Science.gov

Sample records for active metal center

  1. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors II: Noble metal active centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The structure and stability of polymer-metal nanoreactors is detailed, including a complete characterization of the first successful synthesis of stable, dispersible, atomically thin gold nanosheets. Further developments in the synthesis of monodisperse, ∼2.5 nm platinum nanoclusters in aqueous solution and ambient conditions are described and pH stability of the composite material is established. The facile nanoreactor synthesis, environmentally friendly reaction conditions, and structural stability makes these biomimetic systems attractive for applications ranging from chemical detoxification to nanoelectronics.

  2. (BB)-Carboryne Complex of Ruthenium: Synthesis by Double B-H Activation at a Single Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Eleazer, Bennett J; Smith, Mark D; Popov, Alexey A; Peryshkov, Dmitry V

    2016-08-24

    The first example of a transition metal (BB)-carboryne complex containing two boron atoms of the icosahedral cage connected to a single exohedral metal center (POBBOP)Ru(CO)2 (POBBOP = 1,7-OP(i-Pr)2-2,6-dehydro-m-carborane) was synthesized by double B-H activation within the strained m-carboranyl pincer framework. Theoretical calculations revealed that the unique three-membered (BB)>Ru metalacycle is formed by two bent B-Ru σ-bonds with the concomitant increase of the bond order between the two metalated boron atoms. The reactivity of the highly strained electron-rich (BB)-carboryne fragment with small molecules was probed by reactions with electrophiles. The carboryne-carboranyl transformations reported herein represent a new mode of cooperative metal-ligand reactivity of boron-based complexes. PMID:27526855

  3. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  4. (BB)-Carboryne Complex of Ruthenium: Synthesis by Double B–H Activation at a Single Metal Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The first example of a transition metal (BB)-carboryne complex containing two boron atoms of the icosahedral cage connected to a single exohedral metal center (POBBOP)Ru(CO)2 (POBBOP = 1,7-OP(i-Pr)2-2,6-dehydro-m-carborane) was synthesized by double B–H activation within the strained m-carboranyl pincer framework. Theoretical calculations revealed that the unique three-membered (BB)>Ru metalacycle is formed by two bent B–Ru σ-bonds with the concomitant increase of the bond order between the two metalated boron atoms. The reactivity of the highly strained electron-rich (BB)-carboryne fragment with small molecules was probed by reactions with electrophiles. The carboryne–carboranyl transformations reported herein represent a new mode of cooperative metal–ligand reactivity of boron-based complexes. PMID:27526855

  5. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  6. Binding and activation of N2O at transition-metal centers: recent mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Tolman, William B

    2010-02-01

    No laughing matter, nitrous oxide's role in stratospheric ozone depletion and as a greenhouse gas has stimulated great interest in developing and understanding its decomposition, particularly through the use of transition-metal promoters. Recent advances in our understanding of the reaction pathways for N(2)O reduction by metal ions in the gas phase and in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and biological catalytic systems have provided provocative ideas about the structure and properties of metal N(2)O adducts and derived intermediates. These ideas are likely to inform efforts to design more effective catalysts for N(2)O remediation. PMID:20058284

  7. A dicopper complex with distant metal centers. Structure, magnetic properties, electrochemistry and catecholase activity.

    PubMed

    Gasque, Laura; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor Manuel; Membrillo, Ingrid; Olguín, Juan; Mijangos, Edgar; Bernès, Sylvain; González, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of a dinuclear copper(II) complex of the ligand [2,8-dimethyl-5,11-di-(dimethylethyleneamine) 1,4,5,6,7,10,11,12-octahydroimidazo [4,5-h] imidazo [4,5-c] [1,6]diazecine] dimeim have been investigated. Also, its catecholase activity has been explored in different solvent mixtures: MeCN/H2O and OH/H2O, each at several pH values. In CH3OH/H2O, where the activity was superior, the optimal pH value for the catalytic activity was found to be lower than in CH3CN/H2O. The study of the complex's electrochemical behavior (cyclic voltammetry) which was also investigated in these various media, revealed that although an increase in pH in both solvent mixtures results in an increase both in Me oxidizing power (E(1/2)) and reversibility (ipa/ipc) the change of solvent system seems to be a more influencing factor. The superior catalytic activity found in MeOH/H2O pH=8.0, is associated with a significantly more reversible behavior displayed in this medium. Potentiometric determination of the overall formation constant and three successive pKas for the complex, suggest the formation of stable hydroxo complexes which could be the catalytically active species.

  8. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source.

  9. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source. PMID:24738662

  10. Metals Processing Laboratory User Center (MPLUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Metals Processing Laboratory User (MPLUS) Center was officially designated as a DOE User Facility in February, 1996. It`s primary purpose is to assist researchers in key U.S. industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency and enhancing U.S. competitiveness in the world market. The MPLUS Center provides users the unique opportunity to address technology-related issues to solve metals-processing problems from a fully integrated approach. DOE facilitates the process and catalyzes industrial interactions that enables technical synergy and financial leveraging to take place between the industrial sector identifying and prioritizing their technological needs, and MPLUS, which provides access to the technical expertise and specialized facilities to address these needs. MPLUS is designed to provide U.S. industries with access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals-processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals-processing technologies. As originated, MPLUS includes the following four primary user centers: Metals Processing, Metals Joining, Metals Characterization, and Metals Process Modeling. These centers are devoted to assisting U.S. industries in adjusting to rapid changes in the marketplace and in improving products and processes. This approach optimizes the complementary strengths of industry and government. Tremendous industrial response, has resulted in MPLUS expanding to meet the ever-growing technical needs and requests initiated by U.S. industry.

  11. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  12. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  13. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  14. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  15. Self-assembly of the binuclear metal center of phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed

    Shim, H; Raushel, F M

    2000-06-27

    The active site of the bacterial phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta contains two divalent metal ions and a carboxylated lysine residue. The native enzyme contains two Zn(2+) ions, which can be replaced with Co(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), or Mn(2+) without loss of catalytic activity. Carbon dioxide reacts with the side chain of lysine-169 to form a carbamate functional group within the active site, which then serves as a bridging ligand to the two metal ions. The activation of apo-PTE using variable concentrations of divalent metal ions and bicarbonate was measured in order to establish the mechanism by which the active site of PTE is self-assembled. The time courses for the activation of apo-PTE are pseudo-first-order, and the observed rate constants are directly proportional to the concentration of bicarbonate. In contrast, the apparent rate constants for the activation of apo-PTE decrease as the concentrations of the divalent cations are increased and then become constant at higher concentrations of the divalent metal ions. These results are consistent with a largely ordered kinetic mechanism for the assembly of the binuclear metal center where CO(2)/bicarbonate reacts with the apo-PTE prior to the binding of the two metal ions. When apo-PTE is titrated with 0-8 equiv of Co(2+), Cd(2+), or Zn(2+), the concentration of activated enzyme increases linearly until 2 equiv of metal ion is added and then remains constant at elevated levels of the divalent cations. These results are consistent with the synergistic binding of the two metal ions to the active site, and thus the second metal ion binds more tightly to the protein than does the first metal ion. Measurement of the mean dissociation constant indicates that metal binding to the binuclear metal center is strong [(K(alpha)K(beta))(1/2) = 6.0 x 10(-)(11) M and k(off) = 1.5 x 10(-)(3) min(-)(1) for Zn(2+)]. The removal of the carbamate bridge through the mutagenesis of Lys-169 demonstrates that the

  16. Postsynthetic Metal and Ligand Exchange in MFU-4l: A Screening Approach toward Functional Metal-Organic Frameworks Comprising Single-Site Active Centers.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2015-05-26

    The isomorphous partial substitution of Zn(2+) ions in the secondary building unit (SBU) of MFU-4l leads to frameworks with the general formula [M(x)Zn(5-x)Cl4(BTDD)3], in which x≈2, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), or Cu(II), and BTDD = bis(1,2,3-triazolato-[4,5-b],[4',5'-i])dibenzo-[1,4]-dioxin. Subsequent exchange of chloride ligands by nitrite, nitrate, triflate, azide, isocyanate, formate, acetate, or fluoride leads to a variety of MFU-4l derivatives, which have been characterized by using XRPD, EDX, IR, UV/Vis-NIR, TGA, and gas sorption measurements. Several MFU-4l derivatives show high catalytic activity in a liquid-phase oxidation of ethylbenzene to acetophenone with air under mild conditions, among which Co- and Cu derivatives with chloride side-ligands are the most active catalysts. Upon thermal treatment, several side-ligands can be transformed selectively into reactive intermediates without destroying the framework. Thus, at 300 °C, Co(II)-azide units in the SBU of Co-MFU-4l are converted into Co(II)-isocyanate under continuous CO gas flow, involving the formation of a nitrene intermediate. The reaction of Cu(II)-fluoride units with H2 at 240 °C leads to Cu(I) and proceeds through the heterolytic cleavage of the H2 molecule.

  17. Asymmetric Desymmetrization via Metal-Free C-F Bond Activation: Synthesis of 3,5-Diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones with Quaternary Carbon Centers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junki; Suzuki, Satoru; Tokunaga, Etsuko; Haufe, Günter; Shibata, Norio

    2016-08-01

    We disclose the first asymmetric activation of a non-activated aliphatic C-F bond in which a conceptually new desymmetrization of 1,3-difluorides by silicon-induced selective C-F bond scission is a key step. The combination of a cinchona alkaloid based chiral ammonium bifluoride catalyst and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetoamide (BSA) as the silicon reagent enabled the efficient catalytic cycle of asymmetric Csp3 -F bond cleavage under mild conditions with high enantioselectivities. The ortho effect of the aryl group at the prostereogenic center is remarkable. This concept was applied for the asymmetric synthesis of promising agrochemical compounds, 3,5-diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones bearing a quaternary carbon center.

  18. Assemblies of a new flexible multicarboxylate ligand and d10 metal centers toward the construction of homochiral helical coordination polymers: structures, luminescence, and NLO-active properties.

    PubMed

    Zang, Shuangquan; Su, Yang; Li, Yizhi; Ni, Zhaoping; Meng, Qingjin

    2006-01-01

    Hydro(solvo)thermal reactions between a new flexible multicarboxylate ligand of 2,2',3,3'-oxydiphthalic acid (2,2',3,3'-H(4)ODPA) and M(NO(3))(2).xH(2)O (M = Zn, x = 6; M = Cd, x = 4) in the presence of 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) afford two novel homochiral helical coordination polymers [[Zn(2)(2,2',3,3'-ODPA)(bpy)(H(2)O)(3)].(H(2)O)(2) for 1 and [Cd(2)(2,2',3,3'-ODPA)(bpy)(H(2)O)(3)].(H(2)O)(2) for 2]. Though having almost the same chemical formula, they have different space groups (P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1 and P2(1) for 2) and different bridging modes of the 2,2',3,3'-ODPA ligand. Two kinds of homochiral helices (right-handed) are found in both 1 and 2, each of which discriminates only one kind of crystallographical nonequivalent metal atom. 1 has a 2D metal-organic framework and can be seen as the unity of two parallel homochiral Zn1 and Zn2 helices, in which the nodes are etheric oxygen atoms. In contrast, 2 has a 3D metal-organic framework and consists of two partially overlapped homochiral Cd1 and Cd2 helices in the two dimensions. Moreover, metal-ODPA helices give a 2D chiral herringbone structural motif in both 1 and 2 in the two dimensions, which are further strengthened by the second ligand of bpy. Bulk materials for 1 and 2 all have good second-harmonic generation activity, approximately 1 and 0.8 times that of urea.

  19. Theory for plasticity of face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Minho; Koo, Yang Mo; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente; Kwon, Se Kyun

    2014-01-01

    The activation of plastic deformation mechanisms determines the mechanical behavior of crystalline materials. However, the complexity of plastic deformation and the lack of a unified theory of plasticity have seriously limited the exploration of the full capacity of metals. Current efforts to design high-strength structural materials in terms of stacking fault energy have not significantly reduced the laborious trial and error works on basic deformation properties. To remedy this situation, here we put forward a comprehensive and transparent theory for plastic deformation of face-centered cubic metals. This is based on a microscopic analysis that, without ambiguity, reveals the various deformation phenomena and elucidates the physical fundaments of the currently used phenomenological correlations. We identify an easily accessible single parameter derived from the intrinsic energy barriers, which fully specifies the potential diversity of metals. Based entirely on this parameter, a simple deformation mode diagram is shown to delineate a series of convenient design criteria, which clarifies a wide area of material functionality by texture control. PMID:24753563

  20. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  1. Metallicity of the Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A recent study suggests that the stars in the central parsec of our galaxy are not a single, roughly solar-metallicity population, as previously thought. Instead, these stars have a large variation in metallicities which has interesting implications for the formation history of the Milky Ways nuclear star cluster.Clues from AbundancesWhy do we care about the metallicity of stars and stellar populations? Metallicity measurements can help us to separate multiple populations of stars and figure out when and where they were formed.Measurements of the chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way have demonstrated that theres a metallicity gradient in the galaxy: on average, its below solar metallicity at the outer edges of the disk and increases to above solar metallicity within the central 5 kpc of the galaxy.So far, measurements of stars in the very center of the galaxy are consistent with this galactic trend: theyre all slightly above solar metallicity, with little variation between them. But these measurements exist for only about a dozen stars within the central 10 pc of the galaxy! Due to the high stellar density in this region, a larger sample is needed to get a complete picture of the abundances and thats what this study set out to find.Different PopulationsLed by Tuan Do (Dunlap Fellow at the University of Toronto and member of the Galactic Center Group at UCLA), the authors of this study determined the metallicities of 83 late-type giant stars within the central parsec of the galaxy. The metallicities were found by fitting the stars K-band spectra from observations by the NIFS instrument on the Gemini North telescope.In contrast to the previous studies, the authors found that the 83 stars exhibited a wide range of metallicities, from a tenth of solar metallicity all the way to super-solar metallicities.The abundances of the low-metallicity stars they found are consistent with globular cluster metallicities, suggesting that these stars (about 6% of the sample

  2. The mononuclear metal center of type-I dihydroorotase from aquifex aeolicus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dihydroorotase (DHO) is a zinc metalloenzyme, although the number of active site zinc ions has been controversial. E. coli DHO was initially thought to have a mononuclear metal center, but the subsequent X-ray structure clearly showed two zinc ions, α and β, at the catalytic site. Aquifex aeolicus DHO, is a dodecamer comprised of six DHO and six aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC) subunits. The isolated DHO monomer, which lacks catalytic activity, has an intact α-site and conserved β-site ligands, but the geometry of the second metal binding site is completely disrupted. However, the putative β-site is restored when the complex with ATC is formed and DHO activity is regained. Nevertheless, the X-ray structure of the complex revealed a single zinc ion at the active site. The structure of DHO from the pathogenic organism, S. aureus showed that it also has a single active site metal ion. Results Zinc analysis showed that the enzyme has one zinc/DHO subunit and the addition of excess metal ion did not stimulate catalytic activity, nor alter the kinetic parameters. The metal free apoenzyme was inactive, but the full activity was restored upon the addition of one equivalent of Zn2+ or Co2+. Moreover, deletion of the β-site by replacing the His180 and His232 with alanine had no effect on catalysis in the presence or absence of excess zinc. The 2.2 Å structure of the double mutant confirmed that the β-site was eliminated but that the active site remained otherwise intact. Conclusions Thus, kinetically competent A. aeolicus DHO has a mononuclear metal center. In contrast, elimination of the putative second metal binding site in amidohydrolyases with a binuclear metal center, resulted in the abolition of catalytic activity. The number of active site metal ions may be a consideration in the design of inhibitors that selectively target either the mononuclear or binuclear enzymes. PMID:24314009

  3. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  4. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  5. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  6. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  7. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  8. Layer-by-layer synthesis of metal-containing conducting polymers: caged metal centers for interlayer charge transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Huang, Weijie; Pink, Maren; Lee, Dongwhan

    2010-09-01

    Metal-templated [2 + 3]-type cocondensation of a pi-extended boronic acid and nioxime furnished a series of cage molecules, which were electropolymerized to prepare metal-containing conducting polymers (MCPs). Despite sharing essentially isostructural organic scaffolds, these materials display metal-dependent electrochemical properties as evidenced by different redox windows observed for M = Co, Fe, Ru. Consecutive electropolymerization using two different monomers furnished bilayer MCPs having different metals in each layer. In addition to functioning as heavy atom markers in cross-sectional analysis by FIB and EDX, redox-active metal centers participate in voltage-dependent interlayer electron transport to give rise to cyclic voltammograms that are distinctively different from those of each layer alone or random copolymers. A simple electrochemical technique can thus be used as a straightforward diagnostic tool to investigate the structural ordering of electrically conductive layered materials. PMID:20690667

  9. 75 FR 76037 - General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating Division Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). At the request of the State agency, the... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating..., applicable to workers of General Motors Corporation, Grand Rapids Metal Center, Metal Fabricating...

  10. Studying Activity Series of Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Tien-Ghun; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies that illustrate the linking together of numerous chemical concepts involving the activity of metals (quantitative analysis, corrosion, and electrolysis) through the use of deep-level processing strategies. Concludes that making explicit links in the process of teaching chemistry can lead effectively to meaningful…

  11. Center for Radiation Research. 1990 technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyatt, C.E.

    1991-02-01

    The report summarizes research projects, measurement method development, calibration and testing and data evaluation activities that were carried out during Fiscal Year 1990 in the NIST Center for Radiation Research. These activities fall in the areas of radiometric physics, radiation sources and instrumentation, and ionizing radiation.

  12. Emission properties of body-centered cubic elemental metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tuo; Rickman, Benjamin L. Schroeder, W. Andreas

    2015-04-07

    A first principles analysis of photoemission is developed to explain the lower than expected rms transverse electron momentum measured using the solenoid scan technique for the body-centered cubic Group Vb (V, Nb, and Ta) and Group VIb (Cr, Mo, and W) metallic photocathodes. The density functional theory based analysis elucidates the fundamental role that the electronic band structure (and its dispersion) plays in determining the emission properties of solid-state photocathodes and includes evaluation of work function anisotropy using a thin-slab method.

  13. Activities of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new (gamma) ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal; (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report.

  14. 5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

  15. Role of the coordination center in photocurrent behavior of a tetrathiafulvalene and metal complex dyad.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Gang; Ji, Shu-Fang; Huo, Peng; Yin, Jing-Xue; Huang, Yu-De; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2014-03-17

    Small organic molecule-based compounds are considered to be promising materials in photoelectronics and high-performance optoelectronic devices. However, photoelectron conversion research based on functional organic molecule and metal complex dyads is very scarce. We design and prepare a series of compounds containing a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) moiety substituted with pyridylmethylamide groups of formulas [Ni(acac)2L]·2CH3OH (1), [Cu2I2L2]·THF·2CH3CN (2), and [MnCl2L2]n·2nCH3CH2OH (3) (L = 4,5-bis(3-pyridylmethylamide)-4',5'-bimethylthio-tetrathiafulvalene, acac = acetylacetone) to study the role of the coordination center in photocurrent behavior. Complex 1 is a mononuclear species, and complex 2 is a dimeric species. Complex 3 is a two-dimensional (2-D) coordination polymer. Spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these complexes indicate that they are electrochemically active materials. The tetrathiafulvalene ligand L is a photoelectron donor in the presence of electron acceptor methylviologen. The effect of metal coordination centers on photocurrent response behavior is examined. The redox-active metal coordination centers should play an important role in improvement of the photocurrent response property. The different morphologies of the electrode films reflect the dimensions in molecular structures of the coordination compounds.

  16. Catawba Science Center solar activities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    Two demonstration solar water heaters were built. One was to be used at the Science Center and the other with traveling programs. This was completed and both units are being used for these programs which continue. We were able to build a library of 99 solar energy books and booklets that are available to the public for reference. We also conducted programs for 683 students of all ages. The culminating activity was the planned Energy Awareness Festival. This was held on September 26, 1981 and attracted 450 area citizens. We offered free exhibit space and hosted 17 exhibitors.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications. PMID:25280707

  18. Development of Li-Metal Battery Cell Chemistries at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-Art lithium-ion battery technology is limited by specific energy and thus not sufficiently advanced to support the energy storage necessary for aerospace needs, such as all-electric aircraft and many deep space NASA exploration missions. In response to this technological gap, our research team at NASA Glenn Research Center has been active in formulating concepts and developing testing hardware and components for Li-metal battery cell chemistries. Lithium metal anodes combined with advanced cathode materials could provide up to five times the specific energy versus state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells (1000 Whkg versus 200 Whkg). Although Lithium metal anodes offer very high theoretical capacity, they have not been shown to successfully operate reversibly.

  19. Structure of Diethyl Phosphate Bound to the Binuclear Metal Center of Phosphotriesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Tsai, P.; Chen, S.; Himo, F.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate esters at rates close to the diffusion limit. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that a binuclear metal center is positioned in the active site of PTE and that this complex is responsible for the activation of the nucleophilic water from solvent. In this paper, the three-dimensional structure of PTE was determined in the presence of the hydrolysis product, diethyl phosphate (DEP), and a product analogue, cacodylate. In the structure of the PTE-diethyl phosphate complex, the DEP product is found symmetrically bridging the two divalent cations. The DEP displaces the hydroxide from solvent that normally bridges the two divalent cations in structures determined in the presence or absence of substrate analogues. One of the phosphoryl oxygen atoms in the PTE-DEP complex is 2.0 Angstroms from the a-metal ion, while the other oxygen is 2.2 Angstroms from the {beta}-metal ion. The two metal ions are separated by a distance of 4.0 Angstroms. A similar structure is observed in the presence of cacodylate. Analogous complexes have previously been observed for the product complexes of isoaspartyl dipeptidase, d-aminoacylase, and dihydroorotase from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The experimentally determined structure of the PTE-diethyl phosphate product complex is inconsistent with a recent proposal based upon quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations which postulated the formation of an asymmetrical product complex bound exclusively to the {beta}-metal ion with a metal-metal separation of 5.3 Angstroms. This structure is also inconsistent with a chemical mechanism for substrate hydrolysis that utilizes the bridging hydroxide as a base to abstract a proton from a water molecule loosely associated with the a-metal ion. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support a reaction mechanism that utilizes the bridging hydroxide as the direct

  20. Beyond Metal-Hydrides: Non-Transition-Metal and Metal-Free Ligand-Centered Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Andrew Z; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M; Buchanan, Robert M; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2016-06-29

    A new pathway for homogeneous electrocatalytic H2 evolution and H2 oxidation has been developed using a redox active thiosemicarbazone and its zinc complex as seminal metal-free and transition-metal-free examples. Diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) and zinc diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazide) display the highest reported TOFs of any homogeneous ligand-centered H2 evolution catalyst, 1320 and 1170 s(-1), respectively, while the zinc complex also displays one of the highest reported TOF values for H2 oxidation, 72 s(-1), of any homogeneous catalyst. Catalysis proceeds via ligand-centered proton-transfer and electron-transfer events while avoiding traditional metal-hydride intermediates. The unique mechanism is consistent with electrochemical results and is further supported by density functional theory. The results identify a new direction for the design of electrocatalysts for H2 evolution and H2 oxidation that are not reliant on metal-hydride intermediates. PMID:27326672

  1. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  2. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  3. Transition Metal Impurities on the Bond-Centered Site in Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Decoster, S.; Vries, B. de; Vantomme, A.; Cottenier, S.; Emmerich, H.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.

    2009-02-13

    We report on the lattice location of ion implanted Fe, Cu, and Ag impurities in germanium from a combined approach of emission channeling experiments and ab initio total energy calculations. Following common expectation, a fraction of these transition metals (TMs) was found on the substitutional Ge position. Less expected is the observation of a second fraction on the sixfold coordinated bond-centered site. Ab initio calculated heats of formation suggest this is the result of the trapping of a vacancy by a substitutional TM impurity, spontaneously forming an impurity-vacancy complex in the split-vacancy configuration. We also present an approach to displace the TM impurities from the electrically active substitutional site to the bond-centered site.

  4. Activities of the Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at the University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The college has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction is prominent evidence of this record. At the inception of CSC, the center was primarily founded on the need for research on in-space construction of large space systems like space stations and interplanetary space vehicles. The scope of CSC's research has now evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. Within this broadened scope, our research projects seek to impact the underlying technological basis for such spacecraft as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites, and other special purpose spacecraft, as well as the technological basis for large space platforms. The center's research focuses on three areas: spacecraft structures, spacecraft operations and control, and regolith and surface systems. In the area of spacecraft structures, our current emphasis is on concepts and modeling of deployable structures, analysis of inflatable structures, structural damage detection algorithms, and composite materials for lightweight structures. In the area of spacecraft operations and control, we are continuing our previous efforts in process control of in-orbit structural assembly. In addition, we have begun two new efforts in formal approach to spacecraft flight software systems design and adaptive attitude control systems. In the area of regolith and surface systems, we are continuing the work of characterizing the physical properties of lunar

  5. Three-dimensional structure of the binuclear metal center of phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed

    Benning, M M; Kuo, J M; Raushel, F M; Holden, H M

    1995-06-27

    Phosphotriesterase, as isolated from Pseudomonas diminuta, is capable of detoxifying widely used pesticides such as paraoxon and parathion and various mammalian acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The enzyme requires a binuclear metal center for activity. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the apoenzyme was solved (Benning et al., 1994) and shown to consist of an alpha/beta-barrel. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of the holoenzyme, reconstituted with cadmium, as determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis to 2.0-A resolution. Crystals employed in the investigation belonged to the space group C2 with unit cell dimensions of a = 129.5 A, b = 91.4 A, c = 69.4 A, beta = 91.9 degrees, and two subunits in the asymmetric unit. There are significant differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the apo and holo forms of the enzyme such that their alpha-carbon positions superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 3.4 A. The binuclear metal center is located at the C-terminus of the beta-barrel with the cadmiums separated by 3.8 A. There are two bridging ligands to the metals: a water molecule (or possibly a hydroxide ion) and a carbamylated lysine residue (Lys 169). The more buried cadmium is surrounded by His 55, His 57, Lys 169, Asp 301, and the bridging water in a trigonal bipyramidal arrangement. The second metal is coordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry by His 201, His 230, Lys 169, the bridging water molecule, and two additional solvents. PMID:7794910

  6. High reactivity of metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube for the C-H activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xingbang; Zhou, Zheng; Lin, Qiuxing; Wu, Youting; Zhang, Zhibing

    2011-02-01

    Generally speaking, metal is necessary to serve as the active center in C-H activation. Herein, we found that the N-C part of the metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (NCNT) can be used as the active center in methane C-H activation. The NCNT can activate O 2 and further activate methane by the adsorbed oxygen atoms. The catalytic ability of this metal-free NCNT is comparable to these reported noble metal catalysts and enzymes. Another character being different from many previous catalysts is that both two O atoms of O 2 can be effectively used as oxidant in the catalytic cycle of NCNT.

  7. Telerobotic activities at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center telerobotic efforts span three major thrusts: (1) sustaining and expanding the capability of the Shuttle manipulator; (2) developing and integrating the multiple telerobotic system of the Space Station; and (3) fostering and applying research in all areas of telerobotics technology within the government, private, and academic sectors.

  8. Chemical trends in the activation energies of DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, O.; Kawai, H.; Mori, Y.; Kaneko, K.

    1984-12-01

    The activation energies of DX centers in AlGaAs doped with six different impurities (S, Se, Te, Si, Ge, and Sn) are measured by deep level transient spectroscopy. Remarkable trends are established, in which the activation energies of DX centers with group IV impurities become shallower as the mass number of the impurity increases, while those with group VI impurities remain constant.

  9. Marketing backgrounds and activities of community mental health center CEOs.

    PubMed

    Whyte, E G; Smith, M; Reidenbach, E N; Sharpe, T R

    1989-01-01

    More than 300 directors of community mental health centers responded to a survey concerning their marketing training and the marketing activities in which their centers had been engaged. Formal marketing training was found to be in the backgrounds of few of the respondents. The majority had not been engaged in a listing of marketing activities.

  10. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  11. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  12. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  13. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  14. Chemical bonding topology of ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides: from molecules to metals.

    PubMed

    King, R Bruce

    2003-12-29

    The bismuth polyhedra in ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides may form discrete molecules or ions, infinite chains, and/or infinite layers. The chemical bonding in many of these diverse structures is related to that in deltahedral boranes exhibiting three-dimensional aromaticity by replacing the multicenter core bond in the boranes with two-center two-electron (2c-2e) bonds from the central transition metal to the nearest neighbor bismuth vertices. Examples of discrete molecules or ions include octahedral MBi(6)(micro-X)(12)(z)()(-) (X = Br, I; M = Rh, Ir, z = 3; M = Ru, z = 4) with exclusively 2c-2e bonds and pentagonal bipyramidal RhBi(7)Br(8) with a 5c-4e bond in the equatorial pentagonal plane indicative of Möbius aromaticity. The compound Ru(3)Bi(24)Br(20) contains a more complicated discrete bismuth cluster ion Ru(2)Bi(17)(micro-Br)(4)(5+), which can be dissected into a RuBi(5) closo octahedron and a RuBi(8) nido capped square antiprism bridged by a Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit. In RuBi(4)X(2) (X = Br, I), the same Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit bridges Bi(4) squares similar to those found in the known Zintl ion Bi(4)(2)(-) to give infinite chains of Ru(2)Bi(4) octahedra. The electron counts of the RuBi(5), RuBi(8), and Ru(2)Bi(4) polyhedra in these structures follow the Wade-Mingos rules. A different infinite chain structure is constructed from fused RhBi(7/2)Bi bicapped trigonal prisms in Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3). This Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3) structure can alternatively be derived from alternating Rh(2/2)Bi(4) octahedra and Rh(2/)(2)Bi(5) pentagonal bipyramids with electron counts obeying the Wade-Mingos rules. Related chemical bonding principles appear to apply to more complicated layer structures such as Pt(3)Bi(13)I(7) containing Kagomé nets of PtBi(8/2) cubes and Ni(4)Bi(12)X(3) containing linked chains of NiBi(6/3)Bi capped trigonal prisms.

  15. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  16. Metal removal by thermally activated clay marl.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, R Y

    2001-01-01

    A sorption active product has been obtained from Bulgarian clay marl by thermal activation at 750 degrees C. The modified aluminosilicate material is characterized, as well as its use for the removal of metal ions. The effect of the initial metal ion concentration, the contact time, pH, the solution temperature and the ionic strength on the uptake of lead, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solutions were studied in batch experiments. The kinetics of removal of metal ions on modified clay marl appears dependent on the sorbate/sorbent ratio. At low cation concentrations sorption follows a Langmuir isotherm, while at higher sorbate/sorbent ratios the sorption isotherms of metal ions are described by Freundlich's equation. At the pH region of the sorption edge the removal of metal ions by surface complexation and surface precipitation mechanisms is indistinguishable. It is observed that the influence of temperature on the uptake ability of the clay marl is most considerable up to 40 degrees C. These studies show that the thermally modified clay marl can be successfully used for removal of metal ions from water solutions in a wide range of concentrations.

  17. Orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Manuel A; Vidossich, Pietro; Conejero, Salvador; Lledós, Agustí

    2014-12-15

    Hydrogen atoms in the coordination sphere of a transition metal are highly mobile ligands. Here, a new type of dynamic process involving hydrides has been characterized by computational means. This dynamic event consists of an orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers containing N-heterocyclic carbenes. The hydride movement around the carbene-metal-carbene axis is the lowest energy mode connecting energy equivalent isomers. This understanding provides crucial information for the interpretation of NMR spectra.

  18. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A.; Darty, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO2, for harnessing ‘green’ energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO2 into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO2 and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO2, we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO2 and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe4S4 clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO2 during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron–sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B12 and a Fe4S4 cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co3+ intermediate. Studies of CO and CO2 enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C–C and C–S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  19. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2.

