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Sample records for active metabolite oseltamivir

  1. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  2. Simple and sensitive assay for quantification of oseltamivir and its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry: improved applicability to pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Laizure, S. Casey; Meibohm, Bernd; Herring, Vanessa L.; Parker, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Although liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry-based assays have been reported for the measurement of the antiviral oseltamivir (OS) in human samples, these assays either involve complicated sample pretreatment or lack sensitivity. Here we introduce a straightforward approach to improve the assay performance for OS and its metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OSC) in human plasma. A very low concentration of mobile phase modifier can improve the ionization efficiency of both analytes, thus enabling a high sensitivity without any matrix effect. The fast LC gradient further increases the sensitivity by narrowing the peak width (6–9 seconds) and eluting the analytes at higher organic content. The increased ionization efficiency and minimized matrix effects enabled us to introduce a one-step protein precipitation for sample clean-up without compromising the sensitivity. The lower limit of quantification was 0.34 ng/mL for both analytes, which was at least 3 times more sensitive than published assays that involve complicated sample pretreatment. The assay involves measurement of analytes and their stable-isotope internal standards in small-volume (30-µL) plasma. Sodium fluoride was utilized to prevent the hydrolysis of OS during and after sampling. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.34–1000 ng/mL. Accuracy was 95–110% and the precision was 2.2–11.0%. This method was applied successfully to the human pharmacokinetic study of OS, and can estimate the relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of OS with more accuracy. The approach utilized in the optimization of assay performance can be extended to the measurement of other drugs in biomatrices. PMID:23000242

  3. Oseltamivir

    MedlinePlus

    ... syrup, corn syrup, caramel topping, or light brown sugar dissolved in water to the powder. Stir the mixture. Swallow the entire contents of this mixture right away. Continue to take oseltamivir until ... or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient.

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chairat, Kalayanee; Jittamala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to compare the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and its active antiviral metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese individuals and to determine the effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate. Methods The population pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated in 12 obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m−2) and 12 non‐obese (BMI <30 kg m−2) Thai adult volunteers receiving a standard dose of 75 mg and a double dose of 150 mg in a randomized sequence. Concentration–time data were collected and analysed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling. Results The pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were described simultaneously by first‐order absorption, with a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir, followed by a metabolism compartment and a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir carboxylate. Creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of oseltamivir carboxylate clearance {3.84% increase for each 10 ml min−1 increase in creatinine clearance [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.178%, 8.02%]}. Obese individuals had an approximately 25% (95% CI 24%, 28%) higher oseltamivir clearance, 20% higher oseltamivir volume of distribution (95% CI 19%, 23%) and 10% higher oseltamivir carboxylate clearance (95% CI 9%, 11%) compared with non‐obese individuals. However, these altered pharmacokinetic properties were small and did not change the overall exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate. Conclusions The results confirmed that a dose adjustment for oseltamivir in obese individuals is not necessary on the basis of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26810861

  5. Adsorption removal of antiviral drug oseltamivir and its metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate by carbon nanotubes: Effects of carbon nanotube properties and media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Niu, Li-Xia; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ming-Chao; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the adsorption behavior of the antiviral drugs of oseltamivir (OE) and its metabolites (i.e., oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)) on three types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled CNT (SWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), and carboxylated SWCNT (SWCNT-COOH). CNTs can efficiently remove more than 90% of the OE and OC from aqueous solution when the initial concentration was lower than 10(-4) mmol/L. The Polanyi-Manes model depicted the adsorption isotherms of OE and OC on CNTs better than the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The properties of OE/OC and the characteristics of CNTs, particularly the oxygen functional groups (e.g., SWCNT-COOH) played important roles during the adsorption processes. OE showed a higher adsorption affinity than OC. By comparing the different adsorbates adsorption on each CNT and each adsorbate adsorption on different CNTs, the adsorption mechanisms of hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, van der Waals force, and H-bonding were proposed as the contributing factors for OE and OC adsorption on CNTs. Particularly, for verifying the contribution of electrostatic interaction, the changes of adsorption partition efficiency (Kd) of OE and OC on CNTs were evaluated by varying pH from 2 to 11 and the importance of isoelectric point (pHIEP) of CNTs on OE and OC adsorption was addressed. PMID:26265601

  6. Removal of the antiviral agent oseltamivir and its biological activity by oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Mestankova, Hana; Schirmer, Kristin; Escher, Beate I; von Gunten, Urs; Canonica, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    The antiviral agent oseltamivir acid (OA, the active metabolite of Tamiflu(®)) may occur at high concentrations in wastewater during pandemic influenza events. To eliminate OA and its antiviral activity from wastewater, ozonation and advanced oxidation processes were investigated. For circumneutral pH, kinetic measurements yielded second-order rate constants of 1.7 ± 0.1 × 10(5) and 4.7 ± 0.2 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of OA with ozone and hydroxyl radical, respectively. During the degradation of OA by both oxidants, the antiviral activity of the treated aqueous solutions was measured by inhibition of neuraminidase activity of two different viral strains. A transient, moderate (two-fold) increase in antiviral activity was observed in solutions treated up to a level of 50% OA transformation, while for higher degrees of transformation the activity corresponded to that caused exclusively by OA. OA was efficiently removed by ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant effluent, suggesting that ozonation can be applied to remove OA from wastewater. PMID:22230064

  7. Development of novel potent orally bioavailable oseltamivir derivatives active against resistant influenza A.

    PubMed

    Schade, Dennis; Kotthaus, Joscha; Riebling, Lukas; Kotthaus, Jürke; Müller-Fielitz, Helge; Raasch, Walter; Koch, Oliver; Seidel, Nora; Schmidtke, Michaela; Clement, Bernd

    2014-02-13

    With the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses and in view of a highly pathogenic flu pandemic, it is important to develop new anti-influenza agents. Here, the development of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors that were designed to overcome resistance mechanisms along with unfavorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties is described. Several 5-guanidino- and 5-amidino-based oseltamivir derivatives were synthesized and profiled for their anti-influenza activity and in vitro and in vivo PK properties. Amidine 6 and guanidine 7 were comparably effective against a panel of different A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains and also inhibited mutant A/H1N1 neuraminidase. Among different prodrug strategies pursued, a simple amidoxime ethyl ester (9) exhibited a superior PK profile with an oral bioavailability of 31% (rats), which is comparable to oseltamivir (36%). Thus, bioisosteric replacement of the 5-guanidine with an acetamidine-in the form of its N-hydroxy prodrug-successfully tackled the two key limitations of currently used NA inhibitors, as exemplified with oseltamivir. PMID:24422530

  8. Role of the Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1 in Oseltamivir Absorption: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Agnès; Belli, Sara; Funk, Christoph; Otteneder, Michael B.; Portmann, Renée; Heinig, Katja; Prinssen, Eric; Lazic, Stanley E.; Rayner, Craig R.; Hoffmann, Gerhard; Singer, Thomas; Smith, David E.

    2012-01-01

    It was reported that oseltamivir (Tamiflu) absorption was mediated by human peptide transporter (hPEPT) 1. Understanding the exact mechanism(s) of absorption is important in the context of drug-drug and diet-drug interactions. Hence, we investigated the mechanism governing the intestinal absorption of oseltamivir and its active metabolite (oseltamivir carboxylate) in wild-type [Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1] and hPEPT1-transfected cells (CHO-PEPT1), in pharmacokinetic studies in juvenile and adult rats, and in healthy volunteers. In vitro cell culture studies showed that the intracellular accumulation of oseltamivir and its carboxylate into CHO-PEPT1 and CHO-K1 was always similar under a variety of experimental conditions, demonstrating that these compounds are not substrates of hPEPT1. Furthermore, neither oseltamivir nor its active metabolite was capable of inhibiting Gly-Sar uptake in CHO-PEPT1 cells. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in juvenile and adult rats showed that the disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate, after oral administration of oseltamivir, was sensitive to the feed status but insensitive to the presence of milk and Gly-Sar. Moreover, oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate exhibited significantly higher exposure in rats under fasted conditions than under fed conditions. In humans, oral dosing after a high-fat meal resulted in a statistically significant but moderate lower exposure than after an overnight fasting. This change has no clinical implications. Taken together, the results do not implicate either rat Pept1 or hPEPT1 in the oral absorption of oseltamivir. PMID:22584254

  9. Role of the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 in oseltamivir absorption: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Agnès; Belli, Sara; Funk, Christoph; Otteneder, Michael B; Portmann, Renée; Heinig, Katja; Prinssen, Eric; Lazic, Stanley E; Rayner, Craig R; Hoffmann, Gerhard; Singer, Thomas; Smith, David E; Schuler, Franz

    2012-08-01

    It was reported that oseltamivir (Tamiflu) absorption was mediated by human peptide transporter (hPEPT) 1. Understanding the exact mechanism(s) of absorption is important in the context of drug-drug and diet-drug interactions. Hence, we investigated the mechanism governing the intestinal absorption of oseltamivir and its active metabolite (oseltamivir carboxylate) in wild-type [Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1] and hPEPT1-transfected cells (CHO-PEPT1), in pharmacokinetic studies in juvenile and adult rats, and in healthy volunteers. In vitro cell culture studies showed that the intracellular accumulation of oseltamivir and its carboxylate into CHO-PEPT1 and CHO-K1 was always similar under a variety of experimental conditions, demonstrating that these compounds are not substrates of hPEPT1. Furthermore, neither oseltamivir nor its active metabolite was capable of inhibiting Gly-Sar uptake in CHO-PEPT1 cells. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in juvenile and adult rats showed that the disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate, after oral administration of oseltamivir, was sensitive to the feed status but insensitive to the presence of milk and Gly-Sar. Moreover, oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate exhibited significantly higher exposure in rats under fasted conditions than under fed conditions. In humans, oral dosing after a high-fat meal resulted in a statistically significant but moderate lower exposure than after an overnight fasting. This change has no clinical implications. Taken together, the results do not implicate either rat Pept1 or hPEPT1 in the oral absorption of oseltamivir. PMID:22584254

  10. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oseltamivir in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with automated peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Rayner, Craig R; Giraudon, Mylène; Kamal, Mohamed A; Morcos, Peter N; Robson, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at increased risk of developing complications associated with influenza infection. Oseltamivir is indicated for influenza treatment in ESRD patients, but the disposition is poorly understood in this patient population. This study aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oseltamivir in automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and construct a pharmacokinetic model to assist with optimized dosing. METHODS Ten adults with ESRD were prescribed an aggressive APD regimen consisting of three continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) sessions during the day and two continuous ambulatory (CAPD) sessions overnight. Oseltamivir was administered as a single 75 mg dose, immediately before APD treatment. RESULTS Oseltamivir was rapidly eliminated via first-pass metabolism, with most of the dose (Fraction metabolized = 0.964) reaching the circulation as the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate. This metabolite was cleared slowly and was quantifiable throughout the sampling interval. The disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate was described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively. Metabolite clearance by CCPD [0.32 l h−1 (70 kg)−1] was 1.9-fold faster than via CAPD [0.17 l h−1 (70 kg)−1], with renal elimination being dominant in patients with residual urine production. Model simulations showed that a single 75 mg dose attained target exposures in patients with negligible or low urine clearance. However, higher doses are recommended for further investigation in patients with high residual renal function. In all patients, oseltamivir was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS In APD patients with anuria or low residual renal elimination, a single 75 mg dose of oseltamivir produced exposures at the upper end of the safety margin. PMID:25289522

  11. Antiviral activity of the oseltamivir and Melissa officinalis L. essential oil against avian influenza A virus (H9N2).

    PubMed

    Pourghanbari, Gholamhosein; Nili, Hasan; Moattari, Afagh; Mohammadi, Ali; Iraji, Aida

    2016-06-01

    Lemon balm derivatives are going to acquire a novelty as natural and potent remedy for treatment of viral infections since the influenza viruses are developing resistance to the current antivirals widely. Oseltamivir, Melissa officinalis essential oil (MOEO) and their synergistic efficacy against avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H9N2 were evaluated in vitro in MDCK cells at different time exposure by using TCID50, HA, Real Time PCR and HI assay. The results showed that MOEO could inhibit replication of AVI through the different virus replication phase (P ≤ 0.05). Also the highest antiviral activity of MOEO was seen when AIV incubated with MOEO before cell infection. The TCID50/ml was reduced 1.3-2.1, 2.3-2.8, 3.7-4.5 log 10 than control group (5.6 log 10), HAU/50 µl was decreased 85-94, 71.4-94, 71.4-94 % and viral genome copy number/µl was brought down 68-95, 90-100, 89.6-99.9 % at pre-infection, post-infection and simultaneous stage, respectively. Hemagglutination inhibition result showed the MOEO was not able to inhibit agglutination of the chicken red blood cell (cRBC). Replication of the AVI was suppressed by the different concentration of oseltamivir completely or near 100 %. Also oseltamivir showed a synergistic activity with MOEO especially when oseltamivir concentration reduced under 0.005 mg/ml. The chemical composition was examined by GC-MS analysis and Its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b. In conclusion, the findings of the study showed that lemon balm essential oil could inhibit influenza virus replication through different replication cycle steps especially throughout the direct interaction with the virus particles. PMID:27366768

  12. Oseltamivir reduces hippocampal abnormal EEG activities after a virus infection (influenza) in isoflurane-anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Youssouf; Inoue, Isao; Kido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Oseltamivir phosphate (OP, Tamiflu®) is a widely used drug in the treatment of influenza with fever. However, case reports have associated OP intake with sudden abnormal behaviors. In rats infected by the influenza A virus (IAV), the electroencephalogram (EEG) displayed abnormal high-voltage amplitudes with spikes and theta oscillations at a core temperature of 39.9°C to 41°C. Until now, there has been no information describing the effect of OP on intact brain hippocampal activity of IAV-infected animals during hyperthermia. Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of OP on abnormal EEG activities in the hippocampus using the rat model of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Methods Male Wistar rats aged 3 to 4 weeks were used for the study. Influenza A/WSN/33 strain (1 × 105 plaque forming unit in PBS, 60 µL) was applied intranasally to the rats. To characterize OP effects on the IAV-infected rats, EEG activity was studied more particularly in isoflurane-anesthetized IAV-infected rats during hyperthermia. Results We found that the hippocampal EEG of the OP-administered (10 mg/kg) IAV-infected rats showed significant reduction of the high-voltage amplitudes and spikes, but the theta oscillations, which had been observed only at >40°C in OP non-administered rats, appeared at 38°C core temperature. Atropine (30 mg/kg) blocked the theta oscillations. Conclusion Our data suggest that OP efficiently reduces the abnormal EEG activities after IAV infection during hyperthermia. However, OP administration may stimulate ACh release in rats at normal core temperature.

  13. Inhibition of MAO-A and stimulation of behavioural activities in mice by the inactive prodrug form of the anti-influenza agent oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Hiasa, Miki; Isoda, Yumiko; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Saitoh, Kenta; Kimura, Yasuaki; Kanai, Motomu; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Hatakeyama, Dai; Kirino, Yutaka; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Oseltamivir is the most widely prescribed anti-influenza medication. However, in rare instances, it has been reported to stimulate behavioural activities in adolescents. The goal of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism responsible for these behavioural activities. Experimental Approach We performed an in vitro assay of MAO-A, the enzyme responsible for neurotransmitter degradation, using either the active form – oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) or the inactive prodrug – oseltamivir ethyl ester (OEE). We also analysed the docking of MAO-A with OEE or OC in silico. Mouse behaviours after OEE or OC administration were monitored using automated video and computer analysis. Key Results OEE, but not OC, competitively and selectively inhibited human MAO-A. The estimated Ki value was comparable with the Km values of native substrates of MAO-A. Docking simulations in silico based on the tertiary structure of MAO-A suggested that OEE could fit into the inner pocket of the enzyme. Behavioural monitoring using automated video analysis further revealed that OEE, not OC, significantly enhanced spontaneous behavioural activities in mice, such as jumping, rearing, sniffing, turning and walking. Conclusions and Implications Our multilevel analyses suggested OEE to be the cause of the side effects associated with oseltamivir and revealed the molecular mechanism underlying the stimulated behaviours induced by oseltamivir in some circumstances. PMID:23320399

  14. Oseltamivir (tamiflu) induced depressive episode in a female adolescent.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sungho; Joung, Yoo Sook

    2010-12-01

    Oseltamivir was developed for prophylactic and therapeutic use against influenza, specifically targeting the viral enzyme's highly-conserved active site. In recent years, there have been case reports of neuropsychiatric events during or after oseltamivir treatment, in Japan and other countries. However, a search of the literature revealed no such cases in South Korea. We present the case of a 15-year-old female adolescent diagnosed with depressive episode after taking oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is generally well tolerated. Its most frequent adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In influenza patients taking oseltamivir, neuropsychiatric adverse events include delirium, behavioral disturbance, suicide, delusion, panic attack, convulsion, depressed mood, loss of consciousness, etc. Reportedly, such neuropsychiatric adverse events were more common in children than in adults and generally occurred within 48 hours of administration. Here, we report a retrospective review case of an oseltamivir-related neuropsychiatric event in a female adolescent in South Korea. PMID:21253416

  15. Oseltamivir: a first line defense against swine flu.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ritesh; Rewatkar, Prarthana V; Kokil, Ganesh R; Verma, Arunima; Kalra, Atin

    2010-07-01

    Oseltamivir (has known by its brand name 'Tamiflu') is a prodrug, requiring ester hydrolysis for conversion to the active form, Oseltamivir carboxylate. Oseltamivir was the first orally active neuraminidase inhibitor commercially developed by US based Gilead Sciences and is currently marketed by F. Hoffmann-La Roche (Roche). Oseltamivir is an antiviral drug which works by blocking the function of the viral neuraminidase protein. US FDA approved Oseltamivir for prophylaxis of uncomplicated influenza A and B. Currently, Oseltamivir is the only first line defense drug available for the treatment of Swine Flu. Orally Oseltamivir is well tolerated and effective in treatment of influenza in adolescents and adults, including the elderly and patients with chronic cardiac and/or respiratory disease. Many of the pharmaceutical companies targeted Oseltamivir as a block buster molecule. In present review, we have tried to cover chemistry, mode of binding, total synthesis, current patent status, adverse effect and clinical status of Oseltamivir giving emphasis on medicinal chemistry aspect. PMID:20843284

  16. Compliance to oseltamivir among two populations in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom affected by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, November 2009--a waste water epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Singer, Andrew C; Järhult, Josef D; Grabic, Roman; Khan, Ghazanfar A; Fedorova, Ganna; Fick, Jerker; Lindberg, Richard H; Bowes, Michael J; Olsen, Björn; Söderström, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral provision remains the focus of many pandemic preparedness plans, however, there is considerable uncertainty regarding antiviral compliance rates. Here we employ a waste water epidemiology approach to estimate oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) compliance. Oseltamivir carboxylate (oseltamivir's active metabolite) was recovered from two waste water treatment plant (WWTP) catchments within the United Kingdom at the peak of the autumnal wave of the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. Predictions of oseltamivir consumption from detected levels were compared with two sources of national government statistics to derive compliance rates. Scenario and sensitivity analysis indicated between 3-4 and 120-154 people were using oseltamivir during the study period in the two WWTP catchments and a compliance rate between 45-60%. With approximately half the collected antivirals going unused, there is a clear need to alter public health messages to improve compliance. We argue that a near real-time understanding of drug compliance at the scale of the waste water treatment plant (hundreds to millions of people) can potentially help public health messages become more timely, targeted, and demographically sensitive, while potentially leading to less mis- and un-used antiviral, less wastage and ultimately a more robust and efficacious pandemic preparedness plan. PMID:23613721

  17. Evaluation of [11C]oseltamivir uptake into the brain during immune activation by systemic polyinosine-polycytidylic acid injection: a quantitative PET study using juvenile monkey models of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal behaviors of young patients after taking the anti-influenza agent oseltamivir (Tamiflu®, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd., Basel, Switzerland) have been suspected as neuropsychiatric adverse events (NPAEs). Immune response to viral infection is suspected to cause elevation of drug concentration in the brain of adolescents. In the present study, the effect of innate immune activation on the brain uptake of [11C]oseltamivir was quantitatively evaluated in juvenile monkeys. Methods Three 2-year-old monkeys underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scans at baseline and immune-activated conditions. Both scans were conducted under pre-dosing of clinically relevant oseltamivir. The immune activation condition was induced by the intravenous administration of polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). Dynamic [11C]oseltamivir PET scan and serial arterial blood sampling were performed to obtain [11C]oseltamivir kinetics. Brain uptake of [11C]oseltamivr was evaluated by its normalized brain concentration, brain-to-plasma concentration ratio, and plasma-to-brain transfer rate. Plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were also measured. Results Plasma interleukin-6 was elevated after intravenous administration of poly I:C in all monkeys. Brain radioactivity was uniform both at baseline and under poly I:C treatment. The mean brain concentrations of [11C]oseltamivir were 0.0033 and 0.0035% ID/cm3 × kg, the mean brain-to-plasma concentration ratios were 0.58 and 0.65, and the plasma-to-brain transfer rates were 0.0047 and 0.0051 mL/min/cm3 for baseline and poly I:C treatment, respectively. Although these parameters were slightly changed by immune activation, the change was not notable. Conclusions The brain uptake of [11C]oseltamivir was unchanged by poly I:C treatment in juvenile monkeys. This study demonstrated that the innate immune response similar to the immune activation of influenza would not notably change the brain concentration of oseltamivir in

  18. Effect of adenosine system in the action of oseltamivir on behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Hiromura, Makoto; Shiratani, Tomonori; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Honda, Sinichiro; Kosako, Kazuhiro; Soeda, Shinji; Inoue, Kazuhide; Toda, Akihisa

    2015-07-10

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients. We have previously reported that the mechanisms underlying the effects of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1/A2 receptor antagonist, combined with oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is rapidly hydrolyzed to its active form (oseltamivir carboxylate, OCB). In this study, we investigated the effects of an adenosine system and OCB on the action of oseltamivir on mice behavior. Oseltamivir for 1 day (150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone did not affect ambulation at 2 h post-injection. However, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not increase. These enhancements were inhibited by an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, CGS21680 (0.2 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Furthermore, an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, SCH58261 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but SCH58261 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not. Conversely, in phenobarbital (PB)-treated mice, caffeine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, OCB for 1 day (0.3 μg/mouse intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.)) alone increased ambulation. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the adenosine systems and its metabolism. Our findings suggest an interaction between the central blockade of adenosine A2 receptors by caffeine and OCB-induced behavioral changes. PMID:25980995

  19. Potential adverse effects of oseltamivir in rats: males are more vulnerable than females.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Wael M; Al-Kahtani, Mohamed Ali

    2011-09-01

    Oseltamivir is the most widely used antiviral drug for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. However, not much is known about its adverse effects. The potential side effects were investigated in male and female rats (140-170 g). Oseltamivir was administered at 2.2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 5 days. For both genders, treatment with oseltamivir resulted in significant reductions in the hepatic activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase. Also for both genders, oseltamivir produced modest reductions in the hepatic activities of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, quinone oxidoreductase, thioredoxin reductase, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A, as well as hepatic glutathione content. For both genders, neither the kidney functions nor protein profile was affected by oseltamivir. Oseltamivir also caused significant elevation in serum levels of both triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol and in the activity of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, in both genders. For male animals only, oseltamivir treatment elevated the serum level of total cholesterol as well as the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase, and reduced the hepatic activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Oseltamivir caused oxidative stress and acute toxicity in the liver, and disrupted the cholesterol and lipid metabolism but was less likely to cause serious drug interactions. There was a sexual differentiation in these adverse effects, with adverse effects being more evident in male rats. PMID:21861687

  20. Drug Repurposing Identifies Inhibitors of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ju; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Zheng, Jie J

    2016-03-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, oseltamivir, is a widely used anti-influenza drug. However, oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y NA mutation spontaneously emerged as a result of natural genetic drift and drug treatment. Because H275Y and other potential mutations may generate a future pandemic influenza strain that is oseltamivir-resistant, alternative therapy options are needed. Herein, we show that a structure-based computational method can be used to identify existing drugs that inhibit resistant viruses, thereby providing a first line of pharmaceutical defense against this possible scenario. We identified two drugs, nalidixic acid and dorzolamide, that potently inhibit the NA activity of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses with the H275Y NA mutation at very low concentrations, but have no effect on wild-type H1N1 NA even at a much higher concentration, suggesting that the oseltamivir-resistance mutation itself caused susceptibility to these drugs. PMID:26833677

  1. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences. PMID:26339647

  2. Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Chung, G A; Skúlason, V G; Gissurarson, S R; Vilhelmsdóttir, M

    1998-04-01

    Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml. PMID:9795033

  3. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  4. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  5. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolite is any substance produced during metabolism (digestion or other bodily chemical processes). The term metabolite may also refer to the product that remains after a drug is broken down (metabolized) by the body.

  6. Oseltamivir Resistance in Influenza A(H6N2) Caused by an R292K Substitution in Neuraminidase Is Not Maintained in Mallards without Drug Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Mårdnäs, Andreas; Söderström, Hanna; Fedorova, Ganna; Löwenthal, Max; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild waterfowl is the natural reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV); hosted viruses are very variable and provide a source for genetic segments which can reassort with poultry or mammalian adapted IAVs to generate novel species crossing viruses. Additionally, wild waterfowl act as a reservoir for highly pathogenic IAVs. Exposure of wild birds to the antiviral drug oseltamivir may occur in the environment as its active metabolite can be released from sewage treatment plants to river water. Resistance to oseltamivir, or to other neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), in IAVs of wild waterfowl has not been extensively studied. Aim and Methods In a previous in vivo Mallard experiment, an influenza A(H6N2) virus developed oseltamivir resistance by the R292K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA), when the birds were exposed to oseltamivir. In this study we tested if the resistance could be maintained in Mallards without drug exposure. Three variants of resistant H6N2/R292K virus were each propagated during 17 days in five successive pairs of naïve Mallards, while oseltamivir exposure was decreased and removed. Daily fecal samples were analyzed for viral presence, genotype and phenotype. Results and Conclusion Within three days without drug exposure no resistant viruses could be detected by NA sequencing, which was confirmed by functional NAI sensitivity testing. We conclude that this resistant N2 virus could not compete in fitness with wild type subpopulations without oseltamivir drug pressure, and thus has no potential to circulate among wild birds. The results of this study contrast to previous observations of drug induced resistance in an avian H1N1 virus, which was maintained also without drug exposure in Mallards. Experimental observations on persistence of NAI resistance in avian IAVs resemble NAI resistance seen in human IAVs, in which resistant N2 subtypes do not circulate, while N1 subtypes with permissive mutations can circulate without drug pressure. We

  7. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus strain with an H274Y mutation in neuraminidase persists without drug pressure in infected mallards.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Holmberg, Fredrik; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Tolf, Conny; Waldenström, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-04-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and emerging human IAVs often contain gene segments from avian viruses. The active drug metabolite of oseltamivir (oseltamivir carboxylate [OC]), stockpiled as Tamiflu for influenza pandemic preparedness, is not removed by conventional sewage treatment and has been detected in river water. There, it may exert evolutionary pressure on avian IAV in waterfowl, resulting in the development of resistant viral variants. A resistant avian IAV can circulate among wild birds only if resistance does not restrict viral fitness and if the resistant virus can persist without continuous drug pressure. In this in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) study, we tested whether an OC-resistant avian IAV (H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA-H274Y) could retain resistance while drug pressure was gradually removed. Successively infected mallards were exposed to decreasing levels of OC, and fecal samples were analyzed for the neuraminidase sequence and phenotypic resistance. No reversion to wild-type virus was observed during the experiment, which included 17 days of viral transmission among 10 ducks exposed to OC concentrations below resistance induction levels. We conclude that resistance in avian IAV that is induced by exposure of the natural host to OC can persist in the absence of the drug. Thus, there is a risk that human-pathogenic IAVs that evolve from IAVs circulating among wild birds may contain resistance mutations. An oseltamivir-resistant pandemic IAV would pose a substantial public health threat. Therefore, our observations underscore the need for prudent oseltamivir use, upgraded sewage treatment, and surveillance for resistant IAVs in wild birds. PMID:25616792

  8. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  9. Oseltamivir

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the measuring device attached) upside down. Pull back on the plunger slowly until the amount of suspension prescribed by your doctor fills the measuring device to the appropriate marking. Some ...

  10. DHEA metabolites activate estrogen receptors alpha and beta

    PubMed Central

    Michael Miller, Kristy K.; Al-Rayyan, Numan; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Ripp, Sharon L.; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Prough, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels were reported to associate with increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but some carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor studies question this claim. The purpose of this study was to determine how DHEA and its metabolites affect estrogen receptors α or β (ERα or ERβ) -regulated gene transcription and cell proliferation. In transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, androstenediol, DHEA, and DHEA-S activated ERα. In ERβ transfected HepG2 cells, androstenedione, DHEA, androstenediol, and 7-oxo DHEA stimulated reporter activity. ER antagonists ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, general P450 inhibitor miconazole, and aromatase inhibitor exemestane inhibited activation by DHEA or metabolites in transfected cells. ERβ-selective antagonist R,R-THC (R,R-cis-diethyl tetrahydrochrysene) inhibited DHEA and DHEA metabolite transcriptional activity in ERβ-transfected cells. Expression of endogenous estrogen-regulated genes: pS2, progesterone receptor, cathepsin D1, and nuclear respiratory factor-1 was increased by DHEA and its metabolites in an ER-subtype, gene, and cell-specific manner. DHEA metabolites, but not DHEA, competed with 17β-estradiol for ERα and ERβ binding and stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, demonstrating that DHEA metabolites interact directly with ERα and ERβ in vitro, modulating estrogen target genes in vivo. PMID:23123738

  11. Coadministration of Hedera helix L. Extract Enabled Mice to Overcome Insufficient Protection against Influenza A/PR/8 Virus Infection under Suboptimal Treatment with Oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun-Hye; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Shim, Aeri; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Jeong, Hyeon Gun; Kim, Jong Geal; Seo, Sang-Uk; Kim, HyunPyo; Kwon, YongSoo; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Several anti-influenza drugs that reduce disease manifestation exist, and although these drugs provide clinical benefits in infected patients, their efficacy is limited by the emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses. In the current study, we assessed the therapeutic strategy of enhancing the antiviral efficacy of an existing neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, by coadministering with the leaf extract from Hedera helix L, commonly known as ivy. Ivy extract has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihelminthic properties. In the present study, we investigated its potential antiviral properties against influenza A/PR/8 (PR8) virus in a mouse model with suboptimal oseltamivir that mimics a poor clinical response to antiviral drug treatment. Suboptimal oseltamivir resulted in insufficient protection against PR8 infection. Oral administration of ivy extract with suboptimal oseltamivir increased the antiviral activity of oseltamivir. Ivy extract and its compounds, particularly hedrasaponin F, significantly reduced the cytopathic effect in PR8-infected A549 cells in the presence of oseltamivir. Compared with oseltamivir treatment alone, coadministration of the fraction of ivy extract that contained the highest proportion of hedrasaponin F with oseltamivir decreased pulmonary inflammation in PR8-infected mice. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, were reduced by treatment with oseltamivir and the fraction of ivy extract. Analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the bronchial alveolar of PR8-infected mice revealed that CD11b+Ly6G+ and CD11b+Ly6Cint cells were recruited after virus infection; coadministration of the ivy extract fraction with oseltamivir reduced infiltration of these inflammatory cells. In a model of suboptimal oseltamivir treatment, coadministration of ivy extract fraction that includes hedrasaponin F increased protection against PR8 infection that could be

  12. Coadministration of Hedera helix L. Extract Enabled Mice to Overcome Insufficient Protection against Influenza A/PR/8 Virus Infection under Suboptimal Treatment with Oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Aeri; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Jeong, Hyeon Gun; Kim, Jong Geal; Seo, Sang-Uk; Kim, HyunPyo; Kwon, YongSoo; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Several anti-influenza drugs that reduce disease manifestation exist, and although these drugs provide clinical benefits in infected patients, their efficacy is limited by the emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses. In the current study, we assessed the therapeutic strategy of enhancing the antiviral efficacy of an existing neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, by coadministering with the leaf extract from Hedera helix L, commonly known as ivy. Ivy extract has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihelminthic properties. In the present study, we investigated its potential antiviral properties against influenza A/PR/8 (PR8) virus in a mouse model with suboptimal oseltamivir that mimics a poor clinical response to antiviral drug treatment. Suboptimal oseltamivir resulted in insufficient protection against PR8 infection. Oral administration of ivy extract with suboptimal oseltamivir increased the antiviral activity of oseltamivir. Ivy extract and its compounds, particularly hedrasaponin F, significantly reduced the cytopathic effect in PR8-infected A549 cells in the presence of oseltamivir. Compared with oseltamivir treatment alone, coadministration of the fraction of ivy extract that contained the highest proportion of hedrasaponin F with oseltamivir decreased pulmonary inflammation in PR8-infected mice. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, were reduced by treatment with oseltamivir and the fraction of ivy extract. Analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the bronchial alveolar of PR8-infected mice revealed that CD11b+Ly6G+ and CD11b+Ly6Cint cells were recruited after virus infection; coadministration of the ivy extract fraction with oseltamivir reduced infiltration of these inflammatory cells. In a model of suboptimal oseltamivir treatment, coadministration of ivy extract fraction that includes hedrasaponin F increased protection against PR8 infection that could be

  13. Metabolites and DNA adduct formation from flavoenzyme-activated porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Pan, S S; Iracki, T

    1988-08-01

    Porfiromycin was reductively metabolized by NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase and xanthine oxidase under anaerobic conditions. The production of metabolites varied with the pH and the contents of the reaction buffer. In Tris buffer, two major metabolites were produced at pH 7.5 and above, whereas one major metabolite was produced at pH 6.5. The three major metabolites were separated and isolated by HPLC. Identification by californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry showed that the two major metabolites from pH 7.5 were (trans) and (cis)-forms of 7-amino-1-hydroxyl-2-methylaminomitosene and the major metabolite from pH 6.5 was 7-amino-2-methylaminomitosene. All three major metabolites showed substitutions at the C-1 position. DNA was alkylated readily by enzyme-activated porfiromycin. Digestion of porfiromycin-alkylated DNA by DNase, snake venom phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphatase resulted in an insoluble nuclease-resistant fraction and a soluble fraction. The nuclease-resistant fraction reflected a high content of cross-linked adducts. Upon HPLC analysis, the solubilized fraction contained two monofunctionally linked porfiromycin adducts and a possibly cross-linked dinucleotide. The major adduct was isolated by HPLC and identified by NMR, as N2-(2'-deoxyguanosyl)-7-amino-2-methylaminomitosene. The N2 position of deoxyguanosine appeared as the major monofunctional alkylating site for DNA alkylation by porfiromycin. Thus, mitomycin C and porfiromycin (which differs from mitomycin C only by the addition of a methyl group to the aziridine nitrogen) share the same enzymatic activating mechanism that leads to the formation of the same types of metabolites and the same specificity of DNA alkylation. PMID:3412325

  14. The influence of oseltamivir carboxylate and oseltamivir on hemagglutinin inhibition and microneutralization test.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Ishii, T; Honda, A

    2008-12-01

    The administration of oseltamivir in humans is suggested to affect the results of hemagglutinin-inhibition test. To investigate this phenomenon, the concentrations of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in sera obtained from oseltamivir-administered individuals were quantified by the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system. The analysis revealed that the concentrations of OC in sera obtained at 4 and 7h after administration were greater than those at 24h after administration. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that OC or oseltamivir added in the sera affects the expression level of sialic acid alpha2,3-Gal linkages on horse erythrocytes; however, no effect was observed on the expression level of these linkages on chicken erythrocytes. Moreover, the addition of oseltamivir or OC may yield pseudopositive results in hemagglutinin-inhibition assays. These results suggest that the pseudopositive results obtained in hemagglutinin-inhibition assays occurred by the presence of OC, and that it is very important to take care of the patients in the prescription of oseltamivir when anti-influenza investigations are performed. PMID:18755222

  15. Influenza A(H7N9) virus acquires resistance-related neuraminidase I222T substitution when infected mallards are exposed to low levels of oseltamivir in water.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  16. Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Acquires Resistance-Related Neuraminidase I222T Substitution When Infected Mallards Are Exposed to Low Levels of Oseltamivir in Water

    PubMed Central

    Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  17. Secondary Metabolites from Three Florida Sponges with Antidepressant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kochanowska, Anna J.; Rao, Karumanchi V.; Childress, Suzanne; El-Alfy, Abir; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Kelly, Michelle; Stewart, Gina S.; Sufka, Kenneth J.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Brominated indole alkaloids are a common class of metabolites reported from sponges of the order Verongida. Herein we report the isolation, structure determination, and activity of metabolites from three Florida sponges, namely, Verongula rigida (order Verongida, family Aplysinidae), Smenospongia aurea, and S. cerebriformis (order Dictyoceratida, family Thorectidae). All three species were investigated chemically, revealing similarities in secondary metabolites. Brominated compounds, as well as sesquiterpene quinones and hydroquinones, were identified from both V. rigida and S. aurea despite their apparent taxonomic differences at the ordinal level. Similar metabolites found in these distinct sponge species of two different genera provide evidence for a microbial origin of the metabolites. Isolated compounds were evaluated in the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) and the chick anxiety–depression continuum model. Among the isolated compounds, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (1) exhibited significant antidepressant-like action in the rodent FST model, while 5-bromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (2) caused significant reduction of locomotor activity indicative of a potential sedative action. The current study provides ample evidence that marine natural products with the diversity of brominated marine alkaloids will provide potential leads for antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs. PMID:18217716

  18. Different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate: a potent influenza neuraminidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianzhi; Xu, Wenfang

    2008-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is the only orally active anti-influenza drug that potently inhibit neuraminidase. The recent emergence of avian flu, especially the H5N1 type, makes the situation of Tamiflu supply and demand increasingly serious. Further optimization of the current commercial approach and exploration of new synthetic routes are urgent. Here, different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate are reviewed, including discovery and improved synthetic route from (-)-quinic acid or (-)-shikimic acid, new asymmetric synthesis via catalytic desymmetrization of a meso-aziridine (CDMA), Diels-Alder Reaction and from other available materials. PMID:19075659

  19. Synthesis of the alkylated active metabolite of tipidogrel.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shuang; Xia, Guangping; Liu, Ying; Tao, Zunwei; Chen, Ligong; Liu, Dengke

    2015-04-15

    Tipidogrel (3), an effective anti-platelet drug candidate working by irreversibly inhibiting P2Y12 receptor, holds great promise in overcoming clopidogrel resistance and increasing bioavailability. As a prodrug like other thienopyridines, it metabolizes through thiophene ring opening to form active metabolites 3a and 3b, nevertheless they are easily to form disulfide bond. Derivatization of 3a and 3b via alkylation with MPBr can prevent disulfide conjugation and ensure reliable pharmacokinetic results. Thus, in order to support its pre-clinical studies on efficiencies in the formation of tipidogrel active metabolites, 13a and 13b were synthesized via seven steps of chemosynthesis and incubation with MPBr in rat plasma in vitro. The resulting crude productions were purified by semi-preparative HPLC to give Z configuration 13a and E configuration 13b. In LC-MS/MS spectra, they showed identical fragmentation pattern and retention time with M-13a and M-13b, the MPBr-derivatives of active metabolites of tipidogrel in rats. Thus, 13a and 13b were the anticipated alkylated active metabolite of tipidogrel. In addition, in the nucleophilic substitution of thioacetate with compound 11, besides the anticipated compounds 12a and 12b, their isomers compounds 12c and 12d were detected, whose structures were confirmed and the corresponding mechanism was presented. PMID:25801935

  20. A Novel I221L Substitution in Neuraminidase Confers High-Level Resistance to Oseltamivir in Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Escuret, Vanessa; Collins, Patrick J.; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Cattle, Nicholas; Ferraris, Olivier; Sabatier, Murielle; Frobert, Emilie; Caro, Valérie; Skehel, John J.; Gamblin, Steve; Valla, Frédéric; Valette, Martine; Ottmann, Michèle; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Lina, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Influenza B viruses with a novel I221L substitution in neuraminidase (NA) conferring high-level resistance to oseltamivir were isolated from an immunocompromised patient after prolonged oseltamivir treatment. Methods. Enzymatic characterization of the NAs (Km, Ki) and the in vitro fitness of viruses carrying wild-type or mutated (I221L) NA genes were evaluated. Proportions of wild-type and mutated NA genes were directly quantified in the patient samples. Structural characterizations by X-ray crystallography of a wild-type and I221L variant NA were performed. Results. The Km and Ki revealed that the I221L variant NA had approximately 84 and 51 times lower affinity for oseltamivir carboxylate and zanamivir, respectively, compared with wild-type NA. Viruses with a wild-type or I221L variant NA had similar growth kinetics in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and 5 passages in MDCK cells revealed no reversion of the I221L substitution. The crystal structure of the I221L NA and oseltamivir complex showed that the leucine side chain protrudes into the hydrophobic pocket of the active site that accommodates the pentyloxy substituent of oseltamivir. Conclusions. Enzyme kinetic and NA structural analyses provide an explanation for the high level of resistance to oseltamivir while retaining good fitness of viruses carrying I221L variant NA. PMID:24795482

  1. Occurrence and fate of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) and amantadine in sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the occurrence and fate of the two antiviral drugs oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)-the active metabolite of Tamiflu-and amantadine (AMT) at three sewage treatment plants (STPs) during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 influenza seasons in Japan. Both compounds were detected in all samples analyzed. The concentrations in raw influents at the STPs ranged from 140 to 460 ng L(-1) OC and from 184 to 538 ng L(-1) AMT. Primary treatment gave no substantial removal of the drugs (OC, 2-9%; AMT, 7-17%). Biological nutrient-removal-based secondary treatment (anoxic-oxic-anoxic-oxic and anaerobic-anoxic-oxic) removed 20-37% of OC, whereas extended-aeration-based conventional activated sludge treatment removed <20%. STPs using primary plus biological secondary treatment removed <50% of the drugs. The incorporation of tertiary treatment by ozonation removed >90%. Ozonation after secondary treatment in STPs will be necessary during an influenza pandemic to reduce the risks associated with the widespread use of antiviral drugs. PMID:20692015

  2. Metabolism of a highly selective gelatinase inhibitor generates active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijoon; Villegas-Estrada, Adriel; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Toth, Marta; Kreitinger, Gloria; Forbes, Christopher; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2007-11-01

    (4-Phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (inhibitor 1) is a highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which is showing considerable promise in animal models for cancer and stroke. Despite demonstrated potent, selective, and effective inhibition of gelatinases both in vitro and in vivo, the compound is rapidly metabolized, implying that the likely activity in vivo is due to a metabolite rather than the compound itself. To this end, metabolism of inhibitor 1 was investigated in in vitro systems. Four metabolites were identified by LC/MS-MS and the structures of three of them were further validated by comparison with authentic synthetic samples. One metabolite, 4-(4-thiiranylmethanesulfonylphenoxy)phenol (compound 21), was generated by hydroxylation of the terminal phenyl group of 1. This compound was investigated in kinetics of inhibition of several matrix metalloproteinases. This metabolite was a more potent slow-binding inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) than the parent compound 1, but it also served as a slow-binding inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14, the upstream activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2. PMID:17927722

  3. Investigations of fungal secondary metabolites with potential anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Balde, ElHadj Saidou; Andolfi, Anna; Bruyère, Céline; Cimmino, Alessio; Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Vurro, Maurizio; Damme, Marc Van; Altomare, Claudio; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Evidente, Antonio

    2010-05-28

    Fourteen metabolites, isolated from phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, were evaluated for their in vitro antigrowth activity for six distinct cancer cell lines, using the MTT colorimetric assay. Bislongiquinolide (1) and dihydrotrichodimerol (5), which belong to the bisorbicillinoid structural class, displayed significant growth inhibitory activity against the six cancer cell lines studied, while the remaining compounds displayed weak or no activity. The data show that 1 and 5 have similar growth inhibitory activities with respect to those cancer cell lines that display certain levels of resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli or those that are sensitive to apoptosis. Quantitative videomicroscopy analysis revealed that 1 and 5 exert their antiproliferative effect through cytostatic and not cytotoxic activity. The preliminary results from the current study have stimulated further structure-activity investigations with respect to the growth inhibitory activity of compounds belonging to the bisorbicillinoid group. PMID:20415482

  4. Activity of Praziquantel Enantiomers and Main Metabolites against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Isabel; Ingram-Sieber, Katrin; Cowan, Noemi; Todd, Matthew; Robertson, Murray N.; Meli, Claudia; Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    A racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers of praziquantel (PZQ) is currently the treatment of choice for schistosomiasis. Though the S enantiomer and the metabolites are presumed to contribute only a little to the activity of the drug, in-depth side-by-side studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro activities of PZQ and its main metabolites, namely, R- and S-cis- and R- and S-trans-4′-hydroxypraziquantel, against adult worms and newly transformed schistosomula (NTS). Additionally, we explored the in vivo activity and hepatic shift (i.e., the migration of the worms to the liver) produced by each PZQ enantiomer in mice. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of R-PZQ, S-PZQ, and R-trans- and R-cis-4′-hydroxypraziquantel of 0.02, 5.85, 4.08, and 2.42 μg/ml, respectively, for adult S. mansoni were determined in vitro. S-trans- and S-cis-4′-hydroxypraziquantel were not active at 100 μg/ml. These results are consistent with microcalorimetry data and studies with NTS. In vivo, single 400-mg/kg oral doses of R-PZQ and S-PZQ achieved worm burden reductions of 100 and 19%, respectively. Moreover, worms treated in vivo with S-PZQ displayed an only transient hepatic shift and returned to the mesenteric veins within 24 h. Our data confirm that R-PZQ is the main effector molecule, while S-PZQ and the metabolites do not play a significant role in the antischistosomal properties of PZQ. PMID:24982093

  5. Hsp90 Activity Modulation by Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Terracciano, Stefania; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra

    2015-09-01

    Hsp90 is an evolutionarily conserved adenosine triphosphate-dependent molecular chaperone and is one of the most abundant proteins in the cells (1-3 %). Hsp90 is induced when a cell undergoes various types of environmental stresses such as heat, cold, or oxygen deprivation. It is involved in the turnover, trafficking, and activity of client proteins, including apoptotic factors, protein kinases, transcription factors, signaling proteins, and a number of oncoproteins. Most of the Hsp90 client proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and survival, and include kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, transcription factors, and other proteins associated with almost all the hallmarks of cancer. Consistent with these diverse activities, genetic and biochemical studies have demonstrated the implication of Hsp90 in a range of diseases, including cancer, making this chaperone an interesting target for drug research.During the last few decades, plant secondary metabolites have been studied as a major source for lead compounds in drug discovery. Recently, several plant-derived small molecules have been discovered exhibiting inhibitory activity towards Hsp90, such as epigallocatechin gallate, gedunin, lentiginosine, celastrol, and deguelin. In this work, an overview of plant secondary metabolites interfering with Hsp90 activities is provided. PMID:26227505

  6. Investigating Clinically Adequate Concentrations of Oseltamivir Carboxylate in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis Using a Population Pharmacokinetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kayla Yi Ting; Robson, Richard; Subramoney, Vishak; Clinch, Barry; Rayner, Craig R.; Gibiansky, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) are at heightened risk for influenza, but the optimal oseltamivir dosage regimen for treating or preventing influenza in this high-risk population is still uncertain. Pharmacokinetic data for 24 adults with ESRD were pooled from a single-dose and a multiple-dose study to develop a population pharmacokinetic model using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The final model comprised five compartments, two each to describe the systemic pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir phosphate and its metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), and a delay compartment to describe oseltamivir metabolism. Estimated OC clearance in the model was markedly faster during HD sessions (7.43 liters/min) than at other times (0.19 liter/min). Model simulations showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza treatment, producing trough OC concentrations above the median value achieved with the 75-mg twice-daily regimen in patients with normal renal function and peak concentrations below the highest oseltamivir exposures known to be well tolerated (median exposures after twice-daily dosing of 450 mg). Administration of the first dose following diagnosis of influenza need not wait until after the next HD session: addition of a single 30-mg dose during the 12 h before the next HD session raises OC exposures quickly without posing any safety risk. Further simulation showed that 30 mg oseltamivir given after every other HD session is the most suitable regimen for influenza prophylaxis. PMID:26282419

  7. Antioxidant activity of nimesulide and its main metabolites.

    PubMed

    Facino, R M; Carini, M; Aldini, G

    1993-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of nimesulide and its main metabolites, 4'-hydroxynimesulide (M1) and 2-(4'-hydroxyphenoxy)-4-N-acetylamino-methansulfonanilide (M2), was investigated using 2 in vitro models: NADPH-supported lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes (marker MDA formation) and xanthine/xanthine oxidase, iron-promoted depolymerisation of hyaluronic acid, determined by gel permeation chromatographic analysis (marker molecular weight distribution). In the lipid peroxidation model, all the compounds inhibited MDA formation in a concentration-dependent manner, although with different potencies; the maximum scavenging effect was observed for M1 [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 30 mumol/L; M2 IC50 = 0.5 mmol/L; nimesulide = 0.8 mmol/L]. Nimesulide was more active than its metabolites in preventing OH-induced depolymerisation of hyaluronic acid, with a 50% effective concentration of approximately 230 mumol/L, which was fairly comparable to that of tenoxicam. This protective effect was due to the OH.-entrapping capacity of the drug, which, in the Fenton-driven model, is easily converted, via OH. attack, to M1 and putatively to 2-hydroxy-4-nitro-methansulfonanilide. PMID:7506157

  8. Time Economical Total Synthesis of (-)-Oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Ogasawara, Shin

    2016-07-15

    A time economical 60 min total synthesis of (-)-oseltamivir was accomplished in a single reaction vessel over five steps. One of the key issues is reduction in the number of steps by eliminating lengthy reaction steps with substitution of a rapid epimerization step. A catalytic system consisting of three reagents, namely, diphenylprolinol silyl ether, thiourea, and acid, was developed for a rapid asymmetric Michael reaction with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. All reactions were optimized in terms of not only yield and selectivity but also reaction time. PMID:27378379

  9. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v viruses currently circulating in New Zealand are sensitive to oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hall, R J; Peacey, M P; Ralston, J C; Bocacao, J; Ziki, M; Gunn, W; Quirk, A; Huang, Q S

    2009-07-30

    New Zealand, like other southern hemisphere countries with a temperate climate, has been in the winter period with seasonal influenza activity. New Zealand has also experienced a dramatic increase in the number of cases of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v virus. Early reports from the northern hemisphere at the beginning of the pandemic showed that the virus was sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir. In this study we report that pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v viruses currently circulating in New Zealand are sensitive to oseltamivir, but seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses - the co-circulating predominant seasonal strain, is resistant to oseltamivir. PMID:19643060

  10. Post-marketing assessment of neuropsychiatric adverse events in influenza patients treated with oseltamivir: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P; Rayner, Craig R; Thakrar, Bharat T; Dutkowski, Regina; Koerner, Annette; Chu, Tom; Sirzen-Zelenskaya, Alexandra; Britschgi, Markus; Bansod, Sudhir; Donner, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    A 2008 review by our group concluded that the risk of neuropsychiatric adverse events (NPAEs) in influenza patients was not increased by oseltamivir exposure, and did not identify any mechanism by which oseltamivir or its metabolites could cause or worsen such events. The current article reviews new information on this topic. Between September 16, 2007 and May 15, 2010, 1,805 spontaneously-reported NPAEs were identified in 1,330 patients receiving oseltamivir: 767 (42.5%) from Japan, 296 (16.4%) from the USA, and 742 (41.1%) from other countries. NPAEs were more common in children: 1,072 (59.4%) events were in those aged ≤16 years. NPAEs often occurred within 48 h of treatment initiation (953 events; 52.8%). Nearly half of the events were serious in nature (838; 46.4%). The three largest categories of events were abnormal behavior (457 events, 25.3%), miscellaneous psychiatric events (370; 20.5%), and delusions/perceptual disturbances (316 events, 17.5%). A total of 1,545 events (85.6%) in eight different categories were considered to be delirium or delirium-like. Twenty-eight suicide-related events were reported. A US healthcare claims database analysis showed that the risk of NPAEs in 7,798 oseltamivir-treated patients was no higher than that in 10,411 patients not on antivirals, but a study on oseltamivir and abnormal behavior in Japan was less conclusive. NPAE frequency in oseltamivir-exposed Japanese and Taiwanese children with influenza was the same as in unexposed children. New analysis of the UK General Practice Research Database showed that the relative adjusted risk of NPAEs in influenza patients was 2.18-times higher than in the general population. Other epidemiology studies report frequent occurrence of encephalitis and similar disorders in influenza patients independently of oseltamivir exposure. The new data support the findings of the original assessment. Evidence suggests that influenza-related encephalopathies are caused by influenza

  11. Mutagenic activity of austocystins - secondary metabolites of Aspergillus ustus

    SciTech Connect

    Kfir, R.; Johannsen, E.; Vleggaar, R.

    1986-11-01

    Mycotoxins constitute a group of toxic secondary fungal metabolites. Fungi that produce these toxins frequently contaminate food and feed, creating a potential threat to human and animal health. Biological activities of mycotoxins include, amongst others: toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, which can be expressed with or without metabolic activation. Austocystins are similar in structure to aflatoxin B/sup 1/ and are probably synthesized in a similar manner. The Ames Salmonella test, a widely accepted method employed for the detection of mutagenic activity of various chemical compounds was used for testing the mutagenic activity of different mycotoxins. As aflatoxin B/sup 1/ was found by the Ames test to be highly mutagenic, the same test was applied for the study of possible mutagenicity of the austocystins. The mutagenic activity of these compounds was studied with and without metabolic activation using two tester strains of S. typhimurium, one capable of detecting frame shift mutation (strain TA98) and the other capable of detecting base pair substitution (strain TA100).

