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Sample records for active metal sites

  1. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  2. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  3. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn2+, hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co2+. Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites. PMID:26853450

  4. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  5. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  6. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  7. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  8. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability.

  9. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  10. Coordination sphere of the third metal site is essential to the activity and metal selectivity of alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Koutsioulis, Dimitris; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Mäki, Seija; Guthrie, Ellen; Feller, Georges; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Heikinheimo, Pirkko

    2010-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are commercially applied enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters by a reaction involving three active site metal ions. We have previously identified H135 as the key residue for controlling activity of the psychrophilic TAB5 AP (TAP). In this article, we describe three X-ray crystallographic structures on TAP variants H135E and H135D in complex with a variety of metal ions. The structural analysis is supported by thermodynamic and kinetic data. The AP catalysis essentially requires octahedral coordination in the M3 site, but stability is adjusted with the conformational freedom of the metal ion. Comparison with the mesophilic Escherichia coli, AP shows differences in the charge transfer network in providing the chemically optimal metal combination for catalysis. Our results provide explanation why the TAB5 and E. coli APs respond in an opposite way to mutagenesis in their active sites. They provide a lesson on chemical fine tuning and the importance of the second coordination sphere in defining metal specificity in enzymes. Understanding the framework of AP catalysis is essential in the efforts to design even more powerful tools for modern biotechnology. PMID:19916164

  11. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  12. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  13. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  14. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  15. Characterizations of Metal Binding in the Active Sites of Acireductone Dioxygenase Isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Ju, T.; Dang, M.; Goldsmith, R.; Maroney, M.; Pochapsky, T.

    2008-01-01

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1, 2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M2+ metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni2+-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe2+-bound FeARD' catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD' and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates metal in vivo but

  16. Characterization of Metal Binding in the Active Sites of acireductone dioxygenase Isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724

    SciTech Connect

    S Chai; T Ju; M Dang; R Goldsmith; M Maroney; T Pochapsky

    2011-12-31

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M{sup 2+} metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni{sup 2+}-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe{sup 2+}-bound FeARD catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates

  17. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  18. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A; Murelli, Ryan P; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tang, Liang

    2015-12-15

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg(2+). A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg(2+) from Ca(2+). Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution.

  19. Metal ions bound at the active site of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Jonathan M; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Phillips, Simon E V; Lilley, David M J

    2002-07-01

    T7 endonuclease I is a nuclease that is selective for the structure of the four-way DNA junction. The active site is similar to those of a number of restriction enzymes. We have solved the crystal structure of endonuclease I with a wild-type active site. Diffusion of manganese ions into the crystal revealed two peaks of electron density per active site, defining two metal ion-binding sites. Site 1 is fully occupied, and the manganese ion is coordinated by the carboxylate groups of Asp55 and Glu65, and the main chain carbonyl of Thr66. Site 2 is partially occupied, and the metal ion has a single protein ligand, the remaining carboxylate oxygen atom of Asp55. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed the sequential exothermic binding of two manganese ions in solution, with dissociation constants of 0.58 +/- 0.019 and 14 +/- 1.5 mM. These results are consistent with a two metal ion mechanism for the cleavage reaction, in which the hydrolytic water molecule is contained in the first coordination sphere of the site 1-bound metal ion.

  20. Oxygen reduction and evolution at single-metal active sites: Comparison between functionalized graphitic materials and protoporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García-Lastra, J. M.; Abad, E.; Koper, M. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A worldwide spread of clean technologies such as low-temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers depends strictly on their technical reliability and economic affordability. Currently, both conditions are hardly fulfilled mainly due to the same reason: the oxygen electrode, which has large overpotentials and is made of precious materials. A possible solution is the use of non-noble electrocatalysts with single-metal active sites. Here, on the basis of DFT calculations of adsorbed intermediates and a thermodynamic analysis, we compare the oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) activities of functionalized graphitic materials and gas-phase porphyrins with late transition metals. We find that both kinds of materials follow approximately the same activity trends, and active sites with transition metals from groups 7 to 9 may be good ORR and OER electrocatalysts. However, spin analyses show more flexibility in the possible oxidation states of the metal atoms in solid electrocatalysts, while in porphyrins they must be + 2. These observations reveal that the catalytic activity of these materials is mainly due to nearest-neighbor interactions. Based on this, we propose that this class of electrocatalysts may be improved by careful selections of the support and the ligand properties close to the active sites and/or the ramifications near them, so that charge is transferred back and forth during adsorption and selective hydrogen bonds are formed.

  1. Stable isolated metal atoms as active sites for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Yuan, Wen Tao; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Hui Jun; Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-02-17

    The process of using solar energy to split water to produce hydrogen assisted by an inorganic semiconductor is crucial for solving our energy crisis and environmental problems in the future. However, most semiconductor photocatalysts would not exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity without loading suitable co-catalysts. Generally, the noble metals have been widely applied as co-catalysts, but always agglomerate during the loading process or photocatalytic reaction. Therefore, the utilization efficiency of the noble co-catalysts is still very low on a per metal atom basis if no obvious size effect exists, because heterogeneous catalytic reactions occur on the surface active atoms. Here, for the first time, we have synthesized isolated metal atoms (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) stably by anchoring on TiO2 , a model photocatalystic system, by a facile one-step method. The isolated metal atom based photocatalysts show excellent stability for H2 evolution and can lead to a 6-13-fold increase in photocatalytic activity over the metal clusters loaded on TiO2 by the traditional method. Furthermore, the configurations of isolated atoms as well as the originality of their unusual stability were analyzed by a collaborative work from both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  2. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  3. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  4. Direct measurement of metal ion chelation in the active site of human ferrochelatase.

    PubMed

    Hoggins, M; Dailey, H A; Hunter, C N; Reid, J D

    2007-07-10

    The final step in heme biosynthesis, insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX, is catalyzed by protoporphyrin IX ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1). We demonstrate that pre-steady state human ferrochelatase (R115L) exhibits a stoichiometric burst of product formation and substrate consumption, consistent with a rate-determining step following metal ion chelation. Detailed analysis shows that chelation requires at least two steps, rapid binding followed by a slower (k approximately 1 s-1) irreversible step, provisionally assigned to metal ion chelation. Comparison with steady state data reveals that the rate-determining step in the overall reaction, conversion of free porphyrin to free metalloporphyrin, occurs after chelation and is most probably product release. We have measured rate constants for significant steps on the enzyme and demonstrate that metal ion chelation, with a rate constant of 0.96 s-1, is approximately 10 times faster than the rate-determining step in the steady state (kcat = 0.1 s-1). The effect of an additional E343D mutation is apparent at multiple stages in the reaction cycle with a 7-fold decrease in kcat and a 3-fold decrease in kchel. This conservative mutation primarily affects events occurring after metal ion chelation. Further evaluation of structure-function data on site-directed mutants will therefore require both steady state and pre-steady state approaches.

  5. A Dynamic Zn Site in Helicobacter pylori HypA: A Potential Mechanism for Metal-Specific Protein Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy,D.; Herbst, R.; Iwig, J.; Chivers, P.; Maroney, M.

    2007-01-01

    HypA is an accessory protein and putative metallochaperone that is critical for supplying nickel to the active site of NiFe hydrogenases. In addition to binding Ni(II), HypA is known to contain a Zn site that has been suggested to play a structural role. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to show that the Zn site changes structure upon binding nickel, from a S{sub 3}(O/N)-donor ligand environment to an S{sub 4}-donor ligand environment. This provides a potential mechanism for discriminating Ni(II) from other divalent metal ions. The Ni(II) site is shown to be a six-coordinate complex composed of O/N-donors including two histidines. As such, it resembles the nickel site in UreE, a nickel metallochaperone involved in nickel incorporation into urease.

  6. ROLE OF C AND P SITES ON THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF METAL CARBIDE AND PHOSPHIDES: FROM CLUSTERS TO SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; VINES, F.; LIU, P.; ILLAS, F.

    2007-07-01

    Transition metal carbides and phosphides have shown tremendous potential as highly active catalysts. At a microscopic level, it is not well understood how these new catalysts work. Their high activity is usually attributed to ligand or/and ensemble effects. Here, we review recent studies that examine the chemical activity of metal carbide and phosphides as a function of size, from clusters to extended surfaces, and metal/carbon or metal/phosphorous ratio. These studies reveal that the C and P sites in these compounds cannot be considered as simple spectators. They moderate the reactivity of the metal centers and provide bonding sites for adsorbates.

  7. Mobility of heavy metals from tailings to stream waters in a mining activity contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Concas, A; Ardau, C; Cristini, A; Zuddas, P; Cao, G

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the results of a recent characterization of Rio Piscinas (SW of Sardinia, Italy) hydrological basin are reported. In such area (about 50 km2), previous mining activities caused a serious heavy metal contamination of surface waters, groundwater, soils and biota. Acid mine drainage phenomena were observed in the area. The main sources of contamination are the tailings stored in mine tunnels and abandoned along fluvial banks. A methodological approach was adopted in order to identify relations between tailings and water contamination. Representative samples of tailings and stream sediments samples were collected. XRD analyses were performed for mineralogical characterization, while acid digestion was carried out for determining metal contents. Batch sequential leaching tests were performed in order to assess metal mobility. Also groundwater and stream water were sampled in specific locations and suitably characterized. All information collected allowed the understanding of the effect of tailings on water contamination, thus contributing to the qualitative prediction of pollution evolution on the basis of metal mobility. Finally, a potential remediation strategy of stream water is proposed.

  8. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  9. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore » structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  10. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  11. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    PubMed Central

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  12. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  13. Active sites without restraints: high-resolution analysis of metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Eva-Maria; Andrade, Susana L A; Einsle, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    For most three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, the factual accuracy of atom positions by far exceeds the resolution of the experimental data, although the refinement problem presented by a protein structure is substantially underdetermined. This is achieved through using restraints that precisely define protein geometries and thus reduce the degrees of freedom of the refinement problem. If such information is not available or when unusual geometries or particular ligand states complicate structural analysis, possible pitfalls arise that not only concern the precise definition of spatial arrangements, but also the identification of atom types and bond distances. Prominent examples include CO dehydrogenase, hydrogenase, acetylene hydratase and nitrogenase, all of which employ unique active sites that turned out not to be what they seemed upon first inspection.

  14. Scorpionate-type coordination in MFU-4l metal-organic frameworks: small-molecule binding and activation upon the thermally activated formation of open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Grzywa, Maciej; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Postsynthetic metal and ligand exchange is a versatile approach towards functionalized MFU-4l frameworks. Upon thermal treatment of MFU-4l formates, coordinatively strongly unsaturated metal centers, such as zinc(II) hydride or copper(I) species, are generated selectively. Cu(I)-MFU-4l prepared in this way was stable under ambient conditions and showed fully reversible chemisorption of small molecules, such as O2, N2, and H2, with corresponding isosteric heats of adsorption of 53, 42, and 32 kJ mol(-1), respectively, as determined by gas-sorption measurements and confirmed by DFT calculations. Moreover, Cu(I)-MFU-4l formed stable complexes with C2H4 and CO. These complexes were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The demonstrated hydride transfer to electrophiles and strong binding of small gas molecules suggests these novel, yet robust, metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites as promising catalytic materials comprising earth-abundant metal elements.

  15. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source.

  16. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source. PMID:24738662

  17. A Chemical Route to Activation of Open Metal Sites in the Copper-Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials HKUST-1 and Cu-MOF-2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ki; Yun, Won Seok; Kim, Min-Bum; Kim, Jeung Yoon; Bae, Youn-Sang; Lee, JaeDong; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2015-08-12

    Open coordination sites (OCSs) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) often function as key factors in the potential applications of MOFs, such as gas separation, gas sorption, and catalysis. For these applications, the activation process to remove the solvent molecules coordinated at the OCSs is an essential step that must be performed prior to use of the MOFs. To date, the thermal method performed by applying heat and vacuum has been the only method for such activation. In this report, we demonstrate that methylene chloride (MC) itself can perform the activation role: this process can serve as an alternative "chemical route" for the activation that does not require applying heat. To the best of our knowledge, no previous study has demonstrated this function of MC, although MC has been popularly used in the pretreatment step prior to the thermal activation process. On the basis of a Raman study, we propose a plausible mechanism for the chemical activation, in which the function of MC is possibly due to its coordination with the Cu(2+) center and subsequent spontaneous decoordination. Using HKUST-1 film, we further demonstrate that this chemical activation route is highly suitable for activating large-area MOF films. PMID:26197386

  18. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein. PMID:26305718

  19. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein.

  20. The active site of purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) metal content and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Eicken, C; Sift, B H; Kratel, A; Kappl, R; Hüttermann, J; Krebs, B

    1999-03-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes Ipomoea batatas (spPAP) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized using spectroscopic investigations. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed a molecular mass of approximately 112 kDa. The metal content was determined by X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation. In contrast to previous studies it is shown that spPAP contains a Fe(III)-Zn(II) center in the active site as previously determined for the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney bean (kbPAP). Moreover, an alignment of the amino acid sequences suggests that the residues involved in metal-binding are identical in both plant PAPs. Tyrosine functions as one of the ligands for the chromophoric Fe(III). Low temperature EPR spectra of spPAP show a signal near g = 4.3, characteristic for high-spin Fe(III) in a rhombic environment. The Tyr-Fe(III) charge transfer transition and the EPR signal are both very sensitive to changes in pH. The pH dependency strongly suggests the presence of an ionizable group with a pKa of 4.7, arising from an aquo ligand coordinated to Fe(III). EPR and UV/visible studies of spPAP in the presence of the inhibitors phosphate or arsenate suggest that both anions bind to Fe(III) in the binuclear center replacing the coordinated water or hydroxide ligand necessary for hydrolysis. The conserved histidine residues of spPAP corresponding to His202 and His296 in kbPAP probably interact in catalysis. PMID:10102999

  1. The active site of purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) metal content and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Eicken, C; Sift, B H; Kratel, A; Kappl, R; Hüttermann, J; Krebs, B

    1999-03-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes Ipomoea batatas (spPAP) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized using spectroscopic investigations. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed a molecular mass of approximately 112 kDa. The metal content was determined by X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation. In contrast to previous studies it is shown that spPAP contains a Fe(III)-Zn(II) center in the active site as previously determined for the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney bean (kbPAP). Moreover, an alignment of the amino acid sequences suggests that the residues involved in metal-binding are identical in both plant PAPs. Tyrosine functions as one of the ligands for the chromophoric Fe(III). Low temperature EPR spectra of spPAP show a signal near g = 4.3, characteristic for high-spin Fe(III) in a rhombic environment. The Tyr-Fe(III) charge transfer transition and the EPR signal are both very sensitive to changes in pH. The pH dependency strongly suggests the presence of an ionizable group with a pKa of 4.7, arising from an aquo ligand coordinated to Fe(III). EPR and UV/visible studies of spPAP in the presence of the inhibitors phosphate or arsenate suggest that both anions bind to Fe(III) in the binuclear center replacing the coordinated water or hydroxide ligand necessary for hydrolysis. The conserved histidine residues of spPAP corresponding to His202 and His296 in kbPAP probably interact in catalysis.

  2. A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore spaces for high gas storage and active chemical fixation of CO2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao-Ying; Tian, Hong-Rui; Ai, Jing; Li, Lei-Jiao; Dang, Song; Lan, Ya-Qian; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-09-25

    A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore space was constructed based on a designed bent ligand; it exhibits high-capacity multiple gas storage under atmospheric pressure and efficient catalytic activity for chemical fixation of CO2 under mild conditions.

  3. A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore spaces for high gas storage and active chemical fixation of CO2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao-Ying; Tian, Hong-Rui; Ai, Jing; Li, Lei-Jiao; Dang, Song; Lan, Ya-Qian; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-09-25

    A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore space was constructed based on a designed bent ligand; it exhibits high-capacity multiple gas storage under atmospheric pressure and efficient catalytic activity for chemical fixation of CO2 under mild conditions. PMID:27550833

  4. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L.

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  5. UV Raman spectroscopic studies on active sites and synthesis mechanisms of transition metal-containing microporous and mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fengtao; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2010-03-16

    Microporous and mesoporous materials are widely used as catalysts and catalyst supports. Although the incorporation of transition metal ions into the framework of these materials (by isomorphous substitution of Al and Si) is an effective means of creating novel catalytic activity, the characterization of the transition metal species within these materials is difficult. Both the low concentration of the highly dispersed transition metal and the coexistence of extraframework transition metal species present clear challenges. Moreover, the synthetic mechanisms that operate under the highly inhomogeneous conditions of hydrothermal synthesis are far from well understood. A useful technique for addressing these challenges is UV Raman spectroscopy, which is a powerful technique for catalyst characterization and particularly for transition metal-containing microporous and mesoporous materials. Conventional Raman spectroscopy, using visible and IR wavelengths, often fails to provide the information needed for proper characterization as a result of fluorescence interference. But shifting the excitation source to the UV range addresses this difficulty: interference from fluorescence (which typically occurs at 300-700 nm or greater) is greatly diminished. Moreover, signal intensity is enhanced because Raman intensity is proportional to the fourth power of the scattered light frequency. In this Account, we review recent advances in UV Raman spectroscopic characterization of (i) highly dispersed transition metal oxides on supports, (ii) transition metal ions in the framework of microporous and mesoporous materials, and (iii) the synthetic mechanisms involved in making microporous materials. By taking advantage of the strong UV resonance Raman effect, researchers have made tremendous progress in the identification of isolated transition metal ions incorporated in the framework of microporous and mesoporous materials such as TS-1, Ti-MCM-41, Fe-ZSM-5, and Fe-SBA-15. The synthetic

  6. Stepwise assembly of mixed-metal coordination cages containing both kinetically inert and kinetically labile metal ions: introduction of metal-centred redox and photophysical activity at specific sites.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley B; Metherell, Alexander J; Cullen, William; Ward, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Stepwise preparation of the heterometallic octanuclear coordination cages [(M(a))4(M(b))4L12](16+) is reported, in which M(a) = Ru or Os and M(b) = Cd or Co (all in their +2 oxidation state). This requires initial preparation of the kinetically inert mononuclear complexes [(M(a))L3](2+) in which L is a ditopic ligand with two bidentate chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine units: in the complexes [(M(a))L3](2+) one terminus of each ligand is bound to the metal ion, such that the complex has three pendant bidentate sites at which cage assembly can propagate by coordination to additional labile ions M(b) in a separate step. Thus, combination of four [(M(a))L3](2+) units and four [M(b)](2+) ions results in assembly of the complete cages [(M(a))4(M(b))4L12](16+) in which a metal ion lies at each of the eight vertices, and a bridging ligand spans each of the twelve edges, of a cube. The different types of metal ion necessarily alternate around the periphery with each bridging ligand bound to one metal ion of each type. All four cages have been structurally characterised: in the Ru(ii)/Cd(ii) cage (reported in a recent communication) the Ru(ii) and Cd(ii) ions are crystallographically distinct; in the other three cages [Ru(ii)/Co(ii), Os(ii)/Cd(ii) and Os(ii)/Co(ii), reported here] the ions are disordered around the periphery such that every metal site refines as a 50 : 50 mixture of the two metal atom types. The incorporation of Os(ii) units into the cages results in both redox activity [a reversible Os(ii)/Os(iii) couple for all four metal ions simultaneously, at a modest potential] and luminescence [the Os(ii) units have luminescent (3)MLCT excited states which will be good photo-electron donors] being incorporated into the cage superstructure.

  7. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  8. Effects of Metal Ions on Stability and Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrolysin and Further Stabilization of This Enzyme by Modification of a Ca2+-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Gao, Xiaowei; Dai, Zheng; Tang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysin is an extracellular subtilase produced by the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme functions at high temperatures in seawater, but little is known about the effects of metal ions on the properties of pyrolysin. Here, we report that the supplementation of Na+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ salts at concentrations similar to those in seawater destabilizes recombinant pyrolysin but leads to an increase in enzyme activity. The destabilizing effect of metal ions on pyrolysin appears to be related to the disturbance of surface electrostatic interactions of the enzyme. In addition, mutational analysis of two predicted high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites (Ca1 and Ca2) revealed that the binding of Ca2+ is important for the stabilization of this enzyme. Interestingly, Asn substitutions at residues Asp818 and Asp820 of the Ca2 site, which is located in the C-terminal extension of pyrolysin, resulted in improvements in both enzyme thermostability and activity without affecting Ca2+-binding affinity. These effects were most likely due to the elimination of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion at the Ca2 site. Together, these results suggest that metal ions play important roles in modulating the stability and activity of pyrolysin. PMID:24561589

  9. Kinetic isotope effects for alkaline phosphatase reactions: implications for the role of active-site metal ions in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, Jesse G; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K; O'brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C

    2007-08-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active-site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active-site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active-site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

  10. Direct measurement of metal-ion chelation in the active site of the AAA+ ATPase magnesium chelatase.

    PubMed

    Viney, Joanne; Davison, Paul A; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2007-11-01

    Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the first committed step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. This complex enzyme has at least three substrates and couples ATP hydrolysis to the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX. We directly observed metal-ion chelation fluorometrically, providing the first data describing the on-enzyme reaction. We describe the transient-state kinetics of magnesium chelatase with direct observation of the evolution of an enzyme-product complex EMgDIX. We demonstrate that MgATP2- binding occurs after the rate-determining step. As nucleotide hydrolysis is essential for the overall reaction this must also occur after the rate-determining step. This provides the first evidence for the synchronization of the ATPase and chelatase pathways and suggests a mechanism where nucleotide binding acts to clamp the chelatase in a product complex. Comparison of rate constants for the slow step in the reaction with further transient kinetics under conditions where multiple turnovers can occur reveals that an additional activation step is required to explain the behavior of magnesium chelatase. These data provide a new view of the sequence of events occurring in the reaction catalyzed by magnesium chelatase.

  11. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  12. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  13. Designing functional metalloproteins: from structural to catalytic metal sites.

    PubMed

    Zastrow, Melissa L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-09-01

    Metalloenzymes efficiently catalyze some of the most important and difficult reactions in nature. For many years, coordination chemists have effectively used small molecule models to understand these systems. More recently, protein design has been shown to be an effective approach for mimicking metal coordination environments. Since the first designed proteins were reported, much success has been seen for incorporating metal sites into proteins and attaining the desired coordination environment but until recently, this has been with a lack of significant catalytic activity. Now there are examples of designed metalloproteins that, although not yet reaching the activity of native enzymes, are considerably closer. In this review, we highlight work leading up to the design of a small metalloprotein containing two metal sites, one for structural stability (HgS3) and the other a separate catalytic zinc site to mimic carbonic anhydrase activity (ZnN3O). The first section will describe previous studies that allowed for a high affinity thiolate site that binds heavy metals in a way that stabilizes three-stranded coiled coils. The second section will examine ways of preparing histidine rich environments that lead to metal based hydrolytic catalysts. We will also discuss other recent examples of the design of structural metal sites and functional metalloenzymes. Our work demonstrates that attaining the proper first coordination geometry of a metal site can lead to a significant fraction of catalytic activity, apparently independent of the type of secondary structure of the surrounding protein environment. We are now in a position to begin to meet the challenge of building a metalloenzyme systematically from the bottom-up by engineering and analyzing interactions directly around the metal site and beyond.

  14. Metal substitution in the active site of nitrogenase MFe(7)S(9) (M = Mo(4+), V(3+), Fe(3+)).

    PubMed

    Lovell, Timothy; Torres, Rhonda A; Han, Wen-Ge; Liu, Tiqing; Case, David A; Noodleman, Louis

    2002-11-01

    The unifying view that molybdenum is the essential component in nitrogenase has changed over the past few years with the discovery of a vanadium-containing nitrogenase and an iron-only nitrogenase. The principal question that has arisen for the alternative nitrogenases concerns the structures of their corresponding cofactors and their metal-ion valence assignments and whether there are significant differences with that of the more widely known molybdenum-iron cofactor (FeMoco). Spin-polarized broken-symmetry (BS) density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to assess which of the two possible metal-ion valence assignments (4Fe(2+)4Fe(3+) or 6Fe(2+)2Fe(3+)) for the iron-only cofactor (FeFeco) best represents the resting state. For the 6Fe(2+)2Fe(3+) oxidation state, the spin coupling pattern for several spin state alignments compatible with S = 0 were generated and assessed by energy criteria. The most likely BS spin state is composed of a 4Fe cluster with spin S(a) = (7)/(2) antiferromagnetically coupled to a 4Fe' cluster with spin S(b) = (7)/(2). This state has the lowest DFT energy for the isolated FeFeco cluster and displays calculated Mössbauer isomer shifts consistent with experiment. Although the S = 0 resting state of FeFeco has recently been proposed to have metal-ion valencies of 4Fe(2+)4Fe(3+) (derived from experimental Mössbauer isomer shifts), our isomer shift calculations for the 4Fe(2+)4Fe(3+) oxidation state are in poorer agreement with experiment. Using the Mo(4+)6Fe(2+)Fe(3+) oxidation level of the cofactor as a starting point, the structural consequences of replacement of molybdenum (Mo(4+)) with vanadium (V(3+)) or iron (Fe(3+)) in the cofactor have been investigated. The size of the cofactor cluster shows a dependency on the nature of the heterometal and increases in the order FeMoco < FeVco < FeFeco.

  15. Postsynthetic Metal and Ligand Exchange in MFU-4l: A Screening Approach toward Functional Metal-Organic Frameworks Comprising Single-Site Active Centers.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2015-05-26

    The isomorphous partial substitution of Zn(2+) ions in the secondary building unit (SBU) of MFU-4l leads to frameworks with the general formula [M(x)Zn(5-x)Cl4(BTDD)3], in which x≈2, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), or Cu(II), and BTDD = bis(1,2,3-triazolato-[4,5-b],[4',5'-i])dibenzo-[1,4]-dioxin. Subsequent exchange of chloride ligands by nitrite, nitrate, triflate, azide, isocyanate, formate, acetate, or fluoride leads to a variety of MFU-4l derivatives, which have been characterized by using XRPD, EDX, IR, UV/Vis-NIR, TGA, and gas sorption measurements. Several MFU-4l derivatives show high catalytic activity in a liquid-phase oxidation of ethylbenzene to acetophenone with air under mild conditions, among which Co- and Cu derivatives with chloride side-ligands are the most active catalysts. Upon thermal treatment, several side-ligands can be transformed selectively into reactive intermediates without destroying the framework. Thus, at 300 °C, Co(II)-azide units in the SBU of Co-MFU-4l are converted into Co(II)-isocyanate under continuous CO gas flow, involving the formation of a nitrene intermediate. The reaction of Cu(II)-fluoride units with H2 at 240 °C leads to Cu(I) and proceeds through the heterolytic cleavage of the H2 molecule.

  16. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N'-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs. PMID:27431731

  17. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N′-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs. PMID:27431731

  18. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N‧-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs.

  19. Contaminated scrap-metal inventories at ORO-managed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Radioactively contaminated scrap metal inventories were surveyed at facilities operating under contract with the US Department of Energy and managed through the Oak Ridge Operations Office. Nearly 90,000 tons of nickel, aluminum, copper, and ferrous metals (steels) contaminated with low-enriched uranium have accumulated, primarily at the uranium enrichment facilities. The potential value of this metal on the scrap market is over $100 million. However, existing regulations do not permit sale for unlicensed use of materials contaminated with low-enriched uranium. Therefore, current handling practices include burial and above-ground storage. Smelting is also used for shape declassification, with subsequent storage of ingots. This survey of existing inventories, generation rates, and handling capabilities is part of an overall metal waste management program to coordinate related activities among the ORO-managed sites.

  20. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  1. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  2. Triphenylamine-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Cathode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries with Coexistence of Redox Active Sites, High Working Voltage, and High Rate Stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhe; Yi, Xiaohui; Liu, Zixuan; Shang, Jie; Wang, Deyu

    2016-06-15

    Through rational organization of two redox active building block, a triphenylamine-based metal-organic framework (MOF) material, Cu-TCA (H3TCA = tricarboxytriphenyl amine), was synthesized and applied as a cathode active material for the first time in lithium batteries. Cu-TCA exhibited redox activity both in the metal clusters (Cu(+)/Cu(2+)) and organic ligand radicals (N/N(+)) with separated voltage plateaus and a high working potential vs Li/Li(+) up to 4.3 V, comparing with the current commercial LiCoO2 cathode materials. The electrochemical behaviors of this MOF electrode material at different states of charge were carefully studied by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence techniques. Long cycling stability of this MOF was achieved with an average Coulombic efficiency of 96.5% for 200 cycles at a 2 C rate. Discussing the electrochemical performances on the basis of capacity contributions from the metal clusters (Cu(+)/Cu(2+)) and organic ligands (N/N(+)) proposes an alternative mechanism of capacity loss for the MOF materials used in lithium batteries. This improved understanding will shed light on the designing principle of MOF-based cathode materials for their practical application in battery sciences. PMID:27225327

  3. MetalS(3), a database-mining tool for the identification of structurally similar metal sites.

    PubMed

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a database search tool to identify metal sites having structural similarity to a query metal site structure within the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) contained in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such a local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. The database search tool, which we called MetalS(3) (Metal Sites Similarity Search), can be accessed through a Web interface at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals3/ . MetalS(3) uses a suitably adapted version of an algorithm that we previously developed to systematically compare the structure of the query metal site with each MFS in MetalPDB. For each MFS, the best superposition is kept. All these superpositions are then ranked according to the MetalS(3) scoring function and are presented to the user in tabular form. The user can interact with the output Web page to visualize the structural alignment or the sequence alignment derived from it. Options to filter the results are available. Test calculations show that the MetalS(3) output correlates well with expectations from protein homology considerations. Furthermore, we describe some usage scenarios that highlight the usefulness of MetalS(3) to obtain mechanistic and functional hints regardless of homology.