    PubMed

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A; Darty, Joseph E; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2011-08-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO(2), for harnessing 'green' energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO(2) into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO(2) and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO(2), we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO(2) and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe(4)S(4) clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO(2) during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B(12) and a Fe(4)S(4) cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co(3+) intermediate. Studies of CO and CO(2) enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C-C and C-S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  20. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  1. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  2. NASA Glenn Research Center Battery Activities Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon and GRC's involvement in their development. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  3. Animal-Centered Learning Activities in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Lust, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the contribution of animal-centered activities to students achieving learning outcomes in a veterinary therapeutics course. Design Qualitative methods were used to assess the outcome of using “hands-on” animal interactions as tools of engagement in the course. Reflective commentary on animal-centered activities was collected and analyzed. Assessment Animal-centered learning activities are effective tools for engaging students and facilitating their understanding and application of veterinary therapeutic knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Analysis of qualitative data revealed themes of professional caring and caring behaviors as a direct result of animal-centered activities. Elements of empathy, caring, compassion, and self-awareness were strong undercurrents in student's comments. Conclusions Animal-centered learning activities provide an innovative learning environment for the application of veterinary pharmacy knowledge, skills, and attitudes directly to animal patients. The use of animals in the course is a successful active-learning technique to engage pharmacy students and assist them in developing caring attitudes and behaviors beneficial to future health care providers. PMID:17149415

  4. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. PMID:22868068

  5. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation

  6. Electronic structure analysis of the dinuclear metal center in the bioremediator glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Mitić, Natasa; Yip, Sylvia Hsu-Chen; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Schenk, Gerhard; Larrabee, James A

    2010-03-15

    The glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a promiscuous, dinuclear metallohydrolase that has potential application in the remediation of organophosphate nerve agents and pesticides. GpdQ employs an unusual reaction mechanism in which the enzyme is predominantly mononuclear in the resting state, and substrate binding induces the formation of the catalytically competent dinuclear center (Hadler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 14129). Reactivity is further modulated by the coordination flexibility of Asn80, a ligand that binds to the second, loosely bound metal ion (Hadler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 11900). It is proposed that hydrolysis is initiated by a terminal, metal-bound hydroxide molecule which is activated at unusually low pH by electrostatic/hydrogen bonding interactions with a bridging hydroxide species. In this study, electronic structure analysis of the dinuclear center is employed to study the coordination environment of the dinuclear center at the resting and product-bound stage of catalysis. This is achieved through the use of variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism experiments involving the Co(II)-substituted wild type enzyme and its Asn80Asp variant. The data support the above model for the catalytic mechanism whereby the metal ion-bridging hydroxide molecule activates a terminally bound hydroxide nucleophile. Replacement of Asn80 by an aspartate residue does prevent coordination flexibility but also leads to cleavage of the mu-hydroxide bridge and reduced reactivity. This is the first study to investigate the electronic structure of an enzyme with a mu-1,1-carboxylate bridged dicobalt(II) center.

  7. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; Lu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, whilemore » engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.« less

  8. Community Information and Services Centers: Concepts for Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Cleve

    An experimental program based on a study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development was activated to deliver services to urban residents via automated communications technology. Designed to contribute to improvement in the quality of life, the program of a Community Information and Services Center (CISC) included: outreach programs, i.e.,…

  9. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  10. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  11. Detailed Abundance Analysis of a Metal-poor Giant in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Fritz, T. K.; Rich, R. M.; Thorsbro, B.; Schultheis, M.; Origlia, L.; Chatzopoulos, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to Sgr A*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high-resolution (R ∼ 24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K = 10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about {26}-16+54 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar/bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new line list in the K band, finds [Fe/H] ∼ ‑1.0 and [α/Fe] ∼ +0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude that this star is most likely to be a representative of the ∼10 Gyr old population. This is also the most metal-poor-confirmed red giant yet discovered in the vicinity of the nuclear cluster of the Galactic center. We consider recent reports in the literature of a surprisingly large number of metal-poor giants in the Galactic center, but the reported gravity of {log}g∼ 4 for these stars calls into question their reported metallicities.

  12. Tuning the reactivity of an actor ligand for tandem CO2 and C-H activations: from spectator metals to metal-free.

    PubMed

    Annibale, Vincent T; Dalessandro, Daniel A; Song, Datong

    2013-10-30

    The 4,5-diazafluorenide ligand (L(-)) serves as an actor ligand in the formal insertion of CO2 into a C-H bond remote from the metal center. With the Ru(II) complex of L(-) as the starting point, Rh(III), Rh(I), and Cu(I) were used as spectator metal centers to tune the reactivity of the actor ligand toward CO2. In the case of Rh(III)-diazafluorenide a room temperature reversible activation of CO2 was observed, similar to the isoelectronic Ru(II) analogue. In the case of Rh(I)- and Cu(I)-diazafluorenide CO2 is trapped by the formation of dinuclear carboxylate complexes and diazafluorene (LH). The spectator metal center could even be replaced entirely with an organic group allowing for the first metal-free reversible tandem CO2 and C-H activation.

  13. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  14. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  15. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  16. Activity in the Mission Control Center during Apollo 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two individuals are examining a seismic reading in the Mission Control Center's Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) Room during the Apollo 14 S-IVB impact on the moon. Dr. Maurice Ewing (left) is the Director of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory at Columbia University. David Lammlein, a Columbia graduate student, is on the right (17609); Partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the time the Apollo 14 S-IVB stage impacted on the lunar surface. The flight director's console in in the foregroune. Eugene F. Kranz, Chief of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Flight Control Division, is in the right foreground. Seated at the console is Glynn S. Lunney, Head of the Flight Directors Office, Flight Control Division. Facing the camera is Gerald D. Griffin, Flight Director of the Third (Gold) team (17610).

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  18. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  19. Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

  20. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  1. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  2. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  3. Caffeine enhances micturition through neuronal activation in micturition centers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sam; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwan, Lakkyong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Chung, Jun-Young; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2014-12-01

    Caffeine may promote incontinence through its diuretic effect, particularly in individuals with underlying detrusor overactivity, in addition to increasing muscle contraction of the bladder smooth muscle. Caffeine may also affect bladder function via central micturition centers, including the medial preoptic area, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, and pontine micturition center. However, the biochemical mechanisms of caffeine in central micturition centers affecting bladder function remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of caffeine on the central micturition reflex were investigated by measuring the degree of neuronal activation, and by quantifying nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in rats. Following caffeine administration for 14 days, a urodynamic study was performed to assess the changes to bladder function. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining to identify the expression of c‑Fos and NGF in the central micturition areas was performed. Ingestion of caffeine increased bladder smooth muscle contraction pressure and time as determined by cystometry. Expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF in all central micturition areas were significantly increased following the administration of caffeine. The effects on contraction pressure and time were the most potent and expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF were greatest at the lowest dose of caffeine. These results suggest that caffeine facilitates bladder instability through enhancing neuronal activation in the central micturition areas.

  4. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  5. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  6. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  7. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  8. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  9. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and...

  10. [Activities of Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The final report of NASA funded activities at Iowa State University (ISU) for the period between 1/96 and 1/99 includes two main areas of activity. The first is the development and delivery of an x-ray simulation package suitable for evaluating the impact of parameters affects the inspectability of an assembly of parts. The second area was the development of images processing tools to remove reconstruction artifacts in x-ray laminagraphy images. The x-ray simulation portion of this work was done by J. Gray and the x-ray laminagraphy work was done by J. Basart. The report is divided into two sections covering the two activities respectively. In addition to this work reported the funding also covered NASA's membership in the NSF University/Industrial Cooperative Research Center.

  11. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors.

  12. Oxygen Activation at Mononuclear Nonheme Iron Centers: A Superoxo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Chakraborti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K.; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron-oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon dioxygen activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron-superoxo and iron-peroxo species. While iron(IV)-oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(TpiPr2)FeII(O2CC(O)CH3)], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV)-oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles the iron(III)-superoxo species can play in the course of dioxygen activation at a nonheme iron center. PMID:20380464

  13. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  14. Antituberculosis activity of the molecular libraries screening center network library.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Goldman, Robert C; Hobrath, Judith V; Kwong, Cecil D; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Reynolds, Robert C; Secrist, John A; Sosa, Melinda I; White, E Lucile; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-01

    There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein.

  15. [Research activities in Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Centers].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak

    2013-01-01

    Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Center was established in Institute of Tropical Disease (ITD), Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia in 2007 under the program of ''Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases'' supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and then it has been under the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) since 2010. Japanese researchers have been stationed at ITD, conducting joint researches on influenza, viral hepatitis, dengue and infectious diarrhea. Also, another Japanese researcher has been stationed at Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, carrying out joint researches on'' Identification of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) substances and development of HCV and dengue vaccines'' in collaboration with University of Indonesia and Airlangga University through the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) since 2009. In this article, we briefly introduce the background history of Kobe University Research Center in Indonesia, and discuss the research themes and outcomes of J-GRID and SATREPS activities.

  16. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  17. Architecture and evolution of Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Rosen, Wayne; Sherman, Mark; Pease, Phil

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to enhance Earth Science research by improved access to remote sensor earth science data. Building and operating an archive, even one of a moderate size (a few Terabytes), is a challenging task. One of the critical components of this system is Unitree, the Hierarchical File Storage Management System. Unitree, selected two years ago as the best available solution, requires constant system administrative support. It is not always suitable as an archive and distribution data center, and has moderate performance. The Data Archive and Distribution System (DADS) software developed to monitor, manage, and automate the ingestion, archive, and distribution functions turned out to be more challenging than anticipated. Having the software and tools is not sufficient to succeed. Human interaction within the system must be fully understood to improve efficiency to improve efficiency and ensure that the right tools are developed. One of the lessons learned is that the operability, reliability, and performance aspects should be thoroughly addressed in the initial design. However, the GSFC DAAC has demonstrated that it is capable of distributing over 40 GB per day. A backup system to archive a second copy of all data ingested is under development. This backup system will be used not only for disaster recovery but will also replace the main archive when it is unavailable during maintenance or hardware replacement. The GSFC DAAC has put a strong emphasis on quality at all level of its organization. A Quality team has also been formed to identify quality issues and to propose improvements. The DAAC has conducted numerous tests to benchmark the performance of the system. These tests proved to be extremely useful in identifying bottlenecks and deficiencies in operational procedures.

  18. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline PdxAu1− x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin–twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  19. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  20. Metal-center exchange of tetrahedral cages: single crystal to single crystal and spin-crossover properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Li; Chen, Jia-Qian; Qin, Long-Fang; Tian, Lei; Li, Zaijun; Ren, Xuehong; Gu, Zhi-Guo

    2016-04-01

    An effective single crystal to single crystal transformation from a tetrahedral Ni cage to an FeNi cage was demonstrated. The iron(ii) centers of the FeNi cage can be induced to display spin crossover behaviors with an increasing amount of Fe(II) ions. The SCSC metal-center exchange provides a powerful approach to modify solid magnetic properties.

  1. Metal-centered polymers: Using controlled polymerization methodologies for the generation of responsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Matthew

    Controlled polymerization methods were used to prepare highly modular polymeric metal complexes via convergent and divergent strategies. In these materials, the metal center provides a versatile hub for preparing diverse architectures through coordinative bonds. Moreover, the metal complex introduces various properties to the polymer such as luminescence, magnetism, or electroactivity. Suitably functionalized metal complexes have been used for the atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylate and methacrylate monomers by metalloinitiation to generate luminescent biocompatible materials through a divergent synthesis. By cleaving the tert-butyl groups from poly(tert -butyl acrylate), water soluble [Ru(bpyPAA2)3] 2+ has been prepared as well as the amphiphilic star block copolymer [Ru{bpy(PLA-PAA)2}3]2+ (PLA = poly(lactic acid), PAA = poly(acrylic acid) Bipyridine-centered polymeric macroligands may be chelated to a variety of metal salts. The polymer size greatly influences the formation of [Fe(bpy) 3]2+ centered polymers. As the molecular weight increases (> ˜25 kDa) tris complex formation decreases. Tris(bpy) synthesis is also impacted by chemical composition. BpyPtBA2 (PtBA = poly(tert-butyl acrylate) generates an iron mono(bpy) complex before giving rise to the bis(bpy) iron complex; no tris complex is observed. In contrast, the combination of bpyPEG2 (3 equiv) (PEG = (poly(ethylene glycol)) results in the formation of some iron tris(bpy) compound; however, complete tris(bpy) product formation is suppressed, presumably because of the chelating ability of the PEG chains. These examples contrast with other polymeric macroligands such as bpyPS2, bpyPMMA2, bpyPCL2 and bpyPLA 2 (PS = polystyrene; PMMA = poly(methyl methacrylate); PCL = poly(epsilon-caprolactone); PLA = poly(DL-lactic acid)) for which chelation reactions are facile for low molecular weight macroligands (<15 kDa), with chelation efficiencies (defined as (epsilonPMC/epsilonbpy) x 100%) only declining

  2. Space weather activities at NOAA s Space Environment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunches, J.

    The NOAA Space Environment Center is the focal point for real-time space weather monitoring and prediction in the United States . The Space Weather Operations (SWO) division staffs a 24-hour/day operations center, through which both in-situ and remotely sensed data and imagery flow. These diverse data streams are analyzed continuously, and that information is applied to both predictions and specifications of various aspects of the space environment. These include the behavior of the geomagnetic field, the character of the ionosphere, and the strength of the near-earth radiation environment. Models are brought to bear in each of thes e areas, as SEC has an active research-to-operations transition effort. The Rapid Prototyping Center is the venue through which pertinent models and data must pass to be brought into the operational arena. The model outputs are then made available both internally and externally. SEC is a member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES), a partnership currently consisting of eleven nations. The mission of the ISES is to encourage and facilitate near-real-time international monitoring and prediction of the space environment by: the rapid exchange of space environment information; the standardization of the methodology for space environment observations and data reduction; the uniform publication of observations and statistics; and the application of standardized space environment products and services to assist users in reducing the impact of space weather on activities of human interest. An overview of the operational attributes of the SEC, and the function of the ISES, will be presented. Additional issues related to space weather customers, new data streams to be available in the near-term, and how these new data and imagery will be integrated int o operations will be discussed.

  3. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  4. The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golon, Danielle K.

    2016-10-03

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) operates as a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey and is 1 of 12 DAACs within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The LP DAAC ingests, archives, processes, and distributes NASA Earth science remote sensing data. These data are provided to the public at no charge. Data distributed by the LP DAAC provide information about Earth’s surface from daily to yearly intervals and at 15 to 5,600 meter spatial resolution. Data provided by the LP DAAC can be used to study changes in agriculture, vegetation, ecosystems, elevation, and much more. The LP DAAC provides several ways to access, process, and interact with these data. In addition, the LP DAAC is actively archiving new datasets to provide users with a variety of data to study the Earth.

  5. Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Nanotube activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization as well as applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A parametric study of the pulsed laser ablation process is recently completed to monitor the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Enhancement of production is achieved by rastering the graphite target and by increasing the target surface temperature with a cw laser. In-situ diagnostics during production included time resolved passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from the plume. The improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymer/nanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large Surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs. Comparison with existing technologies and possible future improvements in the SWCNT materials sill be presented.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2006-01-01

    Research activities on carbon nanotubes at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization and their applications for human space flight. In-situ diagnostics during nanotube production by laser oven process include collection of spatial and temporal data of passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from C2, C3 and Nickel atoms in the plume. Details of the results from the "parametric study" of the pulsed laser ablation process indicate the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymednanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  7. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  8. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed Central

    Sainna, Mala A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)2(μ2-H)(μ2-NHCH3)(μ3-C)PtCH3(P(CH3)3)2](CO)n+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH3)5, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  9. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed

    Sainna, Mala A; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-09-28

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)₂(μ²-H) (μ²-NHCH₃)(μ³-C)PtCH₃(P(CH₃)₃)₂](CO)n⁺ with n=0, 2 and Cp=η⁵-C₅(CH₃)₅, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes.

  10. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed

    Sainna, Mala A; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)₂(μ²-H) (μ²-NHCH₃)(μ³-C)PtCH₃(P(CH₃)₃)₂](CO)n⁺ with n=0, 2 and Cp=η⁵-C₅(CH₃)₅, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  11. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  12. Activity File of Learning Center and Classroom Multi-Cultural Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverside Unified School District, CA.

    The cards in this file are representative samples of the types of activities developed by teachers involved in a Title I funded learning center of multi-cultural classroom activities for elementary school students. The five cultures that are stuoied are those of blacks, Asian Americans, native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Anglos. A…

  13. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster: a model for the in vitro assembly of metalloprotein metal centers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Shiigi, Stacey A; Swartz, James R

    2014-01-01

    Many organometallic cofactors are highly complex and require multiple accessory proteins for both their assembly and transfer to a target protein. A cell-free system in which the biosynthetic pathway for a prosthetic group has been fully or even partially reconstructed enables investigations of the reaction sequence as well as the cofactor itself. As a model for the in vitro assembly of protein-bound metal centers, we describe a procedure for the cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster in the context of producing purified and active [FeFe] hydrogenase samples for spectroscopic studies. In general terms, this in vitro system is a combination of non-purified accessory proteins, exogenous substrates, and purified hydrogenase apoprotein. We also describe methods for making the required components used in the cell-free system. Specifically, these procedures include anaerobic expression of heterologous metalloproteins in Escherichia coli, anaerobic cell lysate production, and anaerobic metalloprotein purification using Strep-Tactin(®) chromatography.

  15. Development of Secondary Archive System at Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Mark; Kodis, John; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Wacker, Chris; Woytek, Joanne; Lynnes, Chris

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test EOS data and information system (EOSDIS) concepts. To ensure that no data is ever lost, each product received at GSFC DAAC is archived on two different media, VHS and digital linear tape (DLT). The first copy is made on VHS tape and is under the control of UniTree. The second and third copies are made to DLT and VHS media under a custom built software package named 'Archer'. While Archer provides only a subset of the functions available with commercial software like UniTree, it supports migration between near-line and off-line media and offers much greater performance and flexibility to satisfy the specific needs of a data center. Archer is specifically designed to maximize total system throughput, rather than focusing on the turn-around time for individual files. The commercial off the shelf software (COTS) hierarchical storage management (HSM) products evaluated were mainly concerned with transparent, interactive, file access to the end-user, rather than a batch-orientated, optimizable (based on known data file characteristics) data archive and retrieval system. This is critical to the distribution requirements of the GSFC DAAC where orders for 5000 or more files at a time are received. Archer has the ability to queue many thousands of file requests and to sort these requests into internal processing schedules that optimize overall throughput. Specifically, mount and dismount, tape load and unload cycles, and tape motion are minimized. This feature did not seem to be available in many COTS pacages. Archer also uses a generic tar tape format that allows tapes to be read by many different systems rather than the proprietary format found in most COTS packages. This paper discusses some of the specific requirements at GSFC DAAC, the

  16. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  17. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrara (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  18. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  19. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  20. Center-of-pressure movements during equine-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Hilary M; Kaiser, Leeann J; de Pue, Bonnie; Kaiser, Lana

    2011-01-01

    We compared anteroposterior and mediolateral range of motion and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) on the horse's back between riders without disabilities and riders with cerebral palsy. An electronic pressure mat was used to track COP movements beneath the saddle in 4 riders without disabilities and 4 riders with cerebral palsy. Comparisons between rider groups were made using the Mann-Whitney test (p < .05). The two rider groups differed significantly in anteroposterior range of COP motion, mediolateral range of COP motion, and mediolateral COP velocity. Anteroposterior COP velocity did not differ between groups. The results suggest that measurements of COP range of motion and velocity are potentially useful for monitoring changes in balance as an indicator of core stability during equine-assisted activities.

  1. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  2. The effect of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Nigel; Kelly, John C; Moore, David P; Kenny, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The recall of the articular surface replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis in 2010 represents one of the most controversial areas in orthopaedic surgery in recent years. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity in four different regions and determine whether the number of related news reports affected Internet search activity. The Google Trends, Keywords and News applications were used to record the number of news articles and Internet search activity for the terms "hip recall", "metal-on-metal hip" and "ASR hip" from October 2009 to October 2012 in the USA, the UK, Australia and Ireland. There was a large increase in search activity following the official recall in August 2010 in all countries. There was significantly greater search activity after the recall in Ireland compared with the UK for the search term "hip recall" (P = 0.004). For the term "metal-on-metal hip", the UK had significantly more search activity (P = 0.0009). There was a positive correlation between the number of news stories in UK and Ireland with Internet search activity but not in the USA or Australia. Differences between countries affected by the same recall highlight the complex effects of the media on public awareness. The data demonstrates a window of opportunity prior to the official recall for the development of an awareness campaign to provide patients with accurate information.

  3. Ab Initio Study of the Adsorption of Small Molecules on Metal-Organic Frameworks with Oxo-centered Trimetallic Building Units: The Role of the Undercoordinated Metal Ion.

    PubMed

    Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Boese, A Daniel; Fink, Karin; Heine, Thomas; Klopper, Wim

    2015-09-01

    The interactions of H2, CO, CO2, and H2O with the undercoordinated metal centers of the trimetallic oxo-centered M3(III)(μ3-O)(X) (COO)6 moiety are studied by means of wave function and density functional theory. This trimetallic oxo-centered cluster is a common building unit in several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as MIL-100, MIL-101, and MIL-127 (also referred to as soc-MOF). A combinatorial computational screening is performed for a large variety of trimetallic oxo-centered units M3(III)O (M = Al(3+), Sc(3+), V(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Rh(3+), In(3+), Ir(3+)) interacting with H2O, H2, CO, and CO2. The screening addresses interaction energies, adsorption enthalpies, and vibrational properties. The results show that the Rh and Ir analogues are very promising materials for gas storage and separations.

  4. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  5. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  6. Efficiency of metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization

    SciTech Connect

    Duchacek, V.; Kuta, A.; Pribyl, P. )

    1993-01-20

    The effects of copper, mercury, nickel, zinc, cadmium, indium, magnesium, and calcium stearates on the course of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzthiazylsulphenamide-accelerated sulfur vulcanization of natural rubber have been investigated on the basis of curemeter measurements at 145 C. The differences in the efficiencies of these metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization have been discussed from the points of view of the electron configurations of the metals and their affinities to sulfur. The authors attempted to determine why zinc oxide is generally accepted as the best metal vulcanization activator.

  7. ROLE OF C AND P SITES ON THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF METAL CARBIDE AND PHOSPHIDES: FROM CLUSTERS TO SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; VINES, F.; LIU, P.; ILLAS, F.

    2007-07-01

    Transition metal carbides and phosphides have shown tremendous potential as highly active catalysts. At a microscopic level, it is not well understood how these new catalysts work. Their high activity is usually attributed to ligand or/and ensemble effects. Here, we review recent studies that examine the chemical activity of metal carbide and phosphides as a function of size, from clusters to extended surfaces, and metal/carbon or metal/phosphorous ratio. These studies reveal that the C and P sites in these compounds cannot be considered as simple spectators. They moderate the reactivity of the metal centers and provide bonding sites for adsorbates.

  8. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  9. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the 'pseudo-interfacial energy' that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches. PMID:27484794

  11. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the 'pseudo-interfacial energy' that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

  12. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the ‘pseudo-interfacial energy’ that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

  13. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  14. Grain-boundary strengthening in nanocrystalline chromium and the Hall- Petch coefficient of body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Junyan, Zhang; Huang, J C; Bei, Hongbin; Nieh, Tai-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cr (nc-Cr) was synthesized by electrodeposition. Samples with various grain sizes (19 57 nm) were prepared by annealing the as-deposited sample. Microstructures were examined using X-ray and electron microscopy, and the mechanical prop- erties were evaluated using nanoindentation. The strength of nc-Cr samples apparently obeyed the classical Hall Petch relationship. It was found that hardening potency caused by grain refinement was generally higher in body-centered cubic metals than that in face-centered cubic and hexagonal close-packed metals. A possible explanation was offered.

  15. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer involving Os-centered radicals: evidence for tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Grills, David C; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os(•) and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•) radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons are in the range 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.8 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 °C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies (E(D) - E(H)) and the pre-exponential factor ratio (A(H)/A(D)). For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•), the (E(D) - E(H)) = 3.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) and A(H)/A(D) = 0.06 ± 0.02 values suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism.

  16. Constraints on Galactic Center Activity: A Search for Enhanced Galactic Center Lithium and Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.; Turner, B. E.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1998-12-01

    The abundances of lithium and boron provide important information about big bang nucleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution, and cosmic-ray spallation reactions. We conducted the first search for the ground-state hyperfine-structure transitions of Li I (2S1/2; F = 2-1 803 MHz) and B I (2P1/2; F = 2-1 732 MHz). We used the 43 m NRAO radio telescope to search for enhanced Galactic center (GC) Li and B expected from models of Galactic activity. We did not detect Li I or B I and obtained upper limits of N(Li I) < 1.9 × 1016 cm-2, (Li/H) < 3.9 × 10-8, N(B I) < 2.2 × 1018 cm-2, and (B/H) < 9.2 × 10-6 for the dense 20 km s-1 Sgr A molecular cloud where our largest sources of uncertainties are Li I/Li, B I/B, and N(H). Our observations imply (Li/H)GC < 22 (Li/H)disk, (Li/H)GC < 39 (Li/H)disk-spallation, (B/H)GC < 1.2 × 104 (B/H)disk, (B/H)GC < 1.5 × 104 (B/H)disk-spallation. For a simple model combining mass loss from AGB stars (only for Li), spallation reactions, and SN ν-nucleosynthesis, we estimate (Li/H)GC = 1.3 × 10-8 (13 times enhancement) and (B/H)GC = 7.4 × 10-9 (10 times enhancement). If Li is primarily produced via spallation reactions from a cosmic-ray proton flux φp(t) with the same energy and trapping as in the disk, then [\\smallint φp(t)dt]GC < 13[\\smallint φp(t)dt]disk. Comparing our results to AGN models, we conclude that the GC has not had an extended period of AGN activity containing a large cosmic-ray flux (LCR <= 1044 ergs s-1 for 108 yr), a large low-energy cosmic-ray flux (less than 100 times the disk flux), or a large γ-ray flux (Lγ < 1042 ergs s-1 for 109 yr). Furthermore, since any Galactic deuterium production will significantly enhance the abundances of Li and B, our results imply that there are no sources of D in the GC or Galaxy. Therefore, all the Galactic D originated from the infall of primordial matter with the current D/H reduced by astration and mixing.

  17. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  18. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  19. [Requests for active euthanasia: which reality in an oncology center.].

    PubMed

    Chvetzoff, G; Perret, M; Thevenet, G; Arbiol, E; Gobet, S; Saltel, P

    2009-09-01

    Euthanasia is a controversial issue in today's society. In countries where euthanasia is legal, it is mainly associated with people with cancer. We retrospectively studied the frequency and basis of patients' requests for active euthanasia in the oncology setting.MethodsRecurrent requests for euthanasia made by the patients of Leon-Berard cancer center (Lyon, France) between 2001 and 2003 were recorded by questioning the physicians and nurse supervisors in charge or by collecting information from the minutes of multidisciplinary palliative care meetings. We also collected information on the general health status of the patients, their motives and their evolution over time, as well as responses from caregivers.ResultsWe identified 16 requests for euthanasia. These involved 8 men, 7 women and 1 child (median age, 56 years), corresponding to 1% of the total deaths recorded during the period. In 2 cases, the request had come from the family only. The most frequent motives were psychological distress (38%), desire for self-autonomy (31%) and pain (31%). Half of the patients, particularly those striving for autonomy, persisted with their request until death, whereas 2 of 3 requests motivated by physical or psychological distress were not maintained. Sedation was administered to 3 patients in response to recurrent requests.ConclusionRequests for euthanasia in cancer patients are rare but may occur. Sometimes suffering is not relieved by palliative care and the request is maintained. Dealing with these patients puts caregivers in a difficult situation.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  2. THE GALACTIC CENTER: NOT AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris

    2013-06-01

    We present 10 {mu}m-35 {mu}m Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc Multiplication-Sign 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H{sub 2} emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H{sub 2} suggest that most of the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-03-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  4. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  5. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  6. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature.

  7. Antischistosomal Activity of Oxindolimine-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Bruno S.; Couto, Ricardo A. A.; Pinto, Pedro L. S.; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of oxindole-copper and -zinc complex derivatives have been reported as compounds with efficient proapoptotic activity toward different tumor cells (e.g., neuroblastomas, melanomas, monocytes). Here we assessed the efficacy of synthesized oxindole-copper(II), -zinc(II), and -vanadyl (VO2+) complexes against adult Schistosoma mansoni worms. The copper(II) complexes (50% inhibitory concentrations of 30 to 45 μM) demonstrated greater antischistosomal properties than the analogous zinc and vanadyl complexes regarding lethality, reduction of motor activity, and oviposition. PMID:26239976

  8. Driving forces of heavy metal changes in agricultural soils in a typical manufacturing center.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Menglong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Qi; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in 2002 and 2012 in agricultural soils in Dongguan, a manufacturing center in southern China, were analyzed to determine the impact of rapid economic development on soil pollution. The level of pollution was assessed using the Nemerow synthetic pollution index (NPI), and its changing characteristics and driving forces were analyzed using multivariate statistical and geostatistical methods. The results indicate that the mean NPI was 0.79 in 2002 and 0.84 in 2012, which indicates aggravated heavy metal contamination in the agricultural soils. The concentrations of Cd and Zn increased 54.7 and 20.8 %, respectively, whereas Hg and Pb decreased 35.3 and 24.5 %, respectively. Cr, As, Cu, and Ni remained relatively stable. The Hg and Cd concentrations were highly correlated with soil types (P < 0.01), the secondary industrial output per unit of land (P < 0.01), proportion of cereal fields (P < 0.01), proportion of vegetable fields (P < 0.01), population density (P < 0.05), and road density (P < 0.05). The Pb and As concentrations were greatly influenced by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), fertilizer rate (P < 0.01), and road density (P < 0.05). Cr, Zn, Cu, and Ni concentrations were primarily driven by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), and fertilizer rate (P < 0.05).

  9. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  10. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  11. Size Effects in Thin Face-Centered Cubic Metals for Different Complex Forming Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubos, Pierre-Antoine; Hug, Eric; Thibault, Simon; Ben Bettaieb, Mohamed; Keller, Clément

    2013-12-01

    Influence of the size effects on the mechanical behavior of face-centered cubic metals was studied for complex loadings close to microforming ones. The effect of a reduction in thickness ( t) over grain size ( d) ratio on the mechanical behavior for high-purity nickel and copper is investigated for three different loadings by tensile and Nakazima tests (plane strain conditions and balanced biaxial expansion). Experimental results highlight a strong degradation of the mechanical properties of Cu and Ni when the t/ d ratio is reduced below a critical value, independently of the strain path. However, this effect occurs if the equivalent plastic strain is larger than a critical level which is strain path dependent and related to the stress triaxiality. The current study reveals that plastic anisotropy is also affected by size effects. An excellent correlation is obtained between the t/ d ratio and the thickness reduction, through the mean normal plastic anisotropy parameter which is widely used to estimate sheet formability. A size effect map based on forming limit diagrams is proposed to depict the optimal conditions of microforming.

  12. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  13. Redox-activated MRI contrast agents based on lanthanide and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tsitovich, Pavel B; Burns, Patrick J; McKay, Adam M; Morrow, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) potential of tissue is tightly regulated in order to maintain normal physiological processes, but is disrupted in disease states. Thus, the development of new tools to map tissue redox potential may be clinically important for the diagnosis of diseases that lead to redox imbalances. One promising area of chemical research is the development of redox-activated probes for mapping tissue through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we summarize several strategies for the design of redox-responsive MRI contrast agents. Our emphasis is on both lanthanide(III) and transition metal(II/III) ion complexes that provide contrast either as T1 relaxivity MRI contrast agents or as paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents. These agents are redox-triggered by a variety of chemical reactions or switches including redox-activated thiol groups, and heterocyclic groups that interact with the metal ion or influence properties of other ancillary ligands. Metal ion centered redox is an approach which is ripe for development by coordination chemists. Redox-triggered metal ion approaches have great potential for creating large differences in magnetic properties that lead to changes in contrast. An attractive feature of these agents is the ease of fine-tuning the metal ion redox potential over a biologically relevant range.

  14. 77 FR 70211 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VBA Call Center Satisfaction Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-0744. Type of... VA call centers will provide VBA with three key benefits to: (1) Identify what is most important...

