine and norcocaine with about 5% precision. The curves, relating the amounts of cocaine and norcocaine added to control urine per 'fixed' amounts of their labeled analogs, versus the appropriate ion intensity ratios are straight lines with nearly zero intercepts and slopes of 0.98 +/- 0.01 and 0.98 +/- 0.02, respectively. The methodology is used for the analysis of urinary cocaine and norcocaine from three human subjects who received 100 mg cocaine-HCL intravenously.

  10. Molecular structure of antihypertensive drug perindopril, its active metabolite perindoprilat and impurity F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, M.; Bojarska, J.; Ježko, P.; Maniukiewicz, W.; Olczak, A.

    2013-03-01

    The molecular structure of the antihypertensive drug perindopril (2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-ethoxy-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2 carboxylic acid), its active metabolite perindoprilat ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-carboxybutyl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid), and impurity F (ethyl (2S)-2-((3S,5aS,9aS,10aS)-3-methyl-1,4-dioxodecahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indol-2(1H)-yl) pentanoate) has been investigated using B3LYP/6-31g(d) and B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) model chemistry. It has been found that solid state conformations of perindoprilat occur close to, but not actually at minima on the computed gas-phase potential energy surfaces. Both, neutral and zwitterionic structures of perindopril and perindoprilat have been investigated. Relative stability of individual ionized species of this drug has been determined. Water has a remarkable effect on the geometry of the perindopril species studied.

  11. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  12. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  13. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  14. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-06-18

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage.

  15. Exploring the chemodiversity and biological activities of the secondary metabolites from the marine fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wan-Ling; Le, Xiu; Li, Hou-Jin; Yang, Xiang-Ling; Chen, Jun-Xiong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Liang; Wang, Lai-You; Wang, Kun-Teng; Hu, Kun-Chao; Yang, De-Po; Lan, Wen-Jian

    2014-11-01

    The production of fungal metabolites can be remarkably influenced by various cultivation parameters. To explore the biosynthetic potentials of the marine fungus, Neosartorya pseudofischeri, which was isolated from the inner tissue of starfish Acanthaster planci, glycerol-peptone-yeast extract (GlyPY) and glucose-peptone-yeast extract (GluPY) media were used to culture this fungus. When cultured in GlyPY medium, this fungus produced two novel diketopiperazines, neosartins A and B (1 and 2), together with six biogenetically-related known diketopiperazines,1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2, 3-dimethyl-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (3), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-methylen e-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (4), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-1,3,4-trioxopyrazino[1,2-a] indole (5), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (11), didehydrobisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (12) and N-methyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (6). However, a novel tetracyclic-fused alkaloid, neosartin C (14), a meroterpenoid, pyripyropene A (15), gliotoxin (7) and five known gliotoxin analogues, acetylgliotoxin (8), reduced gliotoxin (9), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio) gliotoxin (11) and bis-N-norgliovictin (13), were obtained when grown in glucose-containing medium (GluPY medium). This is the first report of compounds 3, 4, 6, 9, 10 and 12 as naturally occurring. Their structures were determined mainly by MS, 1D and 2D NMR data. The possible biosynthetic pathways of gliotoxin-related analogues and neosartin C were proposed. The antibacterial activity of compounds 2-14 and the cytotoxic activity of compounds 4, 5 and 7-13 were evaluated. Their structure-activity relationships are also preliminarily discussed. PMID:25421322

  16. Exploring the Chemodiversity and Biological Activities of the Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wan-Ling; Le, Xiu; Li, Hou-Jin; Yang, Xiang-Ling; Chen, Jun-Xiong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Liang; Wang, Lai-You; Wang, Kun-Teng; Hu, Kun-Chao; Yang, De-Po; Lan, Wen-Jian

    2014-01-01

    The production of fungal metabolites can be remarkably influenced by various cultivation parameters. To explore the biosynthetic potentials of the marine fungus, Neosartorya pseudofischeri, which was isolated from the inner tissue of starfish Acanthaster planci, glycerol-peptone-yeast extract (GlyPY) and glucose-peptone-yeast extract (GluPY) media were used to culture this fungus. When cultured in GlyPY medium, this fungus produced two novel diketopiperazines, neosartins A and B (1 and 2), together with six biogenetically-related known diketopiperazines,1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (3), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-methylene-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (4), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-1,3,4-trioxopyrazino[1,2-a] indole (5), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (11), didehydrobisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (12) and N-methyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (6). However, a novel tetracyclic-fused alkaloid, neosartin C (14), a meroterpenoid, pyripyropene A (15), gliotoxin (7) and five known gliotoxin analogues, acetylgliotoxin (8), reduced gliotoxin (9), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio) gliotoxin (11) and bis-N-norgliovictin (13), were obtained when grown in glucose-containing medium (GluPY medium). This is the first report of compounds 3, 4, 6, 9, 10 and 12 as naturally occurring. Their structures were determined mainly by MS, 1D and 2D NMR data. The possible biosynthetic pathways of gliotoxin-related analogues and neosartin C were proposed. The antibacterial activity of compounds 2–14 and the cytotoxic activity of compounds 4, 5 and 7–13 were evaluated. Their structure-activity relationships are also preliminarily discussed. PMID:25421322

  17. [Secondary metabolites, lethality and antimicrobial activity of extracts from three corals and three marine mollusks from Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Gabriel; D'Armas, Haydelba; Yáñez, Dayanis; Hernández, Juan; Camacho, Angel

    2010-06-01

    The study of biochemical activity of extracts obtained from marine organisms is gaining interest as some have proved to have efficient health or industrial applications. To evaluate lethality and antimicrobial activities, some chemical tests were performed on crude extracts of the octocorals Eunicea sp., Muricea sp. and Pseudopterogorgia acerosa and the mollusks Pteria colymbus, Phyllonotus pomum and Chicoreus brevifrons, collected in Venezuelan waters. The presence of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, unsaturated sterols and pentacyclic triterpenes in all invertebrates, was evidenced. Additionally, sesquiterpenlactones, saponins, tannins, cyanogenic and cardiotonic glycosides were also detected in some octocoral extracts, suggesting that biosynthesis of these metabolites is typical in this group. From the lethality bioassays, all extracts resulted lethal to Artemia salina (LC50<1000 microg/ml) with an increased of lethal activity with exposition time. P. pomum extract showed the highest lethality rate (LC50=46.8 microg/ml). Compared to the octocorals, mollusks extracts displayed more activity and a greater action spectrum against different bacterial strains, whereas octocorals also inhibited some fungi strains growth. Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible to the antimicrobial power of the extracts (66.7%), whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were not affected. The antibiosis shown by marine organisms extracts indicates that some of their biosynthesized metabolites are physiologically active, and may have possible cytotoxic potential or as a source of antibiotic components.

  18. CSF Biomarkers of Monocyte Activation and Chemotaxis correlate with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Metabolites during Chronic HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Albert M.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Umlauf, Anya; Taylor, Michael J.; Clifford, David B.; Marra, Christina M.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), supporting the need to better understand HIV neuropathogenesis. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain has demonstrated abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals despite cART. We examined the associations between MRS metabolites and selected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers reflecting monocyte/macrophage activation and chemotaxis. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study involving five sites in the United States was conducted. The following CSF biomarkers were measured: soluble CD14 (sCD14), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), and stromal cell derived growth factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α). The following MRS metabolites were measured from basal ganglia (BG), frontal white matter (FWM) and frontal gray matter (FGM): N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), Myo-inositol (MI), Choline (Cho), and Creatine (Cr). CSF biomarkers were compared to absolute MRS metabolites as well as metabolite/Cr ratios using linear regression. Results 83 HIV-infected individuals were included, 78% on cART and 37% with HAND. The most robust positive correlations were between MCP-1 and Cho in BG (R2 0.179, p<0.001) as well as MCP-1 and MI in FWM (R2 0.137, p=0.002). Higher Cr levels in FWM were associated with MCP-1 (R2 0. 075, p=0.01) and IP-10 (R2 0.106, p=0.003). Comparing biomarkers to MRS metabolite/Cr ratios impacted some relationships, e.g., higher sCD14 levels were associated with lower Cho/Cr ratios in FGM (R2 0.224, p<0.001), although higher MCP-1 levels remained associated with Cho/Cr in BG. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that monocyte activation and chemotaxis continue to contribute to HIV-associated brain abnormalities in cART-treated individuals. PMID:26069183

  19. Activation of dormant secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin resistance into the deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-07-29

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe) (1), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-L-prolinate (3), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (4), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1-6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent fungal

  20. Activation of Dormant Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin Resistance into the Deep-Sea Fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(d-Pro-d-Phe) (1), cyclo(d-Tyr-d-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-l-prolinate (3), cyclo(l-Ile-l-Pro) (4), cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1–6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent

  1. Open-Label Crossover Study of Primaquine and Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine Pharmacokinetics in Healthy Adult Thai Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Ashley, Elizabeth A.; Jittamala, Podjanee; Tarning, Joel; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Chotsiri, Palang; Wattanakul, Thanaporn; Panapipat, Salwaluk; Lee, Sue J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is an artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) recommended by the WHO for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and it is being used increasingly for resistant vivax malaria where combination with primaquine is required for radical cure. The WHO recently reinforced its recommendations to add a single dose of primaquine to ACTs to reduce P. falciparum transmission in low-transmission settings. The pharmacokinetics of primaquine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine were evaluated in 16 healthy Thai adult volunteers in a randomized crossover study. Volunteers were randomized to two groups of three sequential hospital admissions to receive 30 mg (base) primaquine, 3 tablets of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (120/960 mg), and the drugs together at the same doses. Blood sampling was performed over 3 days following primaquine and 36 days following dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine dosing. Pharmacokinetic assessment was done with a noncompartmental approach. The drugs were well tolerated. There were no statistically significant differences in dihydroartemisinin and piperaquine pharmacokinetics with or without primaquine. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine coadministration significantly increased plasma primaquine levels; geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval [CI]) of primaquine combined versus primaquine alone for maximum concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to the end of the study (AUC0–last), and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0–∞) were 148% (117 to 187%), 129% (103 to 163%), and 128% (102 to 161%), respectively. This interaction is similar to that described recently with chloroquine and may result in an enhanced radical curative effect. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01525511.) PMID:25267661

  2. Daidzein-sulfate metabolites affect transcriptional and antiproliferative activities of estrogen receptor-beta in cultured human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Acconcia, Filippo; Virgili, Fabio; Cassidy, Aedin; Weinberg, Peter D; Rimbach, Gerald; Marino, Maria

    2005-11-01

    Daidzein (D), a soy isoflavone, is almost completely metabolized in the gut and liver. This biotransformation converts D to more water-soluble products and may affect its biological activity. The ability of daidzein metabolites to modulate 17beta-estradiol (E2)-sensitive gene transcription, cell growth, and a proapoptotic cascade was determined in human cancer cells devoid of any estrogen receptor (ER) and rendered E2 sensitive after transfection with ERbeta. The data show that D and some but not all of its metabolites 1) induce promoter activity, 2) reduce proliferation, 3) promote p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and 4) activate a proapoptotic cascade involving the cleavage of caspase-3 and its substrate poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in human cancer cells in an ERbeta-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cells with ICI 182,780, a pure antiestrogen, completely prevented the actions of D and its metabolites. These findings highlight the important and complex influence of metabolic transformation on key physiological effects of isoflavones and demonstrate the need to take biotransformation into account when assessing the potential health benefits of consuming soy isoflavones. PMID:16251631

  3. Combined mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling of different pigmented rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds and correlation with antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga Ryun; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Sarah; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2014-09-29

    Nine varieties of pigmented rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds that were black, red, or white were used to perform metabolite profiling by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) and gas chromatography (GC) TOF-MS, to measure antioxidant activities. Clear grouping patterns determined by the color of the rice seeds were identified in principle component analysis (PCA) derived from UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Cyanidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, proanthocyanidin dimer, proanthocyanidin trimer, apigenin-6-C-glugosyl-8-C-arabiboside, tricin-O-rhamnoside-O-hexoside, and lipids were identified as significantly different secondary metabolites. In PCA score plots derived from GC-TOF-MS, Jakwangdo (JKD) and Ilpoom (IP) species were discriminated from the other rice seeds by PC1 and PC2. Valine, phenylalanine, adenosine, pyruvate, nicotinic acid, succinic acid, maleic acid, malonic acid, gluconic acid, xylose, fructose, glucose, maltose, and myo-inositol were significantly different primary metabolites in JKD species, while GABA, asparagine, xylitol, and sucrose were significantly distributed in IP species. Analysis of antioxidant activities revealed that black and red rice seeds had higher activity than white rice seeds. Cyanidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, proanthocyanidin dimers, proanthocyanidin trimers, and catechin were highly correlated with antioxidant activities, and were more plentiful in black and red rice seeds. These results are expected to provide valuable information that could help improve and develop rice-breeding techniques.

  4. Calcium and survivin are involved in the induction of apoptosis by dihydroartemisinin in human lung cancer SPC-A-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, D; Chen, W; Yu, B; Zhang, C; Zhang, Y; Qi, H

    2007-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, is an effective novel antimalarial drug. Recent studies suggest that it also has anticancer effects. The present study investigated the apoptosis activity of DHA in cultured human lung cancer cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry. Intracellular free calcium concentrations in the lung cancer cells were evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy using Fura-3/AM as probe. The observations also indicated that DHA downregulated the mRNA and protein expression level of survivin in the lung cancer cell line SPC-A-1 cells, whereas it did not affect those of caspase-4. These results demonstrated that DHA can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cell line SPC-A-1 cells and that calcium and survivin participated in the apoptotic signalling pathways. PMID:17344942

  5. Formation of the Thiol Conjugates and Active Metabolite of Clopidogrel by Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei C.; Hollenberg, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously the formation of a glutathionyl conjugate of the active metabolite (AM) of clopidogrel and the covalent modification of a cysteinyl residue of human cytochrome P450 2B6 in a reconstituted system (Mol Pharmacol 80:839–847, 2011). In this work, we extended our studies of the metabolism of clopidogrel to human liver microsomes in the presence of four reductants, namely, GSH, l-Cys, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), and ascorbic acid. Our results demonstrated that formation of the AM was greatly affected by the reductant used and the relative amounts of the AM formed were increased in the following order: NAC (17%) < l-Cys (53%) < ascorbic acid (61%) < GSH (100%). AM-thiol conjugates were observed in the presence of NAC, l-Cys, and GSH. In the case of GSH, the formation of both the AM and the glutathionyl conjugate was dependent on the GSH concentrations, with similar Km values of ∼0.5 mM, which indicates that formation of the thiol conjugates constitutes an integral part of the bioactivation processes for clopidogrel. It was observed that the AM was slowly converted to the thiol conjugate, with a half-life of ∼10 h. Addition of dithiothreitol to the reaction mixture reversed the conversion, which resulted in a decrease in AM-thiol conjugate levels and a concomitant increase in AM levels, whereas addition of NAC led to the formation of AM-NAC and a concomitant decrease in AM-GSH levels. These results not only confirm that the AM is formed through oxidative opening of the thiolactone ring but also suggest the existence of an equilibrium between the AM, the thiol conjugates, and the reductants. These factors may affect the effective concentrations of the AM in vivo. PMID:22584220

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of triflusal and its main active metabolite HTB in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Zhang, Q; Huang, M; Zong, S; Hua, W; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    Triflusal presents comparable antiplatelet activity to aspirin while presenting a more favourable safety profile, and is used in the treatment of thrombosis. The study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of triflusal and its major metabolite 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- benzoic acid (HTB) in healthy Chinese subjects.30 healthy subjects were recruited in this randomized, single-center, and open-label, parallel, single ascending doses (300, 600, 900 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg, once daily for 7 days) study. Plasma samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. Safety was assessed by adverse events, ECG, laboratory testing, and vital signs.Triflusal was safe and well tolerated. After single-dose administration, triflusal was rapidly absorbed with a mean Tmax of 0.55-0.92 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 0.35-0.65 h, HTB was absorbed with a mean Tmax of 2.35-3.03 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 52.5-65.57 h. Cmax and AUC for triflusal and HTB were approximately dose proportional over the 300-900 mg dose range. In the steady state, the accumulation index (R) indicated that the exposure of triflusal increased slightly with repeated dosing, and the exposure of HTB increased obviously. 3 adverse events certainly related to the investigational drugs occurred in the multiple-dose phase.Following oral dosing under fasting condition, triflusal is promptly absorbed and rapidly depleted from the systemic circulation. HTB is quickly generated from triflusal and slowly eliminated. Triflusal accumulates slightly in the body. HTB plasma concentration builds up progressively toward steady-state. PMID:24105106

  7. Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites from wild growing and micropropagated plants of Renealmia alpinia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Cortés, Natalie; Benjumea, Dora; Osorio, Edison; León, Francisco; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Renealmia alpinia is native to the American continent and can be found from Mexico to Brazil, and in the Caribbean islands. It is known as “matandrea” in Colombia, and it has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat painful diseases and ailments. Based on its traditional uses, it is of interest to evaluate the pharmacologic effects of this plant and its secondary metabolites. Materials and methods Methanol and aqueous extracts of wild and micropropagated R. alpinia (leaves) were obtained and chemically compared by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC). The antinociceptive activity of these extracts was examined using an in vivo assay (Siegmund test). Additionally, the dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia was fractionated and pure compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods. The structure elucidation of isolated compounds was performed by NMR experiments and spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. Purified compounds were evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity for opioids and cannabinoids receptors. Results The dichloromethane extract of the plant’s aerial part afforded sinostrobin (1), naringenin 7,4′-dimethyl ether (2), 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (3), 4-methoxy-6-(2-phenylethenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (4), naringenin 7-methyl ether (5) and 3,5-heptanediol, 1,7-diphenyl (6), which were isolated using chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were established by physical and spectroscopic techniques. The antinociceptive effects observed in mice by extracts of wild and micropropagated plants were similar. The compounds isolated from R. alpinia do not show affinity to opioid or cannabinoid receptors. Conclusion Aqueous and methanol extracts of R. alpinia provide antinociceptive and analgesic effects in an in vivo model. These results contribute additional insight as to why this plant is traditionally used for pain management. Also, this is the first

  8. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  9. Regulation of human tonsillar T-cell proliferation by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, J D; Katz, D R; Barker, S; Fraher, L J; Hewison, M; Hendy, G N; O'Riordan, J L

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on T-cell populations isolated by buoyant density and E rosetting from human tonsils. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 125iododeoxyuridine; interleukin-2 (IL-2) production was measured using an IL-2-dependent cell line, and the number of 1,25(OH)2D3 receptors was measured by whole-cell nuclear association assay. At a concentration of 10(-7) M, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation in all E+ T-cell populations. This effect was more pronounced in the cells from the intermediate and high density layers and was reflected both in cell proliferative responses and in relative IL-2 synthesis. By adding the 1,25(OH)2D3 during the course of the mitogen assay, we demonstrated that activation of the T cell precedes the 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated inhibition. Cells that had been preincubated with mitogen in the presence of the 1,25(OH)2D3 were refractory to further stimulation by mitogens. Receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3 could not be detected in unstimulated T cells. However, activation led to the expression of high-affinity receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3. Co-incubation of the cells with mitogen and 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the number of receptors compared with mitogen alone. The effects provide further evidence for the hypothesis that 1,25(OH)2D3 is an important potential modulator of the immune system through its action on T cells. Taking our observations in conjunction with the known capacity of monocytes to hydroxylate the precursor metabolite (and thus synthesize the active form of cholecalciferol), the results support the suggestion that 1,25(OH)2D3 plays a role as a local mediator of mononuclear phagocyte-T cell interaction in human lymphomedullary tissues. PMID:3026959

  10. [Detection of fungal metabolites showing toxic activity through Artemia salina bioassay].

    PubMed

    González, Ana María; Presa, Maximiliano; Latorre, María Gabriela; Lurá, María Cristina

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect toxic metabolites from fungi contaminating food and medicinal herbs by applying the toxicity assay to Artemia salina. According to toxicity percentages, the extracts were classified as nontoxic (NT), slightly toxic (ST), toxic (T) and highly toxic (HT). Those classified as T and HT were assayed for mycotoxins. Only 6 out of 71 strains were found to be T (8.5%) for A. salina. Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx, isolated from sausages, was found to be HT, mainly due to the presence of ochratoxin A and two other unidentified metabolites. PMID:17592895

  11. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is Activated by Amiodarone Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Aaron N.; Miyakawa, Motonori; Tan, Edwin S.; Scanlan, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Amiodarone (Cordarone, Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals) is a clinically available drug used to treat a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a panel of potential amiodarone metabolites that have significant structural similarity to thyroid hormone and its metabolites the iodothyronamines. Several of these amiodarone derivatives act as specific agonists of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). This result demonstrates a novel molecular target for amiodarone derivatives with potential clinical significance. PMID:18752950

  12. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish K.; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  13. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk).

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish K; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid CPS (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid CPS (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  14. Mutagenic and cell-transforming activities of triol-epoxides as compared to other chrysene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Glatt, H; Seidel, A; Bochnitschek, W; Marquardt, H; Marquardt, H; Hodgson, R M; Grover, P L; Oesch, F

    1986-09-01

    The syn- and anti-isomers of the bay-region diol-epoxides of chrysene and of 3-hydroxychrysene and their metabolic precursors have been investigated for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium (reversion to histidine prototrophy) and V79 Chinese hamster cells (acquirement of resistance to 6-thioguanine) and for transforming activity in M2 mouse prostate cells. Other known and potential chrysene metabolites have been included in mutagenicity experiments. Direct mutagenic activity in S. typhimurium TA 100 exhibited, in order of potency, anti-triol-epoxide greater than syn-triol-epoxide greater than anti-diol-epoxide greater than syn-diol-epoxide greater than chrysene 5,6-oxide much greater than chrysene-1,2-quinone, chrysene-3,4-quinone, and chrysene 5,6-quinone. Chrysene, the six isomeric chrysenols, and the trans-dihydrodiols [trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (chrysene-1,2-diol), trans-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene, trans-5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrochrysene, and 9-hydroxy-trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (9-hydroxychrysene-1,2-diol)] were inactive per se but were activated to mutagens in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-fortified postmitochondrial fraction (S9 mix) of liver homogenate from Arochlor 1254-treated rats. Chrysene, 3-hydroxychrysene, chrysene-1,2-diol, and 9-hydroxychrysene-1,2-diol were activated efficiently; the other compounds were activated weakly. In S. typhimurium TA 98, the mutagenic activities of the chrysene derivatives were weak in comparison with those in the strain TA 100. trans-3,4-Dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene (in the presence of S9 mix) was the most efficacious mutagen in strain TA 98. The relative mutagenic potencies of the directly active compounds differed from the results obtained in strain TA 100, in that in strain TA 98 the anti-diol-epoxide was more mutagenic than the triol-epoxides and chrysene 5,6-oxide was more mutagenic than syn-diol-epoxide and syn-triol-epoxide. In V79 cells

  15. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    biomass of Bacillus subtilis, a Gram-positive bacterium, showed the same pattern. Rapidly-dividing cells derived fewer of their O and H atoms from environmental water than did more slowly-growing cells and spores. To test whether a eukaryotic cell, surrounded by only a membrane, would also maintain an isotopic gradient and a detectable percentage of metabolic water, we applied our approach to cultured rat fibroblasts. Preliminary results showed that approximately 50% of the O and H atoms in exponentially growing cells were derived from metabolic activity. In quiescent cells, metabolic activity generated approximately 25% of the O and H atoms in intracellular water. Thus far, the data we have obtained is consistent with the following model: (1) Intracellular water is composed of water that diffuses in from the extracellular environment and water that is created as a result of metabolic activity. (2) The relative amounts of environmental and metabolic water inside a cell are a function of the cell's metabolic activity. (3) The oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellular metabolites are a function of those of intracellular water, and therefore reflect the metabolic activity of the cell at the time of biosynthesis.

  16. Voltammetric profiling of redox-active metabolites expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Seviour, T; Doyle, L E; Lauw, S J L; Hinks, J; Rice, S A; Nesatyy, V J; Webster, R D; Kjelleberg, S; Marsili, E

    2015-03-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, chemical deconvolution of the pyocyanin voltammetric signal allows its expression to be observed simultaneously with the quorum sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Such analysis has revealed that PQS might protect pyocyanin from self-oxidation, but also exert a pro-oxidative effect on pyocyanin under oxidative conditions to produce additional redox metabolites. PMID:25650009

  17. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  18. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  19. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-02-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. ‘Images’ over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm2 area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  20. Metabolites from Aspergillus fumigatus, an endophytic fungus associated with Melia azedarach, and their antifungal, antifeedant, and toxic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Thirty-nine fungal metabolites 1-39, including two new alkaloids, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6) and 3-hydroxyfumiquinazoline A (16), were isolated from the fermentation broth of Aspergillus fumigatus LN-4, an endophytic fungus isolated from the stem bark of Melia azedarach. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis (mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments) and by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature. These isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro antifungal activities against some phytopathogenic fungi, toxicity against brine shrimps, and antifeedant activities against armyworm larvae (Mythimna separata Walker). Among them, sixteen compounds showed potent antifungal activities against phytopathogenic fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, and Gibberella saubinettii), and four of them, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6), fumitremorgin B (7), verruculogen (8), and helvolic acid (39), exhibited antifungal activities with MIC values of 6.25-50 μg/mL, which were comparable to the two positive controls carbendazim and hymexazol. In addition, of eighteen that exerted moderate lethality toward brine shrimps, compounds 7 and 8 both showed significant toxicities with median lethal concentration (LC(50)) values of 13.6 and 15.8 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, among nine metabolites that were found to possess antifeedant activity against armyworm larvae, compounds 7 and 8 gave the best activity with antifeedant indexes (AFI) of 50.0% and 55.0%, respectively. Structure-activity relationships of the metabolites were also discussed. PMID:22409377

  1. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  2. Chemical composition of three Parmelia lichens and antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of some their major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Manojlović, Nedeljko; Ranković, Branislav; Kosanić, Marijana; Vasiljević, Perica; Stanojković, Tatjana

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia caperata, P. saxatilis and P. sulcata and antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities of some their major metabolites. The phytochemical analysis of acetone extracts of three Parmelia lichens were determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compounds in these extracts were protocetraric and usnic acids (P. caperata) and depsidone salazinic acid (other two species). Besides these compounds, atranorin and chloroatranorin, were also detected in some of these extracts. Antioxidant activity of their isolated metabolites was evaluated by free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. As a result of the study salazinic acid had stronger antioxidant activity than protocetraric acid. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. Both compounds were highly active with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.015 to 1mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. Salazinic acid and protocetraric acid were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 35.67 to 60.18μg/ml. The present study shows that tested lichen compounds demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. That suggest that these lichens can be used as new sources of the natural antimicrobial agents, antioxidants and anticancer compounds.

  3. Chemical composition of three Parmelia lichens and antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of some their major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Manojlović, Nedeljko; Ranković, Branislav; Kosanić, Marijana; Vasiljević, Perica; Stanojković, Tatjana

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia caperata, P. saxatilis and P. sulcata and antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities of some their major metabolites. The phytochemical analysis of acetone extracts of three Parmelia lichens were determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compounds in these extracts were protocetraric and usnic acids (P. caperata) and depsidone salazinic acid (other two species). Besides these compounds, atranorin and chloroatranorin, were also detected in some of these extracts. Antioxidant activity of their isolated metabolites was evaluated by free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. As a result of the study salazinic acid had stronger antioxidant activity than protocetraric acid. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. Both compounds were highly active with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.015 to 1mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. Salazinic acid and protocetraric acid were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 35.67 to 60.18μg/ml. The present study shows that tested lichen compounds demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. That suggest that these lichens can be used as new sources of the natural antimicrobial agents, antioxidants and anticancer compounds. PMID:22921748

  4. Solving the jigsaw puzzle of wound-healing potato cultivars: metabolite profiling and antioxidant activity of polar extracts.

    PubMed

    Dastmalchi, Keyvan; Cai, Qing; Zhou, Kevin; Huang, Wenlin; Serra, Olga; Stark, Ruth E

    2014-08-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a worldwide food staple, but substantial waste accompanies the cultivation of this crop due to wounding of the outer skin and subsequent unfavorable healing conditions. Motivated by both economic and nutritional considerations, this metabolite profiling study aims to improve understanding of closing layer and wound periderm formation and guide the development of new methods to ensure faster and more complete healing after skin breakage. The polar metabolites of wound-healing tissues from four potato cultivars with differing patterns of tuber skin russeting (Norkotah Russet, Atlantic, Chipeta, and Yukon Gold) were analyzed at three and seven days after wounding, during suberized closing layer formation and nascent wound periderm development, respectively. The polar extracts were assessed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods, including multivariate analysis and tentative identification of 22 of the 24 biomarkers that discriminate among the cultivars at a given wound-healing time point or between developmental stages. Differences among the metabolites that could be identified from NMR- and MS-derived biomarkers highlight the strengths and limitations of each method, also demonstrating the complementarity of these approaches in terms of assembling a complete molecular picture of the tissue extracts. Both methods revealed that differences among the cultivar metabolite profiles diminish as healing proceeds during the period following wounding. The biomarkers included polyphenolic amines, flavonoid glycosides, phenolic acids and glycoalkaloids. Because wound healing is associated with oxidative stress, the free radical scavenging activities of the extracts from different cultivars were measured at each wounding time point, revealing significantly higher scavenging activity of the Yukon Gold periderm especially after 7 days of wounding.

  5. Solving the Jigsaw Puzzle of Wound-Healing Potato Cultivars: Metabolite Profiling and Antioxidant Activity of Polar Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a worldwide food staple, but substantial waste accompanies the cultivation of this crop due to wounding of the outer skin and subsequent unfavorable healing conditions. Motivated by both economic and nutritional considerations, this metabolite profiling study aims to improve understanding of closing layer and wound periderm formation and guide the development of new methods to ensure faster and more complete healing after skin breakage. The polar metabolites of wound-healing tissues from four potato cultivars with differing patterns of tuber skin russeting (Norkotah Russet, Atlantic, Chipeta, and Yukon Gold) were analyzed at three and seven days after wounding, during suberized closing layer formation and nascent wound periderm development, respectively. The polar extracts were assessed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods, including multivariate analysis and tentative identification of 22 of the 24 biomarkers that discriminate among the cultivars at a given wound-healing time point or between developmental stages. Differences among the metabolites that could be identified from NMR- and MS-derived biomarkers highlight the strengths and limitations of each method, also demonstrating the complementarity of these approaches in terms of assembling a complete molecular picture of the tissue extracts. Both methods revealed that differences among the cultivar metabolite profiles diminish as healing proceeds during the period following wounding. The biomarkers included polyphenolic amines, flavonoid glycosides, phenolic acids and glycoalkaloids. Because wound healing is associated with oxidative stress, the free radical scavenging activities of the extracts from different cultivars were measured at each wounding time point, revealing significantly higher scavenging activity of the Yukon Gold periderm especially after 7 days of wounding. PMID:24998264

  6. Tissue distribution study of columbianadin and its active metabolite columbianetin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-Bo; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Columbianadin, one of the main bioactive constituents of the roots of Angelica pubescens Maxim. f. biserrata Shan et Yuan, has been found to possess obvious pharmacological effects in previous studies. In this study, a valid and sensitive reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was established and validated for the determination of columbianadin (CBN) and its active metabolite columbianetin (CBT) in rat tissue samples. Sample separation was performed on an RP-HPLC column using a mobile phase of MeOH-H2 O (75:25, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV absorbance of the samples was measured at the wavelength 325 nm. The calibration curves for CBN were linear over the ranges of 0.5-20 µg/g for brain, testes and muscle, 1.0-10.0 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.2-20.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The calibration curves for CBT were linear over the ranges of 0.5-25 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.1-10.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The analysis method was successfully applied to a tissue distribution study of CBN and CBT after intravenous administration of CBN to rats. The results of this study indicated that CBN could be detected in all of the selected tissues after i.v. administration. CBN was distributed to rat tissues rapidly and could be metabolized to CBT in most detected tissues. Of the detected tissues, heart had the highest uptake of CBN, which suggested that heart might be one of the main target tissues of CBN. Concentrations of CBT were obviously higher in the digestive system than in other assayed tissues. The information provided by this research is very useful for gaining knowledge of the capacities of CBN and CBT to access different tissues.

  7. [Simultaneous determination of erdosteine and its active metabolite in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with pre-column derivatization].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ma, Zhi-Yu; Zhong, Da-Fang

    2013-03-01

    A sensitive, rapid and accurate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method with pre-column derivatization was developed for the simultaneous determination of erdosteine and its thiol-containing active metabolite in human plasma. Paracetamol and captopril were chosen as the internal standard of erdosteine and its active metabolite, respectively. Aliquots of 100 microL plasma sample were derivatized by 2-bromine-3'-methoxy acetophenone, then separated on an Agilent XDB-C18 (50 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 1.8 microm) column using 0.1% formic acid methanol--0.1% formic acid 5 mmol x L(-1) ammonium acetate as mobile phase, in a gradient mode. Detection of erdosteine and its active metabolite were achieved by ESI MS/MS in the positive ion mode. The linear calibration curves for erdosteine and its active metabolite were obtained in the concentration ranges of 5-3 000 ng x mL(-1) and 5-10 000 ng x mL(-1), respectively. The lower limit of quantification of erdosteine and its active metabolite were both 5.00 ng x mL(-1). The pharmacokinetic results of erdosteine and its thiol-containing active metabolite showed that the area under curve (AUC) of the thiol-containing active metabolite was 6.2 times of that of erdosteine after a single oral dose of 600 mg erdosteine tables in 32 healthy volunteers, The mean residence time (MRT) of the thiol-containing active metabolite was (7.51 +/- 0.788) h, which provided a pharmacokinetic basis for the rational dosage regimen.

  8. Screening for biologically active metabolites with endosymbiotic bacilli isolated from arthropods.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Klaus; Schimana, Judith; Müller, Johannes; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Kallenborn, Helmut G; Holzenkämpfer, Meike; Krastel, Philipp; Zeeck, Axel; Vater, Joachim; Höltzel, Alexandra; Schmid, Dietmar G; Rheinheimer, Joachim; Dettner, Konrad

    2002-12-17

    Endosymbiotic bacteria from the genus Bacillus were isolated from different compartments of the gut of various members of insects (Hexapoda) and millipedes (Diplopoda). They were grown in submerged culture and investigated by biological assays and HPLC-diode array analysis regarding their production of bioactive metabolites, which were isolated and determined in structure. Known compounds and yet unknown derivatives from the primary metabolism were detected, as well as antibacterially and antifungally acting peptide antibiotics.

  9. Isolation, structural identification and biological activity of two metabolites produced by Penicillium olsonii Bainier and Sartory.

    PubMed

    Amade, P; Mallea, M; Bouaïcha, N

    1994-02-01

    From the culture broth of a fungus, two metabolites have been isolated: bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) precedently isolated from Streptomyces sp. and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-oxoacetaldehyde oxime (PHBA) here reported as a natural compound in the (E)-s-cis configuration. The producing organism was identified as a strain of Penicillium olsonii. Culture growth and chemical identification are discussed in the present work.