  12. Depsides: Lichen Metabolites Active against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thi Huyen; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Lalli, Claudia; Boustie, Joël; Samson, Michel

    2015-01-01

    A thorough phytochemical study of Stereocaulon evolutum was conducted, for the isolation of structurally related atranorin derivatives. Indeed, pilot experiments suggested that atranorin (1), the main metabolite of this lichen, would interfere with the lifecycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Eight compounds, including one reported for the first time (2), were isolated and characterized. Two analogs (5, 6) were also synthesized, to enlarge the panel of atranorin-related structures. Most of these compounds were active against HCV, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of about 10 to 70 µM, with depsides more potent than monoaromatic phenols. The most effective inhibitors (1, 5 and 6) were then added at different steps of the HCV lifecycle. Interestingly, atranorin (1), bearing an aldehyde function at C-3, inhibited only viral entry, whereas the synthetic compounds 5 and 6, bearing a hydroxymethyl and a methyl function, respectively, at C-3 interfered with viral replication. PMID:25793970

  13. Biologically Active Metabolites Produced by the Basidiomycete Quambalaria cyanescens

    PubMed Central

    Stodůlková, Eva; Císařová, Ivana; Kolařík, Miroslav; Chudíčková, Milada; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Pavlů, Barbora; Černý, Jan; Flieger, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Four strains of the fungus Quambalaria cyanescens (Basidiomycota: Microstromatales), were used for the determination of secondary metabolites production and their antimicrobial and biological activities. A new naphthoquinone named quambalarine A, (S)-(+)-3-(5-ethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yliden)-5,7,8-trihydroxy-2-oxo-1,4-naphthoquinone (1), together with two known naphthoquinones, 3-hexanoyl-2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (named here as quambalarine B, 2) and mompain, 2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (3) were isolated. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography, NMR and MS spectrometry. Quambalarine A (1) had a broad antifungal and antibacterial activity and is able inhibit growth of human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and fungi co-occurring with Q. cyanescens in bark beetle galleries including insect pathogenic species Beauveria bassiana. Quambalarine B (2) was active against several fungi and mompain mainly against bacteria. The biological activity against human-derived cell lines was selective towards mitochondria (2 and 3); after long-term incubation with 2, mitochondria were undetectable using a mitochondrial probe. A similar effect on mitochondria was observed also for environmental competitors of Q. cyanescens from the genus Geosmithia. PMID:25723150

  14. Oseltamivir for influenza infection in children: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a common disease affecting many children each year. In a number of cases, particularly in children <2 years old and in those with severe chronic underlying disease, influenza can be complicated by lower respiratory tract infections, acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, febrile seizures, dehydration or encephalopathy. Oseltamivir is the influenza virus drug that is most commonly studied in children for both the treatment and prevention of influenza. To avoid the risk that children with mild influenza or patients suffering from different viral infections receive oseltamivir, oseltamivir treatment should be recommended only in severe influenza cases, especially if confirmed by reliable laboratory tests. However, therapy must be initiated considering the risk of complications and the presence of severe clinical manifestations at age- and weight-appropriate doses. Because the vaccine remains the best option for preventing influenza and its complications, prophylaxis using oseltamivir should only be considered in select patients. PMID:26616633

  15. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    Drugs that are administered to man may be biotransformed to yield metabolites that are pharmacologically active. The therapeutic and toxic activities of drug metabolites and the species in which this activity was demonstrated are compiled for the metabolites of 58 drugs. The metabolite to parent drug ratio in the plasma of non-uraemic man and the percentage urinary excretion of the metabolite in non-uraemic man are also tabulated. Those active metabolites with significant pharmacological activity and high plasma levels, both relative to that of the parent drug, will probably contribute substantially to the pharmacological effect ascribed to the parent drug. Active metabolites may accumulate in patients with end stage renal disease if renal excretion is a major elimination pathway for the metabolite. This is true even if the active metabolite is a minor metabolite of the parent drug, as long as the minor metabolite is not further biotransformed and is mainly excreted in the urine. Minor metabolite accumulation may also occur if it is further biotransformed by a pathway inhibited in uraemia. Some clinical examples of the accumulation of active drug metabolites in patients with renal failure are: (a) The abolition of premature ventricular contractions and prevention of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia in some cardiac patients with poor renal function treated with procainamide are associated with high levels of N-acetylprocainamide. (b) The severe irritability and twitching seen in a uraemic patient treated with pethidine (meperidine) are associated with high levels of norpethidine. (c) The severe muscle weakness and tenderness seen in patients with renal failure receiving clofibrate are associated with excessive accumulation of the free acid metabolite of clofibrate. (d) Patients with severe renal insufficiency taking allopurinol appear to experience a higher incidence of side reactions, possibly due to the accumulation of oxipurinol. (e) Accumulation of free and

  16. Use of embryonated chicken egg as a model to study the susceptibility of avian influenza H9N2 viruses to oseltamivir carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Tare, Deeksha S; Pawar, Shailesh D

    2015-11-01

    Avian influenza (AI) H9N2 viruses are endemic in many bird species, and human infections of H9N2 viruses have been reported. Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu(®)) is the available antiviral drug for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. There are no reports of use of embryonated chicken egg as a model to study susceptibility of AI viruses to oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), the active metabolite. The present study was undertaken to explore the use of embryonated chicken eggs as a model for testing OC against the AI H9N2 viruses. A total of three AI H9N2 viruses, isolated in poultry in India, were used. Various virus dilutions were tested against 14μg/ml of OC. Three methods, namely (1) the in vitro virus-drug treatment, (2) drug delivery and virus challenge by allantoic route, and (3) drug delivery by albumen route and virus challenge by allantoic route were explored. The viruses were also tested using the fluorescence-based neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) assay. There was significant inhibition (p<0.05) of the H9N2 viruses in presence of OC. The infectious virus titers as well as hemagglutination titers were significantly lower in presence of OC as compared to controls. The in vitro treatment of virus and drug; and drug and virus delivery at the same time by allantoic route showed significantly higher inhibition (p<0.05) of virus growth than that by the albumen route. In the NAI assay, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of the H9N2 viruses were within the standard range for known susceptible reference virus. In conclusion, the H9N2 viruses used in the study were susceptible to OC. Embryonated chicken egg could be used as a model to study susceptibility of AI viruses to antiviral drugs. PMID:26297959

  17. A comparative study of the interaction of Tamiflu and Oseltamivir carboxylate with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Vishkaee, Tahereh Sadigh; Mohajerani, Niloufar; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-02-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is a pro-drug that is metabolized to its active form (Oseltamivir carboxylate), after oral administration. OC inhibits influenza A and B neuraminidases in vitro and OP inhibits influenza virus infection and replication in vitro. Serum albumin is the most abundant of the proteins in the circulatory system of a wide variety of organisms and plays an important role in the transport and deposition of many drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of BSA with Tamiflu and Oseltamivir carboxylate in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using a constant protein concentration and various drug contents. FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the drugs binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of drug complexation on protein secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that OP and OC bind BSA with overall binding constants of K(OP-BSA)=1.88 (±0.16)×10(4)M(-1) and K(OC-BSA)=5.7 (±0.09)×10(2)M(-1). Drug complexation alters protein conformation by major reduction of α-helix and random coil and increase of β-sheet and turn structures that indicate a partial protein destabilization. The results suggest that BSA might act as carrier proteins for OP in delivering it to target molecules. PMID:23353784

  18. Prevalence of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Resistant to Oseltamivir in Shiraz, Iran, During 2012 - 2013

    PubMed Central

    Khodadad, Nastaran; Moattari, Afagh; Shamsi Shahr Abadi, Mahmoud; Kadivar, Mohammad Rahim; Sarvari, Jamal; Tavakoli, Forough; Pirbonyeh, Neda; Emami, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oseltamivir has been used as a drug of choice for the prophylaxis and treatment of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection across the world. However, the most frequently identified oseltamivir resistant virus, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, exhibit the H275Y substitution in NA gene. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and phylogenetic relationships of oseltamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Shiraz, Iran. Patients and Methods: Throat swab samples were collected from 200 patients with influenza-like disease from December 2012 until February 2013. A total of 77 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 positive strains were identified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Oseltamivir resistance was detected using quantal assay and nested-PCR method. The NA gene sequencing was conducted to detect oseltamivir-resistant mutants and establish the phylogeny of the prevalent influenza variants. Results: Our results revealed that A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses present in these samples were susceptible to oseltamivir, and contained 5 site specific mutations (V13G, V106I, V241I, N248D, and N369K) in NA gene. These mutations correlated with increasing expression and enzymatic activity of NA protein in the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which were closely related to a main influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cluster isolated around the world. Conclusions: A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, identified in this study in Shiraz, Iran, contained 5 site specific mutations and were susceptible to oseltamivir. PMID:26464773

  19. A Randomized, Crossover Study to Evaluate the Pharmacokinetics of Amantadine and Oseltamivir Administered Alone and in Combination

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Dennis; Roy, Sandip; Rayner, Craig; Amer, Ahmed; Howard, Dan; Smith, James R.; Evans, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The threat of potential pandemic influenza requires a reevaluation of licensed therapies for the prophylaxis or treatment of avian H5N1 infection that may adapt to man. Among the therapies considered for use in pandemic influenza is the co-administration of ion channel and neuraminidase inhibitors, both to potentially increase efficacy as well as to decrease the emergence of resistant isolates. To better understand the potential for drug interactions, a cross-over, randomized, open-label trial was conducted with amantadine, 100 mg po bid, and oseltamivir, 75 mg po bid, given alone or in combination for 5 days. Each subject (N = 17) served as their own control and was administered each drug alone or in combination, with appropriate wash-out. Co-administration with oseltamivir had no clinically significant effect on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of amantadine [mean ratios (90% CI) for AUC0-12 0.93 (0.89, 0.98) and Cmax 0.96 (0.90, 1.02)]. Similarly, amantadine co-administration did not affect oseltamivir PK [AUC0-12 0.92 (0.86, 0.99) and Cmax 0.85 (0.73, 0.99)] or the PK of the metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate [AUC0-12 0.98 (0.95, 1.02) and Cmax 0.95 (0.89, 1.01)]. In this small trial there was no evidence of an increase in adverse events. Although many more subjects would need to be studied to rule out a synergistic increase in adverse events, the combination in this small human drug-drug interaction trial appears safe and without pharmacokinetic consequences. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00416962 PMID:18074029

  20. Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Heath

    2016-01-01

    A debate about the market-leading influenza antiviral medication, oseltamivir, which initially focused on treatment for generally mild illness, has been expanded to question the wisdom of stockpiling for use in future influenza pandemics. Although randomized controlled trial evidence confirms that oseltamivir will reduce symptom duration by 17–25 hours among otherwise healthy adolescents and adults with community-managed disease, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effectiveness of oseltamivir against more serious outcomes. Observational studies, although criticized on methodologic grounds, suggest that oseltamivir given early can reduce the risk for death by half among persons hospitalized with confirmed infection caused by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H5N1) viruses. However, available randomized controlled trial data may not be able to capture the effect of oseltamivir use among hospitalized patients with severe disease. We assert that data on outpatients with relatively mild disease should not form the basis for policies on the management of more severe disease. PMID:27191818

  1. Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Kelly, Heath

    2016-06-01

    A debate about the market-leading influenza antiviral medication, oseltamivir, which initially focused on treatment for generally mild illness, has been expanded to question the wisdom of stockpiling for use in future influenza pandemics. Although randomized controlled trial evidence confirms that oseltamivir will reduce symptom duration by 17-25 hours among otherwise healthy adolescents and adults with community-managed disease, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effectiveness of oseltamivir against more serious outcomes. Observational studies, although criticized on methodologic grounds, suggest that oseltamivir given early can reduce the risk for death by half among persons hospitalized with confirmed infection caused by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H5N1) viruses. However, available randomized controlled trial data may not be able to capture the effect of oseltamivir use among hospitalized patients with severe disease. We assert that data on outpatients with relatively mild disease should not form the basis for policies on the management of more severe disease. PMID:27191818

  2. COMPARISON OF CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY, RESIDUE LEVELS, AND URINARY METABOLITE EXCRETION OF RATS EXPOSED TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Blood cholinesterase activity, urinary levels of phenolic and organophosphorus metabolites, and residues of intact compounds in blood and fat were determined following exposure of rats to organophosphorus pesticides. The eight pesticides studied included representative halogenate...

  3. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  4. Influenza and the use of oseltamivir in children.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Ergin; Karbuz, Adem; Kendirli, Tanıl

    2016-06-01

    Influenza is an infectious disease which causes significant morbidity and mortality. In the USA, approximately 200 000 hospital admissions and 36 000 deaths occur annualy due to severe influenza infections. Although influenza often causes a simple respiratory infection, it sometimes causes disorders affecting several organs including the lung, heart, brain, liver and muscles or serious life-threatening primary viral or secondary bacterial pneumonia. Currently, oseltamivir is the most important and effective drug for severe influenza infections. Severe influenza infections can be controlled and related deaths may be prevented with initiation of this drug especially within first 2 days. Oseltamivir is usually well tolerated and its most commonly reported side effect is related with the gastrointestinal system. In conclusion, the course of influenza changes in a positive direction and the rates of complications and mortality significantly reduce in patients in whom oseltamivir treatment is initiated as soon as possible. PMID:27489462

  5. Influenza and the use of oseltamivir in children

    PubMed Central

    Çiftçi, Ergin; Karbuz, Adem; Kendirli, Tanıl

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious disease which causes significant morbidity and mortality. In the USA, approximately 200 000 hospital admissions and 36 000 deaths occur annualy due to severe influenza infections. Although influenza often causes a simple respiratory infection, it sometimes causes disorders affecting several organs including the lung, heart, brain, liver and muscles or serious life-threatening primary viral or secondary bacterial pneumonia. Currently, oseltamivir is the most important and effective drug for severe influenza infections. Severe influenza infections can be controlled and related deaths may be prevented with initiation of this drug especially within first 2 days. Oseltamivir is usually well tolerated and its most commonly reported side effect is related with the gastrointestinal system. In conclusion, the course of influenza changes in a positive direction and the rates of complications and mortality significantly reduce in patients in whom oseltamivir treatment is initiated as soon as possible. PMID:27489462

  6. Ardipusilloside-I Metabolites from Human Intestinal Bacteria and Their Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei-Yu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ardipusilloside-I (ADS-I) is a triterpenoid saponin extracted from Ardisia pusilla DC, and has been demonstrated to have potent antitumor activity. However, ADS-I metabolism in humans has not been investigated. In this study, we studied the biotransformation of ADS-I in human intestinal bacteria, and examined the in vitro antitumor activity of the major metabolites. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was used to detect ADS-I biotransformation products, and their chemical structures were identified by high performance liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance (HPLC-NMR). The antitumor activity of the major metabolites was determined by the MTT assay. Here, we show that main reaction seen in the metabolism of ADS-I in human intestinal bacteria was deglycosylation, which produced a total of four metabolites. The structures of the two major metabolites M1 and M2 were confirmed by using NMR. MTT assay showed that ADS-I metabolites M1 and M2 have the same levels of inhibitory activities as ADS-I in cultured SMMC-7721 cells and MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates deglycosylation as a primary pathway of ADS-I metabolism in human intestinal bacteria, and suggests that the pharmacological activity of ADS-I may be mediated, at least in part, by its metabolites. PMID:26610438

  7. Antiproliferative and hepatoprotective activity of metabolites from Corynebacterium xerosis against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ghosh, Soby; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the effective anticancer drugs from bacterial products, petroleum ether extract of Corynebacterium xerosis. Methods Antiproliferative activity of the metabolite has been measured by monitoring the parameters like tumor weight measurement, tumor cell growth inhibition in mice and survival time of tumor bearing mice, etc. Hepatoprotective effect of the metabolites was determined by observing biochemical, hematological parameters. Results It has been found that the petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite significantly decrease cell growth (78.58%; P<0.01), tumor weight (36.04 %; P<0.01) and increase the life span of tumor bearing mice (69.23%; P<0.01) at dose 100 mg/kg (i.p.) in comparison to those of untreated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing mice. The metabolite also alters the depleted hematological parameters like red blood cell, white blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb%), etc. towards normal in tumor bearing mice. Metabolite show no adverse effect on liver functions regarding blood glucose, serum alkaline phosphatases, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity and serum billirubin, etc. in normal mice. Histopathological observation of these mice organ does not show any toxic effect on cellular structure. But in the case of EAC bearing untreated mice these hematological and biochemical parameters deteriorate extremely with time whereas petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite receiving EAC bearing mice nullified the toxicity induced by EAC cells. Conclusion Study results reveal that metabolite possesses significant antiproliferative and hepatoprotective effect against EAC cells. PMID:25183099

  8. Combinations of oseltamivir and peramivir for the treatment of influenza A (H1N1) virus infections in cell culture and in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Donald F.; Hurst, Brett L.; Wong, Min-Hui; Tarbet, E. Bart; Babu, Y.S.; Klumpp, Klaus; Morrey, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Oseltamivir and peramivir are being considered for combination treatment of serious influenza virus infections in humans. Both compounds are influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors, and since peramivir binds tighter to the enzyme than oseltamivir carboxylate (the active form of oseltamivir), the possibility exists that antagonistic interactions might result when using the two compounds together. To study this possibility, combination chemotherapy experiments were conducted in vitro and in mice infected with influenza A/NWS/33 (H1N1) virus. Treatment of infected MDCK cells was performed with combinations of oseltamivir carboxylate and peramivir at 0.32-100 μM for 3 days, followed by virus yield determinations. Additive drug interactions with a narrow region of synergy were found using the MacSynergy method. In a viral neuraminidase assay with combinations of inhibitors at 0.01-10 nM, no significant antagonistic or synergistic interactions were observed across the range of concentrations. Infected mice were treated twice-daily for 5 days starting 2 hours prior to virus challenge using drug doses of 0.05-0.4 mg/kg/day. Consistent and statistically significant increases in the numbers of survivors were seen when twice daily oral oseltamivir (0.4 mg/kg/day) was combined with twice daily intramuscular peramivir (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg/day) compared to single drug treatments The data demonstrate that combinations of oseltamivir and peramivir perform better than suboptimal doses of each compound alone to treat influenza infections in mice. Treatment with these two compounds should be considered as an option. PMID:20633577

  9. The mechanisms of delayed onset type adverse reactions to oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Rokuro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oseltamivir is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza in persons at higher risk for influenza complications such as individuals with diabetes, neuropsychiatric illnesses, and respiratory, cardiac, renal, hepatic or haematological diseases. However, a recent Cochrane review reported that reduction of antibody production, renal disorders, hyperglycaemia, psychiatric disorders, and QT prolongation may be related to oseltamivir use. The underlying mechanisms are reviewed. There is decisive evidence that administration of a clinically compatible dose of oseltamivir in mice challenged by a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) that lacks a neuraminidase gene showed symptom-relieving effects and inhibition of viral clearance. These effects were accompanied by decreased level of T cell surface sialoglycosphingolipid (ganglioside) GM1 that is regulated by the endogenous neuraminidase in response to viral challenge. Clinical and non-clinical evidence supports the view that the usual dose of oseltamivir suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha almost completely with partial suppression of viral shedding in human influenza virus infection experiment. Animal toxicity tests support the clinical evidence with regard to renal and cardiac disorders (bradycardia and QT prolongation) and do not disprove the metabolic effect. Reduction of antibody production and cytokine induction and renal, metabolic, cardiac, and prolonged psychiatric disorders after oseltamivir use may be related to inhibition of the host’s endogenous neuraminidase. While the usual clinical dose of zanamivir may not have this effect, a higher dose or prolonged administration of zanamivir and other neuraminidase inhibitors may induce similar delayed reactions, including reduction of the antibody and/or cytokine production. PMID:27251370

  10. The mechanisms of delayed onset type adverse reactions to oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hama, Rokuro

    2016-09-01

    Oseltamivir is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza in persons at higher risk for influenza complications such as individuals with diabetes, neuropsychiatric illnesses, and respiratory, cardiac, renal, hepatic or haematological diseases. However, a recent Cochrane review reported that reduction of antibody production, renal disorders, hyperglycaemia, psychiatric disorders, and QT prolongation may be related to oseltamivir use. The underlying mechanisms are reviewed. There is decisive evidence that administration of a clinically compatible dose of oseltamivir in mice challenged by a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) that lacks a neuraminidase gene showed symptom-relieving effects and inhibition of viral clearance. These effects were accompanied by decreased level of T cell surface sialoglycosphingolipid (ganglioside) GM1 that is regulated by the endogenous neuraminidase in response to viral challenge. Clinical and non-clinical evidence supports the view that the usual dose of oseltamivir suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha almost completely with partial suppression of viral shedding in human influenza virus infection experiment. Animal toxicity tests support the clinical evidence with regard to renal and cardiac disorders (bradycardia and QT prolongation) and do not disprove the metabolic effect. Reduction of antibody production and cytokine induction and renal, metabolic, cardiac, and prolonged psychiatric disorders after oseltamivir use may be related to inhibition of the host's endogenous neuraminidase. While the usual clinical dose of zanamivir may not have this effect, a higher dose or prolonged administration of zanamivir and other neuraminidase inhibitors may induce similar delayed reactions, including reduction of the antibody and/or cytokine production. PMID:27251370

  11. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  12. Diversity of secondary metabolites from marine Bacillus species: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-08-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  13. Evaluation of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites for anthelmintic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. L. Vijaya; Thippeswamy, B.; Kuppust, I. L.; Naveenkumar, K. J.; Shivakumar, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the anthelmintic acivity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites. Materials and Methods: The successive solvent extractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol. The solvent extracts were tested for anthelmintic activity against Pheretima posthuma at 20 mg/ml concentration. The time of paralysis and time of death of the worms was determined for all the extracts. Albendazole was taken as a standard reference and sterile water as a control. Results: All the sample extracts showed significant anthelmintic activity in paralyzing the worms comparable with that of the standard drug. The time of death exhibited by BP metabolites was close to the time exhibited by standard. Conclusion: The study indicates both bacteria Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus have anthelmintic activity indicating potential metabolites in them. PMID:25598639

  14. Curcumin Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evidences in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats Support the Antidiabetic Activity to Be via Metabolite(s)

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Vânia Ortega; Campos, Michel Leandro; Arcaro, Carlos Alberto; Assis, Renata Pires; Baldan-Cimatti, Helen Mariana; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Kettelhut, Isis Carmo; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the curcumin concentration in rat plasma by liquid chromatography and investigates the changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of streptozotocin-diabetic rats treated with curcumin-enriched yoghurt. The analytical method for curcumin detection was linear from 10 to 500 ng/mL. The Cmax⁡ and the time to reach Cmax⁡ (tmax⁡) of curcumin in plasma were 3.14 ± 0.9 μg/mL and 5 minutes (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and 0.06 ± 0.01 μg/mL and 14 minutes (500 mg/kg, p.o.). The elimination half-time was 8.64 ± 2.31 (i.v.) and 32.70 ± 12.92 (p.o.) minutes. The oral bioavailability was about 0.47%. Changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were investigated in four groups: normal and diabetic rats treated with yoghurt (NYOG and DYOG, resp.) and treated with 90 mg/kg/day curcumin incorporated in yoghurt (NC90 and DC90, resp.). After 15 days of treatment, the glucose tolerance and the insulin sensitivity were significantly improved in DC90 rats in comparison with DYOG, which can be associated with an increase in the AKT phosphorylation levels and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscles. These findings can explain, at least in part, the benefits of curcumin-enriched yoghurt to diabetes and substantiate evidences for the curcumin metabolite(s) as being responsible for the antidiabetic activity. PMID:26064170

  15. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations ± standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700 ± 1000 ng L−1, 2100 ± 1700 ng L−1, carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480 ± 380 ng L−1, 360 ± 400 ng L−1, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400 ± 1300 ng L−1, 1800 ± 2300 ng L−1. Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that

  16. Anti-Oxidative Activity of Mytiloxanthin, a Metabolite of Fucoxanthin in Shellfish and Tunicates

    PubMed Central

    Maoka, Takashi; Nishino, Azusa; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Yamano, Yumiko; Wada, Akimori

    2016-01-01

    Anti-oxidative activities of mytiloxanthin, a metabolite of fucoxanthin in shellfish and tunicates, were investigated. Mytiloxanthin showed almost the same activities for quenching singlet oxygen and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation as those of astaxanthin, which is a well-known singlet oxygen quencher. Furthermore, mytiloxanthin showed excellent scavenging activity for hydroxyl radicals and this activity was markedly higher than that of astaxanthin. PMID:27187417

  17. Anti-Oxidative Activity of Mytiloxanthin, a Metabolite of Fucoxanthin in Shellfish and Tunicates.

    PubMed

    Maoka, Takashi; Nishino, Azusa; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Yamano, Yumiko; Wada, Akimori

    2016-01-01

    Anti-oxidative activities of mytiloxanthin, a metabolite of fucoxanthin in shellfish and tunicates, were investigated. Mytiloxanthin showed almost the same activities for quenching singlet oxygen and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation as those of astaxanthin, which is a well-known singlet oxygen quencher. Furthermore, mytiloxanthin showed excellent scavenging activity for hydroxyl radicals and this activity was markedly higher than that of astaxanthin. PMID:27187417

  18. Antifeedant Activity of Ginkgo biloba Secondary Metabolites against Hyphantria cunea Larvae: Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Ren, Lili; Chen, Fang; Feng, Yuqian; Luo, Youqing

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a typical relic plant that rarely suffers from pest hazards. This study analyzed the pattern of G. biloba pest hazards in Beijing; tested the antifeedant activity of G. biloba extracts, including ginkgo flavonoids, ginkgolide, and bilobalide, against Hyphantria cunea larvae; determined the activities of glutathione transferase (GSTs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE) and mixed-functional oxidase (MFO), in larvae after feeding on these G. biloba secondary metabolites; and screened for effective botanical antifeedants in the field. In this study, no indicators of insect infestation were found for any of the examined leaves of G. biloba; all tested secondary metabolites showed significant antifeedant activity and affected the activity of the four larval detoxifying enzymes. Ginkgolide had the highest antifeedant activity and the most significant effect on the detoxifying enzymes (P<0.05). Spraying leaves with G. biloba extracts or ginkgolide both significantly repelled H. cunea larvae in the field (P<0.05), although the former is more economical and practical. This study investigated the antifeedant activity of G. biloba secondary metabolites against H. cunea larvae, and the results provide new insights into the mechanism of G. biloba pest resistance. This study also developed new applications of G. biloba secondary metabolites for effective pest control. PMID:27214257

  19. Antifeedant Activity of Ginkgo biloba Secondary Metabolites against Hyphantria cunea Larvae: Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Fang; Feng, Yuqian

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a typical relic plant that rarely suffers from pest hazards. This study analyzed the pattern of G. biloba pest hazards in Beijing; tested the antifeedant activity of G. biloba extracts, including ginkgo flavonoids, ginkgolide, and bilobalide, against Hyphantria cunea larvae; determined the activities of glutathione transferase (GSTs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE) and mixed-functional oxidase (MFO), in larvae after feeding on these G. biloba secondary metabolites; and screened for effective botanical antifeedants in the field. In this study, no indicators of insect infestation were found for any of the examined leaves of G. biloba; all tested secondary metabolites showed significant antifeedant activity and affected the activity of the four larval detoxifying enzymes. Ginkgolide had the highest antifeedant activity and the most significant effect on the detoxifying enzymes (P<0.05). Spraying leaves with G. biloba extracts or ginkgolide both significantly repelled H. cunea larvae in the field (P<0.05), although the former is more economical and practical. This study investigated the antifeedant activity of G. biloba secondary metabolites against H. cunea larvae, and the results provide new insights into the mechanism of G. biloba pest resistance. This study also developed new applications of G. biloba secondary metabolites for effective pest control. PMID:27214257

  20. Estrogenic activities of diuron metabolites in female Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Thiago Scremin Boscolo; Boscolo, Camila Nomura Pereira; Felício, Andreia Arantes; Batlouni, Sergio Ricardo; Schlenk, Daniel; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2016-03-01

    Some endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter the estrogenic activities of the organism by directly interacting with estrogen receptors (ER) or indirectly through the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Recent studies in male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) indicated that diuron may have anti-androgenic activity augmented by biotransformation. In this study, the effects of diuron and three of its metabolites were evaluated in female tilapia. Sexually mature female fish were exposed for 25 days to diuron, as well as to its metabolites 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA), 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DCPU) and 3,4-dichlorophenyl-N-methylurea (DCPMU), at concentrations of 100 ng/L. Diuron metabolites caused increases in E2 plasma levels, gonadosomatic indices and in the percentage of final vitellogenic oocytes. Moreover, diuron and its metabolites caused a decrease in germinative cells. Significant differences in plasma concentrations of the estrogen precursor and gonadal regulator17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17α-OHP) were not observed. These results show that diuron metabolites had estrogenic effects potentially mediated through enhanced estradiol biosynthesis and accelerated the ovarian development of O. niloticus females. PMID:26741556

  1. Removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and other selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater using a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Batisson, Isabelle; Fick, Jerker; Mencarelli, Mariangela; Grabic, Roman

    2010-09-01

    The capacity of the ligninolytic fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent xenobiotics has been largely reported in the literature. Beside other factors, one barrier to a wider use of this bioremediation fungus is the availability of effective formulations that ensure easy preparation, handling and application. In this series of laboratory experiments, we evaluated the efficiency of a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of P. chrysosporium for removal of four selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater samples. Addition of inoculated granules to samples of the wastewater treatment plant of Bologna significantly increased the removal of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and the antibiotics, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazol, and ciprofloxacin. Similar effects were also observed in effluent water. Oseltamivir was the most persistent of the four active substances. After 30d of incubation, approximately two times more oseltamivir was removed in bioremediated wastewater than controls. The highest removal efficiency of the bioplastic formulation was observed with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Microbiological DNA-based analysis showed that the bioplastic matrix supported the growth of P. chrysosporium, thus facilitating its adaptation to unusual environment such as wastewater. PMID:20673959

  2. Phytol metabolites are circulating dietary factors that activate the nuclear receptor RXR.

    PubMed Central

    Kitareewan, S; Burka, L T; Tomer, K B; Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Stevens, R D; Forman, B M; Mais, D E; Heyman, R A; McMorris, T; Weinberger, C

    1996-01-01

    RXR is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in cell signaling by pairing with a host of other receptors. Previously, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) was defined as a potent RXR activator. Here we describe a unique RXR effector identified from organic extracts of bovine serum by following RXR-dependent transcriptional activity. Structural analyses of material in active fractions pointed to the saturated diterpenoid phytanic acid, which induced RXR-dependent transcription at concentrations between 4 and 64 microM. Although 200 times more potent than phytanic acid, 9cRA was undetectable in equivalent amounts of extract and cannot be present at a concentration that could account for the activity. Phytanic acid, another phytol metabolite, was synthesized and stimulated RXR with a potency and efficacy similar to phytanic acid. These metabolites specifically displaced [3H]-9cRA from RXR with Ki values of 4 microM, indicating that their transcriptional effects are mediated by direct receptor interactions. Phytol metabolites are compelling candidates for physiological effectors, because their RXR binding affinities and activation potencies match their micromolar circulating concentrations. Given their exclusive dietary origin, these chlorophyll metabolites may represent essential nutrients that coordinate cellular metabolism through RXR-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8856661

  3. Rapidly Probing Antibacterial Activity of Graphene Oxide by Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolite Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Hou, Jian; Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Jin, Yulong; Wang, Jianing; He, Qing; Zhao, Rui; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as anti-bacteria agents has aroused great attention. To investigate the antibacterial activity and antibacterial mechanism of nanomaterials from a molecular perspective is important for efficient developing of nanomaterial antibiotics. In the current work, a new mass spectrometry-based method was established to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by the metabolite fingerprinting of microbes. The mass spectra of extracted metabolites from two strains DH5α and ATCC25922 were obtained before and after the incubation with nanomaterials respectively. Then principal component analysis (PCA) of these spectra was performed to reveal the relationship between the metabolism disorder of microbes and bactericidal activity of GO. A parameter “D” obtained from PCA scores was proposed that is capable to quantitatively evaluate the antibacterial activity of GO in concentration and time-dependent experiments. Further annotation of the fingerprinting spectra shows the variabilities of important metabolites such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and glutathione. This metabolic perturbation of E. coli indicates cell membrane destruction and oxidative stress mechanisms for anti-bacteria activity of graphene oxide. It is anticipated that this mass spectrometry-based metabolite fingerprinting method will be applicable to other antibacterial nanomaterials and provide more clues as to their antibacterial mechanism at molecular level. PMID:27306507

  4. Influence of age and caloric restriction on liver glycolytic enzyme activities and metabolite concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2003-03-01

    The influence of caloric restriction (CR) from 2 months of age on the activities of liver glycolytic enzymes and metabolite levels was studied in young and old mice. Livers were sampled 48 h after the last scheduled feeding time. Old mice on CR showed significant decreases in the activities of all the enzymes studied, except for aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglycerate mutase, which were unchanged. The metabolites glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, pyruvate and lactate were lower while fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate were increased in old CR. Young mice on CR also showed reduced enzyme activities, except for aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase and enolase which were unchanged when compared with young controls. The metabolites glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and pyruvate were decreased when compared with young controls, while phosphoenolpyruvate was increased. Ketone bodies increased (65%) in old, but not young, CR mice while fructose-2,6-bisphosphate decreased in both young (22%) and old CR (28%) mice. The results indicate that decreased hepatic glucose levels in CR mice are associated with decreased enzyme activities but not a uniform decrease in metabolite levels. Increased ketone body levels indicate increased utilization of non-carbohydrate fuels while decreased fructose-2,6-bisphosphate level suggests its importance in the control of glycolysis in CR. PMID:12581789

  5. Molecular complexes of cocaine, its active metabolites and some other stimulants with thiamine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L

    1976-10-01

    Cocaine, its pharmacologically active metabolites, norcocaine benzoylnorecgonine, benzoylecgonine and other central nervous system stimulants e.g. dextrococaine, nicotine, caffeine and p-hydroxy norephedrine formed molecular complexes with thiamine. The possible implications of such an interaction are discussed. PMID:10608

  6. Oral administration of active vitamin D metabolites to low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, I Z; Mayne, P D; James, J J; Barnes, I C

    1986-01-01

    The active vitamin D metabolites 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (Rocaltrol) and the analogue 1 alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (One-Alpha) are adequately absorbed after oral administration in the preterm infant. The absorption pattern is similar to that seen in adults. PMID:3755581

  7. Rapidly Probing Antibacterial Activity of Graphene Oxide by Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolite Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Hou, Jian; Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Jin, Yulong; Wang, Jianing; He, Qing; Zhao, Rui; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as anti-bacteria agents has aroused great attention. To investigate the antibacterial activity and antibacterial mechanism of nanomaterials from a molecular perspective is important for efficient developing of nanomaterial antibiotics. In the current work, a new mass spectrometry-based method was established to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by the metabolite fingerprinting of microbes. The mass spectra of extracted metabolites from two strains DH5α and ATCC25922 were obtained before and after the incubation with nanomaterials respectively. Then principal component analysis (PCA) of these spectra was performed to reveal the relationship between the metabolism disorder of microbes and bactericidal activity of GO. A parameter "D" obtained from PCA scores was proposed that is capable to quantitatively evaluate the antibacterial activity of GO in concentration and time-dependent experiments. Further annotation of the fingerprinting spectra shows the variabilities of important metabolites such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and glutathione. This metabolic perturbation of E. coli indicates cell membrane destruction and oxidative stress mechanisms for anti-bacteria activity of graphene oxide. It is anticipated that this mass spectrometry-based metabolite fingerprinting method will be applicable to other antibacterial nanomaterials and provide more clues as to their antibacterial mechanism at molecular level. PMID:27306507

  8. CHARACTERIZATION ADN BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM ARMILLARIA TABESCENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethyl acetate extracts from liquid cultures of Armillaria tabescens showed good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analyses of extract constituents led to the isolation and identification of two new co...

  9. Secondary Metabolites Produced by an Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis sydowiana and Their 20S Proteasome Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuekui; Kim, Soonok; Liu, Changheng; Shim, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have attracted attention due to their functional diversity. Secondary metabolites produced by Pestalotiopsis sydowiana from a halophyte, Phragmites communis Trinus, were investigated. Eleven compounds, including four penicillide derivatives (1-4) and seven α-pyrone analogues (5-10) were isolated from cultures of P. sydowiana. The compounds were identified based on spectroscopic data. The inhibitory activities against the 20S proteasome were evaluated. Compounds 1-3, 5, and 9-10 showed modest proteasome inhibition activities, while compound 8 showed strong activity with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.3 μM. This is the first study on the secondary metabolites produced by P. sydowiana and their proteasome inhibitory activities. The endophytic fungus P. sydowiana might be a good resource for proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27447600

  10. Antifouling Activity of Lipidic Metabolites Derived from Padina tetrastromatica.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Murugan; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Anantharaman, Perumal

    2016-07-01

    An attempt has been made to identify the potential seaweed for antifouling property due to the growing need for environmentally safe antifouling systems. The antibacterial, antimicroalgal, and antimussel foot adherence potentials of methanol, dichloromethane, and hexane extracts of the chosen seaweeds such as Padina tetrastromatica, Caulerpa taxifolia, and Amphiroa fragilissima have been compared against copper sulfate. Among the extracts, the maximum antibacterial activities were exhibited by the methanol extract of P. tetrastromatica. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the methanolic extract of P. tetrastromatica was found to be 10 and 1 μg/ml against test biofilm bacteria and diatoms, respectively. The antimussel foot adherence assay indicated that the extract had inhibited the foot adherence of the green mussels Perna viridis with the effective concentration (EC50) of 25.51 ± 0.03 μg/ml, and lethal concentration for 50 % mortality (LC50) was recorded at 280.22 ± 0.12 μg/ml. Based on the prolific results, the crude methanolic extract of P. tetrastromatica was subjected to purification using silica gel column and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Then, the active compounds of the bioassay-guided fraction (F13) were identified using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and it was observed that fatty acids were the major components, which may be responsible for the antifouling properties. PMID:26956575

  11. Global metabolite analysis of the land snail Theba pisana hemolymph during active and aestivated states.

    PubMed

    Bose, U; Centurion, E; Hodson, M P; Shaw, P N; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2016-09-01

    The state of metabolic dormancy has fascinated people for hundreds of years, leading to research exploring the identity of natural molecular components that may induce and maintain this state. Many animals lower their metabolism in response to high temperatures and/or arid conditions, a phenomenon called aestivation. The biological significance for this is clear; by strongly suppressing metabolic rate to low levels, animals minimize their exposure to stressful conditions. Understanding blood or hemolymph metabolite changes that occur between active and aestivated animals can provide valuable insights relating to those molecular components that regulate hypometabolism in animals, and how they afford adaptation to their different environmental conditions. In this study, we have investigated the hemolymph metabolite composition from the land snail Theba pisana, a remarkably resilient mollusc that displays an annual aestivation period. Using LC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we have identified those hemolymph metabolites that show significant changes in relative abundance between active and aestivated states. We show that certain metabolites, including some phospholipids [e.g. LysoPC(14:0)], and amino acids such as l-arginine and l-tyrosine, are present at high levels within aestivated snails. Further investigation of our T. pisana RNA-sequencing data elucidated the entire repertoire of phospholipid-synthesis genes in the snail digestive gland, as a precursor towards future comparative investigation between the genetic components of aestivating and non-aestivating species. In summary, we have identified a large number of metabolites that are elevated in the hemolymph of aestivating snails, supporting their role in protecting against heat or desiccation. PMID:27318654

  12. Culture condition-dependent metabolite profiling of Aspergillus fumigatus with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daejung; Son, Gun Hee; Park, Hye Min; Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Lee, Sarah; Hong, Seung-Beom; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2013-03-01

    Three sections of Aspergillus (five species, 21 strains) were classified according to culture medium-dependent and time-dependent secondary metabolite profile-based chemotaxonomy. Secondary metabolites were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) and multivariate statistical methods. From the Aspergillus sections that were cultured on malt extract agar (MEA) and Czapek yeast extract agar (CYA) for 7, 12, and 16 d, Aspergillus sections Fumigati (A. fumigatus), Nigri (A. niger), and Flavi (A. flavus, A. oryzae, and A. sojae) clustered separately on the basis of the results of the secondary metabolite analyses at 16 d regardless of culture medium. Based on orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis by partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), we identified the secondary metabolites that helped differentiate sections between A. fumigatus and Aspergillus section Flavi to be gliotoxin G, fumigatin oxide, fumigatin, pseurotin A or D, fumiquinazoline D, fumagillin, helvolic acid, 1,2-dihydrohelvolic acid, and 5,8-dihydroxy-9,12-octadecadienoic acid (5,8-diHODE). Among these compounds, fumagillin, helvolic acid, and 1,2-dihydrohelvolic acid of A. fumigatus showed antifungal activities against Malassezia furfur, which is lipophilic yeast that causes epidermal skin disorders. PMID:23537878

  13. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Micaela B; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0-12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects. PMID:26460484

  14. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Micaela B.; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R.; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0–12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects. PMID:26460484

  15. Reproductive activity in the peninsular pronghorn determined from excreted gonadal steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Holland, Jeff; Eng, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Fecal hormone monitoring was employed to better define annual patterns of reproductive steroid metabolites from a breeding pair of peninsular pronghorn (Antilocapra americana peninsularis) maintained at the Los Angeles Zoo. Notably in the female, increased excretion of estrogen metabolites occurred during the breeding season (Jun-Aug), and a biphasic pattern in progestagen activity was measured during gestation. Of additional interest, a preterm increase in estrogen that continued for an additional 64 days post partum. Male androgen activity correlated with the female estrogen patterns, with a single successful copulation occurring during the breeding season; interestingly however, the male exhibited no reproductive behaviors during the female's preterm/post partum estrogen increase. These data are the first reproductive steroid profiles for the peninsular pronghorn and provide valuable insight that will aid efforts that link the species' reproductive physiology with conservation management. PMID:25652944

  16. Secondary metabolites of plants from the genus chloranthus: chemistry and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Ran; Song, Hong-Chuan; An, Hong-Mei; Huang, Qian; Luo, Xie; Dong, Jin-Yan

    2015-04-01

    Chloranthus, a genus of the family Chloranthaceae, which is mainly distributed in eastern and southern Asia, has been used in Chinese folk medicine due to its antitumor, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory activities. This review compiles the research on isolation, structure elucidation, structural diversity, and bioactivities of Chloranthus secondary metabolites reported between 2007 and 2013. The metabolites listed encompass 82 sesquiterpenoids, 50 dimeric sesquiterpenoids, 15 diterpenoids, one coumarin, and five other compounds. Among them, dimeric sesquiterpenoids, the characteristic components of plants from the genus Chloranthus, have attracted considerable attention due to their complex structures and significant biological features, e.g., antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and hepatoprotective activities, and potent and selective inhibition of the delayed rectifier (IK) K(+) current and tyrosinase. PMID:25879494

  17. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activity of Tryptophan Metabolites in Young Adult Mouse Colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yating; Jin, Un-Ho; Allred, Clint D; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S; Safe, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    The tryptophan microbiota metabolites indole-3-acetate, indole-3-aldehyde, indole, and tryptamine are aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands, and in this study we investigated their AhR agonist and antagonist activities in nontransformed young adult mouse colonocyte (YAMC) cells. Using Cyp1a1 mRNA as an Ah-responsive end point, we observed that the tryptophan metabolites were weak AhR agonists and partial antagonists in YAMC cells, and the pattern of activity was different from that previously observed in CaCo2 colon cancer cells. However, expansion of the end points to other Ah-responsive genes including the Cyp1b1, the AhR repressor (Ahrr), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (TiParp) revealed a highly complex pattern of AhR agonist/antagonist activities that were both ligand- and gene-dependent. For example, the magnitude of induction of Cyp1b1 mRNA was similar for TCDD, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate, whereas lower induction was observed for indole and indole-3-aldehyde was inactive. These results suggest that the tryptophan metabolites identified in microbiota are selective AhR modulators. PMID:25873348

  18. Oxidation of propylthiouracil to reactive metabolites by activated neutrophils. Implications for agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Waldhauser, L; Uetrecht, J

    1991-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is associated with idiosyncratic agranulocytosis that may be due to reactive metabolites generated from oxidative metabolism by neutrophils. Therefore, the metabolism of PTU was investigated in activated neutrophils. Three oxidized metabolites were observed on HPLC: PTU-disulfide, propyluracil-2-sulfinate, and propyluracil-2-sulfonate (PTU-SO3-). No metabolism was detected in cells that had not been activated. Metabolism was inhibited by sodium azide and by catalase. The same products were produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) in an MPO/H2O2/Cl- system. PTU inhibited its own metabolism; however, complete conversion to PTU-SO3- could be achieved with optimal PTU concentrations. MPO/H2O2 without Cl- produced only slight metabolism. The PTU-sulfenyl chloride is a postulated intermediate. In the absence of chloride, oxidation might proceed through propyluracil-2-sulfenic acid. The sulfenyl chloride and PTU-SO3- are both chemically reactive with sulfhydryl compounds such as N-acetylcysteine. Such reactive metabolites, generated by activated neutrophils, may be involved in hypersensitivity reactions associated with PTU, such as agranulocytosis. PMID:1676636

  19. Fungal transformation and T-cell proliferation inhibitory activity of melengestrol acetate and its metabolite.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Elias; Bano, Saira; Atia-tul-Wahab; Jabeen, Almas; Yousuf, Sammer; Mesaik, Ahmed; Smith, Colin; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2014-08-01

    Biotransformation of melengestrol acetate (MGA, 17α-acetoxy-6-methyl-16-methylenepregna-4,6-diene-3,20-dione) (1) was investigated for the first time by using fungal cultures. Incubation of compound 1 with Cunninghamella blakesleeana yielded a new major metabolite, 17α-acetoxy-11β-hydroxy-6-methyl-16-methylenepregna-4,6-diene-3,20-dione (2). The metabolite 2 was purified by using HPLC, followed by characterization through (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and other spectroscopic techniques. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was used to deduce the three dimensional structures of melengestrol acetate (1) and metabolite 2 for the first time. T-cell proliferation assay was employed to evaluate the immunosuppressant effect of compounds 1 and 2 with IC50=0.5±0.07 and 0.6±0.08μg/mL, respectively. The results indicated that these compounds possess sixfold potent T-cell proliferation inhibitory activity as compared to the standard prednisolone (IC50<3.1μg/mL). Both compounds were found to be non-toxic in a 3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cell-based cytotoxicity assay. This discovery of potent anti-inflammatory activity of compounds 1 and 2 can lead the way to develop new immunosuppressant compounds for clinical application. PMID:24793568

  20. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the "Supply Problem".

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nelson G M; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors' opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  1. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the “Supply Problem”

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors’ opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  2. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  3. Biologically active polyketide metabolites from an undetermined fungicolous hyphomycete resembling Cladosporium.

    PubMed

    Höller, Ulrich; Gloer, James B; Wicklow, Donald T

    2002-06-01

    Eight new polyketide-derived metabolites [cladoacetals A and B (1 and 2), 3-(2-formyl-3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (3), 3-deoxyisoochracinic acid (4), isoochracinol (5), 7-hydroxy-3-(2,3-dihydroxybutyl)-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone (6), (+)-cyclosordariolone (10), and altersolanol J (11)] and six known metabolites [two isomeric 1-(1,3-dihydro-4-hydroxy-1-isobenzofuranyl)butan-2,3-diols (7a/b), 7-hydroxy-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone (8), isoochracinic acid (9), altersolanol A (12), and macrosporin (13)] have been isolated from solid-substrate fermentation cultures of an undetermined fungicolous isolate (NRRL 29097) that resembles Cladosporium sp. All structures were assigned primarily by analysis of 1D and/or 2D NMR data. Five of the compounds showed antibacterial activity. PMID:12088431

  4. Microbial transformation of (+)-nootkatone and the antiproliferative activity of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Łysek, Agnieszka; Janeczko, Tomasz; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2011-04-01

    Six metabolites were obtained as a result of microbial transformation of (+)-nootkatone (1) by the fungal strains: Botrytis, Didymosphaeria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium and Fusarium. Their structure were established as (+)-(4R,5S,7R,9R)-9α-hydroxynootkatone (2), (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-13-hydroxynootkatone (3) and (+)-(4R,5S,7R,9R,11S)-11,12-epoxy-9α-hydroxynootkatone (4), (+)-(4R,5S,7R,11S)-11,12-epoksynootkatone (5), (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-11,12-dihydroxynootkatone (6) and (+)-(4R,5S,7R)-7,11,12-trihydroxynootkatone (7) on the basis of their spectral data. Two products: (4) and (7) were not previously reported in the literature. The antiproliferative activity of (+)-nootkatone (1) and isolated metabolites (2-7) of its biotransformation has been evaluated. PMID:21377882

  5. Evaluation of the pharmacological activity of the major mexiletine metabolites on skeletal muscle sodium currents

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, M; De Luca, A; Rana, F; Cavalluzzi, M M; Catalano, A; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Conte Camerino, D

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mexiletine (Mex), an orally effective antiarrhythmic agent used to treat ventricular arrhythmias, has also been found to be effective for myotonia and neuropathic pain. It is extensively metabolized in humans but little information exists about the pharmacodynamic properties of its metabolites. Experimental approach: To determine their contribution to the clinical activity of Mex, p-hydroxy-mexiletine (PHM), hydroxy-methyl-mexiletine (HMM), N-hydroxy-mexiletine (NHM) (phase I reaction products) and N-carbonyloxy β-D-glucuronide (NMG) (phase II reaction product) were tested on sodium currents (INa) of frog skeletal muscle fibres. Sodium currents were elicited with depolarizing pulses from different holding potentials (HP=−140, −100, −70 mV) and stimulation frequencies (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz) using the vaseline-gap voltage-clamp method. Key results: All the hydroxylated derivatives blocked the sodium channel in a voltage- and use-dependent manner. The PHM, HMM and NHM metabolites were up to 10-fold less effective than the parent compound. However, HMM showed a greater use-dependent behaviour (10 Hz), compared to Mex and the other metabolites. Similar to Mex, these products behaved as inactivating channel blockers. Conjugation with glucuronic acid (NMG) resulted in almost complete abolition of the pharmacological activity of the parent compound. Conclusions and Implications: Thus, although less potent, the phase I metabolites tested demonstrated similar pharmacological behaviour to Mex and might contribute to its clinical profile. PMID:16921388

  6. Estimating the fitness advantage conferred by permissive neuraminidase mutations in recent oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeff; Hooper, Kathryn A; Petrie, Stephen; Lee, Raphael; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Reh, Lucia; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Baas, Chantal; Xue, Lumin; Vitesnik, Sophie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; McVernon, Jodie; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; McCaw, James M; Bloom, Jesse D; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-04-01

    Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), the proportion of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR) has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA) H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1)pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide. PMID:24699865

  7. Antimicrobial activity of secondary metabolites from Streptomyces sp. K15, an endophyte in Houttuynia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huabao; Yang, Chunping; Ke, Tao; Zhou, Miaomiao; Li, Zhaojun; Zhang, Min; Gong, Guoshu; Hou, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    We isolated Streptomyces sp. K15 from the root tissue of Houttuynia cordata Thunb and found that some of its secondary metabolites exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, we separated, purified and identified the major active ingredient to be 2-pyrrol formic acid by using silica gel column chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR analysis of the spectral data. 2-Pyrrol formic acid critically inhibited the growth of some phytopathogenic bacteria. Therefore, it has potential value in agricultural applications. PMID:25675117

  8. Triterpenoid resinous metabolites from the genus Boswellia: pharmacological activities and potential species-identifying properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The resinous metabolites commonly known as frankincense or olibanum are produced by trees of the genus Boswellia and have attracted increasing popularity in Western countries in the last decade for their various pharmacological activities. This review described the pharmacological specific details mainly on anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-bacterial and apoptosis-regulating activities of individual triterpenoid together with the relevant mechanism. In addition, species-characterizing triterpenic markers with the methods for their detection, bioavailability, safety and other significant properties were reviewed for further research. PMID:24028654

  9. Development of Oseltamivir Phosphonate Congeners as Anti-Influenza Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Weinheimer, Steven; Tarbet, E. Bart; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E.; Shie, Jiun-Jie; Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Chih-An; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Huang, Pei-Wei; Lin, Wen-Hao; Wang, Shi-Yun; Fang, Jim-Min; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2012-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphonic acid (tamiphosphor, 3a), its monoethyl ester (3c), guanidino-tamiphosphor (4a) and its monoethyl ester (4c) are potent inhibitors of influenza neuraminidases. They inhibit the replication of influenza viruses, including the oseltamivir-resistant H275Y strain, at low nM to pM levels, and significantly protect mice from infection with lethal doses of influenza viruses when orally administered with 1 mg/kg or higher doses. These compounds are stable in simulated gastric fluid, liver microsomes and human blood, and are largely free from binding to plasma proteins. Pharmacokinetic properties of these inhibitors are thoroughly studied in dogs, rats and mice. The absolute oral bioavailability of these compounds was lower than 12%. No conversion of monoester 4c to phosphonic acid 4a was observed in rats after intravenous administration, but partial conversion of 4c was observed with oral administration. Advanced formulation may be investigated to develop these new anti-influenza agents for better therapeutic use. PMID:23009169

  10. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor by carcinogenic aromatic amines and modulatory effects of their N-acetylated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Juricek, Ludmila; Bui, Linh-Chi; Busi, Florent; Pierre, Stéphane; Guyot, Erwan; Lamouri, Aazdine; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Barouki, Robert; Coumoul, Xavier; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Aromatic amines (AAs) are an important class of chemicals which account for 12 % of known carcinogens. The biological effects of AAs depend mainly on their biotransformation into reactive metabolites or into N-acetylated metabolites which are generally considered as less toxic. Although the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway by certain carcinogenic AAs has been reported, the effects of their N-acetylated metabolites on the AhR have not been addressed. Here, we investigated whether carcinogenic AAs and their N-acetylated metabolites may activate/modulate the AhR pathway in the absence and/or the presence of a bona fide AhR ligand (benzo[a]pyrene/B(a)P]. In agreement with previous studies, we found that certain AAs activated the AhR in human liver and lung cells as assessed by an increase in cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression and activity. Altogether, we report for the first time that these properties can be modulated by the N-acetylation status of the AA. Whereas 2-naphthylamine significantly activated the AhR and induced CYP1A1 expression, its N-acetylated metabolite was less efficient. In contrast, the N-acetylated metabolite of 2-aminofluorene was able to significantly activate AhR, whereas the parent AA, 2-aminofluorene, did not. In the presence of B(a)P, activation of AhR or antagonist effects were observed depending on the AA or its N-acetylated metabolite. Activation and/or modulation of the AhR pathway by AAs and their N-acetylated metabolites may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the toxicological effects of AAs. More broadly, our data suggest biological interactions between AAs and other classes of xenobiotics through the AhR pathway. PMID:25224404

  11. Identification of metabolites from an active fraction of Cajanus cajan seeds by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tekale, Satishkumar S; Jaiwal, Bhimrao V; Padul, Manohar V

    2016-11-15

    Antioxidants are important food additives which prolong food storage due to their protective effects against oxidative degradation of foods by free radicals. However, the synthetic antioxidants show toxic properties. Alternative economical and eco-friendly approach is screening of plant extract for natural antioxidants. Plant phenolics are potent antioxidants. Hence, in present study Cajanus cajan seeds were analyzed for antioxidant activity, Iron chelating activity and total phenolic content. The antioxidant activity using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging assay showed 71.3% inhibition and 65.8% Iron chelating activity. Total 37 compounds including some short peptides and five major abundant compounds were identified in active fraction of C. cajan seeds. This study concludes that C. cajan seeds are good source of antioxidants and Iron chelating activity. Metabolites found in C. cajan seeds which remove reactive oxygen species (ROS), may help to alleviate oxidative stress associated dreaded health problem like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27283694

  12. Select steroid hormone glucuronide metabolites can cause toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Hutchinson, Mark R; Frick, Morin M; Zhang, Yingning; Maier, Steven F; Sammakia, Tarek; Rice, Kenner C; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-02-01

    We have recently shown that several classes of glucuronide metabolites, including the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide and the ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide, cause toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signaling in vitro and enhanced pain in vivo. Steroid hormones, including estrogens and corticosterone, are also metabolized through glucuronidation. Here we demonstrate that in silico docking predicts that corticosterone, corticosterone-21-glucuronide, estradiol, estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide all dock with the MD-2 component of the TLR4 receptor complex. In addition to each docking with MD-2, the docking of each was altered by pre-docking with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. As agonist versus antagonist activity cannot be determined from these in silico interactions, an in vitro study was undertaken to clarify which of these compounds can act in an agonist fashion. Studies using a cell line transfected with TLR4, necessary co-signaling molecules, and a reporter gene revealed that only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide increased reporter gene product, indicative of TLR4 agonism. Finally, in in vivo studies, each of the 5 drugs was injected intrathecally at equimolar doses. In keeping with the in vitro results, only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide caused enhanced pain. For both compounds, pain enhancement was blocked by the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, evidence for the involvement in TLR4 in the resultant pain enhancement. These findings have implications for several chronic pain conditions, including migraine and temporomandibular joint disorder, in which pain episodes are more likely in cycling females when estradiol is decreasing and estradiol metabolites are at their highest. PMID:25218902

  13. Select steroid hormone glucuronide metabolites can cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Frick, Morin M.; Zhang, Yingning; Maier, Steven F.; Sammakia, Tarek; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that several classes of glucuronide metabolites, including the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide and the ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide, cause toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signalling in vitro and enhanced pain in vivo. Steroid hormones, including estrogens and corticosterone, are also metabolized through glucuronidation. Here we demonstrate that in silico docking predicts that corticosterone, corticosterone-21-glucuronide, estradiol, estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide all dock with the MD-2 component of the TLR4 receptor complex. In addition to each docking with MD-2, the docking of each was altered by pre-docking with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. As agonist versus antagonist activity cannot be determined from these in silico interactions, an in vitro study was undertaken to clarify which of these compounds can act in an agonist fashion. Studies using a cell line transfected with TLR4, necessary co-signaling molecules, and a reporter gene revealed that only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide increased reporter gene product, indicative of TLR4 agonism. Finally, in in vivo studies, each of the 5 drugs was injected intrathecally at equimolar doses. In keeping with the in vitro results, only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide caused enhanced pain. For both compounds, pain enhancement was blocked by the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, evidence for the involvement in TLR4 in the resultant pain enhancement. These findings have implications for several chronic pain conditions, including migraine and tempromandibular joint disorder, in which pain episodes are more likely in cycling females when estradiol is decreasing and estradiol metabolites are at their highest. PMID:25218902

  14. Biotransformation of dianabol with the filamentous fungi and β-glucuronidase inhibitory activity of resulting metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naik T; Zafar, Salman; Noreen, Shagufta; Al Majid, Abdullah M; Al Othman, Zeid A; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim; Atta-ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2014-07-01

    Biotransformation of the anabolic steroid dianabol (1) by suspended-cell cultures of the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella elegans and Macrophomina phaseolina was studied. Incubation of 1 with C. elegans yielded five hydroxylated metabolites 2-6, while M. phaseolina transformed compound 1 into polar metabolites 7-11. These metabolites were identified as 6β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (2), 15α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (3), 11α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (4), 6β,12β,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (5), 6β,15α,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (6), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,6-dione (7), 7β,17β,-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (8), 15β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (9), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,11-dione (10), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (11). Metabolite 3 was also transformed chemically into diketone 12 and oximes 13, and 14. Compounds 6 and 12-14 were identified as new derivatives of dianabol (1). The structures of all transformed products were deduced on the basis of spectral analyses. Compounds 1-14 were evaluated for β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibitory activity. Compounds 7, 13, and 14 showed a strong inhibition of β-glucuronidase enzyme, with IC50 values between 49.0 and 84.9 μM. PMID:24755238

  15. Oseltamivir Treatment for Children with Influenza-Like Illness in China: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kunling; Xiong, Tengbin; Tan, Seng Chuen; Wu, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza is a common viral respiratory infection that causes epidemics and pandemics in the human population. Oseltamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor—a new class of antiviral therapy for influenza. Although its efficacy and safety have been established, there is uncertainty regarding whether influenza-like illness (ILI) in children is best managed by oseltamivir at the onset of illness, and its cost-effectiveness in children has not been studied in China. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of post rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) treatment with oseltamivir and empiric treatment with oseltamivir comparing with no antiviral therapy against influenza for children with ILI. Methods We developed a decision-analytic model based on previously published evidence to simulate and evaluate 1-year potential clinical and economic outcomes associated with three managing strategies for children presenting with symptoms of influenza. Model inputs were derived from literature and expert opinion of clinical practice and research in China. Outcome measures included costs and quality-adjusted life year (QALY). All the interventions were compared with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER). Results In base case analysis, empiric treatment with oseltamivir consistently produced the greatest gains in QALY. When compared with no antiviral therapy, the empiric treatment with oseltamivir strategy is very cost effective with an ICER of RMB 4,438. When compared with the post RIDT treatment with oseltamivir, the empiric treatment with oseltamivir strategy is dominant. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis projected that there is a 100% probability that empiric oseltamivir treatment would be considered as a very cost-effective strategy compared to the no antiviral therapy, according to the WHO recommendations for cost-effectiveness thresholds. The same was concluded with 99% probability for empiric oseltamivir treatment being a very cost-effective strategy

  16. Low water activity induces the production of bioactive metabolites in halophilic and halotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:21339946

  17. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:21339946

  18. Activation and Products of the Cryptic Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Gene Clusters by Rifampin Resistance (rpoB) Mutations in Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Kasahara, Ken; Hirose, Yutaka; Murakami, Kiriko; Kugimiya, Rie

    2013-01-01

    A subset of rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations result in the overproduction of antibiotics in various actinomycetes, including Streptomyces, Saccharopolyspora, and Amycolatopsis, with H437Y and H437R rpoB mutations effective most frequently. Moreover, the rpoB mutations markedly activate (up to 70-fold at the transcriptional level) the cryptic/silent secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters of these actinomycetes, which are not activated under general stressful conditions, with the exception of treatment with rare earth elements. Analysis of the metabolite profile demonstrated that the rpoB mutants produced many metabolites, which were not detected in the wild-type strains. This approach utilizing rifampin resistance mutations is characterized by its feasibility and potential scalability to high-throughput studies and would be useful to activate and to enhance the yields of metabolites for discovery and biochemical characterization. PMID:23603745

  19. Endophytic Streptomyces in the traditional medicinal plant Arnica montana L.: secondary metabolites and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wardecki, Tina; Brötz, Elke; De Ford, Christian; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-08-01

    Arnica montana L. is a medical plant of the Asteraceae family and grows preferably on nutrient poor soils in mountainous environments. Such surroundings are known to make plants dependent on symbiosis with other organisms. Up to now only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were found to act as endophytic symbiosis partners for A. montana. Here we identified five Streptomyces strains, microorganisms also known to occur as endophytes in plants and to produce a huge variety of active secondary metabolites, as inhabitants of A. montana. The secondary metabolite spectrum of these strains does not contain sesquiterpene lactones, but consists of the glutarimide antibiotics cycloheximide and actiphenol as well as the diketopiperazines cyclo-prolyl-valyl, cyclo-prolyl-isoleucyl, cyclo-prolyl-leucyl and cyclo-prolyl-phenylalanyl. Notably, genome analysis of one strain was performed and indicated a huge genome size with a high number of natural products gene clusters among which genes for cycloheximide production were detected. Only weak activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was revealed, but the extracts showed a marked cytotoxic activity as well as an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis and Fusarium verticillioides. Altogether, our results provide evidence that A. montana and its endophytic Streptomyces benefit from each other by completing their protection against competitors and pathogens and by exchanging plant growth promoting signals with nutrients. PMID:26036671

  20. [The pharmacokinetics of the dipeptide analog of piracetam with nootropic activity GVS-111 and of its basic metabolites].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Zherdev, V P; Dvorianinov, A A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A; Rozantsev, G G; Seredenin, S B

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a new nootropic dipeptide analog of piracetam-N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine (GWS-111) and its main metabolites were studied in rats by means of high performance liquid chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography. The compound under study showed a greater resistance to an enzymatic effect than natural neuropeptides. In addition to an unchanged compound three of its metabolites were found in the blood plasma of the rats. One of them, cyclo-Pro-Gly was an active metabolite of GWS-111. PMID:9206571

  1. Green Tea Catechin Metabolites Exert Immunoregulatory Effects on CD4(+) T Cell and Natural Killer Cell Activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Won, Yeong-Seon; Yang, Xue; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Yamashita, Shuya; Hara, Aya; Takagaki, Akiko; Goto, Keiichi; Nanjo, Fumio; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-05-11

    Tea catechins, such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), have been shown to effectively enhance immune activity and prevent cancer, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Green tea catechins are instead converted to catechin metabolites in the intestine. Here, we show that these green tea catechin metabolites enhance CD4(+) T cell activity as well as natural killer (NK) cell activity. Our data suggest that the absence of a 4'-hydroxyl on this phenyl group (B ring) is important for the effect on immune activity. In particular, 5-(3',5'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (EGC-M5), a major metabolite of EGCG, not only increased the activity of CD4(+) T cells but also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in vivo. These data suggest that EGC-M5 might show immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27112424

  2. Potent Antidiabetic Activity and Metabolite Profiling of Melicope Lunu-ankenda Leaves.

    PubMed

    Al-Zuaidy, Mizher Hezam; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Ismail, Amin; Mohamed, Suhaila; Abdul Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Mumtaz, Muhammad Waseem; Salleh, Syafiq Zikri