  15. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  16. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  17. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  18. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  19. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  20. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  1. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  2. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn2+, hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co2+. Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites. PMID:26853450

  3. Structure of a Novel Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. TCM1: A Familiar Binuclear Metal Center Embedded in a Seven-Bladed β-Propeller Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Xiang, Dao Feng; Bigley, Andrew N; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-07-19

    A novel phosphotriesterase was recently discovered and purified from Sphingobium sp. TCM1 (Sb-PTE) and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of organophosphate esters with a catalytic efficiency that exceeds 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydrolysis of triphenyl phosphate. The enzyme was crystallized and the three-dimensional structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (Protein Data Bank entry 5HRM ). The enzyme adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller protein fold, and three disulfide bonds were identified between Cys-146 and Cys-242, Cys-411 and Cys-443, and Cys-542 and Cys-559. The active site of Sb-PTE contains a binuclear manganese center that is nearly identical to that of the structurally unrelated phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta (Pd-PTE). The two metal ions in the active site are bridged to one another by Glu-201 and a water molecule. The α-metal ion is further coordinated to the protein by interactions with His-389, His-475, and Glu-407, whereas the β-metal ion is further liganded to His-317 and His-258. Computational docking of mimics of the proposed pentavalent reaction intermediates for the hydrolysis of organophosphates was used to provide a model for the binding of chiral substrates in the active site of Sb-PTE. The most striking difference in the catalytic properties of Sb-PTE, relative to those of Pd-PTE, is the enhanced rate of hydrolysis of organophosphate esters with substantially weaker leaving groups. The structural basis for this difference in the catalytic properties between Sb-PTE and Pd-PTE, despite the nearly identical binuclear metal centers for the activation of the substrate and nucleophilic water molecule, is at present unclear. PMID:27353520

  4. Structure of a Novel Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. TCM1: A Familiar Binuclear Metal Center Embedded in a Seven-Bladed β-Propeller Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Xiang, Dao Feng; Bigley, Andrew N; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-07-19

    A novel phosphotriesterase was recently discovered and purified from Sphingobium sp. TCM1 (Sb-PTE) and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of organophosphate esters with a catalytic efficiency that exceeds 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydrolysis of triphenyl phosphate. The enzyme was crystallized and the three-dimensional structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (Protein Data Bank entry 5HRM ). The enzyme adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller protein fold, and three disulfide bonds were identified between Cys-146 and Cys-242, Cys-411 and Cys-443, and Cys-542 and Cys-559. The active site of Sb-PTE contains a binuclear manganese center that is nearly identical to that of the structurally unrelated phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta (Pd-PTE). The two metal ions in the active site are bridged to one another by Glu-201 and a water molecule. The α-metal ion is further coordinated to the protein by interactions with His-389, His-475, and Glu-407, whereas the β-metal ion is further liganded to His-317 and His-258. Computational docking of mimics of the proposed pentavalent reaction intermediates for the hydrolysis of organophosphates was used to provide a model for the binding of chiral substrates in the active site of Sb-PTE. The most striking difference in the catalytic properties of Sb-PTE, relative to those of Pd-PTE, is the enhanced rate of hydrolysis of organophosphate esters with substantially weaker leaving groups. The structural basis for this difference in the catalytic properties between Sb-PTE and Pd-PTE, despite the nearly identical binuclear metal centers for the activation of the substrate and nucleophilic water molecule, is at present unclear.

  5. Activities and Products at IVS combination center at BKG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, S.; Lösler, M.

    2013-08-01

    The IVS combination center is primarily responsible to provide rapid EOP products based on observation campaigns twice a week and a long-term EOP series which is updated four times a year. Besides EOP products, methods and analysis of combined station coordinates and source positions are evolving and new products are developed in order to expand the range of combined VLBI products. Within the last year the combination center continuously worked on several improvements and refinements of the combination procedure: outlier test have been improved, the detection of unsuitable sessions in order to improve the stability of the results, the modeling of station coordinates of the reference frame generation and the data presentation on the combination centers website. Besides the routine combination of 24h VLBI sessions, several other projects have been developed, e.g. the preparation of the latest VLBI reference frame (VTRF) including the calculation of station height variations and baseline lengths generation derived by the combination of station coordinates. The combination center is furthermore intensely working on the combination of source coordinates and on providing user friendly online analysis tools on the combination centers website in order to meet the user requirements.

  6. Activities, accomplishments and research progress of the Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    1992-02-01

    This annual report contains a detailed description of the activities, accomplishments, and research progress of the MIT Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics established under the University Research Initiative Program by AFOSR. During this second phase of the program, the Center has made definite strides toward the goals prescribed in the renewal proposal. The Center now has a staff of twenty-five (25) faculty, research scientists, postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate students and visiting scientists. Members of the Center published forty-eight (48) scientific papers and five (5) books and proceedings, delivered forty (40) invited lectures and fifty-one (51) contributed papers. We have initiated a number of new research activities to complement our other ongoing research programs. Some of our research efforts have already been utilized by Dr. J. R. Jasperse's group at the Geophysics Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory in practical space technology applications relevant to the missions of the Air Force. In addition to the Phillips Laboratory, the Center has interacted with numerous research organizations and universities. The research publications are generally the direct product of such interactions.

  7. Active-learning versus teacher-centered instruction for learning acids and bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-07-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of 'acids and bases'. Sample The sample of this study was 45 high-school students (average age 17 years) from two different classes, which were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) and control groups (n = 25), in a high school in Turkey. Design and methods A pre-test consisting of 25 items was applied to both experimental and control groups before the treatment in order to identify student prerequisite knowledge about their proficiency for learning 'acids and bases'. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the pre-test scores for groups and no significant difference was found between experimental (ME = 40.14) and control groups (MC = 41.92) in terms of mean scores (F 1,43 = 2.66, p > 0.05). The experimental group was taught using an active-learning curriculum developed by the authors and the control group was taught using traditional course content based on teacher-centered instruction. After the implementation, 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' scores were collected for both groups. Results ANOVA results showed that students' 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' post-test scores differed significantly in terms of groups (F 1,43 = 102.53; p < 0.05). Additionally, in this study 54 misconceptions, 14 of them not reported in the literature before, were observed in the following terms: 'acid and base theories'; 'metal and non-metal oxides'; 'acid and base strengths'; 'neutralization'; 'pH and pOH'; 'hydrolysis'; 'acid-base equilibrium'; 'buffers'; 'indicators'; and 'titration'. Based on the achievement test and individual interview results, it was found that high-school students in the experimental group had fewer misconceptions and understood the

  8. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  9. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-01

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω-+|1 mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω--|1 mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω-+|1 and ω--|1 modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag-SiO2-Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  10. Catalytic Activity-d-Band Center Correlation for the O2 Reduction on Platinum in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima,F.; Zhang, J.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.; Ticianelli, E.; Adzic, R.

    2007-01-01

    We determined, by the rotating disk electrode technique, the kinetics of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) on the surfaces of single crystals of Au(111), Ag(111), Pd(111), Rh(111), Ir(111), and Ru(0001), on Pt monolayers deposited on their surfaces, and also on nanoparticles of these metals dispersed on high-surface-area carbon. Plotting the correlation between the experimentally determined activities of these three types of electrocatalysts with the calculated metal d-band center energies,{var_epsilon}{sub d}, revealed a volcano-type dependence. In all cases, the electronic properties of the metal electrocatalysts, represented by the {var_epsilon}{sub d} value, were used for elucidating the metal-dependent catalytic activities, and establishing their electronic properties-the ORR kinetics relationship. Pt(111), Pt/C, and Pt/Pd(111) were found to top their corresponding volcano plots. Pd in alkaline solutions showed particularly high activity, suggesting it may offer potential replacement for Pt in fuel cells.

  11. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Overall view of JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR) during Flight Day 1 of STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  12. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), astronauts John O. Creighton (right) and L. Blaine Hammond review their notes while serving as spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) for STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  13. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight directors (FDs) Lee Briscoe (left) and Charles W. Shaw, seated at FD console, view front visual display monitors during STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  14. Physical activity in the EPIC-Italy centers.

    PubMed

    Salvini, Simonetta; Saieva, Calogero; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Berrino, Franco; Pala, Valeria; Frasca, Graziella; Tumino, Rosario; Veglia, Fabrizio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Palli, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition offers the opportunity to explore patterns of physical activity in a large series of healthy adults enrolled in the different local cohorts of the Italian section of the European EPIC project. Physical activity is considered one of the means by which chronic disease could be prevented. Subjects in the EPIC study completed a life-style questionnaire, with a section dedicated to the assessment of physical activity at work and during leisure time. Time spent in the various activities was transformed into an index of physical activity (physical activity level, PAL) and an activity index that includes intense activity (PAL; intense activity included). Quintiles of these indexes were computed in order to observe the distribution of subject characteristics according to levels of physical activity. In general, the population was characterized by low levels of physical activity at work, with more than 50% of the sample reporting sedentary occupations. During leisure time, only a small percentage of subjects compensated for the inactivity at work by engaging in energy-consuming activities. In particular, organized fitness activities were reported by a small percentage of people, whereas walking was the most common sort of physical activity. Specific types of activity seemed to characterize subjects in the different areas of the country, reflecting local traditions or specific living situations. Detailed information about physical activity habits, together with a description of other characteristics, could help in designing physical activity promotion programs in different Italian populations and age groups.

  15. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  16. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  17. Physical Activity in Child-Care Centers: Do Teachers Hold the Key to the Playground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49…

  18. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  19. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.32 What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  20. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  1. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.32 What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  2. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

    2012-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

  4. Anticancer activity of Arkeshwara Rasa - A herbo-metallic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Nurunnabi, Md; Saha, Samir Kumar; Jahan, Rownak; Lee, Yong-kyu; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though metal based drugs have been prescribed in Ayurveda for centuries to treat various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, toxicity of these drugs containing heavy metal is a great drawback for practical application. So, proper scientific validation of herbo-metallic drugs like Arkeshwara Rasa (AR) have become one of the focused research arena of new drugs against cancers. Aim: To investigate the in vitro anticancer effects of AR. Materials and Methods: Anticancer activity of AR was investigated on two human cancer cell lines, which represent two different tissues (pancreas and skin). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for enzyme activity and trypan blue assay for cell morphology were performed for further confirmation. Results: AR showed potent activity against pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2). LDH activity confirmed that AR was active against pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, it was observed that AR exhibited significant effects on cancer cells due to synergistic effects of different compounds of AR. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that AR has the potential to be an anticancer drug against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313425

  5. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  6. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  7. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight controller Granvil A. Pennington, leaning on console, listens to communications during the STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). MCC FCR visual displays are seen in background. Five veteran astronauts were in the FB-SMS rehearsing their roles for the scheduled June 1988 flight aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  8. Activated metallic gold as an agent for direct methoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-12-21

    We have discovered that metallic gold is a highly effective vehicle for the low-temperature vapor-phase carbonylation of methanol by insertion of CO into the O-H bond to form methoxycarbonyl. This reaction contrasts sharply to the carbonylation pathway well known for homogeneously catalyzed carbonylation reactions, such as the synthesis of acetic acid. The methoxycarbonyl intermediate can be further employed in a variety of methoxycarbonylation reactions, without the use or production of toxic chemicals. More generally we observe facile, selective methoxycarbonylation of alkyl and aryl alcohols and secondary amines on metallic gold well below room temperature. A specific example is the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, which has extensive use in organic synthesis. This work establishes a unique framework for using oxygen-activated metallic gold as a catalyst for energy-efficient, environmentally benign production of key synthetic chemical agents. PMID:22035206

  9. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  10. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  11. Learning by Doing: Engaging Students through Learner-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Karl L.; Csapo, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    With a shift of focus from teaching to learning in higher education, teachers often look for strategies to involve students actively in the learning process, especially since numerous studies have demonstrated that a student's active involvement in the learning process enhances learning. Active learning has resulted in positive learning outcomes.…

  12. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  13. Chiral magnetic effect and natural optical activity in (Weyl) metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, Dmytro; Ma, Jing

    We consider the phenomenon of natural optical activity, and related chiral magnetic effect in metals with low carrier concentration. To reveal the correspondence between the two phenomena, we compute the optical conductivity of a noncentrosymmetric metal to linear order in the wave vector of the light wave, specializing to the low-frequency regime. We show that it is the orbital magnetic moment of quasiparticles that is responsible for the natural optical activity, and thus the chiral magnetic effect. While for purely static magnetic fields the chiral magnetic effect is known to have a topological origin and to be related to the presence of Berry curvature monopoles (Weyl points) in the band structure, we show that the existence of Berry monopoles is not required for the dynamic chiral magnetic effect to appear; the latter is thus not unique to Weyl metals. The magnitude of the dynamic chiral magnetic effect in a material is related to the trace of its gyrotropic tensor. We discuss the conditions under which this trace is non-zero; in noncentrosymmetric Weyl metals it is found to be proportional to the energy-space dipole moment of Berry curvature monopoles. The calculations are done within both the semiclassical kinetic equation, and Kubo linear response formalisms. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1409089.

  14. Purification, substrate range, and metal center of AtzC: the N-isopropylammelide aminohydrolase involved in bacterial atrazine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shapir, Nir; Osborne, Jeffrey P; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2002-10-01

    N-Isopropylammelide isopropylaminohydrolase, AtzC, the third enzyme in the atrazine degradation pathway in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, catalyzes the stoichiometric hydrolysis of N-isopropylammelide to cyanuric acid and isopropylamine. The atzC gene was cloned downstream of the tac promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli, where the expressed enzyme comprised 36% of the soluble protein. AtzC was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and phenyl column chromatography. It has a subunit size of 44,938 kDa and a holoenzyme molecular weight of 174,000. The K(m) and k(cat) values for AtzC with N-isopropylammelide were 406 micro M and 13.3 s(-1), respectively. AtzC hydrolyzed other N-substituted amino dihydroxy-s-triazines, and those with linear N-alkyl groups had higher k(cat) values than those with branched alkyl groups. Native AtzC contained 0.50 eq of Zn per subunit. The activity of metal-depleted AtzC was restored with Zn(II), Fe(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) salts. Cobalt-substituted AtzC had a visible absorbance band at 540 nm (Delta epsilon = 84 M(-1) cm(-1)) and exhibited an axial electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal with the following effective values: g((x)) = 5.18, g((y)) = 3.93, and g((z)) = 2.24. Incubating cobalt-AtzC with the competitive inhibitor 5-azacytosine altered the effective EPR signal values to g((x)) = 5.11, g((y)) = 4.02, and g((z)) = 2.25 and increased the microwave power at half saturation at 10 K from 31 to 103 mW. Under the growth conditions examined, our data suggest that AtzC has a catalytically essential, five-coordinate Zn(II) metal center in the active site and specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of intermediates generated during the metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. PMID:12218024

  15. Purification, Substrate Range, and Metal Center of AtzC: the N-Isopropylammelide Aminohydrolase Involved in Bacterial Atrazine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shapir, Nir; Osborne, Jeffrey P.; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2002-01-01

    N-Isopropylammelide isopropylaminohydrolase, AtzC, the third enzyme in the atrazine degradation pathway in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, catalyzes the stoichiometric hydrolysis of N-isopropylammelide to cyanuric acid and isopropylamine. The atzC gene was cloned downstream of the tac promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli, where the expressed enzyme comprised 36% of the soluble protein. AtzC was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and phenyl column chromatography. It has a subunit size of 44,938 kDa and a holoenzyme molecular weight of 174,000. The Km and kcat values for AtzC with N-isopropylammelide were 406 μM and 13.3 s−1, respectively. AtzC hydrolyzed other N-substituted amino dihydroxy-s-triazines, and those with linear N-alkyl groups had higher kcat values than those with branched alkyl groups. Native AtzC contained 0.50 eq of Zn per subunit. The activity of metal-depleted AtzC was restored with Zn(II), Fe(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) salts. Cobalt-substituted AtzC had a visible absorbance band at 540 nm (Δɛ = 84 M−1 cm−1) and exhibited an axial electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal with the following effective values: g(x) = 5.18, g(y) = 3.93, and g(z) = 2.24. Incubating cobalt-AtzC with the competitive inhibitor 5-azacytosine altered the effective EPR signal values to g(x) = 5.11, g(y) = 4.02, and g(z) = 2.25 and increased the microwave power at half saturation at 10 K from 31 to 103 mW. Under the growth conditions examined, our data suggest that AtzC has a catalytically essential, five-coordinate Zn(II) metal center in the active site and specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of intermediates generated during the metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. PMID:12218024

  16. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  17. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  18. Recent Activities of Tsukuba Correlator/Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, K.; Kurihara, S.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has been a member of IVS and taken charge of a Network Station and an IVS Correlator since 1998. In addition, GSI became an IVS Operational Analysis Center in January 2010.The Tsukuba Correlator takes charge of correlation work for approximately 100 IVS-INT02 (INT2) sessions and 10 Japanese domestic sessions every year. In 2011, the number of INT2 sessions dramatically increased, because INT2 sessions were observed twice a day during the weekend from April 2011 to January 2012 due to the change in position of the Tsukuba 32-m antenna by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. The role of the Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center is to produce ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements, sessions with the goal of obtaining a dUT1 solution within 30 minutes after the end of the observation session. The data processing system at the Tsukuba Correlator and Analysis Center was dramatically improved to achieve rapid data processing. It enabled us to shorten the data processing time to one-sixth and to process the IVS VLBI data in near real-time. In 2011, we processed the ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements with the Onsala or Wettzell stations from INT2 sessions or IVS 24-hour sessions, such as R1, RD or T2 sessions. The most successful sessions for ultra-rapid dUT1 measurement was the CONT11 sessions which were a campaign of 15 days of continuous VLBI sessions. During these sessions, we succeeded in estimating continuous dUT1 solutions in near real-time for 15 days.

  19. Recent activities of the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, J.L.; Bond, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    At present the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center is the largest entity in the USSR responsible for the receipt and processing of space imagery. Besides the aforementioned consulting and training functions, Priroda, upon user request: a) processes multispectral, band-specific, and other remote sensing imagery and supplies a broad range of primary and derivative information in the form of image copies [prints and transparencies] and digital products; and b) cooperates with other GUGK bodies in the compilation of thematic map series on diverse topics. -from Authors

  20. Incoherent Bi off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O': Insulator versus metal

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Seshadri, Ram; Tachibana, Makoto; Hector, Andrew L.

    2011-08-24

    In the cubic, stoichiometric oxide compounds Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ti₂O₇) and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ru₂O₇) Bi³⁺ ions on the pyrochlore A site display a propensity to off-center. Unlike Bi₂Ti₂O₆O', Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' is a metal, so it is of interest to ask whether conduction electrons and/or involvement of Bi 6s states at the Fermi energy influence Bi³⁺ displacements. The Bi³⁺ off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has previously been revealed to be incoherent from detailed reverse Monte Carlo analysis of total neutron scattering. Similar analysis of Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' reveals incoherent off-centering as well, but of smaller magnitude and with distinctly different orientational preference. Analysis of the distributions of metal to oxygen distances presented suggests that Bi in both compounds is entirely Bi³⁺. Disorder in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has the effect of stabilizing valence while simultaneously satisfying the steric constraint imposed by the presence of the lone pair of electrons. In Bi₂Ru₂O₆O', off-centering is not required to satisfy valence and seems to be driven by the lone pair. Decreased volume of the lone pair may be a result of partial screening by conduction electrons.

  1. Incoherent Bi off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O': Insulator versus metal

    DOE PAGES

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Seshadri, Ram; Tachibana, Makoto; Hector, Andrew L.

    2011-08-24

    In the cubic, stoichiometric oxide compounds Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ti₂O₇) and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ru₂O₇) Bi³⁺ ions on the pyrochlore A site display a propensity to off-center. Unlike Bi₂Ti₂O₆O', Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' is a metal, so it is of interest to ask whether conduction electrons and/or involvement of Bi 6s states at the Fermi energy influence Bi³⁺ displacements. The Bi³⁺ off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has previously been revealed to be incoherent from detailed reverse Monte Carlo analysis of total neutron scattering. Similar analysis of Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' reveals incoherent off-centering as well, but of smaller magnitude and with distinctly different orientational preference. Analysismore » of the distributions of metal to oxygen distances presented suggests that Bi in both compounds is entirely Bi³⁺. Disorder in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has the effect of stabilizing valence while simultaneously satisfying the steric constraint imposed by the presence of the lone pair of electrons. In Bi₂Ru₂O₆O', off-centering is not required to satisfy valence and seems to be driven by the lone pair. Decreased volume of the lone pair may be a result of partial screening by conduction electrons.« less

  2. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  3. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    On August 2007 the National Institute for Space Research started a task force to develop and operate a space weather program, which is known by the acronyms Embrace that stands for the Portuguese statement "Estudo e Monitoramento BRAasileiro de Clima Espacial" Program (Brazilian Space Weather Study and Monitoring program). The mission of the Embrace/INPE program is to monitor the Solar-Terrestrial environment, the magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere and the ground induced currents to prevent effects on technological and economic activities. The Embrace/INPE system monitors the physical parameters of the Sun-Earth environment, such as Active Regions (AR) in the Sun and solar radiation by using radio telescope, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) information by satellite and ground-based cosmic ray monitoring, geomagnetic activity by the magnetometer network, and ionospheric disturbance by ionospheric sounders and using data collected by four GPS receiver network, geomagnetic activity by a magnetometer network, and provides a forecasting for Total Electronic Content (TEC) - 24 hours ahead - using a version of the SUPIM model which assimilates the two latter data using nudging approach. Most of these physical parameters are daily published on the Brazilian space weather program web portal, related to the entire network sensors available. Regarding outreach, it has being published a daily bulletin in Portuguese and English with the status of the space weather environment on the Sun, the Interplanetary Medium and close to the Earth. Since December 2011, all these activities are carried out at the Embrace Headquarter, a building located at the INPE's main campus. Recently, a comprehensive data bank and an interface layer are under commissioning to allow an easy and direct access to all the space weather data collected by Embrace through the Embrace web Portal. The information being released encompasses data from: (a) the Embrace Digisonde Network (Embrace DigiNet) that monitors

  4. [History and activities of the Rescue Coordination Center].

    PubMed

    Hausman, A

    1983-01-01

    The founder and first director of the C.C.R. enumerates the principles that led to the conception and the achievement of the C.C.R. He reviews the principal rescue activities during these 25 years and mentions the development of supplementary activities on safety, ergonomics and respiratory protection during the last few years.

  5. Multifunctional, defect-engineered metal-organic frameworks with ruthenium centers: sorption and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Kozachuk, Olesia; Luz, Ignacio; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X; Noei, Heshmat; Kauer, Max; Albada, H Bauke; Bloch, Eric D; Marler, Bernd; Wang, Yuemin; Muhler, Martin; Fischer, Roland A

    2014-07-01

    A mixed-linker solid-solution approach was employed to modify the metal sites and introduce structural defects into the mixed-valence Ru(II/III) structural analogue of the well-known MOF family [M3(II,II)(btc)2] (M=Cu, Mo, Cr, Ni, Zn; btc=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate), with partly missing carboxylate ligators at the Ru2 paddle-wheels. Incorporation of pyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (pydc), which is the same size as btc but carries lower charge, as a second, defective linker has led to the mixed-linker isoreticular derivatives of Ru-MOF, which display characteristics unlike those of the defect-free framework. Along with the creation of additional coordinatively unsaturated sites, the incorporation of pydc induces the partial reduction of ruthenium. Accordingly, the modified Ru sites are responsible for the activity of the "defective" variants in the dissociative chemisorption of CO2, the enhanced performance in CO sorption, the formation of hydride species, and the catalytic hydrogenation of olefins. PMID:24838592

  6. Molecular anatomy of tyrosinase and its related proteins: beyond the histidine-bound metal catalytic center.

    PubMed

    García-Borrón, José C; Solano, Francisco

    2002-06-01

    The structure of tyrosinase (Tyr) is reviewed from a double point of view. On the one hand, by comparison of all Tyr found throughout nature, from prokaryotic organisms to mammals and on the other, by comparison with the tyrosinase related proteins (Tyrps) that appeared late in evolution, and are only found in higher animals. Their structures are reviewed as a whole rather than focused on the histidine (His)-bound metal active site, which is the part of the molecule common to all these proteins. The availability of crystallographic data of hemocyanins and recently of sweet potato catechol oxidase has improved the model of the three-dimensional structure of the Tyr family. Accordingly, Tyr has a higher structural disorder than hemocyanins, particularly at the CuA site. The active site seems to be characterized by the formation of a hydrophobic pocket with a number of conserved aromatic residues sited close to the well-known His. Other regions specific of the mammalian enzymes, such as the cytosolic C-terminal tail, the cysteine clusters, and the N-glycosylation sequons, are also discussed. The complete understanding of the Tyr copper-binding domain and the characterization of the residues determinant of the relative substrate affinities of the Tyrps will improve the design of targeted mutagenesis experiments to understand the different catalytic capabilities of Tyr and Tyrps. This may assist future aims, from the design of more efficient bacterial Tyr for biotechnological applications to the design of inhibitors of undesirable fruit browning in vegetables or of color skin modulators in animals. PMID:12028580

  7. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  8. Report on Advanced Life Support Activities at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant studies at Kennedy Space Center last year focused on selecting cultivars of lettuce, tomato, and pepper for further testing as crops for near-term space flight applications. Other testing continued with lettuce, onion, and radish plants grown at different combinations of light (PPF), temperature, and CO2 concentration. In addition, comparisons of mixed versus mono culture approaches for vegetable production were studied. Water processing testing focused on the development and testing of a rotating membrane bioreactor to increase oxygen diffusion levels for reducing total organic carbon levels and promoting nitrification. Other testing continued to study composting testing for food wastes (NRA grant) and the use of supplemental green light with red/blue LED lighting systems for plant production (NRC fellowship).

  9. Craving love? Enduring grief activates brain's reward center.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Wellisch, David K; Stanton, Annette L; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Irwin, Michael R; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2008-08-15

    Complicated Grief (CG) occurs when an individual experiences prolonged, unabated grief. The neural mechanisms distinguishing CG from Noncomplicated Grief (NCG) are unclear, but hypothesized mechanisms include both pain-related activity (related to the social pain of loss) and reward-related activity (related to attachment behavior). Bereaved women (11 CG, 12 NCG) participated in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, during grief elicitation with idiographic stimuli. Analyses revealed that whereas both CG and NCG participants showed pain-related neural activity in response to reminders of the deceased, only those with CG showed reward-related activity in the nucleus accumbens (NA). This NA cluster was positively correlated with self-reported yearning, but not with time since death, participant age, or positive/negative affect. This study supports the hypothesis that attachment activates reward pathways. For those with CG, reminders of the deceased still activate neural reward activity, which may interfere with adapting to the loss in the present. PMID:18559294

  10. Recent and Future Stratospheric Balloon Activities at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig

    Esrange Space Center located in northern Sweden has during 45 years been a leading launch site for both sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons. We have a unique combination of maintaining both stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets launch operations. Most balloon flights are normally handled inside Scandinavia but since 2005 PersonNamesemi-circular flights are performed with recovery in northern Canada. The Swedish Government and Swedish National Space Board are now finaliz-ing an agreement with Russia for peaceful uPersonNamese of space, which will permit circumpolar balloon flights. Within this agreement we will soon be able to of-fer the science community long duration balloon flights with durations for PersonNameseveral weeks. The balloon operations at Esrange Space Center are yearly expanding. Both NASA and CNES have long term plans for balloon flights from northern Sweden. We have also received a request from JAXA for future balloon missions. To handle balloon campaigns with large numbers of payloads or build up for two different campaigns a new big assembly hall will be ready for use at the beginning of 2011. January 24 we made an historical balloon flight in a very cold stratosphere with a Zodiac metricconverterProductID402?000 m3402ü ınbsp;000 m3402 000 m3 balloon carrying a 750kg gondola with the German Mipas-B/Telis instrument. The balloon reached 34kms alti-tude after a carefully piloted ascent in temperature levels down to -89 degrees Centigrade. The scientists received unique data during the 13 hours and 30 minutes long sailing at different altitudes during slow descent. The payload was recovered in very good condition 80 kms from the border between country-regionFinland and Russia.

  11. Electrical active defects in HfO2 based metal/oxide/metal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, F.

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric as well as thermally stimulated current measurements were performed on metal/HfO2/Pt capacitors in order to study the electrical active defects in hafnia thin films. Two thermally activated relaxation processes have been carried out from both measurements. At low temperatures, the relaxation process can be ascribed to the shallow traps level localized at 0.65 eV and generally evidenced by the second ionization of oxygen vacancies. At high temperatures, the relaxation process arises from the diffusion of positively charged oxygen vacancies by overcoming an energetic barrier of about 1 eV.

  12. A journey into the active center of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the reduction of N2 to NH3, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. This article describes our journey toward the definition of a complete molecular structure of the active site of nitrogenase, with an emphasis on the discovery of the interstitial carbide and the radical SAM-dependent insertion of this atom into the active FeMo cofactor site of nitrogenase.

  13. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  14. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  15. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  16. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  17. A New Approach to Non-Coordinating Anions: Lewis Acid Enhancement of Porphyrin Metal Centers in a Zwitterionic Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacob A; Petersen, Brenna M; Kormos, Attila; Echeverría, Elena; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-17

    We describe a new strategy to generate non-coordinating anions using zwitterionic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). By assembly of anionic inorganic secondary building blocks (SBUs) ([In(CO2)4](-)) with cationic metalloporphyrin-based organic linkers, we prepared zwitterionic MOFs in which the complete internal charge separation effectively prevents the potential binding of the counteranion to the cationic metal center. We demonstrate the enhanced Lewis acidity of Mn(III)- and Fe(III)-porphyrins in the zwitterionic MOFs in three representative electrocyclization reactions: [2 + 1] cycloisomerization of enynes, [3 + 2] cycloaddition of aziridines and alkenes, and [4 + 2] hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of aldehydes with dienes. This work paves a new way to design functional MOFs for tunable chemical catalysis. PMID:27435751

  18. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…

  19. Report on the Activities of the Single Parent Resource Center, 1975-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Switchboard / Single Parent Resource Center, San Francisco, CA.

    This report provides a model for the provision of social services to single parents. The activities the center provides include drop-in support groups, workshops on single parent issues, a single parent magazine, individual counseling and community outreach. The report briefly specifies the goals of the center and the rationale behind its…

  20. Social Inequalities in Body Weight and Physical Activity: Exploring the Role of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J.; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions of exclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this…

  1. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  2. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  3. The Role of Chloride in the Mechanism of O2 Activation at the Mononuclear Nonheme Fe(II) Center of the Halogenase HctB

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear nonheme Fe(II) (MNH) and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dependent halogenases activate O2 to perform oxidative halogenations of activated and nonactivated carbon centers. While the mechanism of halide incorporation into a substrate has been investigated, the mechanism by which halogenases prevent oxidations in the absence of chloride is still obscure. Here, we characterize the impact of chloride on the metal center coordination and reactivity of the fatty acyl-halogenase HctB. Stopped-flow kinetic studies show that the oxidative transformation of the Fe(II)-α-KG-enzyme complex is >200-fold accelerated by saturating concentrations of chloride in both the absence and presence of a covalently bound substrate. By contrast, the presence of substrate, which generally brings about O2 activation at enzymatic MNH centers, only has an ∼10-fold effect in the absence of chloride. Circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic CD (MCD) studies demonstrate that chloride binding triggers changes in the metal center ligation: chloride binding induces the proper binding of the substrate as shown by variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD studies of non-α-KG-containing forms and the conversion from six-coordinate (6C) to 5C/6C mixtures when α-KG is bound. In the presence of substrate, a site with square pyramidal five-coordinate (5C) geometry is observed, which is required for O2 activation at enzymatic MNH centers. In the absence of substrate an unusual trigonal bipyramidal site is formed, which accounts for the observed slow, uncoupled reactivity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the binding of chloride to the metal center of HctB leads to a conformational change in the enzyme that makes the active site more accessible to the substrate and thus facilitates the formation of the catalytically competent enzyme–substrate complex. Results are discussed in relation to other MNH dependent halogenases. PMID:24847780

  4. Transmission research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A joint research program, to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions, consists of analytical and experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing transmission weight and noise, while increasing life and reliability. Recent activities in the areas of transmission and related component research are highlighted. Current areas include specific technologies in support of military rotary wing aviation, gearing technology, transmission noise reduction studies, a recent interest in gearbox diagnostics, and advanced transmission system studies. Results of recent activities are presented along with near term research plans.

  5. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals. PMID:26148803

  6. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals.

  7. Laser beam active brazing of metal ceramic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Bach, Friedrich W.; von Alvensleben, Ferdinand; Kreutzburg, K.