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Activation is Associated with Altered Plasma One-Carbon Metabolites and B-Vitamin Status in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lysne, Vegard; Strand, Elin; Svingen, Gard F. T.; Bjørndal, Bodil; Pedersen, Eva R.; Midttun, Øivind; Olsen, Thomas; Ueland, Per M.; Berge, Rolf K.; Nygård, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of metabolites along the choline oxidation pathway have been linked to increased risk of major lifestyle diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of key enzymes along this pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of PPAR activation on circulating and urinary one-carbon metabolites as well as markers of B-vitamin status. Male Wistar rats (n = 20) received for 50 weeks either a high-fat control diet or a high-fat diet with tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA), a modified fatty acid and pan-PPAR agonist with high affinity towards PPARα. Hepatic gene expression of PPARα, PPARβ/δ and the enzymes involved in the choline oxidation pathway were analyzed and concentrations of metabolites were analyzed in plasma and urine. TTA treatment altered most biomarkers, and the largest effect sizes were observed for plasma concentrations of dimethylglycine, nicotinamide, methylnicotinamide, methylmalonic acid and pyridoxal, which were all higher in the TTA group (all p < 0.01). Hepatic Pparα mRNA was increased after TTA treatment, but genes of the choline oxidation pathway were not affected. Long-term TTA treatment was associated with pronounced alterations on the plasma and urinary concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. PMID:26742069

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Activation is Associated with Altered Plasma One-Carbon Metabolites and B-Vitamin Status in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lysne, Vegard; Strand, Elin; Svingen, Gard F T; Bjørndal, Bodil; Pedersen, Eva R; Midttun, Øivind; Olsen, Thomas; Ueland, Per M; Berge, Rolf K; Nygård, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of metabolites along the choline oxidation pathway have been linked to increased risk of major lifestyle diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of key enzymes along this pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of PPAR activation on circulating and urinary one-carbon metabolites as well as markers of B-vitamin status. Male Wistar rats (n = 20) received for 50 weeks either a high-fat control diet or a high-fat diet with tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA), a modified fatty acid and pan-PPAR agonist with high affinity towards PPARα. Hepatic gene expression of PPARα, PPARβ/δ and the enzymes involved in the choline oxidation pathway were analyzed and concentrations of metabolites were analyzed in plasma and urine. TTA treatment altered most biomarkers, and the largest effect sizes were observed for plasma concentrations of dimethylglycine, nicotinamide, methylnicotinamide, methylmalonic acid and pyridoxal, which were all higher in the TTA group (all p < 0.01). Hepatic Pparα mRNA was increased after TTA treatment, but genes of the choline oxidation pathway were not affected. Long-term TTA treatment was associated with pronounced alterations on the plasma and urinary concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. PMID:26742069

  12. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) transports the primary active tamoxifen metabolites endoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen and restricts their brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Iusuf, Dilek; Teunissen, Sebastiaan F; Wagenaar, Els; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2011-06-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a highly efficient drug efflux pump expressed in brain, liver, and small intestine, but also in tumor cells, that affects pharmacokinetics and confers therapy resistance for many anticancer drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of P-gp on tamoxifen and its primary active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, N-desmethyltamoxifen, and endoxifen. We used in vitro transport assays and Abcb1a/1b(-/-) mice to investigate the impact of P-gp on the oral availability and brain penetration of tamoxifen and its metabolites. Systemic exposure of tamoxifen and its metabolites after oral administration of tamoxifen (50 mg/kg) was not changed in the absence of P-gp. However, brain accumulation of tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, and N-desmethyltamoxifen were modestly, but significantly (1.5- to 2-fold), increased. Endoxifen, however, displayed a 9-fold higher brain penetration at 4 h after administration. Endoxifen was transported by P-gp in vitro. Upon direct oral administration of endoxifen (20 mg/kg), systemic exposure was slightly decreased in Abcb1a/1b(-/-) mice, but brain accumulation of endoxifen was dramatically increased (up to 23-fold at 4 h after administration). Shortly after high-dose intravenous administration (5 or 20 mg/kg), endoxifen brain accumulation was increased only 2-fold in Abcb1a/1b(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a partial saturation of P-gp at the blood-brain barrier. Endoxifen, the clinically most relevant metabolite of tamoxifen, is a P-gp substrate in vitro and in vivo, where P-gp limits its brain penetration. P-gp might thus be relevant for tamoxifen/endoxifen resistance of P-gp-positive breast cancer and tumors positioned behind a functional blood-brain barrier. PMID:21378205

  13. Reduced Photoinhibition under Low Irradiance Enhanced Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) Secondary Metabolites, Phenyl Alanine Lyase and Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z.E.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design experiment was designed to characterize the relationship between production of total flavonoids and phenolics, anthocyanin, photosynthesis, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), electron transfer rate (Fm/Fo), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and antioxidant (DPPH) in Labisia pumila var. alata, under four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s) for 16 weeks. As irradiance levels increased from 225 to 900 μmol/m2/s, the production of plant secondary metabolites (total flavonoids, phenolics and antocyanin) was found to decrease steadily. Production of total flavonoids and phenolics reached their peaks under 225 followed by 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s irradiances. Significant positive correlation of production of total phenolics, flavonoids and antocyanin content with Fv/Fm, Fm/Fo and photosynthesis indicated up-regulation of carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSM) under reduced photoinhibition on the under low light levels condition. At the lowest irradiance levels, Labisia pumila extracts also exhibited a significantly higher antioxidant activity (DPPH) than under high irradiance. The improved antioxidative activity under low light levels might be due to high availability of total flavonoids, phenolics and anthocyanin content in the plant extract. It was also found that an increase in the production of CBSM was due to high PAL activity under low light, probably signifying more availability of phenylalanine (Phe) under this condition. PMID:22754297

  14. Multiple modes of inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2J2 by dronedarone, amiodarone and their active metabolites.

    PubMed

    Karkhanis, Aneesh; Lam, Hui Yuan; Venkatesan, Gopalakrishnan; Koh, Siew Kwan; Chai, Christina Li Lin; Zhou, Lei; Hong, Yanjun; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2016-05-01

    Dronedarone, a multiple ion channel blocker is prescribed for the treatment of paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. While dronedarone does not precipitate toxicities like its predecessor amiodarone, its clinical use has been associated with idiosyncratic hepatic and cardiac adverse effects and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). As dronedarone is a potent mechanism-based inactivator of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, a question arose if it exerts a similar inhibitory effect on CYP2J2, a prominent cardiac CYP450 enzyme. In this study, we demonstrated that CYP2J2 is reversibly inhibited by dronedarone (Ki=0.034 μM), amiodarone (Ki=4.8μM) and their respective pharmacologically active metabolites namely N-desbutyldronedarone (NDBD) (Ki=0.55 μM) and N-desethylamiodarone (NDEA) (Ki=7.4 μM). Moreover, time-, concentration- and NADPH-dependent irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 was investigated where inactivation kinetic parameters (KI, kinact) and partition ratio (r) of dronedarone (0.05 μM, 0.034 min(-1), 3.3), amiodarone (0.21 μM, 0.015 min(-1), 20.7) and NDBD (0.48 μM, 0.024 min(-1), 21.7) were observed except for NDEA. The absence of the characteristic Soret peak, lack of recovery of CYP2J2 activity upon dialysis, and biotransformation of dronedarone and NDBD to quinone-oxime reactive metabolites further confirmed the irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 by dronedarone and NDBD is via the covalent adduction of CYP2J2. Our novel findings illuminate the possible mechanisms of DDIs and cardiac adverse effects due to both reversible inhibition and irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 by dronedarone, amiodarone and their active metabolites. PMID:26972388

  15. Anti-onchocerca Metabolites from Cyperus articulatus: Isolation, In Vitro Activity and In Silico 'Drug-Likeness'.

    PubMed

    Metuge, Jonathan Alunge; Babiaka, Smith B; Mbah, James A; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Ayimele, Godfred A; Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this investigation were to isolate active ingredients from the roots/rhizomes of Cyperus articulatus used as herbal medicine in Cameroon for the treatment of human onchocerciasis and to assess the efficacy of the metabolites on the Onchocerca worm. The antifilarial activity was evaluated in vitro on microfilariae (Mfs) and adult worms of the bovine derived Onchocerca ochengi, a close relative of Onchocerca volvulus. Cytotoxicity was assessed in vitro on monkey kidney epithelial cells. The structures of the active compounds were determined using spectroscopic methods and their drug-likeness evaluated using Lipinski parameters. Two secondary metabolites, AMJ1 [containing mustakone (1) as the major component] and linoleic acid or (9Z,12Z)-octadeca-9,12-dienoic acid (2) were isolated. Both compounds were found to kill both the microfilariae and adult worms of O. ochengi in a dose dependent manner. The IC50s for AMJ1 were 15.7 µg/mL for Mfs, 17.4 µg/mL for adult males and 21.9 µg/mL for adult female worms while for linoleic acid the values were, 15.7 µg/mL for Mfs, 31.0 µg/mL for adult males and 44.2 µg/mL for adult females. The present report provides the first ever evidence of the anti-Onchocerca efficacy of AMJ1 and linoleic acid. Thus, these secondary metabolites may provide a lead for design and development of new antifilarial agents. PMID:25089243

  16. Activation of 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its metabolites to DNA-damaging species in human B lymphoblastoid MCL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Volker M; Cole, Kathleen J; Phillips, David H

    2004-03-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is one of the most potent mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay and a suspected human carcinogen recently identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter. 3-Aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), 3-acetylaminobenzanthrone (3-Ac-ABA) and N-acetyl-N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-Ac-N-OH-ABA) have been identified as 3-NBA metabolites. In the present study we investigated the genotoxic effects of 3-NBA and its metabolites in the human B lymphoblastoid cell line MCL-5. DNA strand breaks were measured using the Comet assay, chromosomal damage was assessed using the micronucleus assay and DNA adduct formation was determined by 32P-post-labelling analysis. DNA strand-breaking activity was observed with each compound in a concentration-dependent manner (1-50 microM, 2 h incubation time). At 50 microM median comet tail lengths (CTLs) were 25.0 microm for 3-NBA, 48.0 microm for 3-ABA, 54.5 microm for 3-Ac-ABA and 65.0 microm for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA. Median CTLs in control incubations were in the range 7.7-13.1 micro m. Moreover, the strand-breaking activity of 3-NBA was more pronounced in the presence of a DNA repair inhibitor, hydroxyurea. Depending on the concentration used (1-20 microM, 24 h incubation time), 3-NBA and its metabolites also showed clastogenic activity in the micronucleus assay. 3-NBA and N-Ac-N-OH-ABA were the most active at low concentrations; at 1 microM the total number of micronuclei per 500 binucleate cells was 4.7 +/- 0.6 in both cases, compared with 1.7-3.0 for controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, multiple DNA adducts were detected with each compound (1 microM, 24 h incubation time), essentially similar to those found recently in vivo in rats treated with 3-NBA or its metabolites. DNA adduct levels ranged from 1.3 to 42.8 and from 2.0 to 39.8 adducts/10(8) nt using the nuclease P1 and butanol enrichment procedures, respectively. DNA binding was highest for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA, followed by 3-NBA, and much lower for 3-ABA

  17. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  18. Transthyretin Binding Heterogeneity and Anti-amyloidogenic Activity of Natural Polyphenols and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Florio, Paola; Folli, Claudia; Cianci, Michele; Del Rio, Daniele; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Berni, Rodolfo

    2015-12-11

    Transthyretin (TTR) is an amyloidogenic protein, the amyloidogenic potential of which is enhanced by a number of specific point mutations. The ability to inhibit TTR fibrillogenesis is known for several classes of compounds, including natural polyphenols, which protect the native state of TTR by specifically interacting with its thyroxine binding sites. Comparative analyses of the interaction and of the ability to protect the TTR native state for polyphenols, both stilbenoids and flavonoids, and some of their main metabolites have been carried out. A main finding of this investigation was the highly preferential binding of resveratrol and thyroxine, both characterized by negative binding cooperativity, to distinct sites in TTR, consistent with the data of x-ray analysis of TTR in complex with both ligands. Although revealing the ability of the two thyroxine binding sites of TTR to discriminate between different ligands, this feature has allowed us to evaluate the interactions of polyphenols with both resveratrol and thyroxine preferential binding sites, by using resveratrol and radiolabeled T4 as probes. Among flavonoids, genistein and apigenin were able to effectively displace resveratrol from its preferential binding site, whereas genistein also showed the ability to interact, albeit weakly, with the preferential thyroxine binding site. Several glucuronidated polyphenol metabolites did not exhibit significant competition for resveratrol and thyroxine preferential binding sites and lacked the ability to stabilize TTR. However, resveratrol-3-O-sulfate was able to significantly protect the protein native state. A rationale for the in vitro properties found for polyphenol metabolites was provided by x-ray analysis of their complexes with TTR. PMID:26468275

  19. Plant polyphenols and oxidative metabolites of the herbal alkenylbenzene methyleugenol suppress histone deacetylase activity in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes.

  20. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  1. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor. PMID:25922884

  2. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor.

  3. Anticholestatic activity of flavonoids from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and of their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R

    2001-05-01

    It is well known that water-soluble extracts of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaves exert choleresis. When studying this effect in vitro using primary cultured rat hepatocytes and cholephilic fluorescent compounds, it was noticed that the artichoke leaf extracts not only stimulated biliary secretion, but that they also reestablished it when secretion was inhibited by addition of taurolithocholate to the culture medium. Furthermore, taurolithocholate-induced bizarre bile canalicular membrane distortions detectable by electron microscopy could be prevented by artichoke leaf extracts in a dose-dependent manner when added simultaneously with the bile acid. These effects were exerted by the flavonol luteolin and, to a lesser extent, by luteolin-7-O-glucoside, while chlorogenic acid and 1.5-dicaffeoyl quinic acid were almost ineffective. Surprisingly, metabolites produced by the cultured hepatocytes were able to stimulate biliary secretion substantially as well as prevent canalicular membrane deformation. These results demonstrate that artichoke leaf extracts exert a potent anticholestatic action at least in the case of taurolithocholate-induced cholestasis. Flavonoids and their metabolites may contribute significantly to this effect.

  4. Activity and characterization of secondary metabolites produced by a new microorganism for control of plant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Hsiung; Tsou, Yi-Jung; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chern, Lih-Ling

    2010-09-30

    Microorganisms capable of utilizing vegetable tissues for growth in soils were isolated and their vegetable broth cultures were individually sprayed directly on leaves to test their ability to control Phytophthora blight of bell pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici. Liquid culture of Streptomyces strain TKA-5, a previously undescribed species obtained in this study, displayed several desirable disease control characteristics in nature, including high potency, long lasting and ability to control also black leaf spot of spoon cabbage caused by Alternaria brassicicolca. The extract was fungicidal to P. capsici but fungistatic to A. brassicicola. It was stable at high temperature and high pH. However, after exposure to pH 2 for 24h, the extract was no longer inhibitory to P. capsici although it was still strongly inhibitory to A. brassicicola. After treatment with cation or anion exchange resins, the extract lost its inhibitory effect against P. capsici but not A. brassicicola. The results suggest that the extract contained two different kinds of inhibitory metabolites, one against P. capsici with both positive and negative charges on its molecule and another against A. brassicicola with no charges on its molecule. The inhibitory metabolites were soluble in ethanol or methanol but not in water, ether or chloroform. They were dialyzable in the membrane tubing with molecular weight cut-off of 10,000, 1000 or 500 but not 100, indicating that the inhibitors have a molecular weight between 500 and 100. Results also showed that both inhibitors are not proteins. PMID:20580869

  5. Inferring the metabolism of human orphan metabolites from their metabolic network context affirms human gluconokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Rolfsson, Óttar; Paglia, Giuseppe; Magnusdóttir, Manuela; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic network reconstructions define metabolic information within a target organism and can therefore be used to address incomplete metabolic information. In the present study we used a computational approach to identify human metabolites whose metabolism is incomplete on the basis of their detection in humans but exclusion from the human metabolic network reconstruction RECON 1. Candidate solutions, composed of metabolic reactions capable of explaining the metabolism of these compounds, were then identified computationally from a global biochemical reaction database. Solutions were characterized with respect to how metabolites were incorporated into RECON 1 and their biological relevance. Through detailed case studies we show that biologically plausible non-intuitive hypotheses regarding the metabolism of these compounds can be proposed in a semi-automated manner, in an approach that is similar to de novo network reconstruction. We subsequently experimentally validated one of the proposed hypotheses and report that C9orf103, previously identified as a candidate tumour suppressor gene, encodes a functional human gluconokinase. The results of the present study demonstrate how semi-automatic gap filling can be used to refine and extend metabolic reconstructions, thereby increasing their biological scope. Furthermore, we illustrate how incomplete human metabolic knowledge can be coupled with gene annotation in order to prioritize and confirm gene functions.

  6. Absolute Bioavailability of cis-Mirincamycin and trans-Mirincamycin in Healthy Rhesus Monkeys and Ex Vivo Antimalarial Activity against Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    PubMed Central

    Khemawoot, Phisit; Saunders, David; Rasameesoraj, Maneerat; Melendez, Victor; Imerbsin, Rawiwan; Ohrt, Colin; Fracisco, Susan; Teja-isavadharm, Paktiya

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, oral bioavailability, and ex vivo antimalarial activity of mirincamycin isomers in a healthy rhesus monkey model were assessed to support lead optimization of novel nonhemolytic drugs for radical cure and causal prophylaxis of malaria. Fourteen male rhesus monkeys were randomized to four groups, which included cis and trans isomers by the oral and intravenous routes, with vehicle-only controls for each dosing route. Concentration-time data were collected for 7 days and were analyzed by noncompartmental analysis. cis-Mirincamycin had an absolute oral bioavailability of 13.6%, which was slightly higher than that of trans-mirincamycin (11.7%), but this difference was not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant difference between the area under the concentration-time curve from zero to 48 h (AUC0–48) of cis-mirincamycin and that of trans-mirincamycin after oral dosing. When cultured in vitro with the W2 clone of Plasmodium falciparum, the 50% inhibitory concentrations for cis-mirincamycin, trans-mirincamycin, and dihydroartemisinin were 11,300, 12,300, and 2.30 nM, respectively. However, when dosed primate plasma was cultured ex vivo against the W2 clone, both isomers had much greater relative potencies than their in vitro activities relative to results for dihydroartemisinin, an increase of approximately 100-fold for the cis isomer and 150-fold for the trans isomer. Further, oral ex vivo activity was significantly higher than intravenous activity for both isomers, particularly during the first 90 min following dosing, suggesting the first-pass formation of one or more metabolites with blood-stage antimalarial activity. Identification of the metabolic pathways and metabolites may help to further delineate the properties of this class of drugs with previously demonstrated liver-stage antimalarial activity. PMID:21947400

  7. Isolation and Identification of Twelve Metabolites of Isocorynoxeine in Rat Urine and their Neuroprotective Activities in HT22 Cell Assay

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wen; Chen, Fangfang; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W.; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isocorynoxeine, one of the major alkaloids from Uncaria Hook, shows the effects of lowering blood pressure, vasodilatation, and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. In this paper, the metabolism of isocorynoxeine was investigated in rats. Twelve metabolites and the parent drug were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and determined by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR, and CD experiments. Seven new compounds were identified as 11-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide, 10-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid, 21-hydroxy-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, and oxireno[18,19]-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, together with six known compounds identified as isocorynoxeine, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid B, corynoxeine, isocorynoxeine-N-oxide, and corynoxeine-N-oxide. Possible metabolic pathways of isocorynoxeine are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for the parent drug and some of its metabolites showed that isocorynoxeine exhibited a significant neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death at the maximum concentration. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M-3, M-6, M-7, and M-10. Our present study is important to further understand their metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:25519834

  8. Anti-phytopathogenic activity of sporothriolide, a metabolite from endophyte Nodulisporium sp. A21 in Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Liu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jin-Long; Zhang, Zheng-Guang; Shen, Li; Liu, Jun-Yan; Ye, Yong-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum caused multiple plant diseases resulting in severe loss of crop production. Increasing documents endorsed that endophytes are a striking resource pool for numerous metabolites with various bioactivities such as anti-fungal. Here we reported the characterization and anti-phytopathogenic activity of sporothriolide, a metabolite produced by Nodulisporium sp. A21-an endophytic fungus in the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Among the total twenty-five endophytic fungi isolated from the healthy leaves of G. biloba, the fermentation broth (FB) of the strain A21 was found potently inhibitory activity against R. solani and S. sclerotiorum using mycelia growth inhibition method. A21 was then identified as Nodulisporium sp., the asexual stage of Hypoxylon sp., by microscopic examination and ITS rDNA sequence data comparison. Under the bioassay-guided fractionation, sporothriolide was isolated from the petroleum ether extract of the FB of A21, whose structure was established by integrated interpretation of HR-ESI-MS and (1)H- and (13)C-NMR. Furthermore, the crystal structure of sporothriolide was first reported. In addition, sporothriolide was validated to be potently antifungal against R. solani, S. sclerotiorum and inhibit conidium germination of Magnaporthe oryzae in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it could be used as a lead compound for new fungicide development. PMID:27017876

  9. Caffeine metabolites in umbilical cord blood, cytochrome P-450 1A2 activity, and intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Laura M; Triche, Elizabeth W; Belanger, Kathleen; Benowitz, Neal L; Holford, Theodore R; Bracken, Michael B

    2006-06-01

    Studies investigating antenatal caffeine consumption and reproductive outcomes show conflicting results, and most studies have used maternal self-reported caffeine consumption to estimate fetal exposure. This study (n=1,606) was specifically designed to test the association of caffeine and its primary metabolites in umbilical cord blood with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Pregnant women were recruited from 56 obstetric practices and 15 clinics affiliated with six hospitals in Connecticut and Massachusetts between September 1996 and January 2000. In an adjusted model including caffeine only, levels in all quartiles were associated with reduced risk of IUGR. In adjusted analyses including paraxanthine and caffeine, serum paraxanthine levels in the highest quartile were associated with increased risk of IUGR (adjusted odds ratio=3.29, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 9.22); caffeine remained protective. These conflicting findings suggest that cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) metabolic activity may be associated with IUGR, so the ratio of paraxanthine to caffeine was then modeled. The likelihood of IUGR increased 21% for every one standard deviation change in the ratio (adjusted odds ratio=1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 1.37), suggesting that CYP1A2 activity, and not the absolute levels of paraxanthine, influences fetal growth. No associations were observed between caffeine or any metabolites and preterm delivery.

  10. Activation of the silent secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin-resistance in a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Yi, Le; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wang, Nan; Han, Xiao

    2015-04-22

    Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1), citrinin (2), penicitrinone A (3), erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4) and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-dien-3β-ol (5), were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1-5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1-5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  11. Metabolic activation of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate to reactive intermediates. II. Covalent binding, reactive metabolite formation, and differential metabolite-specific DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; Holme, J A; McClanahan, R H; Brunborg, G; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1993-02-01

    Analogs of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate (Tris-BP) either labeled at specific positions with carbon-14 and phosphorus-32 or dual-labeled with both deuterium and tritium were administered to male Wistar rats at a nephrotoxic dose of 360 mumol/kg. The covalent binding of Tris-BP metabolites to hepatic, renal, and testicular proteins was determined after 9 and 24 hr, and plasma concentrations of bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)-phosphate (Bis-BP) formed metabolically from Tris-BP were measured at intervals throughout the initial 9-hr postdosing period. The covalent binding of 14C-Tris-BP metabolites in the kidney (2495 +/- 404 pmol/mg protein) was greater than that in the liver (476 +/- 123 pmol/mg protein) or testes (94 +/- 11 pmol/mg protein); the extent of renal covalent protein binding of Tris-BP metabolites was decreased by 82 and 84% when deuterium was substituted at carbon-2 and carbon-3, respectively. Substitution of Tris-BP with deuterium at carbon-2 or carbon-3 also decreased the mean area under the curve for Bis-BP plasma concentration by 48 and 57%, respectively. The mechanism of Tris-BP-induced renal and hepatic DNA damage was evaluated in Wistar rats by an automated alkaline elution procedure after the administration of analogs of Tris-BP or Bis-BP labeled at specific positions with deuterium. Renal DNA damage was decreased when Tris-BP was substituted with deuterium at either carbon-2 or carbon-3; the magnitude of the change correlated with both a decrease in the area under the Bis-BP plasma curve and a decrease in renal covalent binding of Tris-BP metabolites for each of the deuterated analogs. In marked contrast, analogs of Bis-BP labeled with deuterium at carbon-2 or carbon-3 did not show a decrease in the severity of renal DNA damage compared to unlabeled Bis-BP. On the basis of these observations a metabolic scheme for hepatic P-450-mediated oxidation at either carbon-2 or carbon-3 of Tris-BP affording Bis-BP by two alternate pathways that are susceptible

  12. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine versus chloroquine to treat vivax malaria in Afghanistan: an open randomized, non-inferiority, trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Afghanistan's national guidelines recommend chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax infection, the parasite responsible for the majority of its malaria burden. Chloroquine resistance in P. vivax is emerging in Asia. Therapeutic responses across Afghanistan have not been evaluated in detail. Methods Between July 2007 and February 2009, an open-label, randomized controlled trial of chloroquine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in patients aged three months and over with slide-confirmed P. vivax mono-infections was conducted. Consistent with current national guidelines, primaquine was not administered. Subjects were followed up daily during the acute phase of illness (days 0-3) and weekly until day 56. The primary endpoint was the overall cumulative parasitological failure rate at day 56 after the start of treatment, with the hypothesis being that dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine was non-inferior compared to chloroquine (Δ = 5% difference in proportion of failures). Results Of 2,182 individuals with positive blood films for P. vivax, 536 were enrolled in the trial. The day 28 cure rate was 100% in both treatment groups. Parasite clearance was more rapid with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine than chloroquine. At day 56, there were more recurrent infections in the chloroquine arm (8.9%, 95% CI 6.0-13.1%) than the dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine arm (2.8%, 95% CI 1.4-5.8%), a difference in cumulative recurrence rate of 6.1% (2-sided 90%CI +2.6 to +9.7%). The log-rank test comparing the survival curves confirmed the superiority of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine over chloroquine (p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that a lower initial haemoglobin concentration was also independently associated with recurrence. Both regimens were well tolerated and no serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions Chloroquine remains an efficacious treatment for the treatment of vivax malaria in Afghanistan. In a setting where radical therapy cannot be

  13. Allocation of Secondary Metabolites, Photosynthetic Capacity, and Antioxidant Activity of Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) in Response to CO2 and Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 4 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of secondary metabolites, soluble sugar, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) activity, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity (DPPH), and lipid peroxidation under three levels of CO2 (400, 800, and 1200 μmol/mol) and four levels of light intensity (225, 500, 625, and 900 μmol/m2/s) over 15 weeks in Labisia pumila. The production of plant secondary metabolites, sugar, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity, and malondialdehyde content was influenced by the interactions between CO2 and irradiance. The highest accumulation of secondary metabolites, sugar, maliondialdehyde, and DPPH activity was observed under CO2 at 1200 μmol/mol + light intensity at 225 μmol/m2/s. Meanwhile, at 400 μmol/mol CO2 + 900 μmol/m2/s light intensity the production of chlorophyll and maliondialdehyde content was the highest. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1200 μmol/mol the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, fv/fm (maximum efficiency of photosystem II), and PAL activity were enhanced. The production of secondary metabolites displayed a significant negative relationship with maliondialdehyde indicating lowered oxidative stress under high CO2 and low irradiance improved the production of plant secondary metabolites that simultaneously enhanced the antioxidant activity (DPPH), thus improving the medicinal value of Labisia pumila under this condition. PMID:24683336

  14. Allocation of secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, and antioxidant activity of Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) in response to CO2 and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 4 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of secondary metabolites, soluble sugar, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) activity, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity (DPPH), and lipid peroxidation under three levels of CO2 (400, 800, and 1200 μ mol/mol) and four levels of light intensity (225, 500, 625, and 900 μ mol/m(2)/s) over 15 weeks in Labisia pumila. The production of plant secondary metabolites, sugar, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity, and malondialdehyde content was influenced by the interactions between CO2 and irradiance. The highest accumulation of secondary metabolites, sugar, maliondialdehyde, and DPPH activity was observed under CO2 at 1200 μ mol/mol + light intensity at 225 μ mol/m(2)/s. Meanwhile, at 400 μ mol/mol CO2 + 900 μ mol/m(2)/s light intensity the production of chlorophyll and maliondialdehyde content was the highest. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1200 μ mol/mol the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, f v /f m (maximum efficiency of photosystem II), and PAL activity were enhanced. The production of secondary metabolites displayed a significant negative relationship with maliondialdehyde indicating lowered oxidative stress under high CO2 and low irradiance improved the production of plant secondary metabolites that simultaneously enhanced the antioxidant activity (DPPH), thus improving the medicinal value of Labisia pumila under this condition.

  15. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  16. Spectrophotometric assays for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the active metabolites of chlorpyrifos and parathion by plasma paraoxonase/arylesterase.

    PubMed

    Furlong, C E; Richter, R J; Seidel, S L; Costa, L G; Motulsky, A G

    1989-08-01

    Human serum plasma paraoxonase/arylesterase exhibits a genetic polymorphism for the hydrolysis of paraoxon. One allelic form of the enzyme hydrolyzes paraoxon slowly with a low turnover number and the other(s) hydrolyzes paraoxon rapidly with a high turnover number. Chlorpyrifos-oxon, the active metabolite of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (Dursban), is also hydrolyzed by plasma arylesterase/paraoxonase. A specific assay for measuring hydrolysis of this compound is described. This assay is not subject to interference by the esterase activity of serum albumin. The Km for chlorpyrifos-oxon hydrolysis was 75 microM. Hydrolysis was inhibited by phenyl acetate, EDTA, and organic solvents. Enzyme activity required calcium ions and was stimulated by sodium chloride. Hydrolysis was optimized by using methanol instead of acetone to dissolve substrate. Unlike the multimodal distribution of paraoxonase, the distribution of chlorpyrifos-oxonase activity failed to show clear multimodality. An improvement in the assay for hydrolysis of paraoxon by plasma arylesterase/paraoxonase was achieved by elimination of organic solvents. Plotting chlorpyrifos-oxonase activity vs paraoxonase activity for a human population using the new assay conditions provided an excellent resolution of low activity homozygotes from heterozygotes for this allele. A greater than 40-fold difference in rates of chlorpyrifosoxon hydrolysis observed between rat (low activity) and rabbit sera (high activity) correlated well with the reported large differences in LD50 values for chlorpyrifos in these two animals, consistent with an important role of serum paraoxonase in detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides in vivo.

  17. Electrocardiographic safety evaluation of dihydroartemisinin piperaquine in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Mytton, Oliver T; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Peto, Leon; Price, Ric N; La, Yar; Hae, Rae; Singhasivanon, Pratap; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François

    2007-09-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) could become a leading fixed combination malaria treatment worldwide. Although there is accumulating evidence of efficacy and safety from clinical trials, data on cardiotoxicity are limited. In two randomized controlled trials in Thailand, 56 patients had ECGs performed before treatment, 4 hours after the first dose, and 4 hours after the last dose. The mean (95% CI) changes in QTc interval (Bazett's correction) were 2 (-6 to 9) ms and 14 (7 to 21) ms, respectively. These small changes on the third day of treatment are similar to those observed elsewhere in the convalescent phase following antimalarial treatment with drugs known to have no cardiac effects and are therefore likely to result from recovery from acute malaria and not the treatment given. At therapeutic doses, DP does not have clinically significant effects on the electrocardiogram. PMID:17827358

  18. Protopanaxadiol, an Active Ginseng Metabolite, Significantly Enhances the Effects of Fluorouracil on Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Zhiyu; Wan, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Anderson, Samantha; He, Xin; Yu, Chunhao; He, Tong-Chuan; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of protopanaxadiol (PPD), a gut microbiome induced ginseng metabolite, in increasing the anticancer effects of a chemotherapeutic agent fluorouracil (5-FU) on colorectal cancer. An in vitro HCT-116 colorectal cancer cell proliferation test was conducted to observe the effects of PPD, 5-FU and their co-administration and the related mechanisms of action. Then, an in vivo xenografted athymic mouse model was used to confirm the in vitro data. Our results showed that the human gut microbiome converted ginsenoside compound K to PPD as a metabolite. PPD and 5-FU significantly inhibited HCT-116 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (both p < 0.01), and the effects of 5-FU were very significantly enhanced by combined treatment with PPD (p < 0.01). Cell cycle evaluation demonstrated that 5-FU markedly induced the cancer cell S phase arrest, while PPD increased arrest in G1 phase. Compared to the control, 5-FU and PPD increased apoptosis, and their co-administration significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells (p < 0.01). Using bioluminescence imaging, in vivo data revealed that 5-FU significantly reduced the tumor growth up to Day 20 (p < 0.05). PPD and 5-FU co-administration very significantly reduced the tumor size in a dose-related manner (p < 0.01 compared to the 5-FU alone). The quantification of the tumor size and weight changes for 43 days supported the in vivo imaging data. Our results demonstrated that the co-administration of PPD and 5-FU significantly inhibited the tumor growth, indicating that PPD significantly enhanced the anticancer action of 5-FU, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. PPD may have a clinical value in 5-FU’s cancer therapeutics. PMID:25625815

  19. Antitumor Activity of Hierridin B, a Cyanobacterial Secondary Metabolite Found in both Filamentous and Unicellular Marine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vitor; Pereira, Alban R.; Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Domingues, Valentina F.; Gerwick, William H.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.; Martins, Rosário

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are widely recognized as a valuable source of bioactive metabolites. The majority of such compounds have been isolated from so-called complex cyanobacteria, such as filamentous or colonial forms, which usually display a larger number of biosynthetic gene clusters in their genomes, when compared to free-living unicellular forms. Nevertheless, picocyanobacteria are also known to have potential to produce bioactive natural products. Here, we report the isolation of hierridin B from the marine picocyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. LEGE 06113. This compound had previously been isolated from the filamentous epiphytic cyanobacterium Phormidium ectocarpi SAG 60.90, and had been shown to possess antiplasmodial activity. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from both strains confirmed that these cyanobacteria derive from different evolutionary lineages. We further investigated the biological activity of hierridin B, and tested its cytotoxicity towards a panel of human cancer cell lines; it showed selective cytotoxicity towards HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:23922738

  20. Lichen metabolites. 2. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of gyrophoric, usnic, and diffractaic acid on human keratinocyte growth.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K C; Müller, K

    1999-06-01

    The sensitivity of the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT to several lichen metabolites isolated from Parmelia nepalensis and Parmelia tinctorum was evaluated. The tridepside gyrophoric acid (6), the dibenzofuran derivative (+)-usnic acid (1), and the didepside diffractaic acid (5) were potent antiproliferative agents and inhibited cell growth, with IC50 values of 1.7, 2.1, and 2.6 microM, respectively. Methyl beta-orcinolcarboxylate (2), ethyl hematommate (3), the didepside atranorin (4), and (+)-protolichesterinic acid (7) did not influence keratinocyte growth at concentrations of 5 microM. Keratinocytes were further tested for their susceptibility to the action of the potent antiproliferative agents on plasma membrane integrity. The release of lactate dehydrogenase activity into the culture medium was unchanged as compared to controls, documenting that the activity of gyrophoric acid (6), (+)-usnic acid (1), and diffractaic acid (5) was due to cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects. PMID:10395495

  1. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana.

  2. Simultaneous determination of spironolactone and its active metabolite canrenone in human plasma by HPLC-APCI-MS.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haijuan; Xu, Fengguo; Zhang, Zunjian; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Yun

    2006-04-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method for the simultaneous determination of spironolactone and its active metabolite canrenone in human plasma has been developed and validated. After the addition of estazolam as the internal standard (IS), plasma samples were extracted with methylene chloride : ethyl acetate mixture (20 : 80, v/v) and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a reversed-phase C18 column with a mobile phase of methanol-water (57 : 43, v/v). Analytes were determined in a single quadrupole mass spectrometer using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. LC-APCI-MS was performed in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode using target ions at m/z 341.25 for spironolactone and canrenone, m/z 295.05 for estazolam. The method was proved to be sensitive and specific by testing six different plasma batches. Calibration curves of spironolactone and canrenone were linear over the range 2-300 ng/ml. The within- and between-batch precisions (relative standard deviation (RSD)%) were lower than 10% and the accuracy ranged from 85 to 115%. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was identifiable and reproducible at 2 ng/ml. The proposed method was successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of spironolactone and its major metabolite in healthy male Chinese volunteers. PMID:16541392

  3. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    PubMed Central

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  4. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. PMID:26688290

  5. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the "secondary compound hypothesis" and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  6. Cytotoxicity of dihydroartemisinin toward Molt-4 cells attenuated by N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and deferoxamine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Wing; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Derivatives of artemisinin, a compound extracted from the wormwood Artemisia annua L, have potent anticancer properties. The anticancer mechanisms of artemisinin derivatives have not been fully-elucidated. We hypothesize that the cytotoxicity of these compounds is due to the free radicals formed by interaction of their endoperoxide moiety with intracellular iron in cancer cells. The effects of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), a spin-trap free radical scavenger, and deferoxamine (DX), an iron chelating agent, on the in vitro cytotoxicity of dihyroartemisinin (DHA) toward Molt-4 human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells were investigated in the present study. Dihydroartemisinin effectively killed Molt-4 cells in vitro. Its cytotoxicity was significantly attenuated by PBN and DX. Based on the data of our present and previous studies, we conclude that one anticancer mechanism of dihydroartemisinin is the formation of toxic-free radicals via an iron-mediated process. PMID:24123007

  7. Secondary metabolites from the endophytic Botryosphaeria dothidea of Melia azedarach and their antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Yu-Qi; Tang, Jiang-Jiang; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-04-23

    Two new metabolites, an α-pyridone derivative, 3-hydroxy-2-methoxy-5-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (1), and a ceramide derivative, 3-hydroxy-N-(1-hydroxy-3-methylpentan-2-yl)-5-oxohexanamide (2), and a new natural product, 3-hydroxy-N-(1-hydroxy-4-methylpentan-2-yl)-5-oxohexanamide (3), along with 15 known compounds including chaetoglobosin C (7) and chaetoglobosin F (8) were isolated from the solid culture of the endophytic fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea KJ-1, collected from the stems of white cedar (Melia azedarach L). The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D NMR experiments and by mass spectrometric measurements), and the structure of 1 was confirmed by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. These metabolites were evaluated in vitro for antimicrobial, antioxidant, and cytotoxicity activities. Pycnophorin (4) significantly inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus with equal minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 25 μM. Stemphyperylenol (5) displayed a potent antifungal activity against the plant pathogen Alternaria solani with MIC of 1.57 μM comparable to the commonly used fungicide carbendazim. Both altenusin (9) and djalonensone (10) showed markedly DPPH radical scavenging activities. In addition, stemphyperylenol (5) and altenuene (6) exhibited strong cytotoxicity against HCT116 cancer cell line with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 3.13 μM in comparison with the positive control etoposide (IC50 = 2.13 μM). This is the first report of the isolation of these compounds from the endophytic B. dothidea. PMID:24689437

  8. Histopathology, enzyme activities, and PAH metabolites in English sole collected near coastal pulp mills

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The bottom-feeding flatfish, English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus), is widely distributed along the B.C. Pacific coast and fulfills a majority of the requirements as a sentinel species for environmental effects monitoring programs. Studies involving the use of histopathological, biochemical, and chemical tools with English sole collected near the vicinity of B.C. pulp mills are currently being conducted. Analysis, to date, has revealed idiopathic liver lesions to be strongly dependent on location of capture with a prevalence of 30% preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions found in fish collected near pulp mills. All fish residing near pulp mills show hepatocellular hemosiderosis, an iron storage disorder. The mixed-function oxidizing enzyme, EROD, was found to be induced in fish collected near pulp mills. However, the levels of conjugating enzymes, GST and UDP-GT, were found to be unchanged when compared with reference fish. PAH metabolites, measured as FACs in bile, are also present in English sole collected from the mill sites and the conjugated derivatives are presently being identified by HPLC/ES-MS techniques, The relationships between these observations will be discussed.