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is normally characterized by chronic hyperglycemia associated with disturbances in the fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism. There is an increasing trend of using natural products instead of synthetic agents as alternative therapy for disorders due to their fewer side effects. In this study, antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of different Melicope lunu-ankenda (ML) ethanolic extracts were evaluated using inhibition of α-glucosidase and 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging activity, respectively; whereas, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UHPLC-MS/MS) techniques were used for metabolite profiling of ML leaf extracts at different concentrations of ethanol and water. Sixty percent of ethanolic ML extract showed highest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme (IC50 of 37 μg/mL) and DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 of 48 μg/mL). Antidiabetic effect of ML extracts was also evaluated in vivo and it was found that the high doses (400 mg/Kg BW) of ML extract exhibited high suppression in fasting blood glucose level by 62.75%. The metabolites responsible for variation among ML samples with variable ethanolic levels have been evaluated successfully using (1) H-NMR-based metabolomics. The principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares(PLS) analysis scores depicted clear and distinct separations into 4 clusters representing the 4 ethanolic concentrations by PC1 and PC2, with an eigenvalue of 69.9%. Various (1) H-NMR chemical shifts related to the metabolites responsible for sample difference were also ascribed. The main bioactive compounds identified attributing toward the separation included: isorhamnetin, skimmianine, scopoletin, and melicarpinone. Hence, ML may be used as promising medicinal plant for the development of new functional foods, new generation antidiabetic drugs, as a single entity phytomedicine or in

  3. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are associated with hippocampal activity during autobiographical memory recall in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Dantzer, Robert; Teague, T Kent; Bodurka, Jerzy; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of inflammatory mediators such as c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 1β (IL-1), and IL-6 as well as kynurenine metabolites are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and affect depressive behavior, cognition, and hippocampal plasticity in animal models. We previously reported that the ratios of kynurenic acid (KynA) to the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA), were positively correlated with hippocampal volume in depression. The hippocampus is critical for autobiographical memory (AM) recall which is impaired in MDD. Here we tested whether the ratios, KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were associated with AM recall performance as well as hippocampal activity during AM recall. Thirty-five unmedicated depressed participants and 25 healthy controls (HCs) underwent fMRI scanning while recalling emotionally-valenced AMs and provided serum samples for the quantification of kynurenine metabolites, CRP, and cytokines (IL-1 receptor antagonist - IL-1RA; IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha - TNF, interferon gamma -IFN-γ, IL-10). KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were lower in the MDD group relative to the HCs. The concentrations of the CRP and the cytokines did not differ significantly between the HCs and the MDD group. Depressed individuals recalled fewer specific AMs and displayed increased left hippocampal activity during the recall of positive and negative memories. KynA/3HK was inversely associated with left hippocampal activity during specific AM recall in the MDD group. Further, KynA/QA was positively correlated with percent negative specific memories recalled in the MDD group and showed a non-significant trend toward a positive correlation with percent positive specific memories recalled in HCs. In contrast, neither CRP nor the cytokines were significantly associated with AM recall or activity of the hippocampus during AM recall. Conceivably, an imbalance in levels of KynA versus QA

  4. Baicalin, a metabolite of baicalein with antiviral activity against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Ehsan; Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chik, Zamri; Yueh, Andrew; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis, is the main metabolite of baicalein released following administration in different animal models and human. We previously reported the antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus (DENV). Here, we examined the anti-DENV properties of baicalin in vitro, and described the inhibitory potentials of baicalin at different steps of DENV-2 (NGC strain) replication. Our in vitro antiviral experiments showed that baicalin inhibited virus replication at IC50 = 13.5 ± 0.08 μg/ml with SI = 21.5 following virus internalization by Vero cells. Baicalin exhibited virucidal activity against DENV-2 extracellular particles at IC50 = 8.74 ± 0.08 μg/ml and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 18.07 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Our findings showed that baicalin as the main metabolite of baicalein exerting in vitro anti-DENV activity. Further investigations on baicalein and baicalin to deduce its antiviral therapeutic effects are warranted. PMID:24965553

  5. Antifungal, Phytotoxic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Metabolites from Epichloë bromicola, a Fungus Obtained from Elymus tangutorum Grass.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Nan, Zhi-Biao; Gao, Kun; Song, Hui; Tian, Pei; Zhang, Xing-Xu; Li, Chun-Jie; Xu, Wen-Bo; Li, Xiu-Zhang

    2015-10-14

    The development of high-quality herbage is an important aspect of animal husbandry. Inoculating beneficial fungi onto inferior grass is a feasible strategy for producing new varieties of high-quality herbage. Epichloë bromicola is a candidate fungus that is isolated from Elymus tangutorum. A total of 17 metabolites, 1-17, were obtained from E. bromicola, and their biological activities were assayed. Metabolite 1 exhibited antifungal activities against Alternaria alternata, Fusarium avenaceum, Bipolaris sorokiniana, and Curvularia lunata. EC50 values ranged from 0.7 to 5.3 μM, which were better than the positive control, chlorothalonil. Metabolite 8 displayed obvious phytotoxic effects toward Lolium perenne and Poa crymophila seedlings, and it was as active as glyphosate. None of these isolated metabolites displayed cytotoxicity against Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. The IC50 values were greater than 100 μM, and the metabolites increased the growth of the cells at a concentration of 12.5 μM. The bioassay indicated that E. bromicola may be a beneficial fungus for producing new varieties of herbage with various resistances. Additionally, metabolite 7, 3-(2'-(4″-hydroxyphenyl)acetoxy)-2S-methylpropanoic acid, is a new natural product, and its stereochemistry was determined by means of optical rotation computation and chemical reactions. PMID:26395226

  6. Case characteristics and use of oseltamivir in children and household contacts.

    PubMed

    Fallo, Aurelia A; Contrini, María Marta; Neyro, Silvina; López, Eduardo Luis

    2012-07-01

    In May 2009, the onset of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) began in Buenos Aires schools and a containment program was implemented. We report the first 191 school-aged cases. Influenza (H1N1) was a mild disease in children. Oseltamivir was well tolerated and resulted in a significantly reduced duration of symptoms in this group. Oseltamivir was also effective at preventing secondary cases. PMID:22466323

  7. Impact of oseltamivir use on the reduction of complications in patients with influenza: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Theocharis, George; Tansarli, Giannoula S; Rafailidis, Petros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the factors associated with oseltamivir prescription and to study the effectiveness of oseltamivir in reducing influenza-related complications. A prospective cohort study using the SOS Doctors (a network of physicians who perform house-call visits in Attica, Greece). Patients with confirmed or clinically suspected influenza were followed up to 14 days during the 2011-2012 influenza period. 410 patients with confirmed or suspected influenza were included. Healthy adults were mainly enrolled, with a median age of 44 years. Influenza diagnosis was mainly based on clinical criteria (65.8 % of patients). Oseltamivir was prescribed for 45.4 % of them. In a multivariate analysis, prescription of oseltamivir was associated with the attending physician (p < 0.001), positive influenza test (p < 0.001) and diabetes (p = 0.027). Data on complications were available for 351 patients, and 50 (15.8 %) of them reported at least one. Seven patients required hospitalization. Types of complications (pneumonia, bronchitis, etc.) were not significantly different between patients receiving and those not receiving oseltamivir. In the multivariate analysis, higher oseltamivir prescription rate was associated with fewer complications (p < 0.001). Bearing in mind the limitations of a non-randomized study, in a real-life setting, oseltamivir prescription and the rate of complications in patients with influenza were associated with the attending physician, underlying diseases and diagnostic tests. Overall, when the frequency of oseltamivir prescription increased, the influenza-related complications decreased. PMID:27368992

  8. Understanding the interactions between metabolites isolated from Achyrocline satureioides in relation to its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Joray, Mariana Belén; Palacios, Sara María; Carpinella, María Cecilia

    2013-02-15

    As part of our ongoing research on the antibacterial activity of Achyrocline satureioides, this study seeks to better understand the interactions between the metabolites isolated from this plant. For this purpose, the combined effect of 23-methyl-6-O-desmethylauricepyrone (1), quercetin (2) and 3-O-methylquercetin (3), obtained through bioguided fractionation from A. satureioides ethanol extract, was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In first place, the antibacterial effect of the combination of flavonols 2 and 3 was assessed, as these showed individual effectiveness lower than or equal to that of the fraction from which they were obtained. When the flavonols were applied together at concentrations below their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, a synergistic effect (FICI<0.30) against S. aureus was observed. In addition, compounds 2 and 3 in combination reduced 1000 times the MIC of compound 1, showing a clear synergistic interaction (FICI<0.15) in treatments against the Gram (+) bacterium. The most active combination against E. coli showed an additive interaction (FICI<0.62) between the three assayed compounds 1-3. These results indicated the existence of concerted action between these metabolites, evidence of the importance of the synergistic interactions between the components of plant-derived extracts for the control of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23207251

  9. Urinary metabolites of isorhynchophylline in rats and their neuroprotective activities in the HT22 cell assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangfang; Qi, Wen; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W.; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isorhynchophylline is one of the major alkaloids from the Uncaria hook possessing the effects of lowered blood pressure, vasodilatation and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. However, the metabolic pathway of isorhynchophylline has not been fully reported yet. In this paper, the metabolism of isorhynchophylline was investigated in rats. Five metabolites were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and identified by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR and CD experiments. Three new compounds were identified as 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide (M1), 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro isorhynchophylline (M2) and 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid (M4) together with two known compounds isorhynchophylline (M0) and rhynchophylline (M3). Possible metabolic pathways of isorhynchophylline are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for all the metabolites showed that isorhynchophylline (M0) exhibited potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M1–M4. Our present study is important to further understand its metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:24910000

  10. In vitro metabolism of pyripyropene A and ACAT inhibitory activity of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohtawa, Masaki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pyripyropene A (PPPA, 1) of fungal origin, a selective inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), proved orally active in atherogenic mouse models. The in vitro metabolites of 1 in liver microsomes and plasma of human, rabbit, rat and mouse were analyzed by ultra fast liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In the liver microsomes from all species, successive hydrolysis occurred at the 1-O-acetyl residue, then at the 11-O-acetyl residue of 1, while the 7-O-acetyl residue was resistant to hydrolysis. Furthermore, dehydrogenation of the newly generated 11-alcoholic hydroxyl residue occurred in human and mouse-liver microsomes, while oxidation of the pyridine ring occurred in human and rabbit liver microsomes. On the other hand, hydrolysis of the 7-O-acetyl residue proceeded only in the mouse plasma. These data indicated that the in vitro metabolic profiles of 1 have subtle differences among animal species. All of the PPPA metabolites observed in liver microsomes and plasma markedly decreased ACAT2 inhibitory activity. These findings will help us to synthesize new PPPA derivatives more effective in in vivo study than 1. PMID:25005817

  11. Urinary metabolites of isorhynchophylline in rats and their neuroprotective activities in the HT22 cell assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Qi, Wen; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W; Yuan, Dan

    2014-09-01

    Isorhynchophylline is one of the major alkaloids from the Uncaria hook possessing the effects of lowered blood pressure, vasodilatation and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. However, the metabolic pathway of isorhynchophylline has not been fully reported yet. In this paper, the metabolism of isorhynchophylline was investigated in rats. Five metabolites were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and identified by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR and CD experiments. Three new compounds were identified as 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide (M1), 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro isorhynchophylline (M2) and 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid (M4) together with two known compounds isorhynchophylline (M0) and rhynchophylline (M3). Possible metabolic pathways of isorhynchophylline are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for all the metabolites showed that isorhynchophylline (M0) exhibited potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M1-M4. Our present study is important to further understand its metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:24910000

  12. The vitamin D3 metabolite-type activity of Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Basudde, C D; Humphreys, D J

    1976-01-01

    1. Administration of an aqueous extract of the dried leaves of Solanum malacoxylon (DLSM) to rats causes a rapid hyperphosphataemia and a decrease in plasma alkaline phosphatase activity; the two effects are typical of 1,25(OH)2D3, the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D3. 2. DLSM, like both vitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone, increases plasma calcium and citrate levels in rats. The effect of DLSM in influencing plasma citrate, and the role of this important metabolite in mineral metabolism is discussed. 3. A decrease of plasma magnesium levels occurs in rats following treatment with DLSM. This decrease, which is associated with a renal loss of this cation, is remarkably similar to that produced by hypervitaminosis D3. 4. Prolonged administration of DLSM to vitamin D deficient rats causes a polyuria, hypercalciuria, hyperphosphaturia, hypermagnesuria, an increase in urinary total hydroxyproline, an increase in plasma total hexosamines, and a corresponding decrease in the bone total hexosamines. These effects, some of which can also be produced by hyperparathyroidism, or following the administration of parathyroid extract (PTE), large doses of vitamin D3, or 1,25(OH)2D3, suggest that DLSM, like the latter compounds, is capable of causing bone mineral mobilization, and the dissolution of bone organic matrix. PMID:212224

  13. Cytochrome P450-dependent eicosapentaenoic acid metabolites are novel BK channel activators.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Birgit; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Wang, Mong-Heng; Honeck, Horst; Kärgel, Eva; Theuer, Jürgen; Schwartzman, Michal L; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Gollasch, Maik; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2002-02-01

    P450-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites regulate arterial tone by modulating calcium-activated (BK) potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Because eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been reported to improve vascular function, we tested the hypothesis that P450-dependent epoxygenation of EPA produces alternative vasoactive compounds. We synthesized the 5 regioisomeric epoxyeicosattrienoic acids (EETeTr) and examined them for effects on K(+) currents in rat cerebral artery VSMCs with the patch-clamp technique. 11(R),12(S)-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (50 nmol/L) was used for comparison and stimulated K(+) currents 6-fold at +60 mV. However, 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr elicited a more than 14-fold increase. 17(S),18(R)-EET and the remaining four regioisomers were inactive. The effect of 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr was blocked by tetraethylammonium but not by 4-aminopyridine. VSMCs expressed P450s 4A1 and 4A3. Recombinant P450 4A1 hydroxylated EPA at C-19 and C-20 and epoxygenated the 17,18-double bond, yielding the R, S- and S, R-enantiomers in a ratio of 64:36. We conclude that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr represents a novel, potent activator of BK potassium channels. Furthermore, this metabolite can be directly produced in VSMCs. We suggest that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr may function as an important hyperpolarizing factor, particularly with EPA-rich diets. PMID:11882617

  14. Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Activity of Extracts of Ferula heuffelii Griseb. ex Heuff. and Its Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Ivan; Petrović, Silvana; Milenković, Marina; Stanojković, Tatjana; Nikolić, Dejan; Krunić, Aleksej; Niketić, Marjan

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of isolates (CHCl3 and MeOH extracts and selected metabolites) obtained from the underground parts of the Balkan endemic plant Ferula heuffelii Griseb. ex Heuff. were assessed. The CHCl3 and MeOH extracts exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity, being more pronounced against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria, especially against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=12.5 μg/ml for both extracts) and Micrococcus luteus (MIC=50 and 12.5 μg/ml, resp.). Among the tested metabolites, (6E)-1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,7,11-trimethyl-3-vinyldodeca-6,10-dien-1-one (2) and (2S*,3R*)-2-[(3E)-4,8-dimethylnona-3,7-dien-1-yl]-2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2,3-dimethylfuro[3,2-c]coumarin (4) demonstrated the best antimicrobial activity. Compounds 2 and 4 both strongly inhibited the growth of M. luteus (MIC=11.2 and 5.2 μM, resp.) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC=22.5 and 10.5 μM, resp.) and compound 2 additionally also the growth of Bacillus subtilis (MIC=11.2 μM). The cytotoxic activity of the isolates was tested against three human cancer cell lines, viz., cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa), chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562), and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The CHCl3 extract exhibited strong cytotoxic activity against all cell lines (IC50 <11.0 μg/ml). All compounds strongly inhibited the growth of the K562 and HeLa cell lines. Compound 4 exhibited also a strong activity against the MCF-7 cell line, comparable to that of cisplatin (IC50 =22.32±1.32 vs. 18.67±0.75μM). PMID:26460563

  15. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced. PMID:26705419

  16. Antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activities of secondary metabolites from the fungus Eurotium repens

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jiangtao; Radwan, Mohamed M.; León, Francisco; Wang, Xiaoning; Jacob, Melissa R.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, Shabana I.; Lupien, Shari; Hill, Robert A.; Dugan, Frank M.; Cutler, Horace G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined in vitro antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial, and antileishmanial activities of secondary metabolites (1–8) isolated from the fungus Eurotium repens. All compounds showed mild to moderate antibacterial or antifungal or both activities except 7. The activity of compound 6 was the best of the group tested. The in vitro antimalarial evaluation of these compounds revealed that compounds 1–3, 5, and 6 showed antimalarial activities against both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values in the range of 1.1–3.0 μg/ml without showing any cytotoxicity to the mammalian cells. Compound 5 displayed the highest antimalarial activity. Antileishmanial activity against Leishmania donovani promastigotes was observed for compounds 1–6 with IC50 values ranging from 6.2 to 23 μg/ml. Antileishmanial activity of compounds 5 and 6 (IC50 values of 7.5 and 6.2 μg/ml, respectively) was more potent than 1–4 (IC50 values ranging from 19–23 μg/ml). Compounds 7 and 8 did not show any antiprotozoal effect. Preliminary structure and activity relationship studies indicated that antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial, and antileishmanial activities associated with phenol derivates (1–6) seem to be dependent on the number of double bonds in the side chain, which would be important for lead optimization in the future. PMID:23024574

  17. Phenotypic and metabolic investigation of a CSF-1R kinase receptor inhibitor (BLZ945) and its pharmacologically active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Krauser, Joel A; Jin, Yi; Walles, Markus; Pfaar, Ulrike; Sutton, James; Wiesmann, Marion; Graf, Daniel; Pflimlin-Fritschy, Veronique; Wolf, Thierry; Camenisch, Gian; Swart, Piet

    2015-02-01

    1. 4-[2((1R,2R)-2-Hydroxycyclohexylamino)-benzothiazol-6-yloxyl]-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (BLZ945) is a small molecule inhibitor of CSF-1R kinase activity within osteoclasts designed to prevent skeletal related events in metastatic disease. Key metabolites were enzymatically and structurally characterized to understand the metabolic fate of BLZ945 and pharmacological implications. The relative intrinsic clearances for metabolites were derived from in vitro studies using human hepatocytes, microsomes and phenotyped with recombinant P450 enzymes. 2. Formation of a pharmacologically active metabolite (M9) was observed in human hepatocytes. The M9 metabolite is a structural isomer (diastereomer) of BLZ945 and is about 4-fold less potent. This isomer was enzymatically formed via P450 oxidation of the BLZ945 hydroxyl group, followed by aldo-keto reduction to the alcohol (M9). 3. Two reaction phenotyping approaches based on fractional clearances were applied to BLZ945 using hepatocytes and liver microsomes. The fraction metabolized (fm) or contribution ratio was determined for each metabolic reaction type (oxidation, glucuronidation or isomerization) as well as for each metabolite. The results quantitatively illustrate contribution ratios of the involved enzymes and pathways, e.g. the isomerization to metabolite M9 accounted for 24% intrinsic clearance in human hepatocytes. In summary, contribution ratios for the Phase I and Phase II pathways can be determined in hepatocytes. PMID:25180976

  18. Mutagenic activity and metabolites in the urine of workers exposed to trinitrotoluene (TNT).

    PubMed

    Ahlborg, G; Einistö, P; Sorsa, M

    1988-05-01

    Urine samples taken after work and after a free weekend from 50 workers employed in various activities in a chemical plant manufacturing explosives were analysed. On the basis of hygienic surveys, the subjects were divided into three categories of exposure to trinitrotoluene (TNT). The urine analyses consisted of gas chromatographic identification of TNT and its two metabolites, 4-ADNT and 2-ADNT, and a determination of the mutagenic activity. Two frame shift detector strains of Salmonella typhimurium were used, TA 98 and TA 98 NR, the latter being deficient in endogenous nitroreductase activity. On the basis of previous results on TNT mutagenicity, no exogeneous metabolic system was used to test the urine concentrates. Both tester strains showed that the mean urinary mutagenic activity was higher in the after work samples than in post weekend samples from the same subjects, showing that bacterial nitroreductase activity was not significantly responsible for the mutagenicity, although the response was higher with strain TA 98 than with TA 98 NR. The interindividual variation in urine mutagenicity was high, however, and the difference between the two sampling times was statistically significant (p less than 0.05) only for the high exposed group (workers in trotyl foundry and sieve house). Correlation between urinary mutagenicity and concentration of TNT in urine was poor; correlation was significant only with the urinary concentration of 4-ADNT. The correlation between urinary TNT and both metabolites was good (p less than 0.001). These results suggest that analysis of 4-ADNT in urine would be a sufficient biological measure for controlling exposure to TNT. PMID:3378017

  19. Biotransformation of Bisphenol AF to Its Major Glucuronide Metabolite Reduces Estrogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF), an endocrine disrupting chemical, can induce estrogenic activity through binding to estrogen receptor (ER). However, the metabolism of BPAF in vivo and the estrogenic activity of its metabolites remain unknown. In the present study, we identified four metabolites including BPAF diglucuronide, BPAF glucuronide (BPAF-G), BPAF glucuronide dehydrated and BPAF sulfate in the urine of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BPAF-G was further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). After treatment with a single dose of BPAF, BPAF was metabolized rapidly to BPAF-G, as detected in the plasma of SD rats. Biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G was confirmed with human liver microsomes (HLM), and Vmax of glucuronidation for HLM was 11.6 nmol/min/mg. We also found that BPAF glucuronidation could be mediated through several human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) including UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, among which UGT2B7 showed the highest efficiency of glucuronidation. To explain the biological function of BPAF biotransformation, the estrogenic activities of BPAF and BPAF-G were evaluated in ER-positive breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cells. BPAF significantly stimulates ER-regulated gene expression and cell proliferation at the dose of 100 nM and 1 μM in breast cancer cells. However, BPAF-G did not show any induction of estrogenic activity at the same dosages, implying that formation of BPAF-G is a potential host defense mechanism against BPAF. Based on our study, biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G can eliminate BPAF-induced estrogenic activity, which is therefore considered as reducing the potential threat to human beings. PMID:24349450

  20. Biotransformation of bisphenol AF to its major glucuronide metabolite reduces estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yang, Yunjia; Yang, Yi; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF), an endocrine disrupting chemical, can induce estrogenic activity through binding to estrogen receptor (ER). However, the metabolism of BPAF in vivo and the estrogenic activity of its metabolites remain unknown. In the present study, we identified four metabolites including BPAF diglucuronide, BPAF glucuronide (BPAF-G), BPAF glucuronide dehydrated and BPAF sulfate in the urine of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BPAF-G was further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). After treatment with a single dose of BPAF, BPAF was metabolized rapidly to BPAF-G, as detected in the plasma of SD rats. Biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G was confirmed with human liver microsomes (HLM), and Vmax of glucuronidation for HLM was 11.6 nmol/min/mg. We also found that BPAF glucuronidation could be mediated through several human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) including UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, among which UGT2B7 showed the highest efficiency of glucuronidation. To explain the biological function of BPAF biotransformation, the estrogenic activities of BPAF and BPAF-G were evaluated in ER-positive breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cells. BPAF significantly stimulates ER-regulated gene expression and cell proliferation at the dose of 100 nM and 1 μM in breast cancer cells. However, BPAF-G did not show any induction of estrogenic activity at the same dosages, implying that formation of BPAF-G is a potential host defense mechanism against BPAF. Based on our study, biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G can eliminate BPAF-induced estrogenic activity, which is therefore considered as reducing the potential threat to human beings. PMID:24349450

  1. Isophosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of ifosfamide with activity against murine tumours comparable to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed Central

    Struck, R. F.; Dykes, D. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Suling, W. J.; Trader, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Isophosphoramide mustard was synthesized and was found to demonstrate activity essentially comparable to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide against L1210 and P388 leukaemia. Lewis lung carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma 16/C, ovarian sarcoma M5076, and colon tumour 6A, in mice and Yoshida ascitic sarcoma in rats. At doses less than, or equivalent to, the LD10, isophosphoramide mustard retained high activity against cyclophosphamide-resistant L1210 and P388 leukaemias, but was less active against intracerebrally-implanted P388 leukaemia while cyclophosphamide produced a 4 log10 tumour cell reduction. It was also less active (one log10 lower cell kill) than cyclophosphamide against the B16 melonoma. Metabolism studies on ifosfamide in mice identified isophosphoramide mustard in blood. In addition, unchanged drug, carboxyifosfamide, 4-ketoifosfamide, dechloroethyl cyclophosphamide, dechloroethylifosfamide, and alcoifosfamide were identified. The latter 4 metabolites were also identified in urine from an ifosfamide-treated dog. In a simulated in vitro pharmacokinetic experiment against L1210 leukaemia in which drugs were incubated at various concentrations for various times, both 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and isophosphoramide mustard exhibited significant cytoxicity at concentration times time values of 100-1000 micrograms X min ml-1, while acrolein was significantly cytotoxic at 10 micrograms X min ml-1. Treatment of mice with drug followed by L1210 cells demonstrated a shorter duration of effective levels of cytotoxic activity for isophosphoramide mustard and phosphoramide mustard in comparison with cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide. Isophosphoramide mustard and 2-chloroethylamine, a potential hydrolysis product of isophosphoramide mustard and carboxyifosfamide, were less mutagenic in the standard Ames test than the 2 corresponding metabolites of cyclophosphamide [phosphoramide mustard and bis(2-chloroethyl)amine]. PMID:6821629

  2. Plasma cathepsin D isoforms and their active metabolites increase after myocardial infarction and contribute to plasma renin activity.

    PubMed

    Naseem, R Haris; Hedegard, Wade; Henry, Timothy D; Lessard, Jennifer; Sutter, Kathryn; Katz, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) is often found to increase after myocardial infarction (MI). Elevated PRA may contribute to increased myocardial angiotensin II that is responsible for maladaptive remodeling of the myocardium after MI. We hypothesized that MI would also result in cardiac release of cathepsin D, a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme with high renin sequence homology. Cathepsin D release from damaged myocardial tissue could contribute to angiotensin formation by acting as an enzymatic alternate to renin. We assessed circulating renin and cathepsin D from both control and MI patient plasma (7-20 hours after MI) using shallow gradient focusing that allowed for independent measurement of both enzymes. Cathepsin D was increased significantly in the plasma after MI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, circulating active cathepsin D metabolites were also significantly elevated after MI (P < 0.04), and contained the majority of cathepsin D activity in plasma. Spiking control plasma with cathepsin D resulted in a variable but significant (P = 0.005) increase in PRA using a clinical assay. We conclude that 7-20 hours after MI, plasma cathepsin D is significantly elevated and most of the active enzymatic activity is circulating as plasma metabolites. Circulating cathepsin D can falsely increase clinical PRA determinations, and may also provide an alternative angiotensin formation pathway after MI. PMID:15739123

  3. Symphonia globulifera, a widespread source of complex metabolites with potent biological activities.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, Yann; Cottet, Kevin; Kritsanida, Marina; Michel, Sylvie; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Lallemand, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Symphonia globulifera has been widely used in traditional medicine and has therefore been subjected to several phytochemical studies in the American and African continents. Interestingly, some disparities have been observed concerning its metabolic profile. Several phytochemical studies of S. globulifera have led to the identification of more than 40 compounds, including several polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols. Biological evaluations have pointed out the promising biological activities of these secondary metabolites, mostly as antiparasitic or antimicrobial, confirming the traditional use of this plant. The purpose of this review is to describe the natural occurrence, botanical aspects, ethnomedicinal use, structure, and biogenesis, as well as biological activities of compounds isolated from this species according to their provenance. PMID:25590372

  4. Bioactive Metabolites from Chaetomium aureum: Structure Elucidation and Inhibition of the Hsp90 Machine Chaperoning Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kabbaj, Fatima Zahra; Lu, Su; Faouzi, My El Abbés; Meddah, Bouchra; Proksch, Peter; Cherrah, Yahya; Altenbach, Hans-Josef; Aly, Amal H.; Chadli, Ahmed; Debbab, Abdessamad

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the EtOAc extract of the fungus Chaetomium aureum, an endophyte of the Moroccan medicinal plant Thymelaea lythroides, afforded one new resorcinol derivative named chaetorcinol, together with five known metabolites. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry as well as by comparison with the literature. All compounds were tested for their activity towards the Hsp90 chaperoning machine in vitro using the progesterone receptor (PR) and rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL). Among the isolated compounds, only sclerotiorin efficiently inhibited the Hsp90 machine chaperoning activity. However, sclerotiorin showed no cytotoxic effect on breast cancer Hs578T, MDA-MB-231 and prostate cancer LNCaP cell lines. Interestingly, deacetylation of sclerotiorin increased its cytotoxicity toward the tested cell lines over a period of 48h. PMID:25482429

  5. Psychiatric Symptoms in a Patient with Influenza A (H1N1) Treated with Oseltamivir (Tamiflu): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang Won; Han, Changsu

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir is the most common antiviral drug used to treat and prevent influenza. Epidemiological studies performed in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom indicate that oseltamivir may cause psychiatric symptoms; however, the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In South Korea, interest in oseltamivir has increased with the spread of the new influenza virus; however, no case report or investigation of psychiatric symptoms associated with the drug has been reported to date. Here, we report a case o0f a 22-year-old male who complained of mood swings, suicidal feelings, auditory hallucinations, memory deterioration, and insomnia after taking oseltamivir. PMID:26243850

  6. In-stream attenuation of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their metabolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Ferrar, Imma; Ryan, Joseph N.; Thurman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In-stream attenuation was determined for 14 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites. Lagrangian sampling, which follows a parcel of water as it moves downstream, was used to link hydrological and chemical transformation processes. Wastewater loading of neuro-active compounds varied considerably over a span of several hours, and thus a sampling regime was used to verify that the Lagrangian parcel was being sampled and a mechanism was developed to correct measured concentrations if it was not. In-stream attenuation over the 5.4-km evaluated reach could be modeled as pseudo-first-order decay for 11 of the 14 evaluated neuro-active pharmaceutical compounds, illustrating the capacity of streams to reduce conveyance of neuro-active compounds downstream. Fluoxetine and N-desmethyl citalopram were the most rapidly attenuated compounds (t1/2 = 3.6 ± 0.3 h, 4.0 ± 0.2 h, respectively). Lamotrigine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxy-carbamazepine, and carbamazepine were the most persistent (t1/2 = 12 ± 2.0 h, 12 ± 2.6 h, 21 ± 4.5 h, respectively). Parent compounds (e.g., buproprion, carbamazepine, lamotrigine) generally were more persistent relative to their metabolites. Several compounds (citalopram, venlafaxine, O-desmethyl-venlafaxine) were not attenuated. It was postulated that the primary mechanism of removal for these compounds was interaction with bed sediments and stream biofilms, based on measured concentrations in stream biofilms and a column experiment using stream sediments.

  7. In-stream attenuation of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Antweiler, Ronald C; Ferrer, Imma; Ryan, Joseph N; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    In-stream attenuation was determined for 14 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites. Lagrangian sampling, which follows a parcel of water as it moves downstream, was used to link hydrological and chemical transformation processes. Wastewater loading of neuro-active compounds varied considerably over a span of several hours, and thus a sampling regime was used to verify that the Lagrangian parcel was being sampled and a mechanism was developed to correct measured concentrations if it was not. In-stream attenuation over the 5.4-km evaluated reach could be modeled as pseudo-first-order decay for 11 of the 14 evaluated neuro-active pharmaceutical compounds, illustrating the capacity of streams to reduce conveyance of neuro-active compounds downstream. Fluoxetine and N-desmethyl citalopram were the most rapidly attenuated compounds (t1/2 = 3.6 ± 0.3 h, 4.0 ± 0.2 h, respectively). Lamotrigine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxy-carbamazepine, and carbamazepine were the most persistent (t1/2 = 12 ± 2.0 h, 12 ± 2.6 h, 21 ± 4.5 h, respectively). Parent compounds (e.g., buproprion, carbamazepine, lamotrigine) generally were more persistent relative to their metabolites. Several compounds (citalopram, venlafaxine, O-desmethyl-venlafaxine) were not attenuated. It was postulated that the primary mechanism of removal for these compounds was interaction with bed sediments and stream biofilms, based on measured concentrations in stream biofilms and a column experiment using stream sediments. PMID:23952127

  8. Continuing hunt for endophytic actinomycetes as a source of novel biologically active metabolites.

    PubMed

    Masand, Meeta; Jose, Polpass Arul; Menghani, Ekta; Jebakumar, Solomon Robinson David

    2015-12-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens and persistent agrochemicals mount the detrimental threats against human health and welfare. Exploitation of beneficial microorganisms and their metabolic inventions is most promising way to tackle these two problems. Since the successive discoveries of penicillin and streptomycin in 1940s, numerous biologically active metabolites have been discovered from different microorganisms, especially actinomycetes. In recent years, actinomycetes that inhabit unexplored environments have received significant attention due to their broad diversity and distinctive metabolic potential with medical, agricultural and industrial importance. In this scenario, endophytic actinomycetes that inhabit living tissues of plants are emerging as a potential source of novel bioactive compounds for the discovery of drug leads. Also, endophytic actinomycetes are considered as bio-inoculants to improve crop performance through organic farming practices. Further efforts on exploring the endophytic actinomycetes associated with the plants warrant the likelihood of discovering new taxa and their metabolites with novel chemical structures and biotechnological importance. This mini-review highlights the recent achievements in isolation of endophytic actinomycetes and an assortment of bioactive compounds. PMID:26410426

  9. Atrazine and its main metabolites alter the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yueyi; Zhu, Zhihong; Yang, Enlu; Feng, Xiayan; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and its main chlorometabolites, i.e., diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), deisopropylatrazine (DIP), and deethylatrazine (DE), have been widely detected in aquatic systems near agricultural fields. However, their possible effects on aquatic animals are still not fully understood. In this study, it was observed that several developmental endpoints such as the heart beat, hatchability, and morphological abnormalities were influenced by ATZ and its metabolites in different developmental stages. In addition, after 5 days of exposure to 30, 100, 300 μg L(-1) ATZ and its main chlorometabolites, the swimming behaviors of larval zebrafish were significantly disturbed, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were consistently inhibited. Our results also demonstrate that ATZ and its main chlorometabolites are neuroendocrine disruptors that impact the expression of neurotoxicity-related genes such as Ache, Gap43, Gfap, Syn2a, Shha, Mbp, Elavl3, Nestin and Ngn1 in early developmental stages of zebrafish. According to our results, it is possible that not only ATZ but also its metabolites (DACT, DIP and DE) have the same or even more toxic effects on different endpoints of the early developmental stages of zebrafish. PMID:26803580

  10. Anthocyanins and their gut metabolites reduce the adhesion of monocyte to TNFα-activated endothelial cells at physiologically relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krga, Irena; Monfoulet, Laurent-Emmanuel; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Mercier, Sylvie; Glibetic, Maria; Morand, Christine; Milenkovic, Dragan

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of evidence suggests a protective role of dietary anthocyanins against cardiovascular diseases. Anthocyanins' extensive metabolism indicates that their metabolites could be responsible for the protective effects associated with consumption of anthocyanin-rich foods. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of plasma anthocyanins and their metabolites on the adhesion of monocytes to TNFα-activated endothelial cells and on the expression of genes encoding cell adhesion molecules. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to circulating anthocyanins: cyanidin-3-arabinoside, cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, anthocyanin degradation product: 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, or to their gut metabolites: protocatechuic, vanillic, ferulic and hippuric acid, at physiologically-relevant concentrations (0.1-2 μM) and time of exposure. Both anthocyanins and gut metabolites decreased the adhesion of monocytes to HUVECs, with a magnitude ranging from 18.1% to 47%. The mixture of anthocyanins and that of gut metabolites also reduced monocyte adhesion. However, no significant effect on the expression of genes encoding E-selectin, ICAM1 and VCAM1 was observed, suggesting that other molecular targets are involved in the observed effect. In conclusion, this study showed the potency of anthocyanins and their gut metabolites to modulate the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells, the initial step in atherosclerosis development, under physiologically-relevant conditions. PMID:26873533

  11. Linking diet, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity to serum metabolite networks: findings from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Floegel, A; Wientzek, A; Bachlechner, U; Jacobs, S; Drogan, D; Prehn, C; Adamski, J; Krumsiek, J; Schulze, M B; Pischon, T; Boeing, H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: It is not yet resolved how lifestyle factors and intermediate phenotypes interrelate with metabolic pathways. We aimed to investigate the associations between diet, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity with serum metabolite networks in a population-based study. Methods: The present study included 2380 participants of a randomly drawn subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam. Targeted metabolomics was used to measure 127 serum metabolites. Additional data were available including anthropometric measurements, dietary assessment including intake of whole-grain bread, coffee and cake and cookies by food frequency questionnaire, and objectively measured physical activity energy expenditure and cardiorespiratory fitness in a subsample of 100 participants. In a data-driven approach, Gaussian graphical modeling was used to draw metabolite networks and depict relevant associations between exposures and serum metabolites. In addition, the relationship of different exposure metabolite networks was estimated. Results: In the serum metabolite network, the different metabolite classes could be separated. There was a big group of phospholipids and acylcarnitines, a group of amino acids and C6-sugar. Amino acids were particularly positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity. C6-sugar and acylcarnitines were positively associated with obesity and inversely with intake of whole-grain bread. Phospholipids showed opposite associations with obesity and coffee intake. Metabolite networks of coffee intake and obesity were strongly inversely correlated (body mass index (BMI): r=−0.57 and waist circumference: r=−0.59). A strong positive correlation was observed between metabolite networks of BMI and waist circumference (r=0.99), as well as the metabolite networks of cake and cookie intake with cardiorespiratory fitness and intake of whole-grain bread (r=0.52 and r=0

  12. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  13. The antitumor activity study of ginsenosides and metabolites in lung cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng-Yuan; Shang, Wen-Qing; Yu, Jia-Jun; Sun, Qian; Li, Ming-Qing; Sun, Jian-Song

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng and its components exert various biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, and antitumor activity. Ginsenosides are the main biological components of ginseng. Protopanaxadiol (PPD) and protopanaxatriol (PPT) are two metabolites of ginsenosides. However, the difference between these compounds in anti-lung cancer is unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor activity of PPD, PPT, Ginsenosides-Rg3 (G-Rg3) and Ginsenosides-Rh2 (G-Rh2) in lung cancer cell. After treatment with cisplatin, PPD, PPT, G-Rg3 or G-Rh2, the viability, apoptosis level and invasiveness of lung cell lines (A549 cell, a lung adenocarcinoma cell line and SK-MES-1 cell, a lung squamous cell line) in vitro were analyzed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), Annexin V/PI apoptosis and Matrigel invasion assays, respectively. Here we found that all these compounds led to significant decreases of viability and invasiveness and an obvious increase of apoptosis of A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. Among these, the viability of SK-MES-1 cell treated with PPT was decreased to 66.8%, and this effect was closest to Cisplatin. G-Rg3 had the highest stimulatory effect on apoptosis, and PTT had the highest inhibitory effect on cell invasiveness in A549 and SK-MES-1 cells. These results indicate that both ginsenosides and two metabolites have antitumor activity on lung cancer cell in vitro. However, PPT is more powerful for inhibiting the viability and invasiveness of lung cancer cell, especially lung squamous cell. G-Rg3 has the best pro-apoptosis effects. This study provides a scientific basis for potential therapeutic strategies targeted to lung cancer by further structure modification. PMID:27186294

  14. Evolution of the Influenza A Virus Genome during Development of Oseltamivir Resistance In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Renzette, Nicholas; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Liu, Ping; Gallagher, Glen R.; Aiello, Daniel; Porter, Alyssa J.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Bolon, Daniel N.; Poh, Yu-Ping; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kowalik, Timothy F.; Finberg, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Current antiviral therapies include oseltamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor that prevents the release of nascent viral particles from infected cells. However, the IAV genome can evolve rapidly, and oseltamivir resistance mutations have been detected in numerous clinical samples. Using an in vitro evolution platform and whole-genome population sequencing, we investigated the population genomics of IAV during the development of oseltamivir resistance. Strain A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) was grown in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with or without escalating concentrations of oseltamivir over serial passages. Following drug treatment, the H274Y resistance mutation fixed reproducibly within the population. The presence of the H274Y mutation in the viral population, at either a low or a high frequency, led to measurable changes in the neuraminidase inhibition assay. Surprisingly, fixation of the resistance mutation was not accompanied by alterations of viral population diversity or differentiation, and oseltamivir did not alter the selective environment. While the neighboring K248E mutation was also a target of positive selection prior to H274Y fixation, H274Y was the primary beneficial mutation in the population. In addition, once evolved, the H274Y mutation persisted after the withdrawal of the drug, even when not fixed in viral populations. We conclude that only selection of H274Y is required for oseltamivir resistance and that H274Y is not deleterious in the absence of the drug. These collective results could offer an explanation for the recent reproducible rise in oseltamivir resistance in seasonal H1N1 IAV strains in humans. PMID:24155392

  15. In vitro and in vivo stability of oseltamivir within a bioequivalence trial.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, Alexander; Borisova, Irina; Yaroshenko, Irina; Sidorova, Alla

    2016-05-01

    A simple, precise, and rapid method to simultaneously determine the levels of oseltamivir (OS) and oseltamivir carboxylate (OSC) in human plasma was developed. Additionally, the stability of both substances in plasma was investigated under different conditions. The method involved protein precipitation (0.01 % HCl in acetonitrile), and then the supernatant was injected into the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a YMC-Triart C18 (100 × 2.0 mm, 5 μm) column using acetonitrile/water (30:70, v/v) containing 0.1 % formic acid as the mobile phase. Sample volume was 5 μl. The linearity of the method was established in the concentration range of 0.5-100 ng/mL for OS and 1.0-1000 ng/mL for OSC. The intra-day precision and accuracy for oseltamivir were 1.5-8.9 and 94.4-101.0 %, respectively. For oseltamivir carboxylate, the intra-day precision and accuracy were 3.2-12.7 and 92.8-108.8 %, respectively, whereas the inter-day precision and accuracy were 5.5-11.5 and 94.6-104.0 % for oseltamivir and 4.7-11.5 and 99.9-103.9 % for oseltamivir carboxylate, respectively. The application of this method was demonstrated by a bioequivalence study in 28 healthy humans with 75 mg oseltamivir phosphate capsules (Tamiflu®). Sodium fluoride (2.4 mg/mL) with potassium oxalate (3 mg/mL) was used as anticoagulant within sampling of trial. The assay reproducibility was established by reanalysis of 80 incurred samples. PMID:27002612

  16. Cysteamine, the natural metabolite of pantetheinase, shows specific activity against Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Ayi, Kodjo; Bongfen, Silayuv E; Tam, Mifong; Radovanovic, Irena; Gauthier, Susan; Santiago, Helton; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Sher, Alan; Mullick, Alaka; Fortin, Anny; Stevenson, Mary M; Kain, Kevin C; Gros, Philippe

    2010-08-01

    In mice, loss of pantetheinase activity causes susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS. Treatment of mice with the pantetheinase metabolite cysteamine reduces blood-stage replication of P. chabaudi and significantly increases survival. Similarly, a short exposure of Plasmodium to cysteamine ex vivo is sufficient to suppress parasite infectivity in vivo. This effect of cysteamine is specific and not observed with a related thiol (dimercaptosuccinic acid) or with the pantethine precursor of cysteamine. Also, cysteamine does not protect against infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi or the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, suggesting cysteamine acts directly against the parasite and does not modulate host inflammatory response. Cysteamine exposure also blocks replication of P. falciparum in vitro; moreover, these treated parasites show higher levels of intact hemoglobin. This study highlights the in vivo action of cysteamine against Plasmodium and provides further evidence for the involvement of pantetheinase in host response to this infection. PMID:20219464

  17. Cysteamine, the natural metabolite of pantetheinase, shows specific activity against Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Ayi, Kodjo; Bongfen, Silayuv E.; Tam, Mifong; Radovanovic, Irena; Gauthier, Susan; Santiago, Helton; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Sher, Alan; Mullick, Alaka; Fortin, Anny; Stevenson, Mary M.; Kain, Kevin C.; Gros, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In mice, loss of pantetheinase activity causes susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS. Treatment of mice with the pantetheinase metabolite cysteamine reduces blood-stage replication of P. chabaudi and significantly increases survival. Similarly, a short exposure of Plasmodium to cysteamine ex vivo is sufficient to suppress parasite infectivity in vivo. This effect of cysteamine is specific and not observed with a related thiol (dimercaptosuccinic acid) or with the pantethine precursor of cysteamine. Also, cysteamine does not protect against infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi or the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, suggesting cysteamine acts directly against the parasite and does not modulate host inflammatory response. Cysteamine exposure also blocks replication of P. falciparum in vitro; moreover, these treated parasites show higher levels of intact hemoglobin. This study highlights the in vivo action of cysteamine against Plasmodium and provides further evidence for the involvement of pantetheinase in host response to this infection. PMID:20219464

  18. Evaluation of in vitro antiprotozoal activity of Ajuga laxmannii and its secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Atay, Irem; Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Kaiser, Marcel; Akaydin, Galip; Yesilada, Erdem; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-09-01

    Context Some Ajuga L. (Lamiaceae) species are traditionally used for the treatment of malaria, as well as fever, which is a common symptom of many parasitic diseases. Objective In the continuation of our studies on the identification of antiprotozoal secondary metabolites of Turkish Lamiaceae species, we have investigated the aerial parts of Ajuga laxmannii. Materials and methods The aerial parts of A. laxmannii were extracted with MeOH. The H2O subextract was subjected to polyamide, C18-MPLC and SiO2 CCs to yield eight metabolites. The structures of the isolates were elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and MS analyses. The extract, subextracts as well as the isolates were tested for their in vitro antiprotozoal activities against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense, T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani at concentrations of 90-0.123 μg/mL. Results Two iridoid glycosides harpagide (1) and 8-O-acetylharpagide (2), three o-coumaric acid derivatives cis-melilotoside (3), trans-melilotoside (4) and dihydromelilotoside (5), two phenylethanoid glycosides verbascoside (6) and galactosylmartynoside (7) and a flavone-C-glycoside, isoorientin (8) were isolated. Many compounds showed moderate to good antiparasitic activity, with isoorientin (8) displaying the most significant antimalarial potential (an IC50 value of 9.7 μg/mL). Discussion and conclusion This is the first report on the antiprotozoal evaluation of A. laxmannii extracts and isolates. Furthermore, isoorientin and dihydromelilotoside are being reported for the first time from the genus Ajuga. PMID:26734766

  19. Metabolite fingerprinting of pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) embryos to assess active pathways during oil synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsogtbaatar, Enkhtuul; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; Sonera, Marcos Corchado; Alonso, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.), a plant naturalized to North America, accumulates high levels of erucic acid in its seeds, which makes it a promising biodiesel and industrial crop. The main carbon sinks in pennycress embryos were found to be proteins, fatty acids, and cell wall, which respectively represented 38.5, 33.2, and 27.0% of the biomass at 21 days after pollination. Erucic acid reached a maximum of 36% of the total fatty acids. Together these results indicate that total oil and erucic acid contents could be increased to boost the economic competitiveness of this crop. Understanding the biochemical basis of oil synthesis in pennycress embryos is therefore timely and relevant to guide future breeding and/or metabolic engineering efforts. For this purpose, a combination of metabolomics approaches was conducted to assess the active biochemical pathways during oil synthesis. First, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiling of intracellular metabolites highlighted three main families of compounds: organic acids, amino acids, and sugars/sugar alcohols. Secondly, these intermediates were quantified in developing pennycress embryos by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Finally, partitional clustering analysis grouped the intracellular metabolites that shared a similar pattern of accumulation over time into eight clusters. This study underlined that: (i) sucrose might be stored rather than cleaved into hexoses; (ii) glucose and glutamine would be the main sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; and (iii) glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin cycle were active in developing pennycress embryos. PMID:25711705

  20. Metabolite fingerprinting of pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) embryos to assess active pathways during oil synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsogtbaatar, Enkhtuul; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; Sonera, Marcos Corchado; Alonso, Ana Paula

    2015-07-01

    Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.), a plant naturalized to North America, accumulates high levels of erucic acid in its seeds, which makes it a promising biodiesel and industrial crop. The main carbon sinks in pennycress embryos were found to be proteins, fatty acids, and cell wall, which respectively represented 38.5, 33.2, and 27.0% of the biomass at 21 days after pollination. Erucic acid reached a maximum of 36% of the total fatty acids. Together these results indicate that total oil and erucic acid contents could be increased to boost the economic competitiveness of this crop. Understanding the biochemical basis of oil synthesis in pennycress embryos is therefore timely and relevant to guide future breeding and/or metabolic engineering efforts. For this purpose, a combination of metabolomics approaches was conducted to assess the active biochemical pathways during oil synthesis. First, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiling of intracellular metabolites highlighted three main families of compounds: organic acids, amino acids, and sugars/sugar alcohols. Secondly, these intermediates were quantified in developing pennycress embryos by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Finally, partitional clustering analysis grouped the intracellular metabolites that shared a similar pattern of accumulation over time into eight clusters. This study underlined that: (i) sucrose might be stored rather than cleaved into hexoses; (ii) glucose and glutamine would be the main sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; and (iii) glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin cycle were active in developing pennycress embryos. PMID:25711705

  1. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  2. Effect of an Echinacea-Based Hot Drink Versus Oseltamivir in Influenza Treatment: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Noninferiority Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rauš, Karel; Pleschka, Stephan; Klein, Peter; Schoop, Roland; Fisher, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Echinacea has antiviral activity against influenza viruses in vitro and has traditionally been used for treatment of colds and flu. Objectives This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, controlled clinical trial compared a new echinacea formulation with the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, the gold standard treatment for influenza. Methods Following informed consent, 473 patients with early influenza symptoms (≤48 hours) were recruited in primary care in the Czech Republic and randomized to either 5 days of oseltamivir followed by 5 days of placebo, or 10 days of an Echinacea purpurea-based formulation called Echinaforce Hotdrink (A. Vogel Bioforce AG, Roggwil, Switzerland). The proportion of recovered patients (influenza symptoms rated as absent or mild in the evening) was analyzed for noninferiority between treatment groups using a generalized Wilcoxon test with significance level α = 0.05 (2-sided) and using a CI approach in the per-protocol sample. Results Recovery from illness was comparable in the 2 treatment groups at 1.5% versus 4.1% after 1 day, 50.2% versus 48.8% after 5 days, and 90.1% versus 84.8% after 10 days of treatment with Echinaforce Hotdrink and oseltamivir, respectively. Noninferiority was demonstrated for each day and overall (95% CI, 0.487–0.5265 by generalized Wilcoxon test). Very similar results were obtained in the group with virologically confirmed influenza virus infections and in a retrospective analysis during the peak influenza period. The incidence of complications was lower with Echinaforce Hotdrink than with oseltamivir (2.46% vs 6.45%; P = 0.076) and fewer adverse events (particularly nausea and vomiting) were observed with Echinaforce Hotdrink. Conclusions Echinaforce Hotdrink is as effective as oseltamivir in the early treatment of clinically diagnosed and virologically confirmed influenza virus infections with a reduced risk of complications and adverse events. It appears to be an attractive

  3. Assessment of the Potential Biological Activity of Low Molecular Weight Metabolites of Freshwater Macrophytes with QSAR

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Elena V.; Krylova, Julia V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on the assessment of the spectrum of biological activities (antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial) with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) for the major components of three macrophytes widespread in the Holarctic species of freshwater, emergent macrophyte with floating leaves, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., and two species of submergent macrophyte groups, Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton obtusifolius (Mert. et Koch), for the discovery of their ecological and pharmacological potential. The predicted probability of anti-inflammatory or antineoplastic activities above 0.8 was observed for twenty compounds. The same compounds were also characterized by high probability of antifungal and antibacterial activity. Six metabolites, namely, hexanal, pentadecanal, tetradecanoic acid, dibutyl phthalate, hexadecanoic acid, and manool, were a part of the major components of all three studied plants, indicating their high ecological significance and a certain universalism in their use by various species of water plants for the implementation of ecological and biochemical functions. This report underlines the role of identified compounds not only as important components in regulation of biochemical and metabolic pathways and processes in aquatic ecological systems, but also as potential pharmacological agents in the fight against different diseases. PMID:27200207

  4. Antiproliferative, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of the Lichen Xanthoria parietina and Its Secondary Metabolite Parietin

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Loppi, Stefano; Di Santi, Annalisa; Nebbioso, Angela; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Paoli, Luca; De Ruberto, Francesca; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia; Bontempo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus) Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances. PMID:25860944

  5. Antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the lichen Xanthoria parietina and its secondary metabolite parietin.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Loppi, Stefano; Di Santi, Annalisa; Nebbioso, Angela; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Paoli, Luca; De Ruberto, Francesca; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia; Bontempo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus) Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances. PMID:25860944

  6. Assessment of the Potential Biological Activity of Low Molecular Weight Metabolites of Freshwater Macrophytes with QSAR.

    PubMed

    Kurashov, Evgeny A; Fedorova, Elena V; Krylova, Julia V; Mitrukova, Galina G

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on the assessment of the spectrum of biological activities (antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial) with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) for the major components of three macrophytes widespread in the Holarctic species of freshwater, emergent macrophyte with floating leaves, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., and two species of submergent macrophyte groups, Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton obtusifolius (Mert. et Koch), for the discovery of their ecological and pharmacological potential. The predicted probability of anti-inflammatory or antineoplastic activities above 0.8 was observed for twenty compounds. The same compounds were also characterized by high probability of antifungal and antibacterial activity. Six metabolites, namely, hexanal, pentadecanal, tetradecanoic acid, dibutyl phthalate, hexadecanoic acid, and manool, were a part of the major components of all three studied plants, indicating their high ecological significance and a certain universalism in their use by various species of water plants for the implementation of ecological and biochemical functions. This report underlines the role of identified compounds not only as important components in regulation of biochemical and metabolic pathways and processes in aquatic ecological systems, but also as potential pharmacological agents in the fight against different diseases. PMID:27200207

  7. A Practical Strategy to Discover New Antitumor Compounds by Activating Silent Metabolite Production in Fungi by Diethyl Sulphate Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shi-Ming; Wu, Chang-Jing; Li, Chang-Wei; Cui, Cheng-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many fungal biosynthetic pathways are silent in standard culture conditions, and activation of the silent pathways may enable access to new metabolites with antitumor activities. The aim of the present study was to develop a practical strategy for microbial chemists to access silent metabolites in fungi. We demonstrated this strategy using a marine-derived fungus Penicillium purpurogenum G59 and a modified diethyl sulphate mutagenesis procedure. Using this strategy, we discovered four new antitumor compounds named penicimutanolone (1), penicimutanin A (2), penicimutanin B (3), and penicimutatin (4). Structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, especially extensive 2D NMR analysis. Antitumor activities were assayed by the MTT method using human cancer cell lines. Bioassays and HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses were used to estimate the activated secondary metabolite production. Compounds 2 and 3 had novel structures, and 1 was a new compound belonging to a class of very rare natural products from which only four members are so far known. Compounds 1–3 inhibited several human cancer cell lines with IC50 values lower than 20 μM, and 4 inhibited the cell lines to some extent. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of this strategy to discover new compounds by activating silent fungal metabolic pathways. These discoveries provide rationale for the increased use of chemical mutagenesis strategies in silent fungal metabolite studies. PMID:24681631

  8. Structural Characterization of a Therapeutic Anti-Methamphetamine Antibody Fragment: Oligomerization and Binding of Active Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines and monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for treatment of (+)-methamphetamine (METH) abuse are in late stage preclinical and early clinical trial phases, respectively. These immunotherapies work as pharmacokinetic antagonists, sequestering METH and its metabolites away from sites of action in the brain and reduce the rewarding and toxic effects of the drug. A key aspect of these immunotherapy strategies is the understanding of the subtle molecular interactions important for generating antibodies with high affinity and specificity for METH. We previously determined crystal structures of a high affinity anti-METH therapeutic single chain antibody fragment (scFv6H4, KD = 10 nM) in complex with METH and the (+) stereoisomer of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or “ecstasy”). Here we report the crystal structure of scFv6H4 in homo-trimeric unbound (apo) form (2.60Å), as well as monomeric forms in complex with two active metabolites; (+)-amphetamine (AMP, 2.38Å) and (+)-4-hydroxy methamphetamine (p-OH-METH, 2.33Å). The apo structure forms a trimer in the crystal lattice and it results in the formation of an intermolecular composite beta-sheet with a three-fold symmetry. We were also able to structurally characterize the coordination of the His-tags with Ni2+. Two of the histidine residues of each C-terminal His-tag interact with Ni2+ in an octahedral geometry. In the apo state the CDR loops of scFv6H4 form an open conformation of the binding pocket. Upon ligand binding, the CDR loops adopt a closed formation, encasing the drug almost completely. The structural information reported here elucidates key molecular interactions important in anti-methamphetamine abuse immunotherapy. PMID:24349338

  9. Integrated semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model for both sunitinib and its active metabolite SU12662

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huixin; Steeghs, Neeltje; Kloth, Jacqueline S L; de Wit, Djoeke; van Hasselt, J G Coen; van Erp, Nielka P; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2015-01-01

    Aims Previously published pharmacokinetic (PK) models for sunitinib and its active metabolite SU12662 were based on a limited dataset or lacked important elements such as correlations between sunitinib and its metabolite. The current study aimed to develop an improved PK model that circumvented these limitations and to prove the utility of the PK model in treatment optimization in clinical practice. Methods One thousand two hundred and five plasma samples from 70 cancer patients were collected from three PK studies with sunitinib and SU12662. A semi-physiological PK model for sunitinib and SU12662 was developed incorporating pre-systemic metabolism using non-linear mixed effects modelling (nonmem). Allometric scaling based on body weight was applied. The final model was used for simulation of the PK of different treatment regimens. Results Sunitinib and SU12662 PK were best described by a one and two compartment model, respectively. Introduction of pre-systemic formation of SU12662 strongly improved model fit, compared with solely systemic metabolism. The clearance of sunitinib and SU12662 was estimated at 35.7 (relative standard error (RSE) 5.7%) l h−1 and 17.1 (RSE 7.4%) l h−1, respectively for 70 kg patients. Correlation coefficients were estimated between inter-individual variability of both clearances, both volumes of distribution and between clearance and volume of distribution of SU12662 as 0.53, 0.48 and 0.45, respectively. Simulation of the PK model predicted correctly the ratio of patients who did not reach proposed PK targets for efficacy. Conclusions A semi-physiological PK model for sunitinib and SU12662 in cancer patients was presented including pre-systemic metabolism. The model was superior to previous PK models in many aspects. PMID:25393890

  10. Metabolism of 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ by Rat Liver Microsomes: Bioactivation to SIRT1-Activating Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Yuan; Zhou, Qi-Le; Yang, Xin-Bao; Wang, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ (1) has recently become a hot research topic due to its potent bioactivities and abundance in natural sources such as the roots, rhizomes and stems-leaves of Panax ginseng. However, due to the lack of studies on systematic metabolic profiles, the prospects for new drug development of 1 are still difficult to predict, which has become a huge obstacle for its safe clinical use. To solve this problem, investigation of the metabolic profiles of 1 in rat liver microsomes was first carried out. To identify metabolites, a strategy of combined analyses based on prepared metabolites by column chromatography and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) was performed. As a result, four metabolites M1-M4, including a rare new compound named ginsenotransmetin A (M1), were isolated and the structures were confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. A series of metabolites of 1, MA-MG, were also tentatively identified by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS in rat liver microsomal incubate of 1. Partial metabolic pathways were proposed. Among them, 1 and its metabolites M1, M3 and M4 were discovered for the first time to be activators of SIRT1. The SIRT1 activating effects of the metabolite M1 was comparable to those of 1, while the most interesting SIRT1 activatory effects of M3 and M4 were higher than that of 1 and comparable with that of resveratrol, a positive SIRT1 activator. These results indicate that microsome-dependent metabolism may represent a bioactivation pathway for 1. This study is the first to report the metabolic profiles of 1 in vitro, and the results provide an experimental foundation to better understand the in vivo metabolic fate of 1. PMID:27294899

  11. Laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection in immunized long-term care facility residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Winter, Anne-Luise; Peci, Adriana; Eshaghi, Alireza; Baird, Michelle; Memari, Nader; Kristjanson, Erik; Balogun, Elizabeth; Higgins, Rachel R; Li, Aimin; Farrell, David J; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2013-11-01

    We report on an influenza B outbreak in an Ontario long-term care facility in which 2 immunized residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis for at least 5 days developed laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection. All isolates were tested for the most common oseltamivir resistance, and none of them had resistance identified. PMID:24113612

  12. Cytotoxic, Antiangiogenic and Antitelomerase Activity of Glucosyl- and Acyl- Resveratrol Prodrugs and Resveratrol Sulfate Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Falomir, Eva; Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Martí-Centelles, Rosa; Dupont, Alexia; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Carda, Miguel; Morales, Juan C

    2016-07-15

    Resveratrol (RES) is a natural polyphenol with relevant and varied biological activity. However, its low bioavailability and rapid metabolism to its glucuronate and sulfate conjugates has opened a debate on the mechanisms underlying its bioactivity. RES prodrugs are being developed to overcome these problems. We have synthesized a series of RES prodrugs and RES sulfate metabolites (RES-S) and evaluated their biological activities. RES glucosylated prodrugs (RES-Glc) were more cytotoxic in HT-29 and MCF-7 cells than RES itself whereas RES-S showed similar or higher cytotoxicity than RES. VEGF production was decreased by RES-Glc, and RES-disulfate (RES-diS) diminished it even more than RES. Finally, RES-Glc and RES-diS inhibited hTERT gene expression to a higher extent than RES. In conclusion, resveratrol prodrugs are promising candidates as anticancer drugs. In addition, RES-S showed distinct biological activity, thus indicating they are not simply RES reservoirs. PMID:27147200

  13. Antifungal activity of metabolites of the endophytic fungus Trichoderma brevicompactum from garlic

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Xuping; Zhan, Xiaohuan; Ma, Zheng; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Chuanxi

    2014-01-01

    The endophytic fungus strain 0248, isolated from garlic, was identified as Trichoderma brevicompactum based on morphological characteristics and the nucleotide sequences of ITS1-5.8S- ITS2 and tef1. The bioactive compound T2 was isolated from the culture extracts of this fungus by bioactivity-guided fractionation and identified as 4β-acetoxy-12,13- epoxy-Δ9-trichothecene (trichodermin) by spectral analysis and mass spectrometry. Trichodermin has a marked inhibitory activity on Rhizoctonia solani, with an EC50 of 0.25 μgmL−1. Strong inhibition by trichodermin was also found for Botrytis cinerea, with an EC50 of 2.02 μgmL−1. However, a relatively poor inhibitory effect was observed for trichodermin against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (EC50 = 25.60 μgmL−1). Compared with the positive control Carbendazim, trichodermin showed a strong antifungal activity on the above phytopathogens. There is little known about endophytes from garlic. This paper studied in detail the identification of endophytic T. brevicompactum from garlic and the characterization of its active metabolite trichodermin. PMID:24948941

  14. Effect of Competition on the Production and Activity of Secondary Metabolites in Aspergillus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secondary metabolites are of intense interest to humans due to their pharmaceutical and/or toxic properties. Aspergillus species secrete these metabolites by themselves and in the presence of other fungal species. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among different Aspergillu...