    1996-04-01

    The use of engineering ceramics is becoming more and more important. Reasons for this are the specific properties of these materials, such as high strength, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. To apply the advantages of ceramics, joining techniques of metal ceramic parts are required. In this paper, joining of metal ceramic joints by laser beam brazing is presented. This joining technique is characterized by local heat input, and the minimal thermal stress of the brazed components. During the investigations, an Nd:YAG laser and a vacuum chamber were applied. The advantages of Nd:YAG lasers are the simple mechanical construction, and laser beam guidance via quartz glass fibers, which leads to high handling flexibility. In addition, most of the materials show a high absorption rate for this kind of radiation. As materials, ceramic Al2O3 with a purity of 99.4% and metals such as X5CrNi189 and Fe54Ni29Co17 were used. As a filler material, commercially available silver and silver- copper brazes with chemically active elements like titanium were employed. During this study, the brazing wetting behavior and the formation of diffusion layers in dependence on processing parameters were investigated. The results have shown that high brazing qualities can be achieved by means of the laser beam brazing process. Crack-free joining of metal ceramic parts is currently only possible by the use of metals such as Fe54Ni29Co17 because of its low thermal expansion coefficient, which reduces thermal stresses within the joining zone.

  8. Kidspiration[R] for Inquiry-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Baggett, Paige V.; Salyer, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Computer technology can be integrated into science inquiry activities to increase student motivation and enhance and expand scientific thinking. Fifth-grade students used the visual thinking tools in the Kidspiration[R] software program to generate and represent a web of hypotheses around the question, "What affects the distance a marble rolls?"…

  9. Robotics-Centered Outreach Activities: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-del-Solar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, universities are making extensive efforts to attract prospective students to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Thus, outreach is becoming increasingly important, and activities with schoolchildren are being extensively carried out as part of this effort. In this context, robotics is a very attractive and…

  10. An Interdisciplinary, Computer-Centered Approach to Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misale, Judi M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted, interdisciplinary course in decision making developed to promote student participation and critical thinking. Students participate in 20 interactive exercises that utilize and illustrate psychological and economic concepts. Follow-up activities include receiving background information, group discussions, text…

  11. 77 FR 69604 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers Program (EOC... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection:...

  12. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of Acquisition and Logistics (OAL), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA),...

  13. 77 FR 38398 - Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION... notice announces that the Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs,...

  14. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  15. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  16. Metal concentration and antioxidant activity of edible mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Kocak, Mehmet Sefa; Uren, Mehmet Cemil

    2015-05-15

    This study presents information on the antioxidant activity and heavy metal concentrations of Polyporus sulphureus, Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon perlatum and Gomphus clavatus mushrooms collected from the province of Mugla in the South-Aegean Region of Turkey. Antioxidant activities of mushroom samples were evaluated by four complementary tests. All tests showed L. perlatum and G. clavatus to possess extremely high antioxidant potential. Antioxidant activity of the samples was strongly correlated with total phenolic-flavonoid content. In terms of heavy metal content, L. perlatum exceeded the legal limits for daily intake of Pb, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni and Co contents (0.461, 738.00, 14.52, 1.27, 1.65, 0.417 mg/day, respectively) by a 60-kg consumer. Co contents of M. procera (0.026 mg/day) and P. sulphureus (0.030 mg/day) and Cd contents of G. clavatus (0.071 mg/day) were also above the legal limits. According to these results, L. perlatum should not be consumed, despite the potentially beneficial antioxidant activity. Additionally, M. procera and G. clavatus should not be consumed daily due to their high levels of Cd and Co.

  17. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-07

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω₋⁺|₁ mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω₋⁻|₁ mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω₋⁺|₊ and ω₋⁻|₁ modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag–SiO₂–Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  18. Beyond active learning: a case study of teaching practices in an occupation-centered curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Although occupation-centered curricula are highly promoted, the teaching processes that convey such designs remain unclear. This case study elucidated occupation-centered teaching practices. Interview and observational data were collected over 8 weeks, and analysis involved coding transcriptions, data matrices, concept maps, journaling, and writing. Participants augmented active learning strategies with strategies that linked course topics to the subject of occupation. The use of linking strategies suggested that: (a) course content was treated as two-tiered; (b) neither content nor instructional processes were inherently occupation-centered; and (c) subject-centered education strengthens social learning theories. Although curricula may appear occupation-centered based on a curriculum description and course content, ultimately "linking opportunities" in the classroom constitute an essential feature that demarcates a program as occupation-centered.

  19. City Kids and City Critters! Activities for Urban Explorers from the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janet Wier; Huelbig, Carole

    This guide contains activities from the Houston Arboretum and Nature Center programs for children ages 8 to 12 years. The multisensory activities help students improve their observational skills and utilize activity sheets, journals, and hands-on projects to involve them. Children observe, draw, and photograph animals in their natural settings and…

  20. (110) Orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with face-centered cubic structure using template synthesis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuewei; Yuan Zhihao; Li Jushan

    2011-06-15

    A template-assisted assembly technique has been used to synthesize magnetic metal nanowire arrays. Fe, Co, Ni nanowires are fabricated using direct-current electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. The morphology and the crystal structure of the samples are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. The results indicate that Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires all have face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and a preferred orientation along the [110] direction. The ability to prepare well-defined orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with FCC structure opens up new opportunities for both fundamental studies and nanodevice applications. - Research Highlights: {yields} Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires are fabricated in the AAM templates by electrodeposition. {yields} Well-defined orientation growth of the nanowires with FCC structure were investigated. {yields} The electrodeposition parameters affect the crystal structure and growth orientation.

  1. Attitudinal Effects of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Allen, Deedee

    2005-06-01

    The importance of attitudes toward science has risen from widely accepted assumptions that achievement and attitude are positively interdependent and that affective variables are as important as cognitive variables in molding student learning. This report examines the effect on student attitudes toward learning chemistry in an active learning environment that has incorporated elements believed to positively influence student attitudes toward science including cooperative learning, hands-on activities, real-world applications, and engaging technology. These elements were considered for synergetic effects and not as individual contributors to the overall results. Two different sections of the same general chemistry course participated. The lecture setting was used as the control. Residualized gain scores were used to compare net changes in student attitudes. Data were analyzed for possible differences in gain for different academic majors. Anxiety in chemistry was monitored for the two class settings in three areas, learning in chemistry, chemistry evaluation, and chemical handling. Qualitative student feedback was also collected and is summarized in this report on the attitudinal aspects of instruction.

  2. Constraint based scheduling for the Goddard Space Flight Center distributed Active Archive Center's data archive and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nick, Jr.; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Beane, John

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational since October 1, 1993. Its mission is to support the Earth Observing System (EOS) by providing rapid access to EOS data and analysis products, and to test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) design concepts. One of the challenges is to ensure quick and easy retrieval of any data archived within the DAAC's Data Archive and Distributed System (DADS). Over the 15-year life of EOS project, an estimated several Petabytes (10(exp 15)) of data will be permanently stored. Accessing that amount of information is a formidable task that will require innovative approaches. As a precursor of the full EOS system, the GSFC DAAC with a few Terabits of storage, has implemented a prototype of a constraint-based task and resource scheduler to improve the performance of the DADS. This Honeywell Task and Resource Scheduler (HTRS), developed by Honeywell Technology Center in cooperation the Information Science and Technology Branch/935, the Code X Operations Technology Program, and the GSFC DAAC, makes better use of limited resources, prevents backlog of data, provides information about resources bottlenecks and performance characteristics. The prototype which is developed concurrently with the GSFC Version 0 (V0) DADS, models DADS activities such as ingestion and distribution with priority, precedence, resource requirements (disk and network bandwidth) and temporal constraints. HTRS supports schedule updates, insertions, and retrieval of task information via an Application Program Interface (API). The prototype has demonstrated with a few examples, the substantial advantages of using HTRS over scheduling algorithms such as a First In First Out (FIFO) queue. The kernel scheduling engine for HTRS, called Kronos, has been successfully applied to several other domains such as space shuttle mission scheduling, demand flow manufacturing, and avionics communications

  3. Centering perspectives on Black women, hair politics, and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Versey, H Shellae

    2014-05-01

    As researchers categorize issues facing Black women's health, obesity and physical exercise continue to be significant topics of debate. General interventions targeted toward Black women to address obesity and increase physical exercise have been largely ineffective. In this article, I situate the current public health discourse on obesity and related interventions within a sociocultural context of body appearance, with a specific focus on hair. Why do some African American women feel such strong ties to their hair that they will avoid exercise? What can be done to understand this phenomenon and address alternatives that may make both hair maintenance and regular exercise feasible? I map a theoretical argument for why hair matters for some women, and discuss how physical activity intervention strategies might be improved by considering such complexities.

  4. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  5. Immunologically active metallic ion-containing polysaccharides of Achyrocline satureioides.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, J; Knaus, U; Tubaro, L; Schaefer, W; Wagner, H

    1992-08-01

    Two homogeneous, metallic ion-containing pectic polysaccharides with mean M(r)s of 7600 and 15,000 were isolated from dried aerial parts of Achyrocline satureioides by anion exchange column chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration column chromatography on Fractogel TSK HW-50 (S). The structures, as determined by methylation analysis, carboxyl reduction, and partial acid hydrolysis, were shown to be rhamnogalacturonans. Both pectins show a pronounced anticomplementary effect in vitro. The larger carbohydrate AS 4 of higher M(r) exerts anti-inflammatory activity and a strong enhancement of phagocytosis in vivo.

  6. Ultrafast and ultraslow oxygen atom transfer reactions between late metal centers.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Kevin C; Laitar, David S; Muldoon, John; Pu, Lihung; Braun-Sand, Sonja B; Wiest, Olaf; Brown, Seth N

    2007-01-24

    Oxotrimesityliridium(V), (mes)3Ir=O (mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), and trimesityliridium(III), (mes)3Ir, undergo extremely rapid degenerate intermetal oxygen atom transfer at room temperature. At low temperatures, the two complexes conproportionate to form (mes)3Ir-O-Ir(mes)3, the 2,6-dimethylphenyl analogue of which has been characterized crystallographically. Variable-temperature NMR measurements of the rate of dissociation of the mu-oxo dimer combined with measurements of the conproportionation equilibrium by low-temperature optical spectroscopy indicate that oxygen atom exchange between iridium(V) and iridium(III) occurs with a rate constant, extrapolated to 20 degrees C, of 5 x 107 M-1 s-1. The oxotris(imido)osmium(VIII) complex (ArN)3Os=O (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) also undergoes degenerate intermetal atom transfer to its deoxy partner, (ArN)3Os. However, despite the fact that its metal-oxygen bond strength and reactivity toward triphenylphosphine are nearly identical to those of (mes)3Ir=O, the osmium complex (ArN)3Os=O transfers its oxygen atom 12 orders of magnitude more slowly to (ArN)3Os than (mes)3Ir=O does to (mes)3Ir (kOsOs = 1.8 x 10-5 M-1 s-1 at 20 degrees C). Iridium-osmium cross-exchange takes place at an intermediate rate, in quantitative agreement with a Marcus-type cross relation. The enormous difference between the iridium-iridium and osmium-osmium exchange rates can be rationalized by an analogue of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. Both Ir(III) and Ir(V) are pyramidal and can form pyramidal iridium(IV) with little energetic cost in an orbitally allowed linear approach. Conversely, pyramidalization of the planar tris(imido)osmium(VI) fragment requires placing a pair of electrons in an antibonding orbital. The unique propensity of (mes)3Ir=O to undergo intermetal oxygen atom transfer allows it to serve as an activator of dioxygen in cocatalyzed oxidations, for example, acting with osmium tetroxide to catalyze the aerobic

  7. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were

  8. Metal-ion-center assembly of ferredoxin and plastocyanin in isolated chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hsoumin; Theg, S.M.; Bauerle, C.M.; Keegstra, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Most chloroplastic proteins are cytosolically synthesized andposttranslationally transported to their proper locations. Two examples of this group of proteins are ferredoxin and plastocyanin, both of which are metal-containing components of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. The import process for these two proteins includes the insertion of the metal ions to produce the holo forms of the proteins. The authors show here that in vitro translated precursor proteins of ferredoxin and plastocyanin are synthesized as apo forms and are assembled into their respective holo forms after being imported into isolated chloroplasts. They also provide evidence that only mature-sized proteins are competent to be assembled into holo forms.

  9. [Automation of immunohematologic testing activities at French blood transfusion centers].

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Girard, M

    1983-11-01

    In May 1982, a questionnaire was sent to all of the 170 French Blood Transfusion Services (BTS), on behalf of the French Society of Blood Transfusion. The purpose was to determine the types of automated equipment used for immunohematological controls, the way in which they are used and the result of automation and computerization in daily laboratory operations. We received 135 replies (80%). A generalized conclusion can be drawn from the collected information. 50% of the respondents are neither automated nor computerized. 30% are both automated and computerized. 10% are automated but not computerized and 8% are not automated but are computerized. In the field of automated serology there is an increased tendency to complete the ABO/Rh testing by Cc D Ee and Kell phenotyping. The use of computers allows the current test determination to be compared with previous donation data. However, no fully automated equipment, which can conduct antibody screening, exists, cost effectively, in small or average BTS. In France, there has been a significant increase in automation between 1970 and 1980 but only the most important BTS have carried out automation at the same time as computerization. The smaller BTS have usually become automated without becoming computerized. In 1978, Codabar was first used. This has been one of the principal advances of the last 10 years, allowing all the users of automation to start moving towards complete computerization. This advance was assisted by the use of prepackaged software. This questionnaire also determined that the current emphasis is now to computerize administrative and management activities before laboratory activities. This survey has been conducted during a turning point of the automation of French BTS. It shows that they are, on the whole, satisfied with their automation. As far as the safety and the efficiency of the service are concerned, it is only fair to consider that the main purposes of the automation have been achieved. But

  10. Coevolution between human's anticancer activities and functional foods from crop origin center in the world.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ya-Wen; Du, Juan; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Jia-Zhen; Yang, Tao; Yang, Shu-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Meng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death around the world. Anticancer activities from many functional food sources have been reported in years, but correlation between cancer prevalence and types of food with anticancer activities from crop origin center in the world as well as food source with human migration are unclear. Hunger from food shortage is the cause of early human evolution from Africa to Asia and later into Eurasia. The richest functional foods are found in crop origin centers, housing about 70% in the world populations. Crop origin centers have lower cancer incidence and mortality in the world, especially Central Asia, Middle East, Southwest China, India and Ethiopia. Asia and Africa with the richest anticancer crops is not only the most important evolution base of humans and origin center of anticancer functional crop, but also is the lowest mortality and incidence of cancers in the world. Cancer prevention of early human migrations was associated with functional foods from crop origin centers, especially Asia with four centers and one subcenter of crop origin, accounting for 58% of the world population. These results reveal that coevolution between human's anticancer activities associated with functional foods for crop origin centers, especially in Asia and Africa. PMID:25824728

  11. Social inequalities in body weight and physical activity: exploring the role of fitness centers.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-03-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions ofexclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this relation. Using publicly available data and guided by Bourdieu's theory of habitus, we classified fitness centers in Calgary, Canada, on three dimensions of exclusivity (economic, social, and appearance). We found that, although some highly exclusive centers exist, most demonstrated low exclusivity based on our dimensions. An overall contribution of centers to inequalities appears to be limited; however, caution is warranted in light of cutbacks to municipal budgets that can have an impact on publicly funded facilities.

  12. Metal-Ion Effects on the Polarization of Metal-Bound Water and Infrared Vibrational Modes of the Coordinated Metal Center of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase via Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrazinamidase (PZAse) is a key enzyme to activate the pro-drug pyrazinamide (PZA). PZAse is a metalloenzyme that coordinates in vitro different divalent metal cofactors in the metal coordination site (MCS). Several metals including Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ are able to reactivate the metal-depleted PZAse in vitro. We use quantum mechanical calculations to investigate the Zn2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ metal cofactor effects on the local MCS structure, metal–ligand or metal–residue binding energy, and charge distribution. Results suggest that the major metal-dependent changes occur in the metal–ligand binding energy and charge distribution. Zn2+ shows the highest binding energy to the ligands (residues). In addition, Zn2+ and Mn2+ within the PZAse MCS highly polarize the O–H bond of coordinated water molecules in comparison with Fe2+. This suggests that the coordination of Zn2+ or Mn2+ to the PZAse protein facilitates the deprotonation of coordinated water to generate a nucleophile for catalysis as in carboxypeptidase A. Because metal ion binding is relevant to enzymatic reaction, identification of the metal binding event is important. The infrared vibrational mode shift of the C=Nε (His) bond from the M. tuberculosis MCS is the best IR probe to metal complexation. PMID:25055049

  13. De novo-designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions among different influential factors in native proteins impede progress toward complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH (=TRI-HK22E) alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials, and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV, and the nitrite reductase activities range over a factor of 4 in rates. We also observe that the affinities, potentials, and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by the pH conditions (pH 5.8-7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay among these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potential across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step toward understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving the

  14. De novo designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions between different influential factors in native proteins impede progress towards complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH [TRI-EH = TRI-HK22E] alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-Vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV and nitrite reductase activity ranges over a factor of four in rates. We also observe that affinities, potentials and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by pH conditions (pH 5.8 ~ 7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay between these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potentials across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step towards understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving

  15. Proposed Ligand-Centered Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation at a Noninnocent Mononuclear Metal-Thiolate.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Andrew Z; Kumar, Davinder; Ouch Sampson, Kagna; Matzner, Anna M; Mashuta, Mark S; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2015-07-29

    The noninnocent coordinatively saturated mononuclear metal-thiolate complex ReL3 (L = diphenylphosphinobenzenethiolate) serves as an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution or hydrogen oxidation dependent on the presence of acid or base and the applied potential. ReL3 reduces acids to H2 in dichloromethane with an overpotential of 380 mV and a turnover frequency of 32 ± 3 s(-1). The rate law displays a second-order dependence on acid concentration and a first-order dependence on catalyst concentration with an overall third-order rate constant (k) of 184 ± 2 M(-2) s(-1). Reactions with deuterated acid display a kinetic isotope effect of 9 ± 1. In the presence of base, ReL3 oxidizes H2 with a turnover frequency of 4 ± 1 s(-1). The X-ray crystal structure of the monoprotonated species [Re(LH)L2](+), an intermediate in both catalytic H2 evolution and oxidation, has been determined. A ligand-centered mechanism, which does not require metal hydride intermediates, is suggested based on similarities to the redox-regulated, ligand-centered binding of ethylene to ReL3. PMID:26161802

  16. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities in the USGS Ohio Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been written for use by the Ohio Water Science Center in conducting water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Ohio Water Science Center for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Ohio Water Science Center quality-assurance plans for water-quality monitors, the microbiology laboratory, and surface-water and ground-water activities.

  17. Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in the western hemisphere of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Franklin, B.J.; Tanaka, K.L.; Lias, J.; Peer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Five main stages of radial and concentric structures formed around Tharsis from the Noachian through the Amazonian as determined by geologic mapping of 24,452 structures within the stratigraphic framework of Mars and by testing their radial and concentric orientations. Tectonic activity peaked in the Noachian (stage 1) around the largest center, Claritas, an elongate center extending more than 20?? in latitude and defined by about half of the total grabens which are concentrated in the Syria Planum, Thaumasia, and Tempe Terra regions. During the Late Noachian and Early Hesperian (stage 2), extensional structures formed along the length of present-day Valles Marineris and in Thaumasia (with a secondary concentration near Warrego Vallis) radial to a region just to the south of the central margin of Valles Marineris. Early Hesperian (stage 3) radial grabens in Pavonis, Syria, Ulysses, and Tempe Terra and somewhat concentric wrinkle ridges in Lunae and Solis Plana and in Thaumasia, Sirenum, Memnonia, and Amazonis are centered northwest of Syria with secondary centers at Thaumasia, Tempe Terra, Ulysses Fossae, and western Valles Marineris. Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian (stage 4) structures around Alba Patera, the northeast trending alignment of Tharsis Montes, and Olympus Mons appears centered on Alba Patera. Stage 5 structures (Middle-Late Amazonian) represent the last pulse of Tharsis-related activity and are found around the large shield volcanoes and are centered near Pavonis Mons. Tectonic activity around Tharsis began in the Noachian and generally decreased through geologic time to the Amazonian. Statistically significant radial distributions of structures formed during each stage, centered at different locations within the higher elevations of Tharsis. Secondary centers of radial structures during many of the stages appear related to previously identified local magmatic centers that formed at different times and locations throughout Tharsis. Copyright 2001 by

  18. Inorganic–organic hybrids presenting high basic center content: SBA-15 incorporation, toxic metals sorption and energetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Fernando J.V.E.; Melo, Maurício A.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Mesoporous SBA-15 silicas were organofunctionalized with new silylant agents. ► Thiocarbamate was used to enhance the silylating agent chains and basic centers. ► The synthesized pendant chains contain nitrogen and sulfur basic centers. ► The new hybrids sorb toxic cations from aqueous solutions with high efficiency. ► The thermodynamic data demonstrated favorable cation/basic center interactions. - Abstract: Mesoporous SBA-15 samples were organofunctionalized with mono, di- and tri-aminosilanes that previously reacted with thiocarbamide to enhance the organic chains and attach nitrogen and sulfur basic centers to the surface of the solids. These new organosilanes were synthesized through a non-solvent approach to reduce both cost and hazardous wastes. The high affinities for both hard and soft Lewis acids due to the combination of nitrogen and sulfur atoms attached to the same pendant chain enabled favorable sorption capacities for Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} cations, with maximum capacities of 1.90, 3.48 and 5.30 mmol g{sup −1}, respectively, for the most efficient mesoporous silica. Microcalorimetric investigations allowed the calculation of the thermodynamic data at the solid/liquid interface. All Gibbs energy are negative as expected for spontaneous cation/basic center interactions and the positive entropic values from 49 ± 3 to 108 ± 5 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}, also reinforced this favorable interactive process in heterogeneous system. The designed organosilanes covalently bonded to the inorganic siliceous skeleton can be suggested as new materials for toxic metal removal from a wastewater with high efficiency.

  19. Photophysical properties of ortho-metalated monomeric and dimeric complexes containing rhodium(III) and iridium(III) metal centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jason Alexander

    Photophysical properties of dichloro-bridged dimers and monomeric tris complexes of the type [M(NC)2Cl]2 and M(NC)3, where NC refers to the ortho-metalating ligands 2-phenylpyridine (ppy), benzo[h]quinoline (bzq), or 2-(p-tolyl)pyridine (ptpy) and M is Rh(III) or Ir(III), were investigated. Excited-state emission of Rh(III) complexes are highly structured and independent of temperature from 4--100 K in glassy media, with long lifetimes (102 mus to ms). Emission is not observed from the pale yellow, fluid solutions of Rh(III) complexes at room temperature. Below 7K, decay kinetics are sensitive to temperature and are complicated, requiring multi-exponential fits in 4:1 EtOH/MeOH. The spectroscopic properties are consistent with the assignment of a lowest 3pipi* excited-state manifold perturbed by an admixture of higher-lying states possessing strong spin-orbit interactions. The complicated decays are attributed to spin-relaxation-limited behavior between spin-levels in the 3pipi* manifold. Deep yellow solutions of Ir(III) complexes in 4:1 EtOH/MeOH are observed to emit in both glassy media and in fluid solution, displaying severe changes in spectral shape as the glass softens which are not attributable to rigidochromic shifts. Low-temperature spectra are structured with emission origins in the range 496--520 nm whereas room-temperature emission of complexes in fluid solution are characteristically broad structureless bands with maxima redshifted from spectra measured in rigid media. Both the emission and the excited-state lifetimes display temperature dependence, with lifetimes in the microsecond to tens of microseconds range at 77 K, increasing by more than an order of magnitude as the temperature is decreased to 4 K. Each of these characteristic band shapes arises from separate components of the emission which have been time-resolved from the low-temperature spectrum. A long-lived, structured component of the emission, only observed in rigid media, has been

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  1. Learner-Centered Activities from the DVD-Format "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Yun

    This paper demonstrates how Taiwanese English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) college teachers and students collaborate and negotiate to design various learner-centered activities based on the Chinese film, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." These activities are intended to enhance students' listening and speaking abilities. The paper demonstrates eight…

  2. Active-Learning versus Teacher-Centered Instruction for Learning Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of "acids and bases". Sample: The sample of this study was…

  3. Activities. A Collection of Things to Do at the Environmental Learning Center, Isabella, Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Learning Center, Isabella, Minn.

    A collection of activities used successfully at the Environmental Learning Center in Isabella, Minnesota, are contained in this guide. Areas of study are perception and communication, mapping, weather, snow, soil, aquatics, trees, and animals. Within these areas is a number of related activities, each to be adapted to the appropriate grade level.…

  4. SPECIAL ACTIVITIES SUPPLEMENTAL TO AND RELATED TO THE ART PROGRAM AT DEEP RIVER OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary City Public School System, IN.

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE DEALING WITH VARIOUS SUBJECT AREAS WAS PREPARED FOR POSSIBLE STUDY ACTIVITIES THAT WOULD USE THE LEARNING RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT THE DEEP RIVER OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER IN GARY, INDIANA. ACTIVITIES GUIDES ARE PRESENTED FOR (1) ART ACTITIVIES RELATED TO DESIGN, COLOR, LANDSCAPE REPRESENTATION, PAPER CONSTRUCTION, DRAWING, PRINT…

  5. A Work Sampling Study of Provider Activities in School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. Methods: All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this…

  6. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  7. Phytochelatin synthase activity as a marker of metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krystofova, Olga; Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene

    2011-08-30

    The synthesis of phytochelatins is catalyzed by γ-Glu-Cys dipeptidyl transpeptidase called phytochelatin synthase (PCS). Aim of this study was to suggest a new tool for determination of phytochelatin synthase activity in the tobacco BY-2 cells treated with different concentrations of the Cd(II). After the optimization steps, an experiment on BY-2 cells exposed to different concentrations of Cd(NO(3))(2) for 3 days was performed. At the end of the experiment, cells were harvested and homogenized. Reduced glutathione and cadmium (II) ions were added to the cell suspension supernatant. These mixtures were incubated at 35°C for 30min and analysed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detector (HPLC-ED). The results revealed that PCS activity rises markedly with increasing concentration of cadmium (II) ions. The lowest concentration of the toxic metal ions caused almost three fold increase in PCS activity as compared to control samples. The activity of PCS (270fkat) in treated cells was more than seven times higher in comparison to control ones. K(m) for PCS was estimated as 2.3mM. PMID:21715087

  8. Antimicrobial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles supported onto natural clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Hrenovic, Jasna; Milenkovic, Jelena; Daneu, Nina; Kepcija, Renata Matonickin; Rajic, Nevenka

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Cu(2)O, ZnO and NiO nanoparticles supported onto natural clinoptilolite was investigated in the secondary effluent under dark conditions. After 24h of contact the Cu(2)O and ZnO nanoparticles reduced the numbers of viable bacterial cells of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in pure culture for four to six orders of magnitude and showed consistent 100% of antibacterial activity against native E. coli after 1h of contact during 48 exposures. The antibacterial activity of NiO nanoparticles was less efficient. The Cu(2)O and NiO nanoparticles showed 100% of antiprotozoan activity against Paramecium caudatum and Euplotes affinis after 1h of contact, while ZnO nanoparticles were less efficient. The morphology and crystallinity of the nanoparticles were not affected by microorganisms. The metal oxide nanoparticles could find a novel application in the disinfection of secondary effluent and removal of pathogenic microorganisms in the tertiary stage of wastewater treatment.

  9. Insights into the geometric and electronic structure of transition metal centers from valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Christopher J; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-11-17

    hypothetical compounds allowed the development of a framework whereby VtC XES spectra may be understood in terms of a molecular orbital picture. Specifically, VtC spectra may be interpreted as a probe of electronic structure for the ligands bound to a metal center, enabling access to chemical information that can be difficult to obtain with other methods. Examples of this include the ability to (1) assess the identity and number of atomic/small molecule ligands bound to a metal center, (2) quantify the degree of bond activation of a small molecule substrate, and (3) establish the protonation state of donor atoms. With this foundation established, VtC has been meaningfully applied to long-standing questions in bioinorganic chemistry, with the potential for numerous future applications in all areas of metal-mediated catalysis. PMID:26401686

  10. Characterization and metal sorptive properties of oxidized active carbon.

    PubMed

    Strelko, Vladimir; Malik, Danish J

    2002-06-01

    A commercial activated carbon Chemviron F 400 has been oxidized using nitric acid in order to introduce a variety of acidic surface functional groups. Both unoxidized and oxidized carbon samples were characterized using nitrogen porosimetry, elemental analysis, pH titration, Boehm's titration, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Results show that oxidation treatment reduced surface area and pore volume. However, the carbon surface acquires an acidic character with carboxylic groups being the dominant surface functional groups. The modified sample displays cation-exchange properties over a wide range of pH values and exhibits polyfunctional nature. Both carbon samples were challenged for the removal of transition metals such as copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II). The affinity series Mn2+Zn2+ has been found to coincide with the general stability sequence of metal complexes (the Irving-Williams series). The higher preference displayed by carbons toward copper(II) is a consequence of the fact that copper(II) often forms distorted and more stable octahedral complexes. PMID:16290653

  11. Diffusion of adatoms on face-centered cubic transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.

    1994-05-10

    Mechanisms and associated energetics for adatom diffusion on the (100) and (110) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag are investigated. Self-diffusion was studied on (100) and (I 10) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Pd and Ag using corrected effective medium method (CEM) and approximation to CEM used for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies (MD/MC-CEM). Self-diffusion on Pd(100), Ag(100), Ni(110), Cu(110), Pd(110), and Ag(110) is accomplished by classical diffusion: the adatom hops from its equilibrium adsorption site over an intervening bridge site to an adjacent equilibrium site. Self-diffusion on Ni(100) and Cu(100) proceeds by atomic-exchange diffusion: the adatom on the surface displaces an atom in the first surface layer. Aside from explicit inclusion of the kinetic-exchange-correlation energy, it is critical to include enough movable atoms in the calculation to insure correct energetics. Distortions induced by these diffusion mechanisms, especially atomic exchange, are long ranged in surface plane, owing to small distortions of many atoms being energetically favored over large distortions of few atoms. Energetics and rates of heterogeneous adatom diffusion on the (100) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag show that the final state energies differ due to variation of metallic bonding with coordination for different types of metal atoms. The surface energies of the 2 metals can be used to correlate the amount of energy gained or released when the adatom displaces a surface atom. This difference in energetic stability of final configurations determines whether bridge hopping diffusion or atomic displacement is the dominant kinetic process in these heterogeneous systems.

  12. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  13. Frustrated Lewis pairs: metal-free hydrogen activation and more.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W; Erker, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sterically encumbered Lewis acid and Lewis base combinations do not undergo the ubiquitous neutralization reaction to form "classical" Lewis acid/Lewis base adducts. Rather, both the unquenched Lewis acidity and basicity of such sterically "frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs)" is available to carry out unusual reactions. Typical examples of frustrated Lewis pairs are inter- or intramolecular combinations of bulky phosphines or amines with strongly electrophilic RB(C(6)F(5))(2) components. Many examples of such frustrated Lewis pairs are able to cleave dihydrogen heterolytically. The resulting H(+)/H(-) pairs (stabilized for example, in the form of the respective phosphonium cation/hydridoborate anion salts) serve as active metal-free catalysts for the hydrogenation of, for example, bulky imines, enamines, or enol ethers. Frustrated Lewis pairs also react with alkenes, aldehydes, and a variety of other small molecules, including carbon dioxide, in cooperative three-component reactions, offering new strategies for synthetic chemistry. PMID:20025001

  14. Molecular Catalysis of the Electrochemical and Photochemical Reduction of CO2 with Earth-Abundant Metal Complexes. Selective Production of CO vs HCOOH by Switching of the Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingjing; Guo, Zhenguo; Wei, Xi-Guang; Gallenkamp, Charlotte; Bonin, Julien; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu; Robert, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Molecular catalysis of carbon dioxide reduction using earth-abundant metal complexes as catalysts is a key challenge related to the production of useful products--the "solar fuels"--in which solar energy would be stored. A direct approach using sunlight energy as well as an indirect approach where sunlight is first converted into electricity could be used. A Co(II) complex and a Fe(III) complex, both bearing the same pentadentate N5 ligand (2,13-dimethyl-3,6,9,12,18-pentaazabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),2,12,14,16-pentaene), were synthesized, and their catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction was investigated. Carbon monoxide was formed with the cobalt complex, while formic acid was obtained with the iron-based catalyst, thus showing that the catalysis product can be switched by changing the metal center. Selective CO2 reduction occurs under electrochemical conditions as well as photochemical conditions when using a photosensitizer under visible light excitation (λ > 460 nm, solvent acetonitrile) with the Co catalyst. In the case of the Fe catalyst, selective HCOOH production occurs at low overpotential. Sustained catalytic activity over long periods of time and high turnover numbers were observed in both cases. A catalytic mechanism is suggested on the basis of experimental results and preliminary quantum chemistry calculations.