  9. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-Active Metabolites from Platanus occidentalis (American Sycamore)

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Mansoor, Arsala A.; Gross, Amanda; Ashfaq, M. Khalid; Jacob, Melissa; Khan, Shabana I.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    One known and three new potent, selective, and nontoxic anti-MRSA metabolites, kaempferol 3-O-α-l-(2″,3″-di-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (1) (IC50 2.0 µg/mL), kaempferol 3-O-α-l-(2″-E-p-coumaroyl-3″-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (2) (IC50 0.8 µg/mL), kaempferol 3-O-α-l-(2″-Z-p-coumaroyl-3″-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (3) (IC50 0.7 µg/mL), and kaempferol 3-O-α-l-(2″,3″-di-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (4) (IC50 0.4 µg/mL), were isolated from the leaves of the common American sycamore, Platanus occidentalis. Compounds 2–4 are new. Due to the unusual selectivity, potency, and safety of the pure compounds and the semipure glycoside mixture against MRSA, it is clear that this represents a viable class of inhibitors to prevent growth of MRSA on surfaces and systemically. PMID:19904995

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-active metabolites from Platanus occidentalis (American Sycamore).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Mansoor, Arsala A; Gross, Amanda; Ashfaq, M Khalid; Jacob, Melissa; Khan, Shabana I; Hamann, Mark T

    2009-12-01

    One known and three new potent, selective, and nontoxic anti-MRSA metabolites, kaempferol 3-O-alpha-l-(2'',3''-di-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (1) (IC(50) 2.0 microg/mL), kaempferol 3-O-alpha-l-(2''-E-p-coumaroyl-3''-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (2) (IC(50) 0.8 microg/mL), kaempferol 3-O-alpha-l-(2''-Z-p-coumaroyl-3''-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (3) (IC(50) 0.7 microg/mL), and kaempferol 3-O-alpha-l-(2'',3''-di-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (4) (IC(50) 0.4 microg/mL), were isolated from the leaves of the common American sycamore, Platanus occidentalis. Compounds 2-4 are new. Due to the unusual selectivity, potency, and safety of the pure compounds and the semipure glycoside mixture against MRSA, it is clear that this represents a viable class of inhibitors to prevent growth of MRSA on surfaces and systemically.

  11. Dihydroartemisinin as a Putative STAT3 Inhibitor, Suppresses the Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Targeting Jak2/STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lifeng; Song, Qi; Zhou, Chenyang; Li, Xiaoming; Pi, Lihong; Ma, Xiuru; Li, Hui; Lu, Xiuying; Shen, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Developing drugs that can effectively block STAT3 activation may serve as one of the most promising strategy for cancer treatment. Currently, there is no putative STAT3 inhibitor that can be safely and effectively used in clinic. In the present study, we investigated the potential of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) as a putative STAT3 inhibitor and its antitumor activities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The inhibitory effects of DHA on STAT3 activation along with its underlying mechanisms were studied in HNSCC cells. The antitumor effects of DHA against HNSCC cells were explored both in vitro and in vivo. An investigation on cooperative effects of DHA with cisplatin in killing HNSCC cells was also implemented. DHA exhibited remarkable and specific inhibitory effects on STAT3 activation via selectively blocking Jak2/STAT3 signaling. Besides, DHA significantly inhibited HNSCC growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly through induction of apoptosis and attenuation of cell migration. DHA also synergized with cisplatin in tumor inhibition in HNSCC cells. Our findings demonstrate that DHA is a putative STAT3 inhibitor that may represent a new and effective drug for cancer treatment and therapeutic sensitization in HNSCC patients. PMID:26784960

  12. Dihydroartemisinin as a Putative STAT3 Inhibitor, Suppresses the Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Targeting Jak2/STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lifeng; Song, Qi; Zhou, Chenyang; Li, Xiaoming; Pi, Lihong; Ma, Xiuru; Li, Hui; Lu, Xiuying; Shen, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Developing drugs that can effectively block STAT3 activation may serve as one of the most promising strategy for cancer treatment. Currently, there is no putative STAT3 inhibitor that can be safely and effectively used in clinic. In the present study, we investigated the potential of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) as a putative STAT3 inhibitor and its antitumor activities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The inhibitory effects of DHA on STAT3 activation along with its underlying mechanisms were studied in HNSCC cells. The antitumor effects of DHA against HNSCC cells were explored both in vitro and in vivo. An investigation on cooperative effects of DHA with cisplatin in killing HNSCC cells was also implemented. DHA exhibited remarkable and specific inhibitory effects on STAT3 activation via selectively blocking Jak2/STAT3 signaling. Besides, DHA significantly inhibited HNSCC growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly through induction of apoptosis and attenuation of cell migration. DHA also synergized with cisplatin in tumor inhibition in HNSCC cells. Our findings demonstrate that DHA is a putative STAT3 inhibitor that may represent a new and effective drug for cancer treatment and therapeutic sensitization in HNSCC patients. PMID:26784960

  13. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xue; Li, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  14. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions.

  15. Thuringiensin: a thermostable secondary metabolite from Bacillus thuringiensis with insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Li, Lin; Sun, Ming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-07-25

    Thuringiensin (Thu), also known as β-exotoxin, is a thermostable secondary metabolite secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis. It has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects, including species belonging to the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Isoptera, and several nematode species. The chemical formula of Thu is C22H32O19N5P, and it is composed of adenosine, glucose, phosphoric acid, and gluconic diacid. In contrast to the more frequently studied insecticidal crystal protein, Thu is not a protein but a small molecule oligosaccharide. In this review, a detailed and updated description of the characteristics, structure, insecticidal mechanism, separation and purification technology, and genetic determinants of Thu is provided.

  16. Systematic synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of ω-carboxylated menaquinone derivatives--Investigations on identified and putative vitamin K₂ metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinya; Shimizu, Akitaka; Takeda, Noriaki; Oguchi, Kazuki; Katsurai, Tomoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-15

    Vitamin K is an essential nutrient for blood coagulation and bone homeostasis, and also functions in many physiological processes including inflammation and cancer progression. However, the nature and activities of its metabolites remain unclear. We report here systematic synthesis of ω-carboxylated derivatives of menaquinone (vitamin K2), including previously identified metabolites 5, K acid I (10), and K acid II (12), and evaluation of their inhibitory activity toward LPS-stimulated induction of inflammatory cytokines. These results should contribute to an improved understanding of the biochemistry and pharmacology of vitamin K.

  17. Simultaneous determination of macitentan and its active metabolite in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lixiu; Zhou, Ying; He, Xiaomeng; Li, Huqun; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong

    2015-10-01

    Macitentan is a newly approved endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) for the long-term treatment of PAH with superior receptor-binding properties and a longer duration of action compared to other available ERAs. However, analytical methods for simultaneous determination of macitentan and its active metabolite, ACT-132577, in human plasma have not been fully reported in the literature. In this work, a fast, sensitive, and reliable high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (HPLC-MS/MS) was firstly developed and completely validated for simultaneous determination of macitentan and its active metabolite in human plasma. Plasma samples were processed with a protein precipitation using acetonitrile, followed by chromatographic separation using an Inertsil ODS-SP column (100×2.1mm, 3.5μm) under isocratic elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. Quantification was operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the transitions m/z 547.1→201.0 for macitentan, m/z 589.0→203.0 for ACT-132577, and m/z 380.5→243.3 for the IS (donepezil). The assay exhibited a linear range of 1-500ng/mL for both macitentan and ACT-132577. The accuracy and the intra- and inter-precisions were within acceptable ranges and no significant matrix effect was observed during the method validation. The developed method was successfully utilized to a human pharmacokinetic study of macitentan as well as ACT-132577 after oral administration of 10mg macitentan tablet in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  18. Arachidonic Acid Metabolite 19(S)-HETE Induces Vasorelaxation and Platelet Inhibition by Activating Prostacyclin (IP) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    19(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (19(S)-HETE) belongs to a family of arachidonic acid metabolites produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play critical roles in the regulation of cardiovascular, renal and pulmonary functions. Although it has been known for a long time that 19(S)-HETE has vascular effects, its mechanism of action has remained unclear. In this study we show that 19(S)-HETE induces cAMP accumulation in the human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line MEG-01. This effect was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 520 nM, insensitive to pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 and required the expression of the G-protein Gs. Systematic siRNA-mediated knock-down of each G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in MEG-01 followed by functional analysis identified the prostacyclin receptor (IP) as the mediator of the effects of 19(S)-HETE, and the heterologously expressed IP receptor was also activated by 19(S)-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 567 nM. Pretreatment of isolated murine platelets with 19(S)-HETE blocked thrombin-induced platelets aggregation, an effect not seen in platelets from mice lacking the IP receptor. Furthermore, 19(S)-HETE was able to relax mouse mesenteric artery- and thoracic aorta-derived vessel segments. While pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 enzymes had no effect on the vasodilatory activity of 19(S)-HETE these effects were not observed in vessels from mice lacking the IP receptor. These results identify a novel mechanism of action for the CYP450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolite 19(S)-HETE and point to the existence of a broader spectrum of naturally occurring prostanoid receptor agonists. PMID:27662627

  19. The selenium metabolite methylselenol regulates the expression of ligands that trigger immune activation through the lymphocyte receptor NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Kehlet, Stephanie; Andresen, Lars; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Ellgaard, Lars; Gammelgaard, Bente; Skov, Søren

    2014-11-01

    For decades, selenium research has been focused on the identification of active metabolites, which are crucial for selenium chemoprevention of cancer. In this context, the metabolite methylselenol (CH3SeH) is known for its action to selectively kill transformed cells through mechanisms that include increased formation of reactive oxygen species, induction of DNA damage, triggering of apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. Here we reveal that CH3SeH modulates the cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands. The expression of NKG2D ligands is induced by stress-associated pathways that occur early during malignant transformation and enable the recognition and elimination of tumors by activating the lymphocyte receptor NKG2D. CH3SeH regulated NKG2D ligands both on the transcriptional and the posttranscriptional levels. CH3SeH induced the transcription of MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence MICA/B and ULBP2 mRNA. However, the induction of cell surface expression was restricted to the ligands MICA/B. Remarkably, our studies showed that CH3SeH inhibited ULBP2 surface transport through inhibition of the autophagic transport pathway. Finally, we identified extracellular calcium as being essential for CH3SeH regulation of NKG2D ligands. A balanced cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands is considered to be an innate barrier against tumor development. Therefore, our work indicates that the application of selenium compounds that are metabolized to CH3SeH could improve NKG2D-based immune therapy. PMID:25258323

  20. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  1. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety. PMID:27250800

  2. Relationship between disease activity and serum levels of vitamin D metabolites and parathyroid hormone in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lange, U; Jung, O; Teichmann, J; Neeck, G

    2001-12-01

    Vertebral fractures due to osteoporosis are a common but frequently unrecognized complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and various factors may contribute to the development of osteoporosis in AS. It is known that inflammatory activity in rheumatic disease (i.e., proinflammatory cytokines) itself plays a possible role in the pathophysiology of bone loss. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) seems to be another possible candidate for mediatory function in regulating both the inflammatory process and bone turnover. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between disease activity, bone turnover and calciotropic hormones. In 70 patients with established AS and an age- and sex-matched control group, the relation between disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), and serum levels of vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone (PTH), bone alkaline phosphatase (bAP) and urinary pyridinium cross-links were determined. Serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 (p<0.01) and PTH (p<0.01) were negatively correlated with disease activity, the excretion of urinary pyridinium crosslinks showed a positive correlation with disease activity (p<0.01), and 1,25(OH)2D3 and PTH were positively correlated with bAP (p<0.01). These results indicate that high disease activity in AS is associated with an alteration in vitamin D metabolism and increased bone resorption. Furthermore, the decreased levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 may contribute to a negative calcium balance and inhibition of bone formation. Our results suggest further research is necessary to determine whether low levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 as an endogenous immune modulator suppressing activated T cells and cell proliferation may accelerate the inflammation process in AS. PMID:11846329

  3. Disruption of mitochondrial activities in rabbit and human hepatocytes by a quinoxalinone anxiolytic and its carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R G; Bacon, J A; Cramer, C T; Petrella, D K; Sun, E L; Meglasson, M D; Holmuhamedov, E

    1998-11-01

    The quinoxalinone anxiolytic, panadiplon, was dropped from clinical development due to unexpected hepatic toxicity in human volunteers. Subsequent experimental studies in rabbits demonstrated a hepatic toxicity that resembled Reye's syndrome. In the present studies, we examined the effects of panadiplon and a metabolite, cyclopropane carboxylic acid (CPCA) on hepatic mitochondrial activities in vitro and ex vivo. Acute inhibition of beta-oidation of [14C]palmitate was observed in rabbit and human hepatocyte suspensions incubated with 100 microM panadiplon. Panadiplon (30 microM) also reduced mitochondrial uptake of rhodamine 123 (R123) in cultured rabbit and human, but not rat hepatocytes, following 18 h exposure. CPCA also impaired beta-oxidation and R123 uptake in rabbit and human hepatocytes. R123 uptake and beta-oxidation in cells from some donors was not impaired by either agent, and cell death was not observed in any experiment. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits had reduced palmitate beta-oxidation rates and inhibited mitochondrial R123 uptake; R123 uptake remained inhibited until 48-72 h in culture. Rabbit mitochondrial respiration experiments revealed a slightly lower ratio of ATP formed/oxygen consumed in panadiplon-treated animals: direct exposure of normal rabbit liver mitochondria to panadiplon did not have this effect. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits showed reduced respiratory control ratios and lower oxygen consumption compared to controls. Our results indicate that panadiplon induces a mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver, and suggest that this dysfunction may be attributed to the carboxylic acid metabolite.

  4. Dihydroartemisinin ameliorates inflammatory disease by its reciprocal effects on Th and regulatory T cell function via modulating the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan G; Wang, Yunqi; Guo, Zengli; Gu, Ai-di; Dan, Han C; Baldwin, Albert S; Hao, Weidong; Wan, Yisong Y

    2012-11-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is an important derivative of the herb medicine Artemisia annua L., used in ancient China. DHA is currently used worldwide to treat malaria by killing malaria-causing parasites. In addition to this prominent effect, DHA is thought to regulate cellular functions, such as angiogenesis, tumor cell growth, and immunity. Nonetheless, how DHA affects T cell function remains poorly understood. We found that DHA potently suppressed Th cell differentiation in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, DHA greatly promoted regulatory T cell (Treg) generation in a manner dependent on the TGF-βR:Smad signal. In addition, DHA treatment effectively reduced onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and ameliorated ongoing EAE in mice. Administration of DHA significantly decreased Th but increased Tregs in EAE-inflicted mice, without apparent global immune suppression. Moreover, DHA modulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, because mTOR signal was attenuated in T cells upon DHA treatment. Importantly, enhanced Akt activity neutralized DHA-mediated effects on T cells in an mTOR-dependent fashion. This study therefore reveals a novel immune regulatory function of DHA in reciprocally regulating Th and Treg cell generation through the modulating mTOR pathway. It addresses how DHA regulates immune function and suggests a new type of drug for treating diseases in which mTOR activity is to be tempered. PMID:22993204

  5. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  6. Identification of minor secondary metabolites from the latex of Croton lechleri (Muell-Arg) and evaluation of their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    De Marino, Simona; Gala, Fulvio; Zollo, Franco; Vitalini, Sara; Fico, Gelsomina; Visioli, Francesco; Iorizzi, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Dragon's blood (Sangre de drago), a viscous red sap derived from Croton lechleri Muell-Arg (Euphorbiaceae), is extensively used by indigenous cultures of the Amazonian basin for its wound healing properties. The aim of this study was to identify the minor secondary metabolites and test the antioxidant activity of this sustance. A bioguided fractionation of the n-hexane, chloroform, n-butanol, and aqueous extracts led to the isolation of 15 compounds: three megastigmanes, four flavan-3-ols, three phenylpropanoids, three lignans, a clerodane, and the alkaloid taspine. In addition to these known molecules, six compounds were isolated and identified for the first time in the latex: blumenol B, blumenol C, 4,5-dihydroblumenol A, erythro-guaiacyl-glyceryl-beta-O-4'- dihydroconiferyl ether, 2-[4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-2-methoxyphenoxy]-propane-1,3-diol and floribundic acid glucoside. Combinations of spectroscopic methods ((1)H-, (13)C- NMR and 2D-NMR experiments), ESI-MS, and literature comparisons were used for compound identification. In vitro antioxidant activities were assessed by DPPH, total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation assays. Flavan-3-ols derivatives (as major phenolic compounds in the latex) exhibited the highest antioxidant activity.

  7. Activation of p53 with ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, marine sponge metabolites, induces apoptosis and autophagy in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Chung, Kyu Jin; Hwang, In Hyun; Gwak, Jungsuk; Park, Seoyoung; Ju, Bong Gun; Yun, Eunju; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Na, MinKyun; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, p53, plays an essential role in the cellular response to stress through regulating the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we used a cell-based reporter system for the detection of p53 response transcription to identify the marine sponge metabolites, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, as activators of the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone efficiently stabilize the p53 protein through promotion of p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 in both HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Moreover, both compounds upregulate the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1, a p53-dependent gene, and suppress proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase-3 cleavage and the population of cells that positively stained with Annexin V-FITC, both of which are typical biochemical markers of apoptosis. Furthermore, autophagy was elicited by both compounds, as indicated by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta formations and LC3-II turnover in HCT116 cells. Our findings suggest that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone exert their anti-cancer activity by activation of the p53 pathway and may have significant potential as chemo-preventive and therapeutic agents for human colon cancer. PMID:25603347

  8. Selective activation of the gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C from bovine cerebellum by arachidonic acid and its lipoxygenase metabolites.

    PubMed

    Shearman, M S; Naor, Z; Sekiguchi, K; Kishimoto, A; Nishizuka, Y

    1989-01-30

    The gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C (PKC) apparently is expressed only in central nervous tissues, and at a high level in the cerebellum and hippocampus. gamma-PKC from bovine cerebellum, but not the alpha- or beta I/beta II-subspecies, is activated by micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA), in the absence of both phospholipid and diacylglycerol. A significant component of this activation is also calcium independent. Other unsaturated fatty acids are much less active in this respect. Among the AA metabolites tested, lipoxin A (5(S),6(R),15(S)-11-cis-isomer) was a potent, selective activator of the gamma-subspecies, and also, to a lesser extent, 12(S)-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid could support activation. These results raise the possibility that AA and some of its lipoxygenase metabolites may function as messenger molecules in neurones to activate the gamma-subspecies of PKC. PMID:2492951

  9. Tryptophan in Alcoholism Treatment I:  Kynurenine Metabolites Inhibit the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Low Km Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity, Elevate Blood Acetaldehyde Concentration and Induce Aversion to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina; Steptoe, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims were to provide proofs of mechanism and principle by establishing the ability of kynurenine metabolites to inhibit the liver mitochondrial low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity after administration and in vivo, and to induce aversion to alcohol. Methods: Kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) were administered to normal male Wistar rats and ALDH activity was determined both in vitro in liver homogenates and in vivo (by measuring blood acetaldehyde following ethanol administration). Alcohol consumption was studied in an aversion model in rats and in alcohol-preferring C57 mice. Results: ALDH activity was significantly inhibited by all three metabolites by doses as small as 1 mg/kg body wt. Blood acetaldehyde accumulation after ethanol administration was strongly elevated by KA and 3-HK and to a lesser extent by 3-HAA. All three metabolites induced aversion to alcohol in rats and decreased alcohol preference in mice. Conclusions: The above kynurenine metabolites of tryptophan induce aversion to alcohol by inhibiting ALDH activity. An intellectual property covering the use of 3-HK and 3-HAA and derivatives thereof in the treatment of alcoholism by aversion awaits further development. PMID:21896552

  10. Isolation, identification and antimicrobial activities of two secondary metabolites of Talaromyces verruculosus.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fang; Yang, Rui; Chen, Dong-Dong; Wang, Ying; Qin, Bao-Fu; Yang, Xin-Juan; Zhou, Le

    2012-11-28

    From the ethyl acetate extract of the culture broth of Talaromyces verruculosus, a rhizosphere fungus of Stellera chamaejasme L., (-)-8-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxypentyl)-3,4-dihydroisocoumarin (1) and (E)-3-(2,5-dioxo-3-(propan-2-ylidene)pyrrolidin-1-yl)acrylic acid (2) were isolated and evaluated for their antimicrobial activities. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR, MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and 2D NMR spectra. Compound 1 exhibited the significant activities in vitro against two strains of bacteria and four strains of fungi. Compound 2 gave slight activities on the fungi at 100 µg mL(-1), but no activities on the bacteria. Compound 1 should be considered as a new lead or model compound to develop new isocoumarin antimicrobial agents.

  11. Mexiletine metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine belongs to class IB antiarrhythmic drugs and it is still considered a drug of choice for treating myotonias. However some patients do not respond to mexiletine or have significant side effects limiting its use; thus, alternatives to this drug should be envisaged. Mexiletine is extensive metabolized in humans via phase I and phase II reactions. Only a small fraction (about 10%) of the dose of mexiletine administered is recovered without modifications in urine. Although in the past decades Mex metabolites were reported to be devoid of biological activity, recent studies seem to deny this assertion. Actually, several hydroxylated metabolites showed pharmacological activity similar to that of Mex, thus contributing to its clinical profile. Purpose of this review is to summarize all the studies proposed till now about mexiletine metabolites, regarding structureactivity relationship studies as well as synthetic strategies. Biological and analytical studies will be also reported. PMID:25723511

  12. Microbial transformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ by Absidia coerulea and the reversal activity of the metabolites towards multi-drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Qiao, Lirui; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yi; Zou, Jianhua; Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Jungui

    2011-12-01

    Biotransformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ (1) by the fungus Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as ginsenoside-F₁ (2), 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (4), 3-oxo-7β-hydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 3-oxo-7β,15α-dihydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 could catalyze the specific C-3 dehydrogenation of derivatives of ginsenoside-Rg₁, as well as hydroxylation at the 7β and 15α positions. Metabolites 2, 4 and 5 exhibited moderate reversal activity towards A549/taxol MDR tumor cells in vitro. PMID:21946057

  13. Lack of metabolic activation and predominant formation of an excreted metabolite of nontoxic platynecine-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jianqing; Liao, Cangsong; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-21

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) poisoning is well-known because of the intake of PA-containing plant-derived natural products and PA-contaminated foodstuffs. Based on different structures of the necine bases, PAs are classified into three types: retronecine, otonecine, and platynecine type. The former two type PAs possessing an unsaturated necine base with a 1,2-double bond are hepatotoxic due to the P450-mediated metabolic activation to generate reactive pyrrolic ester, which interacts with cellular macromolecules leading to toxicity. With a saturated necine base, platynecine-type PAs are reported to be nontoxic and their nontoxicity was hypothesized to be due to the absence of metabolic activation; however, the metabolic pathway responsible for their nontoxic nature is largely unknown. In the present study, to prove the absence of metabolic activation in nontoxic platynecine-type PAs, hepatic metabolism of platyphylline (PLA), a representative platynecine-type PA, was investigated and directly compared with the representatives of two toxic types of PAs in parallel. By determining the pyrrolic ester-derived glutathione conjugate, our results confirmed that the major metabolic pathway of PLA did not lead to formation of the reactive pyrrolic ester. More interestingly, having a metabolic rate similar to that of toxic PAs, PLA also underwent oxidative metabolisms mediated by P450s, especially P450 3A4, the same enzyme that catalyzes metabolic activation of two toxic types of PAs. However, the predominant oxidative dehydrogenation pathway of PLA formed a novel metabolite, dehydroplatyphylline carboxylic acid, which was water-soluble, readily excreted, and could not interact with cellular macromolecules. In conclusion, our study confirmed that the saturated necine bases determine the absence of metabolic activation and thus govern the metabolic pathway responsible for the nontoxic nature of platynecine-type PAs. PMID:24308637

  14. Effect of phenylalanine metabolites on the activities of enzymes of ketone-body utilization in brain of suckling rats.

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, J; Gimenez, C; Valdivieso, F; Mayor, F

    1976-01-01

    1. The effects of phenylalanine and its metabolites (phenylacetate, phenethylamine, phenyl-lactate, o-hydroxyphenylacetate and phenylpyruvate) on the activity of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.30) 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase (EC 2.8.3.5) and acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9) in brain of suckling rats were investigated. 2. The 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from the brain of suckling rats had a Km for 3-hydroxybutyrate of 1.2 mM. Phenylpyruvate, phenylacetate and o-hydroxyphenylacetate inhibited the enzyme activity with Ki values of 0.5, 1.3 and 4.7 mM respectively. 3. The suckling-rat brain 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activity had a Km for acetoacetate of 0.665 mM and for succinyl (3-carboxypropionyl)-CoA of 0.038 mM. The enzyme was inhibited with respect to acetoacetate by phenylpyruvate (Ki equals 1.3 mM) and o-hydroxyphenylacetate (Ki equals 4.5 mM). The reaction in the direction of acetoacetate was also inhibited by phenylpyruvate (Ki equals 1.6 mM) and o-hydroxyphenylacetate (Ki equals 4.5 mM). 4. Phenylpyruvate inhibited with respect to acetoacetyl-CoA both the mitochondrial (Ki equals 3.2 mM) and cytoplasmic (Ki equals 5.2 mM) acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase activities. 5. The results suggest that inhibition of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activities may impair ketone-body utilization and hence lipid synthesis in the developing brain. This suggestion is discussed with reference to the pathogenesis of mental retardation in phenylketonuria. PMID:12750

  15. Structure of neprilysin in complex with the active metabolite of sacubitril

    PubMed Central

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D’Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Ramage, Paul; Logel, Claude; Cumin, Frederic; Ksander, Gary M.; Wiesmann, Christian; Karki, Rajeshri G.; Mogi, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril is an ethyl ester prodrug of LBQ657, the active neprilysin (NEP) inhibitor, and a component of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan). We report herein the three-dimensional structure of LBQ657 in complex with human NEP at 2 Å resolution. The crystal structure unravels the binding mode of the compound occupying the S1, S1’ and S2’ sub-pockets of the active site, consistent with a competitive inhibition mode. An induced fit conformational change upon binding of the P1’-biphenyl moiety of the inhibitor suggests an explanation for its selectivity against structurally homologous zinc metallopeptidases. PMID:27302413

  16. Structure of neprilysin in complex with the active metabolite of sacubitril.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Ramage, Paul; Logel, Claude; Cumin, Frederic; Ksander, Gary M; Wiesmann, Christian; Karki, Rajeshri G; Mogi, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril is an ethyl ester prodrug of LBQ657, the active neprilysin (NEP) inhibitor, and a component of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan). We report herein the three-dimensional structure of LBQ657 in complex with human NEP at 2 Å resolution. The crystal structure unravels the binding mode of the compound occupying the S1, S1' and S2' sub-pockets of the active site, consistent with a competitive inhibition mode. An induced fit conformational change upon binding of the P1'-biphenyl moiety of the inhibitor suggests an explanation for its selectivity against structurally homologous zinc metallopeptidases. PMID:27302413

  17. The active metabolite of Clopidogrel disrupts P2Y12 receptor oligomers and partitions them out of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Savi, Pierre; Zachayus, Jean-Luc; Delesque-Touchard, Nathalie; Labouret, Catherine; Hervé, Caroline; Uzabiaga, Marie-Françoise; Pereillo, Jean-Marie; Culouscou, Jean-Michel; Bono, Françoise; Ferrara, Pascual; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    P2Y12, a G protein-coupled receptor that plays a central role in platelet activation has been recently identified as the receptor targeted by the antithrombotic drug, clopidogrel. In this study, we further deciphered the mechanism of action of clopidogrel and of its active metabolite (Act-Met) on P2Y12 receptors. Using biochemical approaches, we demonstrated the existence of homooligomeric complexes of P2Y12 receptors at the surface of mammalian cells and in freshly isolated platelets. In vitro treatment with Act-Met or in vivo oral administration to rats with clopidogrel induced the breakdown of these oligomers into dimeric and monomeric entities in P2Y12 expressing HEK293 and platelets respectively. In addition, we showed the predominant association of P2Y12 oligomers to cell membrane lipid rafts and the partitioning of P2Y12 out of rafts in response to clopidogrel and Act-Met. The raft-associated P2Y12 oligomers represented the functional form of the receptor, as demonstrated by binding and signal transduction studies. Finally, using a series of receptors individually mutated at each cysteine residue and a chimeric P2Y12/P2Y13 receptor, we pointed out the involvement of cysteine 97 within the first extracellular loop of P2Y12 in the mechanism of action of Act-Met. PMID:16835302

  18. Fumigaclavine C, an fungal metabolite, improves experimental colitis in mice via downregulating Th1 cytokine production and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Fei, Ming-Jian; Shu, Ren-Geng; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Xu, Qiang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on experimental colitis was examined. Fumigaclavine C, when administered intraperitoneally once a day, significantly reduced the weight loss and mortality rate of mice with experimental colitis induced by intrarectally injection of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). This compound also markedly alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic appearances of colitis. Furthermore, Fumigaclavine C, given both in vivo and in vitro, showed a marked inhibition on the expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-12alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha as well as MMP-9 in sacral lymph node cells, colonic patch lymphocytes and colitis tissues from the TNBS colitis mice. Meanwhile, the compound caused a dose-dependent reduction in IL-2 and IFN-gamma from the lymphocytes at the protein level and MMP-9 activity. These results suggest that Fumigaclavine C may alleviate experimental colitis mainly via down-regulating the production of Th1 cytokines and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase. PMID:16023606

  19. Salicylate, diflunisal and their metabolites inhibit CBP/p300 and exhibit anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Maksimoska, Jasna; Sorum, Alexander W; Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Intelly S; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Newman, John C; Schröder, Sebastian; Ott, Melanie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meier, Jordan; Nimer, Stephen; Verdin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid are potent and widely used anti-inflammatory drugs. They are thought to exert their therapeutic effects through multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases, modulation of NF-κB activity, and direct activation of AMPK. However, the full spectrum of their activities is incompletely understood. Here we show that salicylate specifically inhibits CBP and p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity in vitro by direct competition with acetyl-Coenzyme A at the catalytic site. We used a chemical structure-similarity search to identify another anti-inflammatory drug, diflunisal, that inhibits p300 more potently than salicylate. At concentrations attainable in human plasma after oral administration, both salicylate and diflunisal blocked the acetylation of lysine residues on histone and non-histone proteins in cells. Finally, we found that diflunisal suppressed the growth of p300-dependent leukemia cell lines expressing AML1-ETO fusion protein in vitro and in vivo. These results highlight a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of action for salicylate and derivative drugs. PMID:27244239

  20. In vitro biological activity of secondary metabolites from Seseli rigidum Waldst. et Kit. (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Dragana; Vasić, Sava; Stanković, Milan; Čomić, Ljiljana; Topuzović, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The antioxidant, antimicrobial activity, total phenolic content and flavonoid concentration of Seseli rigidum Waldst. et Kit. were evaluated. Five different extracts of the aboveground plant parts were obtained by extraction with distilled water, methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. Total phenols were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent, with the highest values obtained in the acetone extract (102.13 mg GAE/g). The concentration of flavonoids, determined by using a spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and expressed in terms of rutin equivalent, was also highest in the acetone extracts (291.58 mg RUE/g). The antioxidant activity was determined in vitro using DPPH reagent. The greatest antioxidant activity was expressed in the aqueous extract (46.15 μg/ml). In vitro antimicrobial activities were determined using a microdilution analysis method; minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) were determined. Methanolic extract had the greatest influence on bacilli (MIC at 0.0391 mg/ml), but the best antimicrobial effect had acetone and ethyl acetate extracts considering their broad impact on bacteria. According to our research, S. rigidum can be regarded as promising candidate for natural plant source with high value of biological compounds.

  1. Salicylate, diflunisal and their metabolites inhibit CBP/p300 and exhibit anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Maksimoska, Jasna; Sorum, Alexander W; Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Intelly S; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Newman, John C; Schröder, Sebastian; Ott, Melanie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meier, Jordan; Nimer, Stephen; Verdin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid are potent and widely used anti-inflammatory drugs. They are thought to exert their therapeutic effects through multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases, modulation of NF-κB activity, and direct activation of AMPK. However, the full spectrum of their activities is incompletely understood. Here we show that salicylate specifically inhibits CBP and p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity in vitro by direct competition with acetyl-Coenzyme A at the catalytic site. We used a chemical structure-similarity search to identify another anti-inflammatory drug, diflunisal, that inhibits p300 more potently than salicylate. At concentrations attainable in human plasma after oral administration, both salicylate and diflunisal blocked the acetylation of lysine residues on histone and non-histone proteins in cells. Finally, we found that diflunisal suppressed the growth of p300-dependent leukemia cell lines expressing AML1-ETO fusion protein in vitro and in vivo. These results highlight a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of action for salicylate and derivative drugs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11156.001 PMID:27244239

  2. Antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of extracts and secondary metabolites from Acacia cyanophylla

    PubMed Central

    Ghribia, Lotfi; Ghouilaa, Hatem; Omrib, Amel; Besbesb, Malek; Janneta, Hichem Ben

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antioxidant potential and anti-acetycholinesterase activity of compounds and extracts from Acacia cyanophylla (A. cyanophylla). Methods Three polyphenolic compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate extract of A. cyanophylla flowers. They have been identified as isosalipurposide 1, quercetin 2 and naringenin 3. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as ES-MS. The prepared extracts and the isolated compounds 1-3 were tested for their antioxidant activity using 1′-1′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) scavenging assays and reducing power. They have been also investigated for inhibitory effect against acetylcholinesterase using the microplate assay. Results In the DPPH test, the EtOAc extract of flowers exhibited the highest antioxidant effect (67.26 µg/mL). Isosalipurposide 1 showed a significant antiradical power against DPPH (81.9 µg/mL). All extracts showed a dose-dependent acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In terms of the IC50 value, the butanolic extract (16.03 µg/mL) was the most potent sample. Isosalipurposide 1 was found to be active against AChE with an IC50 value of 52.04 µg/mL. Conclusions The results demonstrated the important antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of pure compounds and extracts from A. cyanophylla. PMID:25183120

  3. Activity levels of tamoxifen metabolites at the estrogen receptor and the impact of genetic polymorphisms of phase I and II enzymes on their concentration levels in plasma.

    PubMed

    Mürdter, T E; Schroth, W; Bacchus-Gerybadze, L; Winter, S; Heinkele, G; Simon, W; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Eichelbaum, M; Schwab, M; Brauch, H

    2011-05-01

    The therapeutic effect of tamoxifen depends on active metabolites, e.g., cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) mediated formation of endoxifen. To test for additional relationships, 236 breast cancer patients were genotyped for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP3A5, UGT1A4, UGT2B7, and UGT2B15; also, plasma concentrations of tamoxifen and 22 of its metabolites, including the (E)-, (Z)-, 3-, and 4'-hydroxymetabolites as well as their glucuronides, were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The activity levels of the metabolites were measured using an estrogen response element reporter assay; the strongest estrogen receptor inhibition was found for (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen (inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) 3 and 7 nmol/l, respectively). CYP2D6 genotypes explained 39 and 9% of the variability of steady-state concentrations of (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, respectively. Among the poor metabolizers, 93% had (Z)-endoxifen levels below IC90 values, underscoring the role of CYP2D6 deficiency in compromised tamoxifen bioactivation. For other enzymes tested, carriers of reduced-function CYP2C9 (*2, *3) alleles had lower plasma concentrations of active metabolites (P < 0.004), pointing to the role of additional pathways.

  4. Effects of Metabolites Produced from (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate by Rat Intestinal Bacteria on Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Activity and Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2015-09-23

    Inhibitory activity of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was examined with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) metabolites produced by intestinal bacteria, together with tea catechins. All of the metabolites showed ACE inhibitory activities and the order of IC50 was hydroxyphenyl valeric acids > 5-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (1) > trihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ dihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (2). Among the catechins, galloylated catechins exhibited stronger ACE inhibitory activity than nongalloylated catechins. Furthermore, the effects of a single oral intake of metabolites 1 and 2 on systolic blood pressure (SBP) were examined with spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Significant decreases in SBP were observed between 2 h after oral administration of 1 (150 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.002) and between 4 h after administration of 2 (200 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.044). These results suggest that the two metabolites have hypotensive effects in vivo.