  15. EFFECTS OF METHOPRENE, ITS METABOLITES, AND BREAKDOWN PRODUCTS ON RETINOID-ACTIVATED PATHWAYS IN TRANSFECTED CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoprene is a terpene-based insecticide designed to act as an agonist of insect juvenile hormone, which is essential for the transition from larval to adult forms in some metamorphic insects. Recent evidence suggests that a methoprene metabolite, methoprene acid, activates a ve...

  16. Increased active metabolite formation explains the greater platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to high-dose clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher D; Li, Ying Grace; Small, David S; Ernest, C Steven; Farid, Nagy A; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Brandt, John T; Salazar, Daniel E; Winters, Kenneth J

    2007-11-01

    Prasugrel pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics after a 60-mg loading dose (LD) and daily 10-mg maintenance doses (MD) were compared in a 3-way crossover study to clopidogrel 600-mg/75-mg and 300-mg/75-mg LD/MD in 41 healthy, aspirin-free subjects. Each LD was followed by 7 days of daily MD and a 14-day washout period. Inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed by turbidometric aggregometry (20 and 5 microM ADP). Prasugrel 60-mg achieved higher mean IPA (54%) 30 minutes post-LD than clopidogrel 300-mg (3%) or 600-mg (6%) (P < 0.001) and greater IPA by 1 hour (82%) and 2 hours (91%) than the 6-hour IPA for clopidogrel 300-mg (51%) or 600-mg (69%) (P < 0.01). During MD, IPA for prasugrel 10-mg (78%) exceeded that of clopidogrel (300-mg/75-mg, 56%; 600-mg/75-mg, 52%; P < 0.001). Active metabolite area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-tlast) after prasugrel 60-mg (594 ng.hr/mL) was 2.2 times that after clopidogrel 600-mg. Prasugrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast was consistent with dose-proportionality from 10-mg to 60-mg, while clopidogrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast exhibited saturable absorption and/or metabolism. In conclusion, greater exposure to prasugrel's active metabolite results in faster onset, higher levels, and less variability of platelet inhibition compared with high-dose clopidogrel in healthy subjects. PMID:18030066

  17. Endoxifen, the active metabolite of tamoxifen, inhibits cloned hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Keon Jin; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Choi, Jin-Sung; Lee, Eun Hui; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-04-01

    The effects of tamoxifen, and its active metabolite endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen), on hERG currents stably expressed in HEK cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and an immunoblot assay. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited hERG tail currents at -50mV in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.6μM, respectively. The steady-state activation curve of the hERG currents was shifted to the hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of endoxifen. The voltage-dependent inhibition of hERG currents by endoxifen increased steeply in the voltage range of channel activation. The inhibition by endoxifen displayed a shallow voltage dependence (δ=0.18) in the full activation voltage range. A fast application of endoxifen induced a reversible block of hERG tail currents during repolarization in a concentration-dependent manner, which suggested an interaction with the open state of the channel. Endoxifen also decreased the hERG current elicited by a 5s depolarizing pulse to +60mV to inactivate the hERG currents, suggesting an interaction with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner with endoxifen being more potent than tamoxifen. These results indicated that tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by direct channel blockage and by the disruption of channel trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. A therapeutic concentration of endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by preferentially interacting with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channel. PMID:25680947

  18. Is oseltamivir (Tamiflu) safe? Re-examining the Tamiflu 'ado' from Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Etsuji

    2010-02-01

    Reports that oseltamivir causes abnormal behaviors in influenza patients and, thereby, increases the risk of injuries or death alerted the world. Such reports came almost exclusively from Japan, which consumes more than 75% of the world supply, even before the novel influenza pandemic started. The Japanese government will not revoke its warning issued in March 2007 against the use of oseltamivir in teenagers despite the accumulating evidence that such abnormal behaviors are part of generic symptoms of influenza-like delirium and not attributable to certain drugs. The author analyzes the background of the 'ado' by compiling the various sources of information, some of which have not been readily available to the international audience and explains why Japan is incapable of producing firm evidence to draw a definite conclusion. The author also alarms the potential risk of sudden death related to oseltamivir and foresees how the problem may be solved in the future. PMID:20121561

  19. Anticancer Activities of Protopanaxadiol- and Protopanaxatriol-Type Ginsenosides and Their Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Shui, Yan-Mei; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, most anticancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial, and botanical sources, but the low success rates of chemotherapies and the development of multidrug resistance emphasize the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against cancer. Ginseng types, including Asian ginseng, American ginseng, and notoginseng, have been used traditionally to treat various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, antioxidative, and antitumor activities. Accumulating reports have shown that ginsenosides, the major active component of ginseng, were helpful for tumor treatment. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PDS) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol saponins (PTS) are two characteristic types of triterpenoid saponins in ginsenosides. PTS holds capacity to interfere with crucial metabolism, while PDS could affect cell cycle distribution and prodeath signaling. This review aims at providing an overview of PTS and PDS, as well as their metabolites, regarding their different anticancer effects with the proposal that these compounds might be potent additions to the current chemotherapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:27446225

  20. Microbial communication leading to the activation of silent fungal secondary metabolite gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Netzker, Tina; Fischer, Juliane; Weber, Jakob; Mattern, Derek J.; König, Claudia C.; Valiante, Vito; Schroeckh, Volker; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms form diverse multispecies communities in various ecosystems. The high abundance of fungal and bacterial species in these consortia results in specific communication between the microorganisms. A key role in this communication is played by secondary metabolites (SMs), which are also called natural products. Recently, it was shown that interspecies “talk” between microorganisms represents a physiological trigger to activate silent gene clusters leading to the formation of novel SMs by the involved species. This review focuses on mixed microbial cultivation, mainly between bacteria and fungi, with a special emphasis on the induced formation of fungal SMs in co-cultures. In addition, the role of chromatin remodeling in the induction is examined, and methodical perspectives for the analysis of natural products are presented. As an example for an intermicrobial interaction elucidated at the molecular level, we discuss the specific interaction between the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus with the soil bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus, which provides an excellent model system to enlighten molecular concepts behind regulatory mechanisms and will pave the way to a novel avenue of drug discovery through targeted activation of silent SM gene clusters through co-cultivations of microorganisms. PMID:25941517

  1. Anticancer Activities of Protopanaxadiol- and Protopanaxatriol-Type Ginsenosides and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Shui, Yan-Mei; Wan, Jian-Bo; Gao, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, most anticancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial, and botanical sources, but the low success rates of chemotherapies and the development of multidrug resistance emphasize the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against cancer. Ginseng types, including Asian ginseng, American ginseng, and notoginseng, have been used traditionally to treat various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, antioxidative, and antitumor activities. Accumulating reports have shown that ginsenosides, the major active component of ginseng, were helpful for tumor treatment. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PDS) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol saponins (PTS) are two characteristic types of triterpenoid saponins in ginsenosides. PTS holds capacity to interfere with crucial metabolism, while PDS could affect cell cycle distribution and prodeath signaling. This review aims at providing an overview of PTS and PDS, as well as their metabolites, regarding their different anticancer effects with the proposal that these compounds might be potent additions to the current chemotherapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:27446225

  2. Functional imaging of focal brain activation in conscious rats: impact of [(14)C]glucose metabolite spreading and release.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2007-11-15

    Labeled glucose and its analogs are widely used in imaging and metabolic studies of brain function, astrocyte-neuron interactions, and neurotransmission. Metabolite shuttling among astrocytes and neurons is essential for cell-cell transfer of neurotransmitter precursors and supply and elimination of energy metabolites, but dispersion and release of labeled compounds from activated tissue would reduce signal registration in metabolic labeling studies, causing underestimation of focal functional activation. Processes and pathways involved in metabolite trafficking and release were therefore assessed in the auditory pathway of conscious rats. Unilateral monotonic stimulation increased glucose utilization (CMR(glc)) in tonotopic bands in the activated inferior colliculus by 35-85% compared with contralateral tissue when assayed with [(14)C]deoxyglucose (DG), whereas only 20-30% increases were registered with [1- or 6-(14)C]glucose. Tonotopic bands were not evident with [1-(14)C]glucose unless assayed during halothane anesthesia or pretreatment with probenecid but were detectable with [6-(14)C]glucose. Extracellular lactate levels transiently doubled during acoustic stimulation, so metabolite spreading was assessed by microinfusion of [(14)C]tracers into the inferior colliculus. The volume of tissue labeled by [1-(14)C]glucose exceeded that by [(14)C]DG by 3.2- and 1.4-fold during rest and acoustic activation, respectively. During activation, the tissue volume labeled by U-(14)C-labeled glutamine and lactate rose, whereas that by glucose fell 50% and that by DG was unchanged. Dispersion of [1-(14)C]glucose and its metabolites during rest was also reduced 50% by preinfusion of gap junction blockers. To summarize, during brain activation focal CMR(glc) is underestimated with labeled glucose because of decarboxylation reactions, spreading within tissue and via the astrocyte syncytium, and release from activated tissue. These findings help explain the fall in CMR(O2)/CMR

  3. Colon cancer chemopreventive effects of baicalein, an active enteric microbiome metabolite from baicalin

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHONG-ZHI; ZHANG, CHUN-FENG; CHEN, LINA; ANDERSON, SAMANTHA; LU, FANG; YUAN, CHUN-SU

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, which is a commonly used herbal medicine in many Asian countries. After oral ingestion, intestinal micro-biota metabolism may change parent compound's structure and its biological activities. However, whether baicalin can be metabolized by enteric microbiota and the related anti-cancer activity is not clear. In this study, using human enteric microbiome incubation and HPLC analysis, we observed that baicalin can be quickly converted to baicalein. We compared the antiproliferative effects of baicalin and baicalein using a panel of human cancer cell lines, including three human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. In vitro antiproliferative effects on CRC cells were verified using an in vivo xenograft nude mouse model. Baicalin showed limited antiproliferative effects on some of these cancer cell lines. Baicalein, however, showed significant antiproliferative effects in all the tested cancer cell lines, especially on HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. In vivo antitumor results supported our in vitro data. We demonstrated that baicalein exerts potent S phase cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects in HCT-116 cells. Baicalein induced the activation of caspase 3 and 9. The in silico modeling suggested that baicalein forms hydrogen bonds with residues Ser251 and Asp253 at the active site of caspase 3, while interactions with residues Leu227 and Asp228 in caspase 9 through its hydroxyl groups. Data from this study suggested that baicalein is a potent anticancer metabolite derived from S. baicalensis. Enteric microbiota play a key role in the colon cancer chemoprevention of S. baicalensis. PMID:26398706

  4. Unexpected hormonal activity of a catechol equine estrogen metabolite reveals reversible glutathione conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Minsun; Wang, Yue-Ting; Wang, Zhican; Qin, Zhihui; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    4-Hydroxyequilenin (4-OHEN) is a major phase I metabolite of the equine estrogens present in widely prescribed hormone replacement formulations. 4-OHEN is autoxidized to an electrophilic o-quinone that has been shown to redox cycle, generating ROS, and to covalently modify proteins and DNA and thus potentially to act as a chemical carcinogen. To establish the ability of 4-OHEN to act as a hormonal carcinogen at the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen responsive gene expression and proliferation were studied in ER(+) breast cancer cells. Recruitment by 4-OHEN of ER to estrogen responsive elements (ERE) of DNA in MCF-7 cells was also studied and observed. 4-OHEN was a potent estrogen, with additional weak activity associated with binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The potency of 4-OHEN towards classical ERα mediated activity was unexpected given the reported rapid autoxidation and trapping of the resultant quinone by GSH. Addition of thiols to cell cultures did not attenuate the estrogenic activity of 4-OHEN and pre-formed thiol conjugates added to cell incubations only marginally reduced ERE-luciferase induction. On reaction of the 4OHEN-GSH conjugate with NADPH, 4-OHEN was observed to be regenerated at a rate dependent upon NADPH concentration, indicating that intracellular non-enzymatic and enzymatic regeneration of 4-OHEN accounts for the observed estrogenic activity of 4-OHEN. 4-OHEN is therefore capable of inducing chemical and hormonal pathways that may contribute to estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis, and trapping by cellular thiols does not provide a mechanism of termination of these pathways. PMID:20540524

  5. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  6. Synthesis of new optically active propargylic fluorides and application to the enantioselective synthesis of monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Prakesch, M; Grée, D; Grée, R

    2001-05-01

    A new approach to obtain optically active unsaturated or polyunsaturated systems with a single fluorine atom in an allylic or propargylic position is reported. Central to this strategy is the high regio- and stereocontrol observed during the fluorination of propargylic alcohols allowing a short and efficient synthesis of 1. Further, simple functional group transformations gave the enals 2 and 3. These three key intermediates were used for the preparation of optically active monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites. PMID:11325281

  7. A fish-feeding laboratory bioassay to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Marty, Micah J; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    Marine chemical ecology is a young discipline, having emerged from the collaboration of natural products chemists and marine ecologists in the 1980s with the goal of examining the ecological functions of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. The result has been a progression of protocols that have increasingly refined the ecological relevance of the experimental approach. Here we present the most up-to-date version of a fish-feeding laboratory bioassay that enables investigators to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. Organic metabolites of all polarities are exhaustively extracted from the tissue of the target organism and reconstituted at natural concentrations in a nutritionally appropriate food matrix. Experimental food pellets are presented to a generalist predator in laboratory feeding assays to assess the antipredatory activity of the extract. The procedure described herein uses the bluehead, Thalassoma bifasciatum, to test the palatability of Caribbean marine invertebrates; however, the design may be readily adapted to other systems. Results obtained using this laboratory assay are an important prelude to field experiments that rely on the feeding responses of a full complement of potential predators. Additionally, this bioassay can be used to direct the isolation of feeding-deterrent metabolites through bioassay-guided fractionation. This feeding bioassay has advanced our understanding of the factors that control the distribution and abundance of marine invertebrates on Caribbean coral reefs and may inform investigations in diverse fields of inquiry, including pharmacology, biotechnology, and evolutionary ecology. PMID:25650625

  8. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  9. Molecular structure of antihypertensive drug perindopril, its active metabolite perindoprilat and impurity F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, M.; Bojarska, J.; Ježko, P.; Maniukiewicz, W.; Olczak, A.

    2013-03-01

    The molecular structure of the antihypertensive drug perindopril (2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-ethoxy-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2 carboxylic acid), its active metabolite perindoprilat ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-carboxybutyl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid), and impurity F (ethyl (2S)-2-((3S,5aS,9aS,10aS)-3-methyl-1,4-dioxodecahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indol-2(1H)-yl) pentanoate) has been investigated using B3LYP/6-31g(d) and B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) model chemistry. It has been found that solid state conformations of perindoprilat occur close to, but not actually at minima on the computed gas-phase potential energy surfaces. Both, neutral and zwitterionic structures of perindopril and perindoprilat have been investigated. Relative stability of individual ionized species of this drug has been determined. Water has a remarkable effect on the geometry of the perindopril species studied.

  10. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  11. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  12. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  13. Exploring the chemodiversity and biological activities of the secondary metabolites from the marine fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wan-Ling; Le, Xiu; Li, Hou-Jin; Yang, Xiang-Ling; Chen, Jun-Xiong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Liang; Wang, Lai-You; Wang, Kun-Teng; Hu, Kun-Chao; Yang, De-Po; Lan, Wen-Jian

    2014-11-01

    The production of fungal metabolites can be remarkably influenced by various cultivation parameters. To explore the biosynthetic potentials of the marine fungus, Neosartorya pseudofischeri, which was isolated from the inner tissue of starfish Acanthaster planci, glycerol-peptone-yeast extract (GlyPY) and glucose-peptone-yeast extract (GluPY) media were used to culture this fungus. When cultured in GlyPY medium, this fungus produced two novel diketopiperazines, neosartins A and B (1 and 2), together with six biogenetically-related known diketopiperazines,1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2, 3-dimethyl-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (3), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-methylen e-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (4), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-1,3,4-trioxopyrazino[1,2-a] indole (5), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (11), didehydrobisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (12) and N-methyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (6). However, a novel tetracyclic-fused alkaloid, neosartin C (14), a meroterpenoid, pyripyropene A (15), gliotoxin (7) and five known gliotoxin analogues, acetylgliotoxin (8), reduced gliotoxin (9), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio) gliotoxin (11) and bis-N-norgliovictin (13), were obtained when grown in glucose-containing medium (GluPY medium). This is the first report of compounds 3, 4, 6, 9, 10 and 12 as naturally occurring. Their structures were determined mainly by MS, 1D and 2D NMR data. The possible biosynthetic pathways of gliotoxin-related analogues and neosartin C were proposed. The antibacterial activity of compounds 2-14 and the cytotoxic activity of compounds 4, 5 and 7-13 were evaluated. Their structure-activity relationships are also preliminarily discussed. PMID:25421322

  14. Exploring the Chemodiversity and Biological Activities of the Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wan-Ling; Le, Xiu; Li, Hou-Jin; Yang, Xiang-Ling; Chen, Jun-Xiong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Liang; Wang, Lai-You; Wang, Kun-Teng; Hu, Kun-Chao; Yang, De-Po; Lan, Wen-Jian

    2014-01-01

    The production of fungal metabolites can be remarkably influenced by various cultivation parameters. To explore the biosynthetic potentials of the marine fungus, Neosartorya pseudofischeri, which was isolated from the inner tissue of starfish Acanthaster planci, glycerol-peptone-yeast extract (GlyPY) and glucose-peptone-yeast extract (GluPY) media were used to culture this fungus. When cultured in GlyPY medium, this fungus produced two novel diketopiperazines, neosartins A and B (1 and 2), together with six biogenetically-related known diketopiperazines,1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (3), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-methylene-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2-a]indole (4), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-1,3,4-trioxopyrazino[1,2-a] indole (5), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (11), didehydrobisdethiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (12) and N-methyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (6). However, a novel tetracyclic-fused alkaloid, neosartin C (14), a meroterpenoid, pyripyropene A (15), gliotoxin (7) and five known gliotoxin analogues, acetylgliotoxin (8), reduced gliotoxin (9), 6-acetylbis(methylthio)gliotoxin (10), bisdethiobis(methylthio) gliotoxin (11) and bis-N-norgliovictin (13), were obtained when grown in glucose-containing medium (GluPY medium). This is the first report of compounds 3, 4, 6, 9, 10 and 12 as naturally occurring. Their structures were determined mainly by MS, 1D and 2D NMR data. The possible biosynthetic pathways of gliotoxin-related analogues and neosartin C were proposed. The antibacterial activity of compounds 2–14 and the cytotoxic activity of compounds 4, 5 and 7–13 were evaluated. Their structure-activity relationships are also preliminarily discussed. PMID:25421322

  15. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  16. Cytotoxicity and characterization of an active metabolite of benzamide riboside, a novel inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Paull, K D; Kelley, J A; Barchi, J J; Marquez, V E; Cooney, D A; Monks, A; Scudiero, D; Krohn, K; Jayaram, H N

    1994-03-15

    Benzamide riboside exhibits significant cytotoxicity against a variety of human tumor cells in culture. On the basis of metabolic studies, the primary target of this drug's action appears to be IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Incubation of human myelogenous leukemia K562 cells with an IC50 concentration of benzamide riboside resulted in an expansion of IMP pools (5.9-fold), with a parallel reduction in the concentration of GMP (90%), GDP (63%), GTP (55%) and dGTP (40%). On kinetic grounds, it was deduced that benzamide riboside (whose Ki versus IMPDH is 6.4 mM, while that of its 5'-monophosphate is 3.9 mM) or its 5'-monophosphate were unlikely to be responsible for inhibition of this target enzyme, IMPDH, since only micromolar concentrations of benzamide riboside were needed to exert potent inhibition of tumor-cell growth. Studies on the metabolism of this C-nucleoside have revealed the presence of a new peak eluting in the nucleoside diphosphate area on HPLC. Treatment of this peak with venom phosphodiesterase degraded it and concurrently nullified its inhibitory activity versus IMPDH; alkaline phosphatase, on the other hand, totally failed to digest the anabolite. These results suggest that the metabolite in question is the phosphodiester, benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD). Evidence that the inhibitor was an analog of NAD, wherein the nicotinamide moiety has been replaced by benzamide, was provided by both NMR and mass spectrometric analysis and confirmed by enzymatic synthesis. Further insight into the nature of the active principle was obtained from kinetic studies, which established that BAD competitively inhibited NAD utilization by partially purified IMPDH from K562 cells with a Ki of 0.118 microM. In concert, these studies establish that benzamide riboside exhibits potent antiproliferative activity by inhibiting IMPDH through BAD. PMID:7907081

  17. Electrochemiluminescent Arrays for Cytochrome P450-Activated Genotoxicity Screening. DNA Damage from Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hvastkovs, Eli G.; So, Minjeong; Krishnan, Sadagopan; Bajrami, Besnik; Tarun, Maricar; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Arrays suitable for genotoxicity screening are reported that generate metabolites from cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) in thin-film spots. Array spots containing DNA, various human cyt P450s, and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) generating metallopolymer [Ru(bpy)2PVP10]2+ were exposed to H2O2 to activate the enzymes. ECL from all spots was visualized simultaneously using a CCD camera. Using benzo[a]pyrene as a test substrate, enzyme activity for producing DNA damage in the arrays was found in the order CYP1B1 > CYP1A2 > CYP1A1 > CYP2E1 > myoglobin, the same as the order of their metabolic activity. Thus, these arrays estimate the relative propensity of different enzymes to produce genotoxic metabolites. This is the first demonstration of ECL arrays for high-throughput in vitro genotoxicity screening. PMID:17261025

  18. Effects of 3-O-methyldopa, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine metabolite, on locomotor activity and dopamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Onzawa, Yoritaka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Uzuhashi, Kengo; Shirasuna, Megumi; Hirosawa, Tasuku; Taogoshi, Takanori; Kihira, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    It has been well known that 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) is a metabolite of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) formed by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), and 3-OMD blood level often reaches higher than physiological level in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving long term L-DOPA therapy. However, the physiological role of 3-OMD has not been well understood. Therefore, in order to clarify the effects of 3-OMD on physiological function, we examined the behavioral alteration in rats based on locomotor activity, and measured dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in rats at the same time after 3-OMD subchronic administration. The study results showed that repeated administrations of 3-OMD increased its blood and the striatum tissue levels in those rats, and decreased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner. Although 3-OMD subchronic administration showed no significant change in DA level in the striatum, DA metabolite levels, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly decreased. After 3-OMD washout period (7 d), locomotor activity and DA turnover in those rats returned to normal levels. Furthermore, locomotor activity and DA turnover decreased by 3-OMD administration were recovered to normal level by acute L-DOPA administration. These results suggested that 3-OMD affect to locomotor activity via DA neuron system. In conclusion, 3-OMD itself may have a disadvantage in PD patients receiving L-DOPA therapy. PMID:22863920

  19. [Secondary metabolites, lethality and antimicrobial activity of extracts from three corals and three marine mollusks from Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Gabriel; D'Armas, Haydelba; Yáñez, Dayanis; Hernández, Juan; Camacho, Angel

    2010-06-01

    The study of biochemical activity of extracts obtained from marine organisms is gaining interest as some have proved to have efficient health or industrial applications. To evaluate lethality and antimicrobial activities, some chemical tests were performed on crude extracts of the octocorals Eunicea sp., Muricea sp. and Pseudopterogorgia acerosa and the mollusks Pteria colymbus, Phyllonotus pomum and Chicoreus brevifrons, collected in Venezuelan waters. The presence of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, unsaturated sterols and pentacyclic triterpenes in all invertebrates, was evidenced. Additionally, sesquiterpenlactones, saponins, tannins, cyanogenic and cardiotonic glycosides were also detected in some octocoral extracts, suggesting that biosynthesis of these metabolites is typical in this group. From the lethality bioassays, all extracts resulted lethal to Artemia salina (LC50<1000 microg/ml) with an increased of lethal activity with exposition time. P. pomum extract showed the highest lethality rate (LC50=46.8 microg/ml). Compared to the octocorals, mollusks extracts displayed more activity and a greater action spectrum against different bacterial strains, whereas octocorals also inhibited some fungi strains growth. Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible to the antimicrobial power of the extracts (66.7%), whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were not affected. The antibiosis shown by marine organisms extracts indicates that some of their biosynthesized metabolites are physiologically active, and may have possible cytotoxic potential or as a source of antibiotic components. PMID:20527468

  20. Direction of estradiol metabolism as a control of its hormonal action--uterotrophic activity of estradiol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C; Fishman, J

    1977-12-01

    The uterotrophic activities of the catechol metabolites of estradiol 2-hydroxyestrone, 2-methoxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestradiol were measured under conditions of continuous administration of sc implanted paraffin pellets. The activity of these estrogens was compared to that of estradiol-17beta and its other principal metabolites estrone, estriol and 15alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol). The major catechol estrogens, 2-hydroxyestrone and 2-methoxyestrone, and the pregnancy metabolite, 15alpha-hydroxyestriol, exhibited no uterotrophic activity. The minor catecholestrogen, 2-hydroxyestradiol, showed some activity whose character was different from that exhibited by implants of estradiol, estrone and estriol all of which were equipotent uterotrophic agents. Implants of 2-hydroxyestrone in the presence of estradiol or estriol pellets did not diminish the response to the latter indicating that the 2-hydroxyestrone is not antiestrogenic under these conditions. It is concluded that the direction of estradiol metabolism can have a profound influence on the expression of peripheral hormonal activity with hydroxylation at C-2 terminating and hydroxylation at C-16 extending it. PMID:590186

  1. CSF biomarkers of monocyte activation and chemotaxis correlate with magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolites during chronic HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Albert M; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Umlauf, Anya; Taylor, Michael J; Clifford, David B; Marra, Christina M; Collier, Ann C; Gelman, Benjamin B; McArthur, Justin C; McCutchan, J Allen; Simpson, David M; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), supporting the need to better understand HIV neuropathogenesis. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain has demonstrated abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals despite cART. We examined the associations between MRS metabolites and selected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers reflecting monocyte/macrophage activation and chemotaxis. A multicenter cross-sectional study involving five sites in the USA was conducted. The following CSF biomarkers were measured: soluble CD14 (sCD14), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), and stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α). The following MRS metabolites were measured from basal ganglia (BG), frontal white matter (FWM), and frontal gray matter (FGM): N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (MI), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr). CSF biomarkers were compared to absolute MRS metabolites as well as metabolite/Cr ratios using linear regression. Eighty-three HIV-infected individuals were included, 78 % on cART and 37 % with HAND. The most robust positive correlations were between MCP-1 and Cho in BG (R (2) 0.179, p < 0.001) as well as MCP-1 and MI in FWM (R (2) 0.137, p = 0.002). Higher Cr levels in FWM were associated with MCP-1 (R (2) 0. 075, p = 0.01) and IP-10 (R (2) 0.106, p = 0.003). Comparing biomarkers to MRS metabolite/Cr ratios impacted some relationships, e.g., higher sCD14 levels were associated with lower Cho/Cr ratios in FGM (R (2) 0.224, p < 0.001), although higher MCP-1 levels remained associated with Cho/Cr in BG. These findings provide evidence that monocyte activation and chemotaxis continue to contribute to HIV-associated brain abnormalities in cART-treated individuals. PMID:26069183

  2. Activation of Dormant Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin Resistance into the Deep-Sea Fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(d-Pro-d-Phe) (1), cyclo(d-Tyr-d-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-l-prolinate (3), cyclo(l-Ile-l-Pro) (4), cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1–6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent

  3. Pre-systemic elimination of tilidine: localization and consequences for the formation of the active metabolite nortilidine.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Christine; Mathes, Kristin; Burhenne, Jürgen; Markert, Christoph; Blank, Antje; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-02-01

    The therapeutic activity of tilidine, an opioid analgesic, is mainly related to its active metabolite nortilidine. Nortilidine formation mainly occurs during the high intestinal first-pass metabolism of tilidine by N-demethylation. Elimination of the active nortilidine to the inactive bisnortilidine is also mediated by N-demethylation and is supposed to take place in the liver, probably at a smaller rate. The aim of this study was the investigation of the pre-systemic elimination of tilidine using grapefruit juice (GFJ) as an intestinal CYP3A4 inhibitor and efavirenz (EFV) as a CYP3A4 activator. A randomized, open, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted in 12 healthy volunteers using 100 mg tilidine solution p.o., regular strength GFJ 250 mL (3 times at 12-hr intervals) and EFV 400 mg (12 hr before tilidine administration). Tilidine, nortilidine and bisnortilidine in plasma and urine were quantified by a validated LC/MS/MS analysis. GFJ did not change any pharmacokinetic parameter of tilidine and its metabolites, which suggests that intestinal CYP3A4 does not contribute to the first-pass metabolism of tilidine. No effect of EFV on the pharmacokinetics of the active nortilidine was observed except a significant reduction of the terminal elimination half-life by 15%. Overall elimination (renal and metabolic clearances) was unaffected by every treatment. CYP3A4 does not seem to play a major role in tilidine first-pass and overall metabolism. Other unknown metabolites and their enzymes responsible for their formation have to be investigated as they account for the majority of renally excreted metabolites. PMID:25223231

  4. The use of oseltamivir during an influenza B outbreak in a chronic care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Holly; Weston, Kathryn M.; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Zhu, Mengzhi; Allchin, Lisa; Booy, Robert; Raina MacIntyre, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Residents of nursing homes and long‐term care facilities are at a higher risk of outbreaks of influenza and of serious complications of influenza than those in the community. In late July 2005, a 90‐bed chronic care psycho‐geriatric hospital in Sydney, Australia, reported cases of influenza‐like illness (ILI) occurring amongst its residents. Methods  An investigation to confirm the outbreak, and its cause, was undertaken. Influenza vaccination levels amongst residents, and the effects of antiviral drugs used for prevention and treatment, were assessed. Oseltamivir was only given to the residents, in the form of both treatment and prophylaxis. Results  A total of 22 out of 89 residents met the clinical case definition of ILI with onset on or after 27 July 2005. This represents an attack rate of 25%. Oseltamivir was commenced on day 9 of the outbreak. Influenza B was identified in six residents as the causative agent of the outbreak. No deaths or acute hospitalization were recorded for this outbreak and there were no further reported cases after the introduction of oseltamivir. Vaccine effectiveness was 75% and the strain of influenza B isolated was well matched to that year’s vaccine. Conclusions  There are few data on the use of oseltamivir in influenza B outbreaks. Early antiviral intervention appeared to curtail this outbreak of influenza B in a chronic care facility. We found high vaccine effectiveness in this frail, institutionalized population, highlighting the importance of influenza vaccination for residents of chronic care facilities. PMID:19453437

  5. 75 FR 20429 - Amended Authorizations of Emergency Use of Certain Antiviral Drugs Zanamivir and Oseltamivir...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Register (74 FR 38628, August 4, 2009), as was the notice of the April 27, 2009, Authorizations (74 FR... certain zanamivir inhalation powder. The Authorization letter for certain oseltamivir phosphate products, as amended on October 30, 2009, and the Authorization letter for certain zanamivir inhalation...

  6. Observed oseltamivir resistance in seasonal influenza viruses in Europe interpretation and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, A; Ciancio, B; Kramarz, P

    2008-01-31

    In this weeks issue of Eurosurveillance, Zambon and colleagues describe the first findings of the European Union-funded European Surveillance Network for Vigilance Against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) of some seasonal influenza viral isolates resistant to the antiviral drug oseltamivir in Europe. PMID:18445376

  7. Not flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) but its murine metabolite 6-OH-FAA exhibits remarkable antivascular activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh Hien; Dauzonne, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2016-06-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) has been proved to be a potent vascular-disrupting agent in mice. Unfortunately, FAA did not produce any anticancer activity in clinical trials. Previously, we had reported that FAA is metabolized by mouse microsomes into six metabolites, whereas it was poorly metabolized by human microsomes, with fewer metabolites formed in lesser amounts. Especially, 6-OH-FAA was not formed by human microsomes. In this work, two major available metabolites, 4'-OH-FAA and 6-OH-FAA, were tested and compared with the parent compound FAA for their potential antivascular activities in vitro. The ability of the products to induce morphological changes, disrupt preformed capillaries of EA.hy926 endothelial cells and inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro was assessed. The action mechanism was determined using the RhoA and Rac1 inhibitors. At 25 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA induced morphological changes and membrane blebbing, whereas 300 µg/ml of FAA and 4'-OH-FAA slightly changed the morphology without inducing membrane blebbing. At 300 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA produced morphological changes that were 2.1-6.9-fold greater than that produced by FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, an effect that was consistent with its much greater inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA. 6-OH-FAA significantly disrupted the EA.hy926 cell capillaries. 6-OH-FAA activities were prevented in EA.hy926 cells pretreated with RhoA, but not Rac1, inhibitor. In this short communication we report for the first time that, in vitro, 6-OH-FAA, a mouse-specific FAA metabolite, exhibits significantly stronger antivascular activities compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, which are mediated through the RhoA kinase pathway. PMID:26901071

  8. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of oxcarbazepine active metabolite in Chinese patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Zhang, Quanying; Xu, Wenjun; Lv, Chengzhe; Hao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of oxcarbazepine and optimize the treatment of oxcarbazepine in Chinese patients with epilepsy. A total of 108 oxcarbazepine therapeutic drug monitoring samples from 78 patients with epilepsy were collected in this study. The pharmacologically active metabolite 10,11-dihydro-10-hydrocarbamazepine (MHD) was used as the analytical target for monitoring therapy of oxcarbazepine. Patients' clinical data were retrospectively collected. The PPK model for MHD was developed using Phoenix NLME 1.2 with a non-linear mixed-effect model. MHD pharmacokinetics obeys a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The effect of age, gender, red blood cell count, red blood cell specific volume, hemoglobin (HGB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatine were analyzed. Bootstrap and data splitting were used simultaneously to validate the final PPK models. The mean values of volume of distribution and clearance of MHD in the patients were 14.2 L and 2.38 L h(-1), respectively. BUN and HGB influenced the MHD volume of distribution according to the following equation: V = tvV × (BUN/4.76)(-0.007) × (HGB/140)(-0.001) × e (ηV) . The MHD clearance was dependent on ALT and gender as follows: CL = tvCL × (ALT/30)(0.181) × (gender) × 1.083 × e (ηCL). The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective and it can be used to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of MHD in Chinese patients with epilepsy and to choose an optimal dosage regimen of oxcarbazepine on the basis of these parameters. PMID:25700977

  9. Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites from wild growing and micropropagated plants of Renealmia alpinia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Cortés, Natalie; Benjumea, Dora; Osorio, Edison; León, Francisco; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Renealmia alpinia is native to the American continent and can be found from Mexico to Brazil, and in the Caribbean islands. It is known as “matandrea” in Colombia, and it has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat painful diseases and ailments. Based on its traditional uses, it is of interest to evaluate the pharmacologic effects of this plant and its secondary metabolites. Materials and methods Methanol and aqueous extracts of wild and micropropagated R. alpinia (leaves) were obtained and chemically compared by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC). The antinociceptive activity of these extracts was examined using an in vivo assay (Siegmund test). Additionally, the dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia was fractionated and pure compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods. The structure elucidation of isolated compounds was performed by NMR experiments and spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. Purified compounds were evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity for opioids and cannabinoids receptors. Results The dichloromethane extract of the plant’s aerial part afforded sinostrobin (1), naringenin 7,4′-dimethyl ether (2), 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (3), 4-methoxy-6-(2-phenylethenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (4), naringenin 7-methyl ether (5) and 3,5-heptanediol, 1,7-diphenyl (6), which were isolated using chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were established by physical and spectroscopic techniques. The antinociceptive effects observed in mice by extracts of wild and micropropagated plants were similar. The compounds isolated from R. alpinia do not show affinity to opioid or cannabinoid receptors. Conclusion Aqueous and methanol extracts of R. alpinia provide antinociceptive and analgesic effects in an in vivo model. These results contribute additional insight as to why this plant is traditionally used for pain management. Also, this is the first

  10. Tissue accumulation kinetics of ciclesonide-active metabolite and budesonide in mice.

    PubMed

    Mårs, Ulla; d'Argy, Roland; Hallbeck, Karin; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Edsbäcker, Staffan

    2013-06-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are mainstay treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, highly lipophilic ICS accumulate in systemic tissues, which may lead to adverse systemic effects. The accumulation of a new, highly lipophilic ICS, ciclesonide and its active metabolite (des-CIC) has not yet been reported. Here, we have compared tissue accumulation of des-CIC and an ICS of a moderate lipophilicity, budesonide (BUD), after 14 days of once-daily treatment in mice. Single, three or 14 daily doses of [(3) H]-des-CIC or [(3) H]-BUD were administered subcutaneously to male CD1 albino mice, which were killed at 4 hr, 24 hr or 5 days after the last dose. Distribution of tissue concentration of radioactivity was studied by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. Pattern of radioactivity distribution across most tissues was similar for both corticosteroids after a single as well as after repeated dosing. However, tissue concentration of radioactivity differed between des-CIC and BUD. After a single dose, concentrations of radioactivity for both corticosteroids were low for most tissues but increased over 14 days of daily dosing. The tissue radioactivity of des-CIC at 24 hr and 5 days after the 14th dose was 2-3 times higher than that of BUD in majority of tissues. Tissue accumulation, assessed as concentration of tissue radioactivity 5 days after the 14th versus 3rd dose, showed an average ratio of 5.2 for des-CIC and 2.7 for BUD (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, des-CIC accumulated significantly more than BUD. Systemic accumulation may lead to increased risk of adverse systemic side effects during long-term therapy. PMID:23256845

  11. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of triflusal and its main active metabolite HTB in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Zhang, Q; Huang, M; Zong, S; Hua, W; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    Triflusal presents comparable antiplatelet activity to aspirin while presenting a more favourable safety profile, and is used in the treatment of thrombosis. The study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of triflusal and its major metabolite 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- benzoic acid (HTB) in healthy Chinese subjects.30 healthy subjects were recruited in this randomized, single-center, and open-label, parallel, single ascending doses (300, 600, 900 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg, once daily for 7 days) study. Plasma samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. Safety was assessed by adverse events, ECG, laboratory testing, and vital signs.Triflusal was safe and well tolerated. After single-dose administration, triflusal was rapidly absorbed with a mean Tmax of 0.55-0.92 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 0.35-0.65 h, HTB was absorbed with a mean Tmax of 2.35-3.03 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 52.5-65.57 h. Cmax and AUC for triflusal and HTB were approximately dose proportional over the 300-900 mg dose range. In the steady state, the accumulation index (R) indicated that the exposure of triflusal increased slightly with repeated dosing, and the exposure of HTB increased obviously. 3 adverse events certainly related to the investigational drugs occurred in the multiple-dose phase.Following oral dosing under fasting condition, triflusal is promptly absorbed and rapidly depleted from the systemic circulation. HTB is quickly generated from triflusal and slowly eliminated. Triflusal accumulates slightly in the body. HTB plasma concentration builds up progressively toward steady-state. PMID:24105106

  12. Regulation of human tonsillar T-cell proliferation by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, J D; Katz, D R; Barker, S; Fraher, L J; Hewison, M; Hendy, G N; O'Riordan, J L

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on T-cell populations isolated by buoyant density and E rosetting from human tonsils. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 125iododeoxyuridine; interleukin-2 (IL-2) production was measured using an IL-2-dependent cell line, and the number of 1,25(OH)2D3 receptors was measured by whole-cell nuclear association assay. At a concentration of 10(-7) M, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation in all E+ T-cell populations. This effect was more pronounced in the cells from the intermediate and high density layers and was reflected both in cell proliferative responses and in relative IL-2 synthesis. By adding the 1,25(OH)2D3 during the course of the mitogen assay, we demonstrated that activation of the T cell precedes the 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated inhibition. Cells that had been preincubated with mitogen in the presence of the 1,25(OH)2D3 were refractory to further stimulation by mitogens. Receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3 could not be detected in unstimulated T cells. However, activation led to the expression of high-affinity receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3. Co-incubation of the cells with mitogen and 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the number of receptors compared with mitogen alone. The effects provide further evidence for the hypothesis that 1,25(OH)2D3 is an important potential modulator of the immune system through its action on T cells. Taking our observations in conjunction with the known capacity of monocytes to hydroxylate the precursor metabolite (and thus synthesize the active form of cholecalciferol), the results support the suggestion that 1,25(OH)2D3 plays a role as a local mediator of mononuclear phagocyte-T cell interaction in human lymphomedullary tissues. PMID:3026959

  13. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is Activated by Amiodarone Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Aaron N.; Miyakawa, Motonori; Tan, Edwin S.; Scanlan, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Amiodarone (Cordarone, Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals) is a clinically available drug used to treat a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a panel of potential amiodarone metabolites that have significant structural similarity to thyroid hormone and its metabolites the iodothyronamines. Several of these amiodarone derivatives act as specific agonists of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). This result demonstrates a novel molecular target for amiodarone derivatives with potential clinical significance. PMID:18752950

  14. [Detection of fungal metabolites showing toxic activity through Artemia salina bioassay].

    PubMed

    González, Ana María; Presa, Maximiliano; Latorre, María Gabriela; Lurá, María Cristina

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect toxic metabolites from fungi contaminating food and medicinal herbs by applying the toxicity assay to Artemia salina. According to toxicity percentages, the extracts were classified as nontoxic (NT), slightly toxic (ST), toxic (T) and highly toxic (HT). Those classified as T and HT were assayed for mycotoxins. Only 6 out of 71 strains were found to be T (8.5%) for A. salina. Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx, isolated from sausages, was found to be HT, mainly due to the presence of ochratoxin A and two other unidentified metabolites. PMID:17592895

  15. Comparison of efficacy and safety of oseltamivir and zanamivir in pandemic influenza treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Nazan; Karabay, Oguz; Yahyaoğlu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Aim: In 2009, a flu pandemic caused panic worldwide. Oseltamivir and zanamivir were widely used in this pandemic. Currently, there are a limited number of studies comparing the efficacy and tolerability of these two drugs. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of these two drugs in the treatment of influenza. Materials and Methods: Patients diagnosed with influenza at our infectious disease outpatient clinic during the influenza season between October 1, 2009 and February 1, 2010 were included in the study. Study data were obtained retrospectively from files for consecutive patients. A total of 136 subjects were selected. After exclusion criteria were applied, 56 subjects were discarded. The information for 80 patients in whom oseltamivir or zanamivir therapy was initiated (40 for each therapy) was compiled, and the efficacy and tolerability of the drugs were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in efficacy for the two drugs (P > 0.05). Temperature normalization was significantly faster in patients taking zanamivir (P = 0.0157). Drowsiness was the most frequent adverse event for both drugs (38% for the oseltamivir group, and 22% for the zanamivir group). Respiratory distress was observed in five patients in the zanamivir group, whereas it was not observed in patients in the oseltamivir group (P < 0.05). One patient had to discontinue therapy in the zanamivir group due to respiratory distress. Conclusion: Efficacy (in terms of symptom relief and duration to resumption of work) and adverse events were similar for zanamivir and oseltamivir, but temperature normalization was much more rapid in patients using zanamivir. Patients using zanamivir should be monitored for respiratory distress. PMID:23248411

  16. Oseltamivir PK/PD Modeling and Simulation to Evaluate Treatment Strategies against Influenza-Pneumococcus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Boianelli, Alessandro; Sharma-Chawla, Niharika; Bruder, Dunja; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza pandemics and seasonal outbreaks have shown the potential of Influenza A virus (IAV) to enhance susceptibility to a secondary infection with the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp). The high morbidity and mortality rate revealed the poor efficacy of antiviral drugs and vaccines to fight IAV infections. Currently, the most effective treatment for IAV is by antiviral neuraminidase inhibitors. Among them, the most frequently stockpiled is Oseltamivir which reduces viral release and transmission. However, effectiveness of Oseltamivir is compromised by the emergence of resistant IAV strains and secondary bacterial infections. To date, little attention has been given to evaluate how Oseltamivir treatment strategies alter Influenza viral infection in presence of Sp coinfection and a resistant IAV strain emergence. In this paper we investigate the efficacy of current approved Oseltamivir treatment regimens using a computational approach. Our numerical results suggest that the curative regimen (75 mg) may yield 47% of antiviral efficacy and 9% of antibacterial efficacy. An increment in dose to 150 mg (pandemic regimen) may increase the antiviral efficacy to 49% and the antibacterial efficacy to 16%. The choice to decrease the intake frequency to once per day is not recommended due to a significant reduction in both antiviral and antibacterial efficacy. We also observe that the treatment duration of 10 days may not provide a clear improvement on the antiviral and antibacterial efficacy compared to 5 days. All together, our in silico study reveals the success and pitfalls of Oseltamivir treatment strategies within IAV-Sp coinfection and calls for testing the validity in clinical trials. PMID:27379214

  17. Oseltamivir PK/PD Modeling and Simulation to Evaluate Treatment Strategies against Influenza-Pneumococcus Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Boianelli, Alessandro; Sharma-Chawla, Niharika; Bruder, Dunja; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza pandemics and seasonal outbreaks have shown the potential of Influenza A virus (IAV) to enhance susceptibility to a secondary infection with the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp). The high morbidity and mortality rate revealed the poor efficacy of antiviral drugs and vaccines to fight IAV infections. Currently, the most effective treatment for IAV is by antiviral neuraminidase inhibitors. Among them, the most frequently stockpiled is Oseltamivir which reduces viral release and transmission. However, effectiveness of Oseltamivir is compromised by the emergence of resistant IAV strains and secondary bacterial infections. To date, little attention has been given to evaluate how Oseltamivir treatment strategies alter Influenza viral infection in presence of Sp coinfection and a resistant IAV strain emergence. In this paper we investigate the efficacy of current approved Oseltamivir treatment regimens using a computational approach. Our numerical results suggest that the curative regimen (75 mg) may yield 47% of antiviral efficacy and 9% of antibacterial efficacy. An increment in dose to 150 mg (pandemic regimen) may increase the antiviral efficacy to 49% and the antibacterial efficacy to 16%. The choice to decrease the intake frequency to once per day is not recommended due to a significant reduction in both antiviral and antibacterial efficacy. We also observe that the treatment duration of 10 days may not provide a clear improvement on the antiviral and antibacterial efficacy compared to 5 days. All together, our in silico study reveals the success and pitfalls of Oseltamivir treatment strategies within IAV-Sp coinfection and calls for testing the validity in clinical trials. PMID:27379214

  18. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk).

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish K; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid CPS (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid CPS (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  19. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish K.; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  20. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    biomass of Bacillus subtilis, a Gram-positive bacterium, showed the same pattern. Rapidly-dividing cells derived fewer of their O and H atoms from environmental water than did more slowly-growing cells and spores. To test whether a eukaryotic cell, surrounded by only a membrane, would also maintain an isotopic gradient and a detectable percentage of metabolic water, we applied our approach to cultured rat fibroblasts. Preliminary results showed that approximately 50% of the O and H atoms in exponentially growing cells were derived from metabolic activity. In quiescent cells, metabolic activity generated approximately 25% of the O and H atoms in intracellular water. Thus far, the data we have obtained is consistent with the following model: (1) Intracellular water is composed of water that diffuses in from the extracellular environment and water that is created as a result of metabolic activity. (2) The relative amounts of environmental and metabolic water inside a cell are a function of the cell's metabolic activity. (3) The oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellular metabolites are a function of those of intracellular water, and therefore reflect the metabolic activity of the cell at the time of biosynthesis.