  15. Transition metal bimetallic oxycarbides: Synthesis, characterization, and activity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.T.; Yu, C.C.; Ramanathan, S.

    1999-06-10

    A new family of bimetallic oxycarbide compounds M{sup I}-M{sup II}-O-C (M{sup I} = Mo, W; M{sup II} = V, Nb, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni) has been synthesized by carburizing bimetallic oxide precursors using a temperature-programmed method. The oxide precursors are prepared by conventional solid-state reaction between two appropriate monometallic oxides. The synthesis involves passing a 20 mol% CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2} mixture over the oxide precursors while raising the temperature at a linear rate of 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} K/s (5 K/min) to a final temperature (T{sub max}) which is held for a period of time (t{sub hold}). The synthesis, chemisorption properties, and reactivation of the materials indicate that the compounds can be divided into two groups of different reducibility (high and low). Their surface activity and surface area are evaluated based on CO chemisorption and N{sub 2} physisorption measurements. It is found that the CO number density correlates with the reducibility of the compounds. The catalysts were evaluated for hydroprocessing in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 643 K. The feed was a model liquid mixture containing 3000 ppm sulfur (dibenzothiophene), 2000 ppm nitrogen (quinoline), 500 ppm oxygen (benzofuran), 20 wt% aromatics (tetralin), and balance aliphatics (tetradecane). The bimetallic oxycarbides had moderate activity for HDN of quinoline, with Nb-Mo-O-C showing higher HDN than a commercial sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst tested at the same conditions. X-ray diffraction of the spent catalysts indicated that the oxycarbides of the early transition metals were tolerant of sulfur, while those involving the late transition metals showed bulk sulfide phases.

  16. Study of spin centers in nanocrystalline titanium dioxide with a high degree of photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A.; Gayvoronskiy, V. Ya.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2010-08-15

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to study the effects of illumination and changes in temperature on spin centers in nanocrystalline anatase powders synthesized by sol-gel methods with various complexing agents. A correlation between the concentration of oxygen radicals at the surface and the rate of photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds in the presence of TiO{sub 2} is observed. It is shown that the concentration of centers active in the electron spin resonance spectra can be used for monitoring the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}.

  17. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  18. Cupryphans, metal-binding, redox-active, redesigned conopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Marco; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Romeo, Cristina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Musci, Giovanni; Polticelli, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Contryphans are bioactive peptides, isolated from the venom of marine snails of the genus Conus, which are characterized by the short length of the polypeptide chain and the high degree of unusual post-translational modifications. The cyclization of the polypeptide chain through a single disulphide bond, the presence of two conserved Pro residues, and the epimerization of a Trp/Leu residue confer to Contryphans a stable and well-defined structure in solution, conserved in all members of the family, and tolerant to multiple substitutions. The potential of Contryphans as scaffolds for the design of redox-active (macro)molecules was tested by engineering a copper-binding site on two different variants of the natural peptide Contryphan-Vn. The binding site was designed by computational modeling, and the redesigned peptides were synthesized and characterized by optical, fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The novel peptides, named Cupryphan and Arg–Cupryphan, bind Cu2+ ions with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a Kd in the 100 nM range. Other divalent metals (e.g., Zn2+ and Mg2+) are bound with much lower affinity. In addition, Cupryphans catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anions with an activity comparable to other nonpeptidic superoxide dismutase mimics. We conclude that the Contryphan motif represents a natural robust scaffold which can be engineered to perform different functions, providing additional means for the design of catalytically active mini metalloproteins. PMID:19241383

  19. Resonant Metallic Nanostructures for Active Metamaterials and Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryce, Imogen Mary

    2011-07-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials are composites consisting of sub-wavelength structures designed to exhibit particular responses to an incident electromagnetic wave. In general, the properties of a metamaterial are fixed at the time of fabrication by the dimensions of each unit cell and the materials used. By incorporating dynamic components to the metamaterial system, a new type of tunable design can be accessed. This thesis describes the design and development of resonant metallic nanostructures for use in active metamaterials. We begin by examining passive systems and introduce concepts that are critical for the design of more complex, tunable structures. We show how a simple metamaterial design, a plasmonic nanoparticle array, can be used to enhance the photocurrent of an ultrathin InGaN quantum well photovoltaic cell. We then explore how more complex resonator shapes can be coupled together in a single unit cell in order to access more complex resonant behavior. In the second half of this thesis, we use several material systems as the basis for the design of active metamaterials. We demonstrate the first tunable metamaterial at optical frequencies using vanadium dioxide, a phase transition material. We exploit this material's transition from a semiconducting to a metallic state and show how a novel fabrication scheme can be used to achieve a frequency tunable resonant response. We then abandon traditional hard and brittle substrates and develop a lithographic transfer process for adhering metallic nanostructures to highly compliant polymeric substrates. Mechanical deformation is then used to distort the resonator shapes and achieve resonant tunability of a full linewidth. This system is exploited to demonstrate interesting resonant hybridization phenomena, such as Fano resonance modulation, and sets the stage for the more elusive goal of driving two resonant nanostructures into contact. Finally, we describe the use of compliant tunable metamaterials as both

  20. DISCOVERY OF THE RECOMBINING PLASMA IN THE SOUTH OF THE GALACTIC CENTER: A RELIC OF THE PAST GALACTIC CENTER ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K.; Murakami, H.; Uchiyama, H.

    2013-08-10

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter {sup G}C South{sup )} has an angular size of {approx}42' Multiplication-Sign 16' centered at (l, b) {approx} (0. Degree-Sign 0, - 1. Degree-Sign 4) and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at {approx}2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density Multiplication-Sign elapsed time) of 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus, GC South is likely to be located in the GC region ({approx}8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be {approx}97 pc Multiplication-Sign 37 pc, 0.16 cm{sup -3}, and 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.

  1. Fatigue damage in cross-ply titanium metal matrix composites containing center holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of fatigue damage in (0/90) sub SCS-6/TI-15-3 laminates containing center holes was studied. Stress levels required for crack initiation in the matrix were predicted using an effective strain parameter and compared to experimental results. Damage progression was monitored at various stages of fatigue loading. In general, a saturated state of damage consisting of matrix cracks and fiber matrix debonding was obtained which reduced the composite modulus. Matrix cracks were bridged by the 0 deg fibers. The fatigue limit (stress causing catastrophic fracture of the laminates) was also determined. The static and post fatigue residual strengths were accurately predicted using a three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The matrix damage that occurred during fatigue loading significantly reduced the notched strength.

  2. Magnetism of iron in face-centered cubic 4d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzain, M.; Rawas, A. Al; Yousif, A.; Gismelseed, A.; Rais, A.; Omari, I. Al; Widatallah, H.

    2004-05-01

    The magnetic moments and hyperfine fields at iron sites embedded in Rh, Pd and Ag face centered cubic structures were calculated using the first principle discrete variational method (DVM) and the full-potential linear-augment plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. In DVM the systems were represented by, clusters of atoms, while in FP-LAPW supercells were used. The objectives of this work are to compare and contrast results from the two different computational methods in addition to comparison to experimental data. Large magnetic moments were obtained for iron in Pd, relatively smaller moments for iron in Ag and smaller moments for iron in Rh. Iron atoms were found to couple ferromagnetically to Pd atoms and antiferromagnetically to Rh. No moment is induced on the Ag atom.

  3. Integration of telencephalic Wnt and hedgehog signaling center activities by Foxg1.

    PubMed

    Danesin, Catherine; Peres, João N; Johansson, Marie; Snowden, Victoria; Cording, Amy; Papalopulu, Nancy; Houart, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    The forebrain is patterned along the dorsoventral (DV) axis by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). However, previous studies have suggested the presence of an Shh-independent mechanism. Our study identifies Wnt/beta-catenin-activated from the telencephalic roof-as an Shh-independent pathway that is essential for telencephalic pallial (dorsal) specification during neurulation. We demonstrate that the transcription factor Foxg1 coordinates the activity of two signaling centers: Foxg1 is a key downstream effector of the Shh pathway during induction of subpallial (ventral) identity, and it inhibits Wnt/beta-catenin signaling through direct transcriptional repression of Wnt ligands. This inhibition restricts the dorsal Wnt signaling center to the roof plate and consequently limits pallial identities. Concomitantly to these roles, Foxg1 controls the formation of the compartment boundary between telencephalon and basal diencephalon. Altogether, these findings identify a key direct target of Foxg1, and uncover a simple molecular mechanism by which Foxg1 integrates two opposing signaling centers.

  4. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors.

  5. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors. PMID:22931592

  6. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  7. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at The George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. In Fall 2011, we began implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories, and tackling thought-provoking questions and problems. Students work together in small groups to gain a deeper understanding of the material. Multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in additional contemplation of the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding and are better able to solve problems. This talk will describe our methods, our successes and the associated challenges of integrating active learning into courses entitled “Stars, Planets and Life” and “Introduction to the Cosmos.”

  8. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  9. Nature of methane activation over oxide centers. Annual report, September 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.; Agarwal, S.K.; Migone, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane was studied over alkali-promoted antimony oxide and lead-magnesia catalysts. Reaction studies were used in conjunction with bulk and surface characterization of the catalysts to attempt to characterize the active centers. It was found that both acidity and availability of strong oxidizing sites can influence the selectivities of the various products of the reaction.

  10. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  11. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  12. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  13. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  14. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  15. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  16. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  17. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  18. Can Physical Education and Physical Activity Outcomes Be Developed Simultaneously Using a Game-Centered Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Andrew; Christensen, Erin; Eather, Narelle; Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Keay, Jeanne; Lubans, David

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pilot intervention using a game-centered approach for improvement of physical activity (PA) and physical education (PE) outcomes simultaneously, and if this had an impact on enjoyment of PE. A group-randomized controlled trial with a 7-week wait-list control group was conducted…

  19. Individual Information-Centered Approach for Handling Physical Activity Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Rowe, David A.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Robinson, Terrance S.; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate individual information (II)-centered methods for handling missing data, using data samples of 118 middle-aged adults and 91 older adults equipped with Yamax SW-200 pedometers and Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. We used a semisimulation approach to create six data sets: three physical activity outcome…

  20. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium. PMID:27207229

  1. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium.

  2. Mechanism-based crystal plasticity modeling of twin boundary migration in nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhani, Hamidreza; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2014-08-01

    Nanotwinned (nt) metals are an important subset of nanostructured materials because they exhibit impressive strength and ductility. Several recent investigations on nt face-centered-cubic (FCC) metals indicate that their macroscopic responses emerge from complex microscopic mechanisms that are dominated by dislocation-TB interactions. Under applied stimulus, nt microstructures evolve through migration of twin boundaries (TBs) that may have implications on the material strength and stability. This work focuses on modeling TB migration within finite element framework in an explicit manner and studying its effects on the micromechanics of twinned FCC metals under quasi-static loading conditions. The theoretical setting is developed using three-dimensional single crystal plasticity as a basis wherein the plastic slip on the {111}<1bar10> slip systems in an FCC crystal structure is modeled as visco-plastic behavior. Owing to their governing role, twins are modeled as discrete lamellas with full crystallographic anisotropy. To model TB migration, an additional visco-plastic slip-law for twinning partial systems ({111}<112bar>) based on the nucleation and motion of twin partial dislocations is introduced. This size-dependent constitutive law is presumed to prevail in the vicinity of the TB and naturally facilitates TB migration when combined with a twinning condition that is based on the accrual of the necessary shear strain. The constitutive development is implemented within a finite element framework through a User Material (UMAT) facility within ABAQUS/STANDARD®. Detailed micromechanics simulations on model microstructures involving single-grained and polycrystalline topologies are presented.

  3. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  4. Paris Observatory Analysis Center (OPAR): Report on Activities, January - December 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Sebastien; Barache, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We report on activities of the Paris Observatory VLBI Analysis Center (OPAR) for calendar year 2012 concerning the development of operational tasks, the development of our Web site, and various other activities: monitoring of the Earth's free core nutation, measuring of the post-seismic displacements of some stations, and the analysis of the recent IVS R&D sessions, including observations of quasars close to the Sun.

  5. Transition metal complexes of a salen-fullerene diad: redox and catalytically active nanostructures for delivery of metals in nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Davies, E Stephen; Mancel, Dorothée; Thomas, Bradley E; Suyetin, Mikhail; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Schröder, Martin; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2013-09-01

    A covalently-linked salen-C60 (H2L) assembly binds a range of transition metal cations in close proximity to the fullerene cage to give complexes [M(L)] (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd), [MCl(L)] (M=Cr, Fe) and [V(O)L]. Attaching salen covalently to the C60 cage only marginally slows down metal binding at the salen functionality compared to metal binding to free salen. Coordination of metal cations to salen-C60 introduces to these fullerene derivatives strong absorption bands across the visible spectrum from 400 to 630 nm, the optical features of which are controlled by the nature of the transition metal. The redox properties of the metal-salen-C60 complexes are determined both by the fullerene and by the nature of the transition metal, enabling the generation of a wide range of fullerene-containing charged species, some of which possess two or more unpaired electrons. The presence of the fullerene cage enhances the affinity of these complexes for carbon nanostructures, such as single-, double- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphitised carbon nanofibres, without detrimental effects on the catalytic activity of the metal centre, as demonstrated in styrene oxidation catalysed by [Cu(L)]. This approach shows promise for applications of salen-C60 complexes in heterogeneous catalysis.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Metal & Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interfaced With Ligand Complexes Of 8-Hydroxyquinoline And α-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanjana, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial nanotechnology is a recent addition to the fight against disease causing organisms, replacing heavy metals and toxins. In the present work, mixed ligand complexes of metals like zinc, silver etc. and metal oxide have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N-and/O-donor amino acids such as L-serine, L-alanine, glycine, cysteine and histidine as secondary ligands. These complexes were characterized using different spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity by using agar well diffusion bioassay.

  7. Enhancement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of bioflavonoid rutin by complexation with transition metals.

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, I B; Ostrakhovitch, E A; Mikhal'chik, E V; Ibragimova, G A; Korkina, L G

    2001-03-15

    The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of two transition metal complexes of bioflavonoid rutin, Fe(rut)Cl(3) and Cu(rut)Cl(2), were studied. It was found that Cu(rut)Cl(2) was a highly efficient in vitro and ex vivo free radical scavenger that sharply decreased (by 2-30 times compared to the parent rutin): oxygen radical production by xanthine oxidase, rat liver microsomes, and rat peritoneal macrophages; the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive products in microsomal lipid peroxidation; and the generation of oxygen radicals by broncho-alveolar cells from bleomycin-treated rats. The copper-rutin complex was also a superior inhibitor of inflammatory and fibrotic processes (characterized by such parameters as macrophage/neutrophil ratio, wet lung weight, total protein content, and hydroxyproline concentration) in the bleomycin-treated rats. The antioxidant activity of Fe(rut)Cl(3) was much lower and in some cases approached that of rutin. Fe(rut)Cl(3) also stimulated to some degree spontaneous oxygen radical production by macrophages. We suggested that the superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of the copper-rutin complex is a consequence of its acquiring the additional superoxide-dismuting copper center. The inhibitory activity of Fe(rut)Cl(3) was lower, probably due to the partial reduction into Fe(rut)Cl(2) in the presence of biological reductants; however, similarly to the copper-rutin complex, this complex efficiently suppressed lung edema. PMID:11266652

  8. Carrier effects of active carbon for methanol carbonylation with supported transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Omata, K.; Yagita, H.

    1996-10-01

    Transition metals such as nickel or noble metals showed excellent catalytic activities for the vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. Reaction proceeded via the carbonylation of methanol to methyl acetate and its successive carbonylation to acetic acid anhydride followed by the hydrolysis. Under slightly pressurized conditions and at around 250{degrees}C methanol was completely carbonylated to acetic acid with the selectivity of 97% or higher. Also, other group 8 metals including noble metals showed excellent catalytic activity only when they were supported on active carbon, whose activity, ordered by strength of metal-halogen bonding showed a volcano-shape relationship with the peak at Rh. The role of active carbon as the active carrier was clarified by kinetics and catalyst characterization which showed that active carbon promoted the reductive elimination of intermediate for acetic acid formation by donating electron from carbon to nickel species.

  9. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Röse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  10. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  11. Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Report on Activities (UCLA/MIT), 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Carter

    2011-04-18

    The final 'phaseout' year of the CMPD ended July 2010; a no cost extension was requested until May 2011 in order to enable the MIT subcontract funds to be fully utilized. Research progress over this time included verification and validation activities for the BOUT and BOUT++ code, studies of spontaneous reconnection in the VTF facility at MIT, and studies of the interaction between Alfven waves and drift waves in LAPD. The CMPD also hosted the 6th plasma physics winter school in 2010 (jointly with the NSF frontier center the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, significant funding came from NSF for this most recent iteration of the Winter School).

  12. Transition metal activation and functionalization of C-H bonds. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1986-11-01

    This project has been directed towards the investigation of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers. The major accomplishments of this past three years have been: (1) to identify a new transition metal complex capable of activating both arene and alkane C-H bonds, (2) to quantitatively evaluate the stability of the hydrido aryl and hydrido alkyl complexes towards reductive elimination, (3) to measure the kinetic selectivity of the reactive intermediate towards alkane and arene C-H bonds, (4) to quantitatively determine the thermodynamics of alkane and arene oxidative addition, (5) to demonstrate that arenes are activated by way of formation of an eta/sup 2/-arene complex, (6) to quantitatively determine the kinetic and thermodynamic preference for intra vs intermolecular activation of arene and alkane C-H bonds, (7) to measure isotope effects for the oxidative addition/reductive elimination pathways as a means of confirming the proposed mechanism of reaction, and (8) to formulate a unified theory of C-H bond activation that applies to other transition metal complexes. The specific complexes involved in these studies are derivatives of the formulation (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)Rh(PMe/sub 3/)(R)H and (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)Rh(PMe/sub 2/R) (R)H.

  13. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at the George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, B. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. Recently (since fall 2011), we have been developing and implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories and tackling questions and problems in a workbook. Students work in small groups, and multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding of the material. In developing our “Stars, Planets and Life” course into an interactive class, we encountered many challenges, but there have also been positive outcomes. Improvements to this class are ongoing, and in fall of 2013 we will begin full implementation of SCALE-UP in our “Introduction to the Cosmos” course.

  14. A Chemical Route to Activation of Open Metal Sites in the Copper-Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials HKUST-1 and Cu-MOF-2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ki; Yun, Won Seok; Kim, Min-Bum; Kim, Jeung Yoon; Bae, Youn-Sang; Lee, JaeDong; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2015-08-12

    Open coordination sites (OCSs) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) often function as key factors in the potential applications of MOFs, such as gas separation, gas sorption, and catalysis. For these applications, the activation process to remove the solvent molecules coordinated at the OCSs is an essential step that must be performed prior to use of the MOFs. To date, the thermal method performed by applying heat and vacuum has been the only method for such activation. In this report, we demonstrate that methylene chloride (MC) itself can perform the activation role: this process can serve as an alternative "chemical route" for the activation that does not require applying heat. To the best of our knowledge, no previous study has demonstrated this function of MC, although MC has been popularly used in the pretreatment step prior to the thermal activation process. On the basis of a Raman study, we propose a plausible mechanism for the chemical activation, in which the function of MC is possibly due to its coordination with the Cu(2+) center and subsequent spontaneous decoordination. Using HKUST-1 film, we further demonstrate that this chemical activation route is highly suitable for activating large-area MOF films. PMID:26197386

  15. Electronic Structure of the Metal Center in the Cd[superscript 2+], Zn[superscript 2+], and Cu[superscript 2+] Substituted Forms of KDO8P Synthase: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kona, Fathima; Tao, Peng; Martin, Philip; Xu, Xingjue; Gatti, Domenico L.

    2009-07-31

    Aquifex aeolicus 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthase (KDO8PS) is active with a variety of different divalent metal ions bound in the active site. The Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes display similar values of k{sub cat} and similar dependence of K{sub m}{sup PEP} and K{sub m}{sup A5P} on both substrate and product concentrations. However, the flux-control coefficients for some of the catalytically relevant reaction steps are different in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, suggesting that the type of metal bound in the active site affects the behavior of the enzyme in vivo. The type of metal also affects the rate of product release in the crystal environment. For example, the crystal structure of the Cu{sup 2+} enzyme incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) shows the formed product, 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDO8P), still bound in the active site in its linear conformation. This observation completes our structural studies of the condensation reaction, which altogether have provided high-resolution structures for the reactants, the intermediate, and the product bound forms of KDO8PS. The crystal structures of the Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes show four residues (Cys-11, His-185, Glu-222, and Asp-233) and a water molecule as possible metal ligands. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimizations reveal that the metal centers have a delocalized electronic structure, and that their true geometry is square pyramidal for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} and distorted octahedral or distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}. These geometries are different from those obtained by QM optimization in the gas phase (tetrahedral for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}, distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}) and may represent conformations of the metal center that minimize the reorganization energy between the substrate-bound and product-bound states

  16. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  17. Design of an experiment to study optically-active centers in diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ankit; Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh

    2012-03-01

    The silicon-vacancy (SiV) and nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes in diamond nanoparticles (NPs) are optically active centers, which produce single photon events. These centers may be formed when a silicon atom from the silicon substrate often used in CVD growth or nitrogen from impurities in the feed gas ends up next to a vacancy in the diamond lattice. Because of their stability and high quantum efficiency, SiV and NV centers in diamond NPs are attractive for applications in quantum computing, optics, biotechnology, and medicine. We briefly review our recently published results on diamond NPs, describe the design of an experimental system for carrying out in-situ optical spectroscopy and time-correlation measurements, and show preliminary photoluminescence data.

  18. Binding of nitrite and its reductive activation to nitric oxide at biomimetic copper centers.

    PubMed

    Monzani, E; Anthony, G J; Koolhaas, A; Spandre, A; Leggieri, E; Casella, L; Gullotti, M; Nardin, G; Randaccio, L; Fontani, M; Zanello, P; Reedijk, J

    2000-04-01

    The reactivity of nitrite towards the copper(II) and copper(I) centers of a series of complexes with tridentate nitrogen donor ligands has been investigated. The ligands are bis[(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)methyl]amine (1-bb), bis[2-(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl]amine (2-bb), and bis[2-(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)ethyl]amine (ddah) and carry two terminal benzimidazole (1-bb, 2-bb) or pyrazole (ddah) rings and a central amine donor residue. While 2-bb and ddah form two adjacent six-membered chelate rings on metal coordination, 1-bb forms two smaller rings of five members. The binding affinity of nitrite and azide to the Cu(II) complexes (ClO4- as counterion) has been determined in solution. The association constants for the two ligands are similar, but nitrite is a slightly stronger ligand than azide when it binds as a bidentate donor. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrite complex [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 (final R=0.056) has been determined: triclinic P1space group, a=8.200(2) A, b=9.582(3) A, c=15.541(4) A. It may be described as a perchlorate salt of a "supramolecular" species resulting from the assembly of two complex cations and one sodium perchlorate unit. The copper stereochemistry in the complex is intermediate between SPY and TBP, and nitrite binds to Cu(II) asymmetrically, with Cu-O distances of 2.037(2) and 2.390(3) A and a nearly planar CuO2N cycle. On standing, solutions of [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 in methanol produce the dinuclear complex [Cu(ddah)(OMe)]2(ClO4)2, containing dibridging methoxy groups. In fact the crystal structure analysis (final R=0.083) showed that the crystals are built up by dinuclear cations, arranged on a crystallographic symmetry center, and perchlorate anions. Electrochemical analysis shows that binding of nitrite to the Cu(II) complexes of 2-bb and ddah shifts the reduction potential of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple towards negative values by about 0.3 V. The thermodynamic parameters of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) electron transfer have also been

  19. Association of metals and proteasome activity in erythrocytes of prostate cancer patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Mitra, Bharati; Kandegedara, Ashoka; Chen, Di; Schmitt, Sara; Shen, Min; Cui, Qiuzhi; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-10-01

    Information is lacking on the effects toxic environmental metals may have on the 26S proteasome. The proteasome is a primary vehicle for selective degradation of damaged proteins in a cell and due to its role in cell proliferation, inhibition of the proteasome has become a target for cancer therapy. Metals are essential to the proteasome's normal function and have been used within proteasome-inhibiting complexes for cancer therapy. This study evaluated the association of erythrocyte metal levels and proteasome chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity in age- and race-matched prostate cancer cases (n=61) and controls (n=61). Erythrocyte metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). CT-like activity was measured by proteasome activity assay using a fluorogenic peptide substrate. Among cases, significant correlations between individual toxic metals were observed (r(arsenic-cadmium)=0.49, p<0.001; r(arsenic-lead)=0.26, p=0.04, r(cadmium-lead) 0.53, p<0.001), but there were no significant associations between metals and CT-like activity. In contrast, within controls there were no significant associations between metals, however, copper and lead levels were significantly associated with CT-like activity. The associations between copper and lead and proteasome activity (r(copper-CT-like)=-0.28, p=0.002 ; r(lead-CT-like)=0.23, p=0.011) remained significant in multivariable models that included all of the metals. These findings suggest that biologically essential metals and toxic metals may affect proteasome activity in healthy controls and, further, show that prostate cancer cases and controls differ in associations between metals and proteasome activity in erythrocytes. More research on toxic metals and the proteasome in prostate cancer is warranted.

  20. Mössbauer characterization of the Fe-S center in the catalytic metal binding site of alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C.; Dietrich, H.; Maret, W.; Zeppezauer, M.; Montiel-Montoya, R.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1986-02-01

    Iron in its divalent and trivalent form can be substituted in the catalytic zinc site of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (HLADH). Fe-HLADH in either oxidation state does not show enzymatic activity in the oxidation of ethanol. Nevertheless, Mössbauer studies of this material are of considerable interest, because they elucidate the effect of pH and coenzyme-induced conformational changes of the protein on the metal ion. It is of importance to note that zinc itself due to the lack of suitable chromophoric and magnetic properties does not provide any comparable information.

  1. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  2. Earth Science Data Archive and Access at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), as an integral part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), is the official source of data for several important earth remote sensing missions. These include the Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) launched in August 1997, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) launched in November 1997, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) scheduled for launch in mid 1999 as part of the EOS AM-1 instrumentation package. The data generated from these missions supports a host of users in the hydrological, land biosphere and oceanographic research and applications communities. The volume and nature of the data present unique challenges to an Earth science data archive and distribution system such as the DAAC. The DAAC system receives, archives and distributes a large number of standard data products on a daily basis, including data files that have been reprocessed with updated calibration data or improved analytical algorithms. A World Wide Web interface is provided allowing interactive data selection and automatic data subscriptions as distribution options. The DAAC also creates customized and value-added data products, which allow additional user flexibility and reduced data volume. Another significant part of our overall mission is to provide ancillary data support services and archive support for worldwide field campaigns designed to validate the results from the various satellite-derived measurements. In addition to direct data services, accompanying documentation, WWW links to related resources, support for EOSDIS data formats, and informed response to inquiries are routinely provided to users. The current GDAAC WWW search and order system is being restructured to provide users with a simplified, hierarchical access to data. Data Browsers have been developed for several data sets to aid users in ordering data. These Browsers allow users to specify

  3. Structure and catalytic activities of ferrous centers confined on the interface between carbon nanotubes and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongqi; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hanqing; Gao, Xingfa; Zhang, Jing; Ibrahim, Kurash; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the ferrous sites. The experimental and theoretical results revealed octahedrally/tetrahedrally coordinated geometry at Fe centers, and the strong hybridization between CNT C π* and Fe 3d orbitals induces discretization of the atomic charges on aromatic rings of CNTs, which facilitates O2 adsorption and electron transfer from carbon to O2, which enhances O2 activation. The O2 activation by the novel HA/Fe-CNT complex can be applied in the oxidative degradation of phenol red (PR) and bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous media.Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the

  4. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network.

  5. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  6. A cage-based cationic body-centered tetragonal metal-organic framework: single-crystal to single-crystal transformation and selective uptake of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-ming; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A cage-based cationic body-centered metal-organic framework was successfully synthesized using a custom-designed bifunctional triazolcarboxylate ligand. It shows interesting single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation upon solvent exchange process and selective uptake of organic dyes.

  7. Coordination sphere of the third metal site is essential to the activity and metal selectivity of alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Koutsioulis, Dimitris; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Mäki, Seija; Guthrie, Ellen; Feller, Georges; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Heikinheimo, Pirkko

    2010-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are commercially applied enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters by a reaction involving three active site metal ions. We have previously identified H135 as the key residue for controlling activity of the psychrophilic TAB5 AP (TAP). In this article, we describe three X-ray crystallographic structures on TAP variants H135E and H135D in complex with a variety of metal ions. The structural analysis is supported by thermodynamic and kinetic data. The AP catalysis essentially requires octahedral coordination in the M3 site, but stability is adjusted with the conformational freedom of the metal ion. Comparison with the mesophilic Escherichia coli, AP shows differences in the charge transfer network in providing the chemically optimal metal combination for catalysis. Our results provide explanation why the TAB5 and E. coli APs respond in an opposite way to mutagenesis in their active sites. They provide a lesson on chemical fine tuning and the importance of the second coordination sphere in defining metal specificity in enzymes. Understanding the framework of AP catalysis is essential in the efforts to design even more powerful tools for modern biotechnology. PMID:19916164

  8. Metal-hydride bond activation and metal-metal interaction in dinuclear iron complexes with linking dinitriles: a synthetic, electrochemical, and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, Ana I F; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Fraústo da Silva, João J R; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2002-12-01

    The dinuclear iron(II)-hydride complexes [[FeH(dppe)(2)](2)(mu-LL)][BF(4)](2) (LL = NCCH=CHCN (1a), NCC(6)H(4)CN (1b), NCCH(2)CH(2)CN (1c); dppe = Ph(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) and the corresponding mononuclear ones, trans-[FeH(LL)(dppe)(2)][BF(4)] (2a-c) were prepared by treatment of trans-[FeHCl(dppe)(2)], in tetrahydrofuran (thf) and in the presence of Tl[BF(4)], with the appropriate dinitrile (in molar deficiency or excess, respectively). Metal-metal interaction was detected by cyclic voltammetry for 1a, which, upon single-electron reversible oxidation, forms the mixed valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) 1a(+) complex. The latter either undergoes heterolytic Fe-H bond cleavage (loss of H(+)) or further oxidation, at a higher potential, also followed by hydride-proton evolution, according to ECECE or EECECEC mechanistic processes, respectively, which were established by digital simulation. Anodically induced Fe-H bond rupture was also observed for the other complexes and the detailed electrochemical behavior, as well as the metal-metal interaction (for 1a), were rationalized by ab initio calculations for model compounds and oxidized derivatives. These calculations were used to generate the structural parameters (full geometry optimization), the most stable isomeric forms, the ionization potentials, the effective atomic charges, and the molecular orbital diagrams, as well as to predict the nature of the other electron-transfer induced chemical steps, i.e. geometric isomerization and nucleophilic addition, by BF(4)(-), to the unsaturated iron center resulting from hydride-proton loss. From the values of the oxidation potential of the complexes, the electrochemical P(L) and E(L) ligand parameters were also estimated for the dinitrile ligands (LL) and for their mononuclear complexes 2 considered as ligands toward a second binding metal center.

  9. Are dangling bond centers important interface traps in 4H-SiC metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, M. A.; Lenahan, P. M.; Lelis, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) have great promise in high power and high temperature applications. Unfortunately, effective channel mobilities remain disappointingly low, typically about 30 cm2/Vs. A major contributor to the disappointing effective channel mobilities is the presence of substantial densities of interface traps at the SiC/SiO2 interface. Many investigators have invoked silicon or carbon dangling bonds to be the dominating source of these interface defects, but very little, if any, direct experimental evidence exists to support this assumption in the SiC/SiO2 system. Cantin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 1 (2004)] have used conventional electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on porous oxidized SiC structures to measure the g tensor for the SiC/SiO2 interface carbon dangling bond. These results provide a particularly straightforward means to search for the presence of carbon dangling bonds in fully processed SiC MOSFETs using electrically detected magnetic resonance. Additionally, simple theory provides guidance to search for silicon dangling bond defects. In this study, we utilize K band electrically detected magnetic resonance via spin dependent charge pumping measurements in which almost all of the SiC band gap at the SiC/SiO2 interface is accessed. Although quite high signal to noise measurements are achieved, we are unable to detect any trace of the carbon dangling bond spectra. However, in very poor quality p-channel devices, we observe a spectrum which could be consistent with silicon dangling bonds. Other defect centers are clearly present and we conclude that these other centers dominate the interface trap density of states.

  10. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  11. In-situ resource utilization activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes theoretical and experimental research activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center aimed at realizing significant cost savings in space missions through the use of locally available resources. The fundamental strategy involves idea generation, scientific screening, feasibility demonstrations, small-scale process plant design, extensive testing, scale-up to realistic production rates, associated controls, and 'packaging', while maintaining sufficient flexibility to respond to national needs in terms of specific applications. Aside from training, the principal activities at the Center include development of a quantitative figure-of-merit to quickly assess the overall mission impact of individual components that constantly change with advancing technologies, extensive tests on a single-cell test bed to produce oxygen from carbon dioxide, and the use of this spent stream to produce methane.

  12. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  13. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  14. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person's Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  15. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person’s Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  16. Features of the electronic structure of the active center of an HbS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D. Yu.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Features of the electronic structure of the nonprotein part of the mutant form of the human hemoglobin molecule, HbS, are studied along with the magnetic state of the iron ion that is the "nucleus" of the active center of the molecule. It is found that the mutant form of the HbS molecule differs from a normal hemoglobin molecule by the distortion of the local environment of the iron ion, which changes the energy level splitting by a crystal field. As a result of ab initio calculations, the magnetic transition in the iron atom from the high-spin state to the low-spin state upon the addition of molecular oxygen to hemoglobin molecule is reproduced. It is established for the first time that a change in the crystal and electronic structure of the active center as a result of a mutation can lead to a substantial change in the energy of the bond between the active center of the hemoglobin molecule and an oxygen molecule.

  17. Metal Catalyzed Fusion: Nuclear Active Environment vs. Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot

    2009-03-01

    To achieve radiationless dd fusion and/or other LENR reactions via chemistry: some focus on environment of interior or altered near-surface volume of bulk metal; some on environment inside metal nanocrystals or on their surface; some on the interface between nanometal crystals and ionic crystals; some on a momentum shock-stimulation reaction process. Experiment says there is also a spontaneous reaction process.

  18. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R I; Dayman, K J; Landsberger, S; Biegalski, S R; Soderquist, C Z; Casella, A J; Brady Raap, M C; Schwantes, J M

    2015-04-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. PMID:25644079

  19. Ternary metal complexes of guaifenesin drug: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, W H; Mahmoud, N F; Mohamed, G G; El-Sonbati, A Z; El-Bindary, A A

    2015-01-01

    The coordination behavior of a series of transition metal ions named Cr(III), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) with a mono negative tridentate guaifenesin ligand (GFS) (OOO donation sites) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) is reported. The metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, UV-vis spectral studies, mass spectroscopy, ESR, XRD and thermal analysis (TG and DTG). The ternary metal complexes were found to have the formulae of [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]Cl·nH2O (M=Cr(III) (n=1) and Fe(III) (n=0)), [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]·nH2O (M=Mn(II) (n=0), Zn(II) (n=0) and Cu(II) (n=3)) and [M(GFS)(Phen)(H2O)]Cl·nH2O (M=Co(II) (n=0), Ni(II) (n=0) and Cd(II) (n=4)). All the chelates are found to have octahedral geometrical structures. The ligand and its ternary chelates are subjected to thermal analyses (TG and DTG). The GFS ligand, in comparison to its ternary metal complexes also was screened for their antibacterial activity on gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and for in vitro antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent GFS ligand. The complexes were also screened for its in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity. PMID:26067934

  20. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  1. Cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Bradshaw, J. F.; Rush, H. F., Jr.; Wallace, J. W.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These research and development activities are being conducted in support of the design and fabrication of models for the new National Transonic Facility (NTF). The scope and current status of major research and development work is described and where available, data are presented from various investigations conducted to date. In addition, design and fabrication experience for existing developmental models to be tested in the NTF is discussed.

  2. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  3. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan. PMID:12793730

  4. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan.

  5. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  6. KDD Services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Mack, Robert; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) processes, stores and distributes earth science data from a variety of remote sensing satellites. End users of the data range from instrument scientists to global change and climate researchers to federal agencies and foreign governments. Many of these users apply data mining techniques to large volumes of data (up to 1 TB) received from the GES DAAC. However, rapid advances in processing power are enabling increases in data processing that are outpacing tape drive performance and network capacity. As a result, the proportion of data that can be distributed to users continues to decrease. As mitigation, we are migrating more data mining and mining preparation activities into the data center in order to reduce the data volume that needs to be distributed and to offer the users a more useful and manageable product. This migration of activities faces a number of technical and human-factor challenges. As data reduction and mining algorithms are normally quite specific to the user's research needs, the user's algorithm must be integrated virtually unchanged into the archive environment. Also, the archive itself is busy with everyday data archive and distribution activities and cannot be dedicated to, or even impacted by, the mining activities. Therefore, we schedule KDD 'campaigns' (similar to reprocessing campaigns), during which we schedule a wholesale retrieval of specific data products, offering users the opportunity to extract information from the data being retrieved during the campaign.

  7. Activities During Spacelab-J Mission at Payload Operations and Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The group of Japanese researchers of the Spacelab-J (SL-J) were thumbs-up in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center after the successful launch of Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour that carried their experiments. The SL-J was a joint mission of NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a marned Spacelab module. The mission conducted microgravity investigations in materials and life sciences. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, frogs, and frog eggs. The POCC was the air/ground communications channel between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The Spacelab science operations were a cooperative effort between the science astronaut crew in orbit and their colleagues in the POCC. Spacelab-J was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

  8. Quality-assurance plan for groundwater activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozar, Mark D.; Kahle, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the standard procedures, policies, and field methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Washington Water Science Center staff for activities related to the collection, processing, analysis, storage, and publication of groundwater data. This groundwater quality-assurance plan changes through time to accommodate new methods and requirements developed by the Washington Water Science Center and the USGS Office of Groundwater. The plan is based largely on requirements and guidelines provided by the USGS Office of Groundwater, or the USGS Water Mission Area. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process. Because numerous policy memoranda have been issued by the Office of Groundwater since the previous groundwater quality assurance plan was written, this report is a substantial revision of the previous report, supplants it, and contains significant additional policies not covered in the previous report. This updated plan includes information related to the organization and responsibilities of USGS Washington Water Science Center staff, training, safety, project proposal development, project review procedures, data collection activities, data processing activities, report review procedures, and archiving of field data and interpretative information pertaining to groundwater flow models, borehole aquifer tests, and aquifer tests. Important updates from the previous groundwater quality assurance plan include: (1) procedures for documenting and archiving of groundwater flow models; (2) revisions to procedures and policies for the creation of sites in the Groundwater Site Inventory database; (3) adoption of new water-level forms to be used within the USGS Washington Water Science Center; (4) procedures for future creation of borehole geophysics, surface geophysics, and aquifer-test archives; and (5) use of the USGS Multi Optional Network Key Entry System software for entry of routine water-level data

  9. Scorpionate-type coordination in MFU-4l metal-organic frameworks: small-molecule binding and activation upon the thermally activated formation of open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Grzywa, Maciej; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Postsynthetic metal and ligand exchange is a versatile approach towards functionalized MFU-4l frameworks. Upon thermal treatment of MFU-4l formates, coordinatively strongly unsaturated metal centers, such as zinc(II) hydride or copper(I) species, are generated selectively. Cu(I)-MFU-4l prepared in this way was stable under ambient conditions and showed fully reversible chemisorption of small molecules, such as O2, N2, and H2, with corresponding isosteric heats of adsorption of 53, 42, and 32 kJ mol(-1), respectively, as determined by gas-sorption measurements and confirmed by DFT calculations. Moreover, Cu(I)-MFU-4l formed stable complexes with C2H4 and CO. These complexes were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The demonstrated hydride transfer to electrophiles and strong binding of small gas molecules suggests these novel, yet robust, metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites as promising catalytic materials comprising earth-abundant metal elements.

  10. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  11. How a redox-innocent metal promotes the formal reductive elimination of biphenyl using redox-active ligands.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Daniel Charles; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    One of the most compelling strategies for utilizing redox-active ligands is to perform redox events at the ligands to avoid accessing prohibitively high energy oxidation states at the metal center. This has been demonstrated experimentally in many systems, yet there is little understanding of the fundamental electronic structures involved with these transformations or how to control them. Here, the reductive elimination of biphenyl from [M(isq)2Ph2] (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf and isq = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-tert-butyliminosemiquinone) was studied computationally. It was found that the metal remains in the +IV oxidation state and all redox chemistry was mediated by the redox-active ligands. Two types of electron-transfer mechanisms were identified, an asymmetric unpaired electron transfer (UET) and a symmetric pairwise electron transfer (PET), the former always being lower in energy. The energetic differences between these two mechanisms were explained through simple molecular orbital theory arguments. Despite the metal's redox-inactivity, it still has a marked influence on the calculated energetics of the reaction, with the Ti systems being much more reactive than the Zr/Hf systems. This primarily originates from the shorter Ti-Ph bond, which leads to a stronger filled-filled interaction between these ligands at the reactant state. This greater reactant destabilization leads to the lower activation energies.

  12. A Coordination Chemistry Approach for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Coexistence of Metal and Ligand Redox Activities in a One-Dimensional Metal-Organic Material.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaihua; Yang, Hao; Li, Fengcai; Cheng, Fangyi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Jun; Cheng, Peng

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate herein the use of a one-dimensional metal-organic material as a new type of electrode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in place of the classic porous three-dimensional materials, which are subject to the size of the channel for lithium-ion diffusion and blocking of the windows of the framework by organic solvents during the charging and discharging processes. Introducing a one-dimensional coordination compound can keep organic active substances insoluble in the electrolyte during the charging and discharging processes, providing a facile and general new system for further studies. The results show that both the aromatic ligand and the metal center can participate in lithium storage simultaneously, illustrating a new energy storage mechanism that has been well-characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the fact that the one-dimensional chains are linked by weak hydrogen bonds rather than strong π-π stacking interactions or covalent bonds is beneficial for the release of capacity entirely without the negative effect of burying the active sites.

  13. Working together may be better: activation of reward centers during a cooperative maze task.

    PubMed

    Krill, Austen L; Platek, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Humans use theory of mind when predicting the thoughts and feelings and actions of others. There is accumulating evidence that cooperation with a computerized game correlates with a unique pattern of brain activation. To investigate the neural correlates of cooperation in real-time we conducted an fMRI hyperscanning study. We hypothesized that real-time cooperation to complete a maze task, using a blind-driving paradigm, would activate substrates implicated in theory of mind. We also hypothesized that cooperation would activate neural reward centers more than when participants completed the maze themselves. Of interest and in support of our hypothesis we found left caudate and putamen activation when participants worked together to complete the maze. This suggests that cooperation during task completion is inherently rewarding. This finding represents one of the first discoveries of a proximate neural mechanism for group based interactions in real-time, which indirectly supports the social brain hypothesis.

  14. Multifrequency EPR Spectroscopy: A Toolkit for the Characterization of Mono- and Di-nuclear Metal Ion Centers in Complex Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Graeme R.

    Metalloenzymes are ubiquitous in nature containing complex metal ion cofactors intimately involved in the enzymes' biological function. The application of multifrequency continuous wave and orientation selective pulsed EPR in conjunction with computer simulation and density functional theory calculations has proven to be a powerful toolkit for the geometric and electronic structural characterization of these metal ion cofactors in the resting enzyme, enzyme-substrate and -product complexes, which in turn provides a detailed understanding of the enzymes' catalytic mechanism. In this chapter, a brief description of the multifrequency EPR toolkit used to structurally (geometric and electronic) characterize metal ion binding sites in complex biological systems and its application in the structural characterization of (i) molybdenum containing enzymes and model complexes, (ii) mono- and di-nuclear copper(II) cyclic peptide complexes (marine and synthetic analogues) and (iii) dinuclear metal ion centers in purple acid phosphatases will be presented.

  15. Final Technical Report on DE-SC00002460 [Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Esther Sans; Takeuchi, Kenneth James; Marschilok, Amy Catherine

    2013-07-26

    Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V were investigated under this project. These metal centers are the focus of this research as they have high earth abundance and have each shown success as cathode materials in lithium batteries. Silver ion, Ag{sup +}, was initially selected as the displacement material as reduction of this center should result in increased conductivity as Ag{sup 0} metal particles are formed in-situ upon electrochemical reduction. The in-situ formation of metal nanoparticles upon electrochemical reduction has been previously noted, and more recently, we have investigated the resulting increase in conductivity. Layered materials as well as materials with tunnel or channel type structures were selected. Layered materials are of interest as they can provide 2-dimensional ion mobility. Tunnel or channel structures are also of interest as they provide a rigid framework that should remain stable over many discharge/charge cycles. We describe some examples of materials we have synthesized that demonstrate promising electrochemistry.

  16. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  17. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  18. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kristen A; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Sherman, Susan N

    2012-02-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don't like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  19. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3–5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children’s physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don’t like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  20. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel. PMID:24512107

  1. Antimalarial and antimicrobial activities of 8-Aminoquinoline-Uracils metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Phopin, Kamonrat; Sinthupoom, Nujarin; Treeratanapiboon, Lertyot; Kunwittaya, Sarun; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    8-Aminoquinoline (8AQ) derivatives have been reported to have antimalarial, anticancer, and antioxidant activities. This study investigated the potency of 8AQ-5-substituted (iodo and nitro) uracils metal (Mn, Cu, Ni) complexes (1-6) as antimalarial and antimicrobial agents. Interestingly, all of these metal complexes (1-6) showed fair antimalarial activities. Moreover, Cu complexes 2 (8AQ-Cu-5Iu) and 5 (8AQ-Cu-5Nu) exerted antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria including P. shigelloides and S. dysenteriae. The results reveal application of 8AQ and its metal complexes as potential compounds to be further developed as novel antimalarial and antibacterial agents. PMID:27103894

  2. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils--An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols. PMID:27057992

  3. Hydrolysis mechanisms of BNPP mediated by facial copper(II) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants: cooperation between the metal centers and the guanidine pendants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Liu, Xueping; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2016-01-28

    The hydrolysis mechanisms of DNA dinucleotide analogue BNPP(-) (bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed by mononuclear/dinuclear facial copper(ii) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Active catalyst forms have been investigated and four different reaction modes are proposed accordingly. The [Cu2(L(1))2(μ-OH)](3+) (L(1) is 1-(2-guanidinoethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) complex features a strong μ-hydroxo mediated antiferromagnetic coupling between the bimetallic centers and the corresponding more stable open-shell singlet state. Three different reaction modes involving two catalysts and a substrate were proposed for L(1) entries and the mode 1 in which an inter-complex nucleophilic attack by a metal bound hydroxide was found to be more favorable. In the L(3)-involved reactions (L(3) is 1-(4-guanidinobutyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), the reaction mode in which an in-plane intracomplex scissoring-like nucleophilic attack by a Cu(ii)-bound hydroxide was found to be more competitive. The protonated guanidine pendants in each proposed mechanism were found to play crucial roles in stabilizing the reaction structures via hydrogen bonds and in facilitating the departure of the leaving group via electrostatic attraction. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental observations that the Cu(ii)-L(3) complexes are hydrolytically more favorable than their L(1)-involved counterparts. PMID:26688285

  4. Metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization: a new paradigm in bond activation and "green" catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Milstein, David

    2011-08-16

    In view of global concerns regarding the environment and sustainable energy resources, there is a strong need for the discovery of new, green catalytic reactions. For this purpose, fresh approaches to catalytic design are desirable. In recent years, complexes based on "cooperating" ligands have exhibited remarkable catalytic activity. These ligands cooperate with the metal center by undergoing reversible structural changes in the processes of substrate activation and product formation. We have discovered a new mode of metal-ligand cooperation, involving aromatization-dearomatization of ligands. Pincer-type ligands based on pyridine or acridine exhibit such cooperation, leading to unusual bond activation processes and to novel, environmentally benign catalysis. Bond activation takes place with no formal change in the metal oxidation state, and so far the activation of H-H, C-H (sp(2) and sp(3)), O-H, and N-H bonds has been demonstrated. Using this approach, we have demonstrated a unique water splitting process, which involves consecutive thermal liberation of H(2) and light-induced liberation of O(2), using no sacrificial reagents, promoted by a pyridine-based pincer ruthenium complex. An acridine pincer complex displays unique "long-range" metal-ligand cooperation in the activation of H(2) and in reaction with ammonia. In this Account, we begin by providing an overview of the metal-ligand cooperation based on aromatization-dearomatization processes. We then describe a range of novel catalytic reactions that we developed guided by these new modes of metal-ligand cooperation. These reactions include the following: (1) acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols to ketones, (2) acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters, (3) acylation of secondary alcohols by esters with dihydrogen liberation, (4) direct coupling of alcohols and amines to form amides and polyamides with liberation of dihydrogen, (5) coupling of esters and amines to form amides

  5. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  6. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries. PMID:22372510

  7. Evaluation design of New York City's regulations on nutrition, physical activity, and screen time in early child care centers.

    PubMed

    Breck, Andrew; Goodman, Ken; Dunn, Lillian; Stephens, Robert L; Dawkins, Nicola; Dixon, Beth; Jernigan, Jan; Kakietek, Jakub; Lesesne, Catherine; Lessard, Laura; Nonas, Cathy; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Osuji, Thearis A; Bronson, Bernice; Xu, Ye; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the multi-method cross-sectional design used to evaluate New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's regulations of nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for children aged 3 years or older in licensed group child care centers. The Center Evaluation Component collected data from a stratified random sample of 176 licensed group child care centers in New York City. Compliance with the regulations was measured through a review of center records, a facility inventory, and interviews of center directors, lead teachers, and food service staff. The Classroom Evaluation Component included an observational and biometric study of a sample of approximately 1,400 children aged 3 or 4 years attending 110 child care centers and was designed to complement the center component at the classroom and child level. The study methodology detailed in this paper may aid researchers in designing policy evaluation studies that can inform other jurisdictions considering similar policies. PMID:25321635

  8. Novel oxygen chirality induced by asymmetric coordination of an ether oxygen atom to a metal center in a series of sugar-pendant dipicolylamine copperII complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikata, Yuji; Sugai, Yuko; Obata, Makoto; Harada, Masafumi; Yano, Shigenobu

    2006-02-20

    Six sugar-pendant 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA) ligands (L1-3 and L'1-3) have been prepared. OH-protected and unprotected D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-xylose were attached to a DPA moiety via an O-glycoside linkage. X-ray crystallography of the copper(II) complexes (1-5) with these ligands revealed that the anomeric oxygen atom is coordinated to the metal center in the solid state, generating a chiral center at the oxygen atom. The CD spectra of these copper complexes in methanol or aqueous solution exhibit Cotton effects in the d-d transition region, which indicates that the ether oxygen atoms remain coordinated to the metal center and the oxygen-atom chirality is preserved even in solution. For complexes 1 and 2, the inverted oxygen-atom chirality and chelate-ring conformation in the solid state are well correlated with the mirror-image CD spectra in methanol solution. The concomitant inversion of the asymmetric configuration around the copper center was also observed in a methanol solution of complex 3 and a pyridine solution of complex 2. The square-pyramidal/octahedral copper(II) centers also exhibited characteristic absorption and CD spectra.

  9. Heavy metal-activated synthesis of peptides in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.; Merchant, S. )

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the authors have addressed the capacity of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce metal-binding peptides in response to stress induced by the heavy metals Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, and Ag{sup +}. Cells cultured in the presence of sublethal concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} synthesized and accumulated oligopeptides consisting solely of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine in an average ratio of 3:3:1. Cadmium-induced peptides were isolated in their native form as higher molecular weight peptide-metal complexes with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 6.5 {times} 10{sup 3}. The isolated complex bound cadmium (as evidenced by absorption spectroscopy) and sequestered (with a stoichiometry of 0.7 moles of cadmium per mole of cysteine) up to 70% of the total cadmium found in extracts of cadmium-treated cells. In Hg{sup 2+}-treated cells, the principal thiol-containing compound induced by Hg{sup 2+} ion was glutathione. It is possible that glutathione functions in plant cells (as it does in animal cells) to detoxify heavy metals. Cells treated with Ag{sup +} ions also synthesized a sulfur-containing component with a charge to mass ratio similar to Cd{sup 2+}-induced peptides. But, in contrast to the results obtained using Cd{sup 2+} as an inducer, these molecules did not accumulate to significant levels in Ag{sup +}-treated cells. The presence of physiological concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} in the growth medium blocked the synthesis of the Ag{sup +}-inducible component(s) and rendered cells resistant to the toxic effects of Ag{sup +}, suggesting competition between Cu{sup 2+} and Ag{sup +} ions, possibly at the level of metal uptake.

  10. Activation and implementation of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.F. III

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has been assigned the primary responsibility for responding to a major radiological emergency. The initial response to any radiological emergency, however, will probably be conducted under the DOE regional radiological assistance plan (RAP). If the dimensions of the crisis demand federal assistance, the following sequence of events may be anticipated: (1) DOE regional RAP response, (2) activation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assistance Center (FRMAC) requested, (3) aerial measuring systems and DOE/NV advance party respond, (4) FRMAC activated, (5) FRMAC responds to state(s) and cognizant federal agency (CFA), and (6) management of FRMAC transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The paper discusses activation channels, authorization, notification, deployment, and interfaces.

  11. A semi-empirical analysis of ZFS parameters for transition metal (TM) ions (Cr3+ and Mn2+) centers in K2MgF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkgöz, Muhammed

    2016-11-01

    The local structure around the transition metal (TM) ions (Cr3+ and Mn2+) centers in K2MgF4, namely tetragonal (TE) center I, monoclinic (MO) center II and orthorhombic (OR) centers III, have been explored by semi-empirical calculations in the frame of superposition model (SPM). We proposed the most appropriate structural model for each center by matching the theoretically predicted zero-field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) with the experimental ones obtained by EPR spectroscopy. It is shown that the tetragonality of MgF6 octahedra increases with the substitution of both Cr3+ and Mn2+ for Mg2+ sites as well as with a rather higher value for the latter one. A tilt angle of 12.51° is found for MO Cr3+ center, which is comparatively small, as compared to the other A2BF4 crystals such as K2ZnF4 and Tl2ZnF4. Almost three times larger relaxation of intervening F-ligand than that of other equatorial F-ligands is also indicated for OR Cr3+ center.

  12. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates.

  13. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    PubMed

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management. PMID:12118815

  14. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  15. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    PubMed

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management.

  16. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  17. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites. PMID:27420904

  18. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites.

  19. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  20. JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) data availability, version 1-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and integrated water vapor. The JPL PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is the United States distribution site for Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  1. Contents of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive, version 2-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea surface height, surface wind vector, sea surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  2. Wind tunnel productivity status and improvement activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    Over the last three years, a major effort has been underway to re-engineering the way wind tunnel testing is accomplished at the NASA Langley Research Center. This effort began with the reorganization of the LaRC and the consolidation of the management of the wind tunnels in the Aerodynamics Division under one operations branch. This paper provides an overview of the re-engineering activities and gives the status of the improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and customer satisfaction that have resulted from the new ways of working.

  3. Galactic Center gamma-ray ``excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Dario Serpico, Pasquale; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 1052÷1053 erg roughly Script O(106) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ``steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  4. Activities in the Payload Operations Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Members of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) group monitor the progress of their experiment through video at the POCC. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administion, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  5. Activities in the Payload Operation Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  6. Galactic Center gamma-ray ''excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela E-mail: serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ∼ 10{sup 52}÷10{sup 53} erg roughly O(10{sup 6}) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ''steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  7. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  8. A late Holocene metal record of Andean climate and anthropogenic activity in lake sediments near Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, S. A.; Kelly, M. A.; Jackson, B. P.; Stroup, J. S.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    The tropical hypothesis maintains that major changes in global climate are motivated by phenomena based at tropical latitudes. Evidence for this hypothesis lies in: modern-day observations of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO); East African lake sediment records of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) position that precede high-latitude changes; and the potential for ITCZ shifts to cause major CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean. In order to improve the understanding of these phenomena we present an ~1800 year record of atmospheric metal deposition in a lake sediment core near Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru (13.9 °S). In June, 2010 we collected a 1.45 meter-long core from Yanacocha - a small, closed-basin tarn that has been isolated from glacial input since ~11,200 BP. The chronology for the core is based on 4 of 6 AMS 14C dates on aquatic macrofossils and one sharp Zr/Ti anomaly at 36 cm, likely derived from the 350 BP eruption of Huaynaputina. We completely digested organic-rich core samples at 1 cm resolution using HNO3, HCl, and HF in a closed-vessel microwave system, and then analyzed the digestates for 67 metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Here we show fluxes of lithogenic metals (Fe, Nb, Ti, and Zr) that reflect changes in wind strength and aridity, fluxes of lithogenic metal isotopes (REEs and Pb) that reflect wind direction, and enrichment factors (EFs) of metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Hg, and Pb) that reflect anthropogenic activity. Five episodic peaks in lithogenic metal fluxes, centered around 1800, 1300, 900, 600, and 100 yrs BP, are thought to result from either drier or windier conditions, potentially caused by a northern ITCZ position or a more persistent El Niño state. The provenance of atmospheric deposition, evidenced by REE ratios (light REEs / heavy REEs), suggest that high lithogenic fluxes are associated with a change in wind direction, possibly caused by a change in the ENSO state, which will be explored with forthcoming Pb

  9. Active measurements of defect processes in shock compressed metals and other solids

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Solid samples have been routinely recovered for examination after having been subjected to high pressure shock loading. Such investigations have revealed many unique and interesting defect features and are essential if a detailed understanding of shock deformation processes is to be achieved. Nevertheless, examination of samples hours or days after they are compressed for only a few microseconds in a loading whose rise time may be subnanosecond fails to address the relationship between the residual defect structure and that existing during the loading. Electrical probes, and to a lesser extent optical probes, have provided reasonably direct measurements of defect states and some limited information on the evolution of these states. For example, measurements of the electrical resistance of metals provide an indication of vacancy concentrations. Similarly, measurements of shock-induced electrical polarization in insulating solids have provided evidence that large numbers of point defects are generated and displaced by the stress and velocity gradients within the shock fronts. Optical measurements of shock-induced bleaching of color centers in NaCl have provided some evidence for kinetics of the formation of higher-order point defects. This paper reviews the status of active measurements which have provided information about shock-induced changes in the defect state of solids.

  10. Physicochemical properties and catalytic activity of metal tetraphenyl porphins in the oxidation of alkylaromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobotaeva, N. S.; Skorokhodova, T. S.; Kokova, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    We consider the effect of complexing metal in a tetraphenylporphin molecule on its catalytic activity in oxidizing alkylaromatic hydrocarbons by molecular oxygen. The catalytic activity of metal porphyrins (Co, Cu, Zn, Mn, and In TPP) is found to depend on their oxidation potentials and the distribution of electron density in the molecule. The electron-donating compound imidazole is shown to affect the oxidation rate.

  11. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  12. [Activity of digestive enzymes during intraperitoneal intake of metal compounds].

    PubMed

    Zdol'nik, T D

    2001-01-01

    Digestive function was studied when three compounds from Group VIB of the Mendeleev periodic system of elements were intraperitoneally administered during 100 days. Potassium bichromate, ammonium molybdate in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium tungstate in a dose of 5.0 mg/kg (in terms of metal) were found to have a resorptive effect on pancreatic function and a local effect on the small intestinal mucosa.

  13. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  14. Transition-Metal-Free Cyclopropanation of 2-Aminoacrylates with N-Tosylhydrazones: A General Route to Cyclopropane α-Amino Acid with Contiguous Quaternary Carbon Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuanle; Li, Jiawei; Chen, Pengquan; Wu, Wanqing; Ren, Yanwei; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-03-18

    Cyclopropanation of 2-aminoacrylates with N-tosylhydrazones could proceed smoothly under transition-metal-free conditions via a [3 + 2] cycloaddition process. This robust protocol exhibits excellent generality, delivering a wide spectrum of cyclopropane α-amino acid esters bearing contiguous quaternary carbon centers in high yields and diastereoselectivities. With these readily available products, the steric convergence of cyclopropane α-amino acids could be readily obtained.

  15. Cloning and divalent-metal activation of a ß-xylosidase, RUM630-BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding RUM630-BX, a ß-xylosidase/arabinofuranosidase, was identified from activity-based screening of a cow rumen metagenomic library. The recombinant enzyme is activated as much as 14-fold (kcat) by divalent metals Mg2+, Mn2+ and Co2+ but not by Ca2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Activation of RUM6...

  16. Mutational analysis of the active center of plant fructosyltransferases: Festuca 1-SST and barley 6-SFT.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Denise; Nüesch, Eveline; Ritsema, Tita; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres

    2005-08-29

    The active center of the glycoside hydrolase family 32 contains the three characteristic motifs (N/S)DPNG, RDP, and EC. We replaced the N-terminal region including the (N/S)DPNG motif of barley 6-SFT (sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase) by the corresponding region of Festuca 1-SST (sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase). The chimeric enzyme, expressed in Pichia, retained the specificity of 6-SFT. Attempts to replace a larger piece at the N-terminus including also the RDP motif failed. A point mutation introduced in the RDP motif of 1-SST abolished enzymatic activity. Interestingly, point mutations of the EC-motif resulted in an enzyme which had lost the capability to form 1-kestose and glucose from sucrose but still accepted 1-kestose, producing fructose and sucrose as well as nystose.

  17. Activity of daptomycin against staphylococci collected from bloodstream infections in Spanish medical centers.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Gómez, María; López, Fátima

    2009-08-01

    We used the broth microdilution method to determine the MICs of daptomycin and 13 comparator agents against 319 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 201 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, and 183 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Isolates were consecutively collected from bloodstream infections in 39 Spanish medical centers during a 3-month period (March through May 2008). Among MRSA, 1 isolate with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin and 6 isolates resistant to linezolid were found. Nonsusceptibility to teicoplanin was detected in 3.9% of CoNS. Daptomycin was highly active against the staphylococcal blood isolates tested-all were inhibited at the daptomycin susceptibility breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/mL. Daptomycin retained its activity against the isolates that were resistant to teicoplanin or linezolid, or that had reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. These data suggest that daptomycin could be useful for the treatment of bloodstream infections caused by staphylococci. PMID:19631100

  18. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis.

  19. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis. PMID:11442093

  20. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine is discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features are presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept is presented.

  1. pH-Dependent Metal Ion Toxicity Influences the Antibacterial Activity of Two Natural Mineral Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Tanya M.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Summers, Jack S.; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that several mineral products sold for medicinal purposes demonstrate antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the physicochemical properties involved in antibacterial activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Using in vitro mineral suspension testing, we have identified two natural mineral mixtures, arbitrarily designated BY07 and CB07, with antibacterial activity against a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens. Mineral-derived aqueous leachates also exhibited antibacterial activity, revealing that chemical, not physical, mineral characteristics were responsible for the observed activity. The chemical properties essential for bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli were probed by testing antibacterial activity in the presence of metal chelators, the hydroxyl radical scavenger, thiourea, and varying pH levels. Chelation of the BY07 minerals with EDTA or desferrioxamine eliminated or reduced BY07 toxicity, respectively, suggesting a role of an acid-soluble metal species, particularly Fe3+ or other sequestered metal cations, in mineral toxicity. This conclusion was supported by NMR relaxation data, which indicated that BY07 and CB07 leachates contained higher concentrations of chemically accessible metal ions than leachates from non-bactericidal mineral samples. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the acidic environment of the hydrated minerals significantly contributes to antibacterial activity by increasing the availability and toxicity of metal ions. These findings provide impetus for further investigation of the physiological effects of mineral products and their applications in complementary antibacterial therapies. PMID:20209160

  2. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  3. Active learning and student-centered pedagogy improve student attitudes and performance in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Peter; Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years-1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change.