  5. Characterization of human urinary metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine.

    PubMed

    Tarning, J; Bergqvist, Y; Day, N P; Bergquist, J; Arvidsson, B; White, N J; Ashton, M; Lindegårdh, N

    2006-12-01

    Five metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine (PQ) (1,3-bis-[4-(7-chloroquinolyl-4)-piperazinyl-1]-propane) have been identified and their molecular structures characterized. After a p.o. dose of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, urine collected over 16 h from two healthy subjects was analyzed using liquid chromatography (LC)/UV, LC/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)/MS, and H NMR. Five different peaks were recognized as possible metabolites [M1, 320 m/z; M2, M3, and M4, 551 m/z (PQ + 16 m/z); and M5, 567 m/z (PQ + 32 m/z)] using LC/MS/MS with gradient elution. The proposed carboxylic M1 has a theoretical monoisotopic molecular mass of 320.1166 m/z, which is in accordance with the FTICR/MS (320.1168 m/z) findings. The LC/MS/MS results also showed a 551 m/z metabolite (M2) with a distinct difference both in polarity and fragmentation pattern compared with PQ, 7-hydroxypiperaquine, and the other 551 m/z metabolites. We suggest that this is caused by N-oxidation of PQ. The results showed two metabolites (M3 and M4) with a molecular ion at 551 m/z and similar fragmentation pattern as both PQ and 7-hydroxypiperaquine; therefore, they are likely to be hydroxylated PQ metabolites. The molecular structures of M1 and M2 were also confirmed using H NMR. Urinary excretion rate in one subject suggested a terminal elimination half-life of about 53 days for M1. Assuming formation rate-limiting kinetics, this would support recent findings that the terminal elimination half-life of PQ has been underestimated previously. PMID:16956956

  6. Dihydroartemisinin prevents breast cancer-induced osteolysis via inhibiting both breast caner cells and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Hong, Jian-Xin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yong; Yuan, Chi-Ting; Lei, Xin-Huan; Zhu, Min; Qin, An; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Hong, Dun

    2016-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of distant relapse in breast cancer, leading to severe complications which dramatically affect the patients’ quality of life. It is believed that the crosstalk between metastatic breast cancer cells and osteoclasts is critical for breast cancer-induced osteolysis. In this study, the effects of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) on osteoclast formation, bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation and mineralization were initially assessed in vitro, followed by further investigation in a titanium-particle-induced osteolysis model in vivo. Based on the proved inhibitory effect of DHA on osteolysis, DHA was further applied to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-induced mouse osteolysis model, with the underlying molecular mechanisms further investigated. Here, we verified for the first time that DHA suppressed osteoclast differentiation, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption through suppressing AKT/SRC pathways, leading to the preventive effect of DHA on titanium-particle-induced osteolysis without affecting osteoblast function. More importantly, we demonstrated that DHA inhibited breast tumor-induced osteolysis through inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells via modulating AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, DHA effectively inhibited osteoclastogenesis and prevented breast cancer-induced osteolysis. PMID:26743690

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of piperaquine in young Ugandan children treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for uncomplicated malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Nancy C.; Yan, Li; Creek, Darren J.; McCormack, Shelley A.; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Bigira, Victor; Wanzira, Humphrey; Kakuru, Abel; Tappero, Jordan W.; Lindegardh, Niklas; Tarning, Joel; Nosten, Francois; Aweeka, Francesca T.; Parikh, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    This prospective trial investigated the population pharmacokinetics of piperaquine, given with dihydroartemisinin to treat uncomplicated malaria in 107 Ugandan children 6 months to 2 years old, an age group previously unstudied. Current weight-based dosing does not adequately address physiological changes in early childhood. Patients were administered standard three-day oral doses and provided 1,282 capillary plasma concentrations from 218 malaria episodes. Less than 30% of treatments achieved 57 ng/mL on day 7. A three-compartment model with first-order absorption described the data well. Age had a statistically significant effect (p<0.005) on clearance/bioavailability in a model that accounts for allometric scaling. Simulations demonstrated that higher doses in all children, but especially in those with lower weight for age, are required for adequate piperaquine exposure, though safety and tolerance will need to be established. These findings support other evidence that both weight and age-specific guidelines for piperaquine dosing in children are urgently needed. PMID:25732044

  8. Non-invasive monitoring of adrenocortical activity in captive African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) by measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ozella, L; Anfossi, L; Di Nardo, F; Pessani, D

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) has become a useful and widely-accepted method for the non-invasive evaluation of stress in vertebrates. In this study we assessed the adrenocortical activity of five captive African Penguins (Spheniscus demersus) by means of FGM evaluation following a biological stressor, i.e. capture and immobilization. In addition, we detected individual differences in secretion of FGMs during a stage of the normal biological cycle of penguins, namely the breeding period, without any external or induced causes of stress. Our results showed that FGM concentrations peaked 5.5-8h after the induced stress in all birds, and significantly decreased within 30 h. As predictable, the highest peak of FGMs (6591 ng/g) was reached by the youngest penguin, which was at its first experience with the stressor. This peak was 1.8-2.7-fold higher compared to those of the other animals habituated to the stimulus. For the breeding period, our results revealed that the increase in FGMs compared to ordinary levels, and the peaks of FGMs, varied widely depending on the age and mainly on the reproductive state of the animal. The bird which showed the lowest peak (2518 ng/g) was an old male that was not in a reproductive state at the time of the study. Higher FGM increases and peaks were reached by the two birds which were brooding (male: 5552%, 96,631 ng/g; female: 1438%, 22,846 ng/g) and by the youngest bird (1582%, 39,700 ng/g). The impact of the reproductive state on FGM levels was unexpected compared to that produced by the induced stress. The EIA used in this study to measure FGM levels proved to be a reliable tool for assessing individual and biologically-relevant changes in FGM concentrations in African Penguin. Moreover, this method allowed detection of physiological stress during the breeding period, and identification of individual differences in relation to the reproductive status. The increase in FGM levels as a response to capture and

  9. Non-invasive monitoring of adrenocortical activity in captive African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) by measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ozella, L; Anfossi, L; Di Nardo, F; Pessani, D

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) has become a useful and widely-accepted method for the non-invasive evaluation of stress in vertebrates. In this study we assessed the adrenocortical activity of five captive African Penguins (Spheniscus demersus) by means of FGM evaluation following a biological stressor, i.e. capture and immobilization. In addition, we detected individual differences in secretion of FGMs during a stage of the normal biological cycle of penguins, namely the breeding period, without any external or induced causes of stress. Our results showed that FGM concentrations peaked 5.5-8h after the induced stress in all birds, and significantly decreased within 30 h. As predictable, the highest peak of FGMs (6591 ng/g) was reached by the youngest penguin, which was at its first experience with the stressor. This peak was 1.8-2.7-fold higher compared to those of the other animals habituated to the stimulus. For the breeding period, our results revealed that the increase in FGMs compared to ordinary levels, and the peaks of FGMs, varied widely depending on the age and mainly on the reproductive state of the animal. The bird which showed the lowest peak (2518 ng/g) was an old male that was not in a reproductive state at the time of the study. Higher FGM increases and peaks were reached by the two birds which were brooding (male: 5552%, 96,631 ng/g; female: 1438%, 22,846 ng/g) and by the youngest bird (1582%, 39,700 ng/g). The impact of the reproductive state on FGM levels was unexpected compared to that produced by the induced stress. The EIA used in this study to measure FGM levels proved to be a reliable tool for assessing individual and biologically-relevant changes in FGM concentrations in African Penguin. Moreover, this method allowed detection of physiological stress during the breeding period, and identification of individual differences in relation to the reproductive status. The increase in FGM levels as a response to capture and

  10. Secondary metabolites from the unripe pulp of Persea americana and their antimycobacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Chen; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Peng, Chien-Fang; Lin, Chu-Hung; Chen, Ih-Sheng

    2012-12-15

    The fruits of Persea americana (Avocado) are nowadays used as healthy fruits in the world. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the active ethyl acetate soluble fraction has led to the isolation of five new fatty alcohol derivatives, avocadenols A-D (1-4) and avocadoin (5) from the unripe pulp of P. americana, along with 12 known compounds (6-17). These structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolates, avocadenol A (1), avocadenol B (2), (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxynonadecane (6), and (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxyheptadec-16-ene (7) showed antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(V)in vitro, with MIC values of 24.0, 33.8, 24.9, and 35.7 μg/ml, respectively.

  11. Secondary metabolites from the unripe pulp of Persea americana and their antimycobacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Chen; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Peng, Chien-Fang; Lin, Chu-Hung; Chen, Ih-Sheng

    2012-12-15

    The fruits of Persea americana (Avocado) are nowadays used as healthy fruits in the world. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the active ethyl acetate soluble fraction has led to the isolation of five new fatty alcohol derivatives, avocadenols A-D (1-4) and avocadoin (5) from the unripe pulp of P. americana, along with 12 known compounds (6-17). These structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolates, avocadenol A (1), avocadenol B (2), (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxynonadecane (6), and (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxyheptadec-16-ene (7) showed antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(V)in vitro, with MIC values of 24.0, 33.8, 24.9, and 35.7 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:22980888

  12. Secondary metabolites of Seseli rigidum: Chemical composition plus antioxidant, antimicrobial and cholinesterase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Stankov-Jovanović, V P; Ilić, M D; Mitić, V D; Mihajilov-Krstev, T M; Simonović, S R; Nikolić Mandić, S D; Tabet, J C; Cole, R B

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of different polarity obtained from various plant parts (root, leaf, flower and fruit) of Seseli rigidum were studied by different antioxidant assays: DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, by total reducing power method as well as via total content of flavonoids and polyphenols. Essential oils of all plant parts showed weak antioxidant characteristics. The inhibitory concentration range of the tested extracts, against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger was 0.01-1.50 mg/mL and of a microbicidal 0.02-3.00 mg/mL. In the interaction with cholinesterase, all essential oils proved effective as inhibitors. The highest percentage of inhibition versus human and horse cholinesterase was shown by root essential oil (38.20% and 48.30%, respectively) among oils, and root hexane extract (40.56% and 50.65% respectively). Essential oils and volatile components of all plant parts were identified by GC, GC-MS and headspace/GC-MS. Statistical analysis of the ensemble of results showed that the root essential oil composition differed significantly from essential oils of other parts of the plant. Taking into account all of the studied activities, the root hexane extract showed the best overall properties. By means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, the 30 most abundant constituents were identified in extracts of different polarity. The presence of identified constituents was linked to observed specific biological activities, thus designating compounds potentially responsible for each exhibited activity. PMID:25863020

  13. Trypanocidal activity of a new pterocarpan and other secondary metabolites of plants from Northeastern Brazil flora.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Nashira Campos; Espíndola, Laila Salmen; Santana, Jaime Martins; Veras, Maria Leopoldina; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Pinheiro, Sávio Moita; de Araújo, Renata Mendonça; Lima, Mary Anne Sousa; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha

    2008-02-15

    Two hundred fifteen compounds isolated from plants of Northeastern Brazil flora have been assayed against epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, using the tetrazolium salt MTT as an alternative method. Eight compounds belonging to four different species: Harpalyce brasiliana (Fabaceae), Acnistus arborescens and Physalis angulata (Solanaceae), and Cordia globosa (Boraginaceae) showed significant activity. Among them, a novel and a known pterocarpan, a chalcone, four withasteroids, and a meroterpene benzoquinone were the represented chemical classes.

  14. Complex secondary metabolites from Ludwigia leptocarpa with potent antibacterial and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Mabou, Florence Déclaire; Tamokou, Jean-de-Dieu; Ngnokam, David; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, Laurence; Kuiate, Jules-Roger; Bag, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea continues to be one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among infants and children in developing countries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts and compounds from Ludwigia leptocarpa, a plant traditionally used for its vermifugal, anti-dysenteric, and antimicrobial properties. A methanol extract was prepared by maceration of the dried plant and this was successively extracted with ethyl acetate to obtain an EtOAc extract and with n-butanol to obtain an n-BuOH extract. Column chromatography of the EtOAc and n-BuOH extracts was followed by purification of different fractions, leading to the isolation of 10 known compounds. Structures of isolated compounds were assigned on the basis of spectral analysis and by comparison to structures of compounds described in the literature. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and gallic acid equivalent antioxidant capacity (GAEAC) assays. Antibacterial activity was assessed with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) with respect to strains of a Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus (a major cause of community and hospital-associated infection), and Gram-negative multi-drug-resistant bacteria, Vibrio cholerae (a cause of cholera) and Shigella flexneri (a cause of shigellosis). All of the extracts showed different degrees of antioxidant and antibacterial activities. 2β-hydroxyoleanolic acid, (2R,3S,2''S)-3''',4',4''',5,5'',7,7''-heptahydroxy-3,8"-biflavanone, and luteolin-8-C-glucoside displayed the most potent antibacterial and antioxidant properties, and these properties were in some cases equal to or more potent than those of reference drugs. Overall, the present results show that L. leptocarpa has the potential to be a natural source of anti-diarrheal and antioxidant products, so further investigation is warranted. PMID:27431270

  15. Secondary metabolites of plants from the genus Saussurea: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Fang; Ni, Zhi-Yu; Dong, Mei; Cong, Bin; Shi, Qing-Wen; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Kiyota, Hiromasa

    2010-11-01

    The Asteraceae family comprises ca. 1000 genera, mainly distributed in Asia and Europe. Saussurea DC., as the largest subgenus of this family, comprises ca. 400 species worldwide, of which ca. 300 species occur in China. Most plants in China grow wild in the alpine zone of the Qingzang Plateau and adjacent regions at elevations of 4000 m. Plants of the genus Saussurea (Asteraceae) are used in both traditional Chinese folk medicine and Tibet folklore medicine, since they are efficacious in relieving internal heat or fever, harmonizing menstruation, invigorating blood circulation, stopping bleeding, alleviating pain, increasing energy, and curing rheumatic arthritis. A large number of biologically active compounds have been isolated from this genus. This review shows the chemotaxonomy of these compounds (215 compounds) such as sesquiterpenoids (101 compounds), flavonoids (19 compounds), phytosterols (15 compounds), triterpenoids (25 compounds), lignans (32 compounds), phenolics (23 compounds), and chlorophylls (11 compounds). Biological activities (anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antitumor, hepatoprotective, anti-ulcer, cholagogic, immunosuppressive, spasmolytic, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antifeedant, CNS depressant, antioxidant, etc.) of these compounds, including structure-activity relationships, are also discussed. PMID:21072766

  16. Neolignans and other metabolites from Ocotea cymosa from the Madagascar rain forest and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Rakotondraibe, L Harinantenaina; Graupner, Paul R; Xiong, Quanbo; Olson, Monica; Wiley, Jessica D; Krai, Priscilla; Brodie, Peggy J; Callmander, Martin W; Rakotobe, Etienne; Ratovoson, Fidy; Rasamison, Vincent E; Cassera, Maria B; Hahn, Donald R; Kingston, David G I; Fotso, Serge

    2015-03-27

    Ten new neolignans including the 6'-oxo-8.1'-lignans cymosalignans A (1a), B (2), and C (3), an 8.O.6'-neolignan (4a), ococymosin (5a), didymochlaenone C (6a), and the bicyclo[3.2.1]octanoids 7-10 were isolated along with the known compounds 3,4,5,3',5'-pentamethoxy-1'-allyl-8.O.4'-neolignan, 3,4,5,3'-tetramethoxy-1'-allyl-8.O.4'-neolignan, didymochlaenone B, virologin B, ocobullenone, and the unusual 2'-oxo-8.1'-lignan sibyllenone from the stems or bark of the Madagascan plant Ocotea cymosa. The new 8.O.6'-neolignan 4a, dihydrobenzofuranoid 5a, and the bicyclo[3.2.1]octanoid 7a had in vitro activity against Aedes aegypti, while the new compounds 5a, 7a, 8, and 10a and the known virolongin B (4b) and ocobullenone (10b) had antiplasmodial activity. We report herein the structure elucidation of the new compounds on the basis of spectroscopic evidence, including 1D and 2D NMR spectra, electronic circular dichroism, and mass spectrometry, and the biological activities of the new and known compounds. PMID:25650896

  17. Estrogenic and androgenic activities of TBBA and TBMEPH, metabolites of novel brominated flame retardants, and selected bisphenols, using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay.

    PubMed

    Fic, Anja; Žegura, Bojana; Gramec, Darja; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated and compared the estrogenic and androgenic activities of the three different classes of environmental pollutants and their metabolites using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay, which has advantages compared with the original YES/YAS protocol. Contrary to the parent brominated flame retardants TBB and TBPH, which demonstrated no or very weak (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities, their metabolites, TBBA and TBMEPH, exhibited anti-estrogenic (IC50 for TBBA=31.75 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=0.265 μM) and anti-androgenic (IC50 for TBBA=73.95 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=2.92 μM) activities. These results reveal that metabolism can enhance the anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects of these two novel brominated flame retardants. Based on the activities of BPAF, BPF, BPA and MBP, we can conclude that the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay gives comparable results to the (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic assays that are reported in the literature. For BPA, it was confirmed previously that the metabolite formed after an ipso-reaction (hydroxycumyl alcohol) exhibited higher estrogenic activity compared with the parent BPA, but this was not confirmed for BPAF and BPF ipso-metabolites, which were not active in the XenoScreen YES/YAS assay. Among the substituted BPA analogues, bis-GMA exhibited weak anti-estrogenic activity, BADGE demonstrated weak anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities (IC50=13.73 μM), and the hydrolysed product BADGE·2H2O demonstrated no (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities.

  18. The effect of the lunar cycle on fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraging ecology of nocturnally and diurnally active spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Roee; Dayan, Tamar; Levy, Ofir; Schubert, Iris; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage.

  19. The Effect of the Lunar Cycle on Fecal Cortisol Metabolite Levels and Foraging Ecology of Nocturnally and Diurnally Active Spiny Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Tamar; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage. PMID:21829733

  20. A cellular system for quantitation of vitamin K cycle activity: structure-activity effects on vitamin K antagonism by warfarin metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Jamil A.; McDonald, Matthew G.; Kulman, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin and other 4-hydroxycoumarins inhibit vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) by depleting reduced vitamin K that is required for posttranslational modification of vitamin K–dependent clotting factors. In vitro prediction of the in vivo potency of vitamin K antagonists is complicated by the complex multicomponent nature of the vitamin K cycle. Here we describe a sensitive assay that enables quantitative analysis of γ-glutamyl carboxylation and its antagonism in live cells. We engineered a human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293–derived cell line (HEK 293-C3) to express a chimeric protein (F9CH) comprising the Gla domain of factor IX fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of proline-rich Gla protein 2. Maximal γ-glutamyl carboxylation of F9CH required vitamin K supplementation, and was dose-dependently inhibited by racemic warfarin at a physiologically relevant concentration. Cellular γ-glutamyl carboxylation also exhibited differential VKOR inhibition by warfarin enantiomers (S > R) consistent with their in vivo potencies. We further analyzed the structure-activity relationship for inhibition of γ-glutamyl carboxylation by warfarin metabolites, observing tolerance to phenolic substitution at the C-5 and especially C-6, but not C-7 or C-8, positions on the 4-hydroxycoumarin nucleus. After correction for in vivo concentration and protein binding, 10-hydroxywarfarin and warfarin alcohols were predicted to be the most potent inhibitory metabolites in vivo. PMID:24297869

  1. Antibacterial Activities of Metabolites from Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) against Fish Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Kevin K; Hamann, Mark T; McChesney, James D; Rodenburg, Douglas L; Ibrahim, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    One approach to the management of common fish diseases in aquaculture is the use of antibiotic-laden feed. However, there are public concerns about the use of antibiotics in agriculture and the potential development of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Therefore, the discovery of other environmentally safe natural compounds as alternatives to antibiotics would benefit the aquaculture industries. Four natural compounds, commonly called platanosides, [kaempferol 3-O-α-L-(2″,3″-di-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (1), kaempferol 3-O-α-L-(2″-E-p-coumaroyl-3″-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (2), kaempferol 3-O-α-L-(2″-Z-p-coumaroyl-3″-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (3), and kaempferol 3-O-α-L-(2″,3″-di-Z-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (4)] isolated from the leaves of the American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) tree were evaluated using a rapid bioassay for their antibacterial activities against common fish pathogenic bacteria including Flavobacterium columnare, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Streptococcus iniae. The four isomers and a mixture of all four isomers were strongly antibacterial against isolates of F. columnare and S. iniae. Against F. columnare ALM-00-173, 3 and 4 showed the strongest antibacterial activities, with 24-h 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values of 2.13 ± 0.11 and 2.62 ± 0.23 mg/L, respectively. Against S. iniae LA94-426, 4 had the strongest antibacterial activity, with 24-h IC50 of 1.87 ± 0.23 mg/L. Neither a mixture of the isomers nor any of the individual isomers were antibacterial against isolates of E. ictaluri and A. hydrophila at the test concentrations used in the study. Several of the isomers appear promising for the potential management of columnaris disease and streptococcosis in fish.

  2. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange.

  3. Larvicidal activity of metabolites from the endophytic Podospora sp. against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Matasyoh, Josphat C; Dittrich, Birger; Schueffler, Anja; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2011-03-01

    In a screening for natural products with mosquito larvicidal activities, the endophytic fungus Podospora sp. isolated from the plant Laggera alata (Asteraceae) was conspicuous. Two xanthones, sterigmatocystin (1) and secosterigmatocystin (2), and an anthraquinone derivative (3) 13-hydroxyversicolorin B were isolated after fermentation on M(2) medium. These compounds were characterised using spectroscopic and X-ray analysis and examined against third instar larvae of Anopheles gambiae. The results demonstrated that compound 1 was the most potent one with LC(50) and LC(90) values of 13.3 and 73.5 ppm, respectively. Over 95% mortality was observed at a concentration 100 ppm after 24 h. These results compared farvorably with the commercial larvicide pylarvex® that showed 100% mortality at the same concentration. Compound 3 was less potent and had an LC(50) of 294.5 ppm and over 95% mortality was achieved at a concentration of 1,000 ppm. Secosterigmatocystin (2) revealed relatively weak activity and therefore LC values were not determined.

  4. Secondary metabolites of ponderosa lemon (Citrus pyriformis) and their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Tahrani, Ahmad; Herrmann, Florian; Kaufmann, Dorothea; Farrag, Nawal; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Column chromatography of the dichloromethane fraction from an aqueous methanolic extract of fruit peel of Citrus pyriformis Hassk. (Rutaceae) resulted in the isolation of seven compounds including one coumarin (citropten), two limonoids (limonin and deacetylnomilin), and four sterols (stigmasterol, ergosterol, sitosteryl-3-beta-D-glucoside, and sitosteryl-6'-O-acyl-3-beta-D-glucoside). From the ethyl acetate fraction naringin, hesperidin, and neohesperidin were isolated. The dichloromethane extract of the defatted seeds contained three additional compounds, nomilin, ichangin, and cholesterol. The isolated compounds were identified by MS (EI, CI, and ESI), 1H, 13C, and 2D-NMR spectral data. The limonoids were determined qualitatively by LC-ESI/MS resulting in the identification of 11 limonoid aglycones. The total methanolic extract of the peel and the petroleum ether, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate fractions were screened for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The ethyl acetate fraction exhibited a significant scavenging activity for DPPH free radicals (IC50 = 132.3 microg/mL). The petroleum ether fraction inhibited 5-lipoxygenase with IC50 = 30.6 microg/mL indicating potential anti-inflammatory properties. Limonin has a potent cytotoxic effect against COS7 cells [IC50 = (35.0 +/- 6.1) microM] compared with acteoside as a positive control [IC50 = (144.5 +/- 10.96) microM].

  5. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  6. A facile reproducible radioimmunoassay of the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E, suitable for measurement of relative differences of phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fretland, D J; Cammarata, P S

    1984-04-01

    A relatively simple, reproducible, radioimmunoassay for the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E (U-PGE-M) in rat and human urine is described. Results of the assay of treated versus control urine extracts correlate well with differences expected from treatments known to alter in vivo phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity. Cross-reactivity of heterogeneous metabolite antiserum with 5 available endogenous prostaglandins and a single metabolite was determined and showed little or no cross reaction. Sensitivity, within-assay precision, interassay reproducibility, and parallelism were also determined and found acceptable. Excretion rates of U-PGE-M by rats and humans were determined, and statistically significant differences could be shown, although absolute values were smaller than estimated absolute values obtained from mass-spectrometric measurements of single, purified metabolites. Normal human male excretion rates differed significantly from those of females. Injection of prostaglandin E1 caused a significant rise in U-PGE-M excretion in rats whereas aspirin and indomethacin caused it to fall. U-PGE-M excretion rates of spontaneous hypertensive rats were significantly less than rates of normotensive controls. Adrenalectomy resulted in excretion of significantly larger amounts of U-PGE-M than in normal or sham-operated controls. A screen of clinically active pharmacological agents and hormones gave results consistent with previously published reports. PMID:6427792

  7. Kinetic characterization of high-activity mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase for the cocaine metabolite norcocaine.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Max; Hou, Shurong; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2014-01-01

    It has been known that cocaine produces its toxic and physiological effects through not only cocaine itself, but also norcocaine formed from cocaine oxidation catalysed by microsomal CYP (cytochrome P450) 3A4 in the human liver. The catalytic parameters (kcat and Km) of human BChE (butyrylcholinesterase) and its three mutants (i.e. A199S/S287G/A328W/Y332G, A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/E441D and A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G) for norcocaine have been characterized in the present study for the first time and compared with those for cocaine. On the basis of the obtained kinetic data, wild-type human BChE has a significantly lower catalytic activity for norcocaine (kcat=2.8 min(-1), Km=15 μM and kcat/Km=1.87 × 10(5) M(-1)·min(-1)) compared with its catalytic activity for (-)-cocaine. The BChE mutants examined in the present study have considerably improved catalytic activities against both cocaine and norcocaine compared with the wild-type enzyme. Within the enzymes examined in the present study, the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant (CocH3) is identified as the most efficient enzyme for hydrolysing both cocaine and norcocaine. CocH3 has a 1080-fold improved catalytic efficiency for norcocaine (kcat=2610 min(-1), Km=13 μM and kcat/Km=2.01 × 10(8) M(-1)·min(-1)) and a 2020-fold improved catalytic efficiency for cocaine. It has been demonstrated that CocH3 as an exogenous enzyme can rapidly metabolize norcocaine, in addition to cocaine, in rats. Further kinetic modelling has suggested that CocH3 with an identical concentration with that of the endogenous BChE in human plasma can effectively eliminate both cocaine and norcocaine in a simplified kinetic model of cocaine abuse.

  8. Kinetic Characterization of High-Activity Mutants of Human Butyrylcholinesterase for Cocaine Metabolite Norcocaine

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Max; Hou, Shurong; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that cocaine produces the toxic and physiological effects through not only cocaine itself but also norcocaine formed from cocaine oxidation catalyzed by microsomal cytochrome P450 3A4 in the human liver. The catalytic parameters (kcat and KM) of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and its three mutants (i.e. the A199S/S287G/A328W/Y332G, A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/E441D, and A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutants) for norcocaine have been characterized in the present study, for the first time, in comparison with those for cocaine. Based on the obtained kinetic data, wild-type human BChE has a significantly lower catalytic activity for norcocaine (kcat = 2.8 min−1, KM = 15 μM, and kcat/KM = 1.87 × 105 M−1 min−1) compared to its catalytic activity for (−)-cocaine. The BChE mutants examined in this study have considerably improved catalytic activities against both cocaine and norcocaine compared to the wild-type enzyme. Within the enzymes examined in this study, the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant (CocH3) is identified as the most efficient enzyme for hydrolyzing both cocaine and norcocaine. CocH3 has a 1080-fold improved catalytic efficiency for norcocaine (kcat = 2610 min−1, KM = 13 μM, and kcat/KM = 2.01 × 108 M−1 min−1) and a 2020-fold improved catalytic efficiency for cocaine. It has been demonstrated that CocH3 as an exogenous enzyme can rapidly metabolize norcocaine, in addition to cocaine, in rats. Further kinetic modeling has suggested that CocH3 with an identical concentration as that of the endogenous BChE in human plasma can effectively eliminate both cocaine and norcocaine in a simplified kinetic model of cocaine abuse. PMID:24125115

  9. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Metabolites from Lactobacillus Strains on Candida Species Implicated in Candida Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogunshe, Adenike A O; Omotoso, Mopelola A; Bello, Victoria B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research from developing countries, such as Nigeria, on Lactobacillus species in the female urogenital tract and their role as a barrier to vaginal infection is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the clinical biotherapeutic potential of indigenous Lactobacillus species. Methods: Antimicrobial metabolites production were characterised using simple and easily reproducible qualitative and quantitative methods. The in vitro inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus antimicrobials on vulvovaginal candidiasis–associated Candida species was investigated using modified agar spot and agar well-diffusion methods. Results: The maximum levels of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and diacetyl from 20 vaginal Lactobacillus strains from diseased subjects were 1.46 mg/L, 1.36 mmol/L, and 1.72 mg/L respectively. From the 4 healthy subjects, the maximum level of lactic acid was 1.08 mg/L; hydrogen peroxide, 1.36 mmol/L; and diacetyl, 0.86 mg/L. The maximum productions of these substances occurred between 72 and 120 hours of incubation. The in vitro antagonistic activities of vaginal L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. brevis, L. plantarum, L. casei, L. delbrueckii, and L. jensenii from diseased subjects inhibited a maximum of 5.71% of the 35 Candida species tested, while vaginal L. acidophilus and L. plantarum from healthy subjects inhibited between 57.1% and 68.6% of Candida species in vitro. Conclusion: Antimicrobial-producing lactobacilli can be considered as adjunct biotherapeutic candidates for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:22589669

  10. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions. PMID:27542476

  11. Chemistry of the nudibranch Aldisa andersoni: structure and biological activity of phorbazole metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Kiss, Robert; Mathieu, Véronique; Leclercqz, Helene; Manzo, Emiliano; Villani, Guido; Mollo, Ernesto; Lefranc, Florence; D'Souza, Lisette; Gavagnin, Margherita; Cimino, Guido

    2012-08-01

    The first chemical study of the Indo-Pacific dorid nudibranch Aldisa andersoni resulted in the isolation of five chlorinated phenyl-pyrrolyloxazoles belonging to the phorbazole series. Two new molecules, 9-chloro-phorbazole D and N1-methyl-phorbazole A, co-occurring with known phorbazoles A, B and D, have been characterized. Phorbazoles were found to be present mainly in the external part of the mollusc. The structures of the new compounds were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data, mainly NMR and mass spectrometry and by comparison with the literature data. Evaluation of feeding-deterrence activity as well as in vitro growth inhibitory properties in human cancer cells was also carried out. PMID:23015775

  12. Chemistry of the Nudibranch Aldisa andersoni: Structure and Biological Activity of Phorbazole Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Kiss, Robert; Mathieu, Véronique; Leclercqz, Helene; Manzo, Emiliano; Villani, Guido; Mollo, Ernesto; Lefranc, Florence; D’Souza, Lisette; Gavagnin, Margherita; Cimino, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The first chemical study of the Indo-Pacific dorid nudibranch Aldisa andersoni resulted in the isolation of five chlorinated phenyl-pyrrolyloxazoles belonging to the phorbazole series. Two new molecules, 9-chloro-phorbazole D and N1-methyl-phorbazole A, co-occurring with known phorbazoles A, B and D, have been characterized. Phorbazoles were found to be present mainly in the external part of the mollusc. The structures of the new compounds were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data, mainly NMR and mass spectrometry and by comparison with the literature data. Evaluation of feeding-deterrence activity as well as in vitro growth inhibitory properties in human cancer cells was also carried out. PMID:23015775

  13. Targeted metabolite analysis and biological activity of Pieris brassicae fed with Brassica rapa var. rapa.

    PubMed

    Pereira, David M; Noites, Alexandra; Valentão, Patricia; Ferreres, Federico; Pereira, José A; Vale-Silva, Luis; Pinto, Eugénia; Andrade, Paula B

    2009-01-28

    For the first time, an insect-plant system, Pieris brassicae fed with Brassica rapa var. rapa, was tested for its biological capacity, namely, antioxidant (DPPH*, *NO, and O(2)*- radicals) and antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) activities. Samples from the insect's life cycle (larvae, excrements, exuviae, and butterfly) were always found to be more efficient than the host plant. Also, P. brassicae materials, as well as its host plant, were screened for phenolics and organic acids. The host plant revealed higher amounts of both compounds. Two phenolic acids, ferulic and sinapic, as well as kaempferol 3-Osophoroside, were common to insect (larvae and excrements) and plant materials, with excrements being considerably richer. Detection of sulfated compounds in excrements, absent in host plant, revealed that metabolic processes in this species involved sulfation. Additionally, deacylation and deglycosilation were observed. All matrices presented the same organic acids qualitative profile, with the exception of excrements.

  14. Biologically active secondary metabolites of barley. I. Developing techniques and assessing allelopathy in barley.

    PubMed

    Liu, D L; Lovett, J V

    1993-10-01

    Allelopathic effects of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) were assessed using modified bioassays that reduced other environmental influences. In a Petri dish bioassay, germination of white mustard was delayed and the radicle lengths were significantly inhibited at a density of 0.5 barley seed/cm(2). In a 'siphoning' bioassay apparatus, when the two species were sown together, radicle elongation of white mustard was not inhibited one day after sowing but became increasingly inhibited as bioassay time increased. Barley allelochemicals were released from the roots in a hydroponic system for at least 70 days after commencement of barley germination. Solutions removed from the hydroponic system of growing barley delayed germination and inhibited growth of white mustard. The allelopathic activity of barley was further confirmed at a density of 0.3 barley seed/cm(2) in a modified stairstep apparatus. PMID:24248571

  15. First syntheses of the biologically active fungal metabolites pestalotiopsones A, B, C and F.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Andrew Michael; Castillo Martinez, Edwin; Barrow, Russell Allan

    2013-02-21

    A synthetic approach accessing the pestalotiopsones, fungal chromones possessing a rare skeletal subtype, is reported for the first time. The synthesis of pestalotiopsone A (1) has been achieved in 7 linear steps (28%), from commercially available 3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid and subsequently the first syntheses of pestalotiopsone B (2), C (3) and F (4) were performed utilising this chemistry. The key steps include a newly described homologation of a substituted benzoic acid to afford phenylacetate derivatives utilising Birch reductive alkylation conditions, a microwave mediated chromanone formation proceeding through an oxa-Michael cyclisation, and an IBX induced dehydrogenation to the desired chromone skeleton. The synthetic natural products were completely characterised for the first time, confirming their structures and their biological activities evaluated against a panel of bacterial pathogens.

  16. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  17. In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?

    SciTech Connect

    Canton, Rocio F. . E-mail: r.Fernandezcanton@iras.uu.nl; Sanderson, J. Thomas; Nijmeijer, Sandra; Bergman, Ake; Letcher, Robert J.; Berg, Martin van den

    2006-10-15

    Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH{sub 3}O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on CYP17 activity except for BDE-183, which showed significant inhibition of CYP17 activity at the highest concentration tested (10 {mu}M), with no signs of cytotoxicity as measured by mitochondrial toxicity tests (MTT). A strong inhibition of CYP17 activity was found for 6-OH-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromoDE (6-OH-BDE47) with a concentration-dependent decrease of almost 90% at 10 {mu}M, but with a concurrent decrease in cell viability at the higher

  18. Phase I Hydroxylated Metabolites of the K2 Synthetic Cannabinoid JWH-018 Retain In Vitro and In Vivo Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Affinity and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brents, Lisa K.; Reichard, Emily E.; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Fantegrossi, William E.; Prather, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Background K2 products are synthetic cannabinoid-laced, marijuana-like drugs of abuse, use of which is often associated with clinical symptoms atypical of marijuana use, including hypertension, agitation, hallucinations, psychosis, seizures and panic attacks. JWH-018, a prevalent K2 synthetic cannabinoid, is structurally distinct from Δ9-THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Since even subtle structural differences can lead to differential metabolism, formation of novel, biologically active metabolites may be responsible for the distinct effects associated with K2 use. The present study proposes that K2's high adverse effect occurrence is due, at least in part, to distinct JWH-018 metabolite activity at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R). Methods/Principal Findings JWH-018, five potential monohydroxylated metabolites (M1–M5), and one carboxy metabolite (M6) were examined in mouse brain homogenates containing CB1Rs, first for CB1R affinity using a competition binding assay employing the cannabinoid receptor radioligand [3H]CP-55,940, and then for CB1R intrinsic efficacy using an [35S]GTPγS binding assay. JWH-018 and M1–M5 bound CB1Rs with high affinity, exhibiting Ki values that were lower than or equivalent to Δ9-THC. These molecules also stimulated G-proteins with equal or greater efficacy relative to Δ9-THC, a CB1R partial agonist. Most importantly, JWH-018, M2, M3, and M5 produced full CB1R agonist levels of activation. CB1R-mediated activation was demonstrated by blockade with O-2050, a CB1R-selective neutral antagonist. Similar to Δ9-THC, JWH-018 and M1 produced a marked depression of locomotor activity and core body temperature in mice that were both blocked by the CB1R-preferring antagonist/inverse agonist AM251. Conclusions/Significance Unlike metabolites of most drugs, the studied JWH-018 monohydroxylated compounds, but not the carboxy metabolite, retain in vitro and in vivo activity at CB1Rs. These observations, combined with higher

  19. Methylphenidate and its ethanol transesterification metabolite ethylphenidate: brain disposition, monoamine transporters and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Williard, Robin L; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Zhu, Hao-Jie B; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2007-02-01

    Ethylphenidate is formed by metabolic transesterification of methylphenidate and ethanol. Study objectives were to (a) establish that ethylphenidate is formed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice; (b) compare the stimulatory effects of ethylphenidate and methylphenidate enantiomers; (c) determine methylphenidate and ethylphenidate plasma and brain distribution and (d) establish in-vitro effects of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate on monoamine transporter systems. Experimental results were that: (a) coadministration of ethanol with the separate methylphenidate isomers enantioselectively produced l-ethylphenidate; (b) d and dl-forms of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate produced dose-responsive increases in motor activity with stimulation being less for ethylphenidate; (c) plasma and whole-brain concentrations were greater for ethylphenidate than methylphenidate and (d) d and DL-methylphenidate and ethylphenidate exhibited comparably potent low inhibition of the dopamine transporter, whereas ethylphenidate was a less potent norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. These experiments establish the feasibility of the B6 mouse model for examining the interactive effects of ethanol and methylphenidate. As reported for humans, concurrent exposure of B6 mice to methylphenidate and ethanol more readily formed l-ethylphenidate than d-ethylphenidate, and the l-isomers of both methylphenidate and ethylphenidate were biologically inactive. The observed reduced stimulatory effect of d-ethylphenidate relative to d-methylphenidate appears not to be the result of brain dispositional factors, but rather may be related to its reduced inhibition of the norepinephrine transporter, perhaps altering the interaction of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neural systems.