  1. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  2. Metabolites from Aspergillus fumigatus, an endophytic fungus associated with Melia azedarach, and their antifungal, antifeedant, and toxic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Thirty-nine fungal metabolites 1-39, including two new alkaloids, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6) and 3-hydroxyfumiquinazoline A (16), were isolated from the fermentation broth of Aspergillus fumigatus LN-4, an endophytic fungus isolated from the stem bark of Melia azedarach. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis (mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments) and by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature. These isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro antifungal activities against some phytopathogenic fungi, toxicity against brine shrimps, and antifeedant activities against armyworm larvae (Mythimna separata Walker). Among them, sixteen compounds showed potent antifungal activities against phytopathogenic fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, and Gibberella saubinettii), and four of them, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6), fumitremorgin B (7), verruculogen (8), and helvolic acid (39), exhibited antifungal activities with MIC values of 6.25-50 μg/mL, which were comparable to the two positive controls carbendazim and hymexazol. In addition, of eighteen that exerted moderate lethality toward brine shrimps, compounds 7 and 8 both showed significant toxicities with median lethal concentration (LC(50)) values of 13.6 and 15.8 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, among nine metabolites that were found to possess antifeedant activity against armyworm larvae, compounds 7 and 8 gave the best activity with antifeedant indexes (AFI) of 50.0% and 55.0%, respectively. Structure-activity relationships of the metabolites were also discussed. PMID:22409377

  3. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Mohamed, Afaf O.; Hawwam, Maha A.; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  4. Solving the Jigsaw Puzzle of Wound-Healing Potato Cultivars: Metabolite Profiling and Antioxidant Activity of Polar Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a worldwide food staple, but substantial waste accompanies the cultivation of this crop due to wounding of the outer skin and subsequent unfavorable healing conditions. Motivated by both economic and nutritional considerations, this metabolite profiling study aims to improve understanding of closing layer and wound periderm formation and guide the development of new methods to ensure faster and more complete healing after skin breakage. The polar metabolites of wound-healing tissues from four potato cultivars with differing patterns of tuber skin russeting (Norkotah Russet, Atlantic, Chipeta, and Yukon Gold) were analyzed at three and seven days after wounding, during suberized closing layer formation and nascent wound periderm development, respectively. The polar extracts were assessed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods, including multivariate analysis and tentative identification of 22 of the 24 biomarkers that discriminate among the cultivars at a given wound-healing time point or between developmental stages. Differences among the metabolites that could be identified from NMR- and MS-derived biomarkers highlight the strengths and limitations of each method, also demonstrating the complementarity of these approaches in terms of assembling a complete molecular picture of the tissue extracts. Both methods revealed that differences among the cultivar metabolite profiles diminish as healing proceeds during the period following wounding. The biomarkers included polyphenolic amines, flavonoid glycosides, phenolic acids and glycoalkaloids. Because wound healing is associated with oxidative stress, the free radical scavenging activities of the extracts from different cultivars were measured at each wounding time point, revealing significantly higher scavenging activity of the Yukon Gold periderm especially after 7 days of wounding. PMID:24998264

  5. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  6. Tissue distribution study of columbianadin and its active metabolite columbianetin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-Bo; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Columbianadin, one of the main bioactive constituents of the roots of Angelica pubescens Maxim. f. biserrata Shan et Yuan, has been found to possess obvious pharmacological effects in previous studies. In this study, a valid and sensitive reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was established and validated for the determination of columbianadin (CBN) and its active metabolite columbianetin (CBT) in rat tissue samples. Sample separation was performed on an RP-HPLC column using a mobile phase of MeOH-H2 O (75:25, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV absorbance of the samples was measured at the wavelength 325 nm. The calibration curves for CBN were linear over the ranges of 0.5-20 µg/g for brain, testes and muscle, 1.0-10.0 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.2-20.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The calibration curves for CBT were linear over the ranges of 0.5-25 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.1-10.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The analysis method was successfully applied to a tissue distribution study of CBN and CBT after intravenous administration of CBN to rats. The results of this study indicated that CBN could be detected in all of the selected tissues after i.v. administration. CBN was distributed to rat tissues rapidly and could be metabolized to CBT in most detected tissues. Of the detected tissues, heart had the highest uptake of CBN, which suggested that heart might be one of the main target tissues of CBN. Concentrations of CBT were obviously higher in the digestive system than in other assayed tissues. The information provided by this research is very useful for gaining knowledge of the capacities of CBN and CBT to access different tissues. PMID:26115176

  7. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses, United States, 2013–14

    PubMed Central

    Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Fry, Alicia M.; Su, Su; Nguyen, Ha T.; Elal, Anwar Abd; Negron, Elizabeth; Hand, Julie; Garten, Rebecca J.; Barnes, John; Xiyan, Xu; Villanueva, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    We report characteristics of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and patients infected with these viruses in the United States. During 2013–14, fifty-nine (1.2%) of 4,968 analyzed US influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses had the H275Y oseltamivir resistance–conferring neuraminidase substitution. Our results emphasize the need for local surveillance for neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility among circulating influenza viruses. PMID:25532050

  8. Long-Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitor Laninamivir Octanoate (CS-8958) versus Oseltamivir as Treatment for Children with Influenza Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, laninamivir octanoate, with oseltamivir. Eligible patients were children 9 years of age and under who had febrile influenza symptoms of no more than 36-h duration. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: a group given 40 mg laninamivir (40-mg group), a group given 20 mg laninamivir (20-mg group), and an oseltamivir group. Laninamivir octanoate was administered as a single inhalation. Oseltamivir (2 mg/kg of body weight) was administered orally twice daily for 5 days. The primary end point was the time to alleviation of influenza illness. The primary analysis included 184 patients (61, 61, and 62 in the 40-mg group, 20-mg group, and oseltamivir group, respectively). Laninamivir octanoate markedly reduced the median time to illness alleviation in comparison with oseltamivir in patients infected with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus, and the reductions were 60.9 h for the 40-mg group and 66.2 h for the 20-mg group. On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the times to alleviation of illness between the laninamivir groups and oseltamivir group for patients with influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Laninamivir octanoate was well tolerated. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal events. Laninamivir octanoate was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Further study will be needed to confirm clinical efficacy against influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Its ease of administration is noteworthy, because a single inhalation is required during the course of illness. PMID:20368393

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Activation is Associated with Altered Plasma One-Carbon Metabolites and B-Vitamin Status in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lysne, Vegard; Strand, Elin; Svingen, Gard F. T.; Bjørndal, Bodil; Pedersen, Eva R.; Midttun, Øivind; Olsen, Thomas; Ueland, Per M.; Berge, Rolf K.; Nygård, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of metabolites along the choline oxidation pathway have been linked to increased risk of major lifestyle diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of key enzymes along this pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of PPAR activation on circulating and urinary one-carbon metabolites as well as markers of B-vitamin status. Male Wistar rats (n = 20) received for 50 weeks either a high-fat control diet or a high-fat diet with tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA), a modified fatty acid and pan-PPAR agonist with high affinity towards PPARα. Hepatic gene expression of PPARα, PPARβ/δ and the enzymes involved in the choline oxidation pathway were analyzed and concentrations of metabolites were analyzed in plasma and urine. TTA treatment altered most biomarkers, and the largest effect sizes were observed for plasma concentrations of dimethylglycine, nicotinamide, methylnicotinamide, methylmalonic acid and pyridoxal, which were all higher in the TTA group (all p < 0.01). Hepatic Pparα mRNA was increased after TTA treatment, but genes of the choline oxidation pathway were not affected. Long-term TTA treatment was associated with pronounced alterations on the plasma and urinary concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. PMID:26742069

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Activation is Associated with Altered Plasma One-Carbon Metabolites and B-Vitamin Status in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lysne, Vegard; Strand, Elin; Svingen, Gard F T; Bjørndal, Bodil; Pedersen, Eva R; Midttun, Øivind; Olsen, Thomas; Ueland, Per M; Berge, Rolf K; Nygård, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of metabolites along the choline oxidation pathway have been linked to increased risk of major lifestyle diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of key enzymes along this pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of PPAR activation on circulating and urinary one-carbon metabolites as well as markers of B-vitamin status. Male Wistar rats (n = 20) received for 50 weeks either a high-fat control diet or a high-fat diet with tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA), a modified fatty acid and pan-PPAR agonist with high affinity towards PPARα. Hepatic gene expression of PPARα, PPARβ/δ and the enzymes involved in the choline oxidation pathway were analyzed and concentrations of metabolites were analyzed in plasma and urine. TTA treatment altered most biomarkers, and the largest effect sizes were observed for plasma concentrations of dimethylglycine, nicotinamide, methylnicotinamide, methylmalonic acid and pyridoxal, which were all higher in the TTA group (all p < 0.01). Hepatic Pparα mRNA was increased after TTA treatment, but genes of the choline oxidation pathway were not affected. Long-term TTA treatment was associated with pronounced alterations on the plasma and urinary concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. PMID:26742069

  11. Characterisation of metabolites of the putative cancer chemopreventive agent quercetin and their effect on cyclo-oxygenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D J L; Lamb, J H; Verschoyle, R D; Howells, L M; Butterworth, M; Lim, C K; Ferry, D; Farmer, P B; Gescher, A J

    2004-01-01

    Quercetin (3,5,7,3′,4′-pentahydroxyflavone) is a flavone with putative ability to prevent cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Its metabolism was evaluated in rats and human. Rats received quercetin via the intravenous (i.v.) route and metabolites were isolated from the plasma, urine and bile. Analysis was by high-performance liquid chromatography and confirmation of species identity was achieved by mass spectrometry. Quercetin and isorhamnetin, the 3′-O-methyl analogue, were found in both the plasma and urine. In addition, several polar peaks were characterised as sulphated and glucuronidated conjugates of quercetin and isorhamnetin. Extension of the metabolism studies to a cancer patient who had received quercetin as an i.v. bolus showed that (Quercetin removed) isorhamnetin and quercetin 3′-O-sulphate were major plasma metabolites. As a catechol, quercetin can potentially be converted to a quinone and subsequently conjugated with glutathione (GSH). Oxidation of quercetin with mushroom tyrosinase in the presence of GSH furnished GSH conjugates of quercetin, two mono- and one bis-substituted conjugates. However, these species were not found in biomatrices in rats treated with quercetin. As cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is mechanistically linked to carcinogenesis, we examined whether quercetin and its metabolites can inhibit COX-2 in a human colorectal cancer cell line (HCA-7). Isorhamnetin and its 4′-isomer tamarixetin were potent inhibitors, reflected in a 90% decrease in prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) levels, a marker of COX-2 activity. Quercetin was less effective, with a 50% decline. Quercetin 3- and 7-O-sulphate had no effect on PGE-2. The results indicate that quercetin may exert its pharmacological effects, at least in part, via its metabolites. PMID:15292928

  12. Tracking oseltamivir-resistance in New Zealand influenza viruses during a medicine reclassification in 2007, a resistant-virus importation in 2008 and the 2009 pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Peacey, Matthew; Ralston, Jacqui C.; de Joux, Danielle J; Bocacao, Judy; Nicol, Mackenzie; Ziki, Molly; Gunn, Wendy; Wang, Jing; Huang, Q Sue

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is an important pharmaceutical intervention against the influenza virus. The importance of surveillance for resistance to oseltamivir has been highlighted by two global events: the emergence of an oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) virus in 2008, and emergence of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009. Oseltamivir is a prescription medicine in New Zealand, but more timely access has been provided since 2007 by allowing pharmacies to directly dispense oseltamivir to patients with influenza-like illness. Objective To determine the frequency of oseltamivir-resistance in the context of a medicine reclassification in 2007, the importation of an oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza virus in 2008, and the emergence of a pandemic in 2009. Methods A total of 1795 influenza viruses were tested for oseltamivir-resistance using a fluorometric neuraminidase inhibition assay. Viruses were collected as part of a sentinel influenza surveillance programme between the years 2006 and 2010. Results All influenza B, influenza A(H3N2) and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses tested between 2006 and 2010 were shown to be sensitive to oseltamivir. Seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses from 2008 and 2009 were resistant to oseltamivir. Sequencing of the neuraminidase gene showed that the resistant viruses contained an H275Y mutation, and S247N was also identified in the neuraminidase gene of one seasonal influenza A(H1N1) virus that exhibited enhanced resistance. Discussion No evidence was found to suggest that increased access to oseltamivir has promoted resistance. A probable importation event was documented for the global 2008 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1) virus nine months after it was first reported in Europe in January 2008. PMID:23908945

  13. Reduced photoinhibition under low irradiance enhanced Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) secondary metabolites, phenyl alanine lyase and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design experiment was designed to characterize the relationship between production of total flavonoids and phenolics, anthocyanin, photosynthesis, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), electron transfer rate (Fm/Fo), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and antioxidant (DPPH) in Labisia pumila var. alata, under four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m(2)/s) for 16 weeks. As irradiance levels increased from 225 to 900 μmol/m(2)/s, the production of plant secondary metabolites (total flavonoids, phenolics and antocyanin) was found to decrease steadily. Production of total flavonoids and phenolics reached their peaks under 225 followed by 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m(2)/s irradiances. Significant positive correlation of production of total phenolics, flavonoids and antocyanin content with Fv/Fm, Fm/Fo and photosynthesis indicated up-regulation of carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSM) under reduced photoinhibition on the under low light levels condition. At the lowest irradiance levels, Labisia pumila extracts also exhibited a significantly higher antioxidant activity (DPPH) than under high irradiance. The improved antioxidative activity under low light levels might be due to high availability of total flavonoids, phenolics and anthocyanin content in the plant extract. It was also found that an increase in the production of CBSM was due to high PAL activity under low light, probably signifying more availability of phenylalanine (Phe) under this condition. PMID:22754297

  14. Reduced Photoinhibition under Low Irradiance Enhanced Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) Secondary Metabolites, Phenyl Alanine Lyase and Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z.E.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design experiment was designed to characterize the relationship between production of total flavonoids and phenolics, anthocyanin, photosynthesis, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), electron transfer rate (Fm/Fo), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and antioxidant (DPPH) in Labisia pumila var. alata, under four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s) for 16 weeks. As irradiance levels increased from 225 to 900 μmol/m2/s, the production of plant secondary metabolites (total flavonoids, phenolics and antocyanin) was found to decrease steadily. Production of total flavonoids and phenolics reached their peaks under 225 followed by 500, 625 and 900 μmol/m2/s irradiances. Significant positive correlation of production of total phenolics, flavonoids and antocyanin content with Fv/Fm, Fm/Fo and photosynthesis indicated up-regulation of carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSM) under reduced photoinhibition on the under low light levels condition. At the lowest irradiance levels, Labisia pumila extracts also exhibited a significantly higher antioxidant activity (DPPH) than under high irradiance. The improved antioxidative activity under low light levels might be due to high availability of total flavonoids, phenolics and anthocyanin content in the plant extract. It was also found that an increase in the production of CBSM was due to high PAL activity under low light, probably signifying more availability of phenylalanine (Phe) under this condition. PMID:22754297

  15. Anti-onchocerca Metabolites from Cyperus articulatus: Isolation, In Vitro Activity and In Silico 'Drug-Likeness'.

    PubMed

    Metuge, Jonathan Alunge; Babiaka, Smith B; Mbah, James A; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Ayimele, Godfred A; Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this investigation were to isolate active ingredients from the roots/rhizomes of Cyperus articulatus used as herbal medicine in Cameroon for the treatment of human onchocerciasis and to assess the efficacy of the metabolites on the Onchocerca worm. The antifilarial activity was evaluated in vitro on microfilariae (Mfs) and adult worms of the bovine derived Onchocerca ochengi, a close relative of Onchocerca volvulus. Cytotoxicity was assessed in vitro on monkey kidney epithelial cells. The structures of the active compounds were determined using spectroscopic methods and their drug-likeness evaluated using Lipinski parameters. Two secondary metabolites, AMJ1 [containing mustakone (1) as the major component] and linoleic acid or (9Z,12Z)-octadeca-9,12-dienoic acid (2) were isolated. Both compounds were found to kill both the microfilariae and adult worms of O. ochengi in a dose dependent manner. The IC50s for AMJ1 were 15.7 µg/mL for Mfs, 17.4 µg/mL for adult males and 21.9 µg/mL for adult female worms while for linoleic acid the values were, 15.7 µg/mL for Mfs, 31.0 µg/mL for adult males and 44.2 µg/mL for adult females. The present report provides the first ever evidence of the anti-Onchocerca efficacy of AMJ1 and linoleic acid. Thus, these secondary metabolites may provide a lead for design and development of new antifilarial agents. PMID:25089243

  16. Effectiveness of clopidogrel dose escalation to normalize active metabolite exposure and antiplatelet effects in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Richard B; Madabushi, Rajnikanth; Zineh, Issam; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peer, Cody J; Schuck, Robert N; Figg, William Douglas; Shuldiner, Alan R; Pacanowski, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    Carriers of two copies of the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 variant convert less clopidogrel into its active metabolite, resulting in diminished antiplatelet responses and higher cardiovascular event rates. To evaluate whether increasing the daily clopidogrel dose in poor metabolizers (PM) overcomes the effect of the CYP2C19 * 2 variant, we enrolled 18 healthy participants in a genotype-stratified, multi-dose, three-period, fixed-sequence crossover study. Six participants with the *1/*1 extensive (EM), *1/*2 intermediate (IM), and *2/*2 poor metabolizer genotypes each received 75 mg, 150 mg, and 300 mg each for 8 days. In each period, maximal platelet aggregation 4 hours post-dose (MPA4) and active metabolite area under the curve (AUC) differed among genotype groups (P < .05 for all). At day 8, PMs needed 300 mg daily and IMs needed 150 mg daily to attain a similar MPA4 as EMs on the 75 mg dose (32.6%, 33.2%, 31.3%, respectively). Similarly, PMs needed 300 mg daily to achieve active metabolite concentrations that were similar to EMs on 75 mg (AUC 37.7 and 33.5 ng h/mL, respectively). These results suggest that quadrupling the usual clopidogrel dose might be necessary to overcome the effect of poor CYP2C19 metabolism. PMID:24710841

  17. Multiple modes of inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2J2 by dronedarone, amiodarone and their active metabolites.

    PubMed

    Karkhanis, Aneesh; Lam, Hui Yuan; Venkatesan, Gopalakrishnan; Koh, Siew Kwan; Chai, Christina Li Lin; Zhou, Lei; Hong, Yanjun; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2016-05-01

    Dronedarone, a multiple ion channel blocker is prescribed for the treatment of paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. While dronedarone does not precipitate toxicities like its predecessor amiodarone, its clinical use has been associated with idiosyncratic hepatic and cardiac adverse effects and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). As dronedarone is a potent mechanism-based inactivator of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, a question arose if it exerts a similar inhibitory effect on CYP2J2, a prominent cardiac CYP450 enzyme. In this study, we demonstrated that CYP2J2 is reversibly inhibited by dronedarone (Ki=0.034μM), amiodarone (Ki=4.8μM) and their respective pharmacologically active metabolites namely N-desbutyldronedarone (NDBD) (Ki=0.55μM) and N-desethylamiodarone (NDEA) (Ki=7.4μM). Moreover, time-, concentration- and NADPH-dependent irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 was investigated where inactivation kinetic parameters (KI, kinact) and partition ratio (r) of dronedarone (0.05μM, 0.034min(-1), 3.3), amiodarone (0.21μM, 0.015min(-1), 20.7) and NDBD (0.48μM, 0.024min(-1), 21.7) were observed except for NDEA. The absence of the characteristic Soret peak, lack of recovery of CYP2J2 activity upon dialysis, and biotransformation of dronedarone and NDBD to quinone-oxime reactive metabolites further confirmed the irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 by dronedarone and NDBD is via the covalent adduction of CYP2J2. Our novel findings illuminate the possible mechanisms of DDIs and cardiac adverse effects due to both reversible inhibition and irreversible inactivation of CYP2J2 by dronedarone, amiodarone and their active metabolites. PMID:26972388

  18. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  19. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of some naturally occurring O- and N-prenyl secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Francesco; Genovese, Salvatore; Fiorito, Serena; della Loggia, Roberto; Tubaro, Aurelia; Sosa, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    A series of O- and N-prenyl secondary metabolites of insect, fungal, and plant origin have been evaluated for their topical anti-inflammatory activity using the Croton oil ear test in mice as a model of acute inflammation. Some of the tested compounds revealed an effect (ID50 = 0.31 divided by 0.56 micromol/cm2) comparable with that of the reference non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (ID50 = 0.23 micromol/cm2). PMID:24660470

  20. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  1. Oseltamivir inhibits influenza virus replication and transmission following ocular-only aerosol inoculation of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Creager, Hannah M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-10-01

    Ocular exposure to influenza virus represents an alternate route of virus entry capable of establishing a respiratory infection in mammals, but the effectiveness of currently available antiviral treatments to limit virus replication within ocular tissue or inhibit virus spread from ocular sites to the respiratory tract is poorly understood. Using an inoculation method that delivers an aerosol inoculum exclusively to the ocular surface, we demonstrate that oral oseltamivir administration following ocular-only aerosol inoculation with multiple avian and human influenza viruses protected ferrets from a fatal and systemic infection, reduced clinical signs and symptoms of illness, and decreased virus transmissibility to susceptible contacts when a respiratory infection was initiated. The presence of oseltamivir further inhibited influenza virus replication in primary human corneal epithelial cells. These findings provide critical experimental evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors during outbreaks of influenza virus resulting in ocular disease or following ocular exposure. PMID:26142497

  2. Transthyretin Binding Heterogeneity and Anti-amyloidogenic Activity of Natural Polyphenols and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Florio, Paola; Folli, Claudia; Cianci, Michele; Del Rio, Daniele; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Berni, Rodolfo

    2015-12-11

    Transthyretin (TTR) is an amyloidogenic protein, the amyloidogenic potential of which is enhanced by a number of specific point mutations. The ability to inhibit TTR fibrillogenesis is known for several classes of compounds, including natural polyphenols, which protect the native state of TTR by specifically interacting with its thyroxine binding sites. Comparative analyses of the interaction and of the ability to protect the TTR native state for polyphenols, both stilbenoids and flavonoids, and some of their main metabolites have been carried out. A main finding of this investigation was the highly preferential binding of resveratrol and thyroxine, both characterized by negative binding cooperativity, to distinct sites in TTR, consistent with the data of x-ray analysis of TTR in complex with both ligands. Although revealing the ability of the two thyroxine binding sites of TTR to discriminate between different ligands, this feature has allowed us to evaluate the interactions of polyphenols with both resveratrol and thyroxine preferential binding sites, by using resveratrol and radiolabeled T4 as probes. Among flavonoids, genistein and apigenin were able to effectively displace resveratrol from its preferential binding site, whereas genistein also showed the ability to interact, albeit weakly, with the preferential thyroxine binding site. Several glucuronidated polyphenol metabolites did not exhibit significant competition for resveratrol and thyroxine preferential binding sites and lacked the ability to stabilize TTR. However, resveratrol-3-O-sulfate was able to significantly protect the protein native state. A rationale for the in vitro properties found for polyphenol metabolites was provided by x-ray analysis of their complexes with TTR. PMID:26468275

  3. Development of A Concise Synthesis of (−)-Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®)

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Zhang, Ting

    2011-01-01

    We report a full account of our work towards the development of an eight-step synthesis of anti-influenza drug (−)-oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) from commercially available starting material. The final synthetic route proceeds with an overall yield of 30 %. Key transformations include a novel palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation reaction (Pd-AAA) as well as a rhodium-catalyzed chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective aziridination reaction. PMID:21365707

  4. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  5. Magnolia Extract, Magnolol, and Metabolites: Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors and Blockade of the Related GPR55

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The bark of Magnolia officinalis is used in Asian traditional medicine for the treatment of anxiety, sleeping disorders, and allergic diseases. We found that the extract and its main bioactive constituents, magnolol and honokiol, can activate cannabinoid (CB) receptors. In cAMP accumulation studies, magnolol behaved as a partial agonist (EC50 = 3.28 μM) with selectivity for the CB2 subtype, while honokiol was less potent showing full agonistic activity at CB1 and antagonistic properties at CB2. We subsequently synthesized the major metabolites of magnolol and found that tetrahydromagnolol (7) was 19-fold more potent than magnolol (EC50 CB2 = 0.170 μM) exhibiting high selectivity versus CB1. Additionally, 7 behaved as an antagonist at GPR55, a CB-related orphan receptor (KB = 13.3 μM, β-arrestin translocation assay). Magnolol and its metabolites may contribute to the biological activities of Magnolia extract via the observed mechanisms of action. Furthermore, the biphenylic compound magnolol provides a simple novel lead structure for the development of agonists for CB receptors and antagonists for the related GPR55. PMID:24900561

  6. Plant polyphenols and oxidative metabolites of the herbal alkenylbenzene methyleugenol suppress histone deacetylase activity in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  7. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor. PMID:25922884

  8. Excretion of tectoridin metabolites in rat urine and bile orally administrated at different dosages and their inhibitory activity against aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jialin; Wu, Zhizhen; Gao, Jie; Wen, Hao; Wang, Tao; Yuan, Dan

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the urinary and biliary excretion of tectoridin, a major active isoflavonoid found in the flowers of Pueraria thomsonii Benth. and the rhizomes of Belamcanda chinensis (L.) DC. Using UHPLC/Q-TOFMS, seven glucuronides and/or sulfated metabolites and four Phase I metabolites were simultaneously quantified in rat urine after oral administration of tectoridin at 100 and 200 mg/kg. Over a 72-h period, 14.2% and 14.7% of the tectoridin were excreted as eleven metabolites in urine, among which, two major metabolites tectorigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (Te-7G) and tectorigenin accounted for 5.5-5.5% and 4.3-4.4%. Furthermore, the cumulative excretion of four glucuronides and sulfated metabolites in bile accounted for 7.3% and 3.9% of the dose within 60 h, among which, Te-7G and tectorigenin-7-O-glucuronide-4'-O-sulfate (Te-7G-4'S) accounted for 2.3-3.0% and 1.4-3.9%, respectively. The results indicate that the urine was the primary elimination route, and glucuronidation after deglycosylation at C-7 position was the major metabolic pathway of tectoridin in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory activities of tectoridin and its five metabolites on rat lens aldose reductase were confirmed (IC₅₀: 1.4-15.5 μM), whereas irisolidone-7-O-glucuronide (Ir-7G) and irisolidone showed little activity. PMID:25256063

  9. Activity and characterization of secondary metabolites produced by a new microorganism for control of plant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Hsiung; Tsou, Yi-Jung; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chern, Lih-Ling

    2010-09-30

    Microorganisms capable of utilizing vegetable tissues for growth in soils were isolated and their vegetable broth cultures were individually sprayed directly on leaves to test their ability to control Phytophthora blight of bell pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici. Liquid culture of Streptomyces strain TKA-5, a previously undescribed species obtained in this study, displayed several desirable disease control characteristics in nature, including high potency, long lasting and ability to control also black leaf spot of spoon cabbage caused by Alternaria brassicicolca. The extract was fungicidal to P. capsici but fungistatic to A. brassicicola. It was stable at high temperature and high pH. However, after exposure to pH 2 for 24h, the extract was no longer inhibitory to P. capsici although it was still strongly inhibitory to A. brassicicola. After treatment with cation or anion exchange resins, the extract lost its inhibitory effect against P. capsici but not A. brassicicola. The results suggest that the extract contained two different kinds of inhibitory metabolites, one against P. capsici with both positive and negative charges on its molecule and another against A. brassicicola with no charges on its molecule. The inhibitory metabolites were soluble in ethanol or methanol but not in water, ether or chloroform. They were dialyzable in the membrane tubing with molecular weight cut-off of 10,000, 1000 or 500 but not 100, indicating that the inhibitors have a molecular weight between 500 and 100. Results also showed that both inhibitors are not proteins. PMID:20580869

  10. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  11. Activation of the Silent Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin-Resistance in a Marine-Derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Yi, Le; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wang, Nan; Han, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1), citrinin (2), penicitrinone A (3), erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4) and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α,6α-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-dien-3β-ol (5), were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1–5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1–5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways. PMID:25913704

  12. Isolation and Identification of Twelve Metabolites of Isocorynoxeine in Rat Urine and their Neuroprotective Activities in HT22 Cell Assay

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wen; Chen, Fangfang; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W.; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isocorynoxeine, one of the major alkaloids from Uncaria Hook, shows the effects of lowering blood pressure, vasodilatation, and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. In this paper, the metabolism of isocorynoxeine was investigated in rats. Twelve metabolites and the parent drug were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and determined by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR, and CD experiments. Seven new compounds were identified as 11-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide, 10-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid, 21-hydroxy-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, and oxireno[18,19]-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, together with six known compounds identified as isocorynoxeine, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid B, corynoxeine, isocorynoxeine-N-oxide, and corynoxeine-N-oxide. Possible metabolic pathways of isocorynoxeine are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for the parent drug and some of its metabolites showed that isocorynoxeine exhibited a significant neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death at the maximum concentration. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M-3, M-6, M-7, and M-10. Our present study is important to further understand their metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:25519834

  13. Isolation and identification of twelve metabolites of isocorynoxeine in rat urine and their neuroprotective activities in HT22 cell assay.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen; Chen, Fangfang; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isocorynoxeine, one of the major alkaloids from Uncaria Hook, shows the effects of lowering blood pressure, vasodilatation, and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. In this paper, the metabolism of isocorynoxeine was investigated in rats. Twelve metabolites and the parent drug were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and determined by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR, and CD experiments. Seven new compounds were identified as 11-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide, 10-hydroxyisocorynoxeine, 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid, 21-hydroxy-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, and oxireno[18, 19]-5-oxoisocorynoxeine, together with six known compounds identified as isocorynoxeine, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid B, corynoxeine, isocorynoxeine-N-oxide, and corynoxeine-N-oxide. Possible metabolic pathways of isocorynoxeine are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for the parent drug and some of its metabolites showed that isocorynoxeine exhibited a significant neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death at the maximum concentration. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M-3, M-6, M-7, and M-10. Our present study is important to further understand their metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:25519834

  14. Anti-phytopathogenic activity of sporothriolide, a metabolite from endophyte Nodulisporium sp. A21 in Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Liu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jin-Long; Zhang, Zheng-Guang; Shen, Li; Liu, Jun-Yan; Ye, Yong-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum caused multiple plant diseases resulting in severe loss of crop production. Increasing documents endorsed that endophytes are a striking resource pool for numerous metabolites with various bioactivities such as anti-fungal. Here we reported the characterization and anti-phytopathogenic activity of sporothriolide, a metabolite produced by Nodulisporium sp. A21-an endophytic fungus in the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Among the total twenty-five endophytic fungi isolated from the healthy leaves of G. biloba, the fermentation broth (FB) of the strain A21 was found potently inhibitory activity against R. solani and S. sclerotiorum using mycelia growth inhibition method. A21 was then identified as Nodulisporium sp., the asexual stage of Hypoxylon sp., by microscopic examination and ITS rDNA sequence data comparison. Under the bioassay-guided fractionation, sporothriolide was isolated from the petroleum ether extract of the FB of A21, whose structure was established by integrated interpretation of HR-ESI-MS and (1)H- and (13)C-NMR. Furthermore, the crystal structure of sporothriolide was first reported. In addition, sporothriolide was validated to be potently antifungal against R. solani, S. sclerotiorum and inhibit conidium germination of Magnaporthe oryzae in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it could be used as a lead compound for new fungicide development. PMID:27017876

  15. Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling and antioxidant activity of Aloe vera ( Aloe barbadensis Miller) in different growth stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Sun Yeou; Kim, Jinwan; Jin, Yoojeong; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2012-11-14

    Metabolite profiling of four different-sized Aloe vera plants was performed using gas chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis. Amino acids, sugars, and organic acids related to growth and development were identified by sizes. In particular, the relative contents of glucose, fructose, alanine, valine, and aspartic acid increased gradually as the size of the aloe increased. Anthraquinone derivatives such as 7-hydroxy-8-O-methylaloin, 7-hydroxyaloin A, and 6'-malonylnataloins A and B increased gradually, whereas chromone derivatives decreased continuously as the size of the aloe increased. The A30 aloe (size = 20-30 cm) with relatively high contents of aloins A and B, was suggested to have antioxidant components showing the highest antioxidant activity among the four different sizes of aloe. These data suggested that MS-based metabolomic approaches can illuminate metabolite changes associated with growth and development and can explain their change of antioxidant activity. PMID:23050594

  16. Mechanistic toxicodynamic model for receptor-mediated toxicity of diazoxon, the active metabolite of diazinon, in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kretschmann, Andreas; Ashauer, Roman; Hitzfeld, Kristina; Spaak, Piet; Hollender, Juliane; Escher, Beate I

    2011-06-01

    The organothiophosphate diazinon inhibits the target site acetylcholinesterase only after activation to its metabolite diazoxon. Commonly, the toxicity of xenobiotics toward aquatic organisms is expressed as a function of the external concentration and the resulting effect on the individual level after fixed exposure times. This approach does not account for the time dependency of internal processes such as uptake, metabolism, and interaction of the toxicant with the target site. Here, we develop a mechanistic toxicodynamic model for Daphnia magna and diazoxon, which accounts for the inhibition of the internal target site acetylcholinesterase and its link to the observable effect, immobilization, and mortality. The model was parametrized by experiments performed in vitro with the active metabolite diazoxon on enzyme extracts and in vivo with the parent compound diazinon. The mechanism of acetylcholinesterase inhibition was shown to occur irreversibly in two steps via formation of a reversible enzyme-inhibitor complex. The corresponding kinetic parameters revealed a very high sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase from D. magna toward diazoxon, which corresponds well with the high toxicity of diazinon toward this species. Recovery of enzyme activity but no recovery from immobilization was observed after in vivo exposure to diazinon. The toxicodynamic model combining all in vitro and in vivo parameters was successfully applied to describe the time course of immobilization in dependence of acetylcholinesterase activity during exposure to diazinon. The threshold value for enzyme activity below which immobilization set in amounted to 40% of the control activity. Furthermore, the model enabled the prediction of the time-dependent diazoxon concentration directly present at the target site. PMID:21539304

  17. IDO1 Metabolites Activate β-catenin Signaling to Promote Cancer Cell Proliferation and Colon Tumorigenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Ameet I.; Rao, M Suprada; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Kerr, Thomas A; Foster, Lynne; Marinshaw, Jeffrey M.; Newberry, Rodney D.; Stenson, William F.; Ciorba, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) catabolizes tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway. Though IDO1 is expressed in inflamed and neoplastic epithelial cells of the colon, its role in colon tumorigenesis is not well understood. We used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to manipulate IDO1 activity in mice with colitis-associated cancer and human colon cancer cell lines. METHODS C57Bl6 wild type (control), IDO1−/−, Rag1−/−, Rag1/IDO1 double knockout mice were exposed to azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce colitis and tumorigenesis. Colitis severity was assessed by measurements of disease activity, cytokine levels and histologic analysis. In vitro experiments were conducted using HCT116 and HT29 human colon cancer cells. 1-methyl tryptophan and small interfering RNA were used to inhibit IDO1. Kynurenine pathway metabolites were used to simulate IDO1 activity. RESULTS C57Bl6 mice given pharmacologic inhibitors of IDO1 and IDO1−/− mice had lower tumor burdens and reduced proliferation in the neoplastic epithelium following administration of DSS and azoxymethane than control mice. These reductions were also observed in Rag1/IDO1 double knockout mice compared to Rag1−/− mice (which lack mature adaptive immunity). In human colon cancer cells, blockade of IDO1 activity reduced nuclear and activated β-catenin, transcription of its target genes (cyclin D1 and Axin2), and ultimately proliferation. Exogenous administration of IDO1 pathway metabolites kynurenine and quinolinic acid led to activation of β-catenin and proliferation of human colon cancer cells, and increased tumor growth in mice. CONCLUSIONS IDO1, which catabolizes tryptophan, promotes colitis-associated tumorigenesis in mice, independent of its ability to limit T-cell mediated immune surveillance. The epithelial cell-autonomous survival advantage provided by IDO1 to colon epithelial cells indicate its potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:23669411

  18. 20(S)-protopanaxadiol, an active ginseng metabolite, exhibits strong antidepressant-like effects in animal tests.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changjiang; Teng, Jijun; Chen, Weidong; Ge, Qiang; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Zirong; Jia, William

    2010-12-01

    Ginseng has been used for mood adjustment in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Our previous study has shown that, total ginsenosides, the major pharmacologically functional ingredients of ginseng, possess antidepressant activity. In the present study, we hypothesized that an intestinal metabolite of ginseng, 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (code name S111), as a post metabolism compound (PMC) of ingested ginsenosides, may be responsible for the antidepressant activity of ginseng. To test this hypothesis, antidepressant-like activity of orally given S111 was measured in animal tests including tail suspension test, forced swimming test and rat olfactory bulbectomy depression model. In all those tests, S111 demonstrated antidepressant-like activity as potent as fluoxetine. S111 treated bulbectomy animals had higher levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain and in vitro reuptake assay showed that S111 had a mild inhibitory effect. Furthermore, S111 but not fluoxetine significantly reduced brain oxidative stress and down-regulated serum corticosterone concentration in bulbectomy animals. No disturbance to central nervous system (CNS) normal functions were found in S111 treated animals. These results suggest that the ginseng active metabolite S111 is a potential antidepressant. Since the monoamine reuptake activity of this compound is rather weak, it remains to be investigated whether its antidepressant-like effect is by mechanisms that are different from current antidepressants. Furthermore, this study has demonstrated that post metabolism compounds (PMCs) of herb medicines such as S111 may be a novel source for drug discovery from medicinal herbs. PMID:20647027

  19. Allocation of secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, and antioxidant activity of Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) in response to CO2 and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 4 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of secondary metabolites, soluble sugar, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) activity, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity (DPPH), and lipid peroxidation under three levels of CO2 (400, 800, and 1200 μ mol/mol) and four levels of light intensity (225, 500, 625, and 900 μ mol/m(2)/s) over 15 weeks in Labisia pumila. The production of plant secondary metabolites, sugar, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity, and malondialdehyde content was influenced by the interactions between CO2 and irradiance. The highest accumulation of secondary metabolites, sugar, maliondialdehyde, and DPPH activity was observed under CO2 at 1200 μ mol/mol + light intensity at 225 μ mol/m(2)/s. Meanwhile, at 400 μ mol/mol CO2 + 900 μ mol/m(2)/s light intensity the production of chlorophyll and maliondialdehyde content was the highest. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1200 μ mol/mol the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, f v /f m (maximum efficiency of photosystem II), and PAL activity were enhanced. The production of secondary metabolites displayed a significant negative relationship with maliondialdehyde indicating lowered oxidative stress under high CO2 and low irradiance improved the production of plant secondary metabolites that simultaneously enhanced the antioxidant activity (DPPH), thus improving the medicinal value of Labisia pumila under this condition. PMID:24683336

  20. Allocation of Secondary Metabolites, Photosynthetic Capacity, and Antioxidant Activity of Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Benth) in Response to CO2 and Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 4 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of secondary metabolites, soluble sugar, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) activity, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity (DPPH), and lipid peroxidation under three levels of CO2 (400, 800, and 1200 μmol/mol) and four levels of light intensity (225, 500, 625, and 900 μmol/m2/s) over 15 weeks in Labisia pumila. The production of plant secondary metabolites, sugar, chlorophyll content, antioxidant activity, and malondialdehyde content was influenced by the interactions between CO2 and irradiance. The highest accumulation of secondary metabolites, sugar, maliondialdehyde, and DPPH activity was observed under CO2 at 1200 μmol/mol + light intensity at 225 μmol/m2/s. Meanwhile, at 400 μmol/mol CO2 + 900 μmol/m2/s light intensity the production of chlorophyll and maliondialdehyde content was the highest. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1200 μmol/mol the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, fv/fm (maximum efficiency of photosystem II), and PAL activity were enhanced. The production of secondary metabolites displayed a significant negative relationship with maliondialdehyde indicating lowered oxidative stress under high CO2 and low irradiance improved the production of plant secondary metabolites that simultaneously enhanced the antioxidant activity (DPPH), thus improving the medicinal value of Labisia pumila under this condition. PMID:24683336

  1. Metabolic activation of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate to reactive intermediates. II. Covalent binding, reactive metabolite formation, and differential metabolite-specific DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; Holme, J A; McClanahan, R H; Brunborg, G; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1993-02-01

    Analogs of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate (Tris-BP) either labeled at specific positions with carbon-14 and phosphorus-32 or dual-labeled with both deuterium and tritium were administered to male Wistar rats at a nephrotoxic dose of 360 mumol/kg. The covalent binding of Tris-BP metabolites to hepatic, renal, and testicular proteins was determined after 9 and 24 hr, and plasma concentrations of bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)-phosphate (Bis-BP) formed metabolically from Tris-BP were measured at intervals throughout the initial 9-hr postdosing period. The covalent binding of 14C-Tris-BP metabolites in the kidney (2495 +/- 404 pmol/mg protein) was greater than that in the liver (476 +/- 123 pmol/mg protein) or testes (94 +/- 11 pmol/mg protein); the extent of renal covalent protein binding of Tris-BP metabolites was decreased by 82 and 84% when deuterium was substituted at carbon-2 and carbon-3, respectively. Substitution of Tris-BP with deuterium at carbon-2 or carbon-3 also decreased the mean area under the curve for Bis-BP plasma concentration by 48 and 57%, respectively. The mechanism of Tris-BP-induced renal and hepatic DNA damage was evaluated in Wistar rats by an automated alkaline elution procedure after the administration of analogs of Tris-BP or Bis-BP labeled at specific positions with deuterium. Renal DNA damage was decreased when Tris-BP was substituted with deuterium at either carbon-2 or carbon-3; the magnitude of the change correlated with both a decrease in the area under the Bis-BP plasma curve and a decrease in renal covalent binding of Tris-BP metabolites for each of the deuterated analogs. In marked contrast, analogs of Bis-BP labeled with deuterium at carbon-2 or carbon-3 did not show a decrease in the severity of renal DNA damage compared to unlabeled Bis-BP. On the basis of these observations a metabolic scheme for hepatic P-450-mediated oxidation at either carbon-2 or carbon-3 of Tris-BP affording Bis-BP by two alternate pathways that are susceptible

  2. Responding to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza: the role of oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, David

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza is affecting countries in all five continents, with most cases so far having been reported in North and South America and Europe, and children and young adults being the most susceptible age groups. To date, the clinical course of disease is typically mild, with low hospitalization and mortality rates. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 is susceptible to oseltamivir and, although few clinical data are yet available, current information suggests that treatment with oseltamivir appears to be beneficial. Only isolated cases of resistance to the drug have been reported to date, in keeping with the low frequency observed in clinical studies involving patients infected with seasonal influenza viruses. Current health authority guidelines recommend the use of oseltamivir in infected adults and children who have or are at elevated risk for severe disease, including pregnant women; use during the pandemic in infants <1 year has also been authorized in Europe and a number of other countries, including the USA and Canada. Before the onset of the current pandemic, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd expanded annual production capacity for oseltamivir to 400 million treatment courses per year to meet anticipated demand. However, during an influenza pandemic, and despite increased production capabilities, resources are nonetheless likely to be initially in short supply. For this reason, Roche, in line with WHO recommendations, has advocated advance stockpiling of antivirals by governments as a pandemic preparedness measure. Between 2004 and December 2009, 350 million treatment courses were supplied to governments worldwide. Support for developing countries has been a priority. Roche has established a cluster of initiatives aimed at increasing access to Tamiflu for the world's developing economies, including, making donations to the WHO, establishing the Tamiflu Reserves Program (TRP) and sub-licensing and manufacturing contracts with local companies in Asia and Africa

  3. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  4. Current results on biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Katalin; Farkas, Edit

    2010-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms of fungi and algae or cyanobacteria. Lichen-forming fungi synthesize a great variety of secondary metabolites, many of which are unique. Developments in analytical techniques and experimental methods have resulted in the identification of about 1050 lichen substances (including those found in cultures). In addition to their role in lichen chemotaxonomy and systematics, lichen secondary compounds have several possible biological roles, including photoprotection against intense radiation, as well as allelochemical, antiviral, antitumor, antibacterial, antiherbivore, and antioxidant action. These compounds are also important factors in metal homeostasis and pollution tolerance of lichen thalli. Although our knowledge of the contribution of these extracellular products to the success of the lichen symbiosis has increased significantly in the last decades, their biotic and abiotic roles have not been entirely explored. PMID:20469633

  5. Protopanaxadiol, an Active Ginseng Metabolite, Significantly Enhances the Effects of Fluorouracil on Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Zhiyu; Wan, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Anderson, Samantha; He, Xin; Yu, Chunhao; He, Tong-Chuan; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of protopanaxadiol (PPD), a gut microbiome induced ginseng metabolite, in increasing the anticancer effects of a chemotherapeutic agent fluorouracil (5-FU) on colorectal cancer. An in vitro HCT-116 colorectal cancer cell proliferation test was conducted to observe the effects of PPD, 5-FU and their co-administration and the related mechanisms of action. Then, an in vivo xenografted athymic mouse model was used to confirm the in vitro data. Our results showed that the human gut microbiome converted ginsenoside compound K to PPD as a metabolite. PPD and 5-FU significantly inhibited HCT-116 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (both p < 0.01), and the effects of 5-FU were very significantly enhanced by combined treatment with PPD (p < 0.01). Cell cycle evaluation demonstrated that 5-FU markedly induced the cancer cell S phase arrest, while PPD increased arrest in G1 phase. Compared to the control, 5-FU and PPD increased apoptosis, and their co-administration significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells (p < 0.01). Using bioluminescence imaging, in vivo data revealed that 5-FU significantly reduced the tumor growth up to Day 20 (p < 0.05). PPD and 5-FU co-administration very significantly reduced the tumor size in a dose-related manner (p < 0.01 compared to the 5-FU alone). The quantification of the tumor size and weight changes for 43 days supported the in vivo imaging data. Our results demonstrated that the co-administration of PPD and 5-FU significantly inhibited the tumor growth, indicating that PPD significantly enhanced the anticancer action of 5-FU, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. PPD may have a clinical value in 5-FU’s cancer therapeutics. PMID:25625815

  6. Antitumor Activity of Hierridin B, a Cyanobacterial Secondary Metabolite Found in both Filamentous and Unicellular Marine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vitor; Pereira, Alban R.; Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Domingues, Valentina F.; Gerwick, William H.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.; Martins, Rosário

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are widely recognized as a valuable source of bioactive metabolites. The majority of such compounds have been isolated from so-called complex cyanobacteria, such as filamentous or colonial forms, which usually display a larger number of biosynthetic gene clusters in their genomes, when compared to free-living unicellular forms. Nevertheless, picocyanobacteria are also known to have potential to produce bioactive natural products. Here, we report the isolation of hierridin B from the marine picocyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. LEGE 06113. This compound had previously been isolated from the filamentous epiphytic cyanobacterium Phormidium ectocarpi SAG 60.90, and had been shown to possess antiplasmodial activity. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from both strains confirmed that these cyanobacteria derive from different evolutionary lineages. We further investigated the biological activity of hierridin B, and tested its cytotoxicity towards a panel of human cancer cell lines; it showed selective cytotoxicity towards HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:23922738

  7. Oseltamivir-resistant pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection in England and Scotland, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Laurence; Lackenby, Angie; Reynolds, Arlene; McMenamin, Jim; Phin, Nick F; Zambon, Maria; Pebody, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Oseltamivir has been widely used for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection, and by April 30, 2010, a total of 285 resistant cases were reported worldwide, including 45 in the United Kingdom. To determine risk factors for emergence of oseltamivir resistance and severe infection, a case-control study was conducted in the United Kingdom. Study participants were hospitalized in England or Scotland during January 4, 2009-April 30, 2010. Controls had confirmed oseltamivir-sensitive pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infections, and case-patients had confirmed oseltamivir-resistant infections. Of 28 case-patients with available information, 21 (75%) were immunocompromised; 31 of 33 case-patients (94%) received antiviral drugs before a sample was obtained. After adjusting for confounders, case-patients remained significantly more likely than controls to be immunocompromised and at higher risk for showing development of respiratory complications. Selective drug pressure likely explains the development of oseltamivir resistance, especially among immunocompromised patients. Monitoring of antiviral resistance is strongly recommended in this group. PMID:22000349

  8. Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Infection in England and Scotland, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Lackenby, Angie; Reynolds, Arlene; McMenamin, Jim; Phin, Nick F.; Zambon, Maria C.; Pebody, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Oseltamivir has been widely used for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection, and by April 30, 2010, a total of 285 resistant cases were reported worldwide, including 45 in the United Kingdom. To determine risk factors for emergence of oseltamivir resistance and severe infection, a case–control study was conducted in the United Kingdom. Study participants were hospitalized in England or Scotland during January 4, 2009–April 30, 2010. Controls had confirmed oseltamivir-sensitive pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infections, and case-patients had confirmed oseltamivir-resistant infections. Of 28 case-patients with available information, 21 (75%) were immunocompromised; 31 of 33 case-patients (94%) received antiviral drugs before a sample was obtained. After adjusting for confounders, case-patients remained significantly more likely than controls to be immunocompromised and at higher risk for showing development of respiratory complications. Selective drug pressure likely explains the development of oseltamivir resistance, especially among immunocompromised patients. Monitoring of antiviral resistance is strongly recommended in this group. PMID:22000349

  9. Equity in the Receipt of Oseltamivir in the United States During the H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Niteesh K.; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Brill, Gregory; Matlin, Olga S.; Fischer, Michael A.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Avorn, Jerry; Brennan, Troyen A.; Shrank, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the relationship between individual characteristics and receipt of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in the United States during the H1N1 pandemic and other flu seasons. Methods. In a cohort of individuals enrolled in pharmacy benefit plans, we used a multivariate logistic regression model to measure associations between subscriber characteristics and filling a prescription for oseltamivir during 3 flu seasons (October 2006–May 2007, October 2007–May 2008, and October 2008–May 2010). In 19 states with county-level influenza rates reported, we controlled for disease burden. Results. Approximately 56 million subscribers throughout the United States were included in 1 or more study periods. During pandemic flu, beneficiaries in the highest income category had 97% greater odds of receiving oseltamivir than those in the lowest category (P < .001). After we controlled for disease burden, subscribers in the 2 highest income categories had 2.18 and 1.72 times the odds of receiving oseltamivir compared with those in the lowest category (P < .001 for both). Conclusions. Income was a stronger predictor of oseltamivir receipt than prevalence of influenza. These findings corroborate concerns about equity of treatment in pandemics, and they call for improved approaches to distributing potentially life-saving treatments. PMID:24825206

  10. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the "secondary compound hypothesis" and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  11. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. PMID:26688290

  12. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    PubMed Central

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  13. Observation of an Unusual Electronically Distorted Semiquinone Radical of PCB Metabolites in the Active Site of Prostaglandin H Synthase-2

    PubMed Central

    Wangpradit, Orarat; Moman, Edelmiro; Nolan, Kevin B.; Buettner, Garry R.; Robertson, Larry W.; Luthe, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    The activation of the metabolites of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into highly reactive radicals is of fundamental importance. We found that human recombinant prostaglandin H synthase-2 (hPGHS-2) biotransforms dihydroxy-PCBs, such as 4-chlorobiphenyl-2′,5′-hydroquinone (4-CB-2′,5′H2Q), into semiquinone radicals via one-electron oxidation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we observed the formation of the symmetric quartet spectrum (1:3:3:1 by area) of 4-chlorobiphenyl-2′,5′-semiquinone radical (4-CB-2′,5′-SQ•−) from 4-CB-2′,5′H2Q. This spectrum changed to an asymmetric spectrum with time: the change can be explained as the overlap of two different semiquinone radical species. Hindered rotation of the 4-CB-2′,5′-SQ•− appears not to be a major factor for the change in lineshape because increasing the viscosity of the medium with glycerol produced no significant change in lineshape. Introduction of a fluorine, which increases the steric hindrance for rotation of the dihydroxy-PCB studied, also produced no significant changes. An in silico molecular docking model of 4-CB-2′,5′H2Q in the peroxidase site of hPGHS-2 together with ab initio quantum mechanical studies indicate that the close proximity of a negatively charged carboxylic acid in the peroxidase active site may be responsible for the observed perturbation in the spectrum. This study provides new insights into the formation of semiquinones from PCB metabolites and underscores the potential role of PGHS-2 in the metabolic activation of PCBs. PMID:20843536

  14. Effects of the microbial secondary metabolite benzothiazole on the nutritional physiology and enzyme activities of Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunhe; Xu, Chunmei; Wang, Qiuhong; Wei, Yan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shuangyu; Zhang, Zhengqun; Mu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae) is the major pest that damages Chinese chive production. As a volatile compound derived from microbial secondary metabolites, benzothiazole has been determined to possess fumigant activity against B. odoriphaga. However, the mechanism of action of benzothiazole is not well understood. In the present study, fourth-instar larvae of B. odoriphaga were exposed to LC10 and LC30 of benzothiazole. Sublethal concentrations (LC10 and LC30) of benzothiazole significantly reduced the food consumption of the larvae on the second day after treatment (2 DAT). However, there were no significant changes in pupal weight among the different treatments. We also measured the protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and trehalose contents and the digestive enzyme activities of the larvae, and the results suggest that benzothiazole reduced the nutrient accumulation and decreased the digestive enzyme activities of B. odoriphaga. In addition, the activity of glutathione S-transferase was significantly decreased at 6h after treatment with benzothiazole, whereas general esterase activities were significantly increased at 6 and 24h after treatment. The results of this study indicate that benzothiazole interferes in the normal food consumption and digestion process by decreasing the activities of digestive enzymes. These results provide valuable information for understanding the toxicity of benzothiazole and for exploring volatile compound for the control of this pest. PMID:27017881

  15. Histopathology, enzyme activities, and PAH metabolites in English sole collected near coastal pulp mills

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The bottom-feeding flatfish, English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus), is widely distributed along the B.C. Pacific coast and fulfills a majority of the requirements as a sentinel species for environmental effects monitoring programs. Studies involving the use of histopathological, biochemical, and chemical tools with English sole collected near the vicinity of B.C. pulp mills are currently being conducted. Analysis, to date, has revealed idiopathic liver lesions to be strongly dependent on location of capture with a prevalence of 30% preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions found in fish collected near pulp mills. All fish residing near pulp mills show hepatocellular hemosiderosis, an iron storage disorder. The mixed-function oxidizing enzyme, EROD, was found to be induced in fish collected near pulp mills. However, the levels of conjugating enzymes, GST and UDP-GT, were found to be unchanged when compared with reference fish. PAH metabolites, measured as FACs in bile, are also present in English sole collected from the mill sites and the conjugated derivatives are presently being identified by HPLC/ES-MS techniques, The relationships between these observations will be discussed.

  16. mu Opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation by heroin metabolites: evidence for greater efficacy of 6-monoacetylmorphine compared with morphine.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Cao, C C; Sexton, T; Schwegel, J A; Martin, T J; Childers, S R

    2001-08-15

    The efficacy of heroin metabolites for the stimulation of mu opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation was investigated using agonist-stimulated [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding. In rat thalamic membranes, heroin and its primary metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), were more efficacious than morphine or morphine-6-beta D-glucuronide. This increased efficacy was not due to increased action of heroin and 6-MAM at delta receptors, as determined by competitive antagonism by naloxone, lack of antagonism by naltrindole, and competitive partial antagonism with morphine. In agreement with this interpretation, the same relative efficacy profile of heroin and its metabolites was observed at the cloned human mu opioid receptor expressed in C6 glioma cells. Moreover, these efficacy differences were GDP-dependent in a manner consistent with accepted mechanisms of receptor-mediated G-protein activation. The activity of heroin was attributed to in vitro deacetylation to 6-MAM, as confirmed by HPLC analysis. These results indicate that the heroin metabolite 6-MAM possesses higher efficacy than other heroin metabolites at mu opioid receptors, which may contribute to the higher efficacy of heroin compared with morphine in certain behavioral paradigms in vivo. PMID:11448454

  17. Epistatic interactions between neuraminidase mutations facilitated the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Bahl, Justin; Zaraket, Hassan; Baranovich, Tatiana; Seiler, Patrick; Prevost, Kristi; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y neuraminidase mutation predominated worldwide during the 2007–2009 seasons. While several neuraminidase substitutions were found to be necessary to counteract the adverse effects of H275Y, the order and impact of evolutionary events involved remain elusive. Here, we reconstruct H1N1 neuraminidase phylogeny during 1999–2009, estimate the timing and order of crucial amino acid changes, and evaluate their impact on the biological outcome of the H275Y mutation. Of the twelve neuraminidase substitutions that occurred during 1999–2009, five (chronologically, V234M, R222Q, K329E, D344N, H275Y, and D354G) are necessary for maintaining full neuraminidase function in the presence of the H275Y mutation by altering protein accumulation or enzyme affinity/activity. The sequential emergence and cumulative effects of these mutations clearly illustrate a role for epistasis in shaping the emergence and subsequent evolution of a drug-resistant virus population, which can be useful in understanding emergence of novel viral phenotypes of influenza. PMID:25297528

  18. Kinetic Study of the Alkaline Degradation of Oseltamivir Phosphate and Valacyclovir Hydrochloride using Validated Stability Indicating HPLC.

    PubMed

    Al-Bagary, Ramzia I; El-Zaher, Asmaa A; Morsy, Fahima A; Fouad, Mai M

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline degradation was performed for oseltamivir phosphate (OP) and valacyclovir hydrochloride (VA). Isocratic stability indicating the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was presented for each drug in the presence of its degradation product. The separations were performed using the Nucleosil ODS column and a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer (pH = 7), acetonitrile, and methanol 50:25:25 (v/v/v) for OP. For VA separation, a Nucleosil CN column using phosphate buffer (pH = 7) and methanol 85:15 (v/v) was used as a mobile phase. Ultraviolet detection at 210 nm and 254 nm was used for OP and VA, respectively. The method showed high sensitivity concerning linearity, accuracy, and precision over the range 1-250 μg mL(-1) for both drugs. The proposed method was used to determine the drug in its pharmaceutical formulation and to investigate the degradation kinetics of each drug's alkaline-stressed samples. The reactions were found to follow a first-order reaction. The activation energy could also be estimated. International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines were adopted for method validation. PMID:24932100

  19. Development and validation of a rapid HPLC method for the determination of oseltamivir phosphate in Tamiflu and generic versions.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Charles, J; Geneste, C; Laborde-Kummer, E; Gheyouche, R; Boudis, H; Dubost, J-P

    2007-08-15

    Oseltamivir phosphate (OP) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of both influenza A and influenza B. It is effective against all known influenza viruses than can infect humans, including pandemic influenza viruses and may be the most appropriate antiviral option against avian influenza caused by H5N1 virus. Tamiflu, the registered trademark used under exclusive license by Roche laboratories with OP as active pharmaceutical ingredient, is considered the best treatment for the bird flu disease. A simple, selective, linear, accurate and precise HPLC method was developed and validated for rapid assay of OP aimed to the quality control of Tamiflu capsules and generic versions. Isocratic elution at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min was employed on a Zorbax CN column (150 mm x 4.6mm; 5 microm) at ambient temperature. The mobile phase consisted of methanol and 0.04 M formic acid pH 3.0 (50:50, v/v). The UV detection wavelength was 226 nm and 20 microL of sample was injected. Sotalol hydrochloride was used as the internal standard (IS). The retention times for OP and IS were 3.40 and 2.25 min, respectively. The method was successfully applied to commercial pharmaceuticals, Tamiflu and generic versions. The proposed method could be applicable for routine analysis of OP and monitoring of the quality of marketed drugs as possibly counterfeit Tamiflu. PMID:17512688

  20. Dual resistance to adamantanes and oseltamivir among seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses: 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Tiffany G; Fry, Alicia M; Garten, Rebecca J; Deyde, Varough M; Shwe, Thein; Bullion, Lesley; Peebles, Patrick J; Li, Yan; Klimov, Alexander I; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct genetic clades of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses have cocirculated in the recent seasons: clade 2B oseltamivir-resistant and adamantane-susceptible viruses, and clade 2C viruses that are resistant to adamantanes and susceptible to oseltamivir. We tested seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses collected in 2008-2010 from the United States and globally for resistance to antivirals approved by the Food and Drug Administration. We report 28 viruses with both adamantane and oseltamivir (dual) resistance from 5 countries belonging to 4 distinct genotypes. Because of limited options for antiviral treatment, emergence of dual-resistant influenza viruses poses a public health concern, and their circulation needs to be closely monitored. PMID:21148491

  1. Dual Resistance to Adamantanes and Oseltamivir Among Seasonal Influenza A(H1N1) Viruses: 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Tiffany G.; Fry, Alicia M.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Deyde, Varough M.; Shwe, Thein; Bullion, Lesley; Peebles, Patrick J.; Li, Yan; Klimov, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct genetic clades of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses have cocirculated in the recent seasons: clade 2B oseltamivir-resistant and adamantane-susceptible viruses, and clade 2C viruses that are resistant to adamantanes and susceptible to oseltamivir. We tested seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses collected in 2008-2010 from the United States and globally for resistance to antivirals approved by the Food and Drug Administration. We report 28 viruses with both adamantane and oseltamivir (dual) resistance from 5 countries belonging to 4 distinct genotypes. Because of limited options for antiviral treatment, emergence of dual-resistant influenza viruses poses a public health concern, and their circulation needs to be closely monitored. PMID:21148491

  2. Thuringiensin: A Thermostable Secondary Metabolite from Bacillus thuringiensis with Insecticidal Activity against a Wide Range of Insects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Li, Lin; Sun, Ming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Thuringiensin (Thu), also known as β-exotoxin, is a thermostable secondary metabolite secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis. It has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects, including species belonging to the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Isoptera, and several nematode species. The chemical formula of Thu is C22H32O19N5P, and it is composed of adenosine, glucose, phosphoric acid, and gluconic diacid. In contrast to the more frequently studied insecticidal crystal protein, Thu is not a protein but a small molecule oligosaccharide. In this review, a detailed and updated description of the characteristics, structure, insecticidal mechanism, separation and purification technology, and genetic determinants of Thu is provided. PMID:25068925

  3. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of oral amitriptyline and its active metabolite nortriptyline in fed and fasted Greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; KuKanich, B

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of oral amitriptyline and its active metabolite nortriptyline in Greyhound dogs. Five healthy Greyhound dogs were enrolled in a randomized crossover design. A single oral dose of amitriptyline hydrochloride (actual mean dose 8.1 per kg) was administered to fasted or fed dogs. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma drug concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Two dogs in the fasted group vomited following amitriptyline administration and were excluded from analysis. The range of amitriptyline CMAX for the remaining fasted dogs (n = 3) was 22.8-64.5 ng/mL compared to 30.6-127 ng/mL for the fed dogs (n = 5). The range of the amitriptyline AUCINF for the three fasted dogs was 167-720 h·ng/mL compared to 287-1146 h·ng/mL for fed dogs. The relative bioavailability of amitriptyline in fasted dogs compared to fed dogs was 69-91% (n = 3). The exposure of the active metabolite nortriptyline was correlated to amitriptyline exposure (R(2)  = 0.84). Due to pharmacokinetic variability and the small number of dogs completing this study, further studies are needed assessing the impact of feeding on oral amitriptyline pharmacokinetics. Amitriptyline may be more likely to cause vomiting in fasted dogs. PMID:25989225

  4. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety. PMID:27250800

  5. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  6. Comparable Fitness and Transmissibility between Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic 2009 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses with the H275Y Neuraminidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Diana D. Y.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Sia, Sin Fun; Chiu, Hsin-Ping; Cheung, Peter P. H.; Chan, Michael C. W.