  4. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities. [National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  5. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  6. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  7. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water:TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water:TEOS mole ratio had no appreaciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  8. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water: TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or, Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water: TEOS mole ratio had no appreciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  9. Acute and chronic metal exposure impairs locomotion activity in Drosophila melanogaster: a model to study Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Ramirez, Leonardo; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The biometals iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and copper (Cu) have been associated to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinsonism. In this work, we report for the first time that acute (15 mM for up to 5 days) or chronic (0.5 mM for up to 15 days) Fe, Mn and Cu exposure significantly reduced life span and locomotor activity (i.e. climbing capabilities) in Drosophila melanogaster. It is shown that the concentration of those biometals dramatically increase in Drosophila's brain acutely or chronically fed with metal. We demonstrate that the metal accumulation in the fly's head is associated with the neurodegeneration of several dopaminergic neuronal clusters. Interestingly, it is found that the PPL2ab DAergic neuronal cluster was erode by the three metals in acute and chronic metal exposure and the PPL3 DAergic cluster was also erode by the three metals but in acute metal exposure only. Furthermore, we found that the chelator desferoxamine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and D: -penicillamine were able to protect but not rescue D. melanogaster against metal intoxication. Taken together these data suggest that iron, manganese and copper are capable to destroy DAergic neurons in the fly's brain, thereby impairing their movement capabilities. This work provides for the first time metal-induced Parkinson-like symptoms in D. melanogaster. Understanding therefore the effects of biometals in the Drosophila model may provide insights into the toxic effect of metal ions and more effective therapeutic approaches to Parkinsonism. PMID:21594680

  10. The role of metals in modulating metalloprotease activity in the AD brain.

    PubMed

    Filiz, Gulay; Price, Katherine A; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-03-01

    Biometals such as copper and zinc have an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence indicates that copper homeostasis is altered in AD brain with elevated extracellular and low intracellular copper levels. Studies in animals and cell cultures have suggested that increasing intracellular copper can ameliorate AD-like pathology including amyloid deposition and tau phosphorylation. Modulating copper homeostasis can also improve cognitive function in animal models of AD. Treatments are now being developed that may result in redistribution of copper within the brain. Metal ligands such as clioquinol (CQ), DP-109 or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) have shown promising results in animal models of AD, however, the actual mode of action in vivo has not been fully determined. We previously reported that CQ-metal complexes were able to increase intracellular copper levels in vitro. This resulted in stimulation of phosphoinositol-3-kinase activity and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). Increased kinase activity resulted in up-regulated matrix metalloprotease (MMP2 and MMP3) activity resulting in enhanced degradation of secreted A beta. These findings are consistent with previous studies reporting metal-mediated activation of MAPKs and MMPs. How this activation occurs is unknown but evidence suggests that copper may be able to activate membrane receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and result in downstream activation of MAPK pathways. This has been supported by studies showing metal-mediated activation of EGFR through ligand-independent processes in a number of cell-types. Our initial studies reveal that copper complexes can in fact activate EGFR. However, further studies are necessary to determine if metal complexes such as CQ-copper induce up-regulation of A beta-degrading MMP activity through this mechanism. Elucidation of this pathway may have important implications for the development of metal ligand based

  11. Home-Type Activities at the Day Care Center. (Tipos De Actividades Del Hogar En El Centro De Cuidado Diario.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaronson, May; Moberg, Patricia E.

    This paper argues that home activities comprise a valuable unplanned curriculum and that many of these activities can be transferred to the day care center. It is suggested that these activities foster a closer relationship between child and caregiver and bridge the gap between familiar home environment and novel day care setting. Home activities…

  12. Metal Ion Removal from Wastewaters by Sorption on Activated Carbon, Cement Kiln Dust, and Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Din, Hala M Gamal; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of activated carbon, cement kiln dust (CKD), and sawdust for the removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from aqueous solutions under mono-metal and competitive sorption systems and the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from different industrial wastewaters. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. The efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from industrial wastewaters was also investigated. Cement kiln dust expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by activated carbon and sawdust. Competition among the metals changed their distribution coefficient (Kd) with the sorbents. Sorption of Pb and Cu was higher than Cd and Zn. The average metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 74, 61, and 60% for Cd, Cu, and Zn, respectively, to nearly 100%. The efficiencies of CKD and activated carbon in removing metals were higher than sawdust, suggesting their potential as low-cost sorbents for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  13. Metal Ion Removal from Wastewaters by Sorption on Activated Carbon, Cement Kiln Dust, and Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Din, Hala M Gamal; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of activated carbon, cement kiln dust (CKD), and sawdust for the removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from aqueous solutions under mono-metal and competitive sorption systems and the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from different industrial wastewaters. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. The efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from industrial wastewaters was also investigated. Cement kiln dust expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by activated carbon and sawdust. Competition among the metals changed their distribution coefficient (Kd) with the sorbents. Sorption of Pb and Cu was higher than Cd and Zn. The average metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 74, 61, and 60% for Cd, Cu, and Zn, respectively, to nearly 100%. The efficiencies of CKD and activated carbon in removing metals were higher than sawdust, suggesting their potential as low-cost sorbents for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters. PMID:26459819

  14. Quantitative assessment on soil enzyme activities of heavy metal contaminated soils with various soil properties.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yu; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Soil enzyme activities are greatly influenced by soil properties and could be significant indicators of heavy metal toxicity in soil for bioavailability assessment. Two groups of experiments were conducted to determine the joint effects of heavy metals and soil properties on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that arylsulfatase was the most sensitive soil enzyme and could be used as an indicator to study the enzymatic toxicity of heavy metals under various soil properties. Soil organic matter (SOM) was the dominant factor affecting the activity of arylsulfatase in soil. A quantitative model was derived to predict the changes of arylsulfatase activity with SOM content. When the soil organic matter content was less than the critical point A (1.05% in our study), the arylsulfatase activity dropped rapidly. When the soil organic matter content was greater than the critical point A, the arylsulfatase activity gradually rose to higher levels showing that instead of harm the soil microbial activities were enhanced. The SOM content needs to be over the critical point B (2.42% in our study) to protect its microbial community from harm due to the severe Pb pollution (500mgkg(-1) in our study). The quantitative model revealed the pattern of variation of enzymatic toxicity due to heavy metals under various SOM contents. The applicability of the model under wider soil properties need to be tested. The model however may provide a methodological basis for ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soil.

  15. Microfungi and Microbial Activity Along a Heavy Metal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Anders; Bååth, Erland; Söderström, Bengt

    1983-01-01

    Soil fungal biomass, microfungal species composition, and soil respiration rate of conifer mor soil were studied along a steep copper and zinc gradient (up to 20,000 μg of Cu and 20,000 μg of Zn g−1 dry soil) around a brass mill near the town of Gusum in South Sweden. Fungal biomass and soil respiration rate decreased by about 75% along the metal gradient. Above 1,000 μg of Cu g−1, the decrease was clearly evident; below 1,000 μg of Cu g−1, no obvious effects were observed, but there was a tendency for a decrease in total mycelial length. No decrease in CFU was found along the gradient, but fungal species composition was drastically changed. The frequency of the genera Penicillium and Oidiodendron decreased from about 30 and 20%, respectively, at the control sites to only a few percent close to the mill. Mortierella was most frequently isolated in moderately polluted sites, but at the highest pollution levels, a decrease in isolation frequency was evident. Some fungal taxa increased in abundance towards the mill, e.g., Geomyces (from 1 to 10%), Paecilomyces (0 to 10%), and sterile forms (from 10 to 20%). Analyses with a multivariate statistical method (partial least squares) showed that organic matter content and soil moisture had little influence on the fungal community compared with the heavy metal pollution. PMID:16346316

  16. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  17. Quality-assurance plan for ground-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drost, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Washington Water Science Center, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of ground-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all Washington Water Science Center personnel involved in ground-water activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the Washington Water Science Center and Discipline change. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process.

  18. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  19. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A; Murelli, Ryan P; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tang, Liang

    2015-12-15

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg(2+). A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg(2+) from Ca(2+). Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution.

  20. Recent activities within the aeroservoelasticity branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  1. Recent activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  2. Dimethylaminoborane (H2BNMe2) coordination to late transition metal centers: snapshots of the B-H oxidative addition process.

    PubMed

    Bénac-Lestrille, Gaëtan; Helmstedt, Ulrike; Vendier, Laure; Alcaraz, Gilles; Clot, Eric; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane

    2011-11-01

    The reaction of cyclodiborazane [Me(2)N-BH(2)](2) with the chloro(dihydrogen) ruthenium complex RuHCl(η(2)-H(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) led to the formation of the unsymmetricaly coordinated dimethylaminoborane complex RuHCl(H(2)BNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2). The dimethylaminoborane coordination (H(2)BNMe(2)) to the ruthenium center in 2 was carefully studied by combining X-ray, multinuclear NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) techniques, and compared with the recently reported osmium analogue which was originally formulated as a σ-B-H borinium complex [OsH(2)Cl(HBNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2)] (4). All our data are in favor of a bis(σ-B-H) coordination mode at a very activated stage in the case of the ruthenium complex 2, whereas in the osmium complex 4, full oxidative addition is favored leading to a complex better formulated as an osmium(IV) boryl species with an α-agostic B-H interaction. The synthesis and characterization of the symmetrical dihydride complex RuH(2)(H(2)BNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3) from addition of the lithium dimethylaminoborohydride to 1 is reported for comparison. PMID:21954867

  3. Lumbricus terrestris L. activity increases the availability of metals and their accumulation in maize and barley.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, E; Alonso-Azcárate, J; Rodríguez, L

    2011-03-01

    The effect of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L. on metal availability in two mining soils was assessed by means of chemical extraction methods and a pot experiment using crop plants. Results from single and sequential extractions showed that L. terrestris had a slight effect on metal fractionation in the studied soils: only metals bound to the soil organic matter were significantly increased in some cases. However, we found that L. terrestris significantly increased root, shoot and total Pb and Zn concentrations in maize and barley for the soil with the highest concentrations of total and available metals. Specifically, shoot Pb concentration was increased by a factor of 7.5 and 3.9 for maize and barley, respectively, while shoot Zn concentration was increased by a factor of 3.7 and 1.7 for maize and barley, respectively. Our results demonstrated that earthworm activity increases the bioavailability of metals in soils. PMID:21190761

  4. Metal cofactors in the structure and activity of the fowlpox resolvase.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Hwang, Young; Hu, Jimmy Yan; Minkah, Nana; Ocwieja, Karen E; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-05-28

    Poxvirus DNA replication generates linear concatemers containing many copies of the viral genome with inverted repeat sequences at the junctions between monomers. The inverted repeats refold to generate Holliday junctions, which are cleaved by the virus-encoded resolvase enzyme to form unit-length genomes. Here we report studies of the influence of metal cofactors on the activity and structure of the resolvase of fowlpox virus, which provides a tractable model for in vitro studies. Small-molecule inhibitors of related enzymes bind simultaneously to metal cofactors and nearby surface amino acid residues, so understanding enzyme-cofactor interactions is important for the design of antiviral agents. Analysis of inferred active-site residues (D7, E60, K102, D132, and D135) by mutagenesis and metal rescue experiments specified residues that contribute to binding metal ions and that multiple binding sites are probably involved. Differential electrophoretic analysis was used to map the conformation of the DNA junction when bound by resolvase. For the wild-type complex in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or Ca(2+), migration was consistent with the DNA arms arranged in near-tetrahedral geometry. However, the D7N active-site mutant resolvase held the arms in a more planar arrangement in EDTA, Ca(2+), or Mg(2+) conditions, implicating metal-dependent contacts at the active site in the larger architecture of the complex. These data show how divalent metals dictate the conformation of FPV resolvase-DNA complexes and subsequent DNA cleavage.

  5. The chemical origin and catalytic activity of coinage metals: from oxidation to dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Syu, Cih-Ying; Yang, Hao-Wen; Hsu, Fu-Hsing; Wang, Jeng-Han

    2014-04-28

    The high oxidation activity of coinage metals (Cu, Ag and Au) has been widely applied in various important reactions, such as oxidation of carbon monoxide, alkenes or alcohols. The catalytic behavior of those inert metals has mostly been attributable to their size effect, the physical effect. In the present study, the chemical effects on their high oxidation activity have been investigated. We mechanistically examine the direct and oxidative dehydrogenation (partial oxidation) reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde on a series of transition metals (groups 9, 10 and 11) with identical physical characteristics and varied chemical origins using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electronic structure analyses at the GGA-PW91 level. The energetic results show that coinage metals have much lower activation energies and higher exothermicities for the oxidative dehydrogenation steps although they have higher energy for the direct dehydrogenation reaction. In the electronic structure analyses, coinage metals with saturated d bands can efficiently donate electrons to O* and OH*, or other electronegative adspecies, and better promote their p bands to higher energy levels. The negatively charged O* and OH* with high-lying p bands are responsible for lowering the energies in oxidative steps. The mechanistic understanding well explains the better oxidation activity of coinage metals and provides valuable information on their utilization in other useful applications, for example, the dehydrogenation process. PMID:24626959

  6. The chemical origin and catalytic activity of coinage metals: from oxidation to dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Syu, Cih-Ying; Yang, Hao-Wen; Hsu, Fu-Hsing; Wang, Jeng-Han

    2014-04-28

    The high oxidation activity of coinage metals (Cu, Ag and Au) has been widely applied in various important reactions, such as oxidation of carbon monoxide, alkenes or alcohols. The catalytic behavior of those inert metals has mostly been attributable to their size effect, the physical effect. In the present study, the chemical effects on their high oxidation activity have been investigated. We mechanistically examine the direct and oxidative dehydrogenation (partial oxidation) reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde on a series of transition metals (groups 9, 10 and 11) with identical physical characteristics and varied chemical origins using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electronic structure analyses at the GGA-PW91 level. The energetic results show that coinage metals have much lower activation energies and higher exothermicities for the oxidative dehydrogenation steps although they have higher energy for the direct dehydrogenation reaction. In the electronic structure analyses, coinage metals with saturated d bands can efficiently donate electrons to O* and OH*, or other electronegative adspecies, and better promote their p bands to higher energy levels. The negatively charged O* and OH* with high-lying p bands are responsible for lowering the energies in oxidative steps. The mechanistic understanding well explains the better oxidation activity of coinage metals and provides valuable information on their utilization in other useful applications, for example, the dehydrogenation process.

  7. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  8. Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Surface-Loaded Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Oxidative Degradation of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yoon; Yun, Eun-Tae; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Changha; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jaesang

    2016-09-20

    This study demonstrates the capability of noble metal nanoparticles immobilized on Al2O3 or TiO2 support to effectively activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and degrade select organic compounds in water. The noble metals outperformed a benchmark PMS activator such as Co(2+) (water-soluble) for PMS activation and organic compound degradation at acidic pH and showed the comparable activation capacity at neutral pH. The efficiency was found to depend on the type of noble metal (following the order of Pd > Pt ≈ Au ≫ Ag), the amount of noble metal deposited onto the support, solution pH, and the type of target organic substrate. In contrast to common PMS-activated oxidation processes that involve sulfate radical as a main oxidant, the organic compound degradation kinetics were not affected by sulfate radical scavengers and exhibited substrate dependency that resembled the PMS activated by carbon nanotubes. The results presented herein suggest that noble metals can mediate electron transfer from organic compounds to PMS to achieve persulfate-driven oxidation, rather than through reductive conversion of PMS to reactive sulfate radical. PMID:27564590

  9. Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Surface-Loaded Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Oxidative Degradation of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yoon; Yun, Eun-Tae; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Changha; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jaesang

    2016-09-20

    This study demonstrates the capability of noble metal nanoparticles immobilized on Al2O3 or TiO2 support to effectively activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and degrade select organic compounds in water. The noble metals outperformed a benchmark PMS activator such as Co(2+) (water-soluble) for PMS activation and organic compound degradation at acidic pH and showed the comparable activation capacity at neutral pH. The efficiency was found to depend on the type of noble metal (following the order of Pd > Pt ≈ Au ≫ Ag), the amount of noble metal deposited onto the support, solution pH, and the type of target organic substrate. In contrast to common PMS-activated oxidation processes that involve sulfate radical as a main oxidant, the organic compound degradation kinetics were not affected by sulfate radical scavengers and exhibited substrate dependency that resembled the PMS activated by carbon nanotubes. The results presented herein suggest that noble metals can mediate electron transfer from organic compounds to PMS to achieve persulfate-driven oxidation, rather than through reductive conversion of PMS to reactive sulfate radical.

  10. Influence of the solvent and metal center on supramolecular chirality induction with bisporphyrin tweezer receptors. Strong metal modulation of effective molarity values.

    PubMed

    Pintre, Inmaculada C; Pierrefixe, Simon; Hamilton, Alex; Valderrey, Virginia; Bo, Carles; Ballester, Pablo

    2012-04-16

    We describe the synthesis of a bisporphyrin tweezer receptor 1·H(4) and its metalation with Zn(II) and Rh(III) cations. We report the thermodynamic characterization of the supramolecular chirality induction process that takes place when the metalated bisporphyrin receptors coordinate to enantiopure 1,2-diaminocyclohexane in two different solvents, toluene and dichloromethane. We also performed a thorough study of several simpler systems that were used as models for the thermodynamic characterization of the more complex bisporphyrin systems. The initial complexation of the chiral diamine with the bisporphyrins produces a 1:1 sandwich complex that opens up to yield a simple 1:2 complex in the presence of excess diamine. The CD spectra associated with the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of both metalloporphyrins, 1·Zn(2) and 1·Rh(2), display bisignate Cotton effects when the chirogenesis process is studied in toluene solutions. On the contrary, in dichloromethane solutions, only 1·Zn(2) yields CD-active 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, while the 1:2 complex of 1·Rh(2) is CD-silent. In both solvents, porphyrin 1·Zn(2) features a stoichiometrically controlled chirality inversion process, which is the sign of the Cotton effect of the 1:1 complex is opposite to that of the 1:2 complex. In contrast, porphyrin 1·Rh(2) affords 1:1 and 1:2 complexes in toluene solutions with the same sign for their CD couplets. Interestingly, in both solvents, the signs of the CD couplets associated with the 1:1 sandwich complexes of 1·Zn(2) and 1·Rh(2) are opposite. The amplitudes of the CD couplets are higher for 1·Zn(2) than for 1·Rh(2). This observation is in agreement with 1·Rh(2) having a smaller extinction coefficient than 1·Zn(2). We performed DFT-based calculations and assigned molecular structures to the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes that explain the observed signs for their CD couplets. Unexpectedly, the quantification of the thermodynamic stability of the two metallobisporphyrin/diamine 1

  11. Sentinel-1 Data System at the Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center (ASF DAAC) has a long history of supporting international collaborations between NASA and foreign flight agencies to promote access to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for US science research. Based on the agreement between the US and the EC, data from the Sentinel missions will be distributed by NASA through archives that mirror those established by ESA. The ASF DAAC is the designated archive and distributor for Sentinel-1 data. The data will be copied from the ESA archive to a rolling archive at the NASA Goddard center, and then pushed to a landing area at the ASF DAAC. The system at ASF DAAC will take the files as they arrive and put them through an ingest process. Ingest will populate the database with the information required to enable search and download of the data through Vertex, the ASF DAAC user interface. Metadata will be pushed to the NASA Common Metadata Repository, enabling data discovery through clients that utilize the repository. Visual metadata will be pushed to the NASA GIBS system for visualization through clients linked to that system. Data files will be archived in the DataDirect Networks (DDN) device that is the primary storage device for the ASF DAAC. A backup copy of the data will be placed in a second DDN device that serves as the disaster recovery solution for the ASF DAAC.

  12. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  13. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  14. Effect of pH and metal ions on DPPH radical scavenging activity of tea.

    PubMed

    Pękal, Anna; Pyrzynska, Krystyna

    2015-02-01

    The 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay is commonly applied for the estimation of antioxidant activity of plant extracts. This article discusses the effect of a sample pH and the presence of metal ions on the results obtained using DPPH method for several tea infusions. Higher radical quenching was observed in less acidic media. The impact of metal ions depends of the types of metal ion and its concentration. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate were less efficient in the reaction with DPPH in the presence of Al(III). Desalting process using cation-exchange resin Dowex 50Wx8 decreased the content of metal ions in all studied tea infusions. The DPPH scavenging activity of the effluents after this process were higher than those of the primary extracts and this may be related to the actual antioxidant capacity of these samples.

  15. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  16. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  17. The active metal brazing of TZM-Mo and SiN ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. J.; Vianco, P. T.; Hosking, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    The active metal brazing of ceramics holds the opportunity to design metal-ceramic brazing processes without conventional metallization and nickel-plating steps. Because of their intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (TCE) properties, molybdenum and the TZM-Mo alloy (Mo-0.5Ti-0.08Zr) are attractive candidates for joining to silicon- nitride ceramics. The recently developed Fe-Ni-Co-based Thermo-Span™ alloy, with reduced TCE from room temperature up to ≈400°C, is also an attractive candidate material for 700°C joint service applications. This article discusses the wetting, solid-state aging, and mechanical behavior of unalloyed molybdenum, TZM-Moalloy, Thermo-Span alloy, and silicon-nitride ceramic brazes made with three different active-metal braze alloys.

  18. Trace metals in sediments of a Mediterranean estuary affected by human activities (Acheloos river estuary, Greece).

    PubMed

    Dassenakis, M; Degaita, A; Scoullos, M

    1995-05-19

    Trace metals were studied in the sediments of the ecologically, economically and scientifically important estuary of the Acheloos river, in western Greece. Human activities (dams, agriculture, traffic, etc.) influence the estuarine system of Acheloos and in combination with the hydrological, mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the estuary affect the chemical behaviour and the distribution patterns of trace metals in its sediments. The large scale disturbance of the system is imminent in the near future as it is planned to divert approximately 50% of the river water. A study of the distribution patterns of trace metals revealed that in the estuary there are zones with different metal levels. The concentrations of most metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn) are elevated in three of these zones (upstream, sill, seawards). A different behaviour was observed for Mn due to its association with carbonates that were observed in significant concentrations throughout the estuarine zone. A sequential extraction procedure, applied to the sediments, indicated low percentages of easily exchangeable metals, increased mobility of Cu and Zn and increased association of Ni, Cr and Fe with the aluminosilicate lattice. Although the river is not considered to be heavily polluted, some metals have shown an enrichment in the surface sediments as a result of general anthropogenic activities not derived from point sources.

  19. Metal ion specificities for folding and cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Jennifer L.; Canny, Marella D.; Azimi, Ehsan; Pardi, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various metal ions on cleavage activity and global folding have been studied in the extended Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to probe global folding as a function of various monovalent and divalent metal ions in this ribozyme. The divalent metals ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have a relatively small variation (less than sixfold) in their ability to globally fold the hammerhead ribozyme, which contrasts with the very large difference (>10,000-fold) in apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions in single-turnover kinetic experiments. There is still a very large range (>4600-fold) in the apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions measured in high salt (2 M NaCl) conditions where the ribozyme is globally folded. These results demonstrate that the identity of the divalent metal ion has little effect on global folding of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme, whereas it has a very large effect on the cleavage kinetics. Mechanisms by which the identity of the divalent metal ion can have such a large effect on cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme are discussed. PMID:18755844

  20. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  1. Implicit trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces activate brain centers involved in reward.

    PubMed

    Platek, Steven M; Krill, Austen L; Wilson, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Hamilton's (Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behavior I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 17-52) theory of inclusive fitness, self-facial resemblance is hypothesized as a mechanism for self-referent phenotypic matching by which humans can detect kin. To understand the mechanisms underlying pro-sociality toward self-resembling faces, we investigated the neural correlates of implicit trustworthiness ratings for self-resembling faces. Here we show that idiosyncratic trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces predict brain activation in the ventral inferior, middle and medial frontal gyri, substrates involved in reward processing. These findings demonstrate that neural reward centers are implicated in evaluating implicit pro-social behaviors toward self-resembling faces. These findings suggest that humans have evolved to use neurocomputational architecture dedicated to face processing and reward evaluation for the differentiation of kin, which drives implicit idiosyncratic affectively regulated social interactions.

  2. Global Change Data Center: Mission, Organization, Major Activities, and 2003 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Rapid, efficient access to Earth sciences data from satellites and ground validation stations is fundamental to the nation's efforts to understand the effects of global environmental changes and their implications for public policy. It becomes a bigger challenge in the future when data volumes increase from current levels to terabytes per day. Demands on data storage, data access, network throughput, processing power, and database and information management are increased by orders of magnitude, while budgets remain constant and even shrink.The Global Change Data Center's (GCDC) mission is to develop and operate data systems, generate science products, and provide archival and distribution services for Earth science data in support of the U.S. Global Change Program and NASA's Earth Sciences Enterprise. The ultimate product of the GCDC activities is access to data to support research, education, and public policy.

  3. Helmet-mounted display and associated research activities recently conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1994-06-01

    To enhance manned extravehicular activity (EVA) utilizing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)(i.e., a space suit and portable life support backpack), NASA has conducted research into implementing helmet mounted display (HMD) and related technology within its next generation of space suits. The NASA/Johnson Space Center has completed four feasibility development programs for the design and development of an EMU HMD, each resulting in the delivery of a binocular or biocular HMD breadboard unit utilizing conventional optical elements (i.e., glass lenses and beamsplitters) and/or holographic optics. Additional research into combining the use of voice recognition for astronaut 'hands- free' access to information via the HMD has also been conducted. Research conducted since 1983 will be summarized along with current shuttle EMU display enhancements. In addition, recommendations for the design of the next generation of displays for use within the EMU will be presented.

  4. Data catalog for JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digby, Susan

    1995-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory contains satellite data sets and ancillary in-situ data for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Geophysical parameters available from the archive include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, surface-wind speed, surface-wind stress vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, integrated water vapor, phytoplankton pigment concentration, heat flux, and in-situ data. PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System and is the United States distribution site for TOPEX/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  5. WebQuests: creating engaging, student-centered, constructivist learning activities.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia K; Burchum, Jacqueline R; Likes, Wendy M; Jacob, Susan; Graff, J Carolyn; Driscoll, Carolyn; Britt, Teresa; Adymy, Cindy; Cowan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Students entering health professions educational programs today have grown up and grown older in an unparalleled age of computers and connectivity. Yet most of these students face challenges in applying their information technology and information literacy abilities because most of them have never received formal training, have only a limited understanding of the tools they use, and underuse those tools. WebQuests are a unique method for enhancing students' information technology and information literacy competencies. As inquiry-oriented, engaging, and student-centered activities, WebQuests promote high-level thinking and problem-solving skills. Although WebQuests are used extensively in primary and secondary educational institutions, they have received limited attention in higher education settings. The authors describe the history of WebQuests and, using examples from a series of WebQuests used in an undergraduate informatics for healthcare course, offer specific guidelines for developing relevant WebQuests for nursing education.

  6. Active and Durable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst Derived from Pd-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jitang; Xia, Guoliang; Jiang, Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Ren; Shi, Ruohong; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-06-01

    The water electrolysis is of critical importance for sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, a highly efficient and stable PdCo alloy catalyst (PdCo@CN) was synthesized by direct annealing of Pd-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) under N2 atmosphere. In 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, PdCo@CN displays remarkable electrocatalytic performance with overpotential of 80 mV, a Tafel slope of 31 mV dec(-1), and excellent stability of 10 000 cycles. Our studies reveal that noble metal doped MOFs are ideal precursors for preparing highly active alloy electrocatalysts with low content of noble metal.

  7. X-ray crystal structure of divalent metal-activated ß-xyloisdase, RS223BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ß-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca2+ cation is located at the back of the active site pocket. The Ca2+ coordinates to H274 to sta...

  8. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to combustion-derived metals rapidly (within 20 min) activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS. To study the mechanisms respons...

  9. Regional distribution pattern of groundwater heavy metals resulting from agricultural activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, J.; Mahvi, A. H.; Jahed, G. R.; Babaei, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    Contaminations of groundwater by heavy metals due to agricultural activities are growing recently. The objective of this study was to evaluate and map regional patterns of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in groundwater on a plain with high agricultural activities. The study was conducted to investigate the concentration of heavy metals and distribution in groundwater in regions of Shush Danial and Andimeshk aquifers in the southern part of Iran. Presently, groundwater is the only appropriate and widely used source of drinking water for rural and urban communities in this region. The region covers an area of 1,100 km2 between the Dez and Karkhe rivers, which lead to the Persian Gulf. For this study, the region was divided into four sub-regions A, B, C and D. Additionally, 168 groundwater samples were collected from 42 water wells during the earlier months of 2004. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS-Flame) was used to measure the concentration of heavy metals in water samples and the Surfer software was used for determination of the contour map of metal distribution. The results demonstrated that in all of the samples, Cd and Zn concentrations were below the EPA MCLG and EPA secondary standard, respectively. However, the Cu contents of 4.8 % of all samples were higher than EPA MCL. It is also indicated that the concentrations of metals were more pronounced at the southern part of the studied region than at the others. The analysis of fertilizers applied for agricultural activities at this region also indicated that a great majority of the above-mentioned heavy metals were discharged into the environment. Absence of confining layers, proximity to land surface, excess agricultural activities in the southern part and groundwater flow direction that is generally from the north to the southern parts in this area make the southern region of the Shush plain especially vulnerable to pollution by heavy metals than by other contaminants.

  10. Analysis of the access patterns at GSFC distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore; Bedet, Jean-Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational for more than two years. Its mission is to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) concepts. Over 550,000 files and documents have been archived, and more than six Terabytes have been distributed to the scientific community. Information about user request and file access patterns, and their impact on system loading, is needed to optimize current operations and to plan for future archives. To facilitate the management of daily activities, the GSFC DAAC has developed a data base system to track correspondence, requests, ingestion and distribution. In addition, several log files which record transactions on Unitree are maintained and periodically examined. This study identifies some of the users' requests and file access patterns at the GSFC DAAC during 1995. The analysis is limited to the subset of orders for which the data files are under the control of the Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) Unitree. The results show that most of the data volume ordered was for two data products. The volume was also mostly made up of level 3 and 4 data and most of the volume was distributed on 8 mm and 4 mm tapes. In addition, most of the volume ordered was for deliveries in North America although there was a significant world-wide use. There was a wide range of request sizes in terms of volume and number of files ordered. On an average 78.6 files were ordered per request. Using the data managed by Unitree, several caching algorithms have been evaluated for both hit rate and the overhead ('cost') associated with the movement of data from near-line devices to disks. The algorithm called LRU/2 bin was found to be the best for this workload, but the STbin algorithm also worked well.

  11. Isolation and divalent-metal activation of a β-xylosidase, RUM630-BX.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D; Wagschal, Kurt; Stoller, J Rose; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding RUM630-BX, a β-xylosidase/arabinofuranosidase, was identified from activity-based screening of a cow rumen metagenomic library. The recombinant enzyme is activated as much as 14-fold (kcat) by divalent metals Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Co(2+) but not by Ca(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+). Activation of RUM630-BX by Mg(2+) (t0.5 144 s) is slowed two-fold by prior incubation with substrate, consistent with the X-ray structure of closely related xylosidase RS223-BX that shows the divalent-metal activator is at the back of the active-site pocket so that bound substrate could block its entrance. The enzyme is considerably more active on natural substrates than artificial substrates, with activity (kcat/Km) of 299 s(-1) mM(-1) on xylotetraose being the highest reported. PMID:26672463

  12. Identification of a brain center whose activity discriminates a choice behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lau, Billy Y B; Mathur, Priya; Gould, Georgianna G; Guo, Su

    2011-02-01

    The ability to make choices and carry out appropriate actions is critical for individual survival and well-being. Choice behaviors, from hard-wired to experience-dependent, have been observed across the animal kingdom. Although differential engagement of sensory neuronal pathways is a known mechanism, neurobiological substrates in the brain that underlie choice making downstream of sensory perception are not well understood. Here, we report a behavioral paradigm in zebrafish in which a half-light/half-dark visual image evokes an innate choice behavior, light avoidance. Neuronal activity mapping using the immediate early gene c-fos reveals the engagement of distinct brain regions, including the medial zone of the dorsal telencephalic region (Dm) and the dorsal nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area (Vd), the teleost anatomical homologs of the mammalian amygdala and striatum, respectively. In animals that were subjected to the identical sensory stimulus but displayed little or no avoidance, strikingly, the Dm and Vd were not engaged, despite similar levels of activation in the brain nuclei involved in visual processing. Based on these findings and previous connectivity data, we propose a neural circuitry model in which the Dm serves as a brain center, the activity of which predicates this choice behavior in zebrafish.

  13. Evaluation of magnetic shear in off-disk center active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    The changes that projection effects produce in the evaluation of magnetic shear in off-disk center active regions by comparing angular shear calculated in image plane and heliographic coordinates are analyzed, and the procedure for properly evaluating magnetic shear by transforming the observed vector magnetic field into the heliographic system is described. This procedure is then used to evaluate magnetic shear along the magnetic neutral line in an active region that was observed on April 24, 1984 at a longitude offset of -45 deg. In particular, the number of 'critically sheared' pixels along an east-west directed segment of the neutral line in the leader sunspot group changes from 16 in the image plane magnetogram to 14 in the heliographic magnetogram. The critical shear as calculated in the image plane served as a good predictor for the location of flaring activity since the flare ribbons of the great flare of April 24 bracketed the inversion line where the critical shear was located. These results indicate that for this particular region, projection effects did not significantly affect the evaluation of critical shear.

  14. Approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean Spanish soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Gil, C.; Mormeneo, S.; Abad, M.; Cervera, M.; González, A.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metal contaminated soils results in various negative environmental effects such as a decrease in biological diversity, decline crop productivity or human exposure to toxic elements in the others. The influence of heavy metal contamination in Spanish Mediterranean soils on its biological activity was studied. Non-polluted soils and heavy metal contaminated soils were sampled from different sites affected by several industrial activities. Soil characteristics, heavy metals (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn and V), soil organic matter, microorganism numbers, biomass microbial carbon, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were determined. Except to a rice farming soil, the results indicate that soils with high concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn showed low soil respiration, biomass carbon and dehydrogenase activity with respect non-polluted soils with similar characteristics. Our results provide evidence that these parameters are good approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean soils. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  15. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  16. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and

  17. Effect of heavy metals ions on enzyme activity in the Mediterranean mussel, Donax trunculus

    SciTech Connect

    Mizrahi, L.; Achituv, Y. )

    1989-06-01

    Heavy metal ions strongly are bound by sulfhydryl groups of proteins. Sulfhydryl binding changes the structure and enzymatic activities of proteins and causes toxic effects evident at the whole organism level. Heavy metal ions like Cd, Cu, Hg, Zn, and Pb in sufficiently high concentrations might kill organisms or cause other adverse effects that changing aquatic community structures. Bivalves are known to be heavy metal accumulators. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of different concentrations of each of five heavy metal ions on the activity of four enzymes in D. trunculus. As it is known that heavy metals inhibit the activity of a wide range of enzymes, the authors chose representative examples of dehydrogenases (lactate and malate dehydrogenases), respiratory enzyme (cytochrome oxidase) and digestive enzyme ({alpha}-amylase). The acute effects of different concentrations of selected metals were examined. These concentrations were higher than those found usually in the locality where the animals occur, but might be encountered during a given event of pollution.

  18. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  19. Double aromaticity in transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8).

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Cheng, Longjiu; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-09-28

    It is well known that double-ring boron clusters have got the special double aromaticity with delocalized π orbitals in two directions (tangential and radial), which are potential ligands centered by a transition metal. In this article, the transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8) are theoretically investigated by density functional theory calculations. These endohedral compounds have also got double aromaticity in both tangential and radial directions. Interestingly, the tangential delocalized π orbitals of boron ligands following the Huckle's (4n + 2) rule do not interact with the central metal, while the radial π orbitals of boron ligands are bonded with the central mental to form spd-π endohedral bonding. The spd-π endohedral bonding follows the 18e-principle in Ni@B14 and Fe@B16. However, due to the flat shape of the compounds, 14e (Cr@B14) and 16e (Ni@B12) can also be electronically very stable where the energy levels of the spd-π orbitals delocalized in z-direction rise up. This intriguing bonding model makes sense in further study of the boron chemistry.

  20. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's Urban Research and Development Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation describes the tools and services provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for modeling the impacts of airborne hazardous materials. NARAC provides atmospheric plume modeling tools and services for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear airborne hazards. NARAC can simulate downwind effects from a variety of scenarios, including fires, industrial and transportation accidents, radiation dispersal device explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, nuclear power plant accidents, and nuclear detonations. NARAC collaborates on radiological dispersion source terms and effects models with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NARAC was designated the interim provider of capabilities for the Department of Homeland Security's Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center by the Homeland Security Council in April 2004. The NARAC suite of software tools include simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end-user's computers, and Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced modeling tools and expert analyses from the national center at LLNL. Initial automated, 3-D predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available from the center in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by quality-assured, refined analyses by 24 x 7 on-duty or on-call NARAC staff. NARAC continues to refine calculations using updated on-scene information, including measurements, until all airborne releases have stopped and the hazardous threats are mapped and impacts assessed. Model predictions include the 3-D spatial and time-varying effects of weather, land use, and terrain, on scales from the local to regional to global. Real-time meteorological data and forecasts are provided by redundant communications links to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  1. Squeezing and Heating Rock to Scope Out How Metallic Iron Dribbled to the Center of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2005-07-01

    Formation of Earth's metallic core was one of the most important events in the history of the planet. Metallic iron is much denser than rock, so it sank to the middle, taking other elements that concentrate in metal rather than silicate (rock) with it. However, we do not understand everything about core formation. One particularly niggling puzzle is why cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) have the same concentration (relative to primitive carbonaceous chondrites) as one another in Earth's mantle. At low pressure these elements concentrate in metallic iron to different extents. Calculations show that if metal segregated from silicate at low pressure, nickel ought to be 100 times less abundant (normalized to chondrites) than cobalt, not equal. Cosmochemists have tackled this problem by doing experiments at high pressure and temperature to map out how cobalt and nickel partitioning between metal and silicate differs compared to low pressure. However, the studies differ in their predictions of the behavior because of differences in the assumed pressure, temperature, and oxidation state during core formation. Nancy Chabot (Case Western Reserve University, now at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory), and David Draper and Carl Agee from the University of New Mexico addressed the discrepancies by designing a series of experiments over a wide range in temperature. Their results plot out the conditions under which metal can sink to the core while leading to the observed cobalt and nickel concentrations in the mantle. While the results do not lead to a unique solution, they point the way for further studies of other elements that tend to concentrate in metallic iron, and they show clearly that the equal nickel and cobalt concentrations in the mantle can be the product of core formation in the early Earth.

  2. Acute toxicity of lead, chromium, and other heavy metals to ciliates from activated sludge plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madoni, P.; Gorbi, G. ); Davoli, D. )

    1994-09-01

    Numerous papers deal with the occurrence of heavy metals in the various components of freshwater ecosystems and sewage treatment systems. However, few papers refer to the presence and effect of heavy metals in populations of aquatic cilated protozoa. In particular, the lethal concentrations (LC50) of heavy metals in ciliate populations that colonize the activated sludge or the biofilm of waste treatment plants. Ciliated protozoa are very numerous in all types of aerobic biological-treatment systems. They play an important role in the purification process removing, through predation, the major part of dispersed bacteria that cause high turbidity in the final effluent. Changes in the community structure and types of ciliate species may affect the food web of these artifical ecosystems, and may also influence the biological performance of plants. Heavy metals can limit growth of protozoa in aquatic environments. The toxicity of heavy metals in biological treatment depends mainly upon two factors, namely, metal species and concentration. Although the resistance of biological systems to metal toxicity may be enhanced greatly by proper acclimatization, a too-high metal concentration may cause serious upsets in the system. It is important to determine the concentrations of heavy metals causing lethal effects on ciliates. Madoni recently studied the acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc on six species of ciliated protozoa from activated sludge plants. The present paper describes the toxic effects of lead and chromium (VI) on 6 cilate species. The acute toxicity of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn on two other ciliates (Drepanomonas revoluta and Spirostomum teres) is also reported. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  4. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  5. Roles of exogenous divalent metals in the nucleolytic activity of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Han, Yingchun; Pan, Qunhui; Shen, Tao; Liu, Changlin

    2007-04-01

    It is well known that the wild type Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (holo SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to peroxide hydrogen and dioxygen. However, a new function of holo SOD, i.e., nucleolytic activity has been found [W. Jiang, T. Shen, Y. Han, Q. Pan, C. Liu, J. Biol. Inorg. Chem. 11 (2006) 835-848], which is linked to the incorporation of exogenous divalent metals into the enzyme-DNA complex. In this study, the roles of exogenous divalent metals in the nucleolytic activity were explored in detail by a series of biochemical experiments. Based on a non-equivalent multi-site binding model, affinity of a divalent metal for the enzyme-DNA complex was determined by absorption titration, indicating that the complex can provide at least a high and a low affinity site for the metal ion. These mean that the holo SOD may use a "two exogenous metal ion pathway" as a mechanism in which both metal ions are directly involved in the catalytic process of DNA cleavage. In addition, the pH versus DNA cleavage rate profiles can be fitted to two ionizing-group models, indicating the presence of a general acid and a general base in catalysis. A model that requires histidine residues, metal-bound water molecules and two hydrated metal ions to operate in concert could be used to interpret the catalysis of DNA hydrolysis, supported by the dependences of loss of the nucleolytic activity on time and on the concentration of the specific chemical modifier to the histidine residues on the enzyme. PMID:17292965

  6. X-ray Crystal Structure of Divalent Metal-Activated β-xylosidase, RS223BX.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D; Wagschal, Kurt; Lee, Charles C; Chan, Victor J; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Anderson, Spencer; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw

    2015-10-01

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 β-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca(2+) cation is located at the back of the active-site pocket. The Ca(2+) is held in the active site by the carboxylate of D85, an "extra" acid residue in comparison to other GH43 active sites. The Ca(2+) is in close contact with a histidine imidazole, which in turn is in contact with the catalytic base (D15) thus providing a mechanism for stabilizing the carboxylate anion of the base and achieve metal activation. The active-site pocket is mirrored by an "inactive-site" pocket of unknown function that resides on the opposite side of the monomer. PMID:26201482

  7. PHABULOSA Controls the Quiescent Center-Independent Root Meristem Activities in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Zhou, Jing; Tarkowská, Danuše; Tarkowski, Petr; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Kim, Eun-Sol; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC) cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA) domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB), under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain. PMID:25730098

  8. Probing the active massive black hole candidate in the center of NGC 404 with VLBI

    SciTech Connect

    Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Kaaret, P.; Cseh, D.; Kharb, P.

    2014-08-10

    Recently, Nyland et al. argued that the radio emission observed in the center of the dwarf galaxy NGC 404 originates in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus powered by a massive black hole (MBH, M ≲ 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}). High-resolution radio detections of MBHs are rare. Here we present sensitive, contemporaneous Chandra X-ray, and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio observations with the European VLBI Network. The source is detected in the X-rays, and shows no long-term variability. If the hard X-ray source is powered by accretion, the apparent low accretion efficiency would be consistent with a black hole (BH) in the hard state. Hard state BHs are known to show radio emission compact on the milliarcsecond scales. However, the central region of NGC 404 is resolved out on 10 mas (0.15-1.5 pc) scales. Our VLBI non-detection of a compact, partially self-absorbed radio core in NGC 404 implies that either the BH mass is smaller than 3{sub −2}{sup +5}×10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}, or the source does not follow the fundamental plane of BH activity relation. An alternative explanation is that the central BH is not in the hard state. The radio emission observed on arcsecond (tens of parsecs) scales may originate in nuclear star formation or extended emission due to AGN activity, although the latter would not be typical considering the structural properties of low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies with confirmed nuclear activity.

  9. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  10. Contributions to Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs by the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  11. NASA Langley Research Center's Contributions to International Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  12. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B.

    PubMed

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the "Large clostridial glycosylating toxins." These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB-together with Toxin A (TcdA)-is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+). TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn(2+) and 180 µM for Mg(2+). TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K⁺ (not by Na⁺). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K⁺ and Mg(2+) (rather than Mn(2+)) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  13. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  14. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C[sub 60] to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C[sub 70] in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of [eta][sup 3]- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of [eta][sup 3]-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  15. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: a pathways approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  16. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Ehsanul; Ray, Sharmila; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Kim, Yoon Shin; Cho, Yong-Sung; Yun, Seong-Taek; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration observed for different industry types, the results were grouped into Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu, Fe, and As in smelting and metal production industries, Mn and Cd in the textile industry, and Cr in the leather industry. In most cases, metal levels in the studied areas were found to exceed the common regulation guideline levels enforced by many countries. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo), calculated to estimate the enrichment of metal concentrations in soil, showed that the level of metal pollution in most surveyed areas is significant, especially for Pb and Cd. It is thus important to keep systematic and continuous monitoring of heavy metals and their derivatives to manage and suppress such pollution. PMID:22645468

  17. Current status of trace metal pollution in soils affected by industrial activities.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ehsanul; Ray, Sharmila; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Kim, Yoon Shin; Cho, Yong-Sung; Yun, Seong-Taek; Brown, Richard J C

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration observed for different industry types, the results were grouped into Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu, Fe, and As in smelting and metal production industries, Mn and Cd in the textile industry, and Cr in the leather industry. In most cases, metal levels in the studied areas were found to exceed the common regulation guideline levels enforced by many countries. The geoaccumulation index (I(geo)), calculated to estimate the enrichment of metal concentrations in soil, showed that the level of metal pollution in most surveyed areas is significant, especially for Pb and Cd. It is thus important to keep systematic and continuous monitoring of heavy metals and their derivatives to manage and suppress such pollution.

  18. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  19. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  20. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  1. Adsorption of aqueous metal ions on cattle-manure-compost based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zaini, Muhammad Abbas Ahmad; Okayama, Reiko; Machida, Motoi

    2009-10-30

    The objective of this study is to examine the suitability and performance of cattle-manure-compost (CMC) based activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. The influence of ZnCl(2) activation ratios and solution pH on the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) were studied. Pore texture, available surface functional groups, pH of point zero charge (pH(PZC)), thermogravimetric analysis and elemental compositions were obtained to characterize the activated carbons. Batch adsorption technique was used to determine the metal-binding ability of activated carbons. The equilibrium data were characterized using Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. It was found that the uptake of aqueous metal ions by activated carbons could be well described by Langmuir equation. It is suggested that the increase of surface area and mesopore ratio as a result of increasing activation ratios favored the removal of Cu(II), while activated carbon rich in acidic groups showed selective adsorption towards Pb(II). The preferable removal of Cu(II) over Pb(II) could be due to the rich nitrogen content as well as the higher mesoporous surface area in the CMC activated carbons. The impregnated CMC activated carbons also showed a better performance for Cu(II) removal at varying solution pH than Filtrasorb 400 (F400), while a similar performance was observed for Pb(II) removal. PMID:19541418

  2. Activation and inhibition of rubber transferases by metal cofactors and pyrophosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Deborah J; da Costa, Bernardo M T; Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Cornish, Katrina

    2003-09-01

    Metal cofactors are necessary for the activity of alkylation by prenyl transfer in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Rubber transferase (RuT, a cis-prenyl transferase) associated with purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica can use magnesium and manganese interchangably to achieve maximum velocity. We define the concentration of activator required for maximum velocity as [A](max). The [A](max)(Mg2+) in F. elastica (100 mM) is 10 times the [A](max)(Mg2+) for either H. brasiliensis (10 mM) or P. argentatum (8 mM). The [A](max)(Mn2+) in F. elastica (11 mM), H. brasiliensis (3.8 mM) and P. argentatum (6.8 mM) and the [A](max)(Mg2+) in H. brasiliensis (10 mM) and P. argentatum (8 mM) are similar. The differences in [A](max)(Mg2+) correlate with the actual endogenous Mg(2+) concentrations in the latex of living plants. Extremely low Mn(2+) levels in vivo indicate that Mg(2+) is the RuT cofactor in living H. brasiliensis and F. elastica trees. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that FPP-Mg(2+) and FPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule initiation, although free FPP and metal cations, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), can interact independently at the active site with the following relative dissociation constants K(d)(FPP) Metal) Metal). Similarly, IPP-Mg(2+) and IPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule polymerization. Although metal cations can interact independently at the active site with the relative dissociation constant K(d)(IPP-Metal) Metal), unlike FPP, IPP alone does not interact independently. All three RuTs have similar characteristics-indeterminate sized products, high K(m)(IPP), high metal [A](max), metal cofactor requirements, and are membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:12946411

  3. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants. PMID:27424913

  4. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants.

  5. Exposure to airborne metals and particulate matter and risk for youth adjudicated for criminal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Erin N.; Chen, Aimin; Ryan, Patrick; Succop, Paul; Wright, John; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2011-11-15

    Antisocial behavior is a product of multiple interacting sociohereditary variables, yet there is increasing evidence that metal exposure, particularly, manganese and lead, play a role in its epigenesis. Other metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury, and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, such as fine particulate matter ({<=}2.5 {mu}m) have been associated with neurological deficits, yet largely unexplored with respect to their relationship with delinquent behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ecological relationship between county-wide reported airborne emissions of air metals, particulate matter, and youth adjudicated for criminal activity. Metal exposure data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency AirData. Population statistics were obtained from the United States Census 2000 and adjudication data was obtained from the Courts of Common Pleases from each Ohio County. Simple correlations were calculated with the percentage of adjudications, all covariates, and estimated metal air emissions. Separate negative binomial regression models for each pollutant were used to provide an estimated risk ratio of pollutant emissions on the risk of adjudication for all Ohio counties adjusting for urban-rural residence, percentage of African Americans, median family income, percentage of family below poverty, percentage of high school graduation in 25 years and older populations, and population density. Metal emissions and PM in 1999 were all correlated with adjudication rate (2003-2005 average). Metal emissions were associated with slightly higher risk of adjudication, with about 3-4% increased risk per natural log unit of metal emission except chromium. The associations achieved statistical significance for manganese and mercury. The particulate matter {<=}2.5 and {<=}10 {mu}m emissions had a higher risk estimate, with 12% and 19% increase per natural log unit emission, respectively, and also achieved statistical

  6. Investigation of electron relaxation in the metal proteins containing the single paramagnetic centers of integer spin by nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. A.; Yanvarev, Eugene A.; Bashkirov, Sh. S.; Kouznetsov, V. I.

    2001-11-01

    Nuclear forward scattering (NFS) of synchrotron radiation (SR) is being modeled in metal proteins containing the single paramagnetic centers of integer spin (Fe2+). It is known the spin fluctuations in the electron environment of Moessbauer ion Fe2+ will be manifested itself in NFS if a sample undergoes the influence of applied magnetic field of a few Tesla. Under the condition we are analyzing how the resonant response (RR) of a sample to SR pulse will be changed due to the both spin-lattice and spin-spin interactions.

  7. [CrF(O2 C(t) Bu)2 ]9 : Synthesis and Characterization of a Regular Homometallic Ring with an Odd Number of Metal Centers and Electrons.

    PubMed

    Woolfson, Robert J; Timco, Grigore A; Chiesa, Alessandro; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Inigo J; Tuna, Floriana; Guidi, Tatiana; Pavarini, Eva; Santini, Paolo; Carretta, Stefano; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-07-25

    The first regular homometallic ring containing an odd number of metal centers is reported. The ring was synthesized by means of amine-templated self-assembly. Extensive physical characterization studies, including magnetic measurements, powder inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and DFT calculations, show that the molecule has a near perfect match to the expected behavior for a frustrated system with the lowest energy pair of S=1/2 spin states separated by only 0.1 meV (0.8 cm(-1) ). PMID:27294807

  8. Broadband and high-efficiency metal-multilayer dielectric grating centered at 800 nm based on non-quarter wave coatings as reflective mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuhua; Kong, Weijin; Yun, Maojin; Zhang, Wenfei; You, Chenglong; Wang, Zhao; Pan, Guoqing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Xiaohong; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-01

    This article deals with designing broadband and high efficiency metal multi-layer dielectric grating (MMDG) used to compress and stretch ultra-short laser pulse. The diffraction characteristics of MMDG are analyzed with the method of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Taking the diffraction efficiency of the -1 order as the value of merit function, the parameters such as groove depth, residual thickness, duty cycle are optimized to obtain broadband and high diffraction efficiency. The optimized MMDG shows an ultra-broadband working spectrum with the average efficiency exceeding 97% over 135nm wavelength centered at 800nm and TE polarization. The optimized MMDG should be useful for chirped pulse amplification.

  9. High-temperature fatigue in metals - A brief review of life prediction methods developed at the Lewis Research Center of NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation focuses primarily on the progress we at NASA Lewis Research Center have made. The understanding of the phenomenological processes of high temperature fatigue of metals for the purpose of calculating lives of turbine engine hot section components is discussed. Improved understanding resulted in the development of accurate and physically correct life prediction methods such as Strain-Range partitioning for calculating creep fatigue interactions and the Double Linear Damage Rule for predicting potentially severe interactions between high and low cycle fatigue. Examples of other life prediction methods are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as A83-12159

  10. A comparative analysis of the center of gravity and center of pressure trajectory path lengths in standing posture: an estimation of active stiffness.

    PubMed

    Caron, O; Gelat, T; Rougier, P; Blanchi, J P

    2000-08-01

    The center of foot pressure (CP) motions, representing the net neuromuscular control, was compared to the center of gravity (CG) motions, representing the net performance. The comparison focused on the trajectory path length parameter along the medio-lateral and antero-posterior axes because these two variables depend on amplitude versus frequency relationship. This relationship was used to evaluate the CG motions based on the CP motions. Seven subjects stood still on a force plate with eyes open and eyes closed. The results showed that the ratio of (CP-CG)/CP trajectory path length was personal for each subject. These results suggest different levels of passive (ligaments, elastic properties) and active (reflex activity) stiffness. For some subjects, this ratio was significantly lower for the eyes open condition than for the eyes closed condition, indicating a decrease of the active stiffness for the eyes open condition. Therefore, a CG-CP comparative analysis appeared helpful in understanding the control of balance and necessary to quantify the subjects' net performance. PMID:11757569

  11. Photoreduction of SERS-active metallic nanostructures on chemically patterned ferroelectric crystals.

    PubMed

    Carville, N Craig; Manzo, Michele; Damm, Signe; Castiella, Marion; Collins, Liam; Denning, Denise; Weber, Stefan A L; Gallo, Katia; Rice, James H; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2012-08-28

    Photodeposition of metallic nanostructures onto ferroelectric surfaces is typically based on patterning local surface reactivity via electric field poling. Here, we demonstrate metal deposition onto substrates which have been chemically patterned via proton exchange (i.e., without polarization reversal). The chemical patterning provides the ability to tailor the electrostatic fields near the surface of lithium niobate crystals, and these engineered fields are used to fabricate metallic nanostructures. The effect of the proton exchange process on the piezoelectric and electrostatic properties of the surface is characterized using voltage-modulated atomic force microscopy techniques, which, combined with modeling of the electric fields at the surface of the crystal, reveal that the deposition occurs preferentially along the boundary between ferroelectric and proton-exchanged regions. The metallic nanostructures have been further functionalized with a target probe molecule, 4-aminothiophenol, from which surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal is detected, demonstrating the suitability of chemically patterned ferroelectrics as SERS-active templates.

  12. Periodic trends in the hydrodenitrogenation activity of carbon-supported transition metal sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eijsbouts, S.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1988-01-01

    Periodic trends of transition metals for the catalysis of reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, isomerization and hydrogen oxidation have been well studied. When activity versus position of the transition metal in the periodic table is plotted, quite often these trends are manifested in the form of so-called volcano-type curves. In the present study, the authors have chosen the HDN of quinoline at moderately high pressure as a model reaction, and they have used the same carbon-supported transition metal sulfide catalysts studied by Vissers et al. Results are shown for the following transition metals: V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. 9 references.

  13. Potential metal impurities in active pharmaceutical substances and finished medicinal products - A market surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Wollein, Uwe; Bauer, Bettina; Habernegg, Renate; Schramek, Nicholas

    2015-09-18

    A market surveillance study has been established by using different atomic spectrometric methods for the determination of selected elemental impurities of particular interest, to gain an overview about the quality of presently marketed drug products and their bulk drug substances. The limit tests were carried out with respect to the existing EMA guideline on the specification limits for residuals of metal catalysts or metal reagents. Also attention was given to the future implementation of two new chapters of the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) stating limit concentrations of elemental impurities. The methods used for determination of metal residues were inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and atomic absorption spectrometry technologies (GFAAS, CVAAS, HGAAS). This article presents the development and validation of the methods used for the determination of 21 selected metals in 113 samples from drug products and their active pharmaceutical ingredients.

  14. Potential metal impurities in active pharmaceutical substances and finished medicinal products - A market surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Wollein, Uwe; Bauer, Bettina; Habernegg, Renate; Schramek, Nicholas

    2015-09-18

    A market surveillance study has been established by using different atomic spectrometric methods for the determination of selected elemental impurities of particular interest, to gain an overview about the quality of presently marketed drug products and their bulk drug substances. The limit tests were carried out with respect to the existing EMA guideline on the specification limits for residuals of metal catalysts or metal reagents. Also attention was given to the future implementation of two new chapters of the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) stating limit concentrations of elemental impurities. The methods used for determination of metal residues were inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and atomic absorption spectrometry technologies (GFAAS, CVAAS, HGAAS). This article presents the development and validation of the methods used for the determination of 21 selected metals in 113 samples from drug products and their active pharmaceutical ingredients. PMID:26036232

  15. Consequences of metal-oxide interconversion for C-H bond activation during CH4 reactions on Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ya-Huei Cathy; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-10-16

    Mechanistic assessments based on kinetic and isotopic methods combined with density functional theory are used to probe the diverse pathways by which C-H bonds in CH4 react on bare Pd clusters, Pd cluster surfaces saturated with chemisorbed oxygen (O*), and PdO clusters. C-H activation routes change from oxidative addition to H-abstraction and then to σ-bond metathesis with increasing O-content, as active sites evolve from metal atom pairs (*-*) to oxygen atom (O*-O*) pairs and ultimately to Pd cation-lattice oxygen pairs (Pd(2+)-O(2-)) in PdO. The charges in the CH3 and H moieties along the reaction coordinate depend on the accessibility and chemical state of the Pd and O centers involved. Homolytic C-H dissociation prevails on bare (*-*) and O*-covered surfaces (O*-O*), while C-H bonds cleave heterolytically on Pd(2+)-O(2-) pairs at PdO surfaces. On bare surfaces, C-H bonds cleave via oxidative addition, involving Pd atom insertion into the C-H bond with electron backdonation from Pd to C-H antibonding states and the formation of tight three-center (H3C···Pd···H)(‡) transition states. On O*-saturated Pd surfaces, C-H bonds cleave homolytically on O*-O* pairs to form radical-like CH3 species and nearly formed O-H bonds at a transition state (O*···CH3(•)···*OH)(‡) that is looser and higher in enthalpy than on bare Pd surfaces. On PdO surfaces, site pairs consisting of exposed Pd(2+) and vicinal O(2-), Pd(ox)-O(ox), cleave C-H bonds heterolytically via σ-bond metathesis, with Pd(2+) adding to the C-H bond, while O(2-) abstracts the H-atom to form a four-center (H3C(δ-)···Pd(ox)···H(δ+)···O(ox))(‡) transition state without detectable Pd(ox) reduction. The latter is much more stable than transition states on *-* and O*-O* pairs and give rise to a large increase in CH4 oxidation turnover rates at oxygen chemical potentials leading to Pd to PdO transitions. These distinct mechanistic pathways for C-H bond activation, inferred from theory

  16. Activated phosphors having matrices of yttrium-transition metal compound

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1975-07-01

    A method is described for preparing a phosphor composition containing a lanthanide activator element with a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO$sub 4$ with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On x-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence. (auth)

  17. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  18. An approach to preparing porous and hollow metal phosphides with higher hydrodesulfurization activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song Limin; Zhang Shujuan; Wei Qingwu

    2011-06-15

    This paper describes an effective method for the synthesis of metal phosphides. Bulk and supported Ni{sub 2}P, Cu{sub 3}P, and CoP were prepared by thermal treatment of metal and the amorphous red phosphorus mixtures. Porous and hollow Ni{sub 2}P particles were also synthesized successfully using this method. The structural properties of these products are investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). A rational mechanism was proposed for the selective formation of Ni{sub 2}P particles. In experimental conditions, the Ni{sub 2}P/SiO{sub 2} catalyst exhibits excellent hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity for dibenzothiophene (DBT). - Graphical abstract: Bulk and supported Ni{sub 2}P, Cu{sub 3}P, and CoP were prepared by thermal treatment of their metal and amorphous red phosphorus mixtures. Porous and hollow Ni{sub 2}P particles were successfully synthesized by this method also. In the experimental condition, a Ni{sub 2}P/SiO{sub 2} catalyst exhibits excellent hydrodesulfurization activity for dibenzothiophene. Highlights: > A new synthetic route by heat treating mixtures of metal and red phosphorus in flowing N{sub 2} to prepare corresponding metal phosphides. > Porous and hollow Ni{sub 2}P particles may successfully be obtained using the route. > It is very easy to synthesize other bulk and supported metal phosphides using the mixing of bulk and supported metal and red phosphorus by the method. > The Ni{sub 2}P/SiO{sub 2} catalyst synthesized by the route shows a good HDS of dibenzothiophene. > Its operation is simple (only heat treating pure metal and red phosphorus), and the reaction time is short (only 0.5 h).

  19. Oxygen Evolution Reaction Dynamics, Faradaic Charge Efficiency, and the Active Metal Redox States of Ni-Fe Oxide Water Splitting Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Görlin, Mikaela; Chernev, Petko; Ferreira de Araújo, Jorge; Reier, Tobias; Dresp, Sören; Paul, Benjamin; Krähnert, Ralph; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mixed Ni-Fe oxides are attractive anode catalysts for efficient water splitting in solar fuels reactors. Because of conflicting past reports, the catalytically active metal redox state of the catalyst has remained under debate. Here, we report an in operando quantitative deconvolution of the charge injected into the nanostructured Ni-Fe oxyhydroxide OER catalysts or into reaction product molecules. To achieve this, we explore the oxygen evolution reaction dynamics and the individual faradaic charge efficiencies using operando differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). We further use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) under OER conditions at the Ni and Fe K-edges of the electrocatalysts to evaluate oxidation states and local atomic structure motifs. DEMS and XAS data consistently reveal that up to 75% of the Ni centers increase their oxidation state from +2 to +3, while up to 25% arrive in the +4 state for the NiOOH catalyst under OER catalysis. The Fe centers consistently remain in the +3 state, regardless of potential and composition. For mixed Ni100-xFex catalysts, where x exceeds 9 atomic %, the faradaic efficiency of O2 sharply increases from ∼30% to 90%, suggesting that Ni atoms largely remain in the oxidation state +2 under catalytic conditions. To reconcile the apparent low level of oxidized Ni in mixed Ni-Fe catalysts, we hypothesize that a kinetic competition between the (i) metal oxidation process and the (ii) metal reduction step during O2 release may account for an insignificant accumulation of detectable high-valent metal states if the reaction rate of process (ii) outweighs that of (i). We conclude that a discussion of the superior catalytic OER activity of Ni-FeOOH electrocatalysts in terms of surface catalysis and redox-inactive metal sites likely represents an oversimplification that fails to capture essential aspects of the synergisms at highly active Ni-Fe sites.

  20. Metal-based biologically active azoles and β-lactams derived from sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S; Almayah, Abdulelah A; Bolandnazar, Zeinab; Swadi, Ali G; Ebrahimi, Amirpasha

    2016-03-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) and sulfathiazole (STZ), converted to their β-lactam derivatives have been synthesized and experimentally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. The structural and electronic properties of the studied molecules were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that the Schiff bases act as bidentate ligands via the coordination of azomethine nitrogen to metal ions as well as the proton displacement from the phenolic group through the metal ions; therefore, Cu complexes can attain the square planner arrangement and Zn complexes have a distorted tetrahedral structure. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps. In addition, the antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds have been screened in vitro against various pathogenic bacterial species. Inspection of the results revealed that all newly synthesized complexes individually exhibit varying degrees of inhibitory effects on the growth of the tested bacterial species, therefore, they may be considered as drug candidates for bacterial pathogens. The free Schiff base ligands (1-2) exhibited a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus spp., and Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains. The results also indicated that the β-lactam derivatives (3-4) have high antibacterial activities on Gram positive bacteria as well as the metal complexes (5-8), particularly Zn complexes, have a significant activity against all Gram negative bacterial strains. It has been shown that the metal complexes have significantly higher activity than corresponding