  20. Antifungal activity against plant pathogens of metabolites from the endophytic fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M; Taráwneh, Amer H; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E; Rosa, Luiz H; Cutler, Horace G; Cutler, Stephen J

    2013-05-15

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1; isocladosporin, 2; 5'-hydroxyasperentin, 3; and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound, 5',6-diacetylcladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, compound 1 exhibited 92.7, 90.1, 95.4, and 79.9% growth inhibition against Colletotrichum acutatum , Colletotrichum fragariae , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , and P. viticola, respectively. Compound 2 showed 50.4, 60.2, and 83.0% growth inhibition at 30 μM against Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides, and P. viticola, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated for the first time from Cl. cladosporioides. Moreover, the identification of essential structural features of the cladosporin nuclei has also been evaluated. These structures provide new templates for the potential treatment and management of plant diseases.

  1. Activation and silencing of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces lividans after transformation with cosmids containing the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    PubMed

    Braña, Alfredo F; Rodríguez, Miriam; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jurgen; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2014-05-01

    Activation and silencing of antibiotic production was achieved in Streptomyces albus J1074 and Streptomyces lividans TK21 after introduction of genes within the thienamycin cluster from S. cattleya. Dramatic phenotypic and metabolic changes, involving activation of multiple silent secondary metabolites and silencing of others normally produced, were found in recombinant strains harbouring the thienamycin cluster in comparison to the parental strains. In S. albus, ultra-performance liquid chromatography purification and NMR structural elucidation revealed the identity of four structurally related activated compounds: the antibiotics paulomycins A, B and the paulomenols A and B. Four volatile compounds whose biosynthesis was switched off were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses and databases comparison as pyrazines; including tetramethylpyrazine, a compound with important clinical applications to our knowledge never reported to be produced by Streptomyces. In addition, this work revealed the potential of S. albus to produce many others secondary metabolites normally obtained from plants, including compounds of medical relevance as dihydro-β-agarofuran and of interest in perfume industry as β-patchoulene, suggesting that it might be an alternative model for their industrial production. In S. lividans, actinorhodins production was strongly activated in the recombinant strains whereas undecylprodigiosins were significantly reduced. Activation of cryptic metabolites in Streptomyces species might represent an alternative approach for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  2. Relationship between cerebral pharmacokinetics and anxiolytic activity of diazepam and its active metabolites after a single intra-peritoneal administration of diazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Dailly, E; Hascoët, M; Colombel, M C; Jolliet, P; Bourin, M

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between the cerebral pharmacokinetics of diazepam and its active metabolites (desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam) and the anxiolytic effect evaluated by the four-plates test and the light/dark test were investigated after a single intra-peritoneal injection of diazepam (1 mg/kg or 1.5 mg/kg). For up to 30 min after administration, the sedative effect interfered with the anxiolytic effect, thus the results of the anxiolytic effect were not interpretable. From 30 min to 60 min after administration, this interference disappeared, the cerebral level of benzodiazepines was stable (the brain elimination of diazepam was compensated for by the appearance of desmethyldiazepam followed by oxazepam) but the anxiolytic effect decreased dramatically in all the tests with diazepam 1 mg/kg or 1.5 mg/kg. The acute tolerance to benzodiazepines and the difference of affinity for subtypes of GABA(A) receptors between diazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam could explain this result.

  3. Influence of gut microbiota-derived ellagitannins' metabolites urolithins on pro-inflammatory activities of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Piwowarski, Jakub P; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-07-01

    Ellagitannin-rich products exhibit beneficial influence in the case of inflammation-associated diseases. Urolithins, metabolites of ellagitannins produced by gut microbiota, in contrary to high molecular weight hydrophilic parental polyphenols, possess well established bioavailability. Because of the important role of neutrophils in progression of inflammation, the influence of urolithins on their pro-inflammatory functions was tested. Urolithin B at a concentration of 20 µM showed significant inhibition of interleukin 8 and extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-9 production. It was also significantly active in prevention of cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-triggered selectin CD62L shedding. Urolithin C was the only active compound towards inhibition of elastase release from cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils with 39.0 ± 15.9% inhibition at a concentration of 5 µM. Myeloperoxidase release was inhibited by urolithins A and C (at 20 µM by 46.7 ± 16.1 and 63.8 ± 8.6%, respectively). Urolithin A was the most potent reactive oxygen species release inhibitor both in formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine and 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-R13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. At the concentration of 1 µM, it caused reactive oxygen species level decrease by 42.6 ± 26.6 and 53.7 ± 16.0%, respectively. Urolithins can specifically modulate inflammatory functions of neutrophils, and thus could contribute to the beneficial health effects of ellagitannin-rich medicinal plant materials and food products.

  4. Enhanced active metabolite generation and platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to clopidogrel regardless of genotype in thienopyridine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, Jose L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Winters, Kenneth J; Effron, Mark B; Duvvuru, Suman; Costigan, Timothy M; Sundseth, Scott; Walker, Joseph R; Saucedo, Jorge F; Kleiman, Neal S; Varenhorst, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Clopidogrel response varies according to the presence of genetic polymorphisms. The CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with impaired response; conflicting results have been reported for CYP2C19*17, ABCB1, and PON1 genotypes. We assessed the impact of CYP2C19, PON1, and ABCB1 polymorphisms on clopidogrel and prasugrel pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Aspirin-treated patients (N=194) with coronary artery disease from two independent, prospective, randomised, multi-centre studies comparing clopidogrel (75 mg) and prasugrel (10 mg) were genotyped and classified by predicted CYP2C19 metaboliser phenotype (ultra metabolisers [UM] = *17 carriers; extensive metabolisers [EM] = *1/1 homozygotes; reduced metabolisers [RM] = *2 carriers). ABCB1 T/T and C/T polymorphisms and PON1 A/A, A/G and G/G polymorphisms were also genotyped. PD parameters were assessed using VerifyNow® P2Y12 and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) expressed as platelet reactivity index (PRI) after 14 days of maintenance dosing. Clopidogrel and prasugrel active metabolite (AM) exposure was calculated in a cohort of 96 patients. For clopidogrel, genetic variants in CYP2C19, but not ABCB1 or PON1, affected PK and PD. For prasugrel, none of the measured genetic variants affected PK or PD. Compared with clopidogrel, platelet inhibition with prasugrel was greater even in the CYP2C19 UM phenotype. Prasugrel generated more AM and achieved greater platelet inhibition than clopidogrel irrespective of CYP2C19, ABCB1, and PON1 polymorphisms. The lack of effect from genetic variants on prasugrel AM generation or antiplatelet activity is consistent with previous studies in healthy volunteers and is consistent with improved efficacy in acute coronary syndrome patients managed with percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24009042

  5. Modification of carbonic anhydrase II with acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, leads to decreased enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Bootorabi, Fatemeh; Jänis, Janne; Valjakka, Jarkko; Isoniemi, Sari; Vainiotalo, Pirjo; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Niemelä, Onni; Parkkila, Seppo

    2008-01-01

    Background Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, can generate covalent modifications of proteins and cellular constituents. However, functional consequences of such modification remain poorly defined. In the present study, we examined acetaldehyde reaction with human carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozyme II, which has several features that make it a suitable target protein: It is widely expressed, its enzymatic activity can be monitored, its structural and catalytic properties are known, and it contains 24 lysine residues, which are accessible sites for aldehyde reaction. Results Acetaldehyde treatment in the absence and presence of a reducing agent (NaBH3(CN)) caused shifts in the pI values of CA II. SDS-PAGE indicated a shift toward a slightly higher molecular mass. High-resolution mass spectra of CA II, measured with and without NaBH3(CN), indicated the presence of an unmodified protein, as expected. Mass spectra of CA II treated with acetaldehyde revealed a modified protein form (+26 Da), consistent with a "Schiff base" formation between acetaldehyde and one of the primary NH2 groups (e.g., in lysine side chain) in the protein structure. This reaction was highly specific, given the relative abundance of over 90% of the modified protein. In reducing conditions, each CA II molecule had reacted with 9–19 (14 on average) acetaldehyde molecules (+28 Da), consistent with further reduction of the "Schiff bases" to substituted amines (N-ethyllysine residues). The acetaldehyde-modified protein showed decreased CA enzymatic activity. Conclusion The acetaldehyde-derived modifications in CA II molecule may have physiological consequences in alcoholic patients. PMID:19036170

  6. Substitution of Wheat for Corn in Beef Cattle Diets: Digestibility, Digestive Enzyme Activities, Serum Metabolite Contents and Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y. F.; Zhao, H. B.; Liu, X. M.; You, W.; Cheng, H. J.; Wan, F. C.; Liu, G. F.; Tan, X. W.; Song, E. L.; Zhang, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing different amounts of wheat, as a partial or whole substitute for corn, on digestibility, digestive enzyme activities, serum metabolite contents and ruminal fermentation in beef cattle. Four Limousin×LuXi crossbred cattle with a body weight (400±10 kg), fitted with permanent ruminal, proximal duodenal and terminal ileal cannulas, were used in a 4×4 Latin square design with four treatments: Control (100% corn), 33% wheat (33% substitution for corn), 67% wheat (67% substitution for corn), and 100% wheat (100% substitution for corn) on a dry matter basis. The results showed that replacing corn with increasing amounts of wheat increased the apparent digestibility values of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p<0.05). While the apparent digestibility of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber were lower with increasing amounts of wheat. Digestive enzyme activities of lipase, protease and amylase in the duodenum were higher with increasing wheat amounts (p<0.05), and showed similar results to those for the enzymes in the ileum except for amylase. Increased substitution of wheat for corn increased the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (p<0.05). Ruminal pH was not different between those given only corn and those given 33% wheat. Increasing the substitution of wheat for corn increased the molar proportion of acetate and tended to increase the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Cattle fed 100% wheat tended to have the lowest ruminal NH3-N concentration compared with control (p<0.05), whereas no differences were observed among the cattle fed 33% and 67% wheat. These findings indicate that wheat can be effectively used to replace corn in moderate amounts to meet the energy and fiber requirements of beef cattle. PMID:26954111

  7. Cardiac Energy Dependence on Glucose Increases Metabolites Related to Glutathione and Activates Metabolic Genes Controlled by Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Cooper, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paul, David S.; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Jia, Wei; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long chain acyl‐CoA synthetases (ACSL) catalyze long‐chain fatty acids (FA) conversion to acyl‐CoAs. Temporal ACSL1 inactivation in mouse hearts (Acsl1H−/−) impaired FA oxidation and dramatically increased glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and mTOR activation, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy. We used unbiased metabolomics and gene expression analyses to elucidate the cardiac cellular response to increased glucose use in a genetic model of inactivated FA oxidation. Methods and Results Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites altered in Acsl1H−/− hearts, including 6 related to glucose metabolism and 11 to cysteine and glutathione pathways. Concurrently, global cardiac transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 568 genes in Acsl1H−/− hearts, a subset of which we hypothesized were targets of mTOR; subsequently, we measured the transcriptional response of several genes after chronic mTOR inhibition via rapamycin treatment during the period in which cardiac hypertrophy develops. Hearts from Acsl1H−/− mice increased expression of several Hif1α‐responsive glycolytic genes regulated by mTOR; additionally, expression of Scl7a5, Gsta1/2, Gdf15, and amino acid‐responsive genes, Fgf21, Asns, Trib3, Mthfd2, were strikingly increased by mTOR activation. Conclusions The switch from FA to glucose use causes mTOR‐dependent alterations in cardiac metabolism. We identified cardiac mTOR‐regulated genes not previously identified in other cellular models, suggesting heart‐specific mTOR signaling. Increased glucose use also changed glutathione‐related pathways and compensation by mTOR. The hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and metabolic changes that occur within the heart when glucose supplants FA as a major energy source suggest that substrate switching to glucose is not entirely benign. PMID:25713290

  8. Effects of chloro-s-triazine herbicides and metabolites on aromatase activity in various human cell lines and on vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J T; Letcher, R J; Heneweer, M; Giesy, J P; van den Berg, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a potential mechanism for the estrogenic properties of three chloro-s-triazine herbicides and six metabolites in vitro in several cell systems. We determined effects on human aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens, in H295R (adrenocortical carcinoma), JEG-3 (placental choriocarcinoma), and MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells; we determined effects on estrogen receptor-mediated induction of vitellogenin in primary hepatocyte cultures of adult male carp (Cyprinus carpio). In addition to atrazine, simazine, and propazine, two metabolites--atrazine-desethyl and atrazine-desisopropyl--induced aromatase activity in H295R cells concentration-dependently (0.3-30 microM) and with potencies similar to those of the parent triazines. After a 24-hr exposure to 30 microM of the triazines, an apparent maximum induction of about 2- to 2.5-fold was achieved. The induction responses were confirmed by similar increases in CYP19 mRNA levels, determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In JEG-3 cells, where basal aromatase expression is about 15-fold greater than in H295R cells, the induction responses were similar but less pronounced; aromatase expression in MCF-7 cells was neither detectable nor inducible under our culture conditions. The fully dealkylated metabolite atrazine-desethyl-desisopropyl and the three hydroxylated metabolites (2-OH-atrazine-desethyl, -desisopropyl, and -desethyl-desisopropyl) did not induce aromatase activity. None of the triazine herbicides nor their metabolites induced vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes; nor did they antagonize the induction of vitellogenin by 100 nM (EC(50) 17beta-estradiol. These findings together with other reports indicate that the estrogenic effects associated with the triazine herbicides in vivo are not estrogen receptor-mediated, but may be explained partly by their ability to induce aromatase in vitro. PMID:11675267

  9. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites.

  10. Network Analysis of Enzyme Activities and Metabolite Levels and Their Relationship to Biomass in a Large Panel of Arabidopsis Accessions[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Trenkamp, Sandra; Steinfath, Matthias; Usadel, Bjorn; Gibon, Yves; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Pyl, Eva-Theresa; Tschoep, Hendrik; Steinhauser, Marie Caroline; Guenther, Manuela; Hoehne, Melanie; Rohwer, Johann M.; Altmann, Thomas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Natural genetic diversity provides a powerful resource to investigate how networks respond to multiple simultaneous changes. In this work, we profile maximum catalytic activities of 37 enzymes from central metabolism and generate a matrix to investigate species-wide connectivity between metabolites, enzymes, and biomass. Most enzyme activities change in a highly coordinated manner, especially those in the Calvin-Benson cycle. Metabolites show coordinated changes in defined sectors of metabolism. Little connectivity was observed between maximum enzyme activities and metabolites, even after applying multivariate analysis methods. Measurements of posttranscriptional regulation will be required to relate these two functional levels. Individual enzyme activities correlate only weakly with biomass. However, when they are used to estimate protein abundances, and the latter are summed and expressed as a fraction of total protein, a significant positive correlation to biomass is observed. The correlation is additive to that obtained between starch and biomass. Thus, biomass is predicted by two independent integrative metabolic biomarkers: preferential investment in photosynthetic machinery and optimization of carbon use. PMID:20699391

  11. Improving the solubility and bioavailability of dihydroartemisinin by solid dispersions and inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Muhammad Tayyab; Batty, Kevin T; Iqbal, Ijaz; Sunderland, Vivian Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a poorly water-soluble drug that displays low bioavailability after oral administration. Attempts have been made to improve the solubility of DHA. Yet, no information is available concerning improved bioavailability. This study aimed to improve the water solubility of DHA by two systems: solid dispersions with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVPK30, PVPK25, PVPK15) and inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), as well as improving the bioavailability of both systems. The phase transition of DHA with hydrophilic polymers was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). DHA became amorphous in DHA-HPβCD complexes and showed more amorphous behavior in XRD analyses with rise in molecular weight of PVP. Melting onset temperature of DHA decreased, while DSC thermograms revealed the peak area and enhanced enthalpy change (DH) in solid dispersions as well as inclusion complexes. DHA solubility was enhanced 84-fold in DHA-HPβCD complexes and 50-times in DHA-PVPK30. The improved solubility using the four polymers was in the following order: HPβCD > PVPK30 > PVPK25 > PVPK15. Values of area under curve (AUC) and half life (t(1/2)) of DHA-PVPK30 were highest followed by DHA-HPβCD, DHA-PVPK15 and DHA-PVPK25. V(d)/f of DHA-PVPK30 was 7-fold. DHA-HPβCD, DHA-PVPK15 and DHA-PVPK25 showed significantly different pharmacokinetic parameters compared with DHA solutions. The 95% confidence interval was meaningful in AUC and t(1/2). Pharmacokinetic parameters revealed that all four-test preparations were significantly more bioavailable than DHA alone.

  12. Upregulation of the MCL-1S protein variant following dihydroartemisinin treatment induces apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    HU, HUI; TAN, CHUNLU; LIU, XUBAO; LUO, FENG; LI, KEZHOU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces apoptosis in the human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cell line through the regulation of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) expression. The inhibitory rates of DHA on QBC939 cell proliferation and the effects of DHA on the cell death rates at various DHA concentrations and following various treatment times were examined. The rate of apoptosis and cell cycle changes following DHA treatment were examined and the changes in the expression of MCL-1 mRNAs and MCL-1 proteins following DHA treatment were also examined. The MTT assay and trypan blue staining demonstrated that DHA significantly inhibited the proliferation (P<0.05) and promoted the death of QBC939 cells (P<0.05). The DNA ladder assay and flow cytometry (FCM) analysis demonstrated that the rate of apoptosis in the experimental group was significantly increased following DHA treatment (P<0.01). FCM analysis also demonstrated that DHA treatment led to a reduction in the percentage of QBC939 cells in the G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and the majority of the DNA-treated cells were arrested in the S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.01). Western blot analysis demonstrated that DHA treatment significantly upregulated the expression of the pro-apoptotic MCL-1S protein. In contrast, no significant difference in the expression of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1L protein was observed following DHA treatment. DHA affected the expression of the apoptosis-associated protein MCL-1 through multiple mechanisms. DHA treatment increased the ratio of MCL-1S/MCL-1L protein, thus inducing apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma cells. PMID:26788167

  13. Target interaction profiling of midostaurin and its metabolites in neoplastic mast cells predicts distinct effects on activation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Barbara; Winter, Georg E.; Blatt, Katharina; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Rix, Uwe; Eisenwort, Gregor; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Gridling, Manuela; Dutreix, Catherine; Hoermann, Gregor; Schwaab, Juliana; Radia, Deepti; Roesel, Johannes; Manley, Paul W.; Reiter, Andreas; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Valent, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic-based drug testing is an emerging approach to establish the clinical value and anti-neoplastic potential of multi-kinase inhibitors. The multikinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) is a promising new agent used to treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM). We examined the target interaction-profiles and the mast cell (MC)-targeting effects of two pharmacologically relevant midostaurin metabolites, CGP52421 and CGP62221. All three compounds, midostaurin and the two metabolites, suppressed IgE-dependent histamine secretion in basophils and MC with reasonable IC50 values. Midostaurin and CGP62221 also produced growth-inhibition and dephosphorylation of KIT in the MC leukemia cell line HMC-1.2, whereas the second metabolite, CGP52421, that accumulates in vivo, showed no substantial effects. Chemical proteomic profiling and drug-competition experiments revealed that midostaurin interacts with KIT and several additional kinase-targets. The key downstream-regulator FES was recognized by midostaurin and CGP62221, but not by CGP52421 in MC lysates, whereas the IgE-receptor-downstream target SYK was recognized by both metabolites. Together, our data show that the clinically relevant midostaurin metabolite CGP52421 inhibits IgE-dependent histamine release, but is a weak inhibitor of MC proliferation which may have clinical implications and may explain why mediator-related symptoms improve in SM patients even when disease progression occurs. PMID:26349526

  14. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  15. An active metabolite of oltipraz (M2) increases mitochondrial fuel oxidation and inhibits lipogenesis in the liver by dually activating AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Eom, Jeong Sik; Lee, Chan Gyu; Yang, Yoon Mee; Lee, Yong Sup; Kim, Sang Geon

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Oltipraz, a cancer chemopreventive agent, has an anti-steatotic effect via liver X receptor-α (LXRα) inhibition. Here we have assessed the biological activity of a major metabolite of oltipraz (M2) against liver steatosis and steatohepatitis and the underlying mechanism(s). Experimental Approach Blood biochemistry and histopathology were assessed in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice treated with M2. An in vitroHepG2 cell model was used to study the mechanism of action. Immunoblotting, real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays were performed to measure target protein or gene expression levels. Key Results M2 treatment inhibited HFD-induced steatohepatitis and diminished oxidative stress in liver. It increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial fuel oxidation. Mitochondrial DNA content and oxygen consumption rate were enhanced. Moreover, M2 treatment repressed activity of LXRα and induction of its target genes, indicating anti-lipogenic effects. M2 activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK by over-expression of dominant negative AMPK (DN-AMPK) or by Compound C prevented M2 from inducing genes for fatty acid oxidation and repressed sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression. M2 activated liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and increased the AMP/ATP ratio. LKB1 knockdown failed to reverse target protein modulations or AMPK activation by M2, supporting the proposal that both LKB1 and increased AMP/ATP ratio contribute to its anti-steatotic effect. Conclusion and Implications M2 inhibited liver steatosis and steatohepatitis by enhancing mitochondrial fuel oxidation and inhibiting lipogenesis. These effects reflected activation of AMPK elicited by increases in LKB1 activity and AMP/ATP ratio. PMID:23145499

  16. Effects of woohwangcheongsimwon suspension on the pharmacokinetics of bupropion and its active metabolite, 4-hydroxybupropion, in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmi; Bae, Soo Kyung; Park, Soo-Jin; Shim, Eon-Jeong; Kim, Ho-Sook; Shon, Ji-Hong; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2010-01-01

    AIMS To examine the effects of woohwangcheongsimwon suspension on the pharmacokinetics of bupropion and its active metabolite, 4-hydroxybupropion, formed via CYP2B6 in vivo. METHODS A two-way crossover clinical trial with a 2 week washout period was conducted in 14 healthy volunteers. In phases I and II, subjects received 150 mg bupropion with or without woohwangcheongsimwon suspension four times (at −0.17, 3.5, 23.5 and 47.5 h, with the time of bupropion administration taken as 0 h) in a randomized balanced crossover order. Bupropion and 4-hydroxybupropion plasma concentrations were measured for up to 72 h by LC-MS/MS. Urine was collected up to 24 h to calculate the renal clearance. In addition, the CYP2B6*6 genotype was also analyzed. RESULTS The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence interval of bupropion with woohwangcheongsimwon suspension relative to bupropion alone were 0.976 (0.917, 1.04) for AUC(0,∞) and 0.948 (0.830,1.08) for Cmax, respectively. The corresponding values for 4-hydroxybupropion were 0.856 (0.802, 0.912) and 0.845 (0.782, 0.914), respectively. The tmax values of bupropion and 4-hydroxybupropion were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05). The pharmacokinetic parameters of bupropion and 4-hydroxybupropion were unaffected by woohwangcheongsimwon suspension. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that woohwangcheongsimwon suspension has a negligible effect on the disposition of a single dose of bupropion in vivo. As a result, temporary co-administration with woohwangcheongsimwon suspension does not seem to require a dosage adjustment of bupropion. PMID:20642555

  17. Relation between clopidogrel active metabolite levels and different platelet aggregation methods in patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Johnston, Marilyn; Hirsh, Jack; Pare, Guillaume; Li, Chunjian; Mehta, Shamir; Teo, Koon K; Sloane, Debi; Yi, Qilong; Zhu, Jun; Eikelboom, John W

    2012-11-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that undergoes bioconversion via cytochrome P450 system to form an active metabolite (AM) that binds to the platelet ADP receptor. The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel is commonly assessed by measuring the aggregatory response to 5 μM ADP by light transmission aggregation (LTA) or multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) or by the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI). To determine which of these three tests of platelet ADP receptor pathway inhibition most closely correlates with clopidogrel AM levels. We analyzed blood samples from 82 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized to receive double-dose or standard dose clopidogrel for 2 weeks. We measured peak clopidogrel AM levels, platelet aggregation in response to ADP and VASP-PRI on days 1, and repeated all the measures on days 7 and 14. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the correlation between clopidogrel AM and LTA, MEA and VASP-PRI. Bland-Altman plots were used to explore the agreement between tests of the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel AM on day 1 correlated most closely with VASP-PRI (r = -0.5767) and demonstrated weaker correlations with LTA (r = -0.4656) and MEA (r = -0.3384) (all p < 0.01). Intra-class correlation (ICC) between VASP-PRI and LTA was 0.6446; VASP-PRI and MEA was 0.4720; and LTA and MEA was 0.4693. Similar results were obtained on days 7 and 14. Commonly used pharmacodynamic measures of clopidogrel response are only moderately correlated with clopidogrel AM levels and may not be suitable to measure the adequacy of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:22797934

  18. Determination of loratadine and its active metabolite in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Vlase, Laurian; Imre, Silvia; Muntean, Dana; Leucuta, Sorin E

    2007-07-27

    A new sensitive and selective liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for quantification of loratadine (LOR) and its active metabolite descarboethoxyloratadine (DSL) in human plasma was validated. After addition of the internal standard, metoclopramide, the human plasma samples (0.3 ml) were precipitated using acetonitrile (0.75 ml) and the centrifuged supernatants were partially evaporated under nitrogen at 37 degrees C at approximately 0.3 ml volume. The LOR, DSL and internal standard were separated on a reversed phase column (Zorbax SB-C18, 100 mmx3.0 mm i.d., 3.5 microm) under isocratic conditions using a mobile phase of an 8:92(v/v) mixture of acetonitrile and 0.4% (v/v) formic acid in water. The flow rate was 1 ml/min and the column temperature 45 degrees C. The detection of LOR, DSL and internal standard was in MRM mode using an ion trap mass spectrometer with electrospray positive ionisation. The ion transitions were monitored as follows: 383-->337 for LOR, 311-->(259+294+282) for DSL and 300-->226.8 for internal standard. Calibration curves were generated over the range of 0.52-52.3 ng/ml for both LOR and DSL with values for coefficient of determination greater than 0.994 by using a weighted (1/y) quadratic regression. The lower limits of quantification were established at 0.52 ng/ml LOR and DSL, respectively, with an accuracy and precision less than 20%. Both analytes demonstrated good short-term, long-term, post-preparative and freeze-thaw stability. Besides its simplicity, the sample treatment allows obtaining a very good recovery of both analytes, around 100%. The validated LC/MS/MS method has been applied to a pharmacokinetic study of loratadine tablets on healthy volunteers.

  19. Microbial transformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol by Absidia corymbifera. Cytotoxic activity of the metabolites against human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangtong; Yang, Min; Nong, Shaojun; Yang, Xue; Ling, Yong; Wang, Donggeng; Wang, Xinyang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Biotransformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (1) by the fungus Absidia corymbifera AS 3.3387 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as 26-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (2), 23, 24-en-25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (3), 25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (4), 7β-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 7-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that A. corymbifera AS 3.3387 could catalyze the side-chain oxidation-reduction, 7β hydroxylation, and the specific C-7 dehydrogenation of derivatives of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol. The metabolites 2, 5, and 6 showed the more potent inhibitory effects against DU-145 and PC-3 cell lines than the substrate. PMID:23022533

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for sequential metabolism: effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Djebli, Nassim; Fabre, David; Boulenc, Xavier; Fabre, Gérard; Sultan, Eric; Hurbin, Fabrice

    2015-04-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that needs to be converted to its active metabolite (clopi-H4) in two sequential cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent steps. In the present study, a dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in Simcyp for clopidogrel and clopi-H4 using a specific sequential metabolite module in four populations with phenotypically different CYP2C19 activity (poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultrarapid metabolizers) receiving a loading dose of 300 mg followed by a maintenance dose of 75 mg. This model was validated using several approaches. First, a comparison of predicted-to-observed area under the curve (AUC)0-24 obtained from a randomized crossover study conducted in four balanced CYP2C19-phenotype metabolizer groups was performed using a visual predictive check method. Second, the interindividual and intertrial variability (on the basis of AUC0-24 comparisons) between the predicted trials and the observed trial of individuals, for each phenotypic group, were compared. Finally, a further validation, on the basis of drug-drug-interaction prediction, was performed by comparing observed values of clopidogrel and clopi-H4 with or without dronedarone (moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor) coadministration using a previously developed and validated physiologically based PBPK dronedarone model. The PBPK model was well validated for both clopidogrel and its active metabolite clopi-H4, in each CYP2C19-phenotypic group, whatever the treatment period (300-mg loading dose and 75-mg last maintenance dose). This is the first study proposing a full dynamic PBPK model able to accurately predict simultaneously the pharmacokinetics of the parent drug and of its primary and secondary metabolites in populations with genetically different activity for a metabolizing enzyme.

  1. Biochemical Characterization of the Active Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Metabolites of 2,6-Diaminopurine Ribonucleoside Prodrug Compared to Sofosbuvir and BMS-986094.

    PubMed

    Ehteshami, Maryam; Tao, Sijia; Ozturk, Tugba; Zhou, Longhu; Cho, Jong Hyun; Zhang, Hongwang; Amiralaei, Sheida; Shelton, Jadd R; Lu, Xiao; Khalil, Ahmed; Domaoal, Robert A; Stanton, Richard A; Suesserman, Justin E; Lin, Biing; Lee, Sam S; Amblard, Franck; Whitaker, Tony; Coats, Steven J; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-01

    Ribonucleoside analog inhibitors (rNAI) target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) and cause RNA chain termination. Here, we expand our studies on β-d-2'-C-methyl-2,6-diaminopurine-ribonucleotide (DAPN) phosphoramidate prodrug 1 (PD1) as a novel investigational inhibitor of HCV. DAPN-PD1 is metabolized intracellularly into two distinct bioactive nucleoside triphosphate (TP) analogs. The first metabolite, 2'-C-methyl-GTP, is a well-characterized inhibitor of NS5B polymerase, whereas the second metabolite, 2'-C-methyl-DAPN-TP, behaves as an adenosine base analog. In vitro assays suggest that both metabolites are inhibitors of NS5B-mediated RNA polymerization. Additional factors, such as rNAI-TP incorporation efficiencies, intracellular rNAI-TP levels, and competition with natural ribonucleotides, were examined in order to further characterize the potential role of each nucleotide metabolite in vivo Finally, we found that although both 2'-C-methyl-GTP and 2'-C-methyl-DAPN-TP were weak substrates for human mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) polymerase (POLRMT) in vitro, DAPN-PD1 did not cause off-target inhibition of mtRNA transcription in Huh-7 cells. In contrast, administration of BMS-986094, which also generates 2'-C-methyl-GTP and previously has been associated with toxicity in humans, caused detectable inhibition of mtRNA transcription. Metabolism of BMS-986094 in Huh-7 cells leads to 87-fold higher levels of intracellular 2'-C-methyl-GTP than DAPN-PD1. Collectively, our data characterize DAPN-PD1 as a novel and potent antiviral agent that combines the delivery of two active metabolites. PMID:27216050

  2. Self-assembled targeted nanoparticles based on transferrin-modified eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kefeng; Dai, Lin; Li, Chunxiao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Luying; Lei, Jiandu

    2016-07-01

    Poor delivery of insoluble anticancer drugs has so far precluded their clinical application. In this study, an efficient tumor targeted-nanoparticle delivery system, transferrin-eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin nanoparticles (TF-8arm-PEG-DHA NPs) for the vehiculation of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was first prepared and evaluated for its targeting efficiency and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo to Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which overexpress transferrin receptors (TFRs). The synthesized TF-8arm-PEG–DHA NPs had high solubility (~102 fold of free DHA), relatively high drug loading (~10 wt% DHA), long circulating half-life and moderate particle size (~147 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in LLC-tumor bearing mice confirmed the enhanced efficacy of TF-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs compared to free DHA and non-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs. All these results together supported that the formulation developed in this work exhibited great potential as an effective tumor targeting delivery system for insoluble anticancer drugs.

  3. Self-assembled targeted nanoparticles based on transferrin-modified eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kefeng; Dai, Lin; Li, Chunxiao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Luying; Lei, Jiandu

    2016-01-01

    Poor delivery of insoluble anticancer drugs has so far precluded their clinical application. In this study, an efficient tumor targeted-nanoparticle delivery system, transferrin-eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin nanoparticles (TF-8arm-PEG-DHA NPs) for the vehiculation of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was first prepared and evaluated for its targeting efficiency and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo to Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which overexpress transferrin receptors (TFRs). The synthesized TF-8arm-PEG–DHA NPs had high solubility (~102 fold of free DHA), relatively high drug loading (~10 wt% DHA), long circulating half-life and moderate particle size (~147 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in LLC-tumor bearing mice confirmed the enhanced efficacy of TF-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs compared to free DHA and non-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs. All these results together supported that the formulation developed in this work exhibited great potential as an effective tumor targeting delivery system for insoluble anticancer drugs. PMID:27377918

  4. Application of liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method to a urinary excretion study of subutinib and active metabolite in human urine.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-kun; Yang, Lin; Gao, Xiao-hua; Chen, Su-ning; Jia, Na; Li, Xue-qing; Zhou, Lun; Hang, Tai-jun; Wen, Ai-dong

    2016-04-01

    A novel and selective liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS) has been established and validated for simultaneous determination of subutinib and active metabolite in human urine. Urine samples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and separated on a Wondasil C18 (150 × 2.1 mm, 3.5 µm), with methanol-0.2% formic acid solution (73:27, v/v) as mobile phase at flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The linear range was 0.5000-200.0 ng/mL for subutinib and active metabolite, with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.5000 ng/mL. Intra- and inter-run precisions were all <11.8 and 14.3%, and the accuracies were all <4.5 and 5.4%, with the extraction recoveries 88.8-97.5 and 93.8-99.4% for the two analytes, respectively. The carryover values were all <15% for the two anayltes. The method was successfully applied to study urinary excretion of subutinib and active metabolite in human after oral administration of subutinib maleate capsules in fed and fasting states.