    2012-01-01

    Limited antiviral compounds are available for the control of influenza, and the emergence of resistant variants would further narrow the options for defense. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir carboxylate, has been identified among the seasonal H1N1 and 2009 pandemic influenza viruses; however, those H275Y resistant variants demonstrated distinct epidemiological outcomes in humans. Specifically, dominance of the H275Y variant over the oseltamivir-sensitive viruses was only reported for a seasonal H1N1 variant during 2008-2009. Here, we systematically analyze the effect of the H275Y NA mutation on viral fitness and transmissibility of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses. The NA genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 A/California/04/09 (CA04), seasonal H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NewCal), and A/Brisbane/59/2007 (Brisbane) were individually introduced into the genetic background of CA04. The H275Y mutation led to reduced NA enzyme activity, an increased Km for 3′-sialylactose or 6′-sialylactose, and decreased infectivity in mucin-secreting human airway epithelial cells compared to the oseltamivir-sensitive wild-type counterparts. Attenuated pathogenicity in both RG-CA04NA-H275Y and RG-CA04 × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses was observed in ferrets compared to RG-CA04 virus, although the transmissibility was minimally affected. In parallel experiments using recombinant Brisbane viruses differing by hemagglutinin and NA, comparable direct contact and respiratory droplet transmissibilities were observed among RG-NewCalHA,NA, RG-NewCalHA,NA-H275Y, RG-BrisbaneHA,NA-H275Y, and RG-NewCalHA × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses. Our results demonstrate that, despite the H275Y mutation leading to a minor reduction in viral fitness, the transmission potentials of three different antigenic strains carrying this mutation were comparable in the naïve ferret model. PMID:22811535

  7. In silico Identification of Ergosterol as a Novel Fungal Metabolite Enhancing RuBisCO Activity in Lycopersicum esculentum.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Joyeeta; Narad, Priyanka; Sengupta, Abhishek; Sharma, P D; Paul, P K

    2016-09-01

    RuBisCO (EC 4.1.1.39), a key enzyme found in stroma of chloroplast, is important for fixing atmospheric CO2 in plants. Alterations in the activity of RuBisCO could influence photosynthetic yield. Therefore, to understand the activity of the protein, knowledge about its structure is pertinent. Though the structure of Nicotiana RuBisCO has been modeled, the structure of tomato RuBisCO is still unknown. RuBisCO extracted from chloroplasts of tomato leaves was subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF followed by Mascot Search. The protein sequence based on gene identification numbers was subjected to in silico model construction, characterization and docking studies. The primary structure analysis revealed that protein was stable, neutral, hydrophilic and has an acidic pI. The result though indicates a 90 % homology with other members of Solanaceae but differs from the structure of Arabidopsis RuBisCO. Different ligands were docked to assess the activity of RuBisCO against these metabolite components. Out of the number of modulators tested, ergosterol had the maximum affinity (E = -248.08) with RuBisCO. Ergosterol is a major cell wall component of fungi and has not been reported to be naturally found in plants. It is a known immune elicitor in plants. The current study throws light on its role in affecting RuBisCO activity in plants, thereby bringing changes in the photosynthetic rate. PMID:26253718

  8. Biopharmaceutical Characterization of Nebulized Antimicrobial Agents in Rats: 5. Oseltamivir Carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Galindo Bedor, Danilo Cesar; Marchand, Sandrine; Lamarche, Isabelle; Laroche, Julian; Pereira de Santana, Davi; Couet, William

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the biopharmaceutical characteristics of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) after pulmonary delivery. After OC bolus and intratracheal nebulization (NEB) in rats, blood was collected and bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) were performed. Epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations were estimated from BAL fluid. The area under the curve (AUC) ratio for ELF to plasma was 842 times higher after NEB than after intravenous (i.v.) administration, indicating that OC nebulization offers a biopharmaceutical advantage over i.v. administration. PMID:27297482

  9. Increasing oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors: a prodrug transporter approach applied to oseltamivir analogue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Varghese Gupta, Sheeba; Dahan, Arik; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-02-01

    Poor oral absorption is one of the limiting factors in utilizing the full potential of polar antiviral agents. The neuraminidase target site requires a polar chemical structure for high affinity binding, thus limiting oral efficacy of many high affinity ligands. The aim of this study was to overcome this poor oral absorption barrier, utilizing prodrug to target the apical brush border peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Guanidine oseltamivir carboxylate (GOCarb) is a highly active polar antiviral agent with insufficient oral bioavailability (4%) to be an effective therapeutic agent. In this report we utilize a carrier-mediated targeted prodrug approach to improve the oral absorption of GOCarb. Acyloxy(alkyl) ester based amino acid linked prodrugs were synthesized and evaluated as potential substrates of mucosal transporters, e.g., PEPT1. Prodrugs were also evaluated for their chemical and enzymatic stability. PEPT1 transport studies included [(3)H]Gly-Sar uptake inhibition in Caco-2 cells and cellular uptake experiments using HeLa cells overexpressing PEPT1. The intestinal membrane permeabilities of the selected prodrugs and the parent drug were then evaluated for epithelial cell transport across Caco-2 monolayers, and in the in situ rat intestinal jejunal perfusion model. Prodrugs exhibited a pH dependent stability with higher stability at acidic pHs. Significant inhibition of uptake (IC(50) <1 mM) was observed for l-valyl and l-isoleucyl amino acid prodrugs in competition experiments with [(3)H]Gly-Sar, indicating a 3-6 times higher affinity for PEPT1 compared to valacyclovir, a well-known PEPT1 substrate and >30-fold increase in affinity compared to GOCarb. The l-valyl prodrug exhibited significant enhancement of uptake in PEPT1/HeLa cells and compared favorably with the well-absorbed valacyclovir. Transepithelial permeability across Caco-2 monolayers showed that these amino acid prodrugs have a 2-5-fold increase in permeability as compared to the parent drug and

  10. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  11. PreQ0 base, an unusual metabolite with anti-cancer activity from Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongbo; Ma, Min; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Kexin; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2015-01-01

    PreQ0 base (7-cyano-7-deazaguanine, compound 1) is the biosynthetic precursor of queuosine-tRNA and important synthetic intermediate for bioactive compounds. It was obtained for the first time as a new natural product from a mangrove actinomycete Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205, during the course of searching for anti-cancer compounds from marine microbes. PreQ0 base showed anti-HeLa (IC50 = 62.0 μg/ml) and anti-HepG2 (IC50 = 80.6 μg/ml) activities, higher cytotoxicity than the positive control, fluorouracil. Furthermore, it exhibited weak α -glucosidase inhibitory activity, but no obvious antimicrobial and Aβ1-42 fibrillation inhibitory activities. In silico analysis of the genome of the strain 172205 revealed a putative biosynthetic gene cluster directing the biosynthesis of PreQ0 base. The gene cluster only contained three Open Reading Frames (ORFs), queC, queD and queE. The absence of the key gene queF encoding 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine reductase catalyzing PreQ0 base to PreQ1 base suggested that the strain only has the capacity of accumulation of PreQ0 base as a metabolite, consistent with our observation in chemical identification. PMID:25353335

  12. Activation of p53 with Ilimaquinone and Ethylsmenoquinone, Marine Sponge Metabolites, Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Chung, Kyu Jin; Hwang, In Hyun; Gwak, Jungsuk; Park, Seoyoung; Ju, Bong Gun; Yun, Eunju; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Na, MinKyun; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, p53, plays an essential role in the cellular response to stress through regulating the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we used a cell-based reporter system for the detection of p53 response transcription to identify the marine sponge metabolites, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, as activators of the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone efficiently stabilize the p53 protein through promotion of p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 in both HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Moreover, both compounds upregulate the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1, a p53-dependent gene, and suppress proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase-3 cleavage and the population of cells that positively stained with Annexin V-FITC, both of which are typical biochemical markers of apoptosis. Furthermore, autophagy was elicited by both compounds, as indicated by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta formations and LC3-II turnover in HCT116 cells. Our findings suggest that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone exert their anti-cancer activity by activation of the p53 pathway and may have significant potential as chemo-preventive and therapeutic agents for human colon cancer. PMID:25603347

  13. Microbial transformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ by Absidia coerulea and the reversal activity of the metabolites towards multi-drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Qiao, Lirui; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yi; Zou, Jianhua; Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Jungui

    2011-12-01

    Biotransformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ (1) by the fungus Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as ginsenoside-F₁ (2), 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (4), 3-oxo-7β-hydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 3-oxo-7β,15α-dihydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 could catalyze the specific C-3 dehydrogenation of derivatives of ginsenoside-Rg₁, as well as hydroxylation at the 7β and 15α positions. Metabolites 2, 4 and 5 exhibited moderate reversal activity towards A549/taxol MDR tumor cells in vitro. PMID:21946057

  14. Effects of licochalcon A on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its active metabolite, EXP-3174, in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, J S; Choi, J S; Choi, D H

    2013-11-01

    Losartan and licochalcon A interact with cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the increase in the use of health supplements may result in licochalcon A being taken concomitantly with losartan to treat or prevent cardiovascular diseases as a combination therapy. The effect of licochalcon A, a natural flavonoid, on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its active metabolite, EXP-3174, was investigated in rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters of losartan and EXP-3174 were determined after oral administration of losartan (9 mg/kg) to rats in the presence or absence of licochalcon A (0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg). The effect of licochalcon A on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) as well as CYP3A4 and 2C9 activities was also evaluated. Licochalcon A inhibited CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 enzyme activities with 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) of 2.0 and 0.1 microM, respectively. In addition, licochalcon A significantly enhanced the cellular accumulation of rhodamine-123 in a concentration-dependent manner in MCF-7/ADR cells overexpressing P-gp. The pharmacokinetic parameters of losartan were significantly altered by licochalcon A. Licochalcon A (2.5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg) increased AUC0-infinity of losartan by 33.4-63.2% and Cmax of losartan by 34.0-62.8%. The total body clearance (CL/F) was significantly decreased (2.5 mg/kg, p < 0.05; 10 mg/kg, p < 0.01) by licochalcon A. Consequently, the absolute bioavailability of losartan in the presence of licochalcon A increased significantly (2.5 mg/kg, p < 0.05; 10 mg/kg, p < 0.01) compared to that in the control group. The relative bioavailability (R.B.) of losartan was 1.15- to 1.63-fold greater than that of the control group. However, there was no significant change in Tmax and t1/2 of losartan in the presence of licochalcon A. Licochalcon A (10 mg/kg) increased the AUC0-infinity of EXP-3174 but this was not significant. Furthermore, concurrent use of licochalcon A (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the metabolite-parent AUC ratio (M

  15. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mariana P C; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E; Custódio, José B A

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. PMID:24240127

  16. Antioxidant activity and metabolite profile of quercetion in vitamin E depleted rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary antioxidants interact in a dynamic fashion, including recycling and sparing one another, to decrease oxidative stress. Limited information is available regarding the interrelationships in vivo between quercetin and vitamin E. We investigated the antioxidant activity and metabolism of querc...

  17. Identification of oseltamivir resistance among pandemic and seasonal influenza A (H1N1) viruses by an His275Tyr genotyping assay using the cycling probe method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Saito, Reiko; Sato, Isamu; Zaraket, Hassan; Nishikawa, Makoto; Tamura, Tsutomu; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Takako; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors are agents used against influenza viruses; however, the emergence of drug-resistant strains is a major concern. Recently, the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus increased globally and the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses was reported. In this study, we developed a cycling probe real-time PCR method for the detection of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) and pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses. We designed two sets of primers and probes that were labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein or 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that correspond to a histidine and a tyrosine at position 275 in the neuraminidase protein, respectively. These SNPs confer susceptibility and resistance to oseltamivir, respectively. In the 2007-2008 season, the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses was 0% (0/72), but in the 2008-2009 season, it increased to 100% (282/282). In the 2009-2010 season, all of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses were susceptible to oseltamivir (0/73, 0%). This method is sensitive and specific for the screening of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) viruses. This method is applicable to routine laboratory-based monitoring of drug resistance and patient management during antiviral therapy. PMID:21084523

  18. Bench to Bed Evidences for Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions Involving Oseltamivir and Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qi; Wo, Siukwan; Ngai, Karry L. K.; Wang, Xiaoan; Fok, Benny; Ngan, Teresa M.; Wong, Vivian T.; Chan, Thomas Y. K.; Lee, Vincent H. L.; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chow, Moses S. S.; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir (OA), an ethyl ester prodrug of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is clinically used as a potent and selective inhibitor of neuraminidase. Chinese medicines have been advocated to combine with conventional drug for avian influenza. The current study aims to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of a Chinese medicine formula, namely, Yin Qiao San and Sang Ju Yin (CMF1), commonly used for anti-influenza in combination with OA in both rat and human, and to reveal the underlined mechanisms. It was found that although Cmax, AUC and urinary recovery of OC, as well as metabolic ratio (AUCOC/AUCOA), were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner following combination use of CMF1 and OA in rat studies (P < 0.01), such coadministration in 14 healthy volunteers only resulted in a trend of minor decrease in the related parameters. Further mechanistic studies found that although CMF1 could reduce absorption and metabolism of OA, it appears to enhance viral inhibition of OA (P < 0.01). In summary, although there was potential interaction between OA and CMF1 found in rat studies, its clinical impact was expected to be minimal. The coadministration of OA and CMF1 at the clinical recommended dosages is, therefore, considered to be safe. PMID:24527044

  19. Structure-dependent activities of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hydroxylated metabolites on zebrafish retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Xiangwei; Xu, Ting; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a group of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been shown to disrupt retinoid homeostasis in different species in both laboratory and field studies. However, the molecular mechanisms of interactions with the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) are not fully understood. Zebrafish have proven useful for investigating mechanisms of chemical toxicity. In the present study, a reporter gene assay was used to investigate the activities of 11 PBDEs and six OH-PBDEs with different degrees of bromination on zebrafish RAR. All tested OH-PBDEs induced RAR transcriptional activity; however, of the 11 PBDEs examined, only BDE28 and BDE154 affected the RAR transcriptional activity. Homology modeling and molecular docking were employed to simulate the interactions of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs with zebrafish RARs and to identify binding affinities to analyze the specialization of the interaction between RARs and PBDEs/OH-PBDEs. The results showed that although these compounds could bind with RARs, the effects of PBDEs/OH-PBDEs on RAR transcriptional activity did not depend on their RAR-binding abilities. The present study is the first attempt to demonstrate that OH-PBDEs could induce RAR transcriptional activity by binding directly with RAR; these effects are possibly related to the structure of the compounds, especially their hydroxylation and bromination. Most of the PBDEs could not directly interact with the RAR. PMID:25077655

  20. Prostaglandin D2 metabolites as a biomarker of in vivo mast cell activation in systemic mastocytosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Catherine; Nguyen, Anna; Bryant, Katherine J; O'Neill, Sean G; McNeil, H Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) participate in diseases such as systemic mastocytosis (SM) and allergic conditions. Less well understood is the role of MCs in non-allergic inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Studying definitive roles for MCs in human diseases has been hampered by the lack of a well-accepted biomarker for monitoring in vivo MC activation. This study aimed to investigate the utility of urinary tetranor PGDM (T-PGDM) as a biomarker of in vivo MC activation in patients with SM, and apply this biomarker to assess MC involvement in relation to RA disease activity. A prospective, cross-sectional cohort study was conducted to measure a major urinary metabolite of prostaglandin D2, T-PGDM. Urine samples were collected from patients with RA (n = 60), SM (n = 17) and healthy normal controls (n = 16) and T-PGDM excretion was determined by enzyme immunoassay as nanograms per milligram of urinary creatinine (ng/mg Cr). Mean urinary T-PGDM excretion was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in patients with SM compared to controls (37.2 vs. 11.5 ng/mg Cr) with 65% of SM patients showing elevated levels. One third of patients with RA had elevated T-PGDM excretion, and the mean level in the RA group (20.0 ng/mg Cr) was significantly higher than controls (p < 0.01). Medications inhibiting cyclooxygenase reduced T-PGDM excretion. Urinary T-PGDM excretion appears promising as a biomarker of in vivo MC activity and elevated levels in 33% of patients with RA provides evidence of MC activation in this disease. PMID:27042302

  1. Lack of metabolic activation and predominant formation of an excreted metabolite of nontoxic platynecine-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jianqing; Liao, Cangsong; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-21

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) poisoning is well-known because of the intake of PA-containing plant-derived natural products and PA-contaminated foodstuffs. Based on different structures of the necine bases, PAs are classified into three types: retronecine, otonecine, and platynecine type. The former two type PAs possessing an unsaturated necine base with a 1,2-double bond are hepatotoxic due to the P450-mediated metabolic activation to generate reactive pyrrolic ester, which interacts with cellular macromolecules leading to toxicity. With a saturated necine base, platynecine-type PAs are reported to be nontoxic and their nontoxicity was hypothesized to be due to the absence of metabolic activation; however, the metabolic pathway responsible for their nontoxic nature is largely unknown. In the present study, to prove the absence of metabolic activation in nontoxic platynecine-type PAs, hepatic metabolism of platyphylline (PLA), a representative platynecine-type PA, was investigated and directly compared with the representatives of two toxic types of PAs in parallel. By determining the pyrrolic ester-derived glutathione conjugate, our results confirmed that the major metabolic pathway of PLA did not lead to formation of the reactive pyrrolic ester. More interestingly, having a metabolic rate similar to that of toxic PAs, PLA also underwent oxidative metabolisms mediated by P450s, especially P450 3A4, the same enzyme that catalyzes metabolic activation of two toxic types of PAs. However, the predominant oxidative dehydrogenation pathway of PLA formed a novel metabolite, dehydroplatyphylline carboxylic acid, which was water-soluble, readily excreted, and could not interact with cellular macromolecules. In conclusion, our study confirmed that the saturated necine bases determine the absence of metabolic activation and thus govern the metabolic pathway responsible for the nontoxic nature of platynecine-type PAs. PMID:24308637

  2. Fumigaclavine C, an fungal metabolite, improves experimental colitis in mice via downregulating Th1 cytokine production and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Fei, Ming-Jian; Shu, Ren-Geng; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Xu, Qiang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on experimental colitis was examined. Fumigaclavine C, when administered intraperitoneally once a day, significantly reduced the weight loss and mortality rate of mice with experimental colitis induced by intrarectally injection of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). This compound also markedly alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic appearances of colitis. Furthermore, Fumigaclavine C, given both in vivo and in vitro, showed a marked inhibition on the expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-12alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha as well as MMP-9 in sacral lymph node cells, colonic patch lymphocytes and colitis tissues from the TNBS colitis mice. Meanwhile, the compound caused a dose-dependent reduction in IL-2 and IFN-gamma from the lymphocytes at the protein level and MMP-9 activity. These results suggest that Fumigaclavine C may alleviate experimental colitis mainly via down-regulating the production of Th1 cytokines and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase. PMID:16023606

  3. Effects of Metabolites Produced from (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate by Rat Intestinal Bacteria on Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Activity and Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2015-09-23

    Inhibitory activity of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was examined with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) metabolites produced by intestinal bacteria, together with tea catechins. All of the metabolites showed ACE inhibitory activities and the order of IC50 was hydroxyphenyl valeric acids > 5-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (1) > trihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ dihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (2). Among the catechins, galloylated catechins exhibited stronger ACE inhibitory activity than nongalloylated catechins. Furthermore, the effects of a single oral intake of metabolites 1 and 2 on systolic blood pressure (SBP) were examined with spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Significant decreases in SBP were observed between 2 h after oral administration of 1 (150 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.002) and between 4 h after administration of 2 (200 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.044). These results suggest that the two metabolites have hypotensive effects in vivo. PMID:26323573

  4. Structure of neprilysin in complex with the active metabolite of sacubitril

    PubMed Central

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D’Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Ramage, Paul; Logel, Claude; Cumin, Frederic; Ksander, Gary M.; Wiesmann, Christian; Karki, Rajeshri G.; Mogi, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril is an ethyl ester prodrug of LBQ657, the active neprilysin (NEP) inhibitor, and a component of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan). We report herein the three-dimensional structure of LBQ657 in complex with human NEP at 2 Å resolution. The crystal structure unravels the binding mode of the compound occupying the S1, S1’ and S2’ sub-pockets of the active site, consistent with a competitive inhibition mode. An induced fit conformational change upon binding of the P1’-biphenyl moiety of the inhibitor suggests an explanation for its selectivity against structurally homologous zinc metallopeptidases. PMID:27302413

  5. Structure of neprilysin in complex with the active metabolite of sacubitril.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Ramage, Paul; Logel, Claude; Cumin, Frederic; Ksander, Gary M; Wiesmann, Christian; Karki, Rajeshri G; Mogi, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril is an ethyl ester prodrug of LBQ657, the active neprilysin (NEP) inhibitor, and a component of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan). We report herein the three-dimensional structure of LBQ657 in complex with human NEP at 2 Å resolution. The crystal structure unravels the binding mode of the compound occupying the S1, S1' and S2' sub-pockets of the active site, consistent with a competitive inhibition mode. An induced fit conformational change upon binding of the P1'-biphenyl moiety of the inhibitor suggests an explanation for its selectivity against structurally homologous zinc metallopeptidases. PMID:27302413

  6. Cytotoxic activities of ethyl acetate extract and a metabolite from a Monocillium species.

    PubMed

    Khondkar, Proma; Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Islam, Anwarul

    2005-09-01

    The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of a cultural broth of a Monocillium species afforded the isolation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Both the extract and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural showed significant cytotoxic activities in a brine shrimp bioassay and the LC(50) values were found to be 14.96 microg/mL and 23.71 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:16220580

  7. Total synthesis of the cyanobacterial metabolite nostodione A: discovery of its antiparasitic activity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    McNulty, J; Keskar, K; Bordón, C; Yolken, R; Jones-Brando, L

    2014-08-18

    A total synthesis of the cyanobacterial natural product nostodione A is reported involving a convergent, diversity-oriented route. A small assemblage of structural analogues were prepared and their cytotoxicity and anti-invasion activity against the protozoal parasite Toxoplasma gondii is reported for the first time. PMID:24970332

  8. Salicylate, diflunisal and their metabolites inhibit CBP/p300 and exhibit anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Maksimoska, Jasna; Sorum, Alexander W; Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Intelly S; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Newman, John C; Schröder, Sebastian; Ott, Melanie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meier, Jordan; Nimer, Stephen; Verdin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid are potent and widely used anti-inflammatory drugs. They are thought to exert their therapeutic effects through multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases, modulation of NF-κB activity, and direct activation of AMPK. However, the full spectrum of their activities is incompletely understood. Here we show that salicylate specifically inhibits CBP and p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity in vitro by direct competition with acetyl-Coenzyme A at the catalytic site. We used a chemical structure-similarity search to identify another anti-inflammatory drug, diflunisal, that inhibits p300 more potently than salicylate. At concentrations attainable in human plasma after oral administration, both salicylate and diflunisal blocked the acetylation of lysine residues on histone and non-histone proteins in cells. Finally, we found that diflunisal suppressed the growth of p300-dependent leukemia cell lines expressing AML1-ETO fusion protein in vitro and in vivo. These results highlight a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of action for salicylate and derivative drugs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11156.001 PMID:27244239

  9. Salicylate, diflunisal and their metabolites inhibit CBP/p300 and exhibit anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Maksimoska, Jasna; Sorum, Alexander W; Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Intelly S; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Newman, John C; Schröder, Sebastian; Ott, Melanie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meier, Jordan; Nimer, Stephen; Verdin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid are potent and widely used anti-inflammatory drugs. They are thought to exert their therapeutic effects through multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases, modulation of NF-κB activity, and direct activation of AMPK. However, the full spectrum of their activities is incompletely understood. Here we show that salicylate specifically inhibits CBP and p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity in vitro by direct competition with acetyl-Coenzyme A at the catalytic site. We used a chemical structure-similarity search to identify another anti-inflammatory drug, diflunisal, that inhibits p300 more potently than salicylate. At concentrations attainable in human plasma after oral administration, both salicylate and diflunisal blocked the acetylation of lysine residues on histone and non-histone proteins in cells. Finally, we found that diflunisal suppressed the growth of p300-dependent leukemia cell lines expressing AML1-ETO fusion protein in vitro and in vivo. These results highlight a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of action for salicylate and derivative drugs. PMID:27244239

  10. In vitro biological activity of secondary metabolites from Seseli rigidum Waldst. et Kit. (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Dragana; Vasić, Sava; Stanković, Milan; Čomić, Ljiljana; Topuzović, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The antioxidant, antimicrobial activity, total phenolic content and flavonoid concentration of Seseli rigidum Waldst. et Kit. were evaluated. Five different extracts of the aboveground plant parts were obtained by extraction with distilled water, methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. Total phenols were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent, with the highest values obtained in the acetone extract (102.13 mg GAE/g). The concentration of flavonoids, determined by using a spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and expressed in terms of rutin equivalent, was also highest in the acetone extracts (291.58 mg RUE/g). The antioxidant activity was determined in vitro using DPPH reagent. The greatest antioxidant activity was expressed in the aqueous extract (46.15 μg/ml). In vitro antimicrobial activities were determined using a microdilution analysis method; minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) were determined. Methanolic extract had the greatest influence on bacilli (MIC at 0.0391 mg/ml), but the best antimicrobial effect had acetone and ethyl acetate extracts considering their broad impact on bacteria. According to our research, S. rigidum can be regarded as promising candidate for natural plant source with high value of biological compounds. PMID:26616372

  11. Antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of extracts and secondary metabolites from Acacia cyanophylla

    PubMed Central

    Ghribia, Lotfi; Ghouilaa, Hatem; Omrib, Amel; Besbesb, Malek; Janneta, Hichem Ben

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antioxidant potential and anti-acetycholinesterase activity of compounds and extracts from Acacia cyanophylla (A. cyanophylla). Methods Three polyphenolic compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate extract of A. cyanophylla flowers. They have been identified as isosalipurposide 1, quercetin 2 and naringenin 3. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as ES-MS. The prepared extracts and the isolated compounds 1-3 were tested for their antioxidant activity using 1′-1′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) scavenging assays and reducing power. They have been also investigated for inhibitory effect against acetylcholinesterase using the microplate assay. Results In the DPPH test, the EtOAc extract of flowers exhibited the highest antioxidant effect (67.26 µg/mL). Isosalipurposide 1 showed a significant antiradical power against DPPH (81.9 µg/mL). All extracts showed a dose-dependent acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In terms of the IC50 value, the butanolic extract (16.03 µg/mL) was the most potent sample. Isosalipurposide 1 was found to be active against AChE with an IC50 value of 52.04 µg/mL. Conclusions The results demonstrated the important antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of pure compounds and extracts from A. cyanophylla. PMID:25183120

  12. Non-invasive monitoring of adrenocortical activity in captive African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) by measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ozella, L; Anfossi, L; Di Nardo, F; Pessani, D

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) has become a useful and widely-accepted method for the non-invasive evaluation of stress in vertebrates. In this study we assessed the adrenocortical activity of five captive African Penguins (Spheniscus demersus) by means of FGM evaluation following a biological stressor, i.e. capture and immobilization. In addition, we detected individual differences in secretion of FGMs during a stage of the normal biological cycle of penguins, namely the breeding period, without any external or induced causes of stress. Our results showed that FGM concentrations peaked 5.5-8h after the induced stress in all birds, and significantly decreased within 30 h. As predictable, the highest peak of FGMs (6591 ng/g) was reached by the youngest penguin, which was at its first experience with the stressor. This peak was 1.8-2.7-fold higher compared to those of the other animals habituated to the stimulus. For the breeding period, our results revealed that the increase in FGMs compared to ordinary levels, and the peaks of FGMs, varied widely depending on the age and mainly on the reproductive state of the animal. The bird which showed the lowest peak (2518 ng/g) was an old male that was not in a reproductive state at the time of the study. Higher FGM increases and peaks were reached by the two birds which were brooding (male: 5552%, 96,631 ng/g; female: 1438%, 22,846 ng/g) and by the youngest bird (1582%, 39,700 ng/g). The impact of the reproductive state on FGM levels was unexpected compared to that produced by the induced stress. The EIA used in this study to measure FGM levels proved to be a reliable tool for assessing individual and biologically-relevant changes in FGM concentrations in African Penguin. Moreover, this method allowed detection of physiological stress during the breeding period, and identification of individual differences in relation to the reproductive status. The increase in FGM levels as a response to capture and

  13. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL). Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1) from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S)-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2) from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3) from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4) from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:24962391

  14. Continued emergence and changing epidemiology of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus, United Kingdom, winter 2010/11.

    PubMed

    Lackenby, A; Moran Gilad, J; Pebody, R; Miah, S; Calatayud, L; Bolotin, S; Vipond, I; Muir, P; Guiver, M; McMenamin, J; Reynolds, A; Moore, C; Gunson, R; Thompson, C; Galiano, M; Bermingham, A; Ellis, J; Zambon, M

    2011-01-01

    During the winter period 2010/11 27 epidemiologically unlinked, confirmed cases of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus infection have been detected in multiple, geographically dispersed settings. Three of these cases were in community settings, with no known exposure to oseltamivir. This suggests possible onward transmission of resistant strains and could be an indication of a possibility of changing epidemiology of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus. PMID:21315056

  15. Theoretical studies on the susceptibility of oseltamivir against variants of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Youyong; Zhang, Liling; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-10-22

    The outbreak and high speed global spread of the new strain of influenza A/H1N1 virus in 2009 posed a serious threat to global health. It is more likely that drug-resistant influenza strains will arise after the extensive use of anti-influenza drugs. Consequently, the identification of the potential resistant sites for drugs in advance and the understanding of the corresponding molecular mechanisms that cause drug resistance are quite important in the design of new drug candidates with better potency to combat drug resistance. Here, we performed molecular simulations to evaluate the potency of oseltamivir to combat drug resistance caused by the mutations in 2009 A/H1N1 neuraminidase (NA). We examined three representative drug-resistant mutations in NA, consisting of H274Y, N294S, and Y252H. First, a theoretical structure of A/H1N1 NA in complex with oseltamivir was constructed using homology modeling. Then, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition were used to characterize the binding of oseltamivir with the wild type (WT) and three mutated NAs. Our predictions show that N294S and H274Y, two popular drug-resistant mutations in different variants of NA, still cause significant resistance to oseltamivir. However, the Y252H mutation does not impair the interactions between oseltamivir and A/H1N1 NA. An examination of individual energy components shows that the loss of polar interactions is the key source for the resistance of the studied mutations to oseltamivir. Moreover, free energy decomposition analysis and structural analysis reveal that the N294S or H274Y mutation triggers the large-scale conformational changes of the binding pocket and then impairs the affinity of oseltamivir. We expect that our results will be useful for the rational design of NA inhibitors with high potency against drug-resistant A/H1N1 mutants. PMID:22998323

  16. Estrogenic and androgenic activities of TBBA and TBMEPH, metabolites of novel brominated flame retardants, and selected bisphenols, using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay.

    PubMed

    Fic, Anja; Žegura, Bojana; Gramec, Darja; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated and compared the estrogenic and androgenic activities of the three different classes of environmental pollutants and their metabolites using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay, which has advantages compared with the original YES/YAS protocol. Contrary to the parent brominated flame retardants TBB and TBPH, which demonstrated no or very weak (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities, their metabolites, TBBA and TBMEPH, exhibited anti-estrogenic (IC50 for TBBA=31.75 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=0.265 μM) and anti-androgenic (IC50 for TBBA=73.95 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=2.92 μM) activities. These results reveal that metabolism can enhance the anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects of these two novel brominated flame retardants. Based on the activities of BPAF, BPF, BPA and MBP, we can conclude that the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay gives comparable results to the (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic assays that are reported in the literature. For BPA, it was confirmed previously that the metabolite formed after an ipso-reaction (hydroxycumyl alcohol) exhibited higher estrogenic activity compared with the parent BPA, but this was not confirmed for BPAF and BPF ipso-metabolites, which were not active in the XenoScreen YES/YAS assay. Among the substituted BPA analogues, bis-GMA exhibited weak anti-estrogenic activity, BADGE demonstrated weak anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities (IC50=13.73 μM), and the hydrolysed product BADGE·2H2O demonstrated no (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities. PMID:25048928

  17. Secondary metabolites from the unripe pulp of Persea americana and their antimycobacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Chen; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Peng, Chien-Fang; Lin, Chu-Hung; Chen, Ih-Sheng

    2012-12-15

    The fruits of Persea americana (Avocado) are nowadays used as healthy fruits in the world. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the active ethyl acetate soluble fraction has led to the isolation of five new fatty alcohol derivatives, avocadenols A-D (1-4) and avocadoin (5) from the unripe pulp of P. americana, along with 12 known compounds (6-17). These structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolates, avocadenol A (1), avocadenol B (2), (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxynonadecane (6), and (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxyheptadec-16-ene (7) showed antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(V)in vitro, with MIC values of 24.0, 33.8, 24.9, and 35.7 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:22980888

  18. The Effect of the Lunar Cycle on Fecal Cortisol Metabolite Levels and Foraging Ecology of Nocturnally and Diurnally Active Spiny Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Tamar; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage. PMID:21829733

  19. Secondary metabolites of Seseli rigidum: Chemical composition plus antioxidant, antimicrobial and cholinesterase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Stankov-Jovanović, V P; Ilić, M D; Mitić, V D; Mihajilov-Krstev, T M; Simonović, S R; Nikolić Mandić, S D; Tabet, J C; Cole, R B

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of different polarity obtained from various plant parts (root, leaf, flower and fruit) of Seseli rigidum were studied by different antioxidant assays: DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, by total reducing power method as well as via total content of flavonoids and polyphenols. Essential oils of all plant parts showed weak antioxidant characteristics. The inhibitory concentration range of the tested extracts, against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger was 0.01-1.50 mg/mL and of a microbicidal 0.02-3.00 mg/mL. In the interaction with cholinesterase, all essential oils proved effective as inhibitors. The highest percentage of inhibition versus human and horse cholinesterase was shown by root essential oil (38.20% and 48.30%, respectively) among oils, and root hexane extract (40.56% and 50.65% respectively). Essential oils and volatile components of all plant parts were identified by GC, GC-MS and headspace/GC-MS. Statistical analysis of the ensemble of results showed that the root essential oil composition differed significantly from essential oils of other parts of the plant. Taking into account all of the studied activities, the root hexane extract showed the best overall properties. By means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, the 30 most abundant constituents were identified in extracts of different polarity. The presence of identified constituents was linked to observed specific biological activities, thus designating compounds potentially responsible for each exhibited activity. PMID:25863020

  20. Complex secondary metabolites from Ludwigia leptocarpa with potent antibacterial and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Mabou, Florence Déclaire; Tamokou, Jean-de-Dieu; Ngnokam, David; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, Laurence; Kuiate, Jules-Roger; Bag, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea continues to be one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among infants and children in developing countries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts and compounds from Ludwigia leptocarpa, a plant traditionally used for its vermifugal, anti-dysenteric, and antimicrobial properties. A methanol extract was prepared by maceration of the dried plant and this was successively extracted with ethyl acetate to obtain an EtOAc extract and with n-butanol to obtain an n-BuOH extract. Column chromatography of the EtOAc and n-BuOH extracts was followed by purification of different fractions, leading to the isolation of 10 known compounds. Structures of isolated compounds were assigned on the basis of spectral analysis and by comparison to structures of compounds described in the literature. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and gallic acid equivalent antioxidant capacity (GAEAC) assays. Antibacterial activity was assessed with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) with respect to strains of a Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus (a major cause of community and hospital-associated infection), and Gram-negative multi-drug-resistant bacteria, Vibrio cholerae (a cause of cholera) and Shigella flexneri (a cause of shigellosis). All of the extracts showed different degrees of antioxidant and antibacterial activities. 2β-hydroxyoleanolic acid, (2R,3S,2''S)-3''',4',4''',5,5'',7,7''-heptahydroxy-3,8"-biflavanone, and luteolin-8-C-glucoside displayed the most potent antibacterial and antioxidant properties, and these properties were in some cases equal to or more potent than those of reference drugs. Overall, the present results show that L. leptocarpa has the potential to be a natural source of anti-diarrheal and antioxidant products, so further investigation is warranted. PMID:27431270

  1. The Content of Secondary Metabolites and Antioxidant Activity of Wild Strawberry Fruit (Fragaria vesca L.).

    PubMed

    Dyduch-Siemińska, Magdalena; Najda, Agnieszka; Dyduch, Jan; Gantner, Magdalena; Klimek, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    Chemical analyses carried out in 2011-2013 aimed at evaluating the contents of flavonoids, free phenolic acids, tannins, anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity (%) by means of DPPH radical neutralization ability in fresh and air-dried fruits of three wild strawberry cultivars. Examinations revealed differences in contents of biologically active substances determined in raw versus dried material depending on the cultivar. Mean concentrations of flavonoids and tannins were highest in raw fruits of "Baron von Solemacher" cv., which amounted to 1.244 mg·g(-1) and 6.09%, respectively. Fresh fruits of "Regina" cv. were characterized by the highest average content of phenolic acids and anthocyanins: 4.987 mg·g(-1) and 0.636 mg·100 g(-1). The pattern of mean contents of biologically active substances analyzed in air-dried fruits was similar. Significant differences in abilities to neutralize the DPPH radical to diphenylpicrylhydrazine by extracts made of examined wild strawberry fruits were also indicated. PMID:26539306

  2. Secondary metabolites from endophytic Streptomyces aureofaciens CMUAc130 and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Taechowisan, Thongchai; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Yuemao; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2005-05-01

    Streptomyces aureofaciens CMUAc130 was isolated from the root tissue of Zingiber officinale Rosc. (Zingiberaceae). It was an antagonist of Colletotrichum musae and Fusarium oxysporum, the causative agents of anthracnose of banana and wilt of wheat, respectively. Evidence for the in vitro antibiosis of S. aureofaciens CMUAc130 was demonstrated by the zone of fungal-growth inhibition. Microscopic observations showed thickness and bulbous structures at the edges of the inhibited fungal hyphae. The culture filtrate and crude extract from this strain were all inhibitory to tested phytopathogenic fungi. The major active ingredients from the culture filtrate of S. aureofaciens CMUAc130 were purified by silica gel-column chromatography and identified to be (i) 5,7-dimethoxy-4-p-methoxylphenylcoumarin and (ii) 5,7-dimethoxy-4-phenylcoumarin by NMR and mass-spectral data, respectively. Bioassay studies showed that compounds (i) and (ii) had antifungal activities against tested fungi, and their MICs were found to be 120 and 150 microg ml(-1), respectively. This is the first report of compounds (i) and (ii) from micro-organisms as active ingredients for the control of phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:15870476

  3. The Content of Secondary Metabolites and Antioxidant Activity of Wild Strawberry Fruit (Fragaria vesca L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dyduch-Siemińska, Magdalena; Najda, Agnieszka; Dyduch, Jan; Gantner, Magdalena; Klimek, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    Chemical analyses carried out in 2011–2013 aimed at evaluating the contents of flavonoids, free phenolic acids, tannins, anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity (%) by means of DPPH radical neutralization ability in fresh and air-dried fruits of three wild strawberry cultivars. Examinations revealed differences in contents of biologically active substances determined in raw versus dried material depending on the cultivar. Mean concentrations of flavonoids and tannins were highest in raw fruits of “Baron von Solemacher” cv., which amounted to 1.244 mg·g−1 and 6.09%, respectively. Fresh fruits of “Regina” cv. were characterized by the highest average content of phenolic acids and anthocyanins: 4.987 mg·g−1 and 0.636 mg·100 g−1. The pattern of mean contents of biologically active substances analyzed in air-dried fruits was similar. Significant differences in abilities to neutralize the DPPH radical to diphenylpicrylhydrazine by extracts made of examined wild strawberry fruits were also indicated. PMID:26539306

  4. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange. PMID:26456097

  5. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  6. Three New and Eleven Known Unusual C25 Steroids: Activated Production of Silent Metabolites in a Marine-Derived Fungus by Chemical Mutagenesis Strategy using Diethyl Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming-Wen; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Three new (1–3) and 11 known (4–14) C25 steroids with an unusual bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring system were isolated by tracing newly produced metabolites in the EtOAc extract of an antitumor mutant AD-1-2 obtained by the diethyl sulphate (DES) mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. HPLC-PDAD-UV and HPLC-ESI-MS analyses indicated that the G59 strain did not produce these metabolites and the production of 1–14 in the mutant AD-1-2 extract was caused by the activation of silent metabolites in the original G59 strain by DES mutagenesis. The structures of the new compounds, named antineocyclocitrinols A (1) and B (2) and 23-O-methylantineocyclocitrinol (3), including their absolute configurations were determined by various spectroscopic methods, especially the NMR and Mo2-induced CD analyses. Compounds 1–3 provide the first examples of the C25 bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring steroids with the Z-configuration of 20,22-double bond. All of 1–14 weakly inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. These results provided additional examples for the successful application of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using DES to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates and supported also the effectiveness and usefulness of this new strategy. PMID:24633254

  7. A facile reproducible radioimmunoassay of the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E, suitable for measurement of relative differences of phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fretland, D J; Cammarata, P S

    1984-04-01

    A relatively simple, reproducible, radioimmunoassay for the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E (U-PGE-M) in rat and human urine is described. Results of the assay of treated versus control urine extracts correlate well with differences expected from treatments known to alter in vivo phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity. Cross-reactivity of heterogeneous metabolite antiserum with 5 available endogenous prostaglandins and a single metabolite was determined and showed little or no cross reaction. Sensitivity, within-assay precision, interassay reproducibility, and parallelism were also determined and found acceptable. Excretion rates of U-PGE-M by rats and humans were determined, and statistically significant differences could be shown, although absolute values were smaller than estimated absolute values obtained from mass-spectrometric measurements of single, purified metabolites. Normal human male excretion rates differed significantly from those of females. Injection of prostaglandin E1 caused a significant rise in U-PGE-M excretion in rats whereas aspirin and indomethacin caused it to fall. U-PGE-M excretion rates of spontaneous hypertensive rats were significantly less than rates of normotensive controls. Adrenalectomy resulted in excretion of significantly larger amounts of U-PGE-M than in normal or sham-operated controls. A screen of clinically active pharmacological agents and hormones gave results consistent with previously published reports. PMID:6427792

  8. Characterization of two water-soluble lignin metabolites with antiproliferative activities from Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Dongqi; Zhang, Wuxia; Duan, Jinyou

    2015-03-01

    The chaga mushroom, Inonotus obliquus has long been recognized as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones since the 16th century. Herein we reported the identification of two homogenous biological macromolecules, designated as IOW-S-1 and IOW-S-2 with anti-tumor activities from the hot-water extract of I. obliquus. Their molecular weights were determined to be 37.9 and 24.5kDa by high performance gel permeation chromatography (HPGPC) respectively. Chemical and spectral analysis indicated that both IOW-S-1 and IOW-S-2 were predominant in lignin, along with ∼20% carbohydrates. Examination of cytotoxicity showed that these two lignin-carbohydrate complexes induced cell death in a concentration dependent manner, while this apoptosis induction was largely cell-cycle independent. Further investigation demonstrated that IOW-S-1 or IOW-S-2 inhibited the activation of the nuclear transcription factor in cancer cells. These findings implied that soluble lignin derivatives were one of bioactive components in I. obliquus, and further provided insights into the understanding of molecular basis for diverse medicinal and nutritional values of this mushroom. PMID:25583019

  9. Natural phenolic metabolites from endophytic Aspergillus sp. IFB-YXS with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wei, Wei; Shi, Jing; Chen, Chaojun; Zhao, Guoyan; Jiao, Ruihua; Tan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Prompted by the pressing necessity to conquer phytopathogenic infections, the antimicrobial compounds were characterized with bioassay-guided method from the ethanol extract derived from the solid-substrate fermentation of Aspergillus sp. IFB-YXS, an endophytic fungus residing in the apparently healthy leave of Ginkgo biloba L. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and mechanism(s) of these bioactive compounds against phytopathogens. Among the compounds, xanthoascin (1) is significantly inhibitory on the growth of the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense subsp. Sepedonicus with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.31μg/ml, which is more potent than streptomycin (MIC 0.62μg/ml), an antimicrobial drug co-assayed herein as a positive reference. Moreover, terphenyl derivatives 3, 5 and 6 are also found to be active against other phytopathogens including Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Swings, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola Swings, Erwinia amylovora and Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans etc. The antibacterial mechanism of xanthoascin (1) was addressed to change the cellular permeability of the phytopathogens, leading to the remarkable leakage of nucleic acids out of the cytomembrane. The work highlights the possibility that xanthoascin (1), an analogue of xanthocillin which is used to be an approved antibiotic, may find its renewed application as a potent antibacterial agrichemical. This study contributes to the development of new antimicrobial drugs, especially against C. michiganense subsp. Sepedonicus. PMID:26004581

  10. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Metabolites from Lactobacillus Strains on Candida Species Implicated in Candida Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogunshe, Adenike A O; Omotoso, Mopelola A; Bello, Victoria B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research from developing countries, such as Nigeria, on Lactobacillus species in the female urogenital tract and their role as a barrier to vaginal infection is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the clinical biotherapeutic potential of indigenous Lactobacillus species. Methods: Antimicrobial metabolites production were characterised using simple and easily reproducible qualitative and quantitative methods. The in vitro inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus antimicrobials on vulvovaginal candidiasis–associated Candida species was investigated using modified agar spot and agar well-diffusion methods. Results: The maximum levels of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and diacetyl from 20 vaginal Lactobacillus strains from diseased subjects were 1.46 mg/L, 1.36 mmol/L, and 1.72 mg/L respectively. From the 4 healthy subjects, the maximum level of lactic acid was 1.08 mg/L; hydrogen peroxide, 1.36 mmol/L; and diacetyl, 0.86 mg/L. The maximum productions of these substances occurred between 72 and 120 hours of incubation. The in vitro antagonistic activities of vaginal L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. brevis, L. plantarum, L. casei, L. delbrueckii, and L. jensenii from diseased subjects inhibited a maximum of 5.71% of the 35 Candida species tested, while vaginal L. acidophilus and L. plantarum from healthy subjects inhibited between 57.1% and 68.6% of Candida species in vitro. Conclusion: Antimicrobial-producing lactobacilli can be considered as adjunct biotherapeutic candidates for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:22589669

  11. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions. PMID:27542476

  12. Aspirin’s Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin’s bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world’s longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  13. Biodegradation of Triton X-100 and its primary metabolites by a bacterial community isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wyrwas, Bogdan; Dymaczewski, Zbysław; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Szymański, Andrzej; Frańska, Magdalena; Kruszelnicka, Izabela; Ginter-Kramarczyk, Dobrochna; Cyplik, Paweł; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2013-10-15

    A set of studies was carried using a continuous flow biodegradation unit in order to isolate a microbial community capable of efficient and complete utilization of octylphenol ethoxylates from activated sludge. Increasing concentrations of Triton X-100 (in the range of 1-1000 mg/l) were applied over a time period of 35 days in order to select microorganisms, which exhibit high tolerance towards this surfactant. The fate of the surfactant and its primary degradation products was assessed by HPLC/MS. It was observed that even small doses of the surfactant contributed to the disruption of the activated sludge, due to adsorption of primary Triton X-100 metabolites (octylphenol and short-chained ethoxylates) on the cells, although the long-chain octylphenol ethoxylates were efficiently degraded during the isolation process. The toxicity assessment of octylphenol as well as octylphenol di- and monoethoxylates towards activated sludge allowed for determination of EC50 values (8 and 55 mg/l, respectively). The identification of the residual microorganisms revealed the presence of Acinetobacter junii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Alcaligenes spp., Pseudomonas fluorescens and Sphingomonas capsulata. The isolated community exhibited a high resistance towards Triton X-100 and was capable of growth even at 10,000 mg/l, with the highest specific growth rate (0.47 h(-1)) observed at 4000 mg/l. Under aerobic conditions both octylphenol and the short-chained ethoxylates were completely degraded while no toxic effect towards the isolated bacterial community was observed. PMID:23770380

  14. Purification of human dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase and its inhibition by A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide.

    PubMed Central

    Bruneau, J M; Yea, C M; Spinella-Jaegle, S; Fudali, C; Woodward, K; Robson, P A; Sautès, C; Westwood, R; Kuo, E A; Williamson, R A; Ruuth, E

    1998-01-01

    Leflunomide is currently in phase-III clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have focused our efforts on the study of the mechanism of action of the active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, in cells and tissue of human origin. The human high-affinity binding protein for radiolabelled A77 1726 was purified from solubilized U937 membranes by following the binding activity through the purification process and was characterized as the mitochondrial enzyme dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DH). The human and murine enzyme displayed identical pI and molecular mass values on SDS/PAGE (43 kDa), which contrasts notably with previous reports suggesting a molecular mass of 50 kDa for the human enzyme. DHO-DH activity was inhibited by A77 1726 and its analogue HR325 with similar potency in U937 and human spleen membrane preparations. HR325 was found to be anti-proliferative for phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, at the same concentrations that caused accumulation of DHO and depletion of uridine. Supplementation of the cultures with exogenous uridine led to partial abrogation of the anti-proliferative effect. This is in line with our recent demonstration that the anti-proliferative effect in vitro of A77 1726 on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen cells was mediated by DHO-DH inhibition [Williamson, Yea, Robson, Curnock, Gadher, Hambleton, Woodward, Bruneau, Hambleton, Moss et al., (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 22467-22472]. Thus, DHO-DH inhibition by A77 1726 and its analogues is responsible for the anti-proliferative effects in vitro of the compounds on human cells and is likely to be responsible for some of its effects in vivo. PMID:9820804

  15. Targeted metabolite analysis and biological activity of Pieris brassicae fed with Brassica rapa var. rapa.

    PubMed

    Pereira, David M; Noites, Alexandra; Valentão, Patricia; Ferreres, Federico; Pereira, José A; Vale-Silva, Luis; Pinto, Eugénia; Andrade, Paula B

    2009-01-28

    For the first time, an insect-plant system, Pieris brassicae fed with Brassica rapa var. rapa, was tested for its biological capacity, namely, antioxidant (DPPH*, *NO, and O(2)*- radicals) and antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) activities. Samples from the insect's life cycle (larvae, excrements, exuviae, and butterfly) were always found to be more efficient than the host plant. Also, P. brassicae materials, as well as its host plant, were screened for phenolics and organic acids. The host plant revealed higher amounts of both compounds. Two phenolic acids, ferulic and sinapic, as well as kaempferol 3-Osophoroside, were common to insect (larvae and excrements) and plant materials, with excrements being considerably richer. Detection of sulfated compounds in excrements, absent in host plant, revealed that metabolic processes in this species involved sulfation. Additionally, deacylation and deglycosilation were observed. All matrices presented the same organic acids qualitative profile, with the exception of excrements. PMID:19115952

  16. Isolation, structure, and HIV-1-integrase inhibitory activity of structurally diverse fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Dewey, Raymond; Polishook, Jon D; Dombrowski, Anne W; Zink, Deborah L; Guan, Ziqiang; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; Pelaez, Fernando; Felock, Peter J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-12-01

    HIV-1 integrase is a critical enzyme for replication of HIV, and its inhibition is one of the most promising new drug strategies for anti-retroviral therapy, with potentially significant advantages over existing therapies. In this report, a series of HIV-1 inhibitors isolated from the organic extract of fermentations from terrestrial fungi is described. These fungal species, belonging to a variety of genera, were collected from throughout the world following the strict guidelines of Rio Convention on Biodiversity. The polyketide- and terpenoid-derived inhibitors are represented by two naphthoquinones, a biphenyl and two triphenyls, a benzophenone, four aromatics with or without catechol units, a linear aliphatic terpenoid, a diterpenoid, and a sesterterpenoid. These compounds inhibited the coupled and strand-transfer reaction of HIV-1 integrase with an IC(50) value of 0.5-120 micro M. The bioassay-directed isolation, structure elucidation, and HIV-1 inhibitory activity of these compounds are described. PMID:14714192

  17. Chemistry of the Nudibranch Aldisa andersoni: Structure and Biological Activity of Phorbazole Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Kiss, Robert; Mathieu, Véronique; Leclercqz, Helene; Manzo, Emiliano; Villani, Guido; Mollo, Ernesto; Lefranc, Florence; D’Souza, Lisette; Gavagnin, Margherita; Cimino, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The first chemical study of the Indo-Pacific dorid nudibranch Aldisa andersoni resulted in the isolation of five chlorinated phenyl-pyrrolyloxazoles belonging to the phorbazole series. Two new molecules, 9-chloro-phorbazole D and N1-methyl-phorbazole A, co-occurring with known phorbazoles A, B and D, have been characterized. Phorbazoles were found to be present mainly in the external part of the mollusc. The structures of the new compounds were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data, mainly NMR and mass spectrometry and by comparison with the literature data. Evaluation of feeding-deterrence activity as well as in vitro growth inhibitory properties in human cancer cells was also carried out. PMID:23015775

  18. Colonic metabolites of berry polyphenols: the missing link to biological activity?

    PubMed

    Williamson, Gary; Clifford, Michael N

    2010-10-01

    The absorption of dietary phenols, polyphenols and tannins (PPT) is an essential step for biological activity and effects on health. Although a proportion of these dietary bioactive compounds are absorbed intact, depending on their chemical structure and the nature of any attached moiety (e.g. sugar, organic acid), substantial amounts of lower molecular weight catabolites are absorbed after biotransformation by the colon microflora. The main products in the colon are (a) benzoic acids (C6-C1), especially benzoic acid and protocatechuic acid; (b) phenylacetic acids (C6-C2), especially phenylacetic acid per se; (c) phenylpropionic acids (C6-C3), where the latter are almost entirely in the dihydro form, notably dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydroferulic acid, phenylpropionic acid and 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-propionic acid. As a result of this biotransformation, some of these compounds can each reach mm concentrations in faecal water. Many of these catabolites are efficiently absorbed in the colon, appear in the blood and are ultimately excreted in the urine. In the case of certain polyphenols, such as anthocyanins, these catabolites are major products in vivo; protocatechuic acid is reported to represent a substantial amount of the ingested dose of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. The major catabolites of berries, and especially blackcurrants, are predicted based on compositional data for polyphenols from berries and other sources. Since microbial catabolites may be present at many sites of the body in higher concentration than the parent compound, it is proposed that at least a part of the biological activities ascribed to berry polyphenols and other PPT are due to their colonic catabolites. PMID:20955650

  19. In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?

    SciTech Connect

    Canton, Rocio F. . E-mail: r.Fernandezcanton@iras.uu.nl; Sanderson, J. Thomas; Nijmeijer, Sandra; Bergman, Ake; Letcher, Robert J.; Berg, Martin van den

    2006-10-15

    Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH{sub 3}O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on CYP17 activity except for BDE-183, which showed significant inhibition of CYP17 activity at the highest concentration tested (10 {mu}M), with no signs of cytotoxicity as measured by mitochondrial toxicity tests (MTT). A strong inhibition of CYP17 activity was found for 6-OH-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromoDE (6-OH-BDE47) with a concentration-dependent decrease of almost 90% at 10 {mu}M, but with a concurrent decrease in cell viability at the higher

  20. Antifungal Activity Against Plant Pathogens of Metabolites from the Endophytic Fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Taráwneh, Amer H.; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E.; Rosa, Luiz H.; Cutler, Horace G.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1, isocladosporin, 2, 5′-hydroxyasperentin, 3, and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound 5′,6-diacetyl cladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, compound 1 exhibited 92.7%, 90.1%, 95.4% and 79.9% growth inhibition against Colletotrichum acutatum, Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides and Phomopsis viticola, respectively. Compound 2 showed 50.4%, 60.2% and 83.0% growth inhibition at 30 μM against Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides and P. viticola, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated for the first time from Cladosporium cladosporioides. Moreover, the identification of essential structural features of the cladosporin nuclei has also been evaluated. These structures provide new templates for the potential treatment and management of plant diseases. PMID:23651409

  1. Determination of some selected secondary metabolites and their invitro antioxidant activity in commercially available Ethiopian tea (Camellia sinensis).

    PubMed

    Bizuayehu, Dereje; Atlabachew, Minaleshewa; Ali, Mirtachew Tihar

    2016-01-01

    Eight brands of tea (Camellia sinensis),which are cultivated and commercially available in Ethiopian market, were analyzed for estimation of their total secondary metabolites (polyphenols, flavonoids and tannins) content and free radical scavenging activity which is expressed on dry weight basis. In this present study, the total polyphenols, tannin and flavonoid contents were studied spectrophotometrically using Folin-Dennis, Folin-Dennis/protein precipitation and aluminium chloride methods respectively. The free radical scavenging activity was determined by using DPPH radical assay. Results of the analysis revealed that the total polyphenol content varied from 21.3 ± 0.24 to 31.6 ± 0.31 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g of dry matter. Total flavonoids content in the tea samples varied from 8.17 ± 0.68 to 23.2 ± 0.68 mg of catechin equivalent/g of dry weight and tannin content varied from 5.64 ± 0.39 7.45 ± 0.27 mg tannic acid equivalent/g of dry weight basis. The free radical scavenging activity among the tea brand samples ranged from 28.8 ± 1.86 to 80.0 ± 0.63 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50%) values varied from 7.3 ± 1.35 to 64.0 ± 2.81 µg/mL of extract. The correlation between the antioxidant activity with total polyphenol content (R = 0.91325), with flavonoids (R = 0.80658) and with tannin (R = 0.73125) was calculated and maximum correlation value was found between polyphenol content and the free radical scavenging activity of the tea samples. The results in this study also revealed that green tea had the higher polyphenolic content and found to have the most promising antioxidant activity. This study further confirmed that Ethiopia tea is reach in phenolic compounds as compared to some overseas tea cultivars/varieties. PMID:27069832

  2. Activation and silencing of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces lividans after transformation with cosmids containing the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    PubMed

    Braña, Alfredo F; Rodríguez, Miriam; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jurgen; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2014-05-01

    Activation and silencing of antibiotic production was achieved in Streptomyces albus J1074 and Streptomyces lividans TK21 after introduction of genes within the thienamycin cluster from S. cattleya. Dramatic phenotypic and metabolic changes, involving activation of multiple silent secondary metabolites and silencing of others normally produced, were found in recombinant strains harbouring the thienamycin cluster in comparison to the parental strains. In S. albus, ultra-performance liquid chromatography purification and NMR structural elucidation revealed the identity of four structurally related activated compounds: the antibiotics paulomycins A, B and the paulomenols A and B. Four volatile compounds whose biosynthesis was switched off were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses and databases comparison as pyrazines; including tetramethylpyrazine, a compound with important clinical applications to our knowledge never reported to be produced by Streptomyces. In addition, this work revealed the potential of S. albus to produce many others secondary metabolites normally obtained from plants, including compounds of medical relevance as dihydro-β-agarofuran and of interest in perfume industry as β-patchoulene, suggesting that it might be an alternative model for their industrial production. In S. lividans, actinorhodins production was strongly activated in the recombinant strains whereas undecylprodigiosins were significantly reduced. Activation of cryptic metabolites in Streptomyces species might represent an alternative approach for pharmaceutical drug discovery. PMID:24633227

  3. Carrier-Mediated Prodrug Uptake to Improve the Oral Bioavailability of Polar Drugs: An Application to an Oseltamivir Analogue.

    PubMed

    Incecayir, Tuba; Sun, Jing; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Xu, Hao; Gose, Tomoka; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi; Hilfinger, John; Lipka, Elke; Amidon, Gordon L

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to improve the intestinal mucosal cell membrane permeability of the poorly absorbed guanidino analogue of a neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir carboxylate (GOC) using a carrier-mediated strategy. Valyl amino acid prodrug of GOC with isopropyl-methylene-dioxy linker (GOC-ISP-Val) was evaluated as the potential substrate for intestinal oligopeptide transporter, hPEPT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing hPEPT1, and an intestinal mouse perfusion system. The diastereomers of GOC-ISP-Val were assessed for chemical and metabolic stability. Permeability of GOC-ISP-Val was determined in Caco-2 cells and mice. Diastereomer 2 was about 2 times more stable than diastereomer 1 in simulated intestinal fluid and rapidly hydrolyzed to the parent drug in cell homogenates. The prodrug had a 9 times-enhanced apparent permeability (P(app)) in Caco-2 cells compared with the parent drug. Both diastereomer exhibited high effective permeability (P(eff)) in mice, 6.32 ± 3.12 and 5.20 ± 2.81 × 10(-5) cm/s for diastereomer 1 and 2, respectively. GOC-ISP-Val was found to be a substrate of hPEPT1. Overall, this study indicates that the prodrug, GOC-ISP-Val, seems to be a promising oral anti-influenza agent that has sufficient stability at physiologically relevant pHs before absorption, significantly improved permeability via hPEPT1 and potentially rapid activation in the intestinal cells. PMID:26869437

  4. Effects of chloro-s-triazine herbicides and metabolites on aromatase activity in various human cell lines and on vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J T; Letcher, R J; Heneweer, M; Giesy, J P; van den Berg, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a potential mechanism for the estrogenic properties of three chloro-s-triazine herbicides and six metabolites in vitro in several cell systems. We determined effects on human aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens, in H295R (adrenocortical carcinoma), JEG-3 (placental choriocarcinoma), and MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells; we determined effects on estrogen receptor-mediated induction of vitellogenin in primary hepatocyte cultures of adult male carp (Cyprinus carpio). In addition to atrazine, simazine, and propazine, two metabolites--atrazine-desethyl and atrazine-desisopropyl--induced aromatase activity in H295R cells concentration-dependently (0.3-30 microM) and with potencies similar to those of the parent triazines. After a 24-hr exposure to 30 microM of the triazines, an apparent maximum induction of about 2- to 2.5-fold was achieved. The induction responses were confirmed by similar increases in CYP19 mRNA levels, determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In JEG-3 cells, where basal aromatase expression is about 15-fold greater than in H295R cells, the induction responses were similar but less pronounced; aromatase expression in MCF-7 cells was neither detectable nor inducible under our culture conditions. The fully dealkylated metabolite atrazine-desethyl-desisopropyl and the three hydroxylated metabolites (2-OH-atrazine-desethyl, -desisopropyl, and -desethyl-desisopropyl) did not induce aromatase activity. None of the triazine herbicides nor their metabolites induced vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes; nor did they antagonize the induction of vitellogenin by 100 nM (EC(50) 17beta-estradiol. These findings together with other reports indicate that the estrogenic effects associated with the triazine herbicides in vivo are not estrogen receptor-mediated, but may be explained partly by their ability to induce aromatase in vitro. PMID:11675267

  5. Substitution of Wheat for Corn in Beef Cattle Diets: Digestibility, Digestive Enzyme Activities, Serum Metabolite Contents and Ruminal Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Zhao, H B; Liu, X M; You, W; Cheng, H J; Wan, F C; Liu, G F; Tan, X W; Song, E L; Zhang, X L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing different amounts of wheat, as a partial or whole substitute for corn, on digestibility, digestive enzyme activities, serum metabolite contents and ruminal fermentation in beef cattle. Four Limousin×LuXi crossbred cattle with a body weight (400±10 kg), fitted with permanent ruminal, proximal duodenal and terminal ileal cannulas, were used in a 4×4 Latin square design with four treatments: Control (100% corn), 33% wheat (33% substitution for corn), 67% wheat (67% substitution for corn), and 100% wheat (100% substitution for corn) on a dry matter basis. The results showed that replacing corn with increasing amounts of wheat increased the apparent digestibility values of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p<0.05). While the apparent digestibility of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber were lower with increasing amounts of wheat. Digestive enzyme activities of lipase, protease and amylase in the duodenum were higher with increasing wheat amounts (p<0.05), and showed similar results to those for the enzymes in the ileum except for amylase. Increased substitution of wheat for corn increased the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (p<0.05). Ruminal pH was not different between those given only corn and those given 33% wheat. Increasing the substitution of wheat for corn increased the molar proportion of acetate and tended to increase the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Cattle fed 100% wheat tended to have the lowest ruminal NH3-N concentration compared with control (p<0.05), whereas no differences were observed among the cattle fed 33% and 67% wheat. These findings indicate that wheat can be effectively used to replace corn in moderate amounts to meet the energy and fiber requirements of beef cattle. PMID:26954111

  6. Cardiac Energy Dependence on Glucose Increases Metabolites Related to Glutathione and Activates Metabolic Genes Controlled by Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Cooper, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paul, David S.; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Jia, Wei; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long chain acyl‐CoA synthetases (ACSL) catalyze long‐chain fatty acids (FA) conversion to acyl‐CoAs. Temporal ACSL1 inactivation in mouse hearts (Acsl1H−/−) impaired FA oxidation and dramatically increased glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and mTOR activation, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy. We used unbiased metabolomics and gene expression analyses to elucidate the cardiac cellular response to increased glucose use in a genetic model of inactivated FA oxidation. Methods and Results Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites altered in Acsl1H−/− hearts, including 6 related to glucose metabolism and 11 to cysteine and glutathione pathways. Concurrently, global cardiac transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 568 genes in Acsl1H−/− hearts, a subset of which we hypothesized were targets of mTOR; subsequently, we measured the transcriptional response of several genes after chronic mTOR inhibition via rapamycin treatment during the period in which cardiac hypertrophy develops. Hearts from Acsl1H−/− mice increased expression of several Hif1α‐responsive glycolytic genes regulated by mTOR; additionally, expression of Scl7a5, Gsta1/2, Gdf15, and amino acid‐responsive genes, Fgf21, Asns, Trib3, Mthfd2, were strikingly increased by mTOR activation. Conclusions The switch from FA to glucose use causes mTOR‐dependent alterations in cardiac metabolism. We identified cardiac mTOR‐regulated genes not previously identified in other cellular models, suggesting heart‐specific mTOR signaling. Increased glucose use also changed glutathione‐related pathways and compensation by mTOR. The hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and metabolic changes that occur within the heart when glucose supplants FA as a major energy source suggest that substrate switching to glucose is not entirely benign. PMID:25713290

  7. Antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the secondary metabolites from in vitro cultures of the Alice sundew (Drosera aliciae).