  4. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL. PMID:26820485

  5. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  6. Crystal structure of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and its complex with true substrate D-fructose: a pivotal role of metal in catalysis, an active site for the non-phosphorylated substrate, and its conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun; Cha, Sun-Shin; Rhee, Sangkee

    2006-09-01

    D-psicose, a rare sugar produced by the enzymatic reaction of D-tagatose 3-epimerase (DTEase), has been used extensively for the bioproduction of various rare carbohydrates. Recently characterized D-psicose 3-epimerase (DPEase) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found to belong to the DTEase family and to catalyze the interconversion of D-fructose and D-psicose by epimerizing the C-3 position, with marked efficiency for D-psicose. The crystal structures of DPEase and its complex with the true substrate D-fructose were determined; DPEase is a tetramer and each monomer belongs to a TIM-barrel fold. The active site in each subunit is distinct from that of other TIM-barrel enzymes, which use phosphorylated ligands as the substrate. It contains a metal ion with octahedral coordination to two water molecules and four residues that are absolutely conserved across the DTEase family. Upon binding of D-fructose, the substrate displaces water molecules in the active site, with a conformation mimicking the intermediate cis-enediolate. Subsequently, Trp112 and Pro113 in the beta4-alpha4 loop undergo significant structural changes, sealing off the active site. Structural evidence and site-directed mutagenesis of the putative catalytic residues suggest that the metal ion plays a pivotal role in catalysis by anchoring the bound D-fructose, and Glu150 and Glu244 carry out an epimerization reaction at the C-3 position.

  7. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  8. Reaction mechanism of the epsilon subunit of E. coli DNA polymerase III: insights into active site metal coordination and catalytically significant residues.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Perera, Lalith; Schaaper, Roel M; Pedersen, Lars C; London, Robert E; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2009-02-01

    The 28 kDa epsilon subunit of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is the exonucleotidic proofreader responsible for editing polymerase insertion errors. Here, we study the mechanism by which epsilon carries out the exonuclease activity. We performed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations on the N-terminal domain containing the exonuclease activity. Both the free-epsilon and a complex epsilon bound to a theta homologue (HOT) were studied. For the epsilon-HOT complex Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) were investigated as the essential divalent metal cofactors, while only Mg(2+) was used for free-epsilon. In all calculations a water molecule bound to the catalytic metal acts as the nucleophile for hydrolysis of the phosphate bond. Initially, a direct proton transfer to H162 is observed. Subsequently, the nucleophilic attack takes place followed by a second proton transfer to E14. Our results show that the reaction catalyzed with Mn(2+) is faster than that with Mg(2+), in agreement with experiment. In addition, the epsilon-HOT complex shows a slightly lower energy barrier compared to free-epsilon. In all cases the catalytic metal is observed to be pentacoordinated. Charge and frontier orbital analyses suggest that charge transfer may stabilize the pentacoordination. Energy decomposition analysis to study the contribution of each residue to catalysis suggests that there are several important residues. Among these, H98, D103, D129, and D146 have been implicated in catalysis by mutagenesis studies. Some of these residues were found to be structurally conserved on human TREX1, the exonuclease domains from E. coli DNA-Pol I, and the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage RB69.

  9. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Studying Activity Series of Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Tien-Ghun; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies that illustrate the linking together of numerous chemical concepts involving the activity of metals (quantitative analysis, corrosion, and electrolysis) through the use of deep-level processing strategies. Concludes that making explicit links in the process of teaching chemistry can lead effectively to meaningful…

  11. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  12. Single-Site Cobalt Catalysts at New Zr8(μ2-O)8(μ2-OH)4 Metal-Organic Framework Nodes for Highly Active Hydrogenation of Alkenes, Imines, Carbonyls, and Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pengfei; Manna, Kuntal; Lin, Zekai; Urban, Ania; Greene, Francis X; Lan, Guangxu; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-09-21

    We report here the synthesis of robust and porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), M-MTBC (M = Zr or Hf), constructed from the tetrahedral linker methane-tetrakis(p-biphenylcarboxylate) (MTBC) and two types of secondary building units (SBUs): cubic M8(μ2-O)8(μ2-OH)4 and octahedral M6(μ3-O)4(μ3-OH)4. While the M6-SBU is isostructural with the 12-connected octahedral SBUs of UiO-type MOFs, the M8-SBU is composed of eight M(IV) ions in a cubic fashion linked by eight μ2-oxo and four μ2-OH groups. The metalation of Zr-MTBC SBUs with CoCl2, followed by treatment with NaBEt3H, afforded highly active and reusable solid Zr-MTBC-CoH catalysts for the hydrogenation of alkenes, imines, carbonyls, and heterocycles. Zr-MTBC-CoH was impressively tolerant of a range of functional groups and displayed high activity in the hydrogenation of tri- and tetra-substituted alkenes with TON > 8000 for the hydrogenation of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene. Our structural and spectroscopic studies show that site isolation of and open environments around the cobalt-hydride catalytic species at Zr8-SBUs are responsible for high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of a wide range of challenging substrates. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for discovering and studying new single-site base-metal solid catalysts with enormous potential for sustainable chemical synthesis. PMID:27598720

  13. Evaluation of the metal binding sites in a recombinant coagulation factor VIII identifies two sites with unique metal binding properties.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lars Anders; Thim, Lars; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted; Nicolaisen, Else Marie

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation factor VIII is a glycosylated, non-covalent heterodimer consisting of a heavy chain (A1-A2-B domains) and a light chain (A3-C1-C2 domains). The association of the chains, and the stability and function of the dimer depend on the presence of metal ions. We applied X-ray fluorescence, X-ray crystallographic structure determination with anomalous signals at different wavelengths, and colorimetric measurements to evaluate the metal binding sites in a recombinant factor VIII molecule, turoctocog alfa. We identified a metal binding site in domain A3 dominated by Cu(+) binding and a site in domain A1 dominated by Zn(2+) binding.

  14. Earliest evidence of pollution by heavy metals in archaeological sites.

    PubMed

    Monge, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J; García-Alix, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Mattielli, Nadine; Finlayson, Clive; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Sánchez, Miguel Cortés; de Castro, Jose María Bermúdez; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; Carrión, José; Rodríguez-Vidal, Joaquín; Finlayson, Geraldine

    2015-09-21

    Homo species were exposed to a new biogeochemical environment when they began to occupy caves. Here we report the first evidence of palaeopollution through geochemical analyses of heavy metals in four renowned archaeological caves of the Iberian Peninsula spanning the last million years of human evolution. Heavy metal contents reached high values due to natural (guano deposition) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. combustion) in restricted cave environments. The earliest anthropogenic pollution evidence is related to Neanderthal hearths from Gorham's Cave (Gibraltar), being one of the first milestones in the so-called "Anthropocene". According to its heavy metal concentration, these sediments meet the present-day standards of "contaminated soil". Together with the former, the Gibraltar Vanguard Cave, shows Zn and Cu pollution ubiquitous across highly anthropic levels pointing to these elements as potential proxies for human activities. Pb concentrations in Magdalenian and Bronze age levels at El Pirulejo site can be similarly interpreted. Despite these high pollution levels, the contaminated soils might not have posed a major threat to Homo populations. Altogether, the data presented here indicate a long-term exposure of Homo to these elements, via fires, fumes and their ashes, which could have played certain role in environmental-pollution tolerance, a hitherto neglected influence.

  15. Earliest evidence of pollution by heavy metals in archaeological sites.

    PubMed

    Monge, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J; García-Alix, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Mattielli, Nadine; Finlayson, Clive; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Sánchez, Miguel Cortés; de Castro, Jose María Bermúdez; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; Carrión, José; Rodríguez-Vidal, Joaquín; Finlayson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Homo species were exposed to a new biogeochemical environment when they began to occupy caves. Here we report the first evidence of palaeopollution through geochemical analyses of heavy metals in four renowned archaeological caves of the Iberian Peninsula spanning the last million years of human evolution. Heavy metal contents reached high values due to natural (guano deposition) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. combustion) in restricted cave environments. The earliest anthropogenic pollution evidence is related to Neanderthal hearths from Gorham's Cave (Gibraltar), being one of the first milestones in the so-called "Anthropocene". According to its heavy metal concentration, these sediments meet the present-day standards of "contaminated soil". Together with the former, the Gibraltar Vanguard Cave, shows Zn and Cu pollution ubiquitous across highly anthropic levels pointing to these elements as potential proxies for human activities. Pb concentrations in Magdalenian and Bronze age levels at El Pirulejo site can be similarly interpreted. Despite these high pollution levels, the contaminated soils might not have posed a major threat to Homo populations. Altogether, the data presented here indicate a long-term exposure of Homo to these elements, via fires, fumes and their ashes, which could have played certain role in environmental-pollution tolerance, a hitherto neglected influence. PMID:26388184

  16. Earliest evidence of pollution by heavy metals in archaeological sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; García-Alix, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Mattielli, Nadine; Finlayson, Clive; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Sánchez, Miguel Cortés; de Castro, Jose María Bermúdez; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; Carrión, José; Rodríguez-Vidal, Joaquín; Finlayson, Geraldine

    2015-09-01

    Homo species were exposed to a new biogeochemical environment when they began to occupy caves. Here we report the first evidence of palaeopollution through geochemical analyses of heavy metals in four renowned archaeological caves of the Iberian Peninsula spanning the last million years of human evolution. Heavy metal contents reached high values due to natural (guano deposition) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. combustion) in restricted cave environments. The earliest anthropogenic pollution evidence is related to Neanderthal hearths from Gorham's Cave (Gibraltar), being one of the first milestones in the so-called “Anthropocene”. According to its heavy metal concentration, these sediments meet the present-day standards of “contaminated soil”. Together with the former, the Gibraltar Vanguard Cave, shows Zn and Cu pollution ubiquitous across highly anthropic levels pointing to these elements as potential proxies for human activities. Pb concentrations in Magdalenian and Bronze age levels at El Pirulejo site can be similarly interpreted. Despite these high pollution levels, the contaminated soils might not have posed a major threat to Homo populations. Altogether, the data presented here indicate a long-term exposure of Homo to these elements, via fires, fumes and their ashes, which could have played certain role in environmental-pollution tolerance, a hitherto neglected influence.

  17. Earliest evidence of pollution by heavy metals in archaeological sites

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; García-Alix, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Mattielli, Nadine; Finlayson, Clive; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Sánchez, Miguel Cortés; de Castro, Jose María Bermúdez; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; Carrión, José; Rodríguez-Vidal, Joaquín; Finlayson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Homo species were exposed to a new biogeochemical environment when they began to occupy caves. Here we report the first evidence of palaeopollution through geochemical analyses of heavy metals in four renowned archaeological caves of the Iberian Peninsula spanning the last million years of human evolution. Heavy metal contents reached high values due to natural (guano deposition) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. combustion) in restricted cave environments. The earliest anthropogenic pollution evidence is related to Neanderthal hearths from Gorham's Cave (Gibraltar), being one of the first milestones in the so-called “Anthropocene”. According to its heavy metal concentration, these sediments meet the present-day standards of “contaminated soil”. Together with the former, the Gibraltar Vanguard Cave, shows Zn and Cu pollution ubiquitous across highly anthropic levels pointing to these elements as potential proxies for human activities. Pb concentrations in Magdalenian and Bronze age levels at El Pirulejo site can be similarly interpreted. Despite these high pollution levels, the contaminated soils might not have posed a major threat to Homo populations. Altogether, the data presented here indicate a long-term exposure of Homo to these elements, via fires, fumes and their ashes, which could have played certain role in environmental-pollution tolerance, a hitherto neglected influence. PMID:26388184

  18. Association constants of Pb2+ with binding sites of fungal biomass using metal-based titrations.

    PubMed

    Naja, G; Mustin, C; Volesky, B; Berthelin, J

    2006-01-01

    Biosorption is perceived as an alternative method for toxic heavy metal removal/recovery from aqueous effluents. This work focused on derivation of some key quantitative physico-chemical characteristics of a representative biosorbent material required for its further effective exploitation. The newly developed acid-base and metal-based titrator allowed the characterization of the chemisorption active sites of Rhizopus arrhizus biomass and the study of their metal affinity. This experimental approach, combined with an analytical method consisting of transforming the initial data enabled the calculation of the number and capacity of the reactive sites (Qads) and the metal affinity constants (Km) for lead sorption by R. arrhizus biomass. The pKm values for Rhizopus biomass varied between -3 and -6 for sites releasing no protons, -1 and 1 for sites releasing one proton, and > 8 for sites releasing two protons - combined with the Pb precipitation phenomenon. At low temperatures, the active binding site number was lower at lower lead concentrations whereas the precipitation was promoted at higher lead concentration values. Lead adsorption contributed modestly (11%) to its overall uptake and occurred at low lead concentrations onto strong and medium affinity binding sites. Micro-precipitation quickly commenced around active binding sites distinguished by their weak affinity whenever the solution lead concentrations reached 10(-6) or 10(-5) M and represented more than 85% of the total sorbed metal quantity. The work also demonstrated the usefulnes of the methodology reported here for characterizing complex biosorbent materials.

  19. FTIR studies of metal ligands, networks of hydrogen bonds, and water molecules near the active site Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Debus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic conversion of water to molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in Photosystem II and provides nearly our entire supply of atmospheric oxygen. The Mn₄CaO₅ cluster accumulates oxidizing equivalents in response to light-driven photochemical events within Photosystem II and then oxidizes two molecules of water to oxygen. The Mn₄CaO₅ cluster converts water to oxygen much more efficiently than any synthetic catalyst because its protein environment carefully controls the cluster's reactivity at each step in its catalytic cycle. This control is achieved by precise choreography of the proton and electron transfer reactions associated with water oxidation and by careful management of substrate (water) access and proton egress. This review describes the FTIR studies undertaken over the past two decades to identify the amino acid residues that are responsible for this control and to determine the role of each. In particular, this review describes the FTIR studies undertaken to characterize the influence of the cluster's metal ligands on its activity, to delineate the proton egress pathways that link the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster with the thylakoid lumen, and to characterize the influence of specific residues on the water molecules that serve as substrate or as participants in the networks of hydrogen bonds that make up the water access and proton egress pathways. This information will improve our understanding of water oxidation by the Mn₄CaO₅ catalyst in Photosystem II and will provide insight into the design of new generations of synthetic catalysts that convert sunlight into useful forms of storable energy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25038513

  20. The Use of Molecular and Genomic Techniques Applied to Microbial Diversity, Community Structure, and Activities at DNAPL and Metal Contaminated Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of in situ subsurface remediation strategies have been developed to mitigate contamination by chlorinated solvent dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) and metals. Geochemical methods include: zerovalent iron emplacement, various electrolytic applications, elec...

  1. Metal-ion rescue revisited: biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4-P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure.

  2. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  3. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  4. METAL ATTENUATION PROCESSES AT MINING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Issue Paper is to provide scientists and engineers responsible for assessing remediation technologies with background information on MNA processes at mining-impacted sites. The global magnitude of the acid drainage problem is clear evidence that in most cases...

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings -- Part 4. Evaluation of the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS) for On-site Destruction of PCBs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the fourth, also the last, report of the report series entitled “Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings.” This report evaluates the performance of an on-site PCB destruction method, known as the AMTS method, developed ...

  7. Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings -- Part 4. Evaluation of the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS) for On-site Destruction of PCBs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the fourth, also the last, report of the report series entitled “Laboratory Study of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contamination and Mitigation in Buildings.” This report evaluates the performance of an on-site PCB destruction method, known as the AMTS method...

  8. Toward "metalloMOFzymes": Metal-Organic Frameworks with Single-Site Metal Catalysts for Small-Molecule Transformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth M; Zhang, Zhenjie; Boissonnault, Jake A

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are being increasingly studied as scaffolds and supports for catalysis. The solid-state structures of MOFs, combined with their high porosity, suggest that MOFs may possess advantages shared by both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts, with few of the shortcomings of either. Herein, efforts to create single-site catalytic metal centers appended to the organic ligand struts of MOFs will be discussed. Reactions important for advanced energy applications, such as H2 production and CO2 reduction, will be highlighted. Examining how these active sites can be introduced, their performance, and their existing limitations should provide direction for design of the next generation of MOF-based catalysts for energy-relevant, small-molecule transformations. Finally, the introduction of second-sphere interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding via squaramide groups) as a possible route to enhancing the activity of these metal centers is reported. PMID:27231968

  9. Evaluating three trace metal contaminated sites: a field and laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Murray, P; Ge, Y; Hendershot, W H

    2000-01-01

    Selecting guidelines to evaluate elevated metals in urban brownfields is hindered by the lack of information for these sites on ecosystem structure and function. A study was performed to compare three trace metal-contaminated sites in the metropolitan Montreal area. The goal was to obtain an idea of the organisms that may be present on urban brownfields and to measure if elevated metals alter the presence and activity of the indigenous biota. Field and laboratory studies were conducted using simple methodologies to determine the extent to which microbial activity affected by trace metal content, to assess diversity of plant and soil invertebrate communities and to measure phytoaccumulation of trace metals. It was found that microbial activity, as measured by substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and nitrification, was not affected by the levels of soil Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn recorded on the sites. Seven of the 12 invertebrate groups collected were sampled on soils with similar Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations. Diversity of plant species increased as a function of the length of time the sites had been inactive. Levels of metals in plant tissue were influenced by soil characteristics and not by total soil Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications. PMID:25280707

  11. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment. PMID:27077538

  12. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment.

  13. Metal site occupancy and allosteric switching in bacterial metal sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P.

    2012-01-01

    All prokaryotes encode a panel of metal sensor or metalloregulatory proteins that govern the expression of genes that allows an organism to quickly adapt to toxicity or deprivation of both biologically essential transition metal ions, e.g., Zn, Cu, Fe, and heavy metal pollutants. As such, metal sensor proteins can be considered arbiters of intracellular transition metal bioavailability and thus potentially control the metallation state of the metalloproteins in the cell. Metal sensor proteins are specialized allosteric proteins that regulate transcription as a result direct binding of one or two cognate metal ions, to the exclusion of all others. In most cases, the binding of the cognate metal ion induces a structural change in a protein oligomer that either activates or inhibits operator DNA binding. A quantitative measure of the degree to which a particular metal drives metalloregulation of operator DNA-binding is the allosteric coupling free energy, ΔGc. In this review, we summarize recent work directed toward understanding metal occupancy and metal selectivity of these allosteric switches in selected families of metal sensor proteins and examine the structural origins of ΔGc in the functional context a thermodynamic “set-point” model of intracellular metal homeostasis. PMID:22178748

  14. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  15. Heavy metal contamination of soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site: implications for dissemination of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihang; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Geng, Xinhua; Chen, Shejun; Huang, Xuexia; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Zhuying; Zhu, Libin; Chen, Jiahao; Lu, Yayin

    2015-02-15

    Illegal e-waste recycling activity has caused heavy metal pollution in many developing countries, including China. In recent years, the Chinese government has strengthened enforcement to impede such activity; however, the heavy metals remaining in the abandoned e-waste recycling site can still pose ecological risk. The present study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site in Longtang, South China. Results showed that the surface soil of the former burning and acid-leaching sites was still heavily contaminated with Cd (>0.39 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (>1981 mg kg(-1)), which exceeded their respective guideline levels. The concentration of heavy metals generally decreased with depth in both burning site and paddy field, which is related to the elevated pH and reduced TOM along the depth gradient. The pond water was seriously acidified and contaminated with heavy metals, while the well water was slightly contaminated since heavy metals were mostly retained in the surface soil. The use of pond water for irrigation resulted in considerable heavy metal contamination in the paddy soil. Compared with previous studies, the reduced heavy metal concentrations in the surface soil imply that heavy metals were transported to the other areas, such as pond. Therefore, immediate remediation of the contaminated soil and water is necessary to prevent dissemination of heavy metals and potential ecological disaster.

  16. Functional Identification of Catalytic Metal Ion Binding Sites within RNA

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s). In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC) that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis. PMID:16092891

  17. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  18. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  19. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  20. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  1. The metal binding site of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease. A spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Urbani, A; Bazzo, R; Nardi, M C; Cicero, D O; De Francesco, R; Steinkühler, C; Barbato, G

    1998-07-24

    The NS3 region of the hepatitis C virus encodes for a serine protease activity, which is necessary for the processing of the nonstructural region of the viral polyprotein. The minimal domain with proteolytic activity resides in the N terminus, where a structural tetradentate zinc binding site is located. The ligands being been identified by x-ray crystallography as being three cysteines (Cys97, Cys99, and Cys145) and one histidine residue (His149), which is postulated to coordinate the metal through a water molecule. In this article, we present an analysis of the role of metal coordination with respect to enzyme activity and folding. Using NMR spectroscopy, the resonances of His149 were assigned based on their isotropic shift in a Co(II)-substituted protein. Data obtained with 15N-labeled NS3 protease were compatible with the involvement of the delta-N of His149 in metal coordination. pH titration experiments showed that the cooperative association of at least two protons is required in the protonation process of His149. Changes in the NMR signals of this residue between pH 7 and 5 are interpreted as evidence for a structural change at the metal binding site, which switches from a "closed" to an "open" conformation. Site-directed mutagenesis of His149 has shown the importance of this residue in the metal incorporation pathway and for achieving an active fold. The metal coordination of the protease was also investigated by circular dichroism and electronic absorption spectroscopies using a Co(II)-substituted enzyme. We show evidence for rearrangements of the metal coordination geometry induced by complex formation with an NS4A peptide cofactor. No such changes were observed upon binding to a substrate peptide. Also, CN- and N3- induced Co(II) ligand field perturbations, which went along with an 1.5-fold enhancement of protease activity.

  2. Aquatic snails from mining sites have evolved to detect and avoid heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, H; Abbott, D P; Cleary, D A; Howell, E; Keller, N C; Smith, M M

    2004-05-01

    Toxicants in polluted environments are often patchily distributed. Hence, rather than being passive absorbers of pollution, some organisms have evolved the ability to detect and avoid toxicants. We studied the avoidance behavior of Physella columbiana, an aquatic pulmonate snail, in a pond that has been polluted with heavy metals for more than 120 years. Populations of this snail are rare at reference sites and are only robust at heavy-metal-polluted sites. We hypothesized that the snails are able to persist because they have evolved the ability to minimize their exposure to metals by actively avoiding metals in their environment. Using a Y-maze flow tank, we tested the avoidance behavior of snails to heavy-metal-polluted sediments and single-metal solutions of cadmium, zinc, or lead. We also tested the avoidance behaviors of the snails' laboratory-reared offspring raised in nonpolluted conditions. In addition, we tested the avoidance behavior of a small population of snails from a reference pond. Although all the snails we tested were able to detect low concentrations of heavy metals, we found that snails from the polluted site were the most sensitive, that their offspring were somewhat less sensitive, and that snails from the reference site were the least sensitive. This suggests that the ability of polluted-site snails to avoid heavy metals is both genetic and environmental. The concentrations of metals avoided by the snails from the polluted site were below the levels found at hot spots within their natal pond. The snails may be able to persist at this site because they decrease their exposure by moving to less-polluted sections of the pond. One application of our findings is the use of aquatic snails and our Y-maze design as an inexpensive pollution detector. Environmental pollutants such as lead, zinc, and arsenic are a problem throughout the world. People in underdeveloped countries often lack sophisticated pollution detection devices. We have developed a

  3. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  4. Sites of mineral deposition in metal-accumulating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.Z.; Simkiss, K.

    1982-06-01

    The basophil cells of the hepatopancrease of gastropods containing intracellular granules, which act as the sites of accumulation or detoxification of environmentally available metals, are discissed. A technique is described which results in the loss of these concretions and allows an ultrastructural study of their formation. Manganese ions are used as a probe for this mineralization process which is shown to occur on the inner surface of a vesicular membrane.

  5. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  6. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  7. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  8. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  9. Microbial characterization of a radionuclide- and metal-contaminated waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Lumppio, H.L.; Ainsworth, C.C.; Plymale, A.E.

    1993-04-01

    The operation of nuclear processing facilities and defense-related nuclear activities has resulted in contamination of near-surface and deep-subsurface sediments with both radionuclides and metals. The presence of mixed inorganic contaminants may result in undetectable microbial populations or microbial populations that are different from those present in uncontaminated sediments. To determine the impact of mixed radionuclide and metal contaminants on sediment microbial communities, we sampled a processing pond that was used from 1948 to 1975 for the disposal of radioactive and metal-contaminated wastewaters from laboratories and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities on the Hanford Site in Washington State. Because the Hanford Site is located in a semiarid environment with average rainfall of 159 mm/year, the pond dried and a settling basin remained after wastewater input into the pond ceased in 1975. This processing pond basin offered a unique opportunity to obtain near-surface sediments that had been contaminated with both radionuclides and metals for several decades. Our objectives were to determine the viable populations of microorganisms in the sediments and to test several hypotheses about how the addition of both radionuclides and metals influenced the microbial ecology of the sediments. Our first hypothesis was that viable populations of microorganisms would be lower in the more contaminated sediments. Second, we expected that long-term metal exposure would result in enhanced metal resistance. Finally, we hypothesized that microorganisms from the most radioactive sediments should have had enhanced radiation resistance.

  10. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  11. Highly dynamic metal exchange in anthrax lethal factor involves the occupation of an inhibitory metal binding site.

    PubMed

    Young, Calvin J; Siemann, Stefan

    2016-10-11

    Metal exchange is a common strategy to replace the zinc ion of many zinc proteins with other transition metals amenable to spectroscopic investigations. We here demonstrate that in anthrax lethal factor (and likely other zinc proteases), metal exchange is a fast process, and involves the occupation of an inhibitory metal site by the incoming ion prior to the release of zinc. PMID:27517100

  12. Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

    2012-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

  13. Hydrogen storage in microporous metal-organic frameworks with exposed metal sites.

    PubMed

    Dincă, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    Owing to their high uptake capacity at low temperature and excellent reversibility kinetics, metal-organic frameworks have attracted considerable attention as potential solid-state hydrogen storage materials. In the last few years, researchers have also identified several strategies for increasing the affinity of these materials towards hydrogen, among which the binding of H(2) to unsaturated metal centers is one of the most promising. Herein, we review the synthetic approaches employed thus far for producing frameworks with exposed metal sites, and summarize the hydrogen uptake capacities and binding energies in these materials. In addition, results from experiments that were used to probe independently the metal-hydrogen interaction in selected materials will be discussed.

  14. The metal-binding sites of glycose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gilg, Kathrin; Mayer, Tobias; Ghaschghaie, Natascha; Klüfers, Peter

    2009-10-14

    In aqueous solution, the reducing sugar phosphates D-arabinose 5-phosphate, D-ribose 5-phosphate, D-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, D-fructose 6-phosphate, D-glucose 6-phosphate and D-mannose 6-phosphate provide metal-binding sites at their glycose core on reaction with Pd(II)(en) or M(III)(tacn) residues (M = Ga, Co; en = ethylenediamine, tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane). The individual species were detected by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The coordination patterns are related to the metal-binding modes of the respective parent glycoses. In detail, ribo- and arabinofuranose phosphate favour kappaO(1,3) coordination, whereas the ketofuranose core of fructose phosphate and fructose bisphosphate provides the kappaO(2,3) chelator thus maintaining the configuration of the respective major solution anomer. On palladium excess, D-fructose 6-phosphate is metallated twice in a unique kappaO(1,3):kappaO(2,4) metallation pattern. Dimetallation is also found for the aldohexose phosphates. A mixed glycose-core-phosphate chelation was detected for Pd(II)(en) and M(III)(tacn) residues with M = Al, Ga in the pH range just above the physiological pH for the D-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate ligand. The results are discussed in relation to D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate-metabolism in class-II aldolases. PMID:19771356

  15. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  16. Comparison of Methods to Obtain Force-Field Parameters for Metal Sites.