  5. Chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites in the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus and submerged culture strategies for up-regulating their production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhang, Meimei; Pan, Shenyuan; Dai, Yucheng

    2010-07-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat is a white rot fungus belonging to the family Hymenochaetaceae in the Basidiomycota. In nature, this fungus rarely forms a fruiting body but usually an irregular shape of sclerotial conk called 'Chaga'. Characteristically, I. obliquus produces massive melanins released to the surface of Chaga. As early as in the sixteenth century, Chaga was used as an effective folk medicine in Russia and Northern Europe to treat several human malicious tumors and other diseases in the absence of any unacceptable toxic side effects. Chemical investigations show that I. obliquus produces a diverse range of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, melanins, and lanostane-type triterpenoids. Among these are the active components for antioxidant, antitumoral, and antiviral activities and for improving human immunity against infection of pathogenic microbes. Geographically, however, this fungus is restricted to very cold habitats and grows very slowly, suggesting that Chaga is not a reliable source of these bioactive compounds. Attempts for culturing this fungus axenically all resulted in a reduced production of bioactive metabolites. This review examines the current progress in the discovery of chemical diversity of Chaga and their biological activities and the strategies to modulate the expression of desired pathways to diversify and up-regulate the production of bioactive metabolites by the fungus grown in submerged cultures for possible drug discovery. PMID:20532760

  6. Distribution of topical ocular nepafenac and its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye.

    PubMed

    Chastain, James E; Sanders, Mark E; Curtis, Michael A; Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Gadd, Martha E; Kapin, Michael A; Markwardt, Kerry L; Dahlin, David C

    2016-04-01

    Nepafenac ophthalmic suspensions, 0.1% (NEVANAC(®)) and 0.3% (ILEVRO™), are topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) products approved in the United States, Europe and various other countries to treat pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery. NEVANAC is also approved in Europe for the reduction in the risk of postoperative macular edema (ME) associated with cataract surgery in diabetic patients. The efficacy against ME suggests that topical administration leads to distribution of nepafenac or its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye. This article evaluates the ocular distribution of nepafenac and amfenac and the extent of local delivery to the posterior segment of the eye, following topical ocular instillation in animal models. Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension was instilled unilaterally in New Zealand White rabbits as either a single dose (0.1%; one drop) or as multiple doses (0.3%, one drop, once-daily for 4 days, or 0.1% one drop, three-times daily for 3 days and one morning dose on day 4). Nepafenac (0.3%) was also instilled unilaterally in cynomolgus monkeys as multiple doses (one drop, three-times daily for 7 days). Nepafenac and amfenac concentrations in harvested ocular tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Locally-distributed compound concentrations were determined as the difference in levels between dosed and undosed eyes. In single-dosed rabbit eyes, peak concentrations of locally-distributed nepafenac and amfenac showed a trend of sclera > choroid > retina. Nepafenac peak levels in sub-samples posterior to the eye equator and inclusive of the posterior pole (E-PP) were 55.1, 4.03 and 2.72 nM, respectively, at 0.25 or 0.50 h, with corresponding amfenac peak levels of 41.9, 3.10 and 0.705 nM at 1 or 4 h. By comparison, peak levels in sclera, choroid and retina sub-samples in a band between the ora serrata and the equator (OS-E) were 13- to 40-fold

  7. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Tanilu; Bernasconi, Andrea; Erhart, Annette; Gamboa, Dioni; Casapia, Martin; Delgado, Christopher; Torres, Kathy; Fanello, Caterina; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria is an important health problem in the Peruvian Amazon region. We carried out a randomised open label clinical trial comparing mefloquine-artesunate, the current first line treatment in this region, with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. Methods and Findings Between July 2003 and July 2005, 522 patients with P. falciparum uncomplicated malaria were recruited, randomized (260 with mefloquine-artesunate and 262 with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine), treated and followed up for 63 days. PCR-adjusted adequate clinical and parasitological response, estimated by Kaplan Meier survival and Per Protocol analysis, was extremely high for both drugs (99.6% for mefloquine-artesunate and 98.4% and for dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine) (RR: 0.99, 95%CI [0.97−1.01], Fisher Exact p = 0.21). All recrudescences were late parasitological failures. Overall, gametocytes were cleared faster in the mefloquine-artesunate group (28 vs 35 days) and new gametocytes tended to appear more frequently in patients treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (day 7: 8 (3.6%) vs 2 (0.9%), RR: 3.84, 95%CI [0.82–17.87]). Adverse events such as anxiety and insomnia were significantly more frequent in the mefloquine-artesunate group, both in adults and children. Conclusion Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is as effective as mefloquine-artesunate in treating uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria but it is better tolerated and more affordable than mefloquine-artesunate (US$1.0 versus US$18.65 on the local market). Therefore, it should be considered as a potential candidate for the first line treatment of P.falciparum malaria in Peru. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00373607 PMID:17971864

  8. Efficacy of Two versus Three-Day Regimens of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for Uncomplicated Malaria in Military Personnel in Northern Cambodia: An Open-Label Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; So, Mary; Sea, Darapiseth; Se, Youry; Gosi, Panita; Lanteri, Charlotte; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Buathong, Nillawan; Nou, Samon; Walsh, Douglas S.; Tyner, Stuart D.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Lin, Jessica; Spring, Michele; Bethell, Delia; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Tang, Douglas; Chuor, Char Meng; Satharath, Prom; Saunders, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emerging antimalarial drug resistance in mobile populations remains a significant public health concern. We compared two regimens of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in military and civilians on the Thai-Cambodian border to evaluate national treatment policy. Methods Efficacy and safety of two and three-day regimens of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine were compared as a nested open-label evaluation within a malaria cohort study in 222 otherwise healthy volunteers (18% malaria-infected at baseline). The first 80 volunteers with slide-confirmed Plasmodium falciparum or vivax malaria were randomized 1:1 to receive either regimen (total dose 360mg dihydroartemisinin and 2880mg piperaquine) and followed weekly for up to 6 months. The primary endpoint was malaria recurrence by day 42. Volunteers with vivax infection received primaquine at study discharge with six months follow-up. Results Eighty patients (60 vivax, 15 falciparum, and 5 mixed) were randomized to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. Intention-to-treat all-species efficacy at Day 42 was 85% for the two-day regimen (95% CI 69–94) and 90% for the three-day regimen (95% CI 75–97). PCR-adjusted falciparum efficacy was 75% in both groups with nearly half (45%) still parasitemic at Day 3. Plasma piperaquine levels were comparable to prior published reports, but on the day of recrudescence were below measurable in vitro piperaquine IC50 levels in all falciparum treatment failures. Conclusions In the brief period since introduction of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, there is early evidence suggesting declining efficacy relative to previous reports. Parasite IC50 levels in excess of plasma piperaquine levels seen only in treatment failures raises concern for clinically significant piperaquine resistance in Cambodia. These findings warrant improved monitoring of clinical outcomes and follow-up, given few available alternative drugs. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280162 PMID:24667662

  9. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  10. Anticancer effect and structure-activity analysis of marine products isolated from metabolites of mangrove fungi in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li-yang; Zhang, Jian-ye; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Zhen, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Mi, Yan-jun; She, Zhi-gang; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Lin, Yong-cheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi provide plenty of structurally unique and biologically active secondary metabolites. We screened 87 marine products from mangrove fungi in the South China Sea for anticancer activity by MTT assay. 14% of the compounds (11/86) exhibited a potent activity against cancer in vitro. Importantly, some compounds such as compounds 78 and 81 appeared to be promising for treating cancer patients with multidrug resistance, which should encourage more efforts to isolate promising candidates for further development as clinically useful chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, DNA intercalation was not involved in their anticancer activities, as determined by DNA binding assay. On the other hand, the structure-activity analysis indicated that the hydroxyl group was important for their cytotoxic activity and that bulky functional groups such as phenyl rings could result in a loss of biological activity, which will direct the further development of marine product-based derivatives. PMID:20479969

  11. Anticancer Effect and Structure-Activity Analysis of Marine Products Isolated from Metabolites of Mangrove Fungi in the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li-yang; Zhang, Jian-ye; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Zhen, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Mi, Yan-jun; She, Zhi-gang; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Lin, Yong-cheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi provide plenty of structurally unique and biologically active secondary metabolites. We screened 87 marine products from mangrove fungi in the South China Sea for anticancer activity by MTT assay. 14% of the compounds (11/86) exhibited a potent activity against cancer in vitro. Importantly, some compounds such as compounds 78 and 81 appeared to be promising for treating cancer patients with multidrug resistance, which should encourage more efforts to isolate promising candidates for further development as clinically useful chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, DNA intercalation was not involved in their anticancer activities, as determined by DNA binding assay. On the other hand, the structure-activity analysis indicated that the hydroxyl group was important for their cytotoxic activity and that bulky functional groups such as phenyl rings could result in a loss of biological activity, which will direct the further development of marine product-based derivatives. PMID:20479969

  12. Anticancer effect and structure-activity analysis of marine products isolated from metabolites of mangrove fungi in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li-yang; Zhang, Jian-ye; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Zhen, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Mi, Yan-jun; She, Zhi-gang; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Lin, Yong-cheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi provide plenty of structurally unique and biologically active secondary metabolites. We screened 87 marine products from mangrove fungi in the South China Sea for anticancer activity by MTT assay. 14% of the compounds (11/86) exhibited a potent activity against cancer in vitro. Importantly, some compounds such as compounds 78 and 81 appeared to be promising for treating cancer patients with multidrug resistance, which should encourage more efforts to isolate promising candidates for further development as clinically useful chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, DNA intercalation was not involved in their anticancer activities, as determined by DNA binding assay. On the other hand, the structure-activity analysis indicated that the hydroxyl group was important for their cytotoxic activity and that bulky functional groups such as phenyl rings could result in a loss of biological activity, which will direct the further development of marine product-based derivatives.

  13. Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Falciparum and Vivax Malaria in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Fobia, Wendy; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A.; Sugiarto, Paulus; Tjitra, Emiliana; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Price, Ric N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is recommended for the treatment of multidrug resistant malaria in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, but the experience with ACTs is limited. We review the exposure of pregnant women to the combination dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine over a 6 year period. Methods From April 2004–June 2009, a prospective hospital-based surveillance screened all pregnant women for malaria and documented maternal and neonatal outcomes. Results Data were available on 6519 pregnant women admitted to hospital; 332 (5.1%) women presented in the first trimester, 324 (5.0%) in the second, 5843 (89.6%) in the third, and in 20 women the trimester was undocumented. Peripheral parasitaemia was confirmed in 1682 women, of whom 106 (6.3%) had severe malaria. Of the 1217 women admitted with malaria in the second and third trimesters without an impending adverse outcome, those treated with DHP were more likely to be discharged with an ongoing pregnancy compared to those treated with a non-ACT regimen (Odds Ratio OR = 2.48 [1.26–4.86]); p = 0.006. However in the first trimester 63% (5/8) of women treated with oral DHP miscarried compared to 2.6% (1/38) of those receiving oral quinine; p<0.001. Of the 847 women admitted for delivery those reporting a history of malaria during their pregnancy who had been treated with quinine-based regimens rather than DHP had a higher risk of malaria at delivery (adjusted OR = 1.56 (95%CI 0.97–2.5), p = 0.068) and perinatal mortality (adjusted OR = 3.17 [95%CI: 1.17–8.60]; p = 0.023). Conclusions In the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, a three day course of DHP simplified antimalarial treatment and had significant benefits over quinine-based regimens in reducing recurrent malaria and poor fetal outcome. These data provide reassuring evidence for the rational design of prospective randomized clinical trials and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:24465458

  14. Definitive Metabolite Identification Coupled with Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) Technology: A Novel Approach to Uncover Structure-Activity Relationships and Guide Drug Design in a Factor IXa Inhibitor Program.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yong; Yang, Xianshu; Martin, Gary E; Yao, Huifang; Shang, Jackie; Bugianesi, Randal M; Ellsworth, Kenneth P; Sonatore, Lisa M; Nizner, Peter; Sherer, Edward C; Hill, Susan E; Knemeyer, Ian W; Geissler, Wayne M; Dandliker, Peter J; Helmy, Roy; Wood, Harold B

    2016-03-10

    A potent and selective Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitor was subjected to a series of liver microsomal incubations, which generated a number of metabolites. Using automated ligand identification system-affinity selection (ALIS-AS) methodology, metabolites in the incubation mixture were prioritized by their binding affinities to the FIXa protein. Microgram quantities of the metabolites of interest were then isolated through microisolation analytical capabilities, and structurally characterized using MicroCryoProbe heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques. The isolated metabolites recovered from the NMR experiments were then submitted directly to an in vitro FIXa enzymatic assay. The order of the metabolites' binding affinity to the Factor IXa protein from the ALIS assay was completely consistent with the enzymatic assay results. This work showcases an innovative and efficient approach to uncover structure-activity relationships (SARs) and guide drug design via microisolation-structural characterization and ALIS capabilities. PMID:26871940

  15. Marine-derived myxobacteria of the suborder Nannocystineae: An underexplored source of structurally intriguing and biologically active metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F

    2016-01-01

    Summary Myxobacteria are famous for their ability to produce most intriguing secondary metabolites. Till recently, only terrestrial myxobacteria were in the focus of research. In this review, however, we discuss marine-derived myxobacteria, which are particularly interesting due to their relatively recent discovery and due to the fact that their very existence was called into question. The to-date-explored members of these halophilic or halotolerant myxobacteria are all grouped into the suborder Nannocystineae. Few of them were chemically investigated revealing around 11 structural types belonging to the polyketide, non-ribosomal peptide, hybrids thereof or terpenoid class of secondary metabolites. A most unusual structural type is represented by salimabromide from Enhygromyxa salina. In silico analyses were carried out on the available genome sequences of four bacterial members of the Nannocystineae, revealing the biosynthetic potential of these bacteria. PMID:27340488

  16. Melatonin and its metabolites accumulate in the human epidermis in vivo and inhibit proliferation and tyrosinase activity in epidermal melanocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kang; Lin, Zongtao; Tidwell, William J; Li, We; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2015-03-15

    Melatonin and its metabolites including 6-hydroxymelatonin (6(OH)M), N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and 5-methoxytryptamine (5MT) are endogenously produced in human epidermis. This production depends on race, gender and age. The highest melatonin levels are in African-Americans. In each racial group they are highest in young African-Americans [30-50 years old (yo)], old Caucasians (60-90 yo) and Caucasian females. AFMK levels are the highest in African-Americans, while 6(OH)M and 5MT levels are similar in all groups. Testing of their phenotypic effects in normal human melanocytes show that melatonin and its metabolites (10(-5) M) inhibit tyrosinase activity and cell growth, and inhibit DNA synthesis in a dose dependent manner with 10(-9) M being the lowest effective concentration. In melanoma cells, they inhibited cell growth but had no effect on melanogenesis, except for 5MT which enhanced L-tyrosine induced melanogenesis. In conclusion, melatonin and its metabolites [6(OH)M, AFMK and 5MT] are produced endogenously in human epidermis and can affect melanocyte and melanoma behavior.

  17. Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activation, and insulin sensitivity are associated with physical function in functionally-limited older adults.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Price, Lori L; Chalé, Angela; Fielding, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Identification of mechanisms underlying physical function will be important for addressing the growing challenge that health care will face with physical disablement in the expanding aging population. Therefore, the goals of the current study were to use metabolic profiling to provide insight into biologic mechanisms that may underlie physical function by examining the association between baseline and the 6-month change in serum mass spectrometry-obtained amino acids, fatty acids, and acylcarnitines with baseline and the 6-month change in muscle strength (leg press one repetition maximum divided by total lean mass, LP/Lean), lower extremity function [short physical performance battery (SPPB)], and mobility (400 m gait speed, 400-m), in response to 6 months of a combined resistance exercise and nutritional supplementation (whey protein or placebo) intervention in functionally-limited older adults (SPPB ≤ 10; 70-85 years, N = 73). Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism (cinnamoylglycine, phenol sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, 3-indoxyl sulfate, serotonin, N-methylproline, hydrocinnamate, dimethylglycine, trans-urocanate, valerate) that are altered in response to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) activation (α-hydroxyisocaproate, α-hydroxyisovalerate, 2-hydroxy-3-methylvalerate, indolelactate, serotonin, 2-hydroxypalmitate, glutarylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, cinnamoylglycine) and that are related to insulin sensitivity (monounsaturated fatty acids: 5-dodecenoate, myristoleate, palmitoleate; γ-glutamylamino acids: γ-glutamylglutamine, γ-glutamylalanine, γ-glutamylmethionine, γ-glutamyltyrosine; branched-chain amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, valine) were associated with function at baseline, with the 6-month change in function or were identified in backward elimination regression predictive models. Collectively, these data suggest that gut microbial metabolism, PPAR-α activation, and insulin sensitivity may be involved in

  18. Changes in the contents of metabolites and enzyme activities in rice plants responding to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn infection: activation of glycolysis and connection to phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutuku, J Musembi; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn causes sheath blight disease in rice, and genetic resistance against it is the most desirable characteristic. Current improvement efforts are based on analysis of polygenic quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but interpretation is limited by the lack of information on the changes in metabolic pathways. Our previous studies linked activation of the glycolytic pathway to enhanced generation of lignin in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The current studies investigated the regulation of glycolysis by examining the time course of changes in enzymatic activities and metabolite contents. The results showed that the activities of all glycolytic enzymes as well as fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)), dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP), 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate contents increased. These results combined with our previous findings that the expression of phosphoglucomutase (PGM), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), enolase and pyruvate kinase (PK) increased after infection suggested that the additional establishment of glycolysis in the cytosol compartment occurred after infection. Further evidence for this was our recent findings that the increase in expression of the 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) plastid isozyme Os06g05860 was accompanied by an increase in expression of three cytosolic PFK isozymes, i.e. Os01g09570, Os01g53680 and Os04g39420, as well as pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofrucokinase (PFP) isozymes Os08g25720 (α-subunit) and Os06g13810 (β-subunit) in infected rice plants of the resistant line. The results also showed that the reactions catalysed by PFK/PFP, aldolase, GAPDH + phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and PK in leaf sheaths of R. solani-infected rice plants were non-equilibrium reactions in vivo. This study showed that PGM, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), TPI and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGmu

  19. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  20. Metabolite identification of artemether by data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis using an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in combination with the online hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Du, Fuying; Zhu, Fanping; Xing, Jie

    2011-11-15

    Artemether (ARM), the O-methyl ether prodrug of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), is a first-line antimalarial drug used in areas of multi-drug resistance. Artemisinin drugs can be metabolized extensively in vivo and this seems related to their autoinduction pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the metabolite identification of ARM was performed by the generic data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis, using high-resolution (HR) liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange for rapid structural characterization. The LC separation was improved allowing the separation of ARM parent drugs and their metabolites from their diastereomers. A total of 77 phase I metabolites of ARM were identified in rat liver microsomal incubates and rat urine, including dihydroartemisinin and artemisinin. In rat bile, 12 phase II metabolites were found. Accurate mass data were obtained in both full scan and HR-MS/MS mode to support assignments of metabolite structures. Online H/D exchange LC/HR-ESI-MS experiments provided additional evidence in differentiating dihydroxylated deoxy-ARM from mono-hydroxylated ARM. The results showed the main phase I metabolites of artemether are hydroxylated, dehydro, demethylated and deoxy products, and they will undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation processes. Most metabolites were reported for the first time. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with an online H/D exchange LC/HR-MS(n) technique in rapid identification of drug metabolites. PMID:22006394

  1. [Multiple and successive treatment failures in a patient infected by Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia and treated by dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine].

    PubMed

    Witkowski, B; Khim, N; Kim, S; Domergue, A; Duru, V; Menard, D

    2016-05-01

    Cases of treatment failures following administration of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) remain rare in malaria endemic areas. In Cambodia, however, failures of these treatments are now commonly observed. Usually, these post-treatment recurrences occur only once and a second course of the same treatment is sufficient to cure patients.We describe here an atypical case of a Plasmodium falciparum-infected patient manifesting several malaria recrudescence episodes following dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Eurartesim®) treatment. This case report illustrates the current issue of resistance to the latest generation of antimalarial drugs in Southeast Asia and highlights the difficulty in efficaciously fighting malaria in this region if new therapy remains unimplemented. PMID:27100863

  2. Metabolomics-on-a-chip of hepatotoxicity induced by anticancer drug flutamide and Its active metabolite hydroxyflutamide using HepG2/C3a microfluidic biochips.

    PubMed

    Choucha Snouber, Leila; Bunescu, Andrei; Naudot, Marie; Legallais, Cécile; Brochot, Céline; Dumas, Marc Emmanuel; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Leclerc, Eric

    2013-03-01

    We used the recently introduced "metabolomics-on-a-chip" approach to test secondary drug toxicity in bioartificial organs. Bioartificial organs cultivated in microfluidic culture conditions provide a beneficial environment, in which the cellular cytoprotective mechanisms are enhanced, compared with Petri dish culture conditions. We investigated the metabolic response of HepG2/C3a cells exposed to flutamide, an anticancer prodrug, and hydroxyflutamide (HF), its active metabolite, in a microfluidic biochip. The cellular response was analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify cell-specific molecule-response markers. The metabolic response to flutamide results in a disruption of glucose homeostasis and in mitochondrial dysfunctions. This flutamide-specific metabolic response was illustrated by a reduction of the extracellular glucose and fructose consumptions and a general reduction of the tricarboxylic acid cycle activity leading to the reduction of the consumption of several amino acids. We also found a higher production of 3-hydroxybutyrate and lactate, and the reduction of the albumin production compared with controls. The toxic metabolic signature associated with the active metabolite HF was illustrated by a high-energy demand and an increase in several amino acid metabolism. Finally, for both molecules, the hepatotoxicity was correlated to the glutathione (GSH) metabolism illustrated by the levels of the 2-hydroxybutyrate and pyroglutamate productions and the increase of the glutamate and glycine productions. Thus, the entire set of results contributed to extract specific mechanistic toxic signatures and their relation to hepatotoxicity, which appeared consistent with literature reports. As new finding of HepG2/C3a cells hepatotoxicity, we propose a metabolic network with a related list of metabolite variations to describe the GSH depletion when followed by a cell death for the HepG2/C3a cells cultivated in our polydimethylsiloxane

  3. Abscisic acid induced changes in production of primary and secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, antioxidant capability, antioxidant enzymes and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2-, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX)] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM) for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2-, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC) were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05) and O2- (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05). This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals. PMID:23884129

  4. The toxicity of the N-hydroxy and 6-hydroxy metabolites of 3,4-dichloropropionanilide does not depend on calcium release-activated calcium channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tricia L; Holásková, Ida; Barnett, John B

    2013-02-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2-4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630-645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites of

  5. Lack of interaction between zidovudine and 4-methyl-amino-antipyrine, the active metabolite of metamizole, in human liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bacracheva, N; Kamali, F

    1995-06-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is eliminated by extensive metabolism to an ether glucuronide (GAZT). The nonnarcotic analgesic metamizole (dipyrone) is a typical polydrug, the active metabolite being 4-methyl-amino-antipyrine (4-MAA). About 20% of 4-MAA is excreted in the form of glucuronide in the urine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 4-MAA inhibits the glucuronidation of AZT, by comparing the GAZT formed in the presence and absence of 4-MAA in the microsomal fractions. Microsomal fractions were obtained from 6 human livers. AZT and 4-MAA were added in concentrations of 1 mmole, corresponding to the therapeutically relevant plasma concentrations of both drugs. Incubation time was 20 min. Concentrations of GAZT were measured using reverse-phase HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography). The mean value of GAZT formed in the microsomal samples without the addition of 4-MAA was 1.87 +/- 0.74 pmole/mg protein. In the presence of 4-MAA, the concentrations averaged 1.77 +/- 0.77 pmole/mg protein, and did not differ significantly from those measured without 4-MAA. In conclusion, the glucuronidation of AZT is not inhibited by 4-MAA, the main active metabolite of metamizole. From the in vitro findings it is predicted that concomitant metamizole administration may fail to enhance by metabolic interference the AZT concentrations under therapy.

  6. Effects of methoxychlor and its metabolite 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane on 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Deng, Haiyun; Li, Hongzhi; Zhu, Qiqi; Zhao, Binghai; Chen, Bingbing; Chu, Yanhui; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2013-03-27

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is primarily used as a pesticide and widely present in the environment. The objective of the present study is to investigate the direct effects of MXC and its metabolite 2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE) on two isoforms of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2) in vitro. Human liver microsome, rat testis microsome and adult Leydig cells were used for the measurement of 11β-HSD1 activity. Human placental and rat kidney microsomes were used for 11β-HSD2 activity. The IC(50) values on human 11β-HSD1 by MXC and HPTE were 1.91±0.07 and 8.88 ± 0.08 μM, respectively. HPTE inhibited rat 11β-HSD1 with IC(50) of 9.15±0.05μM, while MXC did not inhibit the enzyme. MXC and HPTE were competitive inhibitors of 11β-HSD1. HPTE also inhibited human and rat 11β-HSD2 with IC(50) values of 55.57 ± 0.08 and 12.96 ± 0.11 μM, respectively, while MXC did not inhibit 11β-HSD2. In summary, our results showed that MXC and its metabolite HPTE inhibited both isoforms of 11β-HSD in a species- and chemical structure-dependent manner.

  7. Evaluating the Effects of Tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone, an Active Metabolite of Pentachlorophenol, on the Growth of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Binbing; Gao, Bosong; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ), an active metabolite of pentachlorophenol (PCP), is genotoxic and potentially carcinogenic. As an electrophilic and oxidative molecule, TCBQ can conjugate with deoxyguanosine in DNA molecules and/or impose oxidative stress in cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCBQ on intracellular ROS production, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity against three different subtypes of human breast cancer cells. Luminal A subtype MCF7 (ER+, PR+, HER2−) cells maintained the highest intracellular ROS level and were subjected to TCBQ-induced ROS reduction, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. HER2 subtype Sk-Br-3 (ER−, PR−, HER2+) cells possessed the lowest intracellular ROS level. TCBQ promoted ROS production, inhibited apoptosis, and elevated cytotoxicity (due to necrosis) against Sk-Br-3 cells. Triple-negative/basal-like subtype MDA-MB-231 cells were less sensitive towards TCBQ treatment. Therefore, the effect of prolonged exposure to PCP and its active metabolites on cancer growth is highly cancer-cell-type specific. PMID:26981120

  8. Novel, unifying mechanism for mescaline in the central nervous system: electrochemistry, catechol redox metabolite, receptor, cell signaling and structure activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    A unifying mechanism for abused drugs has been proposed previously from the standpoint of electron transfer. Mescaline can be accommodated within the theoretical framework based on redox cycling by the catechol metabolite with its quinone counterpart. Electron transfer may play a role in electrical effects involving the nervous system in the brain. This approach is in accord with structure activity relationships involving mescaline, abused drugs, catecholamines, and etoposide. Inefficient demethylation is in keeping with the various drug properties, such as requirement for high dosage and slow acting. There is a discussion of receptor binding, electrical effects, cell signaling and other modes of action. Mescaline is a nonselective, seretonin receptor agonist. 5-HTP receptors are involved in the stimulus properties. Research addresses the aspect of stereochemical requirements. Receptor binding may involve the proposed quinone metabolite and/or the amino sidechain via protonation. Electroencephalographic studies were performed on the effects of mescaline on men. Spikes are elicited by stimulation of a cortical area. The potentials likely originate in nonsynaptic dendritic membranes. Receptor-mediated signaling pathways were examined which affect mescaline behavior. The hallucinogen belongs to the class of 2AR agonists which regulate pathways in cortical neurons. The research identifies neural and signaling mechanisms responsible for the biological effects. Recently, another hallucinogen, psilocybin, has been included within the unifying mechanistic framework. This mushroom constituent is hydrolyzed to the phenol psilocin, also active, which is subsequently oxidized to an ET o-quinone or iminoquinone.

  9. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martínlvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, Maria Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI. PMID:26023719

  10. Development of a mechanism of action-based screen for anthelmintic microbial metabolites with avermectinlike activity and isolation of milbemycin-producing Streptomyces strains.

    PubMed Central

    Haber, C L; Heckaman, C L; Li, G P; Thompson, D P; Whaley, H A; Wiley, V H

    1991-01-01

    A high-volume screen for anthelmintic microbial metabolites with an avermectinlike mode of action was developed. The primary screen used the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in a whole-organism assay. The specificity for avermectinlike compounds resides in the secondary screen, which takes advantage of the chloride channel-opening properties of the avermectins. By using standard microelectrode techniques, membrane conductance changes following exposure to extracts of microbial cultures were measured in the walking leg stretcher muscle fibers of the lined shore crab Pachygrapsus crassipes. The avermectins and related milbemycins give a characteristic response of rapid loss of membrane resistance coupled with a slight hyperpolarization of the membrane. This is partially (near 50%) reversible with the chloride channel blocker picrotoxinin. Four morphologically similar cultures that produced avermectinlike activities were identified by this screen. Isolation of the active components from one of these cultures (strain UC 8984) followed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy resulted in the identification of milbemycins alpha 1 and alpha 3. These metabolites are members of a large family of milbemycins produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. aureolacrimosus NRRL 5739. Systematic studies revealed that strain UC 8984 is also a S. hygroscopicus strain, but which is taxonomically distinct from NRRL 5739. Images PMID:1719935

  11. The clozapine metabolite N-desmethylclozapine displays variable activity in diverse functional assays at human dopamine D₂ and serotonin 5-HT₁A receptors.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Bruins Slot, Liesbeth; Tourette, Amélie; Tardif, Stéphanie; Cussac, Didier

    2011-11-01

    N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC or norclozapine) is the major active metabolite of the antipsychotic clozapine in humans. The activity of NDMC differs from clozapine at a number of neurotransmitter receptors, probably influencing the pharmacological effects of clozapine treatment. Here, we tested the properties of NDMC in comparison with clozapine at recombinant human dopamine D(2) and serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors, using a panel of functional assays implicating diverse signalling pathways. At dopamine D(2) receptors, NDMC as well as clozapine did not display agonist activity in measures of G protein activation by [(35)S]GTPγS binding and in the sensitive Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation assay. In contrast, there were weak partial agonist actions of NDMC (but not of clozapine) for dopamine D(2)-dependent activation of Ca(2+) liberation via coexpressed chimeric Gα(q/o) proteins and for G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channel (GIRK) current induction in Xenopus oocytes. Intriguingly, GIRK currents induced by NDMC via dopamine D(2) receptors showed a rapid and transient time course, strikingly different from currents recorded with other receptor agonists. At serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors, NDMC was a more efficacious partial agonist than clozapine for [(35)S]GTPγS binding, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and GIRK activation. Respective low and moderate partial agonist properties of NDMC at dopamine D(2) and serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors thus differentiate the metabolite from its parent drug and may contribute to the overall effects of clozapine pharmacotherapy.

  12. ISOLATION, SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF APHROCALLISTIN, AN ADENINE SUBSTITUTED BROMOTYRAMINE METABOLITE FROM THE HEXACTINELLIDA SPONGE APHROCALLISTES BEATRIX

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Amy E.; Roth, Gregory P.; Hoffman, Jennifer K.; Divlianska, Daniela B.; Pechter, Diana; Sennett, Susan H.; Guzmán, Esther A.; Linley, Patricia; McCarthy, Peter J.; Pitts, Tara P.; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Reed, John K.

    2010-01-01

    A new adenine substituted bromotyrosine derived metabolite designated as aphrocallistin (1) has been isolated from the deep-water Hexactinellida sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix beatrix Gray, 1858 (Order Hexactinosida, Family Aphrocallistidae). Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral data and confirmed through a convergent, modular total synthetic route that is amenable towards future analog preparation. Aphrocallistin inhibits the growth of a panel of human tumor cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 7.5 to >100 μM and has been shown to induce G1 cell cycle arrest in the PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cell line. Aphrocallistin has been fully characterized in the NCI cancer cell line panel and has undergone in vitro ADME pharmacological profiling. PMID:19459694

  13. The Active Tamoxifen Metabolite Endoxifen (4OHNDtam) Strongly Down-Regulates Cytokeratin 6 (CK6) in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dankel, Simon; Fenne, Ingvild S.; Skartveit, Linn; Drangevåg, Andreas; Bozickovic, Olivera; Flågeng, Marianne Hauglid; Søiland, Håvard; Mellgren, Gunnar; Lien, Ernst A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen drug used in treatment of Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Effects and side effects of tamoxifen is the sum of tamoxifen and all its metabolites. 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4OHtam) and 4-hydroxy-N-demethyltamoxifen (4OHNDtam, endoxifen) both have ER affinity exceeding that of the parent drug tamoxifen. 4OHNDtam is considered the main active metabolite of tamoxifen. Ndesmethyltamoxifen (NDtam) is the major tamoxifen metabolite. It has low affinity to the ER and is not believed to influence tumor growth. However, NDtam might mediate adverse effects of tamoxifen treatment. In this study we investigated the gene regulatory effects of the three metabolites of tamoxifen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material and Methods Using concentrations that mimic the clinical situation we examined effects of 4OHtam, 4OHNDtam and NDtam on global gene expression in 17β-estradiol (E2) treated MCF-7 cells. Transcriptomic responses were assessed by correspondence analysis, differential expression, gene ontology analysis and quantitative real time PCR (Q-rt-PCR). E2 deprivation and knockdown of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 (SRC-3)/Amplified in Breast Cancer 1 (AIB1) mRNA in MCF-7 cells were performed to further characterize specific effects on gene expression. Results 4OHNDtam and 4OHtam caused major changes in gene expression compared to treatment with E2 alone, with a stronger effect of 4OHNDtam. NDtam had nearly no effect on the global gene expression profile. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 4OHNDtam led to a strong down-regulation of the CytoKeratin 6 isoforms (KRT6A, KRT6B and KRT6C). The CytoKeratin 6 mRNAs were also down-regulated in MCF-7 cells after E2 deprivation and after SRC-3/AIB1 knockdown. Conclusion Using concentrations that mimic the clinical situation we report global gene expression changes that were most pronounced with 4OHNDtam and minimal with NDtam. Genes encoding CytoKeratin 6, were highly down-regulated by 4

  14. Molecular regulation of sinapate ester metabolism in Brassica napus: expression of genes, properties of the encoded proteins and correlation of enzyme activities with metabolite accumulation.

    PubMed

    Milkowski, Carsten; Baumert, Alfred; Schmidt, Diana; Nehlin, Lilian; Strack, Dieter

    2004-04-01

    Members of the Brassicaceae family accumulate specific sinapate esters, i.e. sinapoylcholine (sinapine), which is considered as a major antinutritive compound in seeds of important crop plants like Brassica napus, and sinapoylmalate, which is implicated in UV-B tolerance in leaves. We have studied the molecular regulation of the sinapate ester metabolism in B. napus, and we describe expression of genes, some properties of the encoded proteins and profiles of the metabolites and enzyme activities. The cloned cDNAs encoding the key enzymes of sinapine biosynthesis, UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc):B. napus sinapate glucosyltransferase (BnSGT1) and sinapoylglucose:B. napus choline sinapoyltransferase (BnSCT), were functionally expressed. BnSGT1 belongs to a subgroup of plant GTs catalysing the formation of 1-O-hydroxycinnamoyl-beta-d-glucoses. BnSCT is another member of serine carboxypeptidase-like (SCPL) family of acyltransferases. The B. napus genome contains at least two SGT and SCT genes, each derived from its progenitors B. oleracea and B. rapa. BnSGT1 and BnSCT activities are subjected to pronounced transcriptional regulation. BnSGT1 transcript level increases throughout early stages of seed development until the early cotyledonary stage, and stays constant in later stages. The highest level of BnSGT1 transcripts is reached in 2-day-old seedlings followed by a dramatic decrease. In contrast, expression of BnSCT is restricted to developing seeds. Regulation of gene expression at the transcript level seems to be responsible for changes of BnSGT1 and BnSCT activities during seed and seedling development of B. napus. Together with sinapine esterase (SCE) and sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SMT), activities of BnSGT1 and BnSCT show a close correlation with the accumulation kinetics of the corresponding metabolites.

  15. NF-kappaB-dependent anti-inflammatory activity of urolithins, gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolites, in human colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Larrosa, Mar; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco Abraham; Dolara, Piero; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have reported the anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate extracts, suggesting that ellagitannins (ET) and ellagic acid (EA) are the main anti-inflammatory compounds. However, both ET and EA are metabolised in vivo by the gut microbiota to yield urolithins (Uro) which can be found in the gut and in systemic bloodstream. The present study was carried out to evaluate the individual effect of EA and their microbiota-derived metabolites Uro on colon fibroblasts upon IL-1beta treatment as an in vitro inflammation model. Uro-A and Uro-B (10 microm) inhibited PGE2 production (85 and 40 %, respectively) after IL-1beta stimulation, whereas EA did not show any effect. Uro-A, but not Uro-B, down-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) mRNA expression and protein levels. Both Uro inhibited NF-kappaB translocation to nucleus. Slight but significant effects were found in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Uro-A lowered c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation state, and both Uro inhibited p38 activation. No metabolites derived from Uro or EA were found in the cell media upon incubation of EA or Uro with the cells, and only traces of the compounds were found inside the cells. The present results suggest that Uro, mainly Uro-A, are the main compounds that are responsible for the pomegranate anti-inflammatory properties. The mechanism of action implicated seems to be via the inhibition of activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK, down-regulation of COX-2 and mPGES-1 expressions, and consequently,via the reduction of PGE2 production. Taking into account that Uro did not enter the cells, a competitive binding for IL-1beta membrane receptor cannot be discarded.