    PubMed

    Krolicka, Aleksandra; Szpitter, Anna; Maciag, Monika; Biskup, Edyta; Gilgenast, Ewelina; Wegrzyn, Grazyna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant as well as the antibacterial properties of secondary metabolites obtained from Drosera aliciae (Alice sundew) plants grown in vitro and to examine the mechanism of their antimicrobial action. Bactericidal activity of extracts from D. aliciae, as well as pure ramentaceone (naphthoquinone), which is present in this plant, were examined against human pathogenic strains of micro-organisms that are both resistant and susceptible to antibiotics. A chloroform extract proved to be more effective than a methanol preparation against all of the tested strains, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The lowest minimal-bactericidal-concentration value was in the case of Staphylococcus aureus (25-50 mg fresh weight·ml(-1)). The influence of D. aliciae extracts and ramentaceone on the synthesis of DNA, RNA or proteins in cultures of Enterococcus faecalis was estimated by measurement of the incorporation of the radioactively labelled precursors [3H]thymidine, [3H]uridine or [3H]leucine respectively. The methanol extract of D. aliciae, except for a moderate effect on DNA synthesis, had no influence on RNA and protein synthesis. The chloroform preparation caused about a 75% decrease in [3H]uridine incorporation in comparison with the control after 60 min and a significant diminution in DNA and protein synthesis (44 and 30% respectively). Ramentaceone also decreased DNA and RNA synthesis, but less efficiently than did the chloroform extract, and it caused no changes in [3H]leucine incorporation. The methanol extract from D. aliciae proved to be an effective antioxidant in both the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-10-picrylhydrazyl free radical) and the FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) assay, with the activities exceeding those of well-known antioxidants, namely the flavonoids. The chloroform extract and ramentaceone showed no antioxidative properties. PMID:18782083

  8. Enhanced active metabolite generation and platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to clopidogrel regardless of genotype in thienopyridine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, Jose L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Winters, Kenneth J; Effron, Mark B; Duvvuru, Suman; Costigan, Timothy M; Sundseth, Scott; Walker, Joseph R; Saucedo, Jorge F; Kleiman, Neal S; Varenhorst, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Clopidogrel response varies according to the presence of genetic polymorphisms. The CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with impaired response; conflicting results have been reported for CYP2C19*17, ABCB1, and PON1 genotypes. We assessed the impact of CYP2C19, PON1, and ABCB1 polymorphisms on clopidogrel and prasugrel pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Aspirin-treated patients (N=194) with coronary artery disease from two independent, prospective, randomised, multi-centre studies comparing clopidogrel (75 mg) and prasugrel (10 mg) were genotyped and classified by predicted CYP2C19 metaboliser phenotype (ultra metabolisers [UM] = *17 carriers; extensive metabolisers [EM] = *1/1 homozygotes; reduced metabolisers [RM] = *2 carriers). ABCB1 T/T and C/T polymorphisms and PON1 A/A, A/G and G/G polymorphisms were also genotyped. PD parameters were assessed using VerifyNow® P2Y12 and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) expressed as platelet reactivity index (PRI) after 14 days of maintenance dosing. Clopidogrel and prasugrel active metabolite (AM) exposure was calculated in a cohort of 96 patients. For clopidogrel, genetic variants in CYP2C19, but not ABCB1 or PON1, affected PK and PD. For prasugrel, none of the measured genetic variants affected PK or PD. Compared with clopidogrel, platelet inhibition with prasugrel was greater even in the CYP2C19 UM phenotype. Prasugrel generated more AM and achieved greater platelet inhibition than clopidogrel irrespective of CYP2C19, ABCB1, and PON1 polymorphisms. The lack of effect from genetic variants on prasugrel AM generation or antiplatelet activity is consistent with previous studies in healthy volunteers and is consistent with improved efficacy in acute coronary syndrome patients managed with percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24009042

  9. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. PMID:25975187

  10. Network Analysis of Enzyme Activities and Metabolite Levels and Their Relationship to Biomass in a Large Panel of Arabidopsis Accessions[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Trenkamp, Sandra; Steinfath, Matthias; Usadel, Bjorn; Gibon, Yves; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Pyl, Eva-Theresa; Tschoep, Hendrik; Steinhauser, Marie Caroline; Guenther, Manuela; Hoehne, Melanie; Rohwer, Johann M.; Altmann, Thomas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Natural genetic diversity provides a powerful resource to investigate how networks respond to multiple simultaneous changes. In this work, we profile maximum catalytic activities of 37 enzymes from central metabolism and generate a matrix to investigate species-wide connectivity between metabolites, enzymes, and biomass. Most enzyme activities change in a highly coordinated manner, especially those in the Calvin-Benson cycle. Metabolites show coordinated changes in defined sectors of metabolism. Little connectivity was observed between maximum enzyme activities and metabolites, even after applying multivariate analysis methods. Measurements of posttranscriptional regulation will be required to relate these two functional levels. Individual enzyme activities correlate only weakly with biomass. However, when they are used to estimate protein abundances, and the latter are summed and expressed as a fraction of total protein, a significant positive correlation to biomass is observed. The correlation is additive to that obtained between starch and biomass. Thus, biomass is predicted by two independent integrative metabolic biomarkers: preferential investment in photosynthetic machinery and optimization of carbon use. PMID:20699391

  11. Target interaction profiling of midostaurin and its metabolites in neoplastic mast cells predicts distinct effects on activation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Barbara; Winter, Georg E.; Blatt, Katharina; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Rix, Uwe; Eisenwort, Gregor; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Gridling, Manuela; Dutreix, Catherine; Hoermann, Gregor; Schwaab, Juliana; Radia, Deepti; Roesel, Johannes; Manley, Paul W.; Reiter, Andreas; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Valent, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic-based drug testing is an emerging approach to establish the clinical value and anti-neoplastic potential of multi-kinase inhibitors. The multikinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) is a promising new agent used to treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM). We examined the target interaction-profiles and the mast cell (MC)-targeting effects of two pharmacologically relevant midostaurin metabolites, CGP52421 and CGP62221. All three compounds, midostaurin and the two metabolites, suppressed IgE-dependent histamine secretion in basophils and MC with reasonable IC50 values. Midostaurin and CGP62221 also produced growth-inhibition and dephosphorylation of KIT in the MC leukemia cell line HMC-1.2, whereas the second metabolite, CGP52421, that accumulates in vivo, showed no substantial effects. Chemical proteomic profiling and drug-competition experiments revealed that midostaurin interacts with KIT and several additional kinase-targets. The key downstream-regulator FES was recognized by midostaurin and CGP62221, but not by CGP52421 in MC lysates, whereas the IgE-receptor-downstream target SYK was recognized by both metabolites. Together, our data show that the clinically relevant midostaurin metabolite CGP52421 inhibits IgE-dependent histamine release, but is a weak inhibitor of MC proliferation which may have clinical implications and may explain why mediator-related symptoms improve in SM patients even when disease progression occurs. PMID:26349526

  12. Target interaction profiling of midostaurin and its metabolites in neoplastic mast cells predicts distinct effects on activation and growth.

    PubMed

    Peter, B; Winter, G E; Blatt, K; Bennett, K L; Stefanzl, G; Rix, U; Eisenwort, G; Hadzijusufovic, E; Gridling, M; Dutreix, C; Hoermann, G; Schwaab, J; Radia, D; Roesel, J; Manley, P W; Reiter, A; Superti-Furga, G; Valent, P

    2016-02-01

    Proteomic-based drug testing is an emerging approach to establish the clinical value and anti-neoplastic potential of multikinase inhibitors. The multikinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) is a promising new agent used to treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM). We examined the target interaction profiles and the mast cell (MC)-targeting effects of two pharmacologically relevant midostaurin metabolites, CGP52421 and CGP62221. All three compounds, midostaurin and the two metabolites, suppressed IgE-dependent histamine secretion in basophils and MC with reasonable IC(50) values. Midostaurin and CGP62221 also produced growth inhibition and dephosphorylation of KIT in the MC leukemia cell line HMC-1.2, whereas the second metabolite, CGP52421, which accumulates in vivo, showed no substantial effects. Chemical proteomic profiling and drug competition experiments revealed that midostaurin interacts with KIT and several additional kinase targets. The key downstream regulator FES was recognized by midostaurin and CGP62221, but not by CGP52421 in MC lysates, whereas the IgE receptor downstream target SYK was recognized by both metabolites. Together, our data show that the clinically relevant midostaurin metabolite CGP52421 inhibits IgE-dependent histamine release, but is a weak inhibitor of MC proliferation, which may have clinical implications and may explain why mediator-related symptoms improve in SM patients even when disease progression occurs. PMID:26349526

  13. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  14. Biochemical Characterization of the Active Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Metabolites of 2,6-Diaminopurine Ribonucleoside Prodrug Compared to Sofosbuvir and BMS-986094.

    PubMed

    Ehteshami, Maryam; Tao, Sijia; Ozturk, Tugba; Zhou, Longhu; Cho, Jong Hyun; Zhang, Hongwang; Amiralaei, Sheida; Shelton, Jadd R; Lu, Xiao; Khalil, Ahmed; Domaoal, Robert A; Stanton, Richard A; Suesserman, Justin E; Lin, Biing; Lee, Sam S; Amblard, Franck; Whitaker, Tony; Coats, Steven J; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-01

    Ribonucleoside analog inhibitors (rNAI) target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) and cause RNA chain termination. Here, we expand our studies on β-d-2'-C-methyl-2,6-diaminopurine-ribonucleotide (DAPN) phosphoramidate prodrug 1 (PD1) as a novel investigational inhibitor of HCV. DAPN-PD1 is metabolized intracellularly into two distinct bioactive nucleoside triphosphate (TP) analogs. The first metabolite, 2'-C-methyl-GTP, is a well-characterized inhibitor of NS5B polymerase, whereas the second metabolite, 2'-C-methyl-DAPN-TP, behaves as an adenosine base analog. In vitro assays suggest that both metabolites are inhibitors of NS5B-mediated RNA polymerization. Additional factors, such as rNAI-TP incorporation efficiencies, intracellular rNAI-TP levels, and competition with natural ribonucleotides, were examined in order to further characterize the potential role of each nucleotide metabolite in vivo Finally, we found that although both 2'-C-methyl-GTP and 2'-C-methyl-DAPN-TP were weak substrates for human mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) polymerase (POLRMT) in vitro, DAPN-PD1 did not cause off-target inhibition of mtRNA transcription in Huh-7 cells. In contrast, administration of BMS-986094, which also generates 2'-C-methyl-GTP and previously has been associated with toxicity in humans, caused detectable inhibition of mtRNA transcription. Metabolism of BMS-986094 in Huh-7 cells leads to 87-fold higher levels of intracellular 2'-C-methyl-GTP than DAPN-PD1. Collectively, our data characterize DAPN-PD1 as a novel and potent antiviral agent that combines the delivery of two active metabolites. PMID:27216050

  15. Assessment of adrenocortical activity by non-invasive measurement of faecal cortisol metabolites in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Sid-Ahmed, Omer-Elfaroug; Sanhouri, Ahmed; Elwaseela, Badr-Eldin; Fadllalah, Imad; Mohammed, Galal-Eldin Elazhari; Möstl, Erich

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glucocorticoid production could be monitored non-invasively in dromedary camels by measuring faecal cortisol metabolites (FCMs). Five Sudanese dromedaries, two males and three females, were injected with a synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analogue. Blood samples were collected pre- and post-ACTH injection. Faeces were sampled after spontaneous defecation for five consecutive days (2 days before and 3 days after ACTH injection). Baseline plasma cortisol values ranged from 0.6 to 10.8 ng/ml in males and from 1.1 to 16.6 ng/ml in females, while peak values after ACTH injection were 10.9-41.9 in males and 10-42.2 ng/ml in females. Peak blood cortisol values were reached between 1.5 and 2.0 h after ACTH injection. The concentration of FCMs increased after ACTH injection in the faeces of both sexes, although steroid levels peaked earlier in males [24 h; (286.7-2,559.7 ng/g faeces)] than in females [36-48 h; (1,182.6-5,169.1 ng/g faeces)], reflecting increases of 3.1-8.3- and 4.3-8-fold above baseline levels. To detect chromatographic patterns of immunoreactive FCMs, faecal samples with high FCM concentrations from both sexes were pooled and subjected to reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). RP-HPLC analysis revealed sex differences in the polarity of FCMs, with females showing more polar FCMs than males. We concluded that stimulation of adrenocortical activity by ACTH injection resulted in a measurable increase in blood cortisol that was reliably paralleled by increases in FCM levels. Thus, measurement of FCMs is a powerful tool for monitoring the adrenocortical responses of dromedaries to stressors in field conditions. PMID:23430659

  16. Species and gender differences in the formation of an active metabolite of a substituted 2,4-thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Beconi, M; Mao, A; Creighton, M; Hop, C E C A; Chiu, S H L; Eydelloth, R; Franklin, R; Tang, F; Yu, N; Vincent, S

    2003-07-01

    1. The metabolism of a substituted 2,4-thiazolidinedione (P1) with dual PPARalpha/gamma activity was evaluated in male and female rats, dogs and monkeys. A para-hydroxylated metabolite (M1) with potent PPARgamma-selective agonist, was a major circulating drug-related component in female rats, dogs and monkeys, but not in male rats (M1-to-P1 exposure ratio of <1, 3-5, 5 and 5-11 in male rat, monkey, female rat, and dog, respectively). 2. M1 (%) formed in vitro (5, 53, 57-65, 67 and 67% in male rat, monkey, female rat, dog, and human liver microsomes, respectively), rank ordered with M1 (%) formed in vivo (24-45, 53-57, 78, 75-85%, for male rat, monkey, female rat and dog, respectively, after oral administration of P1). 3. The plasma clearance of M1 was higher in male rats (32 ml min(-1) kg(-1) compared with 6, 7 and 2 ml min(-1) kg(-1) in female rat, male monkey and male dogs, respectively). 4. The low amounts of M1 observed in male rats, with the appearance of products of the cleavage of the propyl group between the phenyl groups was probably due to the presence of the sex-specific CYP2C11, which cleaves P1 at the propyl bridge. None of the CYPs present in female rats cleaved P1 at this site and M1 was only produced by CYP2C6. In humans, only CYP2C8 and the polymorphic CYP2C19 produced M1. PMID:12893525

  17. Relation between clopidogrel active metabolite levels and different platelet aggregation methods in patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Johnston, Marilyn; Hirsh, Jack; Pare, Guillaume; Li, Chunjian; Mehta, Shamir; Teo, Koon K; Sloane, Debi; Yi, Qilong; Zhu, Jun; Eikelboom, John W

    2012-11-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that undergoes bioconversion via cytochrome P450 system to form an active metabolite (AM) that binds to the platelet ADP receptor. The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel is commonly assessed by measuring the aggregatory response to 5 μM ADP by light transmission aggregation (LTA) or multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) or by the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI). To determine which of these three tests of platelet ADP receptor pathway inhibition most closely correlates with clopidogrel AM levels. We analyzed blood samples from 82 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized to receive double-dose or standard dose clopidogrel for 2 weeks. We measured peak clopidogrel AM levels, platelet aggregation in response to ADP and VASP-PRI on days 1, and repeated all the measures on days 7 and 14. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the correlation between clopidogrel AM and LTA, MEA and VASP-PRI. Bland-Altman plots were used to explore the agreement between tests of the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel AM on day 1 correlated most closely with VASP-PRI (r = -0.5767) and demonstrated weaker correlations with LTA (r = -0.4656) and MEA (r = -0.3384) (all p < 0.01). Intra-class correlation (ICC) between VASP-PRI and LTA was 0.6446; VASP-PRI and MEA was 0.4720; and LTA and MEA was 0.4693. Similar results were obtained on days 7 and 14. Commonly used pharmacodynamic measures of clopidogrel response are only moderately correlated with clopidogrel AM levels and may not be suitable to measure the adequacy of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:22797934

  18. Effect of bovine ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism on concentrations in milk of enrofloxacin and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, J A; García-Mateos, D; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Álvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2016-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) is involved in the secretion of several drugs into milk. The bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism increases the secretion into milk of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin in Holstein cows. Danofloxacin and enrofloxacin are the fluoroquinolones most widely used in veterinary medicine. Both enrofloxacin (ENRO) and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) reach milk at relatively high concentrations. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism on in vitro transport as well as on concentrations in plasma and in milk of ENRO and CIPRO. Experiments using cells overexpressing bovine ABCG2 showed the effects of ABCG2 on the transport of CIPRO, demonstrating more efficient in vitro transport of this antimicrobial by the S581 variant as compared with the Y581 variant. Animal studies administering 2.5mg/kg of ENRO subcutaneously to Y/Y 581 and Y/S 581 cows revealed that concentrations in plasma of ENRO and CIPRO were significantly lower in Y/S animals. Regardless of the genotype, the antimicrobial profile in milk after the administration of ENRO was predominantly of CIPRO. With respect to the genotype effects on the amounts of drugs present in milk, AUC0-24 values were more than 1.2 times higher in Y/S cows for ENRO and 2.2 times for CIPRO, indicating a greater capacity of Y581S to transfer these drugs into milk. These results emphasize the clinical relevance of this polymorphism as a factor affecting the concentrations in plasma and in milk of drugs of importance in veterinary medicine. PMID:27157572

  19. Microbial transformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol by Absidia corymbifera. Cytotoxic activity of the metabolites against human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangtong; Yang, Min; Nong, Shaojun; Yang, Xue; Ling, Yong; Wang, Donggeng; Wang, Xinyang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Biotransformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (1) by the fungus Absidia corymbifera AS 3.3387 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as 26-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (2), 23, 24-en-25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (3), 25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (4), 7β-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 7-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that A. corymbifera AS 3.3387 could catalyze the side-chain oxidation-reduction, 7β hydroxylation, and the specific C-7 dehydrogenation of derivatives of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol. The metabolites 2, 5, and 6 showed the more potent inhibitory effects against DU-145 and PC-3 cell lines than the substrate. PMID:23022533

  20. Chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites in the sclerotia of Inonotus obliquus and submerged culture strategies for up-regulating their production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhang, Meimei; Pan, Shenyuan; Dai, Yucheng

    2010-07-01

    Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat is a white rot fungus belonging to the family Hymenochaetaceae in the Basidiomycota. In nature, this fungus rarely forms a fruiting body but usually an irregular shape of sclerotial conk called 'Chaga'. Characteristically, I. obliquus produces massive melanins released to the surface of Chaga. As early as in the sixteenth century, Chaga was used as an effective folk medicine in Russia and Northern Europe to treat several human malicious tumors and other diseases in the absence of any unacceptable toxic side effects. Chemical investigations show that I. obliquus produces a diverse range of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, melanins, and lanostane-type triterpenoids. Among these are the active components for antioxidant, antitumoral, and antiviral activities and for improving human immunity against infection of pathogenic microbes. Geographically, however, this fungus is restricted to very cold habitats and grows very slowly, suggesting that Chaga is not a reliable source of these bioactive compounds. Attempts for culturing this fungus axenically all resulted in a reduced production of bioactive metabolites. This review examines the current progress in the discovery of chemical diversity of Chaga and their biological activities and the strategies to modulate the expression of desired pathways to diversify and up-regulate the production of bioactive metabolites by the fungus grown in submerged cultures for possible drug discovery. PMID:20532760

  1. Hesperidin metabolite hesperetin-7-O-glucuronide, but not hesperetin-3'-O-glucuronide, exerts hypotensive, vasodilatory, and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Jokura, Hiroko; Hashizume, Koujiro; Ominami, Hideo; Shibuya, Yusuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2013-09-01

    Orally ingested hesperidin (HES) is hydrolyzed into hesperetin in the gastrointestinal tract and conjugated during absorption. Hesperetin conjugates are the main circulating metabolites in human and rat plasma. We previously reported that glucosyl hesperidin (GHES), a water-soluble HES derivative, prevents hypertension via improvement of endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Although these hesperetin conjugates seem to be responsible for hypotensive and endothelium-dependent vasodilatory activities of dietary GHES, little is known about the mechanisms of action of these conjugated metabolites. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hesperetin-7-O-β-d-glucuronide (HPT7G) and hesperetin-3'-O-β-d-glucuronide (HPT3'G), which are the predominant HES metabolites in rat plasma, on blood pressure and endothelial function. Intravenous administration of HPT7G (5 mg kg(-1)) decreased blood pressure in anesthetized SHRs. HPT7G enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to acetylcholine, but had no effect on endothelium-independent vasodilation in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in aortas isolated from SHRs. HPT7G decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA expression in rat aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, HPT3'G had little effect on these parameters. In conclusion, HPT7G exerted hypotensive, vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities, similar to hesperetin and these effects are associated, in part, with the activity of GHES and HES to improve hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23831969

  2. Acute HCV/HIV Coinfection Is Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction and Cerebral Metabolite Disturbance, but Not Increased Microglial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Lucy J.; Pavese, Nicola; Ramlackhansingh, Anil; Thomson, Emma; Allsop, Joanna M.; Politis, Marios; Kulasegaram, Ranjababu; Main, Janice; Brooks, David J.; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Winston, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Microglial cell activation and cerebral function impairment are described in both chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV) and Human-Immune-Deficiency viral (HIV) infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute HCV infection upon cerebral function and microglial cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. Methods A case-control study was conducted. Subjects with acute HCV and chronic HIV coinfection (aHCV) were compared to matched controls with chronic HIV monoinfection (HIVmono). aHCV was defined as a new positive plasma HCV RNA within 12 months of a negative RNA test. Subjects underwent neuro-cognitive testing (NCT), cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using a 11C-radiolabeled ligand (PK11195), which is highly specific for translocator protein 18 kDA receptors on activated microglial cells. Differences between cases and controls were assessed using linear regression modelling. Results Twenty-four aHCV cases completed NCT and 1H-MRS, 8 underwent PET. Of 57 HIVmono controls completing NCT, 12 underwent 1H-MRS and 8 PET. Subjects with aHCV demonstrated on NCT, significantly poorer executive function (mean (SD) error rate 26.50(17.87) versus 19.09(8.12), p = 0.001) and on 1H-MRS increased myo-inositol/creatine ratios (mI/Cr, a marker of cerebral inflammation) in the basal ganglia (ratio of 0.71(0.22) versus 0.55(0.23), p = 0.03), compared to subjects with HIVmono. On PET imaging, no difference in 11C-PK11195 binding potential (BP) was observed between study groups (p>0.10 all cerebral locations), however lower BPs were associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use in the parietal (p = 0.01) and frontal (p = 0.03) cerebral locations. Discussion Poorer cognitive performance and disturbance of cerebral metabolites are observed in subjects with aHC,V compared to subjects with HIVmono. Higher 11C-PK11195 BP was not observed in subjects with aHCV, but was

  3. The relationship of nitrogen and C/N ratio with secondary metabolites levels and antioxidant activities in three varieties of Malaysian kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2011-01-01

    Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume), one of the most famous and widely used herbs, especially in Southeast Asia, is found to have interesting bioactive compounds and displays health promoting properties. In this study, the antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts of leaves, stems and roots of three varieties of L. pumila (var. alata, pumila and lanceolata) were evaluated in an effort to compare and validate the medicinal potential of this indigenous Malaysian herb species. The antioxidant activity determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, as well as the total amount of phenolics and flavonoids were the highest in the leaves, followed by the stems and roots in all the varieties. A similar trend was displayed by the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) activity, suggesting that the L. pumila varieties possess high foliar antioxidant properties. At low FRAP activity concentrations, the values of the leaves' inhibition activity in the three varieties were significantly higher than those of the stems and roots, with var. alata exhibiting higher antioxidant activities and total contents of phenolics and flavonoids compared to the varieties pumila and lanceolata. The high production of secondary metabolites and antioxidant activities in var. alata were firmly related to low nitrogen content and high C/N ratio in plant parts. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between secondary metabolite content and antioxidant activities, and revealed that the consumption of L. pumila could exert several beneficial effects by virtue of its antioxidant activity. PMID:21716173

  4. Distribution of topical ocular nepafenac and its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye.

    PubMed

    Chastain, James E; Sanders, Mark E; Curtis, Michael A; Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Gadd, Martha E; Kapin, Michael A; Markwardt, Kerry L; Dahlin, David C

    2016-04-01

    Nepafenac ophthalmic suspensions, 0.1% (NEVANAC(®)) and 0.3% (ILEVRO™), are topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) products approved in the United States, Europe and various other countries to treat pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery. NEVANAC is also approved in Europe for the reduction in the risk of postoperative macular edema (ME) associated with cataract surgery in diabetic patients. The efficacy against ME suggests that topical administration leads to distribution of nepafenac or its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye. This article evaluates the ocular distribution of nepafenac and amfenac and the extent of local delivery to the posterior segment of the eye, following topical ocular instillation in animal models. Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension was instilled unilaterally in New Zealand White rabbits as either a single dose (0.1%; one drop) or as multiple doses (0.3%, one drop, once-daily for 4 days, or 0.1% one drop, three-times daily for 3 days and one morning dose on day 4). Nepafenac (0.3%) was also instilled unilaterally in cynomolgus monkeys as multiple doses (one drop, three-times daily for 7 days). Nepafenac and amfenac concentrations in harvested ocular tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Locally-distributed compound concentrations were determined as the difference in levels between dosed and undosed eyes. In single-dosed rabbit eyes, peak concentrations of locally-distributed nepafenac and amfenac showed a trend of sclera > choroid > retina. Nepafenac peak levels in sub-samples posterior to the eye equator and inclusive of the posterior pole (E-PP) were 55.1, 4.03 and 2.72 nM, respectively, at 0.25 or 0.50 h, with corresponding amfenac peak levels of 41.9, 3.10 and 0.705 nM at 1 or 4 h. By comparison, peak levels in sclera, choroid and retina sub-samples in a band between the ora serrata and the equator (OS-E) were 13- to 40-fold

  5. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Hutchinson, Mark R; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K; Maier, Steven F; Rice, Kenner C; Watkins, Linda R

    2013-05-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  6. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  7. A radioreceptor assay to study the affinity of benzodiazepines and their receptor binding activity in human plasma including their active metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Dorow, R G; Seidler, J; Schneider, H H

    1982-01-01

    1 A radioreceptor assay has been established to measure the receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines in clinical use. 2 The time course of receptor binding activity was studied by this method in the plasma of eight healthy subjects randomly treated with 1 mg lormetazepam (Noctamid, 2 mg flunitrazepam (Rohypnol, and 10 mg diazepam (Valium, and placebo on a cross-over basis. Blood samples were collected up to 154 h after treatment. 3 Receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines on vitro show good correlation with therapeutic human doses (r = 0.96) and may be predictive of drug potency in man. 4 Mean peak plasma levels of lormetazepam binding equivalents were 4.8 +/- 1 ng/ml at 2 h after lormetazepam, 7.2 +/- 1.8 ng/ml at 8 h after flunitrazepam, and 17.9 +/- 2.7 ng/ml at 15 h after diazepam. Plasma elimination half-lives of benzodiazepine binding equivalents were 9.3, 23 and 63 h, respectively. 5 Slow elimination of benzodiazepine binding equivalents following flunitrazepam and diazepam may be due to persistent active metabolites. PMID:6121579

  8. Anticancer Effect and Structure-Activity Analysis of Marine Products Isolated from Metabolites of Mangrove Fungi in the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li-yang; Zhang, Jian-ye; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Zhen, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Mi, Yan-jun; She, Zhi-gang; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Lin, Yong-cheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi provide plenty of structurally unique and biologically active secondary metabolites. We screened 87 marine products from mangrove fungi in the South China Sea for anticancer activity by MTT assay. 14% of the compounds (11/86) exhibited a potent activity against cancer in vitro. Importantly, some compounds such as compounds 78 and 81 appeared to be promising for treating cancer patients with multidrug resistance, which should encourage more efforts to isolate promising candidates for further development as clinically useful chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, DNA intercalation was not involved in their anticancer activities, as determined by DNA binding assay. On the other hand, the structure-activity analysis indicated that the hydroxyl group was important for their cytotoxic activity and that bulky functional groups such as phenyl rings could result in a loss of biological activity, which will direct the further development of marine product-based derivatives. PMID:20479969

  9. Monitoring and Characterization of Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Japan, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Ejima, Miho; Anraku, Akane; Shimabukuro, Kozue; Obuchi, Masatsugu; Kishida, Noriko; Hong, Xu; Takashita, Emi; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Yamashita, Kazuyo; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Yumiko; Oguchi, Akio; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Tashiro, Masato

    2011-01-01

    To monitor and characterize oseltamivir-resistant (OR) pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus with the H275Y mutation, we analyzed 4,307 clinical specimens from Japan by neuraminidase (NA) sequencing or inhibition assay; 61 OR pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were detected. NA inhibition assay and M2 sequencing indicated that OR pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was resistant to M2 inhibitors, but sensitive to zanamivir. Full-genome sequencing showed OR and oseltamivir-sensitive (OS) viruses had high sequence similarity, indicating that domestic OR virus was derived from OS pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. Hemagglutination inhibition test demonstrated that OR and OS pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were antigenically similar to the A/California/7/2009 vaccine strain. Of 61 case-patients with OR viruses, 45 received oseltamivir as treatment, and 10 received it as prophylaxis, which suggests that most cases emerged sporadically from OS pandemic (H1N1) 2009, due to selective pressure. No evidence of sustained spread of OR pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was found in Japan; however, 2 suspected incidents of human-to-human transmission were reported. PMID:21392439

  10. Induction of CYP26A1 by Metabolites of Retinoic Acid: Evidence That CYP26A1 Is an Important Enzyme in the Elimination of Active Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Topletz, Ariel R.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Foti, Robert S.; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, induces gene transcription via binding to nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). The primary hydroxylated metabolites formed from atRA by CYP26A1, and the subsequent metabolite 4-oxo-atRA, bind to RARs and potentially have biologic activity. Hence, CYP26A1, the main atRA hydroxylase, may function either to deplete bioactive retinoids or to form active metabolites. This study aimed to determine the role of CYP26A1 in modulating RAR activation via formation and elimination of active retinoids. After treatment of HepG2 cells with atRA, (4S)-OH-atRA, (4R)-OH-atRA, 4-oxo-atRA, and 18-OH-atRA, mRNAs of CYP26A1 and RARβ were increased 300- to 3000-fold, with 4-oxo-atRA and atRA being the most potent inducers. However, >60% of the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers were converted to 4-oxo-atRA in the first 12 hours of treatment, suggesting that the activity of the 4-OH-atRA was due to 4-oxo-atRA. In human hepatocytes, atRA, 4-OH-atRA, and 4-oxo-atRA induced CYP26A1 and 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed from 4-OH-atRA. In HepG2 cells, 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed even in the absence of CYP26A1 activity and this formation was not inhibited by ketoconazole. In human liver microsomes, 4-oxo-atRA formation was supported by NAD+, suggesting that 4-oxo-atRA formation is mediated by a microsomal alcohol dehydrogenase. Although 4-oxo-atRA was not formed by CYP26A1, it was depleted by CYP26A1 (Km = 63 nM and intrinsic clearance = 90 μl/min per pmol). Similarly, CYP26A1 depleted 18-OH-atRA and the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers. These data support the role of CYP26A1 to clear bioactive retinoids, and suggest that the enzyme forming active 4-oxo-atRA may be important in modulating retinoid action. PMID:25492813

  11. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  12. Assessment of estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities of the mycotoxin zearalenone and its metabolites using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Real, Macarena; Jimenez-Diaz, Inmaculada; Belhassen, Hidaya; Hedhili, Abderazzak; Torné, Pablo; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a well-known mycotoxin present in numerous agricultural products. Humans and animals are therefore at a risk of exposure to zearalenone through consumption of contaminated food. After intake, ZEN is reduced to α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZEL and β-ZEL), zearalanone (ZAN), and α- and β-zearalanol (α-ZAL and β-ZAL). Although their estrogenicity has been well characterized, much less is known about their interaction with other nuclear receptors. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions of ZEN and its five metabolites, with the human androgen receptor (hAR) and estrogen receptor alpha (hERα). Their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was examined in androgen-sensitive PALM cells, whereas the effects on hERα function were assessed in MCF-7 cells using the E-Screen bioassay. We confirm that ZEN and its metabolites are full agonists for hERα and demonstrate that all six compounds tested possess hAR-mediated antagonistic activity in PALM cells, in which ZAN, α-ZAL, and β-ZAL were the most effective hAR antagonists. Overall, the observed estrogenic and anti-androgenic potencies of ZEN and its metabolites suggest that these compounds may interfere with the endocrine system by various modes of action and that further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in animals and humans. PMID:25455890

  13. Marine-derived myxobacteria of the suborder Nannocystineae: An underexplored source of structurally intriguing and biologically active metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F

    2016-01-01

    Summary Myxobacteria are famous for their ability to produce most intriguing secondary metabolites. Till recently, only terrestrial myxobacteria were in the focus of research. In this review, however, we discuss marine-derived myxobacteria, which are particularly interesting due to their relatively recent discovery and due to the fact that their very existence was called into question. The to-date-explored members of these halophilic or halotolerant myxobacteria are all grouped into the suborder Nannocystineae. Few of them were chemically investigated revealing around 11 structural types belonging to the polyketide, non-ribosomal peptide, hybrids thereof or terpenoid class of secondary metabolites. A most unusual structural type is represented by salimabromide from Enhygromyxa salina. In silico analyses were carried out on the available genome sequences of four bacterial members of the Nannocystineae, revealing the biosynthetic potential of these bacteria. PMID:27340488

  14. Human serum determination and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the vitamin E metabolite α-(13'-hydroxy)-6-hydroxychroman.

    PubMed

    Ciffolilli, Silvia; Wallert, Maria; Bartolini, Desirée; Krauth, Verena; Werz, Oliver; Piroddi, Marta; Sebastiani, Bartolomeo; Torquato, Pierangelo; Lorkowski, Stefan; Birringer, Marc; Galli, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Cytochrome P450-derived long-chain metabolites are gaining increasing interest as bioactive intermediates of vitamin E. In this study we first report on the HPLC-ECD and GC-MS analysis in human serum of the earliest metabolite of this vitamin, namely α-(13'-hydroxy)-6-hydroxychroman (α-13'-OH). The two chromatographic procedure are sensitive enough (LOQ of 10nM) to measure α-13'-OH after hexane extraction of 1 ml of sample obtained from healthy volunteers supplemented for 1-week with 1000 IU/d (671 mg/d) RRR-α-tocopherol. The observed concentrations ranged between 15 and 50 nM, with minor differences between fasting and 4-hr post-meal state. Baseline (non-supplemented state) levels of 7.2 ± 1.6 nM were observed extracting higher volumes of serum. Biological effects of α-13'-OH investigated for the first time in RAW264.7 murine macrophages involved transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokines, and transcriptional and functional regulation of COX2 and iNOS enzymes in response to lipopolysaccharides. In conclusion, here we present the first quantitative evaluation of serum α-13'-OH also providing early evidence of the anti-inflammatory potential of this metabolite that is worth of further investigation in the area of functional and nutraceutical implications of vitamin E metabolism. PMID:26454076

  15. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  16. Oseltamivir for influenza in adults and children: systematic review of clinical study reports and summary of regulatory comments

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark; Doshi, Peter; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Onakpoya, Igho; Heneghan, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the potential benefits and harms of oseltamivir by reviewing all clinical study reports (or similar document when no clinical study report exists) of randomised placebo controlled trials and regulatory comments (“regulatory information”). Design Systematic review of regulatory information. Data sources Clinical study reports, trial registries, electronic databases, regulatory archives, and correspondence with manufacturers. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised placebo controlled trials on adults and children who had confirmed or suspected exposure to natural influenza. Main outcome measures Time to first alleviation of symptoms, influenza outcomes, complications, admissions to hospital, and adverse events in the intention to treat population. Results From the European Medicines Agency and Roche, we obtained clinical study reports for 83 trials. We included 23 trials in stage 1 (reliability and completeness screen) and 20 in stage 2 (formal analysis). In treatment trials on adults, oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms by 16.8 hours (95% confidence interval 8.4 to 25.1 hours, P<0.001). There was no effect in children with asthma, but there was an effect in otherwise healthy children (mean difference 29 hours, 95% confidence interval 12 to 47 hours, P=0.001). In treatment trials there was no difference in admissions to hospital in adults (risk difference 0.15%, 95% confidence interval −0.91% to 0.78%, P=0.84) and sparse data in children and for prophylaxis. In adult treatment trials, oseltamivir reduced investigator mediated unverified pneumonia (risk difference 1.00%, 0.22% to 1.49%; number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) 100, 95% confidence interval 67 to 451). The effect was not statistically significant in the five trials that used a more detailed diagnostic form for “pneumonia,” and no clinical study reports reported laboratory or diagnostic confirmation of “pneumonia.” The effect on

  17. Abscisic acid induced changes in production of primary and secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, antioxidant capability, antioxidant enzymes and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2-, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX)] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM) for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2-, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC) were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05) and O2- (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05). This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals. PMID:23884129

  18. A sensitive radioisotopic method for the measurement of NAD(P)H: Its application to the assay of metabolites and enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, A.; Malaisse, W.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A radioisotopic method for the assay of NADH or NADPH is presented, which is based on the conversion of 2-(U-{sup 14}C)ketoglutarate to {sup 14}C-labeled glutamate in the reaction catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase. The efficiency of the method is close to 75%, its precision (coefficient of variation) close to 5%, and its sensitivity close to 0.1 pmol/sample. This simple and rapid method can be applied to the measurement of several metabolites and enzymatic activities. In the present study, its application to the assay of sorbitol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is documented.

  19. H274Y's Effect on Oseltamivir Resistance: What Happens Before the Drug Enters the Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Mohamed, Nornisah; Mohamad, Suriyati; Janezic, Dusanka; Damodaran, K V; Wahab, Habibah A

    2016-01-25

    Increased reports of oseltamivir (OTV)-resistant strains of the influenza virus, such as the H274Y mutation on its neuraminidase (NA), have created some cause for concern. Many studies have been conducted in the attempt to uncover the mechanism of OTV resistance in H274Y NA. However, most of the reported studies on H274Y focused only on the drug-bound system, so the direct effects of the mutation on NA itself prior to drug binding still remain unclear. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations of NA in apo form, followed by principal component analysis and interaction energy calculations, were performed to investigate the structural changes of the NA binding site as a result of the H274Y mutation. It was observed that the disruption of the NA binding site due to the H274Y mutation was initiated by the repulsive effect of Y274 on the 250-loop, which in turn altered the hydrogen-bonding network around residue 274. The rotated W295 side chain caused the upward movement of the 340-loop. Consequently, sliding box docking results suggested that the binding pathway of OTV was compromised because of the disruption of this binding site. This study also highlighted the importance of the functional group at C6 of the sialic acid mimicry. It is hoped that these results will improve the understanding of OTV resistance and shed some light on the design of a novel anti-influenza drug. PMID:26703840

  20. Protective Action of Anandamide and Its COX-2 Metabolite against l-Homocysteine-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Injury in Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangbi; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M; Boini, Krishna; Li, Pin-Lan; Ritter, Joseph K

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that l-homocysteine (Hcys)-induced podocyte injury leading to glomerular damage or sclerosis is attributable to the activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Given the demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids, the present study was designed to test whether anandamide (AEA) or its metabolites diminish NLRP3 inflammasome activation and prevent podocyte injury and associated glomerular damage during hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys). AEA (100 μM) inhibited Hcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in cultured podocytes, as indicated by elevated caspase-1 activity and interleukin-1β levels, and attenuated podocyte dysfunction, as shown by reduced vascular endothelial growth factor production. These effects of AEA were inhibited by the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib (CEL). In mice in vivo, AEA treatment attenuated glomerular NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by hHcys accompanying a folate-free diet, on the basis of inhibition of hHcys-induced colocalization of NLRP3 molecules and increased interleukin-1β levels in glomeruli. Correspondingly, AEA prevented hHcys-induced proteinuria, albuminuria, and glomerular damage observed microscopically. Hcys- and AEA-induced effects were absent in NLRP3-knockout mice. These beneficial effects of AEA against hHcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and glomerular injury were not observed in mice cotreated with CEL. We further demonstrated that prostaglandin E2-ethanolamide (PGE2-EA), a COX-2 product of AEA, at 10 μM had a similar inhibitory effect to that of 100 μM AEA on Hcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome formation and activation in cultured podocytes. From these results, we conclude that AEA has anti-inflammatory properties, protecting podocytes from Hcys-induced injury by inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation through its COX-2 metabolite, PGE2-EA. PMID:27189966

  1. Fast Retrograde Signaling in Response to High Light Involves Metabolite Export, MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6, and AP2/ERF Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Marc Oliver; Moore, Marten; König, Katharina; Pecher, Pascal; Alsharafa, Khalid; Lee, Justin; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins allows for metabolic adjustment in response to changing environmental conditions. This regulation is linked to retrograde signals that transmit information on the metabolic state of the chloroplast to the nucleus. Transcripts of several APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR transcription factors (AP2/ERF-TFs) were found to respond within 10 min after transfer of low-light-acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana plants to high light. Initiation of this transcriptional response was completed within 1 min after transfer to high light. The fast responses of four AP2/ERF genes, ERF6, RRTF1, ERF104, and ERF105, were entirely deregulated in triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (tpt) mutants. Similarly, activation of MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) was upregulated after 1 min in the wild type but not in the tpt mutant. Based on this, together with altered transcript regulation in mpk6 and erf6 mutants, a retrograde signal transmission model is proposed starting with metabolite export through the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator with subsequent MPK6 activation leading to initiation of AP2/ERF-TF gene expression and other downstream gene targets. The results show that operational retrograde signaling in response to high light involves a metabolite-linked pathway in addition to previously described redox and hormonal pathways. PMID:24668746

  2. Cyp2D6 catalyzes 5-hydroxylation of 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)-piperazine, an active metabolite of several psychoactive drugs, in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Nirmala; Zhang, Donglu; Zhu, Mingshe; Zeng, Jianing; Christopher, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    1-(2-Pyrimidinyl)-piperazine (1-PP) is an active metabolite of several psychoactive drugs including buspirone. 1-PP is also the major metabolite in the human circulation and in rat brains following oral administration of buspirone. This study was conducted to identify the enzyme responsible for the metabolic conversion of 1-PP to 5-hydroxy-1-(2-pyrimidinyl)-piperazine (HO-1-PP) in human liver microsomes (HLMs). The product HO-1-PP was quantified by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. In the presence of NADPH, 1-PP (100 microM) was incubated separately with human cDNA-expressed cytochrome P450 isozymes (including CYP2D6, 3A4, 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19, 2E1, and 2B6) at 37 degrees C. CYP2D6 catalyzed the formation of HO-1-PP from 1-PP. This catalytic activity was >95% inhibited by quinidine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor. HO-1-PP formation rates correlated well with the bufuralol 1-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) activities of individual HLMs. The formation of HO-1-PP followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a K(m) of 171 microM and V(max) of 313 pmol/min x mg protein in HLMs. Collectively, these results indicate that polymorphic CYP2D6 is responsible for the conversion of 1-PP to HO-1-PP. PMID:15507542

  3. The distribution and clearance of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine, an active ketamine metabolite, in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, Ruin; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Dossou, Katina Sourou Sylvestre; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Green, Carol; Bupp, James; Swezey, Robert; O’Loughlin, Kathleen; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution, clearance, and bioavailability of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine has been studied in the Wistar rat. The plasma and brain tissue concentrations over time of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine were determined after intravenous (20 mg/kg) and oral (20 mg/kg) administration of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine (n = 3). After intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis and the half-life of drug elimination during the terminal phase (t1/2) was 8.0 ± 4.0 h and the apparent volume of distribution (Vd) was 7352 ± 736 mL/kg, clearance (Cl) was 704 ± 139 mL/h per kg, and the bioavailability was 46.3%. Significant concentrations of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine were measured in brain tissues at 10 min after intravenous administration, ∼30 μg/mL per g tissue which decreased to 6 μg/mL per g tissue at 60 min. The plasma and brain concentrations of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine were also determined after the intravenous administration of (S)-ketamine, where significant plasma and brain tissue concentrations of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine were observed 10 min after administration. The (S)-ketamine metabolites (S)-norketamine, (S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6R)-hydroxynorketamine, (2S,5S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2S,4S)-hydroxynorketamine were also detected in both plasma and brain tissue. The enantioselectivity of the conversion of (S)-ketamine and (R)-ketamine to the respective (2,6)-hydroxynorketamine metabolites was also investigated over the first 60 min after intravenous administration. (S)-Ketamine produced significantly greater plasma and brain tissue concentrations of (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine relative to the (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine observed after the administration of (R)-ketamine. However, the relative brain tissue: plasma concentrations of the enantiomeric (2,6)-hydroxynorketamine metabolites were not significantly different indicating that the penetration of the metabolite is not

  4. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Marjakangas, Jenni M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26856827

  5. A sensitive and rapid ultra HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous detection of clopidogrel and its derivatized active thiol metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Peer, Cody J; Spencer, Shawn D; VanDenBerg, Dustin A H; Pacanowski, Michael A; Horenstein, Richard B; Figg, William D

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive, selective, and rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) and its derivatized active metabolite (CAMD) in human plasma. Derivatization of the active metabolite in blood with 2-bromo-3'-methoxy acetophenone (MPB) immediately after collection ensured metabolite stability during sample handling and storage. Following addition of ticlopidine as an internal standard and simple protein precipitation, the analytes were separated on a Waters Acquity UPLC™ sub-2 μm-C(18) column via gradient elution before detection on a triple-quadrupole MS with multiple-reaction-monitoring via electrospray ionization. The method was validated across the clinically relevant concentration range of 0.01-50 ng/mL for parent clopidogrel and 0.1-150 ng/mL (r(2)=0.99) for CAMD, with a fast run time of 1.5 min to support pharmacokinetic studies using 75, 150, or 300 mg oral doses of clopidogrel. The analytical method measured concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD with accuracy (%DEV) <±12% and precision (%CV) of <±6%. The method was successfully applied to measure the plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD in three subjects administered single oral doses of 75, 150, and 300 mg clopidogrel. It was further demonstrated that the derivatizing agent (MPB) does not affect clopidogrel levels, thus from one aliquot of blood drawn clinically, this method can simultaneously quantify both clopidogrel and CAMD with sensitivity in the picogram per mL range. PMID:22169056

  6. The toxicity of the N-hydroxy and 6-hydroxy metabolites of 3,4-dichloropropionanilide does not depend on calcium release-activated calcium channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tricia L; Holásková, Ida; Barnett, John B

    2013-02-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2-4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630-645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites of

  7. The Toxicity of the N-Hydroxy and 6-Hydroxy Metabolites of 3,4-Dichloropropionanilide Does Not Depend on Calcium Release–Activated Calcium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2–4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630–645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites

  8. The Androgen Metabolite, 5α-Androstane-3β,17β-Diol (3β-Diol), Activates the Oxytocin Promoter Through an Estrogen Receptor-β Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Lacagnina, Anthony F.; Hinds, Laura R.; Carbone, David G.; Uht, Rosalie M.

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone has been shown to suppress the acute stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; however, the mechanisms underlying this response remain unclear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is regulated by a neuroendocrine subpopulation of medial parvocellular neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). These neurons are devoid of androgen receptors (ARs). Therefore, a possibility is that the PVN target neurons respond to a metabolite in the testosterone catabolic pathway via an AR-independent mechanism. The dihydrotestosterone metabolite, 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (3β-diol), binds and activates estrogen receptor-β (ER-β), the predominant ER in the PVN. In the PVN, ER-β is coexpressed with oxytocin (OT). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that 3β-diol regulates OT expression through ER-β activation. Treatment of ovariectomized rats with estradiol benzoate or 3β-diol for 4 days increased OT mRNA selectively in the midcaudal, but not rostral PVN compared with vehicle-treated controls. 3β-Diol treatment also increased OT mRNA in the hypothalamic N38 cell line in vitro. The functional interactions between 3β-diol and ER-β with the human OT promoter were examined using an OT promoter-luciferase reporter construct (OT-luc). In a dose-dependent manner, 3β-diol treatment increased OT-luc activity when cells were cotransfected with ER-β, but not ER-α. The 3β-diol–induced OT-luc activity was reduced by deletion of the promoter region containing the composite hormone response element (cHRE). Point mutations of the cHRE also prevented OT-luc activation by 3β-diol. These results indicate that 3β-diol induces OT promoter activity via ER-β–cHRE interactions. PMID:23515287

  9. Changes in the contents of metabolites and enzyme activities in rice plants responding to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn infection: activation of glycolysis and connection to phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutuku, J Musembi; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn causes sheath blight disease in rice, and genetic resistance against it is the most desirable characteristic. Current improvement efforts are based on analysis of polygenic quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but interpretation is limited by the lack of information on the changes in metabolic pathways. Our previous studies linked activation of the glycolytic pathway to enhanced generation of lignin in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The current studies investigated the regulation of glycolysis by examining the time course of changes in enzymatic activities and metabolite contents. The results showed that the activities of all glycolytic enzymes as well as fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)), dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP), 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate contents increased. These results combined with our previous findings that the expression of phosphoglucomutase (PGM), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), enolase and pyruvate kinase (PK) increased after infection suggested that the additional establishment of glycolysis in the cytosol compartment occurred after infection. Further evidence for this was our recent findings that the increase in expression of the 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) plastid isozyme Os06g05860 was accompanied by an increase in expression of three cytosolic PFK isozymes, i.e. Os01g09570, Os01g53680 and Os04g39420, as well as pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofrucokinase (PFP) isozymes Os08g25720 (α-subunit) and Os06g13810 (β-subunit) in infected rice plants of the resistant line. The results also showed that the reactions catalysed by PFK/PFP, aldolase, GAPDH + phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and PK in leaf sheaths of R. solani-infected rice plants were non-equilibrium reactions in vivo. This study showed that PGM, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), TPI and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGmu

  10. Simultaneous Determination and Pharmacokinetic Study of Protocatechuic Aldehyde and Its Major Active Metabolite Protocatechuic Acid in Rat Plasma by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyang; Yan, Kaijing; Ma, Xiaohui; Li, Wei; Chu, Yang; Guo, Jiahua; Li, Shuming; Zhou, Shuiping; Zhu, Yonghong; Liu, Changxiao

    2016-05-01

    A very simple and selective high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed for simultaneous determination and pharmacokinetic study of protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL) and its active metabolite protocatechuic acid (PCA). The method involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The separation was performed on a Hypersil GOLD C18column (2.1 × 150 mm, 3.0 µm; particle, Thermo, USA) with isocratic elution using a mobile phase consisted of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The detection of target compounds was done by using low-energy collision dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS-MS) using the selective reaction monitoring scan mode. The method was linear for all analytes over the investigated range for all correlation coefficients greater than 0.9950. The lower limits of quantification were 2.0 ng/mL for PAL and PCA. The intra- and interday precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD %) were <6.84 and 5.54%, and the accuracy (relative error, RE %) was between -2.85 and 0.74% (n= 6). The developed method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics of PAL and its major active metabolite PCA in rat plasma after oral and intravenous administration of PAL. PMID:26969682

  11. Novel, unifying mechanism for mescaline in the central nervous system: electrochemistry, catechol redox metabolite, receptor, cell signaling and structure activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    A unifying mechanism for abused drugs has been proposed previously from the standpoint of electron transfer. Mescaline can be accommodated within the theoretical framework based on redox cycling by the catechol metabolite with its quinone counterpart. Electron transfer may play a role in electrical effects involving the nervous system in the brain. This approach is in accord with structure activity relationships involving mescaline, abused drugs, catecholamines, and etoposide. Inefficient demethylation is in keeping with the various drug properties, such as requirement for high dosage and slow acting. There is a discussion of receptor binding, electrical effects, cell signaling and other modes of action. Mescaline is a nonselective, seretonin receptor agonist. 5-HTP receptors are involved in the stimulus properties. Research addresses the aspect of stereochemical requirements. Receptor binding may involve the proposed quinone metabolite and/or the amino sidechain via protonation. Electroencephalographic studies were performed on the effects of mescaline on men. Spikes are elicited by stimulation of a cortical area. The potentials likely originate in nonsynaptic dendritic membranes. Receptor-mediated signaling pathways were examined which affect mescaline behavior. The hallucinogen belongs to the class of 2AR agonists which regulate pathways in cortical neurons. The research identifies neural and signaling mechanisms responsible for the biological effects. Recently, another hallucinogen, psilocybin, has been included within the unifying mechanistic framework. This mushroom constituent is hydrolyzed to the phenol psilocin, also active, which is subsequently oxidized to an ET o-quinone or iminoquinone. PMID:20716904

  12. Type I interferons and microbial metabolites of tryptophan modulate astrocyte activity and central nervous system inflammation via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Rothhammer, Veit; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Bunse, Lukas; Takenaka, Maisa C; Kenison, Jessica E; Mayo, Lior; Chao, Chun-Cheih; Patel, Bonny; Yan, Raymond; Blain, Manon; Alvarez, Jorge I; Kébir, Hania; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Jung, Steffen; Obholzer, Nikolaus; Pochet, Nathalie; Clish, Clary B; Prinz, Marco; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes have important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) during health and disease. Through genome-wide analyses we detected a transcriptional response to type I interferons (IFN-Is) in astrocytes during experimental CNS autoimmunity and also in CNS lesions from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). IFN-I signaling in astrocytes reduces inflammation and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease scores via the ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2). The anti-inflammatory effects of nasally administered interferon (IFN)-β are partly mediated by AHR. Dietary tryptophan is metabolized by the gut microbiota into AHR agonists that have an effect on astrocytes to limit CNS inflammation. EAE scores were increased following ampicillin treatment during the recovery phase, and CNS inflammation was reduced in antibiotic-treated mice by supplementation with the tryptophan metabolites indole, indoxyl-3-sulfate, indole-3-propionic acid and indole-3-aldehyde, or the bacterial enzyme tryptophanase. In individuals with MS, the circulating levels of AHR agonists were decreased. These findings suggest that IFN-Is produced in the CNS function in combination with metabolites derived from dietary tryptophan by the gut flora to activate AHR signaling in astrocytes and suppress CNS inflammation. PMID:27158906

  13. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J.; Moreno-Arribas, Mª Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100–500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI. PMID:26023719

  14. Evaluating the Effects of Tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone, an Active Metabolite of Pentachlorophenol, on the Growth of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Binbing; Gao, Bosong; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ), an active metabolite of pentachlorophenol (PCP), is genotoxic and potentially carcinogenic. As an electrophilic and oxidative molecule, TCBQ can conjugate with deoxyguanosine in DNA molecules and/or impose oxidative stress in cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCBQ on intracellular ROS production, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity against three different subtypes of human breast cancer cells. Luminal A subtype MCF7 (ER+, PR+, HER2−) cells maintained the highest intracellular ROS level and were subjected to TCBQ-induced ROS reduction, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. HER2 subtype Sk-Br-3 (ER−, PR−, HER2+) cells possessed the lowest intracellular ROS level. TCBQ promoted ROS production, inhibited apoptosis, and elevated cytotoxicity (due to necrosis) against Sk-Br-3 cells. Triple-negative/basal-like subtype MDA-MB-231 cells were less sensitive towards TCBQ treatment. Therefore, the effect of prolonged exposure to PCP and its active metabolites on cancer growth is highly cancer-cell-type specific. PMID:26981120

  15. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martínlvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, Maria Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI. PMID:26023719

  16. Quantitation of sorafenib and its active metabolite sorafenib N-oxide in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Lie; Zhao, Ming; Navid, Fariba; Pratz, Keith; Smith, B Doug; Rudek, Michelle A; Baker, Sharyn D

    2010-11-01

    A simple and rapid method with high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry is described for the quantitation of the kinase inhibitor sorafenib and its active metabolite sorafenib N-oxide in human plasma. A protein precipitation extraction procedure was applied to 50 μL of plasma. Chromatographic separation of the two analytes, and the internal standard [(2)H(3)(13)C]-sorafenib, was achieved on a C(18) analytical column and isocratic flow at 0.3 mL/min for 4 min. Mean within-run and between-run precision for all analytes were <6.9% and accuracy was <5.3%. Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 50-10,000 ng/mL for sorafenib and 10-2500 ng/mL for sorafenib N-oxide. This method allows a specific, sensitive, and reliable determination of the kinase inhibitor sorafenib and its active metabolite sorafenib N-oxide in human plasma in a single analytical run. PMID:20870468

  17. Evaluation of the use of oseltamivir prophylaxis in the control of influenza outbreaks in long-term care facilities in Alberta, Canada: a retrospective provincial database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ming; Jacobs, Angela; Khan, Muhammad Naeem; Jaipaul, Joy; Oda, Joanna; Johnson, Marcia; Doroshenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of oseltamivir prophylaxis in the management and control of influenza outbreaks in long-term care facilities in Alberta, Canada. Setting and participants Long-term care facilities where 127 influenza outbreaks were reported to public health authorities in Alberta, Canada, during two influenza seasons from 2013 to 2015. Design and outcome measures Using routinely collected surveillance and administrative data, we examined the association between decision-making time for oseltamivir recommendation as prophylaxis strategy for influenza outbreaks in long-term care facilities (explanatory variable) and the duration of an influenza outbreak, the postprophylaxis risk of influenza-like illness and hospitalisation among residents of long-term care facilities in Alberta (outcome variables) using multivariable linear and Poisson regression models. Results Oseltamivir prophylaxis decision-making time was positively associated with the postintervention duration of an outbreak, with a 1-day delay in making decision on oseltamivir prophylaxis associated with 2.22 (95% CI 1.37 to 3.06) more days of the duration of an outbreak after controlling for potential confounding effect of the number of residents at risk at intervention, outbreak progression time, prevalence of influenza-like illness during outbreak progression, facility location, presence of mixed strain and based on optimal timing of oseltamivir prophylaxis. Although not statistically significant, a 1-day delay in making decision on oseltamivir prophylaxis was associated with a 5% (95% CI −1% to 11%) increase in the postintervention risk of influenza-like illness, and a 6% (95% CI −8% to 22%) increase in the postintervention risk of hospitalisation after controlling for the same potential confounders. Conclusions Our study demonstrated benefits of using oseltamivir prophylaxis to shorten the duration of influenza outbreaks; however, there were no significant differences in the