    PubMed

    Hu, LiHong; Ryde, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    We have critically examined and compared various ways to obtain standard harmonic molecular mechanics (MM) force-field parameters for metal sites in proteins, using the 12 most common Zn(2+) sites as test cases. We show that the parametrization of metal sites is hard to treat with automatic methods. The choice of method is a compromise between speed and accuracy and therefore depends on the intended use of the parameters. If the metal site is not of central interest in the investigation, for example, a structural metal far from the active site, a simple and fast parametrization is normally enough, using either a nonbonded model with restraints or a bonded parametrization based on the method of Seminario. On the other hand, if the metal site is of central interest in the investigation, a more accurate method is needed to give quantitative results, for example, the method by Norrby and Liljefors. The former methods are semiautomatic and can be performed in seconds, once a quantum mechanical (QM) geometry optimization and frequency calculation has been performed, whereas the latter method typically takes several days and requires significant human intervention. All approaches require a careful selection of the atom types used. For a nonbonded model, standard atom types can be used, whereas for a bonded model, it is normally wise to use special atom types for each metal ligand. For accurate results, new atom types for all atoms in the metal site can be used. Atomic charges should also be considered. Typically, QM restrained electrostatic potential charges are accurate and easy to obtain once the QM calculation is performed, and they allow for charge transfer within the complex. For negatively charged complexes, it should be checked that hydrogen atoms of the ligands get proper charges. Finally, water ligands pose severe problems for bonded models in force fields that ignore nonbonded interactions for atoms separated by two bonds. Complexes with a single water ligand

  17. Characterizing multiple metal ion binding sites within a ribozyme by cadmium-induced EPR silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Natalia; Kraut, Stefanie; Jäschke, Andres; Schiemann, Olav

    2007-01-01

    In ribozyme catalysis, metal ions are generally known to make structural and∕or mechanistic contributions. The catalytic activity of a previously described Diels-Alderase ribozyme was found to depend on the concentration of divalent metal ions, and crystallographic data revealed multiple binding sites. Here, we elucidate the interactions of this ribozyme with divalent metal ions in solution using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese ion titrations revealed five high-affinity Mn2+ binding sites with an upper Kd of 0.6±0.2 μM. In order to characterize each binding site individually, EPR-silent Cd2+ ions were used to saturate the other binding sites. This cadmium-induced EPR silencing showed that the Mn2+ binding sites possess different affinities. In addition, these binding sites could be assigned to three different types, including innersphere, outersphere, and a Mn2+ dimer. Based on simulations, the Mn2+-Mn2+ distance within the dimer was found to be ∼6 Å, which is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The EPR-spectroscopic characterization reveals no structural changes upon addition of a Diels-Alder product, supporting the concept of a preorganized catalytic pocket in the Diels-Alder ribozyme and the structural role of these ions. PMID:19404418

  18. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  19. Use of (113)Cd NMR to probe the native metal binding sites in metalloproteins: an overview.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Ian M; Drakenberg, Torbjörn; Reilly, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratories have actively published in this area for several years and the objective of this chapter is to present as comprehensive an overview as possible. Following a brief review of the basic principles associated with (113)Cd NMR methods, we will present the results from a thorough literature search for (113)Cd chemical shifts from metalloproteins. The updated (113)Cd chemical shift figure in this chapter will further illustrate the excellent correlation of the (113)Cd chemical shift with the nature of the coordinating ligands (N, O, S) and coordination number/geometry, reaffirming how this method can be used not only to identify the nature of the protein ligands in uncharacterized cases but also the dynamics at the metal binding site. Specific examples will be drawn from studies on alkaline phosphatase, Ca(2+) binding proteins, and metallothioneins.In the case of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, a dimeric zinc metalloenzyme where a total of six metal ions (three per monomer) are involved directly or indirectly in providing the enzyme with maximal catalytic activity and structural stability, (113)Cd NMR, in conjunction with (13)C and (31)P NMR methods, were instrumental in separating out the function of each class of metal binding sites. Perhaps most importantly, these studies revealed the chemical basis for negative cooperativity that had been reported for this enzyme under metal deficient conditions. Also noteworthy was the fact that these NMR studies preceded the availability of the X-ray crystal structure.In the case of the calcium binding proteins, we will focus on two proteins: calbindin D(9k) and calmodulin. For calbindin D(9k) and its mutants, (113)Cd NMR has been useful both to follow actual changes in the metal binding sites and the cooperativity in the metal binding. Ligand binding to calmodulin has been studied extensively with (113)Cd NMR showing that the metal binding sites are not directly involved in the ligand binding. The (113)Cd

  20. The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Open Sites on Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Michael Mark

    Coordinatively unsaturated corner and edge atoms have been hypothesized to have the highest activity of sites responsible for many catalytic reactions on a metal surface. Recent studies have validated this hypothesis in varied reaction systems. However, quantification of different types of coordinatively unsaturated sites, and elucidation of their individual catalytic rates has remained a largely unresolved challenge when understanding catalysis on metal surfaces. Yet such structure-function knowledge would be invaluable to the design of more active and selective metal-surface catalysts in the future. I investigated the catalytic contributions of undercoordinated sites such as corner and edge atoms are investigated in a model reaction system using organic ligands bound to the gold nanoparticle surface. The catalyst consisted of 4 nm gold nanoparticles on a metal oxide support, using resazurin to resorufin as a model reaction system. My results demonstrate that in this system, corner atom sites are the most undercoordinated sites, and are over an order of magnitude more active when compared to undercoordinated edge atom sites, while terrace sites remain catalytically inactive for the reduction reaction of resazurin to resorufin. Catalytic activity has been also demonstrated for calixarene-bound gold nanoparticles using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. With the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction, a comparative study was undertaken to compare calixarene phosphine and calixarene thiol bound 4 nm gold particles. The results of the study suggested that a leached site was responsible for catalysis and not sites on the original gold nanoparticles. Future experiments with calixarene bound gold clusters could investigate ligand effects in reactions where the active site is not a leached or aggregated gold species, possibly in oxidation reactions, where electron-rich gold is hypothesized to be a good catalyst. The results that emphasize the enhanced catalytic activity of

  1. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content. PMID:24359584

  2. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content.

  3. Metal removal by thermally activated clay marl.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, R Y

    2001-01-01

    A sorption active product has been obtained from Bulgarian clay marl by thermal activation at 750 degrees C. The modified aluminosilicate material is characterized, as well as its use for the removal of metal ions. The effect of the initial metal ion concentration, the contact time, pH, the solution temperature and the ionic strength on the uptake of lead, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solutions were studied in batch experiments. The kinetics of removal of metal ions on modified clay marl appears dependent on the sorbate/sorbent ratio. At low cation concentrations sorption follows a Langmuir isotherm, while at higher sorbate/sorbent ratios the sorption isotherms of metal ions are described by Freundlich's equation. At the pH region of the sorption edge the removal of metal ions by surface complexation and surface precipitation mechanisms is indistinguishable. It is observed that the influence of temperature on the uptake ability of the clay marl is most considerable up to 40 degrees C. These studies show that the thermally modified clay marl can be successfully used for removal of metal ions from water solutions in a wide range of concentrations.

  4. Heavy Metals in the Vegetables Collected from Production Sites

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Hassan; Mosaferi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Contamination of vegetable crops (as an important part of people's diet) with heavy metals is a health concern. Therefore, monitoring levels of heavy metals in vegetables can provide useful information for promoting food safety. The present study was carried out in north-west of Iran (Tabriz) on the content of heavy metals in vegetable crops. Methods: Samples of vegetables including kurrat (n=20) (Allium ampeloprasumssp. Persicum), onion (n=20) (Allium cepa) and tomato (n=18) (Lycopersiconesculentum var. esculentum), were collected from production sites in west of Tabriz and analyzed for presence of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) after extraction by aqua regia method (drying, grounding and acid diges­tion). Results: Mean ± SD (mg/kg DW) concentrations of Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn were 0.32 ± 0.58, 28.86 ± 28.79, 1.75 ± 2.05, 6.37± 5.61 and 58.01 ± 27.45, respec­tively. Cr, Cu and Zn were present in all the samples and the highest concentra­tions were observed in kurrat (leek). Levels of Cd, Cr and Cu were higher than the acceptable limits. There was significant difference in levels of Cr (P<0.05) and Zn (P<0.001) among the studied vegetables. Positive correlation was observed be­tween Cd:Cu (R=0.659, P<0.001) Cr:Ni (R=0.326, P<0.05) and Cr:Zn (R=0.308, P<0.05).   Conclusion: Level of heavy metals in some of the analyzed vegetables, especially kurrat samples, was higher than the standard levels. Considering the possi­ble health outcomes due to the consumption of contaminated vegetables, it is re­quired to take proper actions for avoiding people's chronic exposure. PMID:24688968

  5. Cobalt(III), a probe of metal binding sites of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R A; Vallee, B L

    1975-01-01

    To facilitate the study of individual metal binding sites of polymeric metalloproteins, conversion of exchange-labile Co(II) in E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) to exchange-inert Co(III) was examined. Oxidation of Co(II) alkaline phosphatase with hydrogen peroxide results in a single absorption maximum at 530 nm and loss both of the characteristic electron paramagnetic signal and of enzymatic activity. Zinc neither reactivates this enzyme nor displaces the oxidized cobalt atoms. Metal and amino-acid analyses demonstrate that oxidation alters neither cobalt binding nor amino-acid composition of the enzyme. Al data are consistent with the conclusion that hydrogen peroxide oxidizes Co(II) in alkaline phosphatase to Co(III). Polymeric metalloenzymes can contain different categories of metal atoms serving in catalysis, structure stabilization, and/or control and exerting their effects independently or interdependently. The in situ conversion of exchange-labile Co(II) to exchange-stable (Co(III) offers a method to selectively and differentially "freeze" cobalt atoms at their respective binding sites. The accompanying spectral changes and concomitant retardation in ligand exchange reactions may be used to differentiate between specific metal binding sites that serve different roles in polymeric metalloenzymes. PMID:164026

  6. Ab initio carbon capture in open-site metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Dzubak, AL; Lin, LC; Kim, J; Swisher, JA; Poloni, R; Maximoff, SN; Smit, B; Gagliardi, L

    2012-08-19

    During the formation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal centres can coordinate with the intended organic linkers, but also with solvent molecules. In this case, subsequent activation by removal of the solvent molecules creates unsaturated 'open' metal sites known to have a strong affinity for CO2 molecules, but their interactions are still poorly understood. Common force fields typically underestimate by as much as two orders of magnitude the adsorption of CO2 in open-site Mg-MOF-74, which has emerged as a promising MOF for CO2 capture. Here we present a systematic procedure to generate force fields using high-level quantum chemical calculations. Monte Carlo simulations based on an ab initio force field generated for CO2 in Mg-MOF-74 shed some light on the interpretation of thermodynamic data from flue gas in this material. The force field describes accurately the chemistry of the open metal sites, and is transferable to other structures. This approach may serve in molecular simulations in general and in the study of fluid-solid interactions.

  7. Ab initio carbon capture in open-site metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dzubak, Allison L; Lin, Li-Chiang; Kim, Jihan; Swisher, Joseph A; Poloni, Roberta; Maximoff, Sergey N; Smit, Berend; Gagliardi, Laura

    2012-10-01

    During the formation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal centres can coordinate with the intended organic linkers, but also with solvent molecules. In this case, subsequent activation by removal of the solvent molecules creates unsaturated 'open' metal sites known to have a strong affinity for CO(2) molecules, but their interactions are still poorly understood. Common force fields typically underestimate by as much as two orders of magnitude the adsorption of CO(2) in open-site Mg-MOF-74, which has emerged as a promising MOF for CO(2) capture. Here we present a systematic procedure to generate force fields using high-level quantum chemical calculations. Monte Carlo simulations based on an ab initio force field generated for CO(2) in Mg-MOF-74 shed some light on the interpretation of thermodynamic data from flue gas in this material. The force field describes accurately the chemistry of the open metal sites, and is transferable to other structures. This approach may serve in molecular simulations in general and in the study of fluid-solid interactions.

  8. Release of Radioactive Scrap Metal/Scrap Metal (RSM/SM) at Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Company, Inc. (REECo) is the prime contractor to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in providing service and support for NTS operations. Mercury Base Camp is the main control point for the many forward areas at NTS, which covers 1,350 square miles. The forward areas are where above-ground and underground nuclear tests have been performed over the last 41 years. No metal (or other material) is returned to Mercury without first being tested for radioactivity. No radioactive metals are allowed to reenter Mercury from the forward areas, other than testing equipment. RAMATROL is the monitor check point. They check material in various ways, including swipe tests, and have a large assortment of equipment for testing. Scrap metal is also checked to address Resource Conservation and Recovery Act concerns. After addressing these issues, the scrap metals are categorized. Federal Property Management Regulations (FPMR) are followed by REECo. The nonradioactive scrap material is sold through the GSA on a scheduled basis. Radioactive scrap metal are presently held in forward areas where they were used. REECo has gained approval of their Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325 application, which will allow disposal on site, when RSM is declared a waste. The guideline that REECo uses for release limits is DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Works, Attachment 2, Surface Radioactivity Guides, of this order, give release limits for radioactive materials. However, the removal of radioactive materials from NTS require approval by DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) on a case-by-case basis. Requirements to consider before removal are found in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management.

  9. Self-Supporting Metal-Organic Layers as Single-Site Solid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingyun; Lin, Zekai; Peng, Fei; Wang, Weiwei; Huang, Ruiyun; Wang, Cheng; Yan, Jiawei; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Zhiming; Zhang, Teng; Long, Lasheng; Sun, Junliang; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-04-11

    Metal-organic layers (MOLs) represent an emerging class of tunable and functionalizable two-dimensional materials. In this work, the scalable solvothermal synthesis of self-supporting MOLs composed of [Hf6O4(OH)4(HCO2)6] secondary building units (SBUs) and benzene-1,3,5-tribenzoate (BTB) bridging ligands is reported. The MOL structures were directly imaged by TEM and AFM, and doped with 4'-(4-benzoate)-(2,2',2''-terpyridine)-5,5''-dicarboxylate (TPY) before being coordinated with iron centers to afford highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for the hydrosilylation of terminal olefins. MOL-based heterogeneous catalysts are free from the diffusional constraints placed on all known porous solid catalysts, including metal-organic frameworks. This work uncovers an entirely new strategy for designing single-site solid catalysts and opens the door to a new class of two-dimensional coordination materials with molecular functionalities.

  10. Use of amendments to restore ecosystem function to metal mining impacted sites; Tools to evaluate efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a long history of using residuals based soil amendments for restoration of disturbed sites. More recently, this approach has been tested for use on metal contaminated mining sites. For these sites, amendment mixtures are targeted to reduce metal availability in situ as well as restore eco...

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  12. A sensitive rapid on-site immunoassay for heavy metal contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.; Blake, D.; Flowers, G.

    1996-05-02

    This project concerns the development of immunoassays for heavy metals that will permit the rapid on-site analysis of specific heavy metals, including lead and chromium in water and soil samples. 2 refs.

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  15. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  16. Catalytic glucose isomerization by porous coordination polymers with open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, George; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient catalytic isomerization reactions from glucose to fructose in aqueous media using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is reported for the first time. The catalytic activity of PCPs functionalized with -NH2, -(CH3)2, -NO2, and -SO3H groups on the pore surface is systematically tested. The catalytic activity can be tuned by the acidity of open metal sites (OMSs) by modifying the organic linkers with the functional groups. As a result, it is demonstrated that MIL-101 functionalized with -SO3H not only shows high conversion of glucose but also selectively produces fructose. Further, catalytic one-pot conversion of amylose to fructose is achieved, thanks to the high stability of the framework in an acidic solution. These results show that MOF/PCP compounds having OMSs are promising materials for various useful heterogeneous catalytic reactions, in particular in the biomass field. PMID:25080129

  17. X-ray Crystal Structure of Divalent Metal-Activated β-xylosidase, RS223BX.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D; Wagschal, Kurt; Lee, Charles C; Chan, Victor J; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Anderson, Spencer; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw

    2015-10-01

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 β-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca(2+) cation is located at the back of the active-site pocket. The Ca(2+) is held in the active site by the carboxylate of D85, an "extra" acid residue in comparison to other GH43 active sites. The Ca(2+) is in close contact with a histidine imidazole, which in turn is in contact with the catalytic base (D15) thus providing a mechanism for stabilizing the carboxylate anion of the base and achieve metal activation. The active-site pocket is mirrored by an "inactive-site" pocket of unknown function that resides on the opposite side of the monomer. PMID:26201482

  18. Metal binding sites of the estradiol receptor from calf uterus and their possible role in the regulation of receptor function

    SciTech Connect

    Medici, N.; Minucci, S.; Nigro, V.; Abbondanza, C.; Armetta, I.; Molinari, A.M.; Puca, G.A. )

    1989-01-10

    The existence of putative metal binding sites on the estradiol receptor (ER) molecule from calf uterus was evaluated by immobilizing various divalent metals to iminodiacetate-Sepharose. ER from both crude and highly purified preparations binds to metal-containing adsorbents complexed with Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Cu(II), but not to those complexed with Fe(II) and Cd(II). Analysis of affinity-labeled ER by ({sup 3}H)tamoxifen aziridine after elution from a column of Zn(II)-charged iminodiacetate-Sepharose showed that ER fragments obtained by extensive trypsinization were also bound. Zn(II) and the same other metals able to bind ER, when immobilized on resins, inhibit the binding of estradiol to the receptor at micromolar concentration. This inhibition is noncompetitive and can be reversed by EDTA. The inhibition of the hormone binding was still present after trypsin treatment of the cytosol, and it was abolished by preincubation with the hormone. Micromolar concentrations of these metals were able to block those chemical-physical changes occurring during the process of ER transformation in vitro. The presence of metal binding sites that modulate the ER activity in the hormone binding domain of ER is speculated. Since progesterone receptor showed the same pattern of binding and elution from metal-containing adsorbents, the presence of metal binding regulatory sites could be a property of all steroid receptors.

  19. Characterizing the Environmental Availability of Trace Metals in Savannah River Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-03-18

    An eight step sequential extraction technique was used to characterize the environmental availability of trace metals from background and waste site soil samples collected from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS).

  20. Transition Metal Impurities on the Bond-Centered Site in Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Decoster, S.; Vries, B. de; Vantomme, A.; Cottenier, S.; Emmerich, H.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.

    2009-02-13

    We report on the lattice location of ion implanted Fe, Cu, and Ag impurities in germanium from a combined approach of emission channeling experiments and ab initio total energy calculations. Following common expectation, a fraction of these transition metals (TMs) was found on the substitutional Ge position. Less expected is the observation of a second fraction on the sixfold coordinated bond-centered site. Ab initio calculated heats of formation suggest this is the result of the trapping of a vacancy by a substitutional TM impurity, spontaneously forming an impurity-vacancy complex in the split-vacancy configuration. We also present an approach to displace the TM impurities from the electrically active substitutional site to the bond-centered site.

  1. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  2. Moving metal ions through ferritin-protein nanocages from three-fold pores to catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2010-10-20

    Ferritin nanocages synthesize ferric oxide minerals, containing hundreds to thousands of Fe(III) diferric oxo/hydroxo complexes, by reactions of Fe(II) ions with O(2) at multiple di-iron catalytic centers. Ferric-oxy multimers, tetramers, and/or larger mineral nuclei form during postcatalytic transit through the protein cage, and mineral accretion occurs in the central cavity. We determined how Fe(II) substrates can access catalytic sites using frog M ferritins, active and inactivated by ligand substitution, crystallized with 2.0 M Mg(II) ± 0.1 M Co(II) for Co(II)-selective sites. Co(II) inhibited Fe(II) oxidation. High-resolution (<1.5 Å) crystal structures show (1) a line of metal ions, 15 Å long, which penetrates the cage and defines ion channels and internal pores to the nanocavity that link external pores to the cage interior, (2) metal ions near negatively charged residues at the channel exits and along the inner cavity surface that model Fe(II) transit to active sites, and (3) alternate side-chain conformations, absent in ferritins with catalysis eliminated by amino acid substitution, which support current models of protein dynamics and explain changes in Fe-Fe distances observed during catalysis. The new structural data identify a ∼27-Å path Fe(II) ions can follow through ferritin entry channels between external pores and the central cavity and along the cavity surface to the active sites where mineral synthesis begins. This "bucket brigade" for Fe(II) ion access to the ferritin catalytic sites not only increases understanding of biological nanomineral synthesis but also reveals unexpected design principles for protein cage-based catalysts and nanomaterials.

  3. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. PMID:22868068

  4. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  6. Adsorption of two gas molecules at a single metal site in a metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Runčevski, Tomče; Kapelewski, Matthew T.; Torres-Gavosto, Rodolfo M.; Tarver, Jacob D.; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy to markedly increase the gas storage capacity of metal-organic frameworks is to introduce coordinatively-unsaturated metal centers capable of binding multiple gas molecules. Herein, we provide an initial demonstration that a single metal site within a framework can support the terminal coordination of two gas molecules--specifically hydrogen, methane, or carbon dioxide.

  7. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively.

  8. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively. PMID:26631022

  9. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation

  10. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  11. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  12. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  13. Synthetic receptors as models for alkali metal cation- binding sites in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wall, Stephen L.; Meadows, Eric S.; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2000-06-01

    The alkali metal cations Na+ and K+ have several important physiological roles, including modulating enzyme activity. Recent work has suggested that alkali metal cations may be coordinated by systems, such as the aromatic amino acid side chains. The ability of K+ to interact with an aromatic ring has been assessed by preparing a family of synthetic receptors that incorporate the aromatic side chains of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Thesereceptors are constructed around a diaza-18-crown-6 scaffold, which serves as the primary binding site for an alkali metal cation. The ability of the aromatic rings to coordinate a cation was determined by crystallizing each of the receptors in the presence of K+ and by solving the solid state structures. In all cases, complexation of K+ by the pi system was observed. When possible, the structures of the unbound receptors also were determined for comparison. Further proof that the aromatic ring makes an energetically favorable interaction with the cation was obtained by preparing a receptor in which the arene was perfluorinated. Fluorination of the arene reverses the electrostatics, but the aromaticity is maintained. The fluorinated arene rings do not coordinate the cation in the solid state structure of the K+ complex. Thus, the results of the predicted electrostatic reversal were confirmed. Finally, the biological implications of the alkali metal cation-pi interaction are addressed.

  14. A DNAzyme requiring two different metal ions at two distinct sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhu; Zhang, Yupei; Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-01-01

    Most previously reported RNA-cleaving DNAzymes require only a single divalent metal ion for catalysis. We recently reported a general trivalent lanthanide-dependent DNAzyme named Ce13d. This work shows that Ce13d requires both Na+ and a trivalent lanthanide (e.g. Ce3+), simultaneously. This discovery is facilitated by the sequence similarity between Ce13d and a recently reported Na+-specific DNAzyme, NaA43. The Ce13d cleavage rate linearly depends on the concentration of both metal ions. Sensitized Tb3+ luminescence and DMS footprinting experiments indicate that the guanines in the enzyme loop are important for Na+-binding. The Na+ dissociation constants of Ce13d measured from the cleavage activity assay, Tb3+ luminescence and DMS footprinting are 24.6, 16.3 and 47 mM, respectively. Mutation studies indicate that the role of Ce3+ might be replaced by G23 in NaA43. Ce3+ functions by stabilizing the transition state phosphorane, thus promoting cleavage. G23 competes favorably with low concentration Ce3+ (below 1 μM). The G23-to-hypoxanthine mutation suggests the N1 position of the guanine as a hydrogen bond donor. Together, Ce13d has two distinct metal binding sites, each fulfilling a different role. DNAzymes can be quite sophisticated in utilizing metal ions for catalysis and molecular recognition, similar to protein metalloenzymes. PMID:26657636

  15. A DNAzyme requiring two different metal ions at two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Zhang, Yupei; Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-01-01

    Most previously reported RNA-cleaving DNAzymes require only a single divalent metal ion for catalysis. We recently reported a general trivalent lanthanide-dependent DNAzyme named Ce13d. This work shows that Ce13d requires both Na(+) and a trivalent lanthanide (e.g. Ce(3+)), simultaneously. This discovery is facilitated by the sequence similarity between Ce13d and a recently reported Na(+)-specific DNAzyme, NaA43. The Ce13d cleavage rate linearly depends on the concentration of both metal ions. Sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence and DMS footprinting experiments indicate that the guanines in the enzyme loop are important for Na(+)-binding. The Na(+) dissociation constants of Ce13d measured from the cleavage activity assay, Tb(3+) luminescence and DMS footprinting are 24.6, 16.3 and 47 mM, respectively. Mutation studies indicate that the role of Ce(3+) might be replaced by G23 in NaA43. Ce(3+) functions by stabilizing the transition state phosphorane, thus promoting cleavage. G23 competes favorably with low concentration Ce(3+) (below 1 μM). The G23-to-hypoxanthine mutation suggests the N1 position of the guanine as a hydrogen bond donor. Together, Ce13d has two distinct metal binding sites, each fulfilling a different role. DNAzymes can be quite sophisticated in utilizing metal ions for catalysis and molecular recognition, similar to protein metalloenzymes.

  16. Heavy metal contamination of soils at old mining sites on Thasos Island, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kelepertsis, A E; Bibou, A

    1991-03-01

    Thasos Island has a long history of metalliferous mining, the first mining activities having been initiated by the Phoenicians during the seventh century. The mineralogy of the mineralisation includes primary minerals (galena, sphalerite) and secondary oxidised minerals (smithsonite, cerussite). In the soils studied only secondary minerals were found. Clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, mixed layer clays), plagioclase, calcite and dolomite are also present in the soils. Contamination derived from the old mining sites results in extremely high levels of Pb, Zn, Mn, Fe, As, Sb, Ag, Cd in soils in the vicinity of the old workings. Since many of the Thasos mining sites are in, or adjacent to, areas of agricultural land, plants growing on the polluted sous have increased concentrations of heavy metals. This may well have a possible effect on livestock.

  17. Biomonitoring for metal contamination near two Superfund sites in Woburn, Massachusetts, using phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Gawel, James E; Hemond, Harold F

    2004-09-01

    Characterizing the spatial extent of groundwater metal contamination traditionally requires installing sampling wells, an expensive and time-consuming process in urban areas. Moreover, extrapolating biotic effects from metal concentrations alone is problematic, making ecological risk assessment difficult. Our study is the first to examine the use of phytochelatin measurements in tree leaves for delimiting biological metal stress in shallow, metal-contaminated groundwater systems. Three tree species (Rhamnus frangula, Acer platanoides, and Betula populifolia) growing above the shallow groundwater aquifer of the Aberjona River watershed in Woburn, Massachusetts, display a pattern of phytochelatin production consistent with known sources of metal contamination and groundwater flow direction near the Industri-Plex Superfund site. Results also suggest the existence of a second area of contaminated groundwater and elevated metal stress near the Wells G&H Superfund site downstream, in agreement with a recent EPA ecological risk assessment. Possible contamination pathways at this site are discussed.

  18. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  19. Lithodiversity and its spatial association with metallic mineral sites, Great Basin of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, M.J.; Bonham-Carter, G. F.

    2001-01-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) techniques were used to investigate the spatial association between metallic mineral sites and lithodiversity in Nevada. Mineral site data sets include various size and type subsets of about 5,500 metal-bearing occurrences and deposits. Lithodiversity was calculated by counting the number of unique geological map units within four sizes of square-shaped sample neighborhoods (2.5-by-2.5, 5-by-5, 10-by-10, and 20-by-20 km) on three different scales of geological maps (national, 1:2,500,000; state, 1:500,000; county, 1:250,000). The spatial association between mineral sites and lithodiversity was observed to increase with increasing lithodiversity. This relationship is consistent for (1) both basin-range and range-only regions, (2) four sizes of sample neighborhoods, (3) various mineral site subsets, (4) the three scales of geological maps, and (5) areas not covered by large-scale maps. A map scale of 1:500,000 and lithodiversity sampling neighborhood of 5-by-5 km was determined to best describe the association. Positive associations occurred for areas having >3 geological map units per neighborhood, with the strongest observed at approximately >7 units. Areas in Nevada with more than three geological map units per 5-by-5 km neighborhood contain more mineral sites than would be expected resulting from chance. High lithodiversity likely reflects the occurrence of complex structural, stratigraphic, and intrusive relationships that are thought to control, focus, localize, or expose mineralization. The application of lithodiversity measurements to areas that are not well explored may help delineate regional-scale exploration targets and provide GIS-supported mineral resource assessment and exploration activity another method that makes use of widely available geological map data. ?? 2001 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  20. Remediation of heavy metal contaminated sites in the Venice lagoon and conterminous areas (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Wahsha, Mohammad; Fontana, Silvia; Maleci, Laura

    2013-04-01

    The lagoon of Venice and the conterminous land are affected by heavy contamination of anthropogenic origin, and for this reason the whole area has been classified as site of national interest, and must be restored. Heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb, Sb, Se, Zn) and organic compounds (IPA, PCB, Dioxine) have been identified as the main contaminants at various sites, owing to agriculture and industrial wastes discharged on soils and convoyed to the lagoon. Five case studies of soil remediation are here reported. S. Giuliano is a former palustrine area reclaimed since the 60's with various human transported materials (HTM). In this area, hot spots overpassing the reference limits for residential and green areas have been recorded for Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and IPA. Campalto is a site bordering the Venice lagoon and subjected to oscillating water level, that enhances metal mobility; diffuse contamination by heavy metals, particularly Pb, has been recorded at this site, utilized since 30 years for military and sport (skate) activities. Marghera is dramatically famous for its numerous factories and for oil refineries that affected the lagoon sediments since the 50's. Sediments proved heavily contaminated by As (up to 137 mgkg-1), Cd (57 mgkg-1), Hg (30mgkg-1), Ni, Pb (700 mgkg-1), Zn (5818 mgkg-1). Murano is a small island where many glass factories (the most famous all over the world) are running since XIII century. Glass is stained with several metals and, moreover, some substances are used to regulate fusion temperature, purity, etc., and therefore the surrounding environment is heavily contaminated by these substances. Mean concentrations of As (429 mgkg-1), Cd (1452 mgkg-1), Pb (749 mgkg-1), Zn (1624 mgkg-1), Se (341 mgkg-1), Sb (74 mgkg-1) widely overpass the reference values for both residential and industrial areas in national guidelines. Molo Serbatoi is a former oil container currently under restoration in the port of Venice. Soil contamination by As, Hg, Zn and

  1. Metal cofactors in the structure and activity of the fowlpox resolvase.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Hwang, Young; Hu, Jimmy Yan; Minkah, Nana; Ocwieja, Karen E; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-05-28

    Poxvirus DNA replication generates linear concatemers containing many copies of the viral genome with inverted repeat sequences at the junctions between monomers. The inverted repeats refold to generate Holliday junctions, which are cleaved by the virus-encoded resolvase enzyme to form unit-length genomes. Here we report studies of the influence of metal cofactors on the activity and structure of the resolvase of fowlpox virus, which provides a tractable model for in vitro studies. Small-molecule inhibitors of related enzymes bind simultaneously to metal cofactors and nearby surface amino acid residues, so understanding enzyme-cofactor interactions is important for the design of antiviral agents. Analysis of inferred active-site residues (D7, E60, K102, D132, and D135) by mutagenesis and metal rescue experiments specified residues that contribute to binding metal ions and that multiple binding sites are probably involved. Differential electrophoretic analysis was used to map the conformation of the DNA junction when bound by resolvase. For the wild-type complex in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or Ca(2+), migration was consistent with the DNA arms arranged in near-tetrahedral geometry. However, the D7N active-site mutant resolvase held the arms in a more planar arrangement in EDTA, Ca(2+), or Mg(2+) conditions, implicating metal-dependent contacts at the active site in the larger architecture of the complex. These data show how divalent metals dictate the conformation of FPV resolvase-DNA complexes and subsequent DNA cleavage.

  2. The Identity of the Nucleophile Substitution may Influence Metal Interactions with the Cleavage Site of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Edith M.; Ward, W. Luke; Ruehle, Max Z.; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential metal interactions with the cleavage site of a minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz) were probed using 31P NMR-detected Cd2+ titration studies of HHRz constructs containing a phosphorothioate (PS) modification at the cleavage site. The mHHRz nucleophile position was replaced by either a 2′-F or a 2′-NH2 in order to block cleavage activity during the study. The 2′-F/PS cleavage site mHHRz construct, in which the 2′-F should closely imitate the atom size and electronegativity of a 2′OH, demonstrates low levels of metal ion association (<1 ppm 31P chemical shift changes). This observation indicates that having an atom size and electrostatic properties that are similar to the 2′-OH are not the governing factors in allowing metal interactions with the scissile phosphate of the mHHRz. With a 2′-NH2 substitution, a large upfield change in 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphorothioate peak (Δ~3 ppm with 6 equivalents added Cd2+) indicates observable Cd2+ interactions with the substituted site. Since a 2′-NH2, but not a 2′-F, can serve as a metal ligand, these data suggest that a metal ion interaction with the HHRz cleavage site may include both the scissile phosphate and the 2′ nucleophile. Control samples in which the 2′-NH2/PS unit is placed either next to the mHHRz cleavage site (at U16.1), in a duplex, or in a amUPSU dinucleotide, show much weaker interactions with Cd2+. Results with these control samples indicate that simply the presence of a 2′-NH2/PS unit does not create a strong metal binding site, reinforcing the possibility that the 2′-NH2-moderated Cd-PS interaction is specific to the mHHRz cleavage site. Upfield chemical shifts of both 31P and H2′ 1H resonances in amUPSU are observed with addition of Cd2+, consistent with the predicted metal coordination to both 2′-NH2 and phosphorothioate ligands. These data suggest that metal ion association with the HHRz cleavage site may include an interaction with the 2

  3. Heavy metal contamination of surface soil in electronic waste dismantling area: site investigation and source-apportionment analysis.

    PubMed

    Jinhui Li; Huabo Duan; Pixing Shi

    2011-07-01

    The dismantling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing increasing concern because of its impacts on the environment and risks to human health. Heavy-metal concentrations in the surface soils of Guiyu (Guangdong Province, China) were monitored to determine the status of heavy-metal contamination on e-waste dismantling area with a more than 20 years history. Two metalloids and nine metals were selected for investigation. This paper also attempts to compare the data among a variety of e-waste dismantling areas, after reviewing a number of heavy-metal contamination-related studies in such areas in China over the past decade. In addition, source apportionment of heavy metal in the surface soil of these areas has been analysed. Both the MSW open-burning sites probably contained invaluable e-waste and abandoned sites formerly involved in informal recycling activities are the new sources of soil-based environmental pollution in Guiyu. Although printed circuit board waste is thought to be the main source of heavy-metal emissions during e-waste processing, requirement is necessary to soundly manage the plastic separated from e-waste, which mostly contains heavy metals and other toxic substances.

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  5. X-ray crystal structure of divalent metal-activated ß-xyloisdase, RS223BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ß-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca2+ cation is located at the back of the active site pocket. The Ca2+ coordinates to H274 to sta...

  6. Hidden relationships between metalloproteins unveiled by structural comparison of their metal sites.

    PubMed

    Valasatava, Yana; Andreini, Claudia; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-03-30

    Metalloproteins account for a substantial fraction of all proteins. They incorporate metal atoms, which are required for their structure and/or function. Here we describe a new computational protocol to systematically compare and classify metal-binding sites on the basis of their structural similarity. These sites are extracted from the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) in metal-binding biological macromolecules. Structural similarity is measured by the scoring function of the available MetalS2 program. Hierarchical clustering was used to organize MFSs into clusters, for each of which a representative MFS was identified. The comparison of all representative MFSs provided a thorough structure-based classification of the sites analyzed. As examples, the application of the proposed computational protocol to all heme-binding proteins and zinc-binding proteins of known structure highlighted the existence of structural subtypes, validated known evolutionary links and shed new light on the occurrence of similar sites in systems at different evolutionary distances. The present approach thus makes available an innovative viewpoint on metalloproteins, where the functionally crucial metal sites effectively lead the discovery of structural and functional relationships in a largely protein-independent manner.

  7. Hidden relationships between metalloproteins unveiled by structural comparison of their metal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valasatava, Yana; Andreini, Claudia; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Metalloproteins account for a substantial fraction of all proteins. They incorporate metal atoms, which are required for their structure and/or function. Here we describe a new computational protocol to systematically compare and classify metal-binding sites on the basis of their structural similarity. These sites are extracted from the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) in metal-binding biological macromolecules. Structural similarity is measured by the scoring function of the available MetalS2 program. Hierarchical clustering was used to organize MFSs into clusters, for each of which a representative MFS was identified. The comparison of all representative MFSs provided a thorough structure-based classification of the sites analyzed. As examples, the application of the proposed computational protocol to all heme-binding proteins and zinc-binding proteins of known structure highlighted the existence of structural subtypes, validated known evolutionary links and shed new light on the occurrence of similar sites in systems at different evolutionary distances. The present approach thus makes available an innovative viewpoint on metalloproteins, where the functionally crucial metal sites effectively lead the discovery of structural and functional relationships in a largely protein-independent manner.

  8. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  9. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  10. Soil contamination and plant uptake of heavy metals at polluted sites in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Ren; Cui, Yan-Shan; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Dong, Yi-Ting; Christie, Peter

    2003-05-01

    We investigated heavy metal contamination in soils and plants at polluted sites in China including some with heavy industries, metal mining, smelting and untreated wastewater irrigation areas. We report our main findings in this paper. The concentrations of heavy metals, including Cd and Zn, in the soils at the investigated sites were above the background levels, and generally exceeded the Government guidelines for metals in soil. The concentrations of metals in plants served to indicate the metal contamination status of the site, and also revealed the abilities of various plant species to take up and accumulate the metals from the soil. Substantial differences in the accumulation of heavy metals were observed among the plant species investigated. Polygonum hydropiper growing on contaminated soils in a sewage pond had accumulated 1061 mg kg(-1) of Zn in its shoots. Rumex acetosa L. growing near a smelter had accumulated more than 900 mg kg(-1) of Zn both in its shoots and roots. Therefore these species have potential for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated sites. Our results indicate the need to elucidate the dynamics of soil metal contamination of plants and the onward movement of metal contaminants into the food chain. Also our results indicate that the consumption of rice grown in paddy soils contaminated with Cd, Cr or Zn may pose a serious risk to human health, because from 24 to 22% of the total metal content in the rice biomass was concentrated in the rice grain. Platanus acerifolia growing on heavily contaminated soil accumulated only very low levels of heavy metals, and this mechanism for excluding metal uptake may have value in crop improvement. Sources of metal entering the environmental matrices studied included untreated wastewater, tailings or slurries and dust depositions from metal ore mining, and sewage sludge. Pb, Zn or Cd concentrations declined with the distance from metal smelter in accordance with a good exponential correlation (R2

  11. Site specific metals criteria as determined by Water Effect Ratio studies

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, C.J.; Neserke, G.

    1994-12-31

    Water Effect Ratios (WER) are being used to implement site-specific water quality criteria to address the variability of physical and chemical characteristics of site water and metals that may influence toxicity. A case in point, Coors Brewing Company in Golden, Colorado, has been granted site-specific criteria for the discharge of copper and zinc based on results of WER studies. Acute bioassays were conducted to determine seasonal WER values for copper, zinc and silver. The tests exposed Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas to graduated levels of metals in Clear Creek site water (below discharge mixing zone), reconstituted laboratory water and effluent. Final WER values, calculated by the ratio of LC50`s determined in site water and laboratory water, were multiplied by the standard metals criteria to develop the site specific values incorporated into the Coors Brewing Company permit to discharge. It is suggested that the high LC50 values for metals in site water is a factor of the effluent`s binding capacity that may reduce the bioavailability of metals in site water.

  12. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOEpatents

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-08

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  13. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.

    1994-01-01

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  14. Adsorption of two gas molecules at a single metal site in a metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Runčevski, Tomče; Kapelewski, Matthew T.; Torres-Gavosto, Rodolfo M.; Tarver, Jacob D.; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy to markedly increase the gas storage capacity of metal–organic frameworks is to introduce coordinatively-unsaturated metal centers capable of binding multiple gas molecules. Herein, we provide an initial demonstration that a single metal site within a framework can support the terminal coordination of two gas molecules—specifically hydrogen, methane, or carbon dioxide.

  15. Cupryphans, metal-binding, redox-active, redesigned conopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Marco; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Romeo, Cristina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Musci, Giovanni; Polticelli, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Contryphans are bioactive peptides, isolated from the venom of marine snails of the genus Conus, which are characterized by the short length of the polypeptide chain and the high degree of unusual post-translational modifications. The cyclization of the polypeptide chain through a single disulphide bond, the presence of two conserved Pro residues, and the epimerization of a Trp/Leu residue confer to Contryphans a stable and well-defined structure in solution, conserved in all members of the family, and tolerant to multiple substitutions. The potential of Contryphans as scaffolds for the design of redox-active (macro)molecules was tested by engineering a copper-binding site on two different variants of the natural peptide Contryphan-Vn. The binding site was designed by computational modeling, and the redesigned peptides were synthesized and characterized by optical, fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The novel peptides, named Cupryphan and Arg–Cupryphan, bind Cu2+ ions with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a Kd in the 100 nM range. Other divalent metals (e.g., Zn2+ and Mg2+) are bound with much lower affinity. In addition, Cupryphans catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anions with an activity comparable to other nonpeptidic superoxide dismutase mimics. We conclude that the Contryphan motif represents a natural robust scaffold which can be engineered to perform different functions, providing additional means for the design of catalytically active mini metalloproteins. PMID:19241383

  16. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  17. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  18. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  19. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  20. Metal-binding sites are designed to achieve optimal mechanical and signaling properties.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anindita; Bahar, Ivet

    2010-09-01

    Many proteins require bound metals to achieve their function. We take advantage of increasing structural data on metal-binding proteins to elucidate three properties: the involvement of metal-binding sites in the global dynamics of the protein, predicted by elastic network models, their exposure/burial to solvent, and their signal-processing properties indicated by Markovian stochastics analysis. Systematic analysis of a data set of 145 structures reveals that the residues that coordinate metal ions enjoy remarkably efficient and precise signal transduction properties. These properties are rationalized in terms of their physical properties: participation in hinge sites that control the softest modes collectively accessible to the protein and occupancy of central positions minimally exposed to solvent. Our observations suggest that metal-binding sites may have been evolutionary selected to achieve optimum allosteric communication. They also provide insights into basic principles for designing metal-binding sites, which are verified to be met by recently designed de novo metal-binding proteins.

  1. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  2. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  3. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  4. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO.

  5. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  6. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  7. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  8. Engineering a catalytic metal binding site into a calcium-independent phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C leads to enhanced stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Kravchuk, Alexander V; Zhao, Li; Bruzik, Karol S; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2003-03-01

    Eukaryotic phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cs (PI-PLCs) utilize calcium as a cofactor during catalysis, whereas prokaryotic PI-PLCs use a spatially conserved guanidinium group from Arg69. In this study, we aimed to construct a metal-dependent mutant of a bacterial PI-PLC and characterize the catalytic role of the metal ion, seeking an enhanced understanding of the functional differences between these two positively charged moieties. The following results indicate that a bona fide catalytic metal binding site was created by the single arginine-to-aspartate mutation at position 69: (1) The R69D mutant was activated by Ca(2+), and the activation was specific for R69D, not for other mutants at this position. (2) Titration of R69D with Ca(2+), monitored by (15)N-(1)H HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) NMR, showed that addition of Ca(2+) to R69D restores the environment of the catalytic site analogous to that attained by the WT enzyme. (3) Upon Ca(2+) activation, the thio effect of the S(P)-isomer of the phosphorothioate analogue (k(O)/k(Sp) = 4.4 x 10(5)) approached a value similar to that of the WT enzyme, suggesting a structural and functional similarity between the two positively charged moieties (Arg69 and Asp69-Ca(2+)). The R(P)-thio effect (k(O)/k(Rp) = 9.4) is smaller than that of the WT enzyme by a factor of 5. Consequently, R69D-Ca(2+) displays higher stereoselectivity (k(Rp)/k(Sp) = 47,000) than WT (k(Rp)/k(Sp) = 7600). (4) Results from additional mutagenesis analyses suggest that the Ca(2+) binding site is comprised of side chains from Asp33, Asp67, Asp69, and Glu117. Our studies provide new insight into the mechanism of metal-dependent and metal-independent PI-PLCs.

  9. Plant growth promotion, metabolite production and metal tolerance of dark septate endophytes isolated from metal-polluted poplar phytomanagement sites.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Charlotte; Leyval, Corinne; Foulon, Julie; Chalot, Michel; Blaudez, Damien

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies address the distribution and the diversity of dark septate endophytes (DSEs) in the literature, but little is known about their ecological role and their effect on host plants, especially in metal-polluted soils. Seven DSE strains belonging to Cadophora, Leptodontidium, Phialophora and Phialocephala were isolated from roots of poplar trees from metal-polluted sites. All strains developed on a wide range of carbohydrates, including cell-wall-related compounds. The strains evenly colonized birch, eucalyptus and ryegrass roots in re-synthesis experiments. Root and shoot growth promotion was observed and was both plant and strain dependent. Two Phialophora and Leptodontidium strains particularly improved plant growth. However, there was no correlation between the level of root colonization by DSEs and the intensity of growth promotion. All strains produced auxin and six also stimulated plant growth through the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). SPME-GC/MS analyses revealed four major VOCs emitted by Cadophora and Leptodontidium The strains exhibited growth at high concentrations of several metals. The ability of metal-resistant DSE strains to produce both soluble and volatile compounds for plant growth promotion indicates interesting microbial resources with high potential to support sustainable production of bioenergy crops within the context of the phytomanagement of metal-contaminated sites. PMID:27364359

  10. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  12. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  13. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  14. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  15. The Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils in the Vicinity of Industrial Sites in Dongguan, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Lu, Liwen; Huang, Ting; Huang, Yalin; Ding, Lei; Zhao, Weituo

    2016-01-01

    Exponential industrialization and rapid urbanization have resulted in contamination of soil by metals from anthropogenic sources in Dongguan, China. The aims of this research were to determine the concentration and distribution of various metals (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn)) in soils and identify their potential health risks for local residents. A total of 106 soil samples were collected from the vicinity of industrial sites in Dongguan. Two types of samples were collected from each site: topsoil (0–20 cm, TS) and shallow soil (20–50 cm, SS). Results showed that the soils were contaminated by metals and pollution was mainly focused on TS. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and pollution indexes (PI) implied that there was a slight increase in the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Pb, but the metal pollution caused by industrial activities was less severe, and elements of As and Cr exhibited non-pollution level. The risk assessment results suggested that there was a potential health risk associated with As and Cr exposure for residents because the carcinogenic risks of As and Cr via corresponding exposure pathways exceeded the safety limit of 10−6 (the acceptable level of carcinogenic risk for humans). Furthermore, oral ingestion and inhalation of soil particles are the main exposure pathways for As and Cr to enter the human body. This study may provide basic information of metal pollution control and human health protection in the vicinity of industrial regions. PMID:27548198

  16. The Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils in the Vicinity of Industrial Sites in Dongguan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Lu, Liwen; Huang, Ting; Huang, Yalin; Ding, Lei; Zhao, Weituo

    2016-01-01

    Exponential industrialization and rapid urbanization have resulted in contamination of soil by metals from anthropogenic sources in Dongguan, China. The aims of this research were to determine the concentration and distribution of various metals (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn)) in soils and identify their potential health risks for local residents. A total of 106 soil samples were collected from the vicinity of industrial sites in Dongguan. Two types of samples were collected from each site: topsoil (0-20 cm, TS) and shallow soil (20-50 cm, SS). Results showed that the soils were contaminated by metals and pollution was mainly focused on TS. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and pollution indexes (PI) implied that there was a slight increase in the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Pb, but the metal pollution caused by industrial activities was less severe, and elements of As and Cr exhibited non-pollution level. The risk assessment results suggested that there was a potential health risk associated with As and Cr exposure for residents because the carcinogenic risks of As and Cr via corresponding exposure pathways exceeded the safety limit of 10(-6) (the acceptable level of carcinogenic risk for humans). Furthermore, oral ingestion and inhalation of soil particles are the main exposure pathways for As and Cr to enter the human body. This study may provide basic information of metal pollution control and human health protection in the vicinity of industrial regions. PMID:27548198

  17. Speciation dynamics of metals in dispersion of nanoparticles with discrete distribution of charged binding sites.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Pavel D; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2014-02-01

    We report a comprehensive theory to evaluate the kinetics of complex formation between metal ions and charged spherical nanoparticles. The latter consist of an ion-impermeable core surrounded by a soft shell layer characterized by a discrete axisymmetric 2D distribution of charged sites that bind metal ions. The theory explicitly integrates the conductive diffusion of metal ions from bulk solution toward the respective locations of the reactive sites within the particle shell volume. The kinetic constant k for outer-sphere nanoparticle-metal association is obtained from the sum of the contributions stemming from all reactive sites, each evaluated from the corresponding incoming flux of metal ions derived from steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Illustrations are provided to capture the basic intertwined impacts of particle size, overall particle charge, spatial heterogeneity in site distribution, type of particle (hard, core-shell or porous) and concentration of the background electrolyte on k. As a limit, k converges with predictions from previously reported analytical expressions derived for porous particles with low and high charge density, cases that correspond to coulombic and mean-field (smeared-out) electrostatic treatments, respectively. The conditions underlying the applicability of these latter approaches are rigorously identified in terms of (i) the extent of overlap between electric double layers around charged neighbouring sites, and (ii) the magnitude of the intraparticulate metal concentration gradient. For the first time, the proposed theory integrates the differentiated impact of the local potential around the charged binding sites amidst the overall particle field, together with that of the so-far discarded intraparticulate flux of metal ions. PMID:24336523

  18. Trace Metal Content of Sediments Close to Mine Sites in the Andean Region

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Cristina; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí; Miralles, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of heavy metal pollution in sediments close to two mine sites in the upper part of the Jequetepeque River Basin, Peru. Sediment concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn were analyzed. A comparative study of the trace metal content of sediments shows that the highest concentrations are found at the closest points to the mine sites in both cases. The sediment quality analysis was performed using the threshold effect level of the Canadian guidelines (TEL). The sediment samples analyzed show that potential ecological risk is caused frequently at both sites by As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. The long-term influence of sediment metals in the environment is also assessed by sequential extraction scheme analysis (SES). The availability of metals in sediments is assessed, and it is considered a significant threat to the environment for As, Cd, and Sb close to one mine site and Cr and Hg close to the other mine site. Statistical analysis of sediment samples provides a characterization of both subbasins, showing low concentrations of a specific set of metals and identifies the main characteristics of the different pollution sources. A tentative relationship between pollution sources and possible ecological risk is established. PMID:22606058

  19. Trace metal content of sediments close to mine sites in the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Cristina; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí; Miralles, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of heavy metal pollution in sediments close to two mine sites in the upper part of the Jequetepeque River Basin, Peru. Sediment concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn were analyzed. A comparative study of the trace metal content of sediments shows that the highest concentrations are found at the closest points to the mine sites in both cases. The sediment quality analysis was performed using the threshold effect level of the Canadian guidelines (TEL). The sediment samples analyzed show that potential ecological risk is caused frequently at both sites by As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. The long-term influence of sediment metals in the environment is also assessed by sequential extraction scheme analysis (SES). The availability of metals in sediments is assessed, and it is considered a significant threat to the environment for As, Cd, and Sb close to one mine site and Cr and Hg close to the other mine site. Statistical analysis of sediment samples provides a characterization of both subbasins, showing low concentrations of a specific set of metals and identifies the main characteristics of the different pollution sources. A tentative relationship between pollution sources and possible ecological risk is established. PMID:22606058

  20. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  1. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  2. Spectroscopic definition of the copper active sites in mordenite: selective methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G; Vancauwenbergh, Julie; Coussens, Olivier; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-05-20

    Two distinct [Cu-O-Cu](2+) sites with methane monooxygenase activity are identified in the zeolite Cu-MOR, emphasizing that this Cu-O-Cu active site geometry, having a ∠Cu-O-Cu ∼140°, is particularly formed and stabilized in zeolite topologies. Whereas in ZSM-5 a similar [Cu-O-Cu](2+) active site is located in the intersection of the two 10 membered rings, Cu-MOR provides two distinct local structures, situated in the 8 membered ring windows of the side pockets. Despite their structural similarity, as ascertained by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, the two Cu-O-Cu active sites in Cu-MOR clearly show different kinetic behaviors in selective methane oxidation. This difference in reactivity is too large to be ascribed to subtle differences in the ground states of the Cu-O-Cu sites, indicating the zeolite lattice tunes their reactivity through second-sphere effects. The MOR lattice is therefore functionally analogous to the active site pocket of a metalloenzyme, demonstrating that both the active site and its framework environment contribute to and direct reactivity in transition metal ion-zeolites.

  3. Multivariate analysis of mixed contaminants (PAHs and heavy metals) at manufactured gas plant site soils.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to provide an overview of the distribution pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals in former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils. PCA is the powerful multivariate method to identify the patterns in data and expressing their similarities and differences. Ten PAHs (naphthalene, acenapthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene) and four toxic heavy metals - lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and zinc (Zn) - were detected in the site soils. PAH contamination was contributed equally by both low and high molecular weight PAHs. PCA was performed using the varimax rotation method in SPSS, 17.0. Two principal components accounting for 91.7% of the total variance was retained using scree test. Principle component 1 (PC1) substantially explained the dominance of PAH contamination in the MGP site soils. All PAHs, except anthracene, were positively correlated in PC1. There was a common thread in high molecular weight PAHs loadings, where the loadings were inversely proportional to the hydrophobicity and molecular weight of individual PAHs. Anthracene, which was less correlated with other individual PAHs, deviated well from the origin which can be ascribed to its lower toxicity and different origin than its isomer phenanthrene. Among the four major heavy metals studied in MGP sites, Pb, Cd and Cr were negatively correlated in PC1 but showed strong positive correlation in principle component 2 (PC2). Although metals may not have originated directly from gaswork processes, the correlation between PAHs and metals suggests that the materials used in these sites may have contributed to high concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cr and Zn. Thus, multivariate analysis helped to identify the sources of PAHs, heavy metals and their association in MGP site, and thereby better characterise the site risk, which would not be possible if one uses chemical analysis

  4. Unusual adsorption site behavior in PCN-14 metal-organic framework predicted from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Sebastião M P; Mileo, Paulo G M; Silvino, Pedro F G; Cavalcante, Célio L

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption equilibrium of methane in PCN-14 was simulated by the Monte Carlo technique in the grand canonical ensemble. A new force field was proposed for the methane/PCN-14 system, and the temperature dependence of the molecular siting was investigated. A detailed study of the statistics of the center of mass and potential energy showed a surprising site behavior with no energy barriers between weak and strong sites, allowing open metal sites to guide methane molecules to other neighboring sites. Moreover, this study showed that a model assuming weakly adsorbing open metal clusters in PCN-14, densely populated only at low temperatures (below 150 K), can explain published experimental data. These results also explain previously observed discrepancies between neutron diffraction experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  6. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  7. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site.

    PubMed

    Buss, Joshua A; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  8. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  9. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site.

    PubMed

    Buss, Joshua A; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  10. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  11. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media. PMID:23645478

  12. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media.

  13. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

  15. Accurate metal-site structures in proteins obtained by combining experimental data and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ryde, Ulf

    2007-02-14

    The use of molecular mechanics calculations to supplement experimental data in standard X-ray crystallography and NMR refinements is discussed and it is shown that structures can be locally improved by the use of quantum chemical calculations. Such calculations can also be used to interpret the structures, e.g. to decide the protonation state of metal-bound ligands. They have shown that metal sites in crystal structures are frequently photoreduced or disordered, which makes the interpretation of the structures hard. Similar methods can be used for EXAFS refinements to obtain a full atomic structure, rather than a set of metal-ligand distances.

  16. The metal site as a template for the metalloprotein structure formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlin; Xu, Huibi

    2002-01-01

    Achieving a thorough explanation of the behavior of metal sites in the formation of native metalloprotein structures is an exciting challenge in the biochemistry of metallobiomacromolecules. This study presents a personal insight into the subject. It is proposed that a metal center and its exogenous ligand compose a template. A template may impose a clear stereochemical preference on the loose peptide chains, and organize them into natural stereospecificity via the metal-ligand interaction, a long-range and strong interaction. Therefore, the stable peptide conformation induced by the template effect surrounding a template polyhedron could be called a template-mediated structural motif (TMSM).

  17. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  18. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  19. Ternary metal complexes of guaifenesin drug: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, W H; Mahmoud, N F; Mohamed, G G; El-Sonbati, A Z; El-Bindary, A A

    2015-01-01

    The coordination behavior of a series of transition metal ions named Cr(III), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) with a mono negative tridentate guaifenesin ligand (GFS) (OOO donation sites) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) is reported. The metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, UV-vis spectral studies, mass spectroscopy, ESR, XRD and thermal analysis (TG and DTG). The ternary metal complexes were found to have the formulae of [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]Cl·nH2O (M=Cr(III) (n=1) and Fe(III) (n=0)), [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]·nH2O (M=Mn(II) (n=0), Zn(II) (n=0) and Cu(II) (n=3)) and [M(GFS)(Phen)(H2O)]Cl·nH2O (M=Co(II) (n=0), Ni(II) (n=0) and Cd(II) (n=4)). All the chelates are found to have octahedral geometrical structures. The ligand and its ternary chelates are subjected to thermal analyses (TG and DTG). The GFS ligand, in comparison to its ternary metal complexes also was screened for their antibacterial activity on gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and for in vitro antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent GFS ligand. The complexes were also screened for its in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity. PMID:26067934

  20. Discovery of native metal ion sites located on the ferredoxin docking side of photosystem I.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Chen, L. X.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-03-25

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a large membrane protein that catalyzes light-driven electron transfer across the thylakoid membrane from plastocyanin located in the lumen to ferredoxin in the stroma. Metal analysis reveals that PSI isolated from the cyanobacterial membranes of Synechococcus leopoliensis has a near-stoichiometric 1 molar equiv of Zn2+ per PSI monomer and two additional surface metal ion sites that favor Cu2+ binding. Two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy reveals coupling to the so-called remote nitrogen of a single histidine coordinated to one of the Cu2+ centers. EPR and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies of 2Cu?PSI complexes reveal the direct interaction of ferredoxin with the Cu2+ centers on PSI, establishing the location of native metal sites on the ferredoxin docking side of PSI. On the basis of these spectroscopic results and previously reported site-directed mutagenesis studies, inspection of the PSI crystal structure reveals a cluster of three highly conserved residues, His(D95), Glu(D103), and Asp(C23), as a likely Cu2+ binding site. The discovery of surface metal sites on the acceptor side of PSI provides a unique opportunity to probe the stromal region of PSI and the interactions of PSI with its reaction partner, the soluble electron carrier protein ferredoxin.

  1. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site(s

  2. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  3. The effect of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Nigel; Kelly, John C; Moore, David P; Kenny, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The recall of the articular surface replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis in 2010 represents one of the most controversial areas in orthopaedic surgery in recent years. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity in four different regions and determine whether the number of related news reports affected Internet search activity. The Google Trends, Keywords and News applications were used to record the number of news articles and Internet search activity for the terms "hip recall", "metal-on-metal hip" and "ASR hip" from October 2009 to October 2012 in the USA, the UK, Australia and Ireland. There was a large increase in search activity following the official recall in August 2010 in all countries. There was significantly greater search activity after the recall in Ireland compared with the UK for the search term "hip recall" (P = 0.004). For the term "metal-on-metal hip", the UK had significantly more search activity (P = 0.0009). There was a positive correlation between the number of news stories in UK and Ireland with Internet search activity but not in the USA or Australia. Differences between countries affected by the same recall highlight the complex effects of the media on public awareness. The data demonstrates a window of opportunity prior to the official recall for the development of an awareness campaign to provide patients with accurate information.

  4. Encapsulating Metal Clusters and Acid Sites within Small Voids: Synthetic Strategies and Catalytic Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sarika

    The selective encapsulation of metal clusters within zeolites can be used to prepare clusters that are uniform in diameter and to protect them against sintering and contact with feed impurities, while concurrently allowing active sites to select reactants based on their molecular size, thus conferring enzyme-like specificity to chemical catalysis. The apertures in small and medium-pore zeolites preclude the use of post-synthetic protocols to encapsulate the relevant metal precursors because cationic or anionic precursors with their charge-balancing double layer and gaseous complexes cannot diffuse through their windows or channels. We have developed general strategies to encapsulate metal clusters within small-pore zeolites by using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which stabilize metal precursors against their premature precipitation at the high temperature and pH conditions required for the hydrothermal synthesis of the target zeolite structures and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during the self-assembly of microporous frameworks. When synthesis temperatures were higher than 400 K, available ligands were unable to prevent the premature precipitation of the metal precursors. In such cases, encapsulation was achieved instead via interzeolite transformations after successfully encapsulating metal precursors or clusters via post-synthesis exchange or ligand protection into parent zeolites and subsequently converting them into the target structures while retaining the encapsulated clusters or precursors. Such strategies led to the successful selective encapsulation of a wide range of metal clusters (Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Ir, Re, and Ag) within small-pore (SOD (sodalite), LTA (Linde type A (zeolite A)), GIS (gismondine), and ANA (analcime)) and medium-pore (MFI (ZSM-5)) zeolites. These protocols provide novel and diverse mechanism-based strategies for the design of catalysts with protected

  5. Biostimulation of Metal-Reducing Microbes at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, A. D.; Anderson, R. T.; Chang, J.; Long, P. E.; White, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    In situ biological treatment strategies are currently being used or considered to address groundwater contamination at hundreds and perhaps thousands of sites in the United States. A key to demonstrating the effectiveness of biological treatment strategies at a site is establishing cause and effect relationships, which provide evidence that the desired bioprocesses are occurring, or are likely to occur. These methods involve directly measuring various biochemical constituents of the bacteria themselves (i.e. "biomarkers"), which are indicative of their metabolic processes, and therefore provide direct, relevant information regarding the environment in which they are growing. These biomarkers include the presence and viability of biomass, the ability of the organisms to degrade or transform target contaminant(s), the presence of nutrients to promote bacterial growth and activity, and the oxidation/reduction (redox) status of the system. Using these tools we monitored an in situ biostimulation test at the field scale at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, a former uranium ore processing facility located approximately 0.3 mile east of the city of Rifle in Garfield County, Colorado. The purpose of the study was to investigate if the addition of low concentrations of acetate (approx. 1 millimolar) as an electron donor into the subsurface would create anaerobic conditions that would stimulate growth of metal reducing bacteria capable of reducing soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), respiratory quinone, and DNA data showed that addition of acetate into the subsurface increased the microbial biomass and altered the microbial community structure to one that contained more anaerobic microorganisms (i.e. Geobacter sp.) capable of the reduction of U(VI).

  6. Fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering of data from abandoned mine site contaminated with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourjabbar, A.; Sârbu, C.; Kostarelos, K.; Einax, J. W.; Büchel, G.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of pore water and slate samples are critically analyzed using fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering statistical techniques. The main aim of this study was to investigate the source of contamination near an abandoned uranium mine in Germany. The mining activities were abandoned in 1990 the site was closed, and the surrounding area was remediated. However, heavy metal contamination is still detectable in water, soil and plants today. Hence, investigating the source of the current contamination is an important task. In order to achieve the goal, results from chemical analysis of both pore water samples and leachates from slate samples were initially analyzed using hard (classical) hierarchical clustering algorithms that did not provide meaningful results. By using two fuzzy clustering algorithms, Fuzzy Divisive Hierarchical Clustering (FDHC) and Fuzzy Hierarchical Cross-Clustering (FHCC), a relationship between the leachate from Ordovician-Silurian slate samples (10 samples collected from the test site and the surrounding area) and pore water samples (53 samples collected from 3 locations within the test site at 3 depths over the course of 4 years) was identified. The leachate data formed a cluster which was statistically similar to the cluster formed by the pore water samples collected from two of three locations. In addition, the fuzzy cross-clustering approach allowed for the identification of the characteristics (qualitative and quantitative) responsible for the observed similarities between all the samples. We conclude that the fuzzy algorithms were a better tool for the analysis and interpretation of geological/hydrogeological data where the data sets have an inherent vagueness/uncertainty.

  7. Isolation and divalent-metal activation of a β-xylosidase, RUM630-BX.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D; Wagschal, Kurt; Stoller, J Rose; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding RUM630-BX, a β-xylosidase/arabinofuranosidase, was identified from activity-based screening of a cow rumen metagenomic library. The recombinant enzyme is activated as much as 14-fold (kcat) by divalent metals Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Co(2+) but not by Ca(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+). Activation of RUM630-BX by Mg(2+) (t0.5 144 s) is slowed two-fold by prior incubation with substrate, consistent with the X-ray structure of closely related xylosidase RS223-BX that shows the divalent-metal activator is at the back of the active-site pocket so that bound substrate could block its entrance. The enzyme is considerably more active on natural substrates than artificial substrates, with activity (kcat/Km) of 299 s(-1) mM(-1) on xylotetraose being the highest reported. PMID:26672463

  8. The influence of soil heavy metals pollution on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and community composition near a copper smelter.

    PubMed

    Wang, YuanPeng; Shi, JiYan; Wang, Hui; Lin, Qi; Chen, XinCai; Chen, YingXu

    2007-05-01

    The environmental risk of heavy metal pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to large industrial complexes. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by heavy metals. We studied the potential effects of heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, and community composition in soil near a copper smelter in China. The results showed that microbial biomass C was negatively affected by the elevated metal levels and was closely correlated with heavy metal stress. Enzyme activity was greatly depressed by conditions in the heavy metal-contaminated sites. Good correlation was observed between enzyme activity and the distance from the smelter. Elevated metal loadings resulted in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by changes in their metabolic profiles from correlation analysis. Significant decrease of soil phosphatase activities was found in the soils 200 m away from the smelter. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis demonstrated that heavy metals pollution had a significant impact on bacterial and actinomycetic community structure. There were negative correlations between soil microbial biomass, phosphatase activity, and NH(4)NO(3) extractable heavy metals. The soil microorganism activity and community composition could be predicted significantly using the availability of Cu and Zn. By combining different monitoring approaches from different viewpoints, the set of methods applied in this study were sensitive to site differences and contributed to a better understanding of heavy metals effects on the structure, size and activity of microbial communities in soils. The data presented demonstrate the role of heavy metals pollution in understanding the heavy metal toxicity to soil microorganism near a copper smelter in China. PMID:16828162

  9. Heavy metal levels in Nucella lapillus (gastropoda: prosobranchia) from sites with normal and penis-bearing females from New England

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.R. III; Pondick, J.S.

    1984-11-01

    Pseudohermaphroditism, as manifested by reproductively normal females possessing non-functioning penises, has been reported for more than thirty species of dioecious neogastropods. This anomaly was shown to be unrelated to age or parasitism, but the geographic distribution of this phenomenon indicated that it was environmentally induced rather than genetically controlled. In a survey of N. lapillus populations along the New England Coast, Pondick found abnormal females at sites directly under the influence of industrial discharges, sewage effluent, or vessel-related activities. Histological sections revealed the presence of a penial duct. The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in metal levels in the snail populations studied by Pondick, with particular attention to metals associated with boating activity.

  10. Efficiency of metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization

    SciTech Connect

    Duchacek, V.; Kuta, A.; Pribyl, P. )

    1993-01-20

    The effects of copper, mercury, nickel, zinc, cadmium, indium, magnesium, and calcium stearates on the course of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzthiazylsulphenamide-accelerated sulfur vulcanization of natural rubber have been investigated on the basis of curemeter measurements at 145 C. The differences in the efficiencies of these metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization have been discussed from the points of view of the electron configurations of the metals and their affinities to sulfur. The authors attempted to determine why zinc oxide is generally accepted as the best metal vulcanization activator.

  11. Environmental risk assessment of metals contaminated soils at silvermines abandoned mine site, Co Tipperary, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Aslibekian, Olga; Moles, Richard

    2003-06-01

    A centuries long history of mining and mineral processing has resulted in elevated Cd, Pb and Zn soil concentrations in the vicinity of the Silvermines abandoned mine site (AMS), Co. Tipperary, Ireland. A process for preliminary evaluation of environmental risk was developed and implemented. Potential pathways of metal compound transport and deposition were mapped and used to optimise the subsequent site investigation. Elevated soil metals are shown to be predominantly in areas where metal deposition in soil is associated with water related pathways (surface runoff, seasonal groundwater seepage and floodplains). Extensive areas of soil in the surrounding district are classified as contaminated on the basis of Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations, both total and potential bioavailable (EDTA-extractable). The most affected areas, with metal concentrations in soil comparable with that within the AMS, were floodplains located 2-3 km downstream from the site. Assessment of the sequential effects on grass and grazing animals indicates that Pb poses the greatest risk due to its high toxicity and high concentrations in soil (more than 10,000 mg kg-1). Within floodplain areas grazing cattle may intake a lethal dose of Pb. On the basis of the investigation an approach to risk assessment was developed which allowed quantified assessment of the risks related to individual metals, areas of contamination and contamination targets.

  12. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Michael K; Mehta, Angad P; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  13. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  14. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  15. Electron tunnelling through azurin is mediated by the active site Cu ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, Andrea; Gerunda, Mimmo; Canters, G. W.; Verbeet, M. Ph.; Facci, Paolo

    2003-07-01

    Cu- and Zn-azurin chemisorbed on Au(1 1 1) have been comparatively investigated by electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy in buffer solution. Cu-azurin shows a marked tunnelling current resonance upon substrate potential at -0.21 V (vs SCE), whereas Zn counterparts do not. These data, discussed in terms of current theories on electron tunnelling through redox adsorbates, demonstrate the role of the electroactive metal ion present in the active site in assisting electron transfer via this metalloprotein.

  16. Anisotropic Covalency Contributions to Superexchange Pathways in Type One Copper Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type one (T1) Cu sites deliver electrons to catalytic Cu active sites: the mononuclear type two (T2) Cu site in nitrite reductases (NiRs) and the trinuclear Cu cluster in the multicopper oxidases (MCOs). The T1 Cu and the remote catalytic sites are connected via a Cys-His intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) bridge, which contains two potential ET pathways: P1 through the protein backbone and P2 through the H-bond between the Cys and the His. The high covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond is shown here to activate the T1 Cu site for hole superexchange via occupied valence orbitals of the bridge. This covalency-activated electronic coupling (HDA) facilitates long-range ET through both pathways. These pathways can be selectively activated depending on the geometric and electronic structure of the T1 Cu site and thus the anisotropic covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond. In NiRs, blue (π-type) T1 sites utilize P1 and green (σ-type) T1 sites utilize P2, with P2 being more efficient. Comparing the MCOs to NiRs, the second-sphere environment changes the conformation of the Cys-His pathway, which selectively activates HDA for superexchange by blue π sites for efficient turnover in catalysis. These studies show that a given protein bridge, here Cys-His, provides different superexchange pathways and electronic couplings depending on the anisotropic covalencies of the donor and acceptor metal sites. PMID:25310460

  17. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in soils and crops of industrial sites, Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Anahita; Honarjoo, Naser; Fallahzade, Jaber; Najafi, Payam

    2013-01-15

    This study was planned to investigate the concentrations of heavy metal in soils and crops and estimate the potential health risks of metals to humans via consumption of crops grown at industrial sites (Zarrinshahr and Mobarakeh) and control site (Natanz) in Isfahan province, central Iran. The soils and food crops (wheat and rice grains and onion bulbs) were digested by acid digestion method and then were analyzed for Mn, Cu and Zn by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that the concentration of Zn in the soils of Mobarakeh was higher than the soils of Zarrinshahr and Natanz. The concentrations of Mn in the soils of Natanz and Mobarakeh were higher than the soils of Zarrinshahr. The concentration of Zn in the wheat was significantly higher than that rice and onion crops. The concentrations of Zn and Cu were higher in wheat crop in Mobarakeh compared with other cases. Results of this study revealed that the concentrations of Zn, Cu and Mn in the soils of studied sites were below than the maximum allowable levels. The average concentration of Zn, Cu and Mn metals in rice, wheat and onion crops were below than the maximum allowable levels of WHO guideline. The estimated daily intakes of heavy metals from the crops of three sites were lower than the tolerable daily intake recommended by FAO/WHO. Consequently, these crops cannot be an important source of Zn, Cu and Mn for risk to human health. PMID:24199494

  18. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  19. Roles of exogenous divalent metals in the nucleolytic activity of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Han, Yingchun; Pan, Qunhui; Shen, Tao; Liu, Changlin

    2007-04-01

    It is well known that the wild type Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (holo SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to peroxide hydrogen and dioxygen. However, a new function of holo SOD, i.e., nucleolytic activity has been found [W. Jiang, T. Shen, Y. Han, Q. Pan, C. Liu, J. Biol. Inorg. Chem. 11 (2006) 835-848], which is linked to the incorporation of exogenous divalent metals into the enzyme-DNA complex. In this study, the roles of exogenous divalent metals in the nucleolytic activity were explored in detail by a series of biochemical experiments. Based on a non-equivalent multi-site binding model, affinity of a divalent metal for the enzyme-DNA complex was determined by absorption titration, indicating that the complex can provide at least a high and a low affinity site for the metal ion. These mean that the holo SOD may use a "two exogenous metal ion pathway" as a mechanism in which both metal ions are directly involved in the catalytic process of DNA cleavage. In addition, the pH versus DNA cleavage rate profiles can be fitted to two ionizing-group models, indicating the presence of a general acid and a general base in catalysis. A model that requires histidine residues, metal-bound water molecules and two hydrated metal ions to operate in concert could be used to interpret the catalysis of DNA hydrolysis, supported by the dependences of loss of the nucleolytic activity on time and on the concentration of the specific chemical modifier to the histidine residues on the enzyme. PMID:17292965

  20. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  1. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  2. Background concentrations of metals in wetland soils on and near the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the naturally occurring concentrations of metals in unimpacted wetland soils at the Savannah River Site located near Aiken, SC. Soil samples were collected from three broad categories of wetlands: (1) large stream floodplain wetlands, (2) small stream floodplain wetlands, and (3) upland bays and depressions. Samples were collected from 75 locations to a depth of 3.1 m. All samples were analyzed for selected metals using EPA protocol and standard methods. Additionally, the pH, exchange capacity, and total organic carbon content of each sample was determined. Standard summary statistics were calculated and results are presented for each constituent. Box plots were also created relating metals concentrations to grain size distribution. Metals concentrations were found to increase with increasing silt and clay content. This increase in concentration was attributed to increasing cation exchange capacity and increasing organic matter content.

  3. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices.

  4. Mathematical modeling of heavy metals contamination from MSW landfill site in Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tantemsapya, N; Naksakul, Y; Wirojanagud, W

    2011-01-01

    Kham Bon landfill site is one of many municipality waste disposal sites in Thailand which are in an unsanitary condition. The site has been receiving municipality wastes without separating hazardous waste since 1968. Heavy metals including, Pb, Cr and Cd are found in soil and groundwater around the site, posing a health risk to people living nearby. In this research, contamination transport modelling of Pb, Cr and Cd was simulated using MODFLOW for two periods, at the present (2010) and 20 years prediction (2030). Model results showed that heavy metals, especially Pb and Cr migrated toward the north-eastern and south-eastern direction. The 20 years prediction showed that, heavy metals tend to move from the top soil to the deeper aquifer. The migration would not exceed 500 m radius from the landfill centre in the next 20 years, which is considered to be a slow process. From the simulation model, it is recommended that a mitigation measure should be performed to reduce the risk from landfill contamination. Hazardous waste should be separated for proper management. Groundwater contamination in the aquifer should be closely monitored. Consumption of groundwater in a 500 m radius must be avoided. In addition, rehabilitation of the landfill site should be undertaken to prevent further mobilization of pollutants.

  5. Promoting the Adsorption of Metal Ions on Kaolinite by Defect Sites: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiong; Li, Hang; Yang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Defect sites exist abundantly in minerals and play a crucial role for a variety of important processes. Here molecular dynamics simulations are used to comprehensively investigate the adsorption behaviors, stabilities and mechanisms of metal ions on defective minerals, considering different ionic concentrations, defect sizes and contents. Outer-sphere adsorbed Pb2+ ions predominate for all models (regular and defective), while inner-sphere Na+ ions, which exist sporadically only at concentrated solutions for regular models, govern the adsorption for all defective models. Adsorption quantities and stabilities of metal ions on kaolinite are fundamentally promoted by defect sites, thus explaining the experimental observations. Defect sites improve the stabilities of both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption, and (quasi) inner-sphere Pb2+ ions emerge only at defect sites that reinforce the interactions. Adsorption configurations are greatly altered by defect sites but respond weakly by changing defect sizes or contents. Both adsorption quantities and stabilities are enhanced by increasing defect sizes or contents, while ionic concentrations mainly affect adsorption quantities. We also find that adsorption of metal ions and anions can be promoted by each other and proceeds in a collaborative mechanism. Results thus obtained are beneficial to comprehend related processes for all types of minerals. PMID:26403873

  6. Site-Specific Scaling Relations for Hydrocarbon Adsorption on Hexagonal Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Montemore, Matthew M.; Medlin, James W.

    2013-10-03

    Screening a large number of surfaces for their catalytic performance remains a challenge, leading to the need for simple models to predict adsorption properties. To facilitate rapid prediction of hydrocarbon adsorption energies, scaling relations that allow for calculation of the adsorption energy of any intermediate attached to any symmetric site on any hexagonal metal surface through a carbon atom were developed. For input, these relations require only simple electronic properties of the surface and of the gas-phase reactant molecules. Determining adsorption energies consists of up to four steps: (i) calculating the adsorption energy of methyl in the top site using density functional theory or by simple relations based on the electronic structure of the surface; (ii) using modified versions of classical scaling relations to scale between methyl in the top site and C₁ species with more metal-surface bonds (i.e., C, CH, CH₂) in sites that complete adsorbate tetravalency; (iii) using gas-phase bond energies to predict adsorption energies of longer hydrocarbons (i.e., CR, CR₂, CR₃); and (iv) expressing energetic changes upon translation of hydrocarbons to various sites in terms of the number of agostic interactions and the change in the number of carbon-metal bonds. Combining all of these relations allows accurate scaling over a wide range of adsorbates and surfaces, resulting in efficient screening of catalytic surfaces and a clear elucidation of adsorption trends. The relations are used to explain trends in methane reforming, hydrocarbon chain growth, and propane dehydrogenation.

  7. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  8. Using thermal evolution profiles to infer tritium speciation in nuclear site metals: an aid to decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phil E; Kim, Daeji

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the association and retention of tritium in metals has significance in nuclear decommissioning programs and can lead to cost benefits through waste reduction and recycling of materials. To develop insights, a range of metals from two nuclear sites and one non-nuclear site were investigated which had different exposure histories. Tritium speciation in metals was inferred through incremental heating experiments over the range of 20-900 °C using a Raddec Pyrolyser instrument. Systematic differences in thermal desorption profiles were found for nonirradiated and irradiated metals. In nonirradiated metals (e.g., stainless steel and copper), it was found that significant tritium had become incorporated following prolonged exposure to tritiated water vapor (HTO) or tritium/hydrogen gas (HT) in nuclear facilities. This externally derived tritium enters metals by diffusion with a rate controlled by the metal composition and whether the surface of the metal had been sealed or coated prior to exposure. The tritium is normally trapped in hydrated oxides lying along grain boundaries. In irradiated metals, an additional type of tritium can form internally through neutron capture reactions. The amount formed depends on the concentration and distribution of trace lithium and boron in the metal as well as the integrated neutron flux. Liberating this kind of tritium typically requires temperatures above 800 °C. The pattern of tritium evolution derived from simple thermal desorption experiments allows reliable inferences to be drawn on the likely origin, location, and phases that trap tritium. Any weakly bound tritium liberated at temperatures of ~100 °C is indicative of mostly HTO interactions in the metal. Any strongly bound tritium liberated over the range of 600-900 °C is indicative of neutrogenic tritium formed via neutron capture by trace Li and B. Neutron capture by lithium is likely to be more significant than for boron based on lithium's higher trace

  9. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  10. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-12-16

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32-1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis.

  11. Theoretical study on anti-site defects in half-metallic zinc-blende ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, M.; Seike, M.; Sato, K.; Katayama-Yoshida, H.

    2004-05-01

    Effects of anti-site defects in a half-metallic ferromagnet, zinc-blende CrAs, on its electronic and magnetic properties are studied theoretically based on the first-principles band-structure calculations. The magnetic moment of the anti-site Cr atom is coupled anti-ferromagnetically with that of the Cr atom at the ordinary-site, while the ferromagnetic coupling between the Cr moments at the ordinary-sites is robust against the formation of the anti-site defects. The formation of the impurity-bands in the energy gap of the minority-spin states degrades the degree of the spin-polarization at the Fermi-level.

  12. Concentration and transportation of heavy metals in vegetables and risk assessment of human exposure to bioaccessible heavy metals in soil near a waste-incinerator site, South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Kang, Yuan; Pan, Weijian; Zeng, Lixuan; Zhang, Qiuyun; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-07-15

    There is limited study focusing on the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in vegetables and human exposure to bioaccessible heavy metals in soil. In the present study, heavy metal concentrations (Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd) were measured in five types of vegetables, soil, root, and settled air particle samples from two sites (at a domestic waste incinerator and at 20km away from the incinerator) in Guangzhou, South China. Heavy metal concentrations in soil were greater than those in aerial parts of vegetables and roots, which indicated that vegetables bioaccumulated low amount of heavy metals from soil. The similar pattern of heavy metal (Cr, Cd) was found in the settled air particle samples and aerial parts of vegetables from two sites, which may suggest that foliar uptake may be an important pathway of heavy metal from the environment to vegetables. The highest levels of heavy metals were found in leaf lettuce (125.52μg/g, dry weight) and bitter lettuce (71.2μg/g) for sites A and B, respectively, followed by bitter lettuce and leaf lettuce for sites A and B, respectively. Swamp morning glory accumulated the lowest amount of heavy metals (81.02μg/g for site A and 53.2μg/g for site B) at both sites. The bioaccessibility of heavy metals in soil ranged from Cr (2%) to Cu (71.78%). Risk assessment showed that Cd and Pb in soil samples resulted in the highest non-cancer risk and Cd would result in unacceptable cancer risk for children and risk. The non-dietary intake of soil was the most important exposure pathway, when the bioaccessibility of heavy metals was taken into account.

  13. Concentration and transportation of heavy metals in vegetables and risk assessment of human exposure to bioaccessible heavy metals in soil near a waste-incinerator site, South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Kang, Yuan; Pan, Weijian; Zeng, Lixuan; Zhang, Qiuyun; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-07-15

    There is limited study focusing on the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in vegetables and human exposure to bioaccessible heavy metals in soil. In the present study, heavy metal concentrations (Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd) were measured in five types of vegetables, soil, root, and settled air particle samples from two sites (at a domestic waste incinerator and at 20km away from the incinerator) in Guangzhou, South China. Heavy metal concentrations in soil were greater than those in aerial parts of vegetables and roots, which indicated that vegetables bioaccumulated low amount of heavy metals from soil. The similar pattern of heavy metal (Cr, Cd) was found in the settled air particle samples and aerial parts of vegetables from two sites, which may suggest that foliar uptake may be an important pathway of heavy metal from the environment to vegetables. The highest levels of heavy metals were found in leaf lettuce (125.52μg/g, dry weight) and bitter lettuce (71.2μg/g) for sites A and B, respectively, followed by bitter lettuce and leaf lettuce for sites A and B, respectively. Swamp morning glory accumulated the lowest amount of heavy metals (81.02μg/g for site A and 53.2μg/g for site B) at both sites. The bioaccessibility of heavy metals in soil ranged from Cr (2%) to Cu (71.78%). Risk assessment showed that Cd and Pb in soil samples resulted in the highest non-cancer risk and Cd would result in unacceptable cancer risk for children and risk. The non-dietary intake of soil was the most important exposure pathway, when the bioaccessibility of heavy metals was taken into account. PMID:25829292

  14. Approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean Spanish soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Gil, C.; Mormeneo, S.; Abad, M.; Cervera, M.; González, A.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metal contaminated soils results in various negative environmental effects such as a decrease in biological diversity, decline crop productivity or human exposure to toxic elements in the others. The influence of heavy metal contamination in Spanish Mediterranean soils on its biological activity was studied. Non-polluted soils and heavy metal contaminated soils were sampled from different sites affected by several industrial activities. Soil characteristics, heavy metals (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn and V), soil organic matter, microorganism numbers, biomass microbial carbon, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were determined. Except to a rice farming soil, the results indicate that soils with high concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn showed low soil respiration, biomass carbon and dehydrogenase activity with respect non-polluted soils with similar characteristics. Our results provide evidence that these parameters are good approach to study of heavy metal contamination effect on biological activity in Mediterranean soils. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  15. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  16. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  17. SITE demonstration of the Dynaphore/Forager Sponge technology to remove dissolved metals from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, C.R.; Vaccaro, G.

    1995-10-01

    A Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demonstration was conducted of the Dynaphore/Forager Sponge technology during the week of April 3, 1994 at the N.L. Industries Superfund Site in Pedricktown, New Jersey. The Forager Sponge is an open-celled cellulose sponge incorporating an amine-containing chelating polymer that selectively absorbs dissolved heavy metals in both cationic and anionic states. This technology is a volume reduction technology in which heavy metal contaminants from an aqueous medium are concentrated into a smaller volume for facilitated disposal. The developer states that the technology can be used to remove heavy metals from a wide variety of aqueous media, such as groundwater, surface waters and process waters. The sponge matrix can be directly disposed, or regenerated with chemical solutions. For this demonstration the sponge was set up as a mobile pump-and-treat system which treated groundwater contaminated with heavy metals. The demonstration focused on the system`s ability to remove lead, cadmium, chromium and copper from the contaminated groundwater over a continuous 72-hour test. The removal of heavy metals proceeded in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of innocuous cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and aluminum.

  18. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  19. PROGENITOR DIAGNOSTICS FOR STRIPPED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: MEASURED METALLICITIES AT EXPLOSION SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Modjaz, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Perley, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Kewley, L.

    2011-04-10

    Metallicity is expected to influence not only the lives of massive stars but also the outcome of their deaths as supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, there are surprisingly few direct measurements of the local metallicities of different flavors of core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). Here, we present the largest existing set of host-galaxy spectra with H II region emission lines at the sites of 35 stripped-envelope CCSNe. We derive local oxygen abundances in a robust manner in order to constrain the SN Ib/c progenitor population. We obtain spectra at the SN sites, include SNe from targeted and untargeted surveys, and perform the abundance determinations using three different oxygen-abundance calibrations. The sites of SNe Ic (the demise of the most heavily stripped stars, having lost both H and He layers) are systematically more metal rich than those of SNe Ib (arising from stars that retained their He layer) in all calibrations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test yields the very low probability of 1% that SN Ib and SN Ic environment abundances, which are different on average by {approx}0.2 dex (in the Pettini and Pagel scale), are drawn from the same parent population. Broad-lined SNe Ic (without GRBs) occur at metallicities between those of SNe Ib and SNe Ic. Lastly, we find that the host-galaxy central oxygen abundance is not a good indicator of the local SN metallicity; hence, large-scale SN surveys need to obtain local abundance measurements in order to quantify the impact of metallicity on stellar death.

  20. Formation of metal nanoclusters on specific surface sites of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nathalie; Meining, Winfried; Hars, Ulrike; Fischer, Markus; Ladenstein, Rudolf; Huber, Robert; Bacher, Adelbert; Weinkauf, Sevil; Bachmann, Luis

    2002-08-01

    During vacuum condensation of metals on frozen proteins, nanoclusters are preferentially formed at specific surface sites (decoration). Understanding the nature of metal/protein interaction is of interest for structure analysis and is also important in the fields of biocompatibility and sensor development. Studies on the interaction between metal and distinct areas on the protein which enhance or impede the probability for cluster formation require information on the structural details of the protein's surface underlying the metal clusters. On three enzyme complexes, lumazine synthase from Bacillus subtilis, proteasome from Thermoplasma acidophilum and GTP cyclohydrolase I from Escherichia coli, the decoration sites as determined by electron microscopy (EM) were correlated with their atomic surface structures as obtained by X-ray crystallography. In all three cases, decoration of the same protein results in different cluster distributions for gold and silver. Gold decorates surface areas consisting of polar but uncharged residues and with rough relief whereas silver clusters are preferentially formed on top of protein pores outlined by charged and hydrophilic residues and filled with frozen buffer under the experimental conditions. A common quality of both metals is that they strictly avoid condensation on hydrophobic sites lacking polar and charged residues. The results open ways to analyse the binding mechanism of nanoclusters to small specific sites on the surface of hydrated biomacromolecules by non-microscopic, physical-chemical methods. Understanding the mechanism may lead to advanced decoration techniques resulting in fewer background clusters. This would improve the analysis of single molecules with regard to their symmetries and their orientation in the adsorbed state and in precrystalline assemblies as well as facilitate the detection of point defects in crystals caused by misorientation or by impurities. PMID:12144790

  1. Mössbauer characterization of the Fe-S center in the catalytic metal binding site of alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C.; Dietrich, H.; Maret, W.; Zeppezauer, M.; Montiel-Montoya, R.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1986-02-01

    Iron in its divalent and trivalent form can be substituted in the catalytic zinc site of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (HLADH). Fe-HLADH in either oxidation state does not show enzymatic activity in the oxidation of ethanol. Nevertheless, Mössbauer studies of this material are of considerable interest, because they elucidate the effect of pH and coenzyme-induced conformational changes of the protein on the metal ion. It is of importance to note that zinc itself due to the lack of suitable chromophoric and magnetic properties does not provide any comparable information.

  2. Tolerance to Cadmium of Agave lechuguilla (Agavaceae) Seeds and Seedlings from Sites Contaminated with Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Hurtado, Alejandra; Rangel-Méndez, René; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated if seeds of Agave lechuguilla from contaminated sites with heavy metals were more tolerant to Cd ions than seeds from noncontaminated sites. Seeds from a highly contaminated site (Villa de la Paz) and from a noncontaminated site (Villa de Zaragoza) were evaluated. We tested the effect of Cd concentrations on several ecophysiological, morphological, genetical, and anatomical responses. Seed viability, seed germination, seedling biomass, and radicle length were higher for the non-polluted site than for the contaminated one. The leaves of seedlings from the contaminated place had more cadmium and showed peaks attributed to chemical functional groups such as amines, amides, carboxyl, and alkenes that tended to disappear due to increasing the concentration of cadmium than those from Villa de Zaragoza. Malformed cells in the parenchyma surrounding the vascular bundles were found in seedlings grown with Cd from both sites. The leaves from the contaminated place showed a higher metallothioneins expression in seedlings from the control group than that of seedlings at different Cd concentrations. Most of our results fitted into the hypothesis that plants from metal-contaminated places do not tolerate more pollution, because of the accumulative effect that cadmium might have on them. PMID:24453802

  3. Tolerance to cadmium of Agave lechuguilla (Agavaceae) seeds and seedlings from sites contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hurtado, Alejandra; Rangel-Méndez, René; Yáñez-Espinosa, Laura; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated if seeds of Agave lechuguilla from contaminated sites with heavy metals were more tolerant to Cd ions than seeds from noncontaminated sites. Seeds from a highly contaminated site (Villa de la Paz) and from a noncontaminated site (Villa de Zaragoza) were evaluated. We tested the effect of Cd concentrations on several ecophysiological, morphological, genetical, and anatomical responses. Seed viability, seed germination, seedling biomass, and radicle length were higher for the non-polluted site than for the contaminated one. The leaves of seedlings from the contaminated place had more cadmium and showed peaks attributed to chemical functional groups such as amines, amides, carboxyl, and alkenes that tended to disappear due to increasing the concentration of cadmium than those from Villa de Zaragoza. Malformed cells in the parenchyma surrounding the vascular bundles were found in seedlings grown with Cd from both sites. The leaves from the contaminated place showed a higher metallothioneins expression in seedlings from the control group than that of seedlings at different Cd concentrations. Most of our results fitted into the hypothesis that plants from metal-contaminated places do not tolerate more pollution, because of the accumulative effect that cadmium might have on them. PMID:24453802

  4. Tolerance to cadmium of Agave lechuguilla (Agavaceae) seeds and seedlings from sites contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hurtado, Alejandra; Rangel-Méndez, René; Yáñez-Espinosa, Laura; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated if seeds of Agave lechuguilla from contaminated sites with heavy metals were more tolerant to Cd ions than seeds from noncontaminated sites. Seeds from a highly contaminated site (Villa de la Paz) and from a noncontaminated site (Villa de Zaragoza) were evaluated. We tested the effect of Cd concentrations on several ecophysiological, morphological, genetical, and anatomical responses. Seed viability, seed germination, seedling biomass, and radicle length were higher for the non-polluted site than for the contaminated one. The leaves of seedlings from the contaminated place had more cadmium and showed peaks attributed to chemical functional groups such as amines, amides, carboxyl, and alkenes that tended to disappear due to increasing the concentration of cadmium than those from Villa de Zaragoza. Malformed cells in the parenchyma surrounding the vascular bundles were found in seedlings grown with Cd from both sites. The leaves from the contaminated place showed a higher metallothioneins expression in seedlings from the control group than that of seedlings at different Cd concentrations. Most of our results fitted into the hypothesis that plants from metal-contaminated places do not tolerate more pollution, because of the accumulative effect that cadmium might have on them.

  5. ZrO2 -Based Alternatives to Conventional Propane Dehydrogenation Catalysts: Active Sites, Design, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Sokolov, Sergey; Stoyanova, Mariana; Kondratenko, Vita A; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2015-12-21

    Non-oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene is an established large-scale process that, however, faces challenges, particularly in catalyst development; these are the toxicity of chromium compounds, high cost of platinum, and catalyst durability. Herein, we describe the design of unconventional catalysts based on bulk materials with a certain defect structure, for example, ZrO2 promoted with other metal oxides. Comprehensive characterization supports the hypothesis that coordinatively unsaturated Zr cations are the active sites for propane dehydrogenation. Their concentration can be adjusted by varying the kind of ZrO2 promoter and/or supporting tiny amounts of hydrogenation-active metal. Accordingly designed Cu(0.05 wt %)/ZrO2 -La2 O3 showed industrially relevant activity and durability over ca. 240 h on stream in a series of 60 dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles between 550 and 625 °C. PMID:26566072

  6. Magnetic Measurements and Heavy Metal Concentrations at Formosa Mine Superfund Site, Douglas County, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in the field of environmental magnetism have led to exciting new applications for this field. Magnetic minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and tend to have an affinity for heavy metals. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties are often significantly related to concentrations of heavy metals and/or pollution loading index (PLI). As a result, magnetic techniques have been used as proxy for determining hot spots of several types of pollution produced from a diversity of anthropogenic sources. Magnetic measurements are non-destructive and relatively inexpensive compared to geochemical analyses. The utility of environmental magnetic methods varies widely depending on biological, chemical and physical processes that create and transform soils and sediments. Applications in the direction of mapping heavy metals have been studied and shown to be quite useful in countries such as China and India but to date, little research has been done in the US. As such, there is need to expand the scope of research to a wider range of soil types and land uses, especially within the US. This study investigates the application of environmental magnetic techniques to mapping of heavy metal concentrations and PLI at the Formosa Mine Superfund Site, an abandoned mine about 25 miles southwest of Roseburg, OR. Using hotspot analysis, correlation and cluster analyses, interactions between metals and magnetic parameters are examined in relation to environmental factors such as proximity to seeps and adits. Preliminary results suggest significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with certain heavy metals, signifying that magnetic methods may be useful in mapping heavy metal hotspots at this site.

  7. Oxidation Protection in Metal-Binding Peptide Motif and Its Application to Antibody for Site-Selective Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye-Shin; Lee, Sunbae; Park, Soon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that a metal ion binding motif could serve as an efficient and robust tool for site-specific conjugation strategy. Cysteine-containing metal binding motifs were constructed as single repeat or tandem repeat peptides and their metal binding characteristics were investigated. The tandem repeats of the Cysteine-Glycine-Histidine (CGH) metal ion binding motif exhibited concerted binding to Co(II) ions, suggesting that conformational transition of peptide was triggered by the sequential metal ion binding. Evaluation of the free thiol content after reduction by reducing reagent showed that metal-ion binding elicited strong retardation of cysteine oxidation in the order of Zn(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II). The CGH metal ion binding motif was then introduced to the C-terminus of antibody heavy chain and the metal ion-dependent characteristics of oxidation kinetics were investigated. As in the case of peptides, CGH-motif-introduced antibody exhibited strong dependence on metal ion binding to protect against oxidation. Zn(II)-saturated antibody with tandem repeat of CGH motif retains the cysteine reactivity as long as 22 hour even with saturating O2 condition. Metal-ion dependent fluorophore labeling clearly indicated that metal binding motifs could be employed as an efficient tool for site-specific conjugation. Whereas Trastuzumab without a metal ion binding site exhibited site-nonspecific dye conjugation, Zn(II) ion binding to antibody with a tandem repeat of CGH motif showed that fluorophores were site-specifically conjugated to the heavy chain of antibody. We believe that this strong metal ion dependence on oxidation protection and the resulting site-selective conjugation could be exploited further to develop a highly site-specific conjugation strategy for proteins that contain multiple intrinsic cysteine residues, including monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27420328

  8. Heavy metal contamination from mining sites in South Morocco: monitoring metal content and toxicity of soil runoff and groundwater.

    PubMed

    El Khalil, Hicham; El Hamiani, Ouafae; Bitton, Gabriel; Ouazzani, Naaila; Boularbah, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the assessment of metal toxicity in runoff, in their contaminated soils and in the groundwater sampled from two mining areas in the region of Marrakech using a microbial bioassay MetPLATE. This bioassay is based on the specific inhibition of the beta-galactosidase enzyme of a mutant strain of Escherichia coli, by the metallic pollutants. The stream waters from all sampling stations in the two mines were all very toxic and displayed percent enzyme inhibition exceeding 87% except SWA4 and SWB1 stations in mine C. Their high concentrations of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) confirm the acute toxicity shown by MetPLATE. The pH of stream waters from mine B and C varied between 2.1 and 6.2 and was probably responsible for metal mobilization, suggesting a problem of acid mine drainage in these mining areas. The bioassay MetPLATE was also applied to mine tailings and to soils contaminated by the acidic waters. The results show that the high toxicity of these soils and tailings was mainly due to the relatively concentration of soluble Zn and Cu. The use of MetPLATE in groundwater toxicity testing shows that, most of the samples exhibited low metal toxicity (2.7-45.5% inhibition) except GW3 of the mine B (95.3% inhibition during the wet season and 82.9% inhibition during the dry season). This high toxicity is attributed to the higher than usual concentrations of Cu (189 microg Cu l(-1)) and Zn (1505 microg Zn l(-1)). These results show the potential risk of the contamination of different ecosystems situated to the vicinity of these two metalliferous sites. The general trend observed was an increase in metal toxicity measured by the MetPLATE with increasing total and mobile metal concentrations in the studied matrices. Therefore, the MetPLATE bioassay is a reliable and fast bioassay to estimate the metals toxicity in the aquatic and solids samples.

  9. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Metallo-β-Lactamase GOB in the Periplasmic Dizinc Form Reveals an Unusual Metal Site.

    PubMed

    Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Lisa, María-Natalia; Larrieux, Nicole; Drusin, Salvador I; Viale, Alejandro M; Moreno, Diego M; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Vila, Alejandro J

    2016-10-01

    Metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) are broad-spectrum, Zn(II)-dependent lactamases able to confer resistance to virtually every β-lactam antibiotic currently available. The large diversity of active-site structures and metal content among MBLs from different sources has limited the design of a pan-MBL inhibitor. GOB-18 is a divergent MBL from subclass B3 that is expressed by the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen Elizabethkingia meningoseptica This MBL is atypical, since several residues conserved in B3 enzymes (such as a metal ligand His) are substituted in GOB enzymes. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic di-Zn(II) form of GOB-18. This enzyme displays a unique active-site structure, with residue Gln116 coordinating the Zn1 ion through its terminal amide moiety, replacing a ubiquitous His residue. This situation contrasts with that of B2 MBLs, where an equivalent His116Asn substitution leads to a di-Zn(II) inactive species. Instead, both the mono- and di-Zn(II) forms of GOB-18 are active against penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. In silico docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that residue Met221 is not involved in substrate binding, in contrast to Ser221, which otherwise is conserved in most B3 enzymes. These distinctive features are conserved in recently reported GOB orthologues in environmental bacteria. These findings provide valuable information for inhibitor design and also posit that GOB enzymes have alternative functions.

  11. Antischistosomal Activity of Oxindolimine-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Bruno S.; Couto, Ricardo A. A.; Pinto, Pedro L. S.; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of oxindole-copper and -zinc complex derivatives have been reported as compounds with efficient proapoptotic activity toward different tumor cells (e.g., neuroblastomas, melanomas, monocytes). Here we assessed the efficacy of synthesized oxindole-copper(II), -zinc(II), and -vanadyl (VO2+) complexes against adult Schistosoma mansoni worms. The copper(II) complexes (50% inhibitory concentrations of 30 to 45 μM) demonstrated greater antischistosomal properties than the analogous zinc and vanadyl complexes regarding lethality, reduction of motor activity, and oviposition. PMID:26239976

  12. Health risk-based assessment and management of heavy metals-contaminated soil sites in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Chen, Ting-Chien; Chen, Bo-Ching; Guo, Horng-Yuh; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2010-10-01

    Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act) uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs) have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1) food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2) a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3) risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4) soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan.

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  14. Activation and inhibition of rubber transferases by metal cofactors and pyrophosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Deborah J; da Costa, Bernardo M T; Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Cornish, Katrina

    2003-09-01

    Metal cofactors are necessary for the activity of alkylation by prenyl transfer in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Rubber transferase (RuT, a cis-prenyl transferase) associated with purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica can use magnesium and manganese interchangably to achieve maximum velocity. We define the concentration of activator required for maximum velocity as [A](max). The [A](max)(Mg2+) in F. elastica (100 mM) is 10 times the [A](max)(Mg2+) for either H. brasiliensis (10 mM) or P. argentatum (8 mM). The [A](max)(Mn2+) in F. elastica (11 mM), H. brasiliensis (3.8 mM) and P. argentatum (6.8 mM) and the [A](max)(Mg2+) in H. brasiliensis (10 mM) and P. argentatum (8 mM) are similar. The differences in [A](max)(Mg2+) correlate with the actual endogenous Mg(2+) concentrations in the latex of living plants. Extremely low Mn(2+) levels in vivo indicate that Mg(2+) is the RuT cofactor in living H. brasiliensis and F. elastica trees. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that FPP-Mg(2+) and FPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule initiation, although free FPP and metal cations, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), can interact independently at the active site with the following relative dissociation constants K(d)(FPP) Metal) Metal). Similarly, IPP-Mg(2+) and IPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule polymerization. Although metal cations can interact independently at the active site with the relative dissociation constant K(d)(IPP-Metal) Metal), unlike FPP, IPP alone does not interact independently. All three RuTs have similar characteristics-indeterminate sized products, high K(m)(IPP), high metal [A](max), metal cofactor requirements, and are membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:12946411

  15. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  16. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  17. Coordination Environment of a Site-Bound Metal Ion in the Hammerhead Ribozyme Determined by 15N and 2H ESEEM Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Matthew; Lahiri, Simanti; Hoogstraten, Charles G.; Britt, R. David; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Although site-bound Mg2+ ions have been proposed to influence RNA structure and function, establishing the molecular properties of such sites has been challenging due largely to the unique electrostatic properties of the RNA biopolymer. We have previously determined that, in solution, the hammerhead ribozyme (a self-cleaving RNA) has a high-affinity metal ion binding site characterized by a Kd,app < 10 µM for Mn2+ in 1 M NaCl and speculated that this site has functional importance in the ribozyme cleavage reaction. Here we determine both the precise location and the hydration level of Mn2+ in this site using ESEEM (electron spin–echo envelope modulation) spectroscopy. Definitive assignment of the high-affinity site to the activity-sensitive A9/G10.1 region is achieved by site-specific labeling of G10.1 with 15N guanine. The coordinated metal ion retains four water ligands as measured by 2H ESEEM spectroscopy. The results presented here show that a functionally important, specific metal binding site is uniquely populated in the hammerhead ribozyme even in a background of high ionic strength. Although it has a relatively high thermodynamic affinity, this ion remains partially hydrated and is chelated to the RNA by just two ligands. PMID:17177426

  18. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  19. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2008-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TIM proteins. The structure of phosphatidylserine bound to the Ig domain showed that the hydrophilic head penetrates into the MILIBS and coordinates with the metal ion, while the aromatic residues on the tip of the FG loop interacted with the fatty acid chains and could insert into the lipid bilayer. Our results also revealed a significant role of the MILIBS in trafficking of TIM-1 to the cell surface. PMID:18083575

  20. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: a pathways approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  1. Metals other than uranium affected microbial community composition in a historical uranium-mining site.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Jana; Löffler, Sylvia; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Büchel, Georg; Hazen, Terry C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    To understand the links between the long-term impact of uranium and other metals on microbial community composition, ground- and surface water-influenced soils varying greatly in uranium and metal concentrations were investigated at the former uranium-mining district in Ronneburg, Germany. A soil-based 16S PhyloChip approach revealed 2358 bacterial and 35 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTU) within diverse phylogenetic groups with higher OTU numbers than at other uranium-contaminated sites, e.g., at Oak Ridge. Iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB), which have the potential to attenuate uranium and other metals by the enzymatic and/or abiotic reduction of metal ions, were found at all sites. Although soil concentrations of solid-phase uranium were high, ranging from 5 to 1569 μg·g (dry weight) soil(-1), redundancy analysis (RDA) and forward selection indicated that neither total nor bio-available uranium concentrations contributed significantly to the observed OTU distribution. Instead, microbial community composition appeared to be influenced more by redox potential. Bacterial communities were also influenced by bio-available manganese and total cobalt and cadmium concentrations. Bio-available cadmium impacted FeRB distribution while bio-available manganese and copper as well as solid-phase zinc concentrations in the soil affected SRB composition. Archaeal communities were influenced by the bio-available lead as well as total zinc and cobalt concentrations. These results suggest that (i) microbial richness was not impacted by heavy metals and radionuclides and that (ii) redox potential and secondary metal contaminants had the strongest effect on microbial community composition, as opposed to uranium, the primary source of contamination.

  2. Site-specific control of N7-metal coordination in DNA by a fluorescent purine derivative.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Anaëlle; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2012-01-01

    A synthetic strategy that utilizes O6-protected 8-bromoguanosine gives broad access to C8-guanine derivatives with phenyl, pyridine, thiophene, and furan substituents. The resulting 8-substituted 2'-deoxyguanosines are push-pull fluorophores that can exhibit environmentally sensitive quantum yields (Φ=0.001-0.72) due to excited-state proton-transfer reactions with bulk solvent. Changes in nucleoside fluorescence were used to characterize metal-binding affinity and specificity of 8-substituted 2'-deoxyguanosines. One derivative, 8-(2-pyridyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (2PyG), exhibits selective binding of Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Zn(II) through a bidentate effect provided by the N7 position of guanine and the 2-pyridyl nitrogen atom. Upon incorporation into DNA, 2-pyridine-modified guanine residues selectively bind to Cu(II) and Ni(II) with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) that range from 25 to 850 nM; the affinities depend on the folded state of the oligonucleotide (duplex>G-quadruplex) as well as the identity of the metal ion (Cu>Ni≫Cd). These binding affinities are approximately 10 to 1 000 times higher than for unmodified metal binding sites in DNA, thereby providing site-specific control of metal localization in alternatively folded nucleic acids. Temperature-dependent circular-dichroism studies reveal metal-dependent stabilization of duplexes, but destabilization of G-quadruplex structures upon adding Cu(II) to 2PyG-modified oligonucleotides. These results demonstrate how the addition of a single pyridine group to the C8 position of guanine provides a powerful new tool for studying the effects of N7 metalation on the structure, stability, and electronic properties of nucleic acids.

  3. The influence of soil organic carbon on interactions between microbial parameters and metal concentrations at a long-term contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Muhlbachova, G; Sagova-Mareckova, M; Omelka, M; Szakova, J; Tlustos, P

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and copper deposits on soil microbial parameters were investigated at a site exposed to contamination for over 200 years. Soil samples were collected in triplicates at 121 sites differing in contamination and soil organic carbon (SOC). Microbial biomass, respiration, dehydrogenase activity and metabolic quotient were determined and correlated with total and extractable metal concentrations in soil. The goal was to analyze complex interactions between toxic metals and microbial parameters by assessing the effect of soil organic carbon in the relationships. The effect of SOC was significant in all interactions and changed the correlations between microbial parameters and metal fractions from negative to positive. In some cases, the effect of SOC was combined with that of clay and soil pH. In the final analysis, dehydrogenase activity was negatively correlated to total metal concentrations and acetic acid extractable metals, respiration and metabolic quotient were to ammonium nitrate extractable metals. Dehydrogenase activity was the most sensitive microbial parameter correlating most frequently with contamination. Total and extractable zinc was most often correlated with microbial parameters. The large data set enabled robust explanation of discrepancies in organic matter functioning occurring frequently in analyzing of contaminated soil processes.

  4. Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Appling, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    Conservative approaches to human health or ecological risk assessment often result in evaluations that indicate a risk at metal concentrations near or below background levels. This presents a complex dilemma to regulators, responsible parties, and the public: How can risk be more realistically estimated so that the public is not unnecessarily alarmed into thinking normal exposures pose abnormal risk, and site remediation can be responsible yet cost-effective? One answer is using-ecological and human health studies together to improve the quality of both types of assessments. Mammalian herbivores and roving children are good spatial and temporal integrators of exposure; biomarkers or Monte Carlo-based models of exposure to herbivores can support realistic estimates of exposure to children. Reduced bioavailability of metals in soils at mining sites is well recognized for many metals and is amenable to study in ecological species; such studies reduce the overestimate of risk to humans through direct contact or exposure via the food chain. Recent and current human health studies of lead and arsenic bioavailability also support ecological assessments. Mixtures of metals pose special challenges because of the potential for antagonistic, additive, or synergistic effects with respect to bioavailability, absorption, distribution, excretion, toxic effects and nutritional or physiological essentiality. Combining results from pharmacokinetic, mechanistic, and environmental studies of mixtures enhances the predictive abilities of risk assessments.

  5. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site

    PubMed Central

    Adama, M.; Esena, R.; Fosu-Mensah, B.; Yirenya-Tawiah, D.

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (Igeo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites. PMID:27034685

  6. Chemical transformation of toxic metals by a Psuedomonas strain from a toxic waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Choate, D.; Blake, R.; Revis, N. Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN )

    1991-03-11

    Pseudomonas maltophilia, 0-2, isolated from soil at a toxic waste site in Oak Ridge, TN, catalyzed the transformation and precipitation of numerous toxic metal cations and oxyanions. When a viable inoculum (1%) of 0-2 was introduced into LB broth containing 0.2 mM Hg(II), 1 mM Cr(VI), 40 mM Se(IV), 3 mM Pb(II), 3mM Au(III), 3mM Cd(II), 10mM Te(IV), or 4mM Ag(I), effective removal of the toxic metal was complete within 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 4, 5, and 7 days, respectively. The NADPH-dependent reduction of Hg(II) was catalyzed by an inducible mercuric reductase. The reduction of selenite and tellurite to their insoluble elemental forms appeared to be mediated by an intracellular glutathione reductase that utilized the spontaneously-formed bis(glutathio)Se or bis(glutathio)Te, respectively, as pseudosubstrates. The biomolecules responsible for the remaining metal transformations are currently under investigation. This project could provide useful information toward the eventual exploitation of P. maltophilia and related organisms for the removal of toxic metal wastes from selected, heavily polluted sites.

  7. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site.

    PubMed

    Adama, M; Esena, R; Fosu-Mensah, B; Yirenya-Tawiah, D

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (I geo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites. PMID:27034685

  8. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  9. Ribonuclease L and metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease cleavage sites in host and viral RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daphne A.; Jha, Babal K.; Silverman, Robert H.; Hesselberth, Jay R.; Barton, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is a metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease associated with antiviral and antibacterial defense, cancer and lifespan. Despite the biological significance of RNase L, the RNAs cleaved by this enzyme are poorly defined. In this study, we used deep sequencing methods to reveal the frequency and location of RNase L cleavage sites within host and viral RNAs. To make cDNA libraries, we exploited the 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphate at the end of RNA fragments produced by RNase L and other metal-ion–independent endoribonucleases. We optimized and validated 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphate cDNA synthesis and Illumina sequencing methods using viral RNAs cleaved with purified RNase L, viral RNAs cleaved with purified RNase A and RNA from uninfected and poliovirus-infected HeLa cells. Using these methods, we identified (i) discrete regions of hepatitis C virus and poliovirus RNA genomes that were profoundly susceptible to RNase L and other single-strand specific endoribonucleases, (ii) RNase L-dependent and RNase L-independent cleavage sites within ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and (iii) 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphates at the ends of 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA. Monitoring the frequency and location of metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease cleavage sites within host and viral RNAs reveals, in part, how these enzymes contribute to health and disease. PMID:24500209

  10. Communication between the Zinc and Nickel Sites in Dimeric HypA: Metal Recognition and pH Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Perovic, I; Martin-Diaconescu, V; O’Brien, K; Chivers, P; Sondej Pochapsky, S; Pochapsky, T; Maroney, M

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, requires the nickel-containing metalloenzymes urease and NiFe-hydrogenase to survive this low pH environment. The maturation of both enzymes depends on the metallochaperone, HypA. HypA contains two metal sites, an intrinsic zinc site and a low-affinity nickel binding site. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that the structure of the intrinsic zinc site of HypA is dynamic and able to sense both nickel loading and pH changes. At pH 6.3, an internal pH that occurs during acid shock, the zinc site undergoes unprecedented ligand substitutions to convert from a Zn(Cys){sub 4} site to a Zn(His){sub 2}(Cys){sub 2} site. NMR spectroscopy shows that binding of Ni(II) to HypA results in paramagnetic broadening of resonances near the N-terminus. NOEs between the {beta}-CH{sub 2} protons of Zn cysteinyl ligands are consistent with a strand-swapped HypA dimer. Addition of nickel causes resonances from the zinc binding motif and other regions to double, indicating more than one conformation can exist in solution. Although the structure of the high-spin, 5-6 coordinate Ni(II) site is relatively unaffected by pH, the nickel binding stoichiometry is decreased from one per monomer to one per dimer at pH = 6.3. Mutation of any cysteine residue in the zinc binding motif results in a zinc site structure similar to that found for holo-WT-HypA at low pH and is unperturbed by the addition of nickel. Mutation of the histidines that flank the CXXC motifs results in a zinc site structure that is similar to holo-WT-HypA at neutral pH (Zn(Cys){sub 4}) and is no longer responsive to nickel binding or pH changes. Using an in vitro urease activity assay, it is shown that the recombinant protein is sufficient for recovery of urease activity in cell lysate from a HypA deletion mutant, and that mutations in the zinc-binding motif result in a decrease in recovered urease activity. The results are interpreted in terms of a model

  11. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  12. Identification of ice nucleation active sites on feldspar dust particles.

    PubMed

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-03-19

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  13. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  14. Turning aluminium into a noble-metal-like catalyst for low-temperature activation of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Irinder S; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Veyan, Jean François; Chabal, Yves J

    2011-11-01

    Activation of molecular hydrogen is the first step in producing many important industrial chemicals that have so far required expensive noble-metal catalysts and thermal activation. We demonstrate here that aluminium doped with very small amounts of titanium can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90 K. Using an approach that uses CO as a probe molecule, we identify the atomistic arrangement of the catalytically active sites containing Ti on Al(111) surfaces, combining infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and first-principles modelling. CO molecules, selectively adsorbed on catalytically active sites, form a complex with activated hydrogen that is removed at remarkably low temperatures (115 K; possibly as a molecule). These results provide the first direct evidence that Ti-doped Al can carry out the essential first step of molecular hydrogen activation under nearly barrierless conditions, thereby challenging the monopoly of noble metals in hydrogen activation. PMID:21946610

  15. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  16. Bioavailability of particulate metal to zebra mussels: biodynamic modelling shows that assimilation efficiencies are site-specific.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Priadi, Cindy; Ayrault, Sophie; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the ability of the biodynamic model to predict the trophic bioaccumulation of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in a freshwater bivalve. Zebra mussels were transplanted to three sites along the Seine River (France) and collected monthly for 11 months. Measurements of the metal body burdens in mussels were compared with the predictions from the biodynamic model. The exchangeable fraction of metal particles did not account for the bioavailability of particulate metals, since it did not capture the differences between sites. The assimilation efficiency (AE) parameter is necessary to take into account biotic factors influencing particulate metal bioavailability. The biodynamic model, applied with AEs from the literature, overestimated the measured concentrations in zebra mussels, the extent of overestimation being site-specific. Therefore, an original methodology was proposed for in situ AE measurements for each site and metal.

  17. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  18. Differential Assembly of Catalytic Interactions within the Conserved Active Sites of Two Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and a critical aspect of RNA function. Yet structured RNAs typically lack the preorganization needed for strong binding and precise positioning. A striking example is the group I ribozyme from Tetrahymena, which binds its guanosine substrate (G) orders of magnitude slower than diffusion. Binding of G is also thermodynamically coupled to binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) and further work has shown that the transition from E•G to E•S•G accompanies a conformational change that allows G to make the active site interactions required for catalysis. The group I ribozyme from Azoarcus has a similarly slow association rate but lacks the coupled binding observed for the Tetrahymena ribozyme. Here we test, using G analogs and metal ion rescue experiments, whether this absence of coupling arises from a higher degree of preorganization within the Azoarcus active site. Our results suggest that the Azoarcus ribozyme forms cognate catalytic metal ion interactions with G in the E•G complex, interactions that are absent in the Tetrahymena E•G complex. Thus, RNAs that share highly similar active site architectures and catalyze the same reactions can differ in the assembly of transition state interactions. More generally, an ability to readily access distinct local conformational states may have facilitated the evolutionary exploration needed to attain RNA machines that carry out complex, multi-step processes. PMID:27501145

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of metal complexes of novel Schiff base. Synthesis, thermal and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. M.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; Ibrahim, Amr A.

    2009-07-01

    Novel Schiff base (HL) ligand is prepared via condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The ligand is characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Metal complexes are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analyses (TGA, DrTGA and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a uninegatively tridentate manner with NNO donor sites of the azomethine N, amino N and deprotonated caroxylic-O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligands, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia Coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus Pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data show that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Shciff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  20. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  1. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  2. FINDSITE-metal: Integrating evolutionary information and machine learning for structure-based metal binding site prediction at the proteome level

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of gene sequences, many of which are hypothetical proteins with unknown function, has stimulated the development of accurate computational tools for protein function prediction with evolution/structure-based approaches showing considerable promise. In this paper, we present FINDSITE-metal, a new threading-based method designed specifically to detect metal binding sites in modeled protein structures. Comprehensive benchmarks using different quality protein structures show that weakly homologous protein models provide sufficient structural information for quite accurate annotation by FINDSITE-metal. Combining structure/evolutionary information with machine learning results in highly accurate metal binding annotations; for protein models constructed by TASSER, whose average Cα RMSD from the native structure is 8.9 Å, 59.5% (71.9%) of the best of top five predicted metal locations are within 4 Å (8 Å) from a bound metal in the crystal structure. For most of the targets, multiple metal binding sites are detected with the best predicted binding site at rank 1 and within the top 2 ranks in 65.6% and 83.1% of the cases, respectively. Furthermore, for iron, copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium ions, the binding metal can be predicted with high, typically 70-90%, accuracy. FINDSITE-metal also provides a set of confidence indexes that help assess the reliability of predictions. Finally, we describe the proteome-wide application of FINDSITE-metal that quantifies the metal binding complement of the human proteome. FINDSITE-metal is freely available to the academic community at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/findsite-metal/. PMID:21287609

  3. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  4. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  5. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Unsaturated Metal Sites in M2 (dobpdc) Frameworks with Exceptional Structural Stability and Relation between Lewis Acidity and Adsorption Enthalpy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ga Young; Lee, Woo Ram; Jo, Hyuna; Park, Joonho; Song, Jeong Hwa; Lim, Kwang Soo; Moon, Dohyun; Jung, Hyun; Lim, Juhyung; Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Yousung; Hong, Chang Seop

    2016-05-23

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) M2 (dobpdc) (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; H4 dobpdc=4,4'-dihydroxy-1,1'-biphenyl-3,3'-dicarboxylic acid), with a highly dense arrangement of open metal sites along hexagonal channels were prepared by microwave-assisted or simple solvothermal reactions. The activated materials were structurally expanded when guest molecules including CO2 were introduced into the pores. The Lewis acidity of the open metal sites varied in the order MnZn, as confirmed by C=O stretching bands in the IR spectra, which are related to the CO2 adsorption enthalpy. DFT calculations revealed that the high CO2 binding affinity of transition-metal-based M2 (dobpdc) is primarily attributable to the favorable charge transfer from CO2 (oxygen lone pair acting as a Lewis base) to the open metal sites (Lewis acid), while electrostatic effects, the underlying factor responsible for the particular order of binding strength observed across different transition metals, also play a role. The framework stability against water coincides with the order of Lewis acidity. In this series of MOFs, the structural stability of Ni2 (dobpdc) is exceptional; it endured in water vapor, liquid water, and in refluxing water for one month, and the solid remained intact on exposure to solutions of pH 2-13. The DFT calculations also support the experimental finding that Ni2 (dobpdc) has higher chemical stability than the other frameworks.

  6. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Unsaturated Metal Sites in M2 (dobpdc) Frameworks with Exceptional Structural Stability and Relation between Lewis Acidity and Adsorption Enthalpy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ga Young; Lee, Woo Ram; Jo, Hyuna; Park, Joonho; Song, Jeong Hwa; Lim, Kwang Soo; Moon, Dohyun; Jung, Hyun; Lim, Juhyung; Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Yousung; Hong, Chang Seop

    2016-05-23

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) M2 (dobpdc) (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; H4 dobpdc=4,4'-dihydroxy-1,1'-biphenyl-3,3'-dicarboxylic acid), with a highly dense arrangement of open metal sites along hexagonal channels were prepared by microwave-assisted or simple solvothermal reactions. The activated materials were structurally expanded when guest molecules including CO2 were introduced into the pores. The Lewis acidity of the open metal sites varied in the order MnZn, as confirmed by C=O stretching bands in the IR spectra, which are related to the CO2 adsorption enthalpy. DFT calculations revealed that the high CO2 binding affinity of transition-metal-based M2 (dobpdc) is primarily attributable to the favorable charge transfer from CO2 (oxygen lone pair acting as a Lewis base) to the open metal sites (Lewis acid), while electrostatic effects, the underlying factor responsible for the particular order of binding strength observed across different transition metals, also play a role. The framework stability against water coincides with the order of Lewis acidity. In this series of MOFs, the structural stability of Ni2 (dobpdc) is exceptional; it endured in water vapor, liquid water, and in refluxing water for one month, and the solid remained intact on exposure to solutions of pH 2-13. The DFT calculations also support the experimental finding that Ni2 (dobpdc) has higher chemical stability than the other frameworks. PMID:27105924

  7. Enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of metal complexes to proteins: sortase-mediated coupling of copper-64 to a single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Alt, Karen; Jeffery, Charmaine M; Price, Roger I; Jagdale, Shweta; Rigby, Sheena; Williams, Charlotte C; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-06-10

    The enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of a radioactive metal complex to a single-chain antibody using the transpeptidase sortase A is reported. Cage amine sarcophagine ligands that were designed to function as substrates for the sortase A mediated bioconjugation to antibodies were synthesized and enzymatically conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment. The antibody fragment scFv(anti-LIBS) targets ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein receptor GPIIb/IIIa, which is present on activated platelets. The immunoconjugates were radiolabeled with the positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu. The new radiolabeled conjugates were shown to bind selectively to activated platelets. The diagnostic potential of the most promising conjugate was demonstrated in an in vivo model of carotid artery thrombosis using positron emission tomography. This approach gives homogeneous products through site-specific enzyme-mediated conjugation and should be broadly applicable to other metal complexes and proteins. PMID:24777818

  8. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L; Hallaert, Simon D; Böttger, Lars H; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-08-18

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(ii), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species-α-Fe(ii) and α-O-are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive 'spectator' iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(ii) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(ii) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(iv)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function-producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an 'entatic' state-might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27535535

  9. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  10. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  11. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  12. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  13. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-01

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω-+|1 mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω--|1 mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω-+|1 and ω--|1 modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag-SiO2-Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  15. Bimetallic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Probing the Lewis Acid Site for CO2 Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ruyi; Li, Pei-Zhou; Zeng, Yong-Fei; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Ruo; Duan, Hui; Luo, Zhong; Wang, Jin-Gui; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) incorporating two kinds of second building units (SBUs), i.e., dimeric paddlewheel (Zn2 (COO)4 ) and tetrameric (Zn4 (O)(CO2 )6 ), is successfully assembled by the reaction of a tricarboxylate ligand with Zn(II) ion. Subsequently, single-crystal-to-single-crystal metal cation exchange using the constructed MOF is investigated, and the results show that Cu(II) and Co(II) ions can selectively be introduced into the MOF without compromising the crystallinity of the pristine framework. This metal cation-exchangeable MOF provides a useful platform for studying the metal effect on both gas adsorption and catalytic activity of the resulted MOFs. While the gas adsorption experiments reveal that Cu(II) and Co(II) exchanged samples exhibit comparable CO2 adsorption capability to the pristine Zn(II) -based MOF under the same conditions, catalytic investigations for the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 with epoxides into related carbonates demonstrate that Zn(II) -based MOF affords the highest catalytic activity as compared with Cu(II) and Co(II) exchanged ones. Molecular dynamic simulations are carried out to further confirm the catalytic performance of these constructed MOFs on chemical fixation of CO2 to carbonates. This research sheds light on how metal exchange can influence intrinsic properties of MOFs.

  16. Heavy metals in bivalve mussels and their habitats from different sites along the Chilean Coast

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregori, I.; Pinochet, H.; Delgado, D. ); Gras, N.; Munoz, L. )

    1994-02-01

    It is well known that heavy metals have a great ecological significance due to their toxicity and accumulative behaviour playing a prominent role in marine ecosystems. They occur in all compartments in the marine environment with a tendency to accumulate in organism from different trophic levels of the marine webs. Along this pathway, toxic trace metals become a potential hazard for man and mammals. Coastal and estuarine zones are more vulnerable to anthropogenic pollution with toxic metals and it must be kept in mind that these zones have high seafood production. Chile is in a favourable position to develop fishing activities since it has approximately 4.500 km. of coastline bordering the South Pacific Ocean. The seawater is rich in nutrients and new aquaculture projects have been developed during the last year. However, these seafoods, like other marine organisms, are susceptible to being contaminated by trace metals, produced especially by the mining and industrial processing of ores and metals (i.e., Cu, Mo). This activity is well known as an important source of heavy metals, due to the enormous quantities of waste products, some of which were formerly released directly to the marine environment. Actually there are many aspects demanding better and more detailed knowledge on the occurrence, inventory, of the Chilean marine ecosystem. For these reasons we are developing a programme for monitoring some heavy metals in marine samples. The development of analytical quality control procedures and the analysis of toxic trace elements in fresh and canned mussels were recently published. In this paper, we present the results obtained for the Cadmium, Copper and Zinc contents in water, sediment and mollusc samples collected from different geographical areas located along the coast of Chile. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Tunable catalytic activity of solid solution metal-organic frameworks in one-pot multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Gándara, Felipe; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this research is to establish how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of more than one metal in equivalent crystallographic sites (solid solution MOFs) exhibit catalytic activity, which is tunable by virtue of the metal ions ratio. New MOFs with general formula [InxGa1-x(O2C2H4)0.5(hfipbb)] were prepared by the combination of Ga and In. They are isostructural with their monometal counterparts, synthesized with Al, Ga, and In. Differences in their behavior as heterogeneous catalysts in the three-component, one pot Strecker reaction illustrate the potential of solid solution MOFs to provide the ability to address the various stages involved in the reaction mechanism.

  18. Metal-activated histidine carbon donor hydrogen bonds contribute to metalloprotein folding and function.

    PubMed

    Schmiedekamp, Ann; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    Carbon donor hydrogen bonds are typically weak interactions that contribute less than 2 kcal/mol, and provide only modest stabilization in proteins. One exception is the class of hydrogen bonds donated by heterocyclic side chain carbons. Histidine is capable of particularly strong interactions through the Cepsilon(1) and Cdelta(2) carbons when the imidazole is protonated or bound to metal. Given the frequent occurrence of metal-bound histidines in metalloproteins, we characterized the energies of these interactions through DFT calculations on model compounds. Imidazole-water hydrogen bonding could vary from -11.0 to -17.0 kcal/mol, depending on the metal identity and oxidation state. A geometric search of metalloprotein structures in the PDB identified a number of candidate His C-H...O hydrogen bonds which may be important for folding or function. DFT calculations on model complexes of superoxide reductase show a carbon donor hydrogen bond positioning a water molecule above the active site.

  19. Mobilization and attenuation of metals downstream from a base-metal mining site in the Matra Mountains, northeastern Hungary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odor, L.; Wanty, R.B.; Horvath, I.; Fugedi, U.; ,

    1999-01-01

    Regional geochemical baseline values have been established for Hungary by the use of low-density stream-sediment surveys of flood-plain deposits of large drainage basins and of the fine fraction of stream sediments. The baseline values and anomaly thresholds thus produced helped to evaluate the importance of high toxic element concentrations found in soils in a valley downstream of a polymetallic vein-type base-metal mine. Erosion of the mine dumps and flotation dump, losses of metals during filtering, storage and transportation, human neglects, and operational breakdowns, have all contributed to the contamination of a small catchment basin in a procession of releases of solid waste. The sulfide-rich waste material weathers to a yellow color; this layer of 'yellow sand' blankets a narrow strip of the floodplain of Toka Creek in the valley near the town of Gyongyosoroszi. Contamination was spread out in the valley by floods. Metals present in the yellow sand include Pb, As, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Sb. Exposure of the local population to these metals may occur through inhalation of airborne particulates or by ingestion of these metals that are taken up by crops grown in the valley. To evaluate the areal extent and depth of the contamination, active stream sediment, flood-plain deposits, lake or reservoir sediments, soils, and surface water were sampled along the erosion pathways downstream of the mine and dumps. The flood-plain profile was sampled in detail to see the vertical distribution of elements and to relate the metal concentrations to the sedimentation and contamination histories of the flood plain. Downward migration of mobile Zn and Cd from the contaminated upper layers under supergene conditions is observed, while vertical migration of Pb, As, Hg and Sb appears to be insignificant. Soil profiles of 137Cs which originated from above-ground atomic bomb tests and the Chernobyl accident, provide good evidence that the upper 30-40 cm of the flood-plain sections, which

  20. Oxidative stress in the mollusk Echinolittorina peruviana (Gasteropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822) and trace metals in coastal sectors with mining activity.

    PubMed

    Jara, C; Gaete, H; Lobos, G; Hidalgo, M E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coastal waters of sites with mining activity in Echinolittorina peruviana, through oxidative stress biomarkers and heavy metals determination both in water and in tissue. Organisms were collected in the intertidal zone in areas with and without mining activity. Metal concentrations in the water and tissues, and also, the following biomarkers of oxidative stress: antioxidant enzyme activity, superoxide dismutase and catalase, non-enzymatic oxidative capacity (TRAP), oxidative damage to proteins (carbonyls) and TBARS, were measured The concentrations of accumulated metals had the following order Fe > Cu > Cd > Zn > Cr > Mo > As; the highest concentrations of metals in water and tissues were found in Caleta Palito and Chañaral. Results suggest that the coastal waters with mining activity and greatest concentrations of copper and iron induced the greater antioxidant response and oxidative damage to lipids in E. peruviana. PMID:24829115

  1. Heavy metals in oysters, mussels and clams collected from coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhan-Qiang; Cheung, R Y H; Wong, M H

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of 8 heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn) were examined in 3 species of bivalves ( Perna viridis, Crassostrea rivularis and Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 25 sites along the Pearl River Delta coastal waters in the South China Sea from July to August 1996. In general, Cd, Cu, Zn and Sn concentrations in the three bivalve species collected from the Estuarine Zone were significantly higher than those collected from the Western and Eastern Zones of the Pearl River Delta, which are related to the existence of various anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the Pearl River Delta. The Western Estuarine Zone is mainly impacted hy Cr, Ni and Cu contamination. In Victoria Harbor, heavy metal contamination is mainly due to Cu and Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn concentrations in oysters were significantly higher than those in mussels and clams. This could be explained by the fact that oysters live mainly in the Estuarine Zone of the Pearl River Delta which receives most of the polluting discharges from the catchment of the Delta. During turbid condition, heavy metals( soluble or adsorbed on suspended particulates) discharged from the Delta are filtered from the water column and subsequently accumulated into the soft body tissues of oysters. Heavy metal concentrations in the three bivalve species were compared with the maximum permissible levels of heavy metals in seafood regulated by the Public Health and Municipal Services Ordinance, Laws of Hong Kong, and it was revealed that Cd and Cr concentrations in the three bivalve species exceeded the upper limits. At certain hotspots in the Delta, the maximum acceptable daily load for Cd was also exceeded.

  2. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  3. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  4. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  5. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  6. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  8. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  9. Effect of heavy metals on soil enzyme activity at different field conditions in Middle Spis mining area (Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Angelovičová, Lenka; Lodenius, Martin; Tulisalo, Esa; Fazekašová, Danica

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals concentrations were measured in the former mining area located in Hornad river valley (Slovakia). Soil samples were taken in 2012 from 20 sites at two field types (grasslands, heaps of waste material) and two different areas. Total content of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg), urease (URE), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), soil reaction (pH) were changing depending on the field/area type. The tailing pond and processing plants have been found as the biggest sources of pollution. URE, ACP and ALP activities significantly decreased while the heavy metal contents increased. Significant differences were found among area types in the heavy metal contents and activity of URE. No statistical differences in the content of heavy metals but significant statistical differences for soil pH were found for field types (grassland and heaps). Significant negative correlation was found for URE-Pb, URE-Zn and also between soil reaction and ACP and ALP. PMID:25293393

  10. Effect of heavy metals on soil enzyme activity at different field conditions in Middle Spis mining area (Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Angelovičová, Lenka; Lodenius, Martin; Tulisalo, Esa; Fazekašová, Danica

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals concentrations were measured in the former mining area located in Hornad river valley (Slovakia). Soil samples were taken in 2012 from 20 sites at two field types (grasslands, heaps of waste material) and two different areas. Total content of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg), urease (URE), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), soil reaction (pH) were changing depending on the field/area type. The tailing pond and processing plants have been found as the biggest sources of pollution. URE, ACP and ALP activities significantly decreased while the heavy metal contents increased. Significant differences were found among area types in the heavy metal contents and activity of URE. No statistical differences in the content of heavy metals but significant statistical differences for soil pH were found for field types (grassland and heaps). Significant negative correlation was found for URE-Pb, URE-Zn and also between soil reaction and ACP and ALP.

  11. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils.

  12. Mycorrhizal fungi modulate phytochemical production and antioxidant activity of Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae) under metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rozpądek, P; Wężowicz, K; Stojakowska, A; Malarz, J; Surówka, E; Sobczyk, Ł; Anielska, T; Ważny, R; Miszalski, Z; Turnau, K

    2014-10-01

    Cichorium intybus (common chicory), a perennial plant, common in anthropogenic sites, has been the object of a multitude of studies in recent years due to its high content of antioxidants utilized in pharmacy and food industry. Here, the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants under toxic metal stress was studied. Plants inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis and non-inoculated were grown on non-polluted and toxic metal enriched substrata. The results presented here indicate that AMF improves chicory fitness. Fresh and dry weight was found to be severely affected by the fungi and heavy metals. The concentration of hydroxycinnamates was increased in the shoots of mycorrhizal plants cultivated on non-polluted substrata, but no differences were found in plants cultivated on metal enriched substrata. The activity of SOD and H2O2 removing enzymes CAT and POX was elevated in the shoots of mycorrhizal plants regardless of the cultivation environment. Photochemical efficiency of inoculated chicory was significantly improved. Our results indicate that R. irregularis inoculation had a beneficial role in sustaining the plants ability to cope with the deleterious effects of metal toxicity.

  13. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils. PMID:26739424

  14. Transition Metal Ions in Zeolites: Coordination and activation of O2

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Pieter J.; Woertink, Julia S.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.; Schoonheydt, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites containing transition metal ions (TMI) often show promising activity as heterogeneous catalysts in pollution abatement and selective oxidation reactions. In this paper, two aspects of research on the TMI Cu, Co and Fe in zeolites are discussed: (i) coordination to the lattice and (ii) activated oxygen species. At low loading, TMI preferably occupy exchange sites in six-membered oxygen rings (6MR) where the TMI preferentially coordinate with the oxygen atoms of Al tetrahedra. High TMI loadings result in a variety of TMI species formed at the zeolite surface. Removal of the extra-lattice oxygens during high temperature pretreatments can result in auto-reduction. Oxidation of reduced TMI sites often results in the formation of highly reactive oxygen species. In Cu-ZSM-5, calcination with O2 results in the formation of a species, which was found to be a crucial intermediate in both the direct decomposition of NO and N2O and the selective oxidation of methane into methanol. An activated oxygen species, called α-oxygen, is formed in Fe-ZSM5 and reported to be the active site in the partial oxidation of methane and benzene into methanol and phenol, respectively. However, this reactive α-oxygen can only be formed with N2O, not with O2. O2 activated Co intermediates in Faujasite (FAU) zeolites can selectively oxidize α-pinene and epoxidize styrene. In Co-FAU, CoIII superoxo and peroxo complexes are suggested to be the active cores, whereas in Cu and Fe-ZSM-5 various monomeric and dimeric sites have been proposed, but no consensus has been obtained. Very recently, the active site in Cu-ZSM-5 was identified as a bent [Cu-O-Cu]2+ core (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009, 106, 18908-18913). Overall, O2 activation depends on the interplay of structural factors such as type of zeolite, size of the channels and cages and chemical factors such as Si/Al ratio and the nature, charge and distribution of the charge balancing cations. The presence of several different TMI sites

  15. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~10(20) cm(-3) is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S · cm(-1) from ~1.7 S · cm(-1) for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~10(19) cm(-3), the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2. PMID:26792630

  16. Spectroscopic analysis of soil metal contamination around a derelict mine site in the Blue Mountains, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddini, A.; Raval, S.; Taplin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Abandoned mine sites pose the potential threat of the heavy metal pollution spread through streams and via runoff leading to contamination of soil and water in their surrounding areas. Regular monitoring of these areas is critical to minimise impacts on water resources, flora and fauna. Conventional ground based monitoring is expensive and sometimes impractical; spectroscopic methods have been emerged as a reliable alternative for this purpose. In this study, the capabilities of the spectroscopy method were examined for modelling soil contamination from around the abandoned silver-zinc mine located at Yerranderie, NSW Australia. The diagnostic characteristics of the original reflectance data were compared with models derived from first and second derivatives of the reflectance data. The results indicate that the models derived from the first derivative of the reflectance data estimate heavy metals significantly more accurately than model derived from the original reflectance. It was also found in this study that there is no need to use second derivative for modelling heavy metal soil contamination. Finally, the results indicate that estimates were of greater accuracy for arsenic and lead compared to other heavy metals, while the estimation for silver was found to be the most erroneous.

  17. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-Taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~1020 cm‑3 is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S·cm‑1 from ~1.7 S·cm‑1 for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~1019 cm‑3, the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2.

  18. Phytoaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Natural Vegetation at the Municipal Wastewater Site in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Muhammad; Ruqia, Bibi; Hussain, Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal accumulation in crops and soils from wastewater irrigation poses a significant threat to the human health. A study was carried out to investigate the removal potential of heavy metals (HM) by native plant species, namely Cannabis sativa L., Chenopodium album L., Datura stramonium L., Sonchus asper L., Amaranthus viridus L., Oenothera rosea (LHer), Xanthium stramonium L., Polygonum macalosa L., Nasturtium officinale L. and Conyza canadensis L. growing at the municipal wastewater site in Abbottabad city, Pakistan. The HM concentrations varied among plants depending on the species. Metal concentrations across species varied in the order iron (Fe) > zinc (Zn) > chromium (Cr) > nickel (Ni) > cadmium (Cd). Majority of the species accumulated more HM in roots than shoots. Among species, the concentrations (both in roots and shoots) were in the order C. sativa > C. album > X. stramonium > C. canadensis > A. viridus > N. officinale > P. macalosa > D. stramonium > S. asper > O. rosea. No species was identified as a hyperaccumulator. All species exhibited a translocation factor (TF) less than 1. Species like C. sativa, C. album and X. stramonium gave higher (> 1) biological concentration factor (BCF) and biological accumulation coefficient (BAC) especially for Fe, Cr and Cd than other species. Higher accumulation of heavy metals in these plant species signifies the general application of these species for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of HM from polluted soils. PMID:26366840

  19. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~1020 cm−3 is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S·cm−1 from ~1.7 S·cm−1 for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~1019 cm−3, the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2. PMID:26792630

  20. Anticancer activity of Arkeshwara Rasa - A herbo-metallic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Nurunnabi, Md; Saha, Samir Kumar; Jahan, Rownak; Lee, Yong-kyu; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though metal based drugs have been prescribed in Ayurveda for centuries to treat various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, toxicity of these drugs containing heavy metal is a great drawback for practical application. So, proper scientific validation of herbo-metallic drugs like Arkeshwara Rasa (AR) have become one of the focused research arena of new drugs against cancers. Aim: To investigate the in vitro anticancer effects of AR. Materials and Methods: Anticancer activity of AR was investigated on two human cancer cell lines, which represent two different tissues (pancreas and skin). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for enzyme activity and trypan blue assay for cell morphology were performed for further confirmation. Results: AR showed potent activity against pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2). LDH activity confirmed that AR was active against pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, it was observed that AR exhibited significant effects on cancer cells due to synergistic effects of different compounds of AR. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that AR has the potential to be an anticancer drug against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313425

  1. Activated metallic gold as an agent for direct methoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-12-21

    We have discovered that metallic gold is a highly effective vehicle for the low-temperature vapor-phase carbonylation of methanol by insertion of CO into the O-H bond to form methoxycarbonyl. This reaction contrasts sharply to the carbonylation pathway well known for homogeneously catalyzed carbonylation reactions, such as the synthesis of acetic acid. The methoxycarbonyl intermediate can be further employed in a variety of methoxycarbonylation reactions, without the use or production of toxic chemicals. More generally we observe facile, selective methoxycarbonylation of alkyl and aryl alcohols and secondary amines on metallic gold well below room temperature. A specific example is the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, which has extensive use in organic synthesis. This work establishes a unique framework for using oxygen-activated metallic gold as a catalyst for energy-efficient, environmentally benign production of key synthetic chemical agents. PMID:22035206

  2. Analyzing relationships between surface perturbations and local chemical reactivity of metal sites: Alkali promotion of O2 dissociation on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongliang; Linic, Suljo

    2016-06-01

    Many commercial heterogeneous catalysts are complex structures that contain metal active sites promoted by multiple additives. Developing fundamental understanding about the impact of these perturbations on the local surface reactivity is crucial for catalyst development and optimization. In this contribution, we develop a general framework for identifying underlying mechanisms that control the changes in the surface reactivity of a metal site (more specifically the adsorbate-surface interactions) upon a perturbation in the local environment. This framework allows us to interpret fairly complex interactions on metal surfaces in terms of specific, physically transparent contributions that can be evaluated independently of each other. We use Cs-promoted dissociation of O2 as an example to illustrate our approach. We concluded that the Cs adsorbate affects the outcome of the chemical reaction through a strong alkali-induced electric field interacting with the static dipole moment of the O2/Ag(111) system.

  3. [Human health risk assessment of an abandoned metal smelter site in Shenyang, China].

    PubMed

    Chao, Lei; Zhou, Qi-Xing; Chen, Su; Cui, Shuang

    2007-08-01

    Based on the investigation of heavy metal pollutions on an abandoned metal smelter site in Shenyang, and by using the United States Environmental Protection Agency methodologies for human health risk assessment, the human health risk of the polluted soil on the study site was assessed. For the defined future land use patterns, the industrial (I) and recreational (II) exposure scenarios were assumed and evaluated. The combined hazard index for all the contaminants of potential concern was 2.65 x 10(-2) for Scenario I and 3.67 x 10(-2) for Scenario II. Regarding the potential carcinogenic risk associated with inhalation route, only cadmium was a contributor, with the risk of 4.48 x 10(-9) and 7.30 x 10(-10) for Scenario I and Scenario II, respectively. The hazard indices were less than a unit, and the carcinogenic health risk was negligible. The potential health risks of the study site (for both industrial and recreational scenarios) were mainly associated with the exposure to copper. The risk-based remedial goals calculated for the industrial scenario were lower than the environment quality risk assessment criteria for soil at the manufacturing facilities of China. PMID:17974249

  4. Heavy metal contents of epiphytic acrocarpous mosses within inhabited sites in southwest Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Onianwa, P.C.; Ajayi, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    The levels of the metals Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Mn, and Fe accumulated in acrocarpous mosses within inhabited parts of villages and towns in the southwest region of Nigeria were determined, and then used for a classification of the area into relative pollution zones. Ibadan City was found to be the most polluted in the study area. Other zones of low and medium polluted villages and towns were identified. The zonations based on metal levels in these mosses were to some extent similar to that already obtained in a separate study of the same area with epiphytic forest mosses. The enrichment factors show that the gradients between zones of different pollution levels were higher in mosses within the inhabited sites.

  5. Metal(loid)s in sediment, lobster and mussel tissues near historical gold mine sites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tony R; Grant, Jon

    2015-12-15

    Previous studies near historical gold mining districts in Nova Scotia have identified significant enrichment of metal(loid)s in coastal marine sediments. Most of this inventory is buried below biologically active zones, although in some areas arsenic has bioaccumulated in marine biota resulting in localised bivalve shellfish closures. Isaacs Harbour is poised for future industrial development, but before potential impacts are predicted, current marine baseline conditions must be determined. To address this gap, this study established a baseline using surface sediments and biota (mussel and lobster tissues), to provide a broader picture of metal(loid)s in the marine environment. Results confirmed previous studies showing that most sediment metal(loid) concentrations still exceeded Canadian Marine Sediment Quality Guidelines, and also provided evidence of Canadian Food Inspection Agency fish tissue exceedances of arsenic in lobster and lead in mussel tissues indicating that some bioaccumulation of legacy contaminants in marine biota continues to the present day.

  6. Metal(loid)s in sediment, lobster and mussel tissues near historical gold mine sites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tony R; Grant, Jon

    2015-12-15

    Previous studies near historical gold mining districts in Nova Scotia have identified significant enrichment of metal(loid)s in coastal marine sediments. Most of this inventory is buried below biologically active zones, although in some areas arsenic has bioaccumulated in marine biota resulting in localised bivalve shellfish closures. Isaacs Harbour is poised for future industrial development, but before potential impacts are predicted, current marine baseline conditions must be determined. To address this gap, this study established a baseline using surface sediments and biota (mussel and lobster tissues), to provide a broader picture of metal(loid)s in the marine environment. Results confirmed previous studies showing that most sediment metal(loid) concentrations still exceeded Canadian Marine Sediment Quality Guidelines, and also provided evidence of Canadian Food Inspection Agency fish tissue exceedances of arsenic in lobster and lead in mussel tissues indicating that some bioaccumulation of legacy contaminants in marine biota continues to the present day. PMID:26475024

  7. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  8. 75 FR 76037 - General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating Division Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). At the request of the State agency, the... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating..., applicable to workers of General Motors Corporation, Grand Rapids Metal Center, Metal Fabricating...

  9. Novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC{sub 50} values of 9.63 μM (for ZLA) and 8.64 μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC{sub 50} values of 49.1 μM (for ZLA) and 55.3 μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD. -- Highlights: ► Two novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives are designed and synthesized. ► ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency. ► They are potential leads for disease-modifying treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  11. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  12. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates to the active site of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg2+, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg2+ to an active site because Mg2+ is spectroscopically silent and Mg2+ binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg2+ with Mn2+:Mn2+ that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn2+ is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn2+ that is free in solution and Mn2+ bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor. PMID:23761703

  13. Investigation of the active sites of rhodium sulfide for hydrogen evolution/oxidation using carbon monoxide as a probe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirala; Upham, David C; Liu, Ru-Fen; Burk, Jonathan; Economou, Nick; Buratto, Steven; Metiu, Horia; McFarland, Eric W

    2014-05-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) was observed to decrease the activity for hydrogen evolution, hydrogen oxidation, and H2-D2 exchange on rhodium sulfide, platinum, and rhodium metal. The temperature at which the CO was desorbed from the catalyst surface (detected by recovery in the H2-D2 exchange activity of the catalyst) was used as a descriptor for the CO binding energy to the active site. The differences in the CO desorption temperature between the different catalysts showed that the rhodium sulfide active site is not metallic rhodium. Using density functional theory, the binding energy of CO to the Rh sites in rhodium sulfide is found comparable to the binding energy on Pt. Coupled with experiment this supports the proposition that rhodium rather than sulfur atoms in the rhodium sulfide are the active site for the hydrogen reaction. This would indicate the active sites for hydrogen evolution/oxidation as well as oxygen reduction (determined by other groups using X-ray absorption spectroscopy) may be the same.

  14. Chiral magnetic effect and natural optical activity in (Weyl) metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, Dmytro; Ma, Jing

    We consider the phenomenon of natural optical activity, and related chiral magnetic effect in metals with low carrier concentration. To reveal the correspondence between the two phenomena, we compute the optical conductivity of a noncentrosymmetric metal to linear order in the wave vector of the light wave, specializing to the low-frequency regime. We show that it is the orbital magnetic moment of quasiparticles that is responsible for the natural optical activity, and thus the chiral magnetic effect. While for purely static magnetic fields the chiral magnetic effect is known to have a topological origin and to be related to the presence of Berry curvature monopoles (Weyl points) in the band structure, we show that the existence of Berry monopoles is not required for the dynamic chiral magnetic effect to appear; the latter is thus not unique to Weyl metals. The magnitude of the dynamic chiral magnetic effect in a material is related to the trace of its gyrotropic tensor. We discuss the conditions under which this trace is non-zero; in noncentrosymmetric Weyl metals it is found to be proportional to the energy-space dipole moment of Berry curvature monopoles. The calculations are done within both the semiclassical kinetic equation, and Kubo linear response formalisms. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1409089.

  15. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  16. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  17. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  18. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  19. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  20. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  1. Intragenic suppression of an active site mutation in the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Malecki, J; Chaudhry, M A; Weinfeld, M; Hill, J H; Lee, J C; Mitra, S

    1999-03-19

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE) contain several highly conserved sequence motifs. The glutamic acid residue in a consensus motif, LQE96TK98 in human APE (hAPE-1), is crucial because of its role in coordinating Mg2+, an essential cofactor. Random mutagenesis of the inactive E96A mutant cDNA, followed by phenotypic screening in Escherichia coli, led to isolation of an intragenic suppressor with a second site mutation, K98R. Although the Km of the suppressor mutant was about sixfold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, their kcat values were similar for AP endonuclease activity. These results suggest that the E96A mutation affects only the DNA-binding step, but not the catalytic step of the enzyme. The 3' DNA phosphoesterase activities of the wild-type and the suppressor mutant were also comparable. No global change of the protein conformation is induced by the single or double mutations, but a local perturbation in the structural environment of tryptophan residues may be induced by the K98R mutation. The wild-type and suppressor mutant proteins have similar Mg2+ requirement for activity. These results suggest a minor perturbation in conformation of the suppressor mutant enabling an unidentified Asp or Glu residue to substitute for Glu96 in positioning Mg2+ during catalysis. The possibility that Asp70 is such a residue, based on its observed proximity to the metal-binding site in the wild-type protein, was excluded by site-specific mutation studies. It thus appears that another acidic residue coordinates with Mg2+ in the mutant protein. These results suggest a rather flexible conformation of the region surrounding the metal binding site in hAPE-1 which is not obvious from the X-ray crystallographic structure. PMID:10074406

  2. Metal availability in a highly contaminated, dredged-sediment disposal site: field measurements and geochemical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lions, Julie; Guérin, Valérie; Bataillard, Philippe; van der Lee, Jan; Laboudigue, Agnès

    2010-09-01

    Two complementary approaches were used to characterize arsenic and metal mobilizations from a dredged-sediment disposal site: a detailed field study combined with hydrogeochemical modeling. Contaminants in sediments were found to be mainly present as sulfides subject to oxidation. Secondary phases (carbonates, sulfates, (hydr)oxides) were also observed. Oxidative processes occurred at different rates depending on physicochemical conditions and contaminant contents in the sediment. Two distinct areas were identified on the site, each corresponding to a specific contaminant mobility behavior. In a reducing area, Fe and As were highly soluble and illustrated anoxic behavior. In well-oxygenated material, groundwater was highly contaminated in Zn, Cd and Pb. A third zone in which sediments and groundwater were less contaminated was also characterized. This study enabled us to prioritize remediation work, which should aim to limit infiltration and long-term environmental impact.

  3. Do heavy metals existing in abandoned mining sites represent a real health risk? A study case in the SE Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; García-Lorenzo, Mari Luz; Martínez-López, Salvadora; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Hernández-Cordoba, Manuel; Bech, Jaime

    2013-04-01

    Mining activities have been carried out for centuries in Sierra Minera (SE Spain) giving rise to a large number of sites distributed throughout the zone in which residues are accumulated. This communication reports studies as regards metal mobilization and analysis of the health risk that could be posed by inhalation, dermic contact or occasional ingestion of this type of sediments. Lead was used as the metal for the studies due to its particular abundance in the zone. A large number of samples were taken and general analytical determinations (pH, particle size, organic matter, equivalent calcium carbonate content and mineralogical composition) were carried out in order its characterization. An in vitro method for obtaining formation on Pb bioaccessibility in these mine waste materials was also carried out. Our results prove that mineral associations, different alteration states and sorption/desorption processes play an important role in the bioavailability of lead. In addition, it is noteworthy that the metal fraction dissolved by the proposed in vitro methodology is lower than 100%, both in the stomach and intestinal phases. Finally an assessment of the risk posed by lead is achieved. To this respect it should be noted that the IRIS database provide cancer slope factor and reference dose, as a way to assess the risk caused by arsenic, cadmium and copper but no for lead, probably due to the wide variety of real situations, and the discrepancy of the sources. The way here suggested is a novelty in this sense, and the results could be extrapolated to other similar zones and be incorporated to the general protocol of risk assessment applied to contaminated sites.

  4. The impact of metal pollution on soil faunal and microbial activity in two grassland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, Magdalena; De Jonge, Maarten; Dardenne, Freddy; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2014-10-01

    In this study the influence of metal pollution on soil functional activity was evaluated by means of Bait lamina and BIOLOG(®) EcoPlates™ assays. The in situ bait lamina assay investigates the feeding activity of macrofauna, mesofauna and microarthropods while the BIOLOG(®) EcoPlate™ assay measures the metabolic fingerprint of a selectively extracted microbial community. Both assays proved sensitive enough to reveal changes in the soil community between the plots nearest to and further away from a metal pollution source. Feeding activity (FA) at the less polluted plots reached percentages of 90% while plots nearer to the source of pollution reached percentages as low as 10%. After 2 and 6 days of incubation average well color development (AWCD) and functional richness (R') were significantly lower at the plots closest to the source of pollution. While the Shannon Wiener diversity index (H') decreased significantly at sites nearer to the source of pollution after 2 days but not after 6 days of incubation. Arsenic, Cu and Pb correlated significantly and negatively with feeding activity and functional indices while the role of changing environmental factors such as moisture percentage could not be ruled out completely. Compared to the Bait lamina method that is used in situ and which is therefore more affected by site specific variation, the BIOLOG assay, which excludes confounding factors such as low moisture percentage, may be a more reliable assay to measure soil functional activity.

  5. Active Site Dependent Reaction Mechanism over Ru/CeO2 Catalyst toward CO2 Methanation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; He, Shan; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Lirong; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2016-05-18

    Oxygen vacancy on the surface of metal oxides is one of the most important defects which acts as the reactive site in a variety of catalytic reactions. In this work, operando spectroscopy methodology was employed to study the CO2 methanation reaction catalyzed by Ru/CeO2 (with oxygen vacancy in CeO2) and Ru/α-Al2O3 (without oxygen vacancy), respectively, so as to give a thorough understanding on active site dependent reaction mechanism. In Ru/CeO2 catalyst, operando XANES, IR, and Raman were used to reveal the generation process of Ce(3+), surface hydroxyl, and oxygen vacancy as well as their structural evolvements under practical reaction conditions. The steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA)-type in situ DRIFT infrared spectroscopy undoubtedly substantiates that CO2 methanation undergoes formate route over Ru/CeO2 catalyst, and the formate dissociation to methanol catalyzed by oxygen vacancy is the rate-determining step. In contrast, CO2 methanation undergoes CO route over Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 with the absence of oxygen vacancy, demonstrating active site dependent catalytic mechanism toward CO2 methanation. In addition, the catalytic activity evaluation and the oscillating reaction over Ru/CeO2 catalyst further prove that the oxygen vacancy catalyzes the rate-determining step with a much lower activation temperature compared with Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 (125 vs 250 °C).

  6. Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.

  7. Identification of essential histidine residues in the active site of Escherichia coli xylose (glucose) isomerase.

    PubMed

    Batt, C A; Jamieson, A C; Vandeyar, M A

    1990-01-01

    Two conserved histidine residues (His-101 and His-271) appear to be essential components in the active site of the enzyme xylose (glucose) isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5). These amino acid residues were targeted for mutagenesis on the basis of sequence homology among xylose isomerases isolated from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Ampullariella sp. strain 3876, and Streptomyces violaceus-niger. Each residue was selectively replaced by site-directed mutagenesis and shown to be essential for activity. No measurable activity was observed for any mutations replacing either His-101 or His-271. Circular dichroism measurements revealed no significant change in the overall conformation of the mutant enzymes, and all formed dimers similar to the wild-type enzyme. Mutations at His-271 could be distinguished from those at His-101, since the former resulted in a thermolabile protein whereas no significant change in heat stability was observed for the latter. Based upon these results and structural data recently reported, we speculate that His-101 is the catalytic base mediating the reaction. Replacement of His-271 may render the enzyme thermolabile, since this residue appears to be a ligand for one of the metal ions in the active site of the enzyme. PMID:2405386

  8. Site-dependent catalytic activity of graphene oxides towards oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaobin; Cao, Zexing

    2012-12-28

    Graphene oxides (GOs) may offer extraordinary potential in the design of novel catalytic systems due to the presence of various oxygen functional groups and their unique electronic and structural properties. Using first-principles calculations, we explore the plausible mechanisms for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene by GOs and the diffusion of the surface oxygen-containing groups under an external electric field. The present results show that GOs with modified oxygen-containing groups may afford high catalytic activity for the ODH of propane to propene. The presence of hydroxyl groups around the active sites provided by epoxides can remarkably enhance the C-H bond activation of propane and the activity enhancement exhibits strong site dependence. The sites of oxygen functional groups on the GO surface can be easily tuned by the diffusion of these groups under an external electric field, which increases the reactivity of GOs towards ODH of propane. The chemically modified GOs are thus quite promising in the design of metal-free catalysis. PMID:22801590

  9. From single crystal surfaces to single atoms: investigating active sites in electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, Anthony P

    2014-04-21

    Electrocatalytic processes will undoubtedly be at the heart of energising future transportation and technology with the added importance of being able to create the necessary fuels required to do so in an environmentally friendly and cost effective manner. For this to be successful two almost mutually exclusive surface properties need to be reconciled, namely producing highly active/reactive surface sites that exhibit long term stability. This article reviews the various approaches which have been undertaken to study the elusive nature of these active sites on metal surfaces which are considered as adatoms or clusters of adatoms with low coordination number. This includes the pioneering studies at extended well defined stepped single crystal surfaces using cyclic voltammetry up to the highly sophisticated in situ electrochemical imaging techniques used to study chemically synthesised nanomaterials. By combining the information attained from single crystal surfaces, individual nanoparticles of defined size and shape, density functional theory calculations and new concepts such as mesoporous multimetallic thin films and single atom electrocatalysts new insights into the design and fabrication of materials with highly active but stable active sites can be achieved. The area of electrocatalysis is therefore not only a fascinating and exciting field in terms of realistic technological and economical benefits but also from the fundamental understanding that can be acquired by studying such an array of interesting materials. PMID:24599277

  10. Individual and cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities on the metal and phosphorus content of fluvial fine-grained sediment; Quesnel River Basin, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler B; Owens, Philip N

    2014-10-15

    The impact of agriculture, forestry and metal mining on the quality of fine-grained sediment (<63 μm) was investigated in the Quesnel River Basin (QRB) (~11,500 km(2)) in British Columbia, Canada. Samples of fine-grained sediment were collected monthly during the snow-free season in 2008 using time-integrated samplers at replicate sites representative of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the basin (i.e. "impacted" sites). Samples were also collected from replicate reference sites and also from the main stem of the Quesnel River at the downstream confluence with the Fraser River. Generally, metal(loid) and phosphorus (P) concentrations for "impacted" sites were greater than for reference sites. Furthermore, concentrations of copper (forestry and mining sites), manganese (agriculture and forestry sites) and selenium (agriculture, forestry and mining sites) exceeded upper sediment quality guideline (SQG) thresholds. These results suggest that agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities are having an influence on the concentrations of sediment-associated metal(loid)s and P in the Quesnel basin. Metal(loid) and P concentrations of sediment collected from the downstream site were not significantly greater than values for the reference sites, and were typically lower than the values for the impacted sites. This suggests that the cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the QRB are presently not having a measureable effect at the river basin-scale. The lack of a cumulative effect at the basin-scale is thought to reflect: (i) the relatively recent occurrence of land use disturbances in this basin; (ii) the dominance of sediment contributions from natural forest and agriculture; and (iii) the potential for storage of contaminants on floodplains and other storage elements between the locations of disturbance activities and the downstream sampling site, which may be attenuating the disturbance signal. PMID:25105754

  11. Individual and cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities on the metal and phosphorus content of fluvial fine-grained sediment; Quesnel River Basin, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler B; Owens, Philip N

    2014-10-15

    The impact of agriculture, forestry and metal mining on the quality of fine-grained sediment (<63 μm) was investigated in the Quesnel River Basin (QRB) (~11,500 km(2)) in British Columbia, Canada. Samples of fine-grained sediment were collected monthly during the snow-free season in 2008 using time-integrated samplers at replicate sites representative of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the basin (i.e. "impacted" sites). Samples were also collected from replicate reference sites and also from the main stem of the Quesnel River at the downstream confluence with the Fraser River. Generally, metal(loid) and phosphorus (P) concentrations for "impacted" sites were greater than for reference sites. Furthermore, concentrations of copper (forestry and mining sites), manganese (agriculture and forestry sites) and selenium (agriculture, forestry and mining sites) exceeded upper sediment quality guideline (SQG) thresholds. These results suggest that agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities are having an influence on the concentrations of sediment-associated metal(loid)s and P in the Quesnel basin. Metal(loid) and P concentrations of sediment collected from the downstream site were not significantly greater than values for the reference sites, and were typically lower than the values for the impacted sites. This suggests that the cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the QRB are presently not having a measureable effect at the river basin-scale. The lack of a cumulative effect at the basin-scale is thought to reflect: (i) the relatively recent occurrence of land use disturbances in this basin; (ii) the dominance of sediment contributions from natural forest and agriculture; and (iii) the potential for storage of contaminants on floodplains and other storage elements between the locations of disturbance activities and the downstream sampling site, which may be attenuating the disturbance signal.

  12. Metal-Mediated Modulation of Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Activity and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues 47Cys and 195His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  13. High and Reversible Ammonia Uptake in Mesoporous Azolate Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open Mn, Co, and Ni Sites.

    PubMed

    Rieth, Adam J; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-08-01

    A series of new mesoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) made from extended bisbenzenetriazolate linkers exhibit coordinatively unsaturated metal sites that are responsible for high and reversible uptake of ammonia. Isostructural Mn, Co, and Ni materials adsorb 15.47, 12.00, and 12.02 mmol of NH3/g, respectively, at STP. Importantly, these near-record capacities are reversible for at least three cycles. These results demonstrate that azolate MOFs are sufficiently thermally and chemically stable to find uses in recyclable sorption, storage, and potentially separation of chemically challenging and/or corrosive gases, especially when designed to exhibit a high density of open metal sites.

  14. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  15. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  16. Efficiency of stepwise magnetic-chemical site assessment for fly ash derived heavy metal pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liwan; Appel, Erwin; Rösler, Wolfgang; Magiera, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    Previous works revealed a close relationship between magnetic susceptibility (MS) and heavy metal (HM) contents originating from industrial sources. However, despite general statements on the usefulness of magnetic mapping, the benefit of this procedure for geochemistry was not quantified yet. We present a study on fly ash pollution in soil around a coal-burning power plant complex and simulate a stepwise approach of magnetic pre-screening and subsequent targeted sampling for chemical analysis. The aim of this study is not to discuss correlations between MS and HM, but to show that a combined stepwise magnetic-chemical approach is the most efficient way for outlining HM contamination. In order to provide quantitative evidence, we explored map similarities of spatial HM distributions based on magnetochemical data and chemical data only. We determined 3-D triangular planes defined by categorized HM values at the sampling coordinates and calculated the average dihedral angle of the normal vectors as a similarity result. The study shows that the `Targeted' HM map (selection of 30 sites based magnetic pre-screening) has a higher similarity with the `True' Pollution HM map (85 sites) than HM maps resulting from site selections (30 sites) without using magnetic pre-screening information.

  17. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  18. Microfungi and Microbial Activity Along a Heavy Metal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Anders; Bååth, Erland; Söderström, Bengt

    1983-01-01

    Soil fungal biomass, microfungal species composition, and soil respiration rate of conifer mor soil were studied along a steep copper and zinc gradient (up to 20,000 μg of Cu and 20,000 μg of Zn g−1 dry soil) around a brass mill near the town of Gusum in South Sweden. Fungal biomass and soil respiration rate decreased by about 75% along the metal gradient. Above 1,000 μg of Cu g−1, the decrease was clearly evident; below 1,000 μg of Cu g−1, no obvious effects were observed, but there was a tendency for a decrease in total mycelial length. No decrease in CFU was found along the gradient, but fungal species composition was drastically changed. The frequency of the genera Penicillium and Oidiodendron decreased from about 30 and 20%, respectively, at the control sites to only a few percent close to the mill. Mortierella was most frequently isolated in moderately polluted sites, but at the highest pollution levels, a decrease in isolation frequency was evident. Some fungal taxa increased in abundance towards the mill, e.g., Geomyces (from 1 to 10%), Paecilomyces (0 to 10%), and sterile forms (from 10 to 20%). Analyses with a multivariate statistical method (partial least squares) showed that organic matter content and soil moisture had little influence on the fungal community compared with the heavy metal pollution. PMID:16346316

  19. Metals and metalloids in hair samples of children living near the abandoned mine sites of Sulcis-Inglesiente (Sardinia, Italy).

    PubMed

    Varrica, D; Tamburo, E; Milia, N; Vallascas, E; Cortimiglia, V; De Giudici, G; Dongarrà, G; Sanna, E; Monna, F; Losno, R

    2014-10-01

    The Sulcis-Iglesiente district (SW Sardinia, Italy) is one of the oldest and most important polymetallic mining areas in Italy. Large outcrops of sulfide and oxide ores, as well as the products of the long-lasting mining activity, are present throughout the district releasing significant quantities of metals and metalloids into the surrounding environment. Here are reported concentrations of 21 elements determined in scalp hair samples from children (aged 11-13 years) living in different geochemical environments of southwestern Sardinia: Iglesias, hosting several abandoned mines, and the island of Sant׳Antioco, not affected by significant base metal mineralization events. Trace element determinations were performed by ICP-MS. Statistically significant differences (p<0.01) in elemental concentration levels between the two study sites were found. Hair of children from Iglesias exhibited higher concentration values for Ag, Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, U, V, and Zn. Rubidium, V and U resulted more abundant at Sant׳Antioco. Hair samples from Iglesias showed gender-related differences for a larger number of elements (Ag, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sr, U and Zn) than at Sant׳Antioco, where only U was significantly different. The above elemental concentrations in females were always higher than in male donors. Robust Principal Component Analysis operated on log-transformed elemental concentrations showed components indicative of a) sulfides ore minerals (PC1) reflecting the influence of the diffuse mineralization covering the entire study area, b) the presence of some bioavailable As sources (PC2) as As-rich pyrite and Fe-containing sphalerite and c) other sources of metals overlapping the diffuse mineralizations, as carbonate rocks and coal deposits (PC3). The results provided evidence of a potential risk of adverse effects on the health of the exposed population, with children living at Iglesias being greatly exposed to several metals and metalloids originated in mining

  20. Supramolecular modeling of mono-copper enzyme active sites with calix[6]arene-based funnel complexes.

    PubMed

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2015-07-21

    Supramolecular bioinorganic chemistry is a natural evolution in biomimetic metallic systems since it constitutes a further degree of complexity in modeling. The traditional approach consisting of mimicking the first coordination sphere of metal sites proved to be very efficient, because valuable data are extracted from these examples to gain insight in natural systems mechanisms. But it does not reproduce several specific aspects of enzymes that can be mimicked by the implementation of a cavity embedding the labile active site and thus controlling the properties of the metal ion by noncovalent interactions. This Account reports on a strategy aimed at reproducing some supramolecular aspects encountered in the natural systems. The cavity complexes described herein display a coordination site constructed on a macrocycle. Thanks to a careful design of the cavity-based ligands, complexes orienting their labile site specifically toward the inside of the macrocycle were obtained. The supramolecular systems are based on the flexible calix[6]arene core that surrounds the metal ion labile site, thereby constraining exogenous molecules to pass through the conic funnel to reach the metal center. Such an architecture confers to the metal ion very unusual properties and behaviors, which in many aspects are biologically relevant. Three generations of calix[6]-based ligands are presented and discussed in the context of modeling the monocopper sites encountered in some enzymes. A wide range of phenomena are highlighted such as the impact that the size and shape of the access channel to the metal center have on the selectivity and rate of the binding process, the possible remote control of the electronics through small modifications operated on the cavity edges, induced-fit behavior associated with host-guest association (shoe-tree effect) that affects the redox properties of the metal ion and the electron exchange pathway, consequences of forbidden associative ligand exchange

  1. A Two-Metal-Ion-Mediated Conformational Switching Pathway for HDV Ribozyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA enzymes serve as a potentially powerful platform from which to design catalysts and engineer new biotechnology. A fundamental understanding of these systems provides insight to guide design. The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) is a small, self-cleaving RNA motif widely distributed in nature, that has served as a paradigm for understanding basic principles of RNA catalysis. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the precise roles of divalent metal ions and key nucleotides in catalysis. In an effort to establish a reaction mechanism model consistent with available experimental data, we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to explore different conformations and metal ion binding modes along the HDVr reaction path. Building upon recent crystallographic data, our results provide a dynamic model of the HDVr reaction mechanism involving a conformational switch between multiple non-canonical G25:U20 base pair conformations in the active site. These local nucleobase dynamics play an important role in catalysis by modulating the metal binding environments of two Mg2+ ions that support catalysis at different steps of the reaction pathway. The first ion plays a structural role by inducing a base pair flip necessary to obtain the catalytic fold in which C75 moves towards to the scissile phosphate in the active site. Ejection of this ion then permits a second ion to bind elsewhere in the active site and facilitate nucleophile activation. The simulations collectively describe a mechanistic scenario that is consistent with currently available experimental data from crystallography, phosphorothioate substitutions, and chemical probing studies. Avenues for further experimental verification are suggested. PMID:27774349

  2. Environmental impact assessment of radionuclide and metal contamination at the former U site at Kadji Sai, Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Lind, O C; Stegnar, P; Tolongutov, B; Rosseland, B O; Strømman, G; Uralbekov, B; Usubalieva, A; Solomatina, A; Gwynn, J P; Lespukh, E; Salbu, B

    2013-09-01

    During 1949-1967, a U mine, a coal-fired thermal power plant and a processing plant for the extraction of U from the produced ash were operated at the Kadji Sai U mining site in Tonsk district, Issyk-Kul County, Kyrgyzstan. The Kadji Sai U legacy site represents a source of contamination of the local environment by naturally occurring radionuclides and associated trace elements. To assess the environmental impact of radionuclides and trace metals at the site, field expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2008 by the Joint collaboration between Norway, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan (JNKKT) project and the NATO SfP RESCA project. In addition to in situ gamma and Rn dose rate measurements, sampling included at site fractionation of water and sampling of water, fish, sediment, soils and vegetation. The concentrations of radionuclides and trace metals in water from Issyk-Kul Lake were in general low, but surprisingly high for As. Uptake of U and As was also observed in fish from the lake with maximum bioconcentration factors for liver of 1.6 and 75, respectively. The concentrations of U in water within the Kadji Sai area varied from 0.01 to 0.05 mg/L, except for downstream from the mining area where U reached a factor of 10 higher, 0.2 mg/L. Uranium concentrations in the drinking water of Kadji Sai village were about the level recommended by the WHO for drinking water. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratio reflected equilibrium conditions in the mining pond, but far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching 2.3 for an artesian well). Uranium, As and Ni were mainly present as low molecular mass (LMM, less than 10 kDa) species in all samples, indicating that these elemental species are mobile and potentially bioavailable. The soils from the mining sites were enriched in U, As and trace metals. Hot spots with elevated radioactivity levels were easily detected in Kadji Sai and radioactive particles were observed. The presence of particles carrying significant amount of

  3. Environmental impact assessment of radionuclide and metal contamination at the former U site at Kadji Sai, Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Lind, O C; Stegnar, P; Tolongutov, B; Rosseland, B O; Strømman, G; Uralbekov, B; Usubalieva, A; Solomatina, A; Gwynn, J P; Lespukh, E; Salbu, B

    2013-09-01

    During 1949-1967, a U mine, a coal-fired thermal power plant and a processing plant for the extraction of U from the produced ash were operated at the Kadji Sai U mining site in Tonsk district, Issyk-Kul County, Kyrgyzstan. The Kadji Sai U legacy site represents a source of contamination of the local environment by naturally occurring radionuclides and associated trace elements. To assess the environmental impact of radionuclides and trace metals at the site, field expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2008 by the Joint collaboration between Norway, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan (JNKKT) project and the NATO SfP RESCA project. In addition to in situ gamma and Rn dose rate measurements, sampling included at site fractionation of water and sampling of water, fish, sediment, soils and vegetation. The concentrations of radionuclides and trace metals in water from Issyk-Kul Lake were in general low, but surprisingly high for As. Uptake of U and As was also observed in fish from the lake with maximum bioconcentration factors for liver of 1.6 and 75, respectively. The concentrations of U in water within the Kadji Sai area varied from 0.01 to 0.05 mg/L, except for downstream from the mining area where U reached a factor of 10 higher, 0.2 mg/L. Uranium concentrations in the drinking water of Kadji Sai village were about the level recommended by the WHO for drinking water. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratio reflected equilibrium conditions in the mining pond, but far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching 2.3 for an artesian well). Uranium, As and Ni were mainly present as low molecular mass (LMM, less than 10 kDa) species in all samples, indicating that these elemental species are mobile and potentially bioavailable. The soils from the mining sites were enriched in U, As and trace metals. Hot spots with elevated radioactivity levels were easily detected in Kadji Sai and radioactive particles were observed. The presence of particles carrying significant amount of

  4. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  5. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  6. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  7. Sub-cellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-01-01

    We identified a Cu accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulated Cu, dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but was functionally Cu-deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. NanoSIMS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bio-available for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mis-metallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein (re)-metallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  8. Levels of asymmetry in Formica pratensis Retz. (Hymenoptera, Insecta) from a chronic metal-contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Rabitsch, W.B.

    1997-07-01

    Asymmetries of bilaterally symmetrical morphological traits in workers of the ant Formica pratensis Retzius were compared at sites with different levels of metal contamination and between mature and pre-mature colonies. Statistical analyses of the right-minus-left differences revealed that their distributions fit assumptions of fluctuating asymmetry (FA). No direct asymmetry or antisymmetry were present. Mean measurement error accounts for a third of the variation, but the maximum measurement error was 65%. Although significant differences of FA in ants were observed, the inconsistent results render uncovering a clear pattern difficult. Lead, cadmium, and zinc concentrations in the ants decreased with the distance from the contamination source, but no relation was found between FA and the heavy metal levels. Ants from the premature colonies were more asymmetrical than those from mature colonies but accumulated less metals. The use of asymmetry measures in ecotoxicology and biomonitoring is criticized, but should remain widely applicable if statistical assumptions are complemented by genetic and historical data.

  9. Leachability and heavy metal speciation of 17-year old stabilised/solidified contaminated site soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-08-15

    The long-term leachability, heavy metal speciation transformation and binding mechanisms in a field stabilised/solidified contaminated soil (made ground) from West Drayton site were recently investigated following in situ auger mixing treatment with a number of cement-based binders back in 1996. Two batch leaching tests (TCLP and BS EN 12457) and a modified five step sequential extraction procedure along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were employed for the testing of the 17-year-old field soil. The results of batch leaching tests show that the treatment employed remained effective at 17 years of service time, with all BS EN 12457 test samples and most of TCLP test samples satisfied drinking water standards. Sequential extraction results illustrate that the leaching of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in all mixes mainly occurred at the Fe/Mn phase, ranging from 43% to 83%. Amongst the five metals tested, Ni was the most stable with around 40% remained in the residual phase for all the different cement-based binder stabilised/solidified samples. XRD and SEM analyses show that the hydration process has been fully completed and further carbonation took place. In summary, this study confirms that such cement-based stabilisation/solidification (S/S) treatment can achieve satisfactory durability and thus is a reliable technique for long-term remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. PMID:24956579

  10. Risk assessment of heavy metals and their source distribution in waters of a contaminated industrial site.

    PubMed

    Krishna, A Keshav; Mohan, K Rama

    2014-03-01

    Industrially contaminated sites with hazardous materials are a priority and urgent problem all over the world. Appropriate risk assessment is required to determine health risks associated with contaminated sites. The present study was conducted to investigate distribution of potentially hazardous, heavy metal (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentrations in surface and groundwater samples collected during summer (pre-monsoon) and winter (post-monsoon) seasons from an industrially contaminated site, Hyderabad, India, with potential source of metal contamination because of industrial effluents and usage of pesticides in agriculture. Heavy metal (HM) concentrations were analysed by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and were compared with permissible limits set by the World Health Organisation. Data obtained was treated using multivariate statistical approaches like R-mode factor analysis (FA), principal component analysis, cluster analysis, geoaccumulation