  16. CYP2J2 and its metabolites (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids) attenuate cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and enhancing nuclear translocation of Akt1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Zeng, Hesong; Wen, Zheng; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 epoyxgenase 2J2 and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known to protect against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, which involve the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt. Although the functional roles of AMPK and Akt are well established, the significance of cross talk between them in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and antihypertrophy of CYP2J2 and EETs remains unclear. We investigated whether CYP2J2 and its metabolites EETs protected against cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and Akt1. Moreover, we tested whether EETs enhanced cross talk between AMPKα2 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1), and stimulated nuclear translocation of p-Akt1, to exert their antihypertrophic effects. AMPKα2(-/-) mice that overexpressed CYP2J2 in heart were treated with Ang II for 2 weeks. Interestingly, overexpression of CYP2J2 suppressed cardiac hypertrophy and increased levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the heart tissue and plasma of wild-type mice but not AMPKα2(-/-) mice. The CYP2J2 metabolites, 11,12-EET, activated AMPKα2 to induce nuclear translocation of p-Akt1 selectively, which increased the production of ANP and therefore inhibited the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we found that AMPKα2β2γ1 and p-Akt1 interact through the direct binding of the AMPKγ1 subunit to the Akt1 protein kinase domain. This interaction was enhanced by 11,12-EET. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism in which CYP2J2 and EETs enhanced Akt1 nuclear translocation through interaction with AMPKα2β2γ1 and protect against cardiac hypertrophy and suggest that overexpression of CYP2J2 might have clinical potential to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  17. How PBDEs Are Transformed into Dihydroxylated and Dioxin Metabolites Catalyzed by the Active Center of Cytochrome P450s: A DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong; Chen, Jingwen; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Xingbao

    2016-08-01

    Predicting metabolism of chemicals and potential toxicities of relevant metabolites remains a vital and difficult task in risk assessment. Recent findings suggested that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) can be transformed into dihydroxylated and dioxin metabolites catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), whereas the mechanisms pertinent to these transformations remain largely unknown. Here, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we probed the metabolic pathways of 2,2',4,4'-tetraBDE (BDE-47) using the active center model of CYPs (Compound I). Results show that BDE-47 is first oxidized to monohydroxylated products (HO-BDEs), wherein a keto-enol tautomerism is identified for rearrangement of the cyclohexenone intermediate. Dihydroxylation with HO-BDEs as precursors, has a unique phenolic H-abstraction and hydroxyl rebound pathway that is distinct from that for monohydroxylation, which accounts for the absence of epoxides in in vitro studies. Furthermore, we found only dihydroxylated PBDEs with heterophenyl -OH substituents ortho- and meta- to the ether bond serve as precursors for dioxins, which are evolved from aryl biradical coupling of diketone intermediates that are produced from dehydrogenation of the dihydroxylated PBDEs by Compound I. This study may enlighten the development of computational models that afford mechanism-based prediction of the xenobiotic biotransformation catalyzed by CYPs. PMID:27363260

  18. Melatonin and its metabolites accumulate in the human epidermis in vivo and inhibit proliferation and tyrosinase activity in epidermal melanocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kang; Lin, Zongtao; Tidwell, William J.; Li, We; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin and its metabolites including 6-hydroxymelatonin (6(OH)M), N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and 5-methoxytryptamine (5MT) are endogenously produced in human epidermis. This production depends on race, gender and age. The highest melatonin levels are in African-Americans. In each racial group they are highest in young African-Americans [30–50 years old (yo)], old Caucasians (60–90 yo) and Caucasian females. AFMK levels are the highest in African-Americans, while 6(OH)M and 5MT levels are similar in all groups. Testing of their phenotypic effects in normal human melanocytes show that melatonin and its metabolites (10−5 M) inhibit tyrosinase activity and cell growth, and inhibit DNA synthesis in a dose dependent manner with 10−9 M being the lowest effective concentration. In melanoma cells, they inhibited cell growth but had no effect on melanogenesis, except for 5MT which enhanced L-tyrosine induced melanogenesis. In conclusion, melatonin and itsmetabolites [6(OH)M, AFMK and 5MT] are produced endogenously in human epidermis and can affect melanocyte and melanoma behavior. PMID:25168391

  19. Non-peptide metabolites from the genus Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Hamdache, Ahlem; Lamarti, Ahmed; Aleu, Josefina; Collado, Isidro G

    2011-04-25

    Bacillus species produce a number of non-peptide metabolites that display a broad spectrum of activity and structurally diverse bioactive chemical structures. Biosynthetic, biological, and structural studies of these metabolites isolated from Bacillus species are reviewed. This contribution also includes a detailed study of the activity of the metabolites described, especially their role in biological control mechanisms.

  20. Challenges and solutions in the bioanalysis of BMS-986094 and its metabolites including a highly polar, active nucleoside triphosphate in plasma and tissues using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ang; Lute, John; Gu, Huidong; Wang, Bonnie; Trouba, Kevin J; Arnold, Mark E; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    BMS-986094, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus, was withdrawn from clinical trials because of a serious safety issue. To investigate a potential association between drug/metabolite exposure and toxicity in evaluations conducted after the termination of the BMS-986094 development program, it was essential to determine the levels of BMS-986094 and its major metabolites INX-08032, INX-08144 and INX-09054 in circulation and the active nucleoside triphosphate INX-09114 in target and non-target tissues. However, there were many challenges in the bioanalysis of these compounds. The chromatography challenge for the extremely polar nucleoside triphosphate was solved by applying mixed-mode chromatography which combined anion exchange and reversed-phase interactions. The LC conditions provided adequate retention and good peak shape of the analyte and showed good robustness. A strategy using simultaneous extraction but separate LC analysis of the prodrug BMS-986094 and its major circulating metabolites was used to overcome a carryover issue of the hydrophobic prodrug while still achieving good chromatography of the polar metabolites. In addition, the nucleotide analytes were not stable in the presence of endogenous enzymes. Low pH and low temperature were required for blood collection and plasma sample processing. However, the use of phosphatase inhibitor and immediate homogenization and extraction were critical for the quantitative analysis of the active triphosphate, INX-09114, in tissue samples. To alleviate the bioanalytical complexity caused by multiple analytes, different matrices, and various species, a fit-for-purpose approach to assay validation was implemented based on the needs of drug safety assessment in non-clinical (GLP or non-GLP) studies. The assay for INX-08032 was fully validated in plasma of toxicology species. The lower limit of quantification was 1.00ng/mL and the linear curve range was 1.00-500.00ng/mL using a weighted (1/x(2

  1. Challenges and solutions in the bioanalysis of BMS-986094 and its metabolites including a highly polar, active nucleoside triphosphate in plasma and tissues using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ang; Lute, John; Gu, Huidong; Wang, Bonnie; Trouba, Kevin J; Arnold, Mark E; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    BMS-986094, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus, was withdrawn from clinical trials because of a serious safety issue. To investigate a potential association between drug/metabolite exposure and toxicity in evaluations conducted after the termination of the BMS-986094 development program, it was essential to determine the levels of BMS-986094 and its major metabolites INX-08032, INX-08144 and INX-09054 in circulation and the active nucleoside triphosphate INX-09114 in target and non-target tissues. However, there were many challenges in the bioanalysis of these compounds. The chromatography challenge for the extremely polar nucleoside triphosphate was solved by applying mixed-mode chromatography which combined anion exchange and reversed-phase interactions. The LC conditions provided adequate retention and good peak shape of the analyte and showed good robustness. A strategy using simultaneous extraction but separate LC analysis of the prodrug BMS-986094 and its major circulating metabolites was used to overcome a carryover issue of the hydrophobic prodrug while still achieving good chromatography of the polar metabolites. In addition, the nucleotide analytes were not stable in the presence of endogenous enzymes. Low pH and low temperature were required for blood collection and plasma sample processing. However, the use of phosphatase inhibitor and immediate homogenization and extraction were critical for the quantitative analysis of the active triphosphate, INX-09114, in tissue samples. To alleviate the bioanalytical complexity caused by multiple analytes, different matrices, and various species, a fit-for-purpose approach to assay validation was implemented based on the needs of drug safety assessment in non-clinical (GLP or non-GLP) studies. The assay for INX-08032 was fully validated in plasma of toxicology species. The lower limit of quantification was 1.00ng/mL and the linear curve range was 1.00-500.00ng/mL using a weighted (1/x(2

  2. Induction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15 gene expression by the major active metabolites of tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chanawong, Apichaya; Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; Mackenzie, Peter I; McKinnon, Ross A

    2015-06-01

    We previously reported upregulation of UGT2B15 by 17β-estradiol in breast cancer MCF7 cells via binding of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) to an estrogen response unit (ERU) in the proximal UGT2B15 promoter. In the present study, we show that this ERα-mediated upregulation was significantly reduced by two ER antagonists (fulvestrant and raloxifene) but was not affected by a third ER antagonist, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHTAM), a major active tamoxifen (TAM) metabolite. Furthermore, we found that, similar to 17β-estradiol, 4-OHTAM and endoxifen (another major active TAM metabolite) elevated UGT2B15 mRNA levels, and that this stimulation was significantly abrogated by fulvestrant. Further experiments using 4-OHTAM revealed a critical role for ERα in this regulation. Specifically; knockdown of ERα expression by anti-ERα small interfering RNA reduced the 4-OHTAM-mediated induction of UGT2B15 expression; 4-OHTAM activated the wild-type but not the ERU-mutated UGT2B15 promoter; and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed increased ERα occupancy at the UGT2B15 ERU in MCF7 cells upon exposure to 4-OHTAM. Together, these data indicate that both 17β-estradiol and the antiestrogen 4-OHTAM upregulate UGT2B15 in MCF7 cells via the same ERα-signaling pathway. This is consistent with previous observations that both 17β-estradiol and TAM upregulate a common set of genes in MCF7 cells via the ER-signaling pathway. As 4-OHTAM is a UGT2B15 substrate, the upregulation of UGT2B15 by 4-OHTAM in target breast cancer cells is likely to enhance local metabolism and inactivation of 4-OHTAM within the tumor. This represents a potential mechanism that may reduce TAM therapeutic efficacy or even contribute to the development of acquired TAM resistance.

  3. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  4. Food-drug interactions: effect of capsaicin on the pharmacokinetics of simvastatin and its active metabolite in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xue-jia; Chen, Jian-guo; Liu, Jin-mei; Shi, Fang; Lu, Yong-ning

    2013-03-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methy-N-vanilly-6-nonenamide, CAP), the main ingredient responsible for the hot pungent taste of chilli peppers. However, little is known about the metabolic interactions between CAP and clinically used drugs. This study attempted to investigate the effect of CAP on the pharmacokinetics of simvastatin (SV), a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A substrate and an important cholesterol-lowering agent. CAP (3, 8 or 25 mg/kg), ketoconazole, dexamethasone or 5% CMC-Na was given to rats for seven consecutive days and on the seventh day SV (80 mg/kg) was administered orally. The results showed that when a single dose of SV was administered to rats fed with CAP over one week, AUC(0→∞), C(max) of SV and its acid metabolite was significantly decreased in comparison to the control treatment. Pretreatment of rats with CAP resulted in an decrease in the AUC(0-∞) of SV of about 67.06% (CAP 3 mg/kg, P<0.05), 73.21% (CAP 8 mg/kg, P<0.01) and 77.49% (CAP 25 mg/kg, P<0.01) compared with the control group. The results demonstrate that chronic ingestion of high doses of CAP will decrease the bioavailability of SV to a significant extent in rats.

  5. Multi-Country Evaluation of Safety of Dihydroartemisinin/Piperaquine Post-Licensure in African Public Hospitals with Electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Baiden, Rita; Ali, Ali M.; Mahende, Muhidin K.; Ogutu, Bernhards R.; Oduro, Abraham; Tinto, Halidou; Gyapong, Margaret; Sie, Ali; Sevene, Esperanca; Macete, Eusebio; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Adjei, Alex; Compaoré, Guillaume; Valea, Innocent; Osei, Isaac; Yawson, Abena; Adjuik, Martin; Akparibo, Raymond; Kakolwa, Mwaka A.; Abdulla, Salim; Binka, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The antimalarial drug piperaquine is associated with delayed ventricular depolarization, causing prolonged QT interval (time taken for ventricular de-polarisation and re-polarisation). There is a lack of safety data regarding dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine (DHA/PPQ) for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, which has limited its use. We created a platform where electrocardiograms (ECG) were performed in public hospitals for the safety assessment of DHA/PPQ, at baseline before the use of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine (Eurartesim®), and on day 3 (before and after administration of the final dose) and day 7 post-administration. Laboratory analyses included haematology and clinical chemistry. The main objective of the ECG assessment in this study was to evaluate the effect of administration of DHA/PPQ on QTc intervals and the association of QTc intervals with changes in blood biochemistry, full and differential blood count over time after the DHA/PPQ administration. A total of 1315 patients gave consent and were enrolled of which 1147 (87%) had complete information for analyses. Of the enrolled patients 488 (42%), 323 (28%), 213 (19%) and 123 (11%) were from Ghana, Burkina Faso, Tanzania and Mozambique, respectively. Median (lower—upper quartile) age was 8 (5–14) years and a quarter of the patients were children under five years of age (n = 287). Changes in blood biochemistry, full and differential blood count were temporal which remained within clinical thresholds and did not require any intervention. The mean QTcF values were significantly higher than on day 1 when measured on day 3 before and after administration of the treatment as well as on day 7, four days after completion of treatment (12, 22 and 4 higher, p < 0.001). In all age groups the values of QT, QTcF and QTcB were highest on day 3 after drug intake. The mean extreme QTcF prolongation from baseline was lowest on day 3 before drug intake (33 ms, SD = 19) and highest on day 3 after the last dose

  6. Delayed parasite clearance after treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients in central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thriemer, Kamala; Hong, Nguyen Van; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Phuc, Bui Quang; Ha, Do Manh; Pockele, Evi; Guetens, Pieter; Van, Nguyen Van; Duong, Tran Thanh; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2014-12-01

    Reduced susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum toward artemisinin derivatives has been reported from the Thai-Cambodian and Thai-Myanmar borders. Following increasing reports from central Vietnam of delayed parasite clearance after treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), the current first-line treatment, we carried out a study on the efficacy of this treatment. Between September 2012 and February 2013, we conducted a 42-day in vivo and in vitro efficacy study in Quang Nam Province. Treatment was directly observed, and blood samples were collected twice daily until parasite clearance. In addition, genotyping, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and in vitro sensitivity testing of isolates was performed. The primary endpoints were parasite clearance rate and time. The secondary endpoints included PCR-corrected and uncorrected cure rates, qPCR clearance profiles, in vitro sensitivity results (for chloroquine, dihydroartemisinin, and piperaquine), and genotyping for mutations in the Kelch 13 propeller domain. Out of 672 screened patients, 95 were recruited and 89 available for primary endpoint analyses. The median parasite clearance time (PCT) was 61.7 h (interquartile range [IQR], 47.6 to 83.2 h), and the median parasite clearance rate had a slope half-life of 6.2 h (IQR, 4.4 to 7.5 h). The PCR-corrected efficacy rates were estimated at 100% at day 28 and 97.7% (95% confidence interval, 91.2% to 99.4%) at day 42. At day 3, the P. falciparum prevalence by qPCR was 2.5 times higher than that by microscopy. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of isolates with delayed clearance times (≥ 72 h) were significantly higher than those with normal clearance times for all three drugs. Delayed parasite clearance (PCT, ≥ 72 h) was significantly higher among day 0 samples carrying the 543 mutant allele (47.8%) than those carrying the wild-type allele (1.8%; P = 0.048). In central Vietnam, the efficacy of DHA-PPQ is still satisfactory, but the parasite clearance time

  7. Isolation of Secondary Metabolites from the Soil-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea YRS-06, a Biological Control Agent, and Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ming-Ming; Qi, Feng-Ming; Li, Jie; Jiang, Chun-Xiao; Hou, Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Di, Duo-Long; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Wu, Quan-Xiang

    2016-03-23

    The fungus Clonostachys rosea is widely distributed all over the world. The destructive force of this fungus, as a biological control agent, is very strong to lots of plant pathogenic fungi. As part of the ongoing search for antibiotics from fungi obtained from soil samples, the secondary metabolites of C. rosea YRS-06 were investigated. Through efficient bioassay-guided isolation, three new bisorbicillinoids possessing open-ended cage structures, tetrahydrotrichodimer ether (1) and dihydrotrichodimer ether A and B (2 and 3), and 12 known compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined via extensive NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and CD spectroscopic analyses and X-ray diffraction data. Compounds 1-3 are rare bisorbicillinoids with a γ-pyrone moiety. The biological properties of 1-15 were evaluated against six different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Bisorbicillinoids, 2-5, and TMC-151 C and E, 14 and 15, showed potent antibacterial activity. PMID:26974009

  8. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  9. Participation of covalent modification of Keap1 in the activation of Nrf2 by tert-butylbenzoquinone, an electrophilic metabolite of butylated hydroxyanisole

    SciTech Connect

    Abiko, Yumi; Miura, Takashi; Phuc, Bui Hoang; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2011-08-15

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is an antioxidant and class-2B carcinogen. It is biotransformed to tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), which readily auto-oxidizes to the electrophilic metabolite tert-butylbenzoquinone (TBQ). BHA and TBHQ activate Nrf2, a transcription factor that is negatively regulated by Keap1 and plays a role in the initial response to chemicals causing oxidative or electrophilic stress, although, the exact mechanism of Nrf2 activation remains unclear. Here, we examined the role of TBQ in Nrf2 activation. Exposure of RAW264.7 cells to TBQ activated Nrf2 and up-regulated its downstream proteins; under these conditions, TBQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, while pretreatment with catalase conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-CAT) did not affect the TBQ-induced activation of Nrf2, the ROS generation caused by TBQ was entirely abolished by PEG-CAT, suggesting that ROS is not the dominant factor for TBQ-dependent Nrf2 activation. A click chemistry technique indicated that TBQ chemically modifies Keap1. Furthermore, ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis with purified Keap1 revealed that TBQ covalently binds to Keap1 through Cys23, Cys151, Cys226, and Cys368. These results suggest that TBQ derived from BHA activates Nrf2 through electrophilic modification of Keap1 rather than ROS formation. - Research Highlights: > tert-Butylbenzoquinone (TBQ) activates Nrf2 in RAW264.7 cells. > ROS is not essential factor for Nrf2 activation caused by TBQ. > TBQ covalently binds to Keap1 through reactive thiols, resulting in Nrf2 activation.

  10. Oxidized Metabolites of 20-Hydroxyecdysone and Their Activity on Skeletal Muscle Cells: Preparation of a Pair of Desmotropes with Opposite Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Csábi, József; Hsieh, Tusty-Jiuan; Hasanpour, Feria; Martins, Ana; Kele, Zoltán; Gáti, Tamás; Simon, András; Tóth, Gábor; Hunyadi, Attila

    2015-10-23

    Increasing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt) has been suggested as a key signaling step in the nonhormonal anabolic activity of the phytoecdysteroid 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) in mammals. Base-catalyzed autoxidation of this compound was shown previously to yield interesting B-ring-modified analogues. Herein is reported a thorough study on this reaction, resulting in the preparation and complete NMR spectroscopic assignments of calonysterone (5) and its previously overlooked desmotropic pair (7), along with two new sensitive metabolites of 20E. The two isomers showed considerable stability in solution. Time dependency of the reaction for yield optimization is also presented; by means of analytical HPLC, the two desmotropes can reach a maximum combined yield of >90%. The activity of these compounds on Akt phosphorylation was tested in murine skeletal muscle cells. Compounds 2 and 5 showed more potent activity than 20E in increasing Akt activation, while compound 7 exerted an opposite effect. As such, the present study provides the first direct evidence for a pair of desmotropes exerting significantly different bioactivities. PMID:26465254

  11. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat pancreatic beta-cells by linoleic acid through both intracellular metabolites and membrane receptor signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; Pei, Jianming; Chen, Chen

    2008-09-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) determine the excitability of pancreatic beta-cells and importantly regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) decrease GSIS after long-term exposure to beta-cells, but the effects of exogenous FFAs on K(ATP) channels are not yet well clarified. In this study, the effects of linoleic acid (LA) on membrane potential (MP) and K(ATP) channels were observed in primary cultured rat pancreatic beta-cells. LA (20 microM) induced hyperpolarization of MP and opening of K(ATP) channels, which was totally reversed and inhibited by tolbutamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker. Inhibition of LA metabolism by acyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor, triacsin C (10 microM), partially inhibited LA-induced opening of K(ATP) channels by 64%. The non-FFA G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 agonist, GW9508 (40 microM), induced an opening of K(ATP) channels, which was similar to that induced by LA under triacsin C treatment. Blockade of protein kinases A and C did not influence the opening of K(ATP) channels induced by LA and GW9508, indicating that these two protein kinase pathways are not involved in the action of LA on K(ATP) channels. The present study demonstrates that LA induces hyperpolarization of MP by activating K(ATP) channels via both intracellular metabolites and activation of GPR40. It indicates that not only intracellular metabolites of FFAs but also GPR40-mediated pathways take part in the inhibition of GSIS and beta-cell dysfunction induced by FFAs.

  12. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aloe vera Adventitious Root Extracts through the Alteration of Primary and Secondary Metabolites via Salicylic Acid Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10–11 and 5–13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment. PMID:24358188

  13. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  14. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes.

  15. A Randomized Comparison of Chloroquine Versus Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Plasmodium vivax Infection in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thuan, Phung Duc; Ca, Nguyen Thuy Nha; Van Toi, Pham; Nhien, Nguyen Thanh Thuy; Thanh, Ngo Viet; Anh, Nguyen Duc; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Thai, Cao Quang; Thai, Le Hong; Hoa, Nhu Thi; Dong, Le Thanh; Loi, Mai Anh; Son, Do Hung; Khanh, Tran Tinh Ngoc; Dolecek, Christiane; Nhan, Ho Thi; Wolbers, Marcel; Thwaites, Guy; Farrar, Jeremy; White, Nicholas J; Hien, Tran Tinh

    2016-04-01

    A total of 128 Vietnamese patients with symptomatic Plasmodium vivax mono-infections were enrolled in a prospective, open-label, randomized trial to receive either chloroquine or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ). The proportions of patients with adequate clinical and parasitological responses were 47% in the chloroquine arm (31 of 65 patients) and 66% in the DHA-PPQ arm (42 of 63 patients) in the Kaplan-Meier intention-to-treat analysis (absolute difference 19%, 95% confidence interval = 0-37%), thus establishing non-inferiority of DHA-PPQ. Fever clearance time (median 24 versus 12 hours,P= 0.02), parasite clearance time (median 36 versus 18 hours,P< 0.001), and parasite clearance half-life (mean 3.98 versus 1.80 hours,P< 0.001) were all significantly shorter in the DHA-PPQ arm. All cases of recurrent parasitemia in the chloroquine arm occurred from day 33 onward, with corresponding whole blood chloroquine concentration lower than 100 ng/mL in all patients. Chloroquine thus remains efficacious for the treatment of P. vivax malaria in southern Vietnam, but DHA-PPQ provides more rapid symptomatic and parasitological recovery. PMID:26856909

  16. Clinical Efficacy of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria at the China-Myanmar Border.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Zhaoqing; Yuan, Lili; Zhou, Guofa; Parker, Daniel; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Yan, Guiyun; Fan, Qi; Xiao, Yuping; Cao, Yaming; Cui, Liwang

    2015-09-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are currently used as the first-line therapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the recent emergence and/or spread of artemisinin resistance in parts of Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) of southeast Asia requires close monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy of ACTs. This study was conducted from March 2012 to December 2013 in four clinics and seven villages along the China-Myanmar border. A total of 109 patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) and followed up on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 42 after treatment. A total of 71 patients (22 children and 49 adults) completed the 42-day follow-up. DP remained highly efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria with an overall 42-day cure rate of 100%. The day 3 parasite-positive rate was 7.04% (5/71). Within 14 days of treatment, a total of 13 (18.31%) patients had detectable gametocytes and a large proportion of these were persistent from the first three days of treatment. The presence of gametocytes in patients through 14 days after DP treatment suggests that the incorporation of a single dose of primaquine for clearing gametocytemia should be considered for blocking parasite transmission. PMID:26283743

  17. Dihydroartemisinin and transferrin dual-dressed nano-graphene oxide for a pH-triggered chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wei, Yanchun; Zhai, Shaodong; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2015-09-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a unique anti-malarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recently, it has been studied as an alternative modality for cancer therapy, utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism from interacting with Ferrous ion (Fe (II)). In this work, a novel nanodrug (DHA-GO-Tf) is constructed based on nanoscale Graphene oxide (GO) dual-dressed with DHA and Transferrin (Tf). Tf dually functions as a pilot for the nanoparticle to target tumor cell with over expressed Transferrin receptor (TfR) and a ferric ion carrier. Upon tumor cellular endocytosis, Ferric ion (Fe(III)) is released from the Tf, triggered by the low pH in the lysosomes of the tumor cell. The intracellular Fe (III) is reduced to Fe (II) and interacts with DHA to increase its cytotoxicity. The potential of this alternative anti-tumor modality is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Comparing with DHA alone, the nanodrug DHA-GO-Tf resulted in a significantly enhanced tumor delivery specificity and cytotoxicity, and achieved a complete tumor cure in mice with minimal side-effects. PMID:26022978

  18. Metabolite identification of seven active components of Huan-Nao-Yi-Cong-Fang in rat plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minchao; Lu, Yanzhen; Liu, Jiangang; Li, Hao; Wei, Yun

    2016-02-01

    Huan-Nao-Yi-Cong-Fang (HNYCF) is a potential prescription in treating Alzheimer's disease. Seven constituents [ferulic acid (FA), 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (THSG), berberine hydrochloride (BHCl), emodin, ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), ginsenoside Re (Re) and ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1)] have been used as quality chemical markers of HNYCF owing to their biological significance and high contents in crude plant materials. This study explored the metabolites of the seven bioactive components in rat plasma to give useful data for further study of the action mechanism of HNYCF. LC/MS-IT-TOF was used to simultaneously characterize the metabolites of the seven components. Using the combination of MetID Solution 1.0 software and accurate mass measurements, the metabolites of HNYCF were reliably characterized. Their structures were elucidated based on the accurate MS(2) spectra and comparisons of their changes in accurate molecular masses and fragment ions with those of parent compounds. A total of five parent active compounds (BHCl, emodin, Rg1, Rb1 and Re) and 10 metabolites were found from the rat plasma 2 h after oral administration of HNYCF dosage, of which two metabolites of emodin were observed for the first time. The proposed metabolic pathways of the bioactive components in the rat plasma are helpful for further studies on the pharmacokinetics and real active compound forms of this drug.

  19. Antimicrobial, phytotoxic, nematicidal, cytotoxic, and mutagenic activities of 1-hydroxypyrene, the initial metabolite in pyrene metabolism by the basidiomycete Crinipellis stipitaria

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.; Kremer, S.; Anke, H.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the testing fungi for degradation or detoxification of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and elucidation of the pathways involved. Investigations on microbial metabolism of pyrene are limited to some bacteria and the fungi Cunninghamella elegans, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Crinipellis stipitaria and Aspergillus niger. The fungal transformation products of pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene, 1,6-dihydroxypyrene, 1,8-dihydroxypyrene, 1,6-pyrenequinone, 1,8-pyrenequinone and some glucoside conjugates of hydroxylated pyrenes were identified. Until now, only mutagenic activities of some of these metabolites towards Salmonella typhimurium have been reported. Nothing is known about additional biological activities of these compounds, especially their effects on soil organisms are of ecological importance. During bioremediation processes these compounds could accumulate. In the present study we describe the antimicrobial, nematicidal, phytotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic activities of 1-hydroxypyrene, the initial transformation product of pyrene metabolization by C. stipitaria and compares this, with the activities of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene. 15 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Glucuronidation and sulfonation, in vitro, of the major endocrine-active metabolites of methoxychlor in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, and induction following treatment with 3-methylcholanthrene

    PubMed Central

    James, Margaret O.; Stuchal, Leah D.; Nyagode, Beatrice A.

    2008-01-01

    of the conjugation pathways with those published for the demethylation of MXC showed that formation of the endocrine-active metabolites was more efficient than either conjugation pathway. Residues of OH-MXC and HPTE were detected in extracts of liver microsomes from MXC-treated fish. This work showed that although OH-MXC and HPTE could be eliminated by glucuronidation and sulfonation, the phase II pathways were less efficient than the phase I pathway leading to formation of these endocrine-active metabolites. PMID:18078677

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug-Drug Interaction Studies to Assess the Effect of Abiraterone Acetate, Abiraterone, and Metabolites of Abiraterone on CYP2C8 Activity.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Johan; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Jiao, James; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Snoeys, Jan; Stieltjes, Hans; Wynant, Inneke; Smit, Johan W; Chien, Caly

    2016-10-01

    Abiraterone acetate, the prodrug of the cytochrome P450 C17 inhibitor abiraterone, plus prednisone is approved for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We explored whether abiraterone interacts with drugs metabolized by CYP2C8, an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. Abiraterone acetate and abiraterone and its major metabolites, abiraterone sulfate and abiraterone sulfate N-oxide, inhibited CYP2C8 in human liver microsomes, with IC50 values near or below the peak total concentrations observed in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (IC50 values: 1.3-3.0 µM, 1.6-2.9 µM, 0.044-0.15 µM, and 5.4-5.9 µM, respectively). CYP2C8 inhibition was reversible and time-independent. To explore the clinical relevance of the in vitro data, an open-label, single-center study was conducted comprising 16 healthy male subjects who received a single 15-mg dose of the CYP2C8 substrate pioglitazone on day 1 and again 1 hour after the administration of abiraterone acetate 1000 mg on day 8. Plasma concentrations of pioglitazone, its active M-III (keto derivative) and M-IV (hydroxyl derivative) metabolites, and abiraterone were determined for up to 72 hours after each dose. Abiraterone acetate increased exposure to pioglitazone; the geometric mean ratio (day 8/day 1) was 125 [90% confidence interval (CI), 99.9-156] for Cmax and 146 (90% CI, 126-171) for AUClast Exposure to M-III and M-IV was reduced by 10% to 13%. Plasma abiraterone concentrations were consistent with previous studies. These results show that abiraterone only weakly inhibits CYP2C8 in vivo. PMID:27504016

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug-Drug Interaction Studies to Assess the Effect of Abiraterone Acetate, Abiraterone, and Metabolites of Abiraterone on CYP2C8 Activity.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Johan; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Jiao, James; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Snoeys, Jan; Stieltjes, Hans; Wynant, Inneke; Smit, Johan W; Chien, Caly

    2016-10-01

    Abiraterone acetate, the prodrug of the cytochrome P450 C17 inhibitor abiraterone, plus prednisone is approved for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We explored whether abiraterone interacts with drugs metabolized by CYP2C8, an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. Abiraterone acetate and abiraterone and its major metabolites, abiraterone sulfate and abiraterone sulfate N-oxide, inhibited CYP2C8 in human liver microsomes, with IC50 values near or below the peak total concentrations observed in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (IC50 values: 1.3-3.0 µM, 1.6-2.9 µM, 0.044-0.15 µM, and 5.4-5.9 µM, respectively). CYP2C8 inhibition was reversible and time-independent. To explore the clinical relevance of the in vitro data, an open-label, single-center study was conducted comprising 16 healthy male subjects who received a single 15-mg dose of the CYP2C8 substrate pioglitazone on day 1 and again 1 hour after the administration of abiraterone acetate 1000 mg on day 8. Plasma concentrations of pioglitazone, its active M-III (keto derivative) and M-IV (hydroxyl derivative) metabolites, and abiraterone were determined for up to 72 hours after each dose. Abiraterone acetate increased exposure to pioglitazone; the geometric mean ratio (day 8/day 1) was 125 [90% confidence interval (CI), 99.9-156] for Cmax and 146 (90% CI, 126-171) for AUClast Exposure to M-III and M-IV was reduced by 10% to 13%. Plasma abiraterone concentrations were consistent with previous studies. These results show that abiraterone only weakly inhibits CYP2C8 in vivo.

  3. Up-regulation of interleukin-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation in T cells by biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin; Chung, Su Wol; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung . E-mail: tskim@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring compounds derived from plants. Although phytoestrogens exhibit many biological functions including estrogen agonist/antagonist properties, the effect on allergic responses remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites, genistein, p-ethylphenol and phenolic acid, affect production of IL-4, a pro-inflammatory cytokine closely associated with allergic immune responses, in primary CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 T lymphoma cells. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol significantly enhanced IL-4 production from both CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner, while phenolic acid did not. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol also enhanced IL-4 gene promoter activity in EL4 cells transiently transfected with IL-4 promoter constructs, but this effect was impaired in EL4 cells transfected with an IL-4 promoter construct deleted of a P4 site carrying NF-AT and AP-1 binding sites. In addition, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased both NF-AT and AP-1 DNA binding activities, indicating that they might enhance IL-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation. Furthermore, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and PKC activity, while they did not affect ERK phosphorylation. The enhanced NF-AT DNA binding activities were suppressed by inhibitors for PI3-K and PKC, but not by p38 MAPK inhibitors. In contrast, the enhanced AP-1 DNA binding activities and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were significantly suppressed by specific inhibitors for PKC and p38 MAPK, but not by PI3-K inhibitors. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol enhance IL-4 production in activated T cells by two independent pathways, PI3-K/PKC/NF-AT and PKC/p38 MAPK/AP-1.

  4. Metabolite secretion, Fe(3+)-reducing activity and wood degradation by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor ATCC 20869.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, André; Gavioli, Daniela; Ferraz, André

    2014-11-01

    Trametes versicolor is a promising white-rot fungus for the biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In the present work, T. versicolor ATCC 20869 was grown on Pinus taeda wood chips under solid-state fermentation conditions to examine the wood-degrading mechanisms employed by this fungus. Samples that were subjected to fungal pretreatment for one-, two- and four-week periods were investigated. The average mass loss ranged from 5 % to 8 % (m m(-)(1)). The polysaccharides were preferentially degraded: hemicellulose and glucan losses reached 13.4 % and 6.9 % (m m(-)(1)) after four weeks of cultivation, respectively. Crude enzyme extracts were obtained and assayed using specific substrates and their enzymatic activities were measured. Xylanases were the predominant enzymes, while cellobiohydrolase activities were marginally detected. Endoglucanase activity, β-glucosidase activity, and wood glucan losses increased up to the second week of biodegradation and remained constant after that time. Although no lignin-degrading enzyme activity was detected, the lignin loss reached 7.5 % (m m(-)(1)). Soluble oxalic acid was detected in trace quantities. After the first week of biodegradation, the Fe(3+)-reducing activity steadily increased with time, but the activity levels were always lower than those observed in the undecayed wood. The progressive wood polymer degradation appeared related to the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, as well as to Fe(3+)-reducing activity, which was restored in the cultures after the first week of biodegradation.

  5. Metabolite secretion, Fe(3+)-reducing activity and wood degradation by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor ATCC 20869.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, André; Gavioli, Daniela; Ferraz, André

    2014-11-01

    Trametes versicolor is a promising white-rot fungus for the biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In the present work, T. versicolor ATCC 20869 was grown on Pinus taeda wood chips under solid-state fermentation conditions to examine the wood-degrading mechanisms employed by this fungus. Samples that were subjected to fungal pretreatment for one-, two- and four-week periods were investigated. The average mass loss ranged from 5 % to 8 % (m m(-)(1)). The polysaccharides were preferentially degraded: hemicellulose and glucan losses reached 13.4 % and 6.9 % (m m(-)(1)) after four weeks of cultivation, respectively. Crude enzyme extracts were obtained and assayed using specific substrates and their enzymatic activities were measured. Xylanases were the predominant enzymes, while cellobiohydrolase activities were marginally detected. Endoglucanase activity, β-glucosidase activity, and wood glucan losses increased up to the second week of biodegradation and remained constant after that time. Although no lignin-degrading enzyme activity was detected, the lignin loss reached 7.5 % (m m(-)(1)). Soluble oxalic acid was detected in trace quantities. After the first week of biodegradation, the Fe(3+)-reducing activity steadily increased with time, but the activity levels were always lower than those observed in the undecayed wood. The progressive wood polymer degradation appeared related to the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, as well as to Fe(3+)-reducing activity, which was restored in the cultures after the first week of biodegradation. PMID:25442296

  6. The methoxychlor metabolite, HPTE, directly inhibits the catalytic activity of cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc) in cultured rat ovarian cells.

    PubMed

    Akgul, Yucel; Derk, Raymond C; Meighan, Terence; Rao, K Murali Krishna; Murono, Eisuke P

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to the pesticide methoxychlor in rodents is linked to impaired steroid production, ovarian atrophy and reduced fertility. Following in vivo administration, it is rapidly converted by the liver to 2,2-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), the reported active metabolite. Both methoxychlor and HPTE have weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and these effects are thought to be mediated through the estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively. Previous in vivo studies on methoxychlor exposure to female animals have demonstrated decreased progesterone production but no change in serum estrogen levels. We recently showed that HPTE specifically inhibits the P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc, CYP11A1) step resulting in decreased androgen production by cultured rat testicular Leydig cells. The current studies examined the mechanism of action of HPTE on progesterone production by cultured ovarian cells (granulosa and theca-interstitial) from pregnant mare serum gonadotropin-primed immature rats. In addition, we evaluated whether the effects of HPTE on rat ovarian cell progesterone biosynthesis were mediated through the estrogen or androgen receptors. Exposure to HPTE (0, 10, 50 or 100nM) alone progressively inhibited progesterone formation in cultured theca-interstitial and granulosa cells and the P450scc catalytic activity in theca-interstitial cells in a dose-dependent manner with significant declines starting at 50nM. However, HPTE did not change mRNA levels of the P450scc system (P450scc, adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin) as well as P450scc protein levels. Of interest, estradiol, xenoestrogens (bisphenol-A or 4-tert-octylphenol), a pure antiestrogen (ICI 182,780), or antiandrogens (4-hydroxyflutamide or the vinclozolin metabolite M-2), had no effect on progesterone production even at 1000nM. Co-treatment of HPTE with ICI 182,780 did not block the effect of HPTE on progesterone formation. These studies suggest that the

  7. Novel concept in the mechanism of injury and protection of gastric mucosa: role of renin-angiotensin system and active metabolites of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Ptak-Belowska, A; Kwiecien, S; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Strzalka, M; Drozdowicz, D; Pajdo, R; Olszanecki, R; Korbut, R; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2012-01-01

    The term cytoprotection pioneered by Robert and colleagues has been introduced to describe the remarkable ability of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins (PGs) to prevent acute gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by noxious stimuli such as ethanol, bile acids, hiperosmolar solutions and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin. Since that time many factors were implicated to possess gastroprotective properties such as growth factors including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming factor alpha (TGFα), vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) as well as appetite gut hormones including gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin and recently ghrelin. This protective action of gut peptides has been attributed to the release of PG but question remains whether another peptide angiotensin, the classic component of the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could be involved in the mechanism of gastric integrity and gastroprotection. After renin stimulation, the circulating angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II (ANG II) by the activity of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). The ANG II acting via its binding to two major receptor subtypes the ANG type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) has been shown be activated during stress and to contribute to the pathogenesis of cold stress- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric lesions. All bioactive angiotensin peptides can be generated not only in systemic circulation, but also locally in several tissues and organs. Recently the new functional components of RAS, such as Ang-(1-7), Ang IV, Ang-(1-12) and novel pathways ACE2 have been described suggesting the gastroprotective role for the novel ANG II metabolite, Ang-(1-7). The fact that Ang-(1-7) is produced in excessive amounts in the gastric mucosa of rodents and that pretreatment by Ang-(1-7) exhibits a potent gastroprotective activity against the gastric lesions induced by cold

  8. Linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, stimulate c-Fos, c-Jun, and c-Myc mRNA expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and growth in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G N; Alexander, R W; Runge, M S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies from other laboratories suggest that linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, play an important role in modulating the growth of some cells. A correlation has been demonstrated between hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids and conditions characterized by abnormal cell growth such as atherosclerosis and psoriasis. To determine if linoleic acid and its metabolites modulate cell growth in atherosclerosis, we measured DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Linoleic acid induces DNA synthesis, c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc mRNA expression and MAPK activation in VSMC. Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a potent inhibitor of the lipoxygenase system, significantly reduced the growth-response effects of linoleic acid in VSMC, suggesting that conversion of linoleic acid to hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids (HPODEs) is required for these effects. HPODEs also caused significant induction of DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and MAPK activation in growth-arrested VSMC, suggesting that linoleic acid and its metabolic products, HPODEs, are potential mitogens in VSMC, and that conditions such as oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation which provoke the production of these substances may alter VSMC growth. Images PMID:7635978

  9. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context.

  10. A NOVEL METABOLIC ACTIVATION PATHWAY FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES-MEDIATED DNA DAMAGE AND MORPHOLOGICAL CELL TRANSFORMATION IN MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS BY K-REGION DIOL METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[ a ]pyrene (BP) is a well-studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) .Many
    mechanisms have been suggested to explain its carcinogenic activity, yet many questions still
    remain. K-region dihydrodiols (diols) ofPAHs are common metabolites and some are genotoxic. W...

  11. Activity of the Lichen Usnea steineri and its Major Metabolites against Gram-positive, Multidrug-resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tozatti, Marcos G; Ferreira, Daniele S; Flauzino, Lúzio G Bocalon; Moraes, Thaís da Silva; Martins, Carlos H G; Groppo, Milton; Andrade e Silva, Márcio L; Januário, Ana H; Pauletti, Patricia M; Cunhaa, Wilson R

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity and possible synergistic effects of extracts and compounds isolated from Usnea steineri were evaluated against four resistant bacterial species. A phytochemical study of the acetone extract of U. steineri resulted in the isolation and characterization of difractaic acid and (+)-usnic acid as the main compounds. The acetone extract showed strong activity (less than 10 µg/mL) against resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, and (+)-usnic acid exhibited strong activity against S. epidermidis (MIC 3.12 µg/mL), S. aureus and S. haemnolyticus (MIC 12.5 µg/mL). Combinations of penicillin and tetracycline with (+)-usnic acid did not show any synergistic antimicrobial effects. Difractaic acid was inactive. Our results showed that the acetone extract of U. steineri possesses significant in vitro antimicrobial activity, which is likely related to the presence of (+)-usnic acid. PMID:27396202

  12. Isolation and structural elucidation of two secondary metabolites from the filamentous fungus Penicillium ochrochloron with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Rančić, Ana; Soković, Marina; Karioti, Anastasia; Vukojević, Jelena; Skaltsa, Helen

    2006-07-01

    In this investigation, the extracts of filamentous fungi exhibited inhibitory effect on the growth of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, as well as against the yeast Candida albicans. Penicillium ochrochloron has been proven as the most active fungus against all tested microorganisms. Further bio-guided chemical analysis of P. ochrochloron afforded two components with antimicrobial activity identified as (-) 2, 3, 4-trihydroxybutanamide and (-) erythritol.

  13. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an endogenous 17β-estradiol metabolite, inhibits microglial proliferation and activation via an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schaufelberger, Sara A; Rosselli, Marinella; Barchiesi, Federica; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (estradiol) inhibits microglia proliferation. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) is an endogenous metabolite of estradiol with little affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). We hypothesize that 2-ME inhibits microglial proliferation and activation and contributes to estradiol's inhibitory effects on microglia. We compared the effects of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol [2-OE; estradiol metabolite produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP450)], and 2-ME [formed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) acting upon 2-OE] on microglial (BV2 cells) DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, activation, and phagocytosis. 2-ME and 2-OE were approximately three- and 10-fold, respectively, more potent than estradiol in inhibiting microglia DNA synthesis. The antimitogenic effects of estradiol were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of CYP450 and COMT. Inhibition of COMT blocked the conversion of 2-OE to 2-ME and the antimitogenic effects of 2-OE but not 2-ME. Microglia expressed ERβ and GPR30 but not ERα. 2,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERβ agonist), but not 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (ERα agonist) or G1 (GPR30 agonist), inhibited microglial proliferation. The antiproliferative effects of estradiol, but not 2-OE or 2-ME, were partially reversed by ICI-182,780 (ERα/β antagonist) but not by 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole (ERα antagonist) or G15 (GPR30 antagonist). Lipopolysaccharide increased microglia iNOS and COX-2 expression and phagocytosing activity of microglia; these effects were inhibited by 2-ME. We conclude that in microglia, 2-ME inhibits proliferation, proinflammatory responses, and phagocytosis. 2-ME partially mediates the effects of estradiol via ER-independent mechanisms involving sequential metabolism of estradiol to 2-OE and 2-ME. 2-ME could be of potential therapeutic use in postischemic stroke injuries. Interindividual differences in estradiol metabolism might affect the

  14. In vivo selection of Plasmodium falciparum Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 variants by artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Vito; Tinto, Halidou; Valea, Innocent; Fitzhenry, Robert; Delgado-Ratto, Christopher; Mbonye, Martin K; Van Overmeir, Chantal; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfcrt-76 and Pfmdr1-86 gene polymorphisms were determined during a clinical trial in Burkina Faso comparing the efficacies of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL). Significant selection of Pfcrt-K76 was observed after exposure to AL and DHA-PPQ, as well as selection of Pfmdr1-N86 after AL but not DHA-PPQ treatment, suggesting reverse selection on the Pfcrt gene by PPQ. These results support the rational use of DHA-PPQ in settings where chloroquine (CQ) resistance is high. PMID:25403659

  15. Effects of Hemerocallis flava on motor activity and the concentration of central monoamines and its metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, M T; Ho, Y F; Peng, W H; Wu, C R; Chen, C F

    1996-06-01

    In this study, we used behavioral and biochemical methods to investigate the effects of Hemerocallis flava (Liliaceae) (abbreviated as HF) on motor activity and the concentration of monoamines in rats. The water fraction of the resuspended HF extract was most active in reducing the motility in rats. The water fraction of the HF extract enhanced the reduction of locomotor activity produced by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, but it reduced the increase of locomotor activity produced by L-dopa plus benserazide and p-chlorophenylalanine. Furthermore, the water fraction of the HF extract significantly decreased the concentration of norepinepherine in the cortex and the concentration of dopamine and serotonin in the brain stem. It also increased the concentration of vanilylmandelic acid in the cortex, homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid in the brain stem. These results suggest that the reduction of locomotor activity produced by the water fraction of HF extract may be related to the decrease in the concentration of norepinepherine in the cortex and the concentration of dopamine and serotonin in brain stem. PMID:8735450

  16. [Search for nucleic acid influencing, as well as membrane active, potential cancerostatic fungal metabolites using microbiological and cytological screening methods].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, K; Gutsche, W; Horschak, R; Zureck, A

    1978-01-01

    A prescreening program including microbiological and cytological assays was employed in search of potential cancerostatic antibiotics in crude extracts of mushrooms. The microbiological tests based on agar diffusion techniques consist of prophage induction test and BIP-test. All active compounds selected by these microbiological models are potential inhibitors of nucleic acid metabolism. Cytological assays on leukemia L 1210 cells have been carried out by microscopic examination and by evaluation using an electronic particle counter. Activity was expressed as decrease of the number of single cells caused by agglutination or lysis of cells, changes in cell surface area, dye exclusion, and increase of cell volume. A wide variety of mushrooms was demonstrated to exhibit interesting activities in some of these screening systems. The influence of primary metabolic products of mushrooms on microbiological models was studied additionally. In vivo assays have not yet been accomplished.

  17. The significance of lichens and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Huneck, S

    1999-12-01

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  18. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  19. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of novel flame retardants TBB, TBPH and their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Klopčič, Ivana; Skledar, Darja Gramec; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2016-10-01

    The anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities of the two novel brominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH and of their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH have been compared using the luciferase reporter gene assays. Only the parent compounds TBB and TBPH exhibited anti-glucocorticoid activity with IC50 values of 1.9 μM and 0.3 μM. Furthermore, mode of action for these two compounds is by direct competing to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with IC50 values of 0.03 μM and 0.002 μM. All four tested compounds possess anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities, without agonist activities on the respective receptors. Anti-androgenic activities with IC50 values of 43.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 47.5 μM and 1.3 μM were found for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH. The anti-thyroid hormonal IC50 values of 37.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 22.8 μM and 32.3 μM for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH, together with the above quoted results, indicate that metabolism can modify anti-androgenic, anti-glucocorticoid and anti-thyroid hormonal effects of these novel brominated flame retardants. Furthermore, the parent flame retardants are shown to be able to disrupt the function of the GR as antagonists by direct competition to the receptor.

  20. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of novel flame retardants TBB, TBPH and their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Klopčič, Ivana; Skledar, Darja Gramec; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2016-10-01

    The anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities of the two novel brominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH and of their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH have been compared using the luciferase reporter gene assays. Only the parent compounds TBB and TBPH exhibited anti-glucocorticoid activity with IC50 values of 1.9 μM and 0.3 μM. Furthermore, mode of action for these two compounds is by direct competing to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with IC50 values of 0.03 μM and 0.002 μM. All four tested compounds possess anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities, without agonist activities on the respective receptors. Anti-androgenic activities with IC50 values of 43.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 47.5 μM and 1.3 μM were found for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH. The anti-thyroid hormonal IC50 values of 37.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 22.8 μM and 32.3 μM for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH, together with the above quoted results, indicate that metabolism can modify anti-androgenic, anti-glucocorticoid and anti-thyroid hormonal effects of these novel brominated flame retardants. Furthermore, the parent flame retardants are shown to be able to disrupt the function of the GR as antagonists by direct competition to the receptor. PMID:27380226

  1. Primary, Secondary Metabolites, Photosynthetic Capacity and Antioxidant Activity of the Malaysian Herb Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pumila Benth) Exposed to Potassium Fertilization under Greenhouse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design was used to characterize the relationship between production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carbohydrate content, leaf gas exchange, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), soluble protein, invertase and antioxidant enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Labisia pumila Benth var. alata under four levels of potassium fertilization experiments (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg K/ha) conducted for 12 weeks. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid and carbohydrate content was affected by the interaction between potassium fertilization and plant parts. As the potassium fertilization levels increased from 0 to 270 kg K/ha, the production of soluble protein and PAL activity increased steadily. At the highest potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) L. pumila exhibited significantly higher net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs), intercellular CO2 (Ci), apparent quantum yield (ξ) and lower dark respiration rates (Rd), compared to the other treatments. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid are also higher under 270 kg K/ha compared to 180, 90 and 0 kg K/ha. Furthermore, from the present study, the invertase activity was also found to be higher in 270 kg K/ha treatment. The antioxidant enzyme activities (APX, CAT and SOD) were lower under high potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) and have a significant negative correlation with total phenolics and flavonoid production. From this study, it was observed that the up-regulation of leaf gas exchange and downregulation of APX, CAT and SOD activities under high supplementation of potassium fertilizer enhanced the carbohydrate content that simultaneously increased the production of L. pumila secondary metabolites, thus increasing the health promoting effects of this plant. PMID:23203128

  2. Primary, secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity and antioxidant activity of the Malaysian Herb Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pumila Benth) exposed to potassium fertilization under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2012-11-20

    A randomized complete block design was used to characterize the relationship between production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carbohydrate content, leaf gas exchange, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), soluble protein, invertase and antioxidant enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Labisia pumila Benth var. alata under four levels of potassium fertilization experiments (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg K/ha) conducted for 12 weeks. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid and carbohydrate content was affected by the interaction between potassium fertilization and plant parts. As the potassium fertilization levels increased from 0 to 270 kg K/ha, the production of soluble protein and PAL activity increased steadily. At the highest potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) L. pumila exhibited significantly higher net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)), intercellular CO(2) (C(i)), apparent quantum yield (ξ) and lower dark respiration rates (R(d)), compared to the other treatments. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid are also higher under 270 kg K/ha compared to 180, 90 and 0 kg K/ha. Furthermore, from the present study, the invertase activity was also found to be higher in 270 kg K/ha treatment. The antioxidant enzyme activities (APX, CAT and SOD) were lower under high potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) and have a significant negative correlation with total phenolics and flavonoid production. From this study, it was observed that the up-regulation of leaf gas exchange and downregulation of APX, CAT and SOD activities under high supplementation of potassium fertilizer enhanced the carbohydrate content that simultaneously increased the production of L. pumila secondary metabolites, thus increasing the health promoting effects of this plant.

  3. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent.

  4. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of polyketide metabolite from marine Streptomyces sp. AP-123 and its cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2013-01-01

    A Gram positive, filamentous, spore forming antagonistic Streptomyces sp. AP-123 derived from marine region of Andra Pradesh, India, was studied for its medical importance. Among the 210 Streptomyces strains screened at 64.3% exhibited activity against Gram positive bacteria, 48.5% showed activity towards Gram negative bacteria, 38.8% exhibited both Gram positive and negative bacteria and 80.85% strains revealed significant antifungal activity. However, primary screening revealed that Streptomyces sp. AP-123 exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria compared to other Streptomyces strains. The presence of l-diaminopimelic acid and glycine in the cell wall hydrolysates and streptomycin resistance indicated the strain belonged to Streptomyces genus. The 16S rDNA gene based phylogenetic affiliation was determined by using bioinformatic tools and it was identified as Streptomyces sp. AP-123 with 99% sequence similarity to Streptomyces flavogriseus. The antimicrobial substances were extracted by hexane and ethyl acetate from spent medium in which Streptomyces sp. AP-123 was cultivated at 30 °C for 5 d. The antimicrobial activity was assessed using broth micro-dilution technique. A compound was obtained by eluting the crude extract using varying concentrations of solvents followed by the chromatographic purification. Based on the IR, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectral data, the compound was identified as polyketide related antibiotic. It exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and also showed a potent cytotoxic activity against cell lines viz. Vero (Green monkey kidney) and HEP2 (laryngeal carcinoma cells) in vitro. The lowest Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the compound against Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus were 25 and 37.5 μg mL(-1), respectively. Against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa it exhibited MIC of 50 and 37.58 μg mL(-1), respectively

  5. Seven New and Two Known Lipopeptides as well as Five Known Polyketides: The Activated Production of Silent Metabolites in a Marine-Derived Fungus by Chemical Mutagenesis Strategy Using Diethyl Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Li, Chang-Wei; Cui, Cheng-Bin

    2014-01-01

    AD-2-1 is an antitumor fungal mutant obtained by diethyl sulfate mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. The G59 strain originally did not produce any metabolites with antitumor activities in MTT assays using K562 cells. Tracing newly produced metabolites under guidance of MTT assay and TLC analysis by direct comparison with control G59 extract, seven new (1–7) and two known (8–9) lipopeptides were isolated together with five known polyketides 10–14 from the extract of mutant AD-2-1. Structures of the seven new compounds including their absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic and chemical evidences and named as penicimutalides A–G (1–7). Seven known compounds were identified as fellutamide B (8), fellutamide C (9), 1′-O-methylaverantin (10), averantin (11), averufin (12), nidurufin (13), and sterigmatocystin (14). In the MTT assay, 1–14 inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. All the bioassays and HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses demonstrated that the production of 1–14 in the mutant AD-2-1 was caused by the activated production of silent metabolites in the original G59 fungal strain. Present results provided additional examples for effectiveness of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using diethyl sulphate mutagenesis to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates. PMID:24686557

  6. Seven new and two known lipopeptides as well as five known polyketides: the activated production of silent metabolites in a marine-derived fungus by chemical mutagenesis strategy using diethyl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Li, Chang-Wei; Cui, Cheng-Bin

    2014-04-01

    AD-2-1 is an antitumor fungal mutant obtained by diethyl sulfate mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. The G59 strain originally did not produce any metabolites with antitumor activities in MTT assays using K562 cells. Tracing newly produced metabolites under guidance of MTT assay and TLC analysis by direct comparison with control G59 extract, seven new (1-7) and two known (8-9) lipopeptides were isolated together with five known polyketides 10-14 from the extract of mutant AD-2-1. Structures of the seven new compounds including their absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic and chemical evidences and named as penicimutalides A-G (1-7). Seven known compounds were identified as fellutamide B (8), fellutamide C (9), 1'-O-methylaverantin (10), averantin (11), averufin (12), nidurufin (13), and sterigmatocystin (14). In the MTT assay, 1-14 inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. All the bioassays and HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses demonstrated that the production of 1-14 in the mutant AD-2-1 was caused by the activated production of silent metabolites in the original G59 fungal strain. Present results provided additional examples for effectiveness of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using diethyl sulphate mutagenesis to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates. PMID:24686557

  7. Alkaloid metabolite profiles by GC/MS and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities with binding-mode predictions of five Amaryllidaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Natalie; Alvarez, Rafael; Osorio, Edison H; Alzate, Fernando; Berkov, Strahil; Osorio, Edison

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic inhibition is an important target for the management of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AChE inhibitors are the mainstay drugs for its treatment. In order to discover new sources of potent AChE inhibitors, a combined strategy is presented based on AChE-inhibitory activity and chemical profiles by GC/MS, together with in silico studies. The combined strategy was applied on alkaloid extracts of five Amaryllidaceae species that grow in Colombia. Fifty-seven alkaloids were detected using GC/MS, and 21 of them were identified by comparing their mass-spectral fragmentation patterns with standard reference spectra in commercial and private library databases. The alkaloid extracts of Zephyranthes carinata exhibited a high level of inhibitory activity (IC50 = 5.97 ± 0.24 μg/mL). Molecular modeling, which was performed using the structures of some of the alkaloids present in this extract and the three-dimensional crystal structures of AChE derived from Torpedo californica, disclosed their binding configuration in the active site of this AChE. The results suggested that the alkaloids 3-epimacronine and lycoramine might be of interest for AChE inhibition. Although the galanthamine group is known for its potential utility in treating AD, the tazettine-type alkaloids should be evaluated to find more selective compounds of potential benefit for AD. PMID:25305596

  8. Removal of ethylenthiourea and 1,2,4-triazole pesticide metabolites from water by adsorption in commercial activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Camila C; Bottrel, Sue Ellen C; Costa, Elizângela P; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Leão, Mônica M D

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the adsorption capacity of ethylenthiourea (ETU) and 1H-1,2,4-triazole (1,2,4-T) for two commercial activated carbons: charcoal-powdered activated carbon (CPAC) and bovine bone-powdered activated carbon (BPAC). The tests were conducted at a bench scale, with ETU and 1,2,4-T diluted in water, for isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies. The removal of the compounds was accompanied by a total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and ultraviolet (UV) reduction analysis. The coals were characterized by their surface area using nitrogen adsorption/desorption, by a scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and by a zero charge point analysis (pHpcz). The results showed that adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model for both coals, and the adsorption isotherms for CPAC and BPAC were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, respectively. The CPAC removed approximately 77% of the ETU and 76% of the 1,2,4-T. The BPAC was ineffective at removing the contaminants. PMID:23356339

  9. Secondary metabolites from a culture of the fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri and their in vitro cytostatic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eamvijarn, Amnat; Kijjoa, Anake; Bruyère, Céline; Mathieu, Véronique; Manoch, Leka; Lefranc, Florence; Silva, Artur; Kiss, Robert; Herz, Werner

    2012-11-01

    Four known (1, 2, 3, and 6) and three new compounds including a 1,4-diacetyl-2,5-dibenzylpiperazine derivative (4), a quinazolinone-containing indole derivative (5), and a new ester of 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (7) were isolated from the fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri S. W. Peterson. Compound 2 displayed in vitro growth inhibitory activity that ranged between the activities of etoposide and carboplatin, chosen as reference compounds, in six distinct cancer cell lines. Compound 1 displayed less activity than 2. Computer-assisted phase-contrast microscopy-related analysis revealed that 2 displayed cytostatic, not cytotoxic, effects in human U373 glioblastoma and A549 non-small cell lung cancer apoptosis-resistant cells with marked inhibition of mitotic rates. Cancer cells in the remaining phases of the cell cycle were unchanged. Flow cytometry analysis further confirmed that 2 does not induce apoptotic features in U373 or A549 cancer cells. Thus, 2 represents a novel chemical scaffold from which derivatives for anticancer cytostatic compounds can be derived. PMID:22976482

  10. Cinnamon and Its Metabolite Sodium Benzoate Attenuate the Activation of p21rac and Protect Memory and Learning in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Brahmachari, Saurabh; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB) in attenuating oxidative stress and protecting memory and learning in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NaB, but not sodium formate, was found to inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse microglial cells. Similarly, NaB also inhibited fibrillar amyloid beta (Aβ)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium(+)-induced microglial production of ROS. Although NaB reduced the level of cholesterol in vivo in mice, reversal of the inhibitory effect of NaB on ROS production by mevalonate, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, but not cholesterol, suggests that depletion of intermediates, but not end products, of the mevalonate pathway is involved in the antioxidant effect of NaB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an inhibitor of p21rac geranylgeranyl protein transferase suppressed the production of ROS and that NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac in microglia. As expected, marked activation of p21rac was observed in the hippocampus of subjects with AD and 5XFAD transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. However, oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder and NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac and attenuated oxidative stress in the hippocampus of Tg mice as evident by decreased dihydroethidium (DHE) and nitrotyrosine staining, reduced homocysteine level and increased level of reduced glutathione. This was accompanied by suppression of neuronal apoptosis, inhibition of glial activation, and reduction of Aβ burden in the hippocampus and protection of memory and learning in transgenic mice. Therefore, cinnamon powder may be a promising natural supplement in halting or delaying the progression of AD.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus Reduces Activity of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 in Liver and Kidney Leading to Decreased Formation of Mycophenolic Acid Acyl-Glucuronide Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Altered concentrations of MPA metabolites have been reported in diabetic kidney transplant recipients, although the reason for this difference is unknown. We aimed to compare MPA biotransformation and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression and activity between liver (n = 16) and kidney (n = 8) from diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Glucuronidation of MPA, as well as the expression and probe substrate activity of UGTs primarily responsible for MPA phenol glucuronide (MPAG) formation (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9), and MPA acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) formation (UGT2B7), was characterized. We have found that both diabetic and nondiabetic human liver microsomes and kidney microsomes formed MPAG with similar efficiency; however, AcMPAG formation was significantly lower in diabetic samples. This finding is supported by markedly lower glucuronidation of the UGT2B7 probe zidovudine, UGT2B7 protein, and UGT2B7 mRNA in diabetic tissues. UGT genetic polymorphism did not explain this difference because UGT2B7*2 or *1c genotype were not associated with altered microsomal UGT2B7 protein levels or AcMPAG formation. Furthermore, mRNA expression and probe activities for UGT1A1 or UGT1A9, both forming MPAG but not AcMPAG, were comparable between diabetic and nondiabetic tissues, suggesting the effect may be specific to UGT2B7-mediated AcMPAG formation. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with significantly reduced UGT2B7 mRNA expression, protein level, and enzymatic activity of human liver and kidney, explaining in part the relatively low circulating concentrations of AcMPAG in diabetic patients. PMID:21123165

  12. Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Ugandan Schoolchildren Selects for Plasmodium falciparum Transporter Polymorphisms That Modify Drug Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter I; Conrad, Melissa D; Legac, Jennifer; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Tumwebaze, Patrick; Wandera, Bonnie; Brooker, Simon J; Staedke, Sarah G; Kamya, Moses R; Nsobya, Sam L; Dorsey, Grant; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-10-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) offers prolonged protection against malaria, but its impact on Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity is uncertain. In a trial of intermittent preventive treatment in schoolchildren in Tororo, Uganda, in 2011 to 2012, monthly DP for 1 year decreased the incidence of malaria by 96% compared to placebo; DP once per school term offered protection primarily during the first month after therapy. To assess the impact of DP on selection of drug resistance, we compared the prevalence of key polymorphisms in isolates that emerged at different intervals after treatment with DP. Blood obtained monthly and at each episode of fever was assessed for P. falciparum parasitemia by microscopy. Samples from 160 symptomatic and 650 asymptomatic episodes of parasitemia were assessed at 4 loci (N86Y, Y184F, and D1246Y in pfmdr1 and K76T in pfcrt) that modulate sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials, utilizing a ligase detection reaction-fluorescent microsphere assay. For pfmdr1 N86Y and pfcrt K76T, but not the other studied polymorphisms, the prevalences of mutant genotypes were significantly greater in children who had received DP within the past 30 days than in those not treated within 60 days (86Y, 18.0% versus 8.3% [P = 0.03]; 76T, 96.0% versus 86.1% [P = 0.05]), suggesting selective pressure of DP. Full sequencing of pfcrt in a subset of samples did not identify additional polymorphisms selected by DP. In summary, parasites that emerged soon after treatment with DP were more likely than parasites not under drug pressure to harbor pfmdr1 and pfcrt polymorphisms associated with decreased sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under no. NCT01231880.). PMID:27401569

  13. Clinical and pharmacological determinants of the therapeutic response to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Price, R N; Hasugian, A R; Ratcliff, A; Siswantoro, H; Purba, H L E; Kenangalem, E; Lindegardh, N; Penttinen, P; Laihad, F; Ebsworth, E P; Anstey, N M; Tjitra, E

    2007-11-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHP) is an important new treatment for drug-resistant malaria, although pharmacokinetic studies on the combination are limited. In Papua, Indonesia, we assessed determinants of the therapeutic efficacy of DHP for uncomplicated malaria. Plasma piperaquine concentrations were measured on day 7 and day 28, and the cumulative risk of parasitological failure at day 42 was calculated using survival analysis. Of the 598 patients in the evaluable population 342 had infections with Plasmodium falciparum, 83 with Plasmodium vivax, and 173 with a mixture of both species. The unadjusted cumulative risks of recurrence were 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.6 to 9.4%) for P. falciparum and 8.9% (95% CI: 6.0 to 12%) for P. vivax. After correcting for reinfections the risk of recrudescence with P. falciparum was 1.1% (95% CI: 0.1 to 2.1%). The major determinant of parasitological failure was the plasma piperaquine concentration. A concentration below 30 ng/ml on day 7 was observed in 38% (21/56) of children less than 15 years old and 22% (31/140) of adults (P = 0.04), even though the overall dose (mg per kg of body weight) in children was 9% higher than that in adults (P < 0.001). Patients with piperaquine levels below 30 ng/ml were more likely to have a recurrence with P. falciparum (hazard ratio [HR] = 6.6 [95% CI: 1.9 to 23]; P = 0.003) or P. vivax (HR = 9.0 [95% CI: 2.3 to 35]; P = 0.001). The plasma concentration of piperaquine on day 7 was the major determinant of the therapeutic response to DHP. Lower plasma piperaquine concentrations and higher failure rates in children suggest that dose revision may be warranted in this age group.

  14. Efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in Cambodia, 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Leang, Rithea; Barrette, Amy; Bouth, Denis Mey; Menard, Didier; Abdur, Rashid; Duong, Socheat; Ringwald, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    We describe here the results of antimalarial therapeutic efficacy studies conducted in Cambodia from 2008 to 2010. A total of 15 studies in four sentinel sites were conducted using dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infection and chloroquine (CQ) and DP for the treatment of P. vivax infection. All studies were performed according to the standard World Health Organization protocol for the assessment of antimalarial treatment efficacy. Among the studies of DP for the treatment of P. falciparum, an increase in treatment failure was observed in the western provinces. In 2010, the PCR-corrected treatment failure rates for DP on day 42 were 25% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10 to 51%) in Pailin and 10.7% (95% CI = 4 to 23%) in Pursat, while the therapeutic efficacy of DP remained high (100%) in Ratanakiri and Preah Vihear provinces, located in northern and eastern Cambodia. For the studies of P. vivax, the day 28 uncorrected treatment failure rate among patients treated with CQ ranged from 4.4 to 17.4%; DP remained 100% effective in all sites. Further study is required to investigate suspected P. falciparum resistance to piperaquine in western Cambodia; the results of in vitro and molecular studies were not found to support the therapeutic efficacy findings. The emergence of artemisinin resistance in this region has likely put additional pressure on piperaquine. Although DP appears to be an appropriate new first-line treatment for P. vivax in Cambodia, alternative treatments are urgently needed for P. falciparum-infected patients in western Cambodia.

  15. Role of Pfmdr1 in In Vitro Plasmodium falciparum Susceptibility to Chloroquine, Quinine, Monodesethylamodiaquine, Mefloquine, Lumefantrine, and Dihydroartemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Wurtz, Nathalie; Fall, Bécaye; Pascual, Aurélie; Fall, Mansour; Baret, Eric; Camara, Cheikhou; Nakoulima, Aminata; Diatta, Bakary; Fall, Khadidiatou Ba; Mbaye, Pape Saliou; Diémé, Yaya; Bercion, Raymond; Wade, Boubacar

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Pfmdr1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1) polymorphisms in antimalarial drug resistance is still debated. Here, we evaluate the association between polymorphisms in Pfmdr1 (N86Y, Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y) and Pfcrt (K76T) and in vitro responses to chloroquine (CQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine (LMF), quinine (QN), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in 174 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal. The Pfmdr1 86Y mutation was identified in 14.9% of the samples, and the 184F mutation was identified in 71.8% of the isolates. No 1034C, 1042N, or 1246Y mutations were detected. The Pfmdr1 86Y mutation was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to MDAQ (P = 0.0023), LMF (P = 0.0001), DHA (P = 0.0387), and MQ (P = 0.00002). The N86Y mutation was not associated with CQ (P = 0.214) or QN (P = 0.287) responses. The Pfmdr1 184F mutation was not associated with various susceptibility responses to the 6 antimalarial drugs (P = 0.168 for CQ, 0.778 for MDAQ, 0.324 for LMF, 0.961 for DHA, 0.084 for QN, and 0.298 for MQ). The Pfmdr1 86Y-Y184 haplotype was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to MDAQ (P = 0.0136), LMF (P = 0.0019), and MQ (P = 0.0001). The additional Pfmdr1 86Y mutation increased significantly the in vitro susceptibility to MDAQ (P < 0.0001), LMF (P < 0.0001), MQ (P < 0.0001), and QN (P = 0.0026) in wild-type Pfcrt K76 parasites. The additional Pfmdr1 86Y mutation significantly increased the in vitro susceptibility to CQ (P = 0.0179) in Pfcrt 76T CQ-resistant parasites. PMID:25199781

  16. Effect of atorvastatin on CYP2C9 metabolic activity as measured by the formation rate of losartan metabolite in hypercholesterolaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Umit; Sain-Guven, Gulay; Yardimci, Yildiz; Kilicarslan, Alpaslan; Babaoglu, Melih O; Bozkurt, Atilla

    2011-08-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have a potential to interact with substrates of the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9). This may lead to concentration-dependent toxicity such as skeletal muscle side effects. Atorvastatin, a widely used statin, is presently inadequately investigated in vivo with regard to effects on CYP2C9 activity in human beings. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of atorvastatin on the activity of CYP2C9 in a group of Turkish hypercholesterolaemic patients. We prospectively investigated the atorvastatin effect on CYP2C9 activity in a sample of Turkish hypercholesterolaemia patients (11 women, 7 men) who commenced atorvastatin (10 mg/day). Losartan was used as a probe drug to determine CYP2C9 metabolic activity. A single 25-mg oral dose of losartan was given to the patients before, on the first day and after the fourth week of the atorvastatin treatment. Urinary concentrations of losartan and its metabolite, E3174, were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Urinary losartan/E3174 ratios were used as an index of CYP2C9 activity. As the baseline enzyme activity may influence the extent of drug-drug interactions, the CYP2C9*2 and 2C9*3 alleles were identified by using PCR-RFLP. In the patients with the CYP2C9*1*1 genotype (n = 12), atorvastatin treatment did not cause a significant change in losartan/E3174 ratios (medians; 95% CI) neither after the first day (0.73; 0.34-1.61) nor at the fourth week (0.71; 0.36-1.77) of the treatment as compared with the baseline activity (0.92; 0.57-1.74, p = 0.38). Similarly, no significant change in the baseline CYP2C9 activity (0.91; 0.30-1.60) was observed in patients with the CYP2C9*1*2 genotype as compared with those of the first day (1.08; 0.08-2.72) and fourth week (0.64; 0.0-3.82) of the atorvastatin treatment (n = 4, p = 0.86). These observations in a hypercholesterolaemic patient sample suggest that atorvastatin does not have a significant effect

  17. Biodegradation of methoxychlor and its metabolites by the white rot fungus Stereum hirsutum related to the inactivation of estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Min; Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Ki-Ryeong; Hong, Eui-Ju; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Myung-Kil; Kang, Ha-Young; Choi, In-Gyu

    2006-01-01

    The white rot fungus Stereum hirsutum was used to degrade methoxychlor [2,2,2-trichloro-1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] in culture and the degraded products were extensively determined. The estrogenic activity of the degraded products of methoxychlor was examined using cell proliferation and pS2 gene expression assays in MCF-7 cells. S. hirsutum showed high resistance to methoxychlor 100 ppm, and the mycelial growth was fully completed within 8 days of incubation at 30 degrees C. Methoxychlor in liquid culture medium was gradually converted into 2,2-dichloro-1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane, 2,2-dichloro-1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethylene, 2-chloro-1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl) ethane, 2-chloro-1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl) ethylene, and 1,1-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethylene, indicating that methoxychlor is dominantly degraded by dechlorination and dehydrogenation. MCF-7 cells were demonstrated to proliferate actively at the 10-5 M concentration of methoxychlor. However, cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by the incubation with methoxychlor culture media containing S. hirsutum. In addition, the expression level of pS2 mRNA was increased at the concentration (10-5 M) of methoxychlor. The reductive effect of S. hirsutum for methoxychlor was clear but not significant as in the proliferation assay.

  18. Urolithins, intestinal microbial metabolites of Pomegranate ellagitannins, exhibit potent antioxidant activity in a cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Bialonska, Dobroslawa; Kasimsetty, Sashi G; Khan, Shabana I; Ferreira, Daneel

    2009-11-11

    Many health benefits of pomegranate products have been attributed to the potent antioxidant action of their tannin components, mainly punicalagins and ellagic acid. While moving through the intestines, ellagitannins are metabolized by gut bacteria into urolithins that readily enter systemic circulation. In this study, the antioxidant properties of seven urolithin derivatives were evaluated in a cell-based assay. This method is biologically more relevant because it reflects bioavailability of the test compound to the cells, and the antioxidant action is determined in the cellular environment. Our results showed that the antioxidant activity of urolithins was correlated with the number of hydroxy groups as well as the lipophilicity of the molecule. The most potent antioxidants are urolithins C and D with IC(50) values of 0.16 and 0.33 microM, respectively, when compared to IC(50) values of 1.1 and 1.4 microM of the parent ellagic acid and punicalagins, respectively. The dihydroxylated urolithin A showed weaker antioxidant activity, with an IC(50) value 13.6 microM, however, the potency was within the range of urolithin A plasma concentrations. Therefore, products of the intestinal microbial transformation of pomegranate ellagitannins may account for systemic antioxidant effects.

  19. Polyphenolic Secondary Metabolites Synergize the Activity of Commercial Antibiotics against Clinical Isolates of β-Lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.