  18. The Active Tamoxifen Metabolite Endoxifen (4OHNDtam) Strongly Down-Regulates Cytokeratin 6 (CK6) in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dankel, Simon; Fenne, Ingvild S.; Skartveit, Linn; Drangevåg, Andreas; Bozickovic, Olivera; Flågeng, Marianne Hauglid; Søiland, Håvard; Mellgren, Gunnar; Lien, Ernst A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen drug used in treatment of Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Effects and side effects of tamoxifen is the sum of tamoxifen and all its metabolites. 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4OHtam) and 4-hydroxy-N-demethyltamoxifen (4OHNDtam, endoxifen) both have ER affinity exceeding that of the parent drug tamoxifen. 4OHNDtam is considered the main active metabolite of tamoxifen. Ndesmethyltamoxifen (NDtam) is the major tamoxifen metabolite. It has low affinity to the ER and is not believed to influence tumor growth. However, NDtam might mediate adverse effects of tamoxifen treatment. In this study we investigated the gene regulatory effects of the three metabolites of tamoxifen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material and Methods Using concentrations that mimic the clinical situation we examined effects of 4OHtam, 4OHNDtam and NDtam on global gene expression in 17β-estradiol (E2) treated MCF-7 cells. Transcriptomic responses were assessed by correspondence analysis, differential expression, gene ontology analysis and quantitative real time PCR (Q-rt-PCR). E2 deprivation and knockdown of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 (SRC-3)/Amplified in Breast Cancer 1 (AIB1) mRNA in MCF-7 cells were performed to further characterize specific effects on gene expression. Results 4OHNDtam and 4OHtam caused major changes in gene expression compared to treatment with E2 alone, with a stronger effect of 4OHNDtam. NDtam had nearly no effect on the global gene expression profile. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 4OHNDtam led to a strong down-regulation of the CytoKeratin 6 isoforms (KRT6A, KRT6B and KRT6C). The CytoKeratin 6 mRNAs were also down-regulated in MCF-7 cells after E2 deprivation and after SRC-3/AIB1 knockdown. Conclusion Using concentrations that mimic the clinical situation we report global gene expression changes that were most pronounced with 4OHNDtam and minimal with NDtam. Genes encoding CytoKeratin 6, were highly down-regulated by 4

  19. Fungal metabolite ophiobolin A as a promising anti-glioma agent: In vivo evaluation, structure-activity relationship and unique pyrrolylation of primary amines.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; Masi, Marco; Lisy, Romana; Ferdérin, Marlène; English, Lance R; Cimmino, Alessio; Mathieu, Véronique; Brenner, Andrew J; Kuhn, John G; Whitten, Steven T; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    Glioblastoma, the most common form of malignant primary brain tumor, is characterized by resistance to apoptosis, which is largely responsible for the low effectiveness of the classical chemotherapeutic approaches based on apoptosis induction in cancer cells. Previously, a fungal secondary metabolite ophiobolin A was found to have significant activity against apoptosis-resistant glioblastoma cells through the induction of a non-apoptotic cell death, thus, offering an innovative strategy to combat this type of cancer. The current work describes the results of a preliminary evaluation of ophiobolin A in an in vivo glioblastoma model and its chemical derivatization to establish first synthetically generated structure-activity relationship. The synthetic work has also led to the discovery of a unique reaction of ophiobolin A with primary amines suggesting the possibility of pyrrolylation of lysine residues on its intracellular target protein(s). PMID:26341136

  20. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of an FtsZ Inhibitor, TXA-709, and Its Active Metabolite, TXA-707, in a Murine Neutropenic Thigh Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, Alexander J.; Parhi, Ajit; Madison, Michaela; Marchillo, Karen; VanHecker, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Processes of cellular division are attractive targets for new drug development. FtsZ, an integral protein involved in cell cytokinesis, is a representative example. In the present study, the pharmacodynamic (PD) activity of an FtsZ inhibitor, TXA-709, and its active metabolite, TXA-707, was evaluated in the neutropenic murine thigh infection model against 5 Staphylococcus aureus isolates, including both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant isolates. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of the TXA-707 active metabolite were examined after oral administration of the TXA-709 prodrug at 10, 40, and 160 mg/kg of body weight. The half-life ranged from 3.2 to 4.4 h, and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) were relatively linear over the doses studied. All organisms exhibited an MIC of 1 mg/liter. Dose fractionation demonstrated the area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC (AUC/MIC ratio) to be the PD index most closely linked to efficacy (R2 = 0.72). Dose-dependent activity was demonstrated against all 5 isolates, and the methicillin-resistance phenotype did not alter the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) targets. Net stasis was achieved against all isolates and a 1-log10 kill level against 4 isolates. PD targets included total drug 24-h AUC/MIC values of 122 for net stasis and 243 for 1-log10 killing. TXA-709 and TXA-707 are a promising novel antibacterial class and compound for S. aureus infections. These results should prove useful for design of clinical dosing regimen trials. PMID:26259789

  1. Analysis of prasugrel active metabolite R-138727 in human plasma: a sensitive, highly selective and fast LC-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Sreekanth; Datla, Peda Varma; Kodali, Geetha; Seru, Ganapaty

    2016-05-01

    A cost effective, sensitive, simple, and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of the prasugrel metabolite in human plasma. Following solid phase extraction, the analyte (prasugrel active metabolite; R-138727) and internal standard (emtricitabine) were separated using a mobile phase in an isocratic elution mode on a reverse phase C18 column and were analyzed by an LC-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using the respective [M+H](+) ions, m/z 498.3-206.0 for R-138727 and m/z 248.2-130.1 for the internal standard. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.2-120ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 0.2ng/mL with a relative standard deviation of 5.0%. This LC-MS/MS method was validated with intra-batch and inter-batch precision and accuracy. Results for precision and accuracy are in range of 3.9-9.6% and 95.2-102.2% respectively. This validated method is simple and repeatable to use in bioequivalence/pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:27038402

  2. How PBDEs Are Transformed into Dihydroxylated and Dioxin Metabolites Catalyzed by the Active Center of Cytochrome P450s: A DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong; Chen, Jingwen; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Xingbao

    2016-08-01

    Predicting metabolism of chemicals and potential toxicities of relevant metabolites remains a vital and difficult task in risk assessment. Recent findings suggested that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) can be transformed into dihydroxylated and dioxin metabolites catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), whereas the mechanisms pertinent to these transformations remain largely unknown. Here, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we probed the metabolic pathways of 2,2',4,4'-tetraBDE (BDE-47) using the active center model of CYPs (Compound I). Results show that BDE-47 is first oxidized to monohydroxylated products (HO-BDEs), wherein a keto-enol tautomerism is identified for rearrangement of the cyclohexenone intermediate. Dihydroxylation with HO-BDEs as precursors, has a unique phenolic H-abstraction and hydroxyl rebound pathway that is distinct from that for monohydroxylation, which accounts for the absence of epoxides in in vitro studies. Furthermore, we found only dihydroxylated PBDEs with heterophenyl -OH substituents ortho- and meta- to the ether bond serve as precursors for dioxins, which are evolved from aryl biradical coupling of diketone intermediates that are produced from dehydrogenation of the dihydroxylated PBDEs by Compound I. This study may enlighten the development of computational models that afford mechanism-based prediction of the xenobiotic biotransformation catalyzed by CYPs. PMID:27363260

  3. Challenges and solutions in the bioanalysis of BMS-986094 and its metabolites including a highly polar, active nucleoside triphosphate in plasma and tissues using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ang; Lute, John; Gu, Huidong; Wang, Bonnie; Trouba, Kevin J; Arnold, Mark E; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    BMS-986094, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus, was withdrawn from clinical trials because of a serious safety issue. To investigate a potential association between drug/metabolite exposure and toxicity in evaluations conducted after the termination of the BMS-986094 development program, it was essential to determine the levels of BMS-986094 and its major metabolites INX-08032, INX-08144 and INX-09054 in circulation and the active nucleoside triphosphate INX-09114 in target and non-target tissues. However, there were many challenges in the bioanalysis of these compounds. The chromatography challenge for the extremely polar nucleoside triphosphate was solved by applying mixed-mode chromatography which combined anion exchange and reversed-phase interactions. The LC conditions provided adequate retention and good peak shape of the analyte and showed good robustness. A strategy using simultaneous extraction but separate LC analysis of the prodrug BMS-986094 and its major circulating metabolites was used to overcome a carryover issue of the hydrophobic prodrug while still achieving good chromatography of the polar metabolites. In addition, the nucleotide analytes were not stable in the presence of endogenous enzymes. Low pH and low temperature were required for blood collection and plasma sample processing. However, the use of phosphatase inhibitor and immediate homogenization and extraction were critical for the quantitative analysis of the active triphosphate, INX-09114, in tissue samples. To alleviate the bioanalytical complexity caused by multiple analytes, different matrices, and various species, a fit-for-purpose approach to assay validation was implemented based on the needs of drug safety assessment in non-clinical (GLP or non-GLP) studies. The assay for INX-08032 was fully validated in plasma of toxicology species. The lower limit of quantification was 1.00ng/mL and the linear curve range was 1.00-500.00ng/mL using a weighted (1/x(2

  4. Induction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15 gene expression by the major active metabolites of tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chanawong, Apichaya; Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; Mackenzie, Peter I; McKinnon, Ross A

    2015-06-01

    We previously reported upregulation of UGT2B15 by 17β-estradiol in breast cancer MCF7 cells via binding of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) to an estrogen response unit (ERU) in the proximal UGT2B15 promoter. In the present study, we show that this ERα-mediated upregulation was significantly reduced by two ER antagonists (fulvestrant and raloxifene) but was not affected by a third ER antagonist, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHTAM), a major active tamoxifen (TAM) metabolite. Furthermore, we found that, similar to 17β-estradiol, 4-OHTAM and endoxifen (another major active TAM metabolite) elevated UGT2B15 mRNA levels, and that this stimulation was significantly abrogated by fulvestrant. Further experiments using 4-OHTAM revealed a critical role for ERα in this regulation. Specifically; knockdown of ERα expression by anti-ERα small interfering RNA reduced the 4-OHTAM-mediated induction of UGT2B15 expression; 4-OHTAM activated the wild-type but not the ERU-mutated UGT2B15 promoter; and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed increased ERα occupancy at the UGT2B15 ERU in MCF7 cells upon exposure to 4-OHTAM. Together, these data indicate that both 17β-estradiol and the antiestrogen 4-OHTAM upregulate UGT2B15 in MCF7 cells via the same ERα-signaling pathway. This is consistent with previous observations that both 17β-estradiol and TAM upregulate a common set of genes in MCF7 cells via the ER-signaling pathway. As 4-OHTAM is a UGT2B15 substrate, the upregulation of UGT2B15 by 4-OHTAM in target breast cancer cells is likely to enhance local metabolism and inactivation of 4-OHTAM within the tumor. This represents a potential mechanism that may reduce TAM therapeutic efficacy or even contribute to the development of acquired TAM resistance. PMID:25795461

  5. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  6. In silico modification of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza A virus subtype H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Rachmania, Rizky Archintya; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research focused on the modification of the functional groups of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor against influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Interactions of three of the best ligands were evaluated in the hydrated state using molecular dynamics simulation at two different temperatures. The docking result showed that AD3BF2D ligand (N-[(1S,6R)-5-amino-5-{[(2R,3S,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]oxy}-4-formylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]acetamide-3-(1-ethylpropoxy)-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate) had better binding energy values than standard oseltamivir. AD3BF2D had several interactions, including hydrogen bonds, with the residues in the catalytic site of neuraminidase as identified by molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that AD3BF2D ligand can be used as a good candidate for neuraminidase inhibitor to cope with influenza A virus subtype H1N1. PMID:25859271

  7. In silico screening of molecular imprinting prepolymerization systems: oseltamivir selective polymers through full-system molecular dynamics-based studies.

    PubMed

    Shoravi, Siamak; Olsson, Gustaf D; Karlsson, Björn C G; Bexborn, Fredrik; Abghoui, Younes; Hussain, Javed; Wiklander, Jesper G; Nicholls, Ian A

    2016-05-01

    All-component molecular dynamics studies were used to probe a library of oseltamivir molecularly imprinted polymer prepolymerization mixtures. Polymers included one of five functional monomers (acrylamide, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, methacrylic acid, 2-(triflouromethyl)acrylic acid, 4-vinylpyridine) and one of three porogens (acetonitrile, chloroform, methanol) combined with the crosslinking agent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile). Polymers were characterized by nitrogen gas sorption measurements and SEM, and affinity studies performed using radioligand binding in various media. In agreement with the predictions made from the simulations, polymers prepared in acetonitrile using either methacrylic or trifluoromethacrylic acid demonstrated the highest affinities for oseltamivir. Further, the ensemble of interactions observed in the methanol system provided an explanation for the morphology of polymers prepared in this solvent. The materials developed here offer potential for use in solid-phase extraction or for catalysis. The results illustrate the strength of this in silico strategy as a potential prognostic tool in molecularly imprinted polymer design. PMID:27043914

  8. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  9. A new and fast DLLME-CE method for the enantioselective analysis of zopiclone and its active metabolite after fungal biotransformation.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2015-05-10

    Zopiclone (ZO) is a chiral drug that undergoes extensive metabolism to N-desmethylzopiclone (N-Des-ZO) and zopiclone-N-oxide (N-Ox-ZO). Pharmacological studies have shown (S)-N-Des-ZO metabolite presents anxiolytic activity and a patent for this metabolite was requested for anxiety treatment and related disorders. In this context, biotransformation employing fungi may be a promising strategy to obtain N-Des-ZO. To perform the biotransformation study in this work, an enantioselective method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed. CE analyses were carried out in sodium phosphate buffer (pH 2.5; 50mmolL(-1)) containing 0.5% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD, at a constant voltage of +25kV. DLLME was conducted using 2mL of liquid culture medium pH 9.5. Chloroform (100μL) and methanol (300μL) were employed as extraction and disperser solvent, respectively. After CE and DLLME optimization, the analytical method was fully validated. The method was linear over a concentration range of 90-6000ngmL(-1) for each ZO enantiomer (r>0.999) and 50-1000ngmL(-1) for each N-Des-ZO enantiomer (r>0.998). Absolute recovery of 51 and 82% was achieved for N-Des-ZO and ZO, respectively. The accuracy and precision results agreed with the EMA (European Medicines Agency) guideline, and so did the stability study. Application of the developed method in a biotransformation study was conducted in order to investigate the ability of fungi, belonging to the genus Cunninghamella, in metabolizing ZO chiral drug. Fungi Cunninghamella elegans ATCC 10028B and Cunninghamella echinulata var elegans ATCC 8688A demonstrated to be able to enantioselectively biotransform ZO to its active metabolite, N-Des-ZO. Therefore, the proposed goals of this work, i.e. a fast DLLME-CE method and an outstanding strategy to obtain N-Des-ZO, were successfully attained. PMID:25778930

  10. Isolation of Secondary Metabolites from the Soil-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea YRS-06, a Biological Control Agent, and Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ming-Ming; Qi, Feng-Ming; Li, Jie; Jiang, Chun-Xiao; Hou, Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Di, Duo-Long; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Wu, Quan-Xiang

    2016-03-23

    The fungus Clonostachys rosea is widely distributed all over the world. The destructive force of this fungus, as a biological control agent, is very strong to lots of plant pathogenic fungi. As part of the ongoing search for antibiotics from fungi obtained from soil samples, the secondary metabolites of C. rosea YRS-06 were investigated. Through efficient bioassay-guided isolation, three new bisorbicillinoids possessing open-ended cage structures, tetrahydrotrichodimer ether (1) and dihydrotrichodimer ether A and B (2 and 3), and 12 known compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined via extensive NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and CD spectroscopic analyses and X-ray diffraction data. Compounds 1-3 are rare bisorbicillinoids with a γ-pyrone moiety. The biological properties of 1-15 were evaluated against six different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Bisorbicillinoids, 2-5, and TMC-151 C and E, 14 and 15, showed potent antibacterial activity. PMID:26974009

  11. The large-leaved Kudingcha (Ilex latifolia Thunb and Ilex kudingcha C.J. Tseng): a traditional Chinese tea with plentiful secondary metabolites and potential biological activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xu, Li J; Ma, Gui Z; Dong, Yin M; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Pei G

    2013-07-01

    In China, Kudingcha has been used for almost 2,000 years as a tea to quench thirst, remove phlegm, refresh the mind, and improve eyesight. The group of large-leaved Kudingcha is coveted for its potential effects on lipid metabolism, which are attributed to the presence of characteristic ingredients. This contribution reviews studies from the past few decades regarding the plant characteristics, ethnobotanical usages, chemical constituents, and related biological activities of the large-leaved Kudingcha (Ilex latifolia Thunb and Ilex kudingcha C.J. Tseng). Triterpenoids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, and essential oils are the main metabolites in the large-leaved Kudingcha, and these ingredients protect the vascular system, regulate lipid metabolism, and have antioxidant, hypoglycemic, and anti-tumor effects. Moreover, large-leaved Kudingcha shares several properties with the popular green tea and the Yerba maté from South America. PMID:23529541

  12. An environmental risk assessment for oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for sewage works and surface waters under seasonal-influenza- and pandemic-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2009-09-01

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, anti-viral medications such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) are expected to be used in high amounts over a duration of several weeks. Oseltamivir has been predicted to reach high concentrations in surface waters and sewage works. New oseltamivir environmental fate and toxicity studies permit an environmental risk assessment (ERA) under seasonal- and pandemic-use scenarios. The environmental fate data for sewage works (no removal), surface waters (no significant degradation), and water/sediment systems (>50% primary degradation in 100 days) were used for the derivation of new predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for western Europe and the River Lee catchment in the UK. Existing worst-case PECs for western Europe, the River Lee catchment in the UK and the Lower Colorado basin in the USA under pandemic conditions (< or =98.1 microg/L for surface waters, < or =348 microg/L for sewage works) were also considered for the ERA. PECs were compared with predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) based on new chronic ecotoxicity data (no observed effect concentration for algae, daphnia, and fish > or =1 mg/L). Based on all PEC/PNEC risk ratios, no significant risk is evident to surface waters or sewage works during both regular seasonal-use and high pandemic-use of oseltamivir. PMID:19560203

  13. Participation of covalent modification of Keap1 in the activation of Nrf2 by tert-butylbenzoquinone, an electrophilic metabolite of butylated hydroxyanisole

    SciTech Connect

    Abiko, Yumi; Miura, Takashi; Phuc, Bui Hoang; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2011-08-15

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is an antioxidant and class-2B carcinogen. It is biotransformed to tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), which readily auto-oxidizes to the electrophilic metabolite tert-butylbenzoquinone (TBQ). BHA and TBHQ activate Nrf2, a transcription factor that is negatively regulated by Keap1 and plays a role in the initial response to chemicals causing oxidative or electrophilic stress, although, the exact mechanism of Nrf2 activation remains unclear. Here, we examined the role of TBQ in Nrf2 activation. Exposure of RAW264.7 cells to TBQ activated Nrf2 and up-regulated its downstream proteins; under these conditions, TBQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, while pretreatment with catalase conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-CAT) did not affect the TBQ-induced activation of Nrf2, the ROS generation caused by TBQ was entirely abolished by PEG-CAT, suggesting that ROS is not the dominant factor for TBQ-dependent Nrf2 activation. A click chemistry technique indicated that TBQ chemically modifies Keap1. Furthermore, ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis with purified Keap1 revealed that TBQ covalently binds to Keap1 through Cys23, Cys151, Cys226, and Cys368. These results suggest that TBQ derived from BHA activates Nrf2 through electrophilic modification of Keap1 rather than ROS formation. - Research Highlights: > tert-Butylbenzoquinone (TBQ) activates Nrf2 in RAW264.7 cells. > ROS is not essential factor for Nrf2 activation caused by TBQ. > TBQ covalently binds to Keap1 through reactive thiols, resulting in Nrf2 activation.

  14. Oxidized Metabolites of 20-Hydroxyecdysone and Their Activity on Skeletal Muscle Cells: Preparation of a Pair of Desmotropes with Opposite Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Csábi, József; Hsieh, Tusty-Jiuan; Hasanpour, Feria; Martins, Ana; Kele, Zoltán; Gáti, Tamás; Simon, András; Tóth, Gábor; Hunyadi, Attila

    2015-10-23

    Increasing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt) has been suggested as a key signaling step in the nonhormonal anabolic activity of the phytoecdysteroid 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) in mammals. Base-catalyzed autoxidation of this compound was shown previously to yield interesting B-ring-modified analogues. Herein is reported a thorough study on this reaction, resulting in the preparation and complete NMR spectroscopic assignments of calonysterone (5) and its previously overlooked desmotropic pair (7), along with two new sensitive metabolites of 20E. The two isomers showed considerable stability in solution. Time dependency of the reaction for yield optimization is also presented; by means of analytical HPLC, the two desmotropes can reach a maximum combined yield of >90%. The activity of these compounds on Akt phosphorylation was tested in murine skeletal muscle cells. Compounds 2 and 5 showed more potent activity than 20E in increasing Akt activation, while compound 7 exerted an opposite effect. As such, the present study provides the first direct evidence for a pair of desmotropes exerting significantly different bioactivities. PMID:26465254

  15. The Inotropic Effect of the Active Metabolite of Levosimendan, OR-1896, Is Mediated through Inhibition of PDE3 in Rat Ventricular Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Ørstavik, Øivind; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Andersen, Geir Øystein; Skomedal, Tor; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2015-01-01

    Aims We recently published that the positive inotropic response (PIR) to levosimendan can be fully accounted for by phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition in both failing human heart and normal rat heart. To determine if the PIR of the active metabolite OR-1896, an important mediator of the long-term clinical effects of levosimendan, also results from PDE3 inhibition, we compared the effects of OR-1896, a representative Ca2+ sensitizer EMD57033 (EMD), levosimendan and other PDE inhibitors. Methods Contractile force was measured in rat ventricular strips. PDE assay was conducted on rat ventricular homogenate. cAMP was measured using RII_epac FRET-based sensors. Results OR-1896 evoked a maximum PIR of 33±10% above basal at 1 μM. This response was amplified in the presence of the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (89±14%) and absent in the presence of the PDE3 inhibitors cilostamide (0.5±5.3%) or milrinone (3.2±4.4%). The PIR was accompanied by a lusitropic response, and both were reversed by muscarinic receptor stimulation with carbachol and absent in the presence of β-AR blockade with timolol. OR-1896 inhibited PDE activity and increased cAMP levels at concentrations giving PIRs. OR-1896 did not sensitize the concentration-response relationship to extracellular Ca2+. Levosimendan, OR-1896 and EMD all increased the sensitivity to β-AR stimulation. The combination of either EMD and levosimendan or EMD and OR-1896 further sensitized the response, indicating at least two different mechanisms responsible for the sensitization. Only EMD sensitized the α1-AR response. Conclusion The observed PIR to OR-1896 in rat ventricular strips is mediated through PDE3 inhibition, enhancing cAMP-mediated effects. These results further reinforce our previous finding that Ca2+ sensitization does not play a significant role in the inotropic (and lusitropic) effect of levosimendan, nor of its main metabolite OR-1896. PMID:25738589

  16. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aloe vera Adventitious Root Extracts through the Alteration of Primary and Secondary Metabolites via Salicylic Acid Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10–11 and 5–13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment. PMID:24358188

  17. A Semiphysiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Approach to Predict the Dose-Exposure Relationship of an Antiparasitic Prodrug/Active Metabolite Pair

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Grace Zhixia; Generaux, Claudia N.; Yoon, Miyoung; Goldsmith, Rachel B.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Hall, James E.; Olson, Carol A.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Dose selection during antiparasitic drug development in animal models and humans traditionally has relied on correlations between plasma concentrations obtained at or below maximally tolerated doses that are efficacious. The objective of this study was to improve the understanding of the relationship between dose and plasma/tissue exposure of the model antiparasitic agent, pafuramidine, using a semiphysiologically based pharmacokinetic (semi-PBPK) modeling approach. Preclinical and clinical data generated during the development of pafuramidine, a prodrug of the active metabolite, furamidine, were used. A whole-body semi-PBPK model for rats was developed based on a whole-liver PBPK model using rat isolated perfused liver data. A whole-body semi-PBPK model for humans was developed on the basis of the whole-body rat model. Scaling factors were calculated using metabolic and transport clearance data generated from rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes. Both whole-body models described pafuramidine and furamidine disposition in plasma and predicted furamidine tissue (liver and kidney) exposure and excretion profiles (biliary and renal). The whole-body models predicted that the intestine contributes significantly (30–40%) to presystemic furamidine formation in both rats and humans. The predicted terminal elimination half-life of furamidine in plasma was 3- to 4-fold longer than that of pafuramidine in rats (170 versus 47 h) and humans (64 versus 19 h). The dose-plasma/tissue exposure relationship for the prodrug/active metabolite pair was determined using the whole-body models. The human model proposed a dose regimen of pafuramidine (40 mg once daily) based on a predefined efficacy-safety index. A similar approach could be used to guide dose-ranging studies in humans for next-in-class compounds. PMID:21953913

  18. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes. PMID:26863742

  19. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPARγ) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding

  20. Metabolite identification of seven active components of Huan-Nao-Yi-Cong-Fang in rat plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minchao; Lu, Yanzhen; Liu, Jiangang; Li, Hao; Wei, Yun

    2016-02-01

    Huan-Nao-Yi-Cong-Fang (HNYCF) is a potential prescription in treating Alzheimer's disease. Seven constituents [ferulic acid (FA), 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (THSG), berberine hydrochloride (BHCl), emodin, ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), ginsenoside Re (Re) and ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1)] have been used as quality chemical markers of HNYCF owing to their biological significance and high contents in crude plant materials. This study explored the metabolites of the seven bioactive components in rat plasma to give useful data for further study of the action mechanism of HNYCF. LC/MS-IT-TOF was used to simultaneously characterize the metabolites of the seven components. Using the combination of MetID Solution 1.0 software and accurate mass measurements, the metabolites of HNYCF were reliably characterized. Their structures were elucidated based on the accurate MS(2) spectra and comparisons of their changes in accurate molecular masses and fragment ions with those of parent compounds. A total of five parent active compounds (BHCl, emodin, Rg1, Rb1 and Re) and 10 metabolites were found from the rat plasma 2 h after oral administration of HNYCF dosage, of which two metabolites of emodin were observed for the first time. The proposed metabolic pathways of the bioactive components in the rat plasma are helpful for further studies on the pharmacokinetics and real active compound forms of this drug. PMID:26138785

  1. Antimicrobial, phytotoxic, nematicidal, cytotoxic, and mutagenic activities of 1-hydroxypyrene, the initial metabolite in pyrene metabolism by the basidiomycete Crinipellis stipitaria

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.; Kremer, S.; Anke, H.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the testing fungi for degradation or detoxification of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and elucidation of the pathways involved. Investigations on microbial metabolism of pyrene are limited to some bacteria and the fungi Cunninghamella elegans, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Crinipellis stipitaria and Aspergillus niger. The fungal transformation products of pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene, 1,6-dihydroxypyrene, 1,8-dihydroxypyrene, 1,6-pyrenequinone, 1,8-pyrenequinone and some glucoside conjugates of hydroxylated pyrenes were identified. Until now, only mutagenic activities of some of these metabolites towards Salmonella typhimurium have been reported. Nothing is known about additional biological activities of these compounds, especially their effects on soil organisms are of ecological importance. During bioremediation processes these compounds could accumulate. In the present study we describe the antimicrobial, nematicidal, phytotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic activities of 1-hydroxypyrene, the initial transformation product of pyrene metabolization by C. stipitaria and compares this, with the activities of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene. 15 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Species-Dependent Uptake of Glycylsarcosine but Not Oseltamivir in Pichia pastoris Expressing the Rat, Mouse, and Human Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glycylsarcosine (a model dipeptide) and oseltamivir (an antiviral prodrug) exhibited a species-dependent uptake in yeast Pichia pastoris expressing the rat, mouse, and human homologs of PEPT1. Experiments were performed with [3H]glycylsarcosine (GlySar) in yeast P. pastoris expressing human, mouse, and rat peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1), in which uptake was examined as a function of time, concentration, potential inhibitors, and the dose-response inhibition of GlySar by oseltamivir. Studies with [14C]oseltamivir were also performed under identical experimental conditions. We found that GlySar exhibited saturable uptake in all three species, with Km values for human (0.86 mM) > mouse (0.30 mM) > rat (0.16 mM). GlySar uptake in the yeast transformants was specific for peptides (glycylproline) and peptide-like drugs (cefadroxil, cephradine, and valacyclovir), but was unaffected by glycine, l-histidine, cefazolin, cephalothin, cephapirin, acyclovir, 4-acetamido-4′-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid, tetraethylammonium, and elacridar. Although oseltamivir caused a dose-dependent inhibition of GlySar uptake [IC50 values for human (27.4 mM) > rat (18.3 mM) > mouse (10.7 mM)], the clinical relevance of this interaction would be very low in humans. Of importance, oseltamivir was not a substrate for the intestinal PEPT1 transporter in yeast expressing the three mammalian species tested. Instead, the prodrug exhibited nonspecific binding to the yeast vector and PEPT1 transformants. Finally, the mouse appeared to be a better animal model than the rat for exploring the intestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of peptides and peptide-like drugs in human. PMID:22490229

  3. Validation of an enzyme immunoassay for assessing adrenocortical activity and evaluation of factors that affect levels of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two New World primates.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, Rebecca; Heymann, Eckhard W; Link, Andrés; Heistermann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Non-invasive methods to assess stress hormone output via fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) have become a powerful tool in behavioral studies and conservation biology because they allow exploring the link between behavior, an animal's socio-ecological environment and its adrenocortical activity. However, FGCM levels are influenced by numerous other factors which often confound their interpretation. Thus, before applying these methods, knowledge on the impact of these factors is important. In this study we investigated the effect of (1) time of day, (2) age, (3) sex and (4) female reproductive state on FGCM levels in brown spider monkeys (Ateles hybridus) and red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus). Initially, we validated a 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone enzyme immunoassay for monitoring the physiological stress response via fecal analysis in both species. We determined FGCM levels in fecal samples collected from two and six groups of wild spider monkeys (n=461 samples) and howler monkeys (n=166 samples), respectively. Our analyses revealed a strong effect of time of day on FGCM levels in spider monkeys, but no effect in howler monkeys. Adults of both species had significantly higher FGCM levels than subadults. In neither of the two species we found a sex-effect on FGCM output. Reproductive condition strongly affected FGCM levels in female spider monkeys which showed increasing concentrations with progressing gestation. This was not investigated in female howler monkeys due to an insufficient sample size. Our data indicate that the influence of the tested factors on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite output is species-specific, and that these variables need to be considered when interpreting FGCM levels in the species. PMID:23707497

  4. Formation and anti-tumor activity of uncommon in vitro and in vivo metabolites of CPI-613, a novel anti-tumor compound that selectively alters tumor energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, King C; Shorr, Robert; Rodriguez, Robert; Maturo, Claudia; Boteju, Lakmal W; Sheldon, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    CPI-613 is a novel anti-tumor compound with a mechanism-of-action which appears distinct from the current classes of anti-cancer agents used in the clinic. CPI-613 demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity. In vitro metabolic studies using liver S9 were performed which demonstrated that CPI-613 undergoes both phase 1 (oxidation) and phase 2 (glucuronidation) transformations. Its metabolic half-life varied between species and ranged from 8 minutes (Hanford minipig) to 47 minutes (CD-1 mouse). We performed metabolite mass assessments using selected in vitro incubation samples and demonstrated that +16 amu oxidation with and without +176 amu glucuronidation products were generated by human and animal liver S9. LC/MS/MS fragmentation patterns showed that an uncommon sulfoxide metabolite was formed and the O-glucuronidation occurred at the terminal carboxyl moiety. We observed that the +192 amu sulfoxide/glucuronide was generated only in human liver S9 and not by any of the other species tested. Synthetic metabolites were prepared and compared with the enzymatically-generated metabolites. Both the chromatographic retention times and the LC/MS/MS fragmentation patterns were similar, demonstrating that the synthetic metabolites were virtually identical to the S9-generated products. CYP450 reaction phenotyping and inhibition data both suggested that multiple CYP isozymes (2C8 and 3A4, along with minor contributions by 2C9 and 2C19) were involved in CPI-613 metabolism and sulfoxide formation. Plasma samples from human subjects dosed with CPI-613 also contained the sulfoxide ± glucuronide metabolites. These results show that the in vitro- and in vivo-generated phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites were in good agreement. PMID:21722089

  5. Substrate-competitive activity-based profiling of ester prodrug activating enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D.; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H.; Carlson, Heather A.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Martin, Brent R.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating pre-clinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a 4-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse, but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design and preclinical

  6. Novel concept in the mechanism of injury and protection of gastric mucosa: role of renin-angiotensin system and active metabolites of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Ptak-Belowska, A; Kwiecien, S; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Strzalka, M; Drozdowicz, D; Pajdo, R; Olszanecki, R; Korbut, R; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2012-01-01

    The term cytoprotection pioneered by Robert and colleagues has been introduced to describe the remarkable ability of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins (PGs) to prevent acute gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by noxious stimuli such as ethanol, bile acids, hiperosmolar solutions and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin. Since that time many factors were implicated to possess gastroprotective properties such as growth factors including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming factor alpha (TGFα), vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) as well as appetite gut hormones including gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin and recently ghrelin. This protective action of gut peptides has been attributed to the release of PG but question remains whether another peptide angiotensin, the classic component of the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could be involved in the mechanism of gastric integrity and gastroprotection. After renin stimulation, the circulating angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II (ANG II) by the activity of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). The ANG II acting via its binding to two major receptor subtypes the ANG type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) has been shown be activated during stress and to contribute to the pathogenesis of cold stress- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric lesions. All bioactive angiotensin peptides can be generated not only in systemic circulation, but also locally in several tissues and organs. Recently the new functional components of RAS, such as Ang-(1-7), Ang IV, Ang-(1-12) and novel pathways ACE2 have been described suggesting the gastroprotective role for the novel ANG II metabolite, Ang-(1-7). The fact that Ang-(1-7) is produced in excessive amounts in the gastric mucosa of rodents and that pretreatment by Ang-(1-7) exhibits a potent gastroprotective activity against the gastric lesions induced by cold

  7. Short-term effect of dietary yeast nucleotide supplementation on small intestinal enzyme activities, bacterial populations and metabolites and ileal nutrient digestibilities in newly weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Sauer, N; Eklund, M; Roth, S; Rink, F; Jezierny, D; Bauer, E; Mosenthin, R

    2012-08-01

    In previous studies, dietary nucleotides have been shown to improve performance in single-stomached animals by promoting the renewal of small intestine epithelial cells and by influencing the activity and composition of the microbial community in the digestive tract. The present experiment was carried out with 12 barrows weaned at the age of 18 days and fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. To determine short-term effects of dietary yeast nucleotides, the piglets received a grain-soybean meal-based basal diet with or without supplementation of 1 g/kg of a dried yeast product containing free nucleotides. Dietary supplementation with yeast did not affect bacterial numbers in the ileum as well as ileal concentrations of individual short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), total SCFA and total lactic acid (p > 0.05). Moreover, there was no effect of supplemental yeast nucleotides on ileal α-amylase, leucine amino peptidase, maltase and lactase activities (p > 0.05), as well as on ileal dry matter, crude protein and crude fibre digestibilities (p > 0.05). In conclusion, short-term supplementation with dietary yeast nucleotides did not affect microbial metabolite concentrations, bacterial numbers and enzyme activities in the ileal digesta as well as ileal nutrient digestibilities of newly weaned pigs. PMID:21797935

  8. Oseltamivir treatment of mice before or after mild influenza infection reduced cellular and cytokine inflammation in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Zi Xin; Jones, Jessica E.; Anderson, Gary P.; Gualano, Rosa C.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Wong et al. (2011) Oseltamivir treatment of mice before or after mild influenza infection reduced cellular and cytokine inflammation in the lung. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 343–350. Background  Lung inflammation is a critical determinant of influenza infection outcomes but is seldom evaluated in animal studies of oseltamivir (OS), which have focused on viral titre and survival. Objectives  To study the effects of pre‐ and post‐infection dosing with OS on viral replication and inflammation in a mouse model of non‐lethal influenza infection. Methods  BALB/c mice were infected with a laboratory‐adapted H3N1 strain of influenza. In pre‐dosing studies, OS was gavaged twice daily (1 and 10 mg/kg/day) from 4 hours prior to infection and continuing for 5 days (d) post‐infection (p.i). In the second post‐infection dosing study, dosing at 10 mg/kg/day began at 24–48 hours p.i. Mice were dissected at d3, d5 and d7 p.i. (pre‐dosing study) and d5 p.i. (post‐dosing study). Lung viral titres were determined by plaque assay. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and used for the quantitation of inflammatory cells and mediators. Results  Pre‐infection dosing of OS reduced total cells, neutrophils and macrophages in BALF. With pre‐ or post‐infection dosing, the pro‐inflammatory mediators TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and granulocyte–macrophage colony‐stimulating factor, the neutrophil chemokines keratinocyte‐derived chemokine and MIP‐1α and the macrophage chemokine MCP‐1 were reduced in BALF. Pre‐dosing with 1 mg/kg OS did not reduce viral titres, while 10 mg/kg slightly reduced viral titres at d3 and d5 p.i. Conclusions  Oseltamivir reduced the inflammatory response to influenza when given pre‐ or post‐infection. This anti‐inflammatory effect may contribute to the clinical benefit of OS. PMID:21668689

  9. A NOVEL METABOLIC ACTIVATION PATHWAY FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES-MEDIATED DNA DAMAGE AND MORPHOLOGICAL CELL TRANSFORMATION IN MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS BY K-REGION DIOL METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[ a ]pyrene (BP) is a well-studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) .Many
    mechanisms have been suggested to explain its carcinogenic activity, yet many questions still
    remain. K-region dihydrodiols (diols) ofPAHs are common metabolites and some are genotoxic. W...

  10. Antileishmanial Metabolites from Geosmithia langdonii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antileishmanial bioassay guided fractionation of Geosmithia langdonii has resulted in the isolation and identification of two new compounds (1 and 2) together with 10 known compounds (3–12). The structures of the isolated metabolites were elucidated based on comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data as well as mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration at C4, C5, and C6 of 2 was determined as R using a modified Mosher esterification method and NOESY correlations. The extracts and the isolated metabolites were evaluated for their antileishmanial activities. Compounds 3, 9, 11, and 12 were found to be active against Leishmania donovani with IC50 values of 6.9, 3.3, 8.5, and 9.2 μM, respectively, while compounds 1, 5, and 10 showed lower activities against L. donovani with IC50 values of 13.0, 47.3, and 34.0 μM, respectively. PMID:25084548

  11. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an endogenous 17β-estradiol metabolite, inhibits microglial proliferation and activation via an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schaufelberger, Sara A; Rosselli, Marinella; Barchiesi, Federica; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (estradiol) inhibits microglia proliferation. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) is an endogenous metabolite of estradiol with little affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). We hypothesize that 2-ME inhibits microglial proliferation and activation and contributes to estradiol's inhibitory effects on microglia. We compared the effects of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol [2-OE; estradiol metabolite produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP450)], and 2-ME [formed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) acting upon 2-OE] on microglial (BV2 cells) DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, activation, and phagocytosis. 2-ME and 2-OE were approximately three- and 10-fold, respectively, more potent than estradiol in inhibiting microglia DNA synthesis. The antimitogenic effects of estradiol were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of CYP450 and COMT. Inhibition of COMT blocked the conversion of 2-OE to 2-ME and the antimitogenic effects of 2-OE but not 2-ME. Microglia expressed ERβ and GPR30 but not ERα. 2,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERβ agonist), but not 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (ERα agonist) or G1 (GPR30 agonist), inhibited microglial proliferation. The antiproliferative effects of estradiol, but not 2-OE or 2-ME, were partially reversed by ICI-182,780 (ERα/β antagonist) but not by 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole (ERα antagonist) or G15 (GPR30 antagonist). Lipopolysaccharide increased microglia iNOS and COX-2 expression and phagocytosing activity of microglia; these effects were inhibited by 2-ME. We conclude that in microglia, 2-ME inhibits proliferation, proinflammatory responses, and phagocytosis. 2-ME partially mediates the effects of estradiol via ER-independent mechanisms involving sequential metabolism of estradiol to 2-OE and 2-ME. 2-ME could be of potential therapeutic use in postischemic stroke injuries. Interindividual differences in estradiol metabolism might affect the

  12. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  13. Primary, secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity and antioxidant activity of the Malaysian Herb Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pumila Benth) exposed to potassium fertilization under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design was used to characterize the relationship between production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carbohydrate content, leaf gas exchange, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), soluble protein, invertase and antioxidant enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Labisia pumila Benth var. alata under four levels of potassium fertilization experiments (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg K/ha) conducted for 12 weeks. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid and carbohydrate content was affected by the interaction between potassium fertilization and plant parts. As the potassium fertilization levels increased from 0 to 270 kg K/ha, the production of soluble protein and PAL activity increased steadily. At the highest potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) L. pumila exhibited significantly higher net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)), intercellular CO(2) (C(i)), apparent quantum yield (ξ) and lower dark respiration rates (R(d)), compared to the other treatments. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid are also higher under 270 kg K/ha compared to 180, 90 and 0 kg K/ha. Furthermore, from the present study, the invertase activity was also found to be higher in 270 kg K/ha treatment. The antioxidant enzyme activities (APX, CAT and SOD) were lower under high potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) and have a significant negative correlation with total phenolics and flavonoid production. From this study, it was observed that the up-regulation of leaf gas exchange and downregulation of APX, CAT and SOD activities under high supplementation of potassium fertilizer enhanced the carbohydrate content that simultaneously increased the production of L. pumila secondary metabolites, thus increasing the health promoting effects of this plant. PMID:23203128

  14. Primary, Secondary Metabolites, Photosynthetic Capacity and Antioxidant Activity of the Malaysian Herb Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pumila Benth) Exposed to Potassium Fertilization under Greenhouse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Karimi, Ehsan; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A randomized complete block design was used to characterize the relationship between production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carbohydrate content, leaf gas exchange, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), soluble protein, invertase and antioxidant enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Labisia pumila Benth var. alata under four levels of potassium fertilization experiments (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg K/ha) conducted for 12 weeks. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid and carbohydrate content was affected by the interaction between potassium fertilization and plant parts. As the potassium fertilization levels increased from 0 to 270 kg K/ha, the production of soluble protein and PAL activity increased steadily. At the highest potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) L. pumila exhibited significantly higher net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs), intercellular CO2 (Ci), apparent quantum yield (ξ) and lower dark respiration rates (Rd), compared to the other treatments. It was found that the production of total phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid are also higher under 270 kg K/ha compared to 180, 90 and 0 kg K/ha. Furthermore, from the present study, the invertase activity was also found to be higher in 270 kg K/ha treatment. The antioxidant enzyme activities (APX, CAT and SOD) were lower under high potassium fertilization (270 kg K/ha) and have a significant negative correlation with total phenolics and flavonoid production. From this study, it was observed that the up-regulation of leaf gas exchange and downregulation of APX, CAT and SOD activities under high supplementation of potassium fertilizer enhanced the carbohydrate content that simultaneously increased the production of L. pumila secondary metabolites, thus increasing the health promoting effects of this plant. PMID:23203128

  15. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of novel flame retardants TBB, TBPH and their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Klopčič, Ivana; Skledar, Darja Gramec; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2016-10-01

    The anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities of the two novel brominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH and of their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH have been compared using the luciferase reporter gene assays. Only the parent compounds TBB and TBPH exhibited anti-glucocorticoid activity with IC50 values of 1.9 μM and 0.3 μM. Furthermore, mode of action for these two compounds is by direct competing to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with IC50 values of 0.03 μM and 0.002 μM. All four tested compounds possess anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities, without agonist activities on the respective receptors. Anti-androgenic activities with IC50 values of 43.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 47.5 μM and 1.3 μM were found for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH. The anti-thyroid hormonal IC50 values of 37.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 22.8 μM and 32.3 μM for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH, together with the above quoted results, indicate that metabolism can modify anti-androgenic, anti-glucocorticoid and anti-thyroid hormonal effects of these novel brominated flame retardants. Furthermore, the parent flame retardants are shown to be able to disrupt the function of the GR as antagonists by direct competition to the receptor. PMID:27380226

  16. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent. PMID:26931552

  17. A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, attenuates lupus nephritis by promoting the development of regulatory T cells and inhibiting IL-17-producing double negative T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guilin; Yang, Lifen; Li, Zhenping; Williams, James W; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a challenging problem that affects 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without effective therapy. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, effectively inhibits development of LN and attenuates the generalized autoimmune features. A77 1726 suppresses the expansion of double negative (DN) T cells, and inhibits T and B cell activation. Intriguingly, A77 1726 treatment significantly increases CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells but suppresses potential "pathogenic" IL-17-producing DN T cells in lymph nodes. In vitro experiment shows that A77 1726 potentiates the conversion of naive CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) by inhibiting Akt. Taken together, our data indicate that the therapeutic effects of A77 1726 in murine LN are mediated, at least in part, by augmenting iTregs which suppress pathogenic IL-17-producing DN T cells through an Akt-dependent mechanism. PMID:25638413

  18. Seven New and Two Known Lipopeptides as well as Five Known Polyketides: The Activated Production of Silent Metabolites in a Marine-Derived Fungus by Chemical Mutagenesis Strategy Using Diethyl Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Li, Chang-Wei; Cui, Cheng-Bin

    2014-01-01

    AD-2-1 is an antitumor fungal mutant obtained by diethyl sulfate mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. The G59 strain originally did not produce any metabolites with antitumor activities in MTT assays using K562 cells. Tracing newly produced metabolites under guidance of MTT assay and TLC analysis by direct comparison with control G59 extract, seven new (1–7) and two known (8–9) lipopeptides were isolated together with five known polyketides 10–14 from the extract of mutant AD-2-1. Structures of the seven new compounds including their absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic and chemical evidences and named as penicimutalides A–G (1–7). Seven known compounds were identified as fellutamide B (8), fellutamide C (9), 1′-O-methylaverantin (10), averantin (11), averufin (12), nidurufin (13), and sterigmatocystin (14). In the MTT assay, 1–14 inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. All the bioassays and HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses demonstrated that the production of 1–14 in the mutant AD-2-1 was caused by the activated production of silent metabolites in the original G59 fungal strain. Present results provided additional examples for effectiveness of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using diethyl sulphate mutagenesis to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates. PMID:24686557

  19. Simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by UPLC-MS/MS after QuEChERS preparation.

    PubMed

    Mu, Pengqian; Xu, Nana; Chai, Tingting; Jia, Qi; Yin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Shuming; Qian, Yongzhong; Qiu, Jing

    2016-06-15

    A fast method for the simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by ultra-high liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed. The analytes included anti-influenza drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, oseltamivir, oseltamivir carboxylate, memantine, arbidol, and moroxydine), anti-herpes drugs (acyclovir, ganciclovir, famciclovir, penciclovir, ribavirin and its main metabolite TCONH2), and an immunomodulator (imiquimod). The samples were pretreated using a modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method. The determination of the target compounds was conducted in less than 11.0min, and specificity was ensured by the use of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) acquisition mode. Good linearities (R(2)>0.9928) were obtained in the range of 0.1-100μg/L, and the recovery rates were 56.2-113.4% with RSDs of 1.7-10.3% for intra-day precision and 2.4-8.8% for inter-day precision. The LODs and LOQs of all analytes were in the ranges of 0.02-1.0 and 0.05-2.5μg/kg, respectively. An analysis of real samples suggested that this method is simple, sensitive, reliable and practical for the detection of antiviral drugs in animal tissue. PMID:27174693

  20. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  1. Cinnamon and Its Metabolite Sodium Benzoate Attenuate the Activation of p21rac and Protect Memory and Learning in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Brahmachari, Saurabh; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB) in attenuating oxidative stress and protecting memory and learning in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NaB, but not sodium formate, was found to inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse microglial cells. Similarly, NaB also inhibited fibrillar amyloid beta (Aβ)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium(+)-induced microglial production of ROS. Although NaB reduced the level of cholesterol in vivo in mice, reversal of the inhibitory effect of NaB on ROS production by mevalonate, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, but not cholesterol, suggests that depletion of intermediates, but not end products, of the mevalonate pathway is involved in the antioxidant effect of NaB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an inhibitor of p21rac geranylgeranyl protein transferase suppressed the production of ROS and that NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac in microglia. As expected, marked activation of p21rac was observed in the hippocampus of subjects with AD and 5XFAD transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. However, oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder and NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac and attenuated oxidative stress in the hippocampus of Tg mice as evident by decreased dihydroethidium (DHE) and nitrotyrosine staining, reduced homocysteine level and increased level of reduced glutathione. This was accompanied by suppression of neuronal apoptosis, inhibition of glial activation, and reduction of Aβ burden in the hippocampus and protection of memory and learning in transgenic mice. Therefore, cinnamon powder may be a promising natural supplement in halting or delaying the progression of AD. PMID:26102198

  2. Cinnamon and Its Metabolite Sodium Benzoate Attenuate the Activation of p21rac and Protect Memory and Learning in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Khushbu K.; Roy, Avik; Brahmachari, Saurabh; Rangasamy, Suresh B.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB) in attenuating oxidative stress and protecting memory and learning in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NaB, but not sodium formate, was found to inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse microglial cells. Similarly, NaB also inhibited fibrillar amyloid beta (Aβ)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium(+)-induced microglial production of ROS. Although NaB reduced the level of cholesterol in vivo in mice, reversal of the inhibitory effect of NaB on ROS production by mevalonate, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, but not cholesterol, suggests that depletion of intermediates, but not end products, of the mevalonate pathway is involved in the antioxidant effect of NaB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an inhibitor of p21rac geranylgeranyl protein transferase suppressed the production of ROS and that NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac in microglia. As expected, marked activation of p21rac was observed in the hippocampus of subjects with AD and 5XFAD transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. However, oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder and NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac and attenuated oxidative stress in the hippocampus of Tg mice as evident by decreased dihydroethidium (DHE) and nitrotyrosine staining, reduced homocysteine level and increased level of reduced glutathione. This was accompanied by suppression of neuronal apoptosis, inhibition of glial activation, and reduction of Aβ burden in the hippocampus and protection of memory and learning in transgenic mice. Therefore, cinnamon powder may be a promising natural supplement in halting or delaying the progression of AD. PMID:26102198

  3. Diabetes Mellitus Reduces Activity of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 in Liver and Kidney Leading to Decreased Formation of Mycophenolic Acid Acyl-Glucuronide Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Altered concentrations of MPA metabolites have been reported in diabetic kidney transplant recipients, although the reason for this difference is unknown. We aimed to compare MPA biotransformation and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression and activity between liver (n = 16) and kidney (n = 8) from diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Glucuronidation of MPA, as well as the expression and probe substrate activity of UGTs primarily responsible for MPA phenol glucuronide (MPAG) formation (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9), and MPA acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) formation (UGT2B7), was characterized. We have found that both diabetic and nondiabetic human liver microsomes and kidney microsomes formed MPAG with similar efficiency; however, AcMPAG formation was significantly lower in diabetic samples. This finding is supported by markedly lower glucuronidation of the UGT2B7 probe zidovudine, UGT2B7 protein, and UGT2B7 mRNA in diabetic tissues. UGT genetic polymorphism did not explain this difference because UGT2B7*2 or *1c genotype were not associated with altered microsomal UGT2B7 protein levels or AcMPAG formation. Furthermore, mRNA expression and probe activities for UGT1A1 or UGT1A9, both forming MPAG but not AcMPAG, were comparable between diabetic and nondiabetic tissues, suggesting the effect may be specific to UGT2B7-mediated AcMPAG formation. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with significantly reduced UGT2B7 mRNA expression, protein level, and enzymatic activity of human liver and kidney, explaining in part the relatively low circulating concentrations of AcMPAG in diabetic patients. PMID:21123165

  4. Removal of ethylenthiourea and 1,2,4-triazole pesticide metabolites from water by adsorption in commercial activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Camila C; Bottrel, Sue Ellen C; Costa, Elizângela P; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Leão, Mônica M D

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the adsorption capacity of ethylenthiourea (ETU) and 1H-1,2,4-triazole (1,2,4-T) for two commercial activated carbons: charcoal-powdered activated carbon (CPAC) and bovine bone-powdered activated carbon (BPAC). The tests were conducted at a bench scale, with ETU and 1,2,4-T diluted in water, for isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies. The removal of the compounds was accompanied by a total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and ultraviolet (UV) reduction analysis. The coals were characterized by their surface area using nitrogen adsorption/desorption, by a scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and by a zero charge point analysis (pHpcz). The results showed that adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model for both coals, and the adsorption isotherms for CPAC and BPAC were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, respectively. The CPAC removed approximately 77% of the ETU and 76% of the 1,2,4-T. The BPAC was ineffective at removing the contaminants. PMID:23356339

  5. Secondary metabolites from a culture of the fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri and their in vitro cytostatic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eamvijarn, Amnat; Kijjoa, Anake; Bruyère, Céline; Mathieu, Véronique; Manoch, Leka; Lefranc, Florence; Silva, Artur; Kiss, Robert; Herz, Werner

    2012-11-01

    Four known (1, 2, 3, and 6) and three new compounds including a 1,4-diacetyl-2,5-dibenzylpiperazine derivative (4), a quinazolinone-containing indole derivative (5), and a new ester of 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (7) were isolated from the fungus Neosartorya pseudofischeri S. W. Peterson. Compound 2 displayed in vitro growth inhibitory activity that ranged between the activities of etoposide and carboplatin, chosen as reference compounds, in six distinct cancer cell lines. Compound 1 displayed less activity than 2. Computer-assisted phase-contrast microscopy-related analysis revealed that 2 displayed cytostatic, not cytotoxic, effects in human U373 glioblastoma and A549 non-small cell lung cancer apoptosis-resistant cells with marked inhibition of mitotic rates. Cancer cells in the remaining phases of the cell cycle were unchanged. Flow cytometry analysis further confirmed that 2 does not induce apoptotic features in U373 or A549 cancer cells. Thus, 2 represents a novel chemical scaffold from which derivatives for anticancer cytostatic compounds can be derived. PMID:22976482

  6. An Antimicrobial Metabolite from Bacillus sp.: Significant Activity Against Pathogenic Bacteria Including Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Ajay G.; Dhanarajan, Gunaseelan; Nema, Sushma; Sen, Ramkrishna; Roy, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the cell free modified tryptone soya broth (pH 7.4 ± 0.2) of Bacillus subtilis URID 12.1 showed significant antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The partially purified antimicrobial molecule was found to be resistant to extremes of pH and temperatures and also to higher concentrations of trypsin and proteinase K. The antimicrobial molecule was purified by a three-step method that included reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for 14 species of bacteria using a microbroth dilution technique. The HPLC-purified fraction showed the MICs ranging from 0.5 to 16 μg/ml for methicillin and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MVRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) strains. The molecular mass of the antimicrobial compound was determined to be 842.37 Da. The same antimicrobial fraction showed negligible haemolytic activity against human red blood cells even at a concentration as high as 100 μg/ml. Because of its significant antimicrobial activity at low MIC values coupled with its non-haemolytic property, it may prove to be a novel antimicrobial lead molecule. PMID:26696963

  7. Metabolism and excretion kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled difloxacin in pigs after oral administration, and antimicrobial activity of manure containing difloxacin and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshoeft, Marc; Kusari, Souvik; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2009-04-15

    Fluoroquinolones are amongst the most important antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. On this account the behavior of difloxacin (DIF) and its metabolites was investigated by administering the {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled veterinary drug to fattening pigs. The excretion kinetics were determined after daily collection of manure. Sarafloxacin (SAR) was found to be the major metabolite, three further trace metabolites were also recovered, applying high-resolution (HR) mass spectrometric technique. The identification of DIF and SAR was confirmed by comparison with the spectroscopic and chromatographic data of the authentic references. The identification of the three trace metabolites was performed by HR-MS/MS. Only 8.1% of the administered radioactivity remained in the pig after 10 days and DIF accounted for 95.9% of the radioactivity excreted. More than 99% of the labeled compounds were detected and identified in the manure. The mean recoveries for all single electrolytes were {>=}94%. Linearity was established over concentration range 10-10,000 {mu}g/kg manure with a correlation coefficient {>=}0.99. By using in vitro antimicrobial activity tests against a group of standard pathogenic control strains, the results showed that the residual antibiotic concentrations in the manure of pigs are high enough to exhibit antibacterial activity.

  8. Metabolism and excretion kinetics of 14C-labeled and non-labeled difloxacin in pigs after oral administration, and antimicrobial activity of manure containing difloxacin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshöft, Marc; Kusari, Souvik; Zühlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Fluoroquinolones are amongst the most important antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. On this account the behavior of difloxacin (DIF) and its metabolites was investigated by administering the (14)C-labeled and non-labeled veterinary drug to fattening pigs. The excretion kinetics were determined after daily collection of manure. Sarafloxacin (SAR) was found to be the major metabolite, three further trace metabolites were also recovered, applying high-resolution (HR) mass spectrometric technique. The identification of DIF and SAR was confirmed by comparison with the spectroscopic and chromatographic data of the authentic references. The identification of the three trace metabolites was performed by HR-MS/MS. Only 8.1% of the administered radioactivity remained in the pig after 10 days and DIF accounted for 95.9% of the radioactivity excreted. More than 99% of the labeled compounds were detected and identified in the manure. The mean recoveries for all single electrolytes were 94%. Linearity was established over concentration range 10-10,000 microg/kg manure with a correlation coefficient 0.99. By using in vitro antimicrobial activity tests against a group of standard pathogenic control strains, the results showed that the residual antibiotic concentrations in the manure of pigs are high enough to exhibit antibacterial activity. PMID:19181312

  9. Evaluation of the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in Mouse Liver Tumor Induction by Trichloroethylene and Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA), both of which are themselves mouse liver carcinoge...

  10. Glycolytic metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits cold and menthol activation of the transient receptor potential melastatin type 8 channel.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, A C; Selescu, T; Gasler, I; Soltuzu, L; Babes, A

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl compound involved in protein modifications linked to diabetes mellitus. The plasma level of MG is elevated in diabetic patients, particularly those with painful diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is often associated with spontaneous pain and altered thermal perception. This study assesses effects of MG on TRPM8, an ion channel involved in innocuous cold sensing and cold allodynia and also in cold-mediated analgesia. Acute treatment with MG inhibited the activation of recombinant rat and human transient receptor potential melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) by cold and chemical agonists. A similar effect was observed when native TRPM8 was investigated in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons treated with MG for 16-24 hr displayed a significant reduction in the fraction of cold- and menthol-sensitive neurons, most likely expressing TRPM8. The fraction of allyl isothiocyanate-sensitive neurons was also reduced, and the coexpression among different neuronal populations was affected. The same prolonged exposure to MG significantly reduced the expression of TRPM8 at the mRNA level. Overall, our data provide evidence for decreased activity and expression level of TRPM8 in the presence of MG, which may be linked to some of the alterations in pain and temperature sensing reported by diabetic patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26629685

  11. The fungal metabolite gliotoxin inhibits proteasome proteolytic activity and induces an irreversible pseudocystic transformation and cell death in Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Benchimol, Marlene

    2016-08-01

    Proteasomal proteolysis is required for a wide range of cellular processes, including protein quality control, cell cycle progression, cell death and metabolic adaptation to environment changes or stress responses. Proteasome inhibitors are useful compounds for determining the roles of proteasome in eukaryotic cells. Here, we investigated the effects of gliotoxin, a proteasome inhibitor, on the cell growth, replication, ultrastructure, DNA integrity and proteasomal proteolytic activity of the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. The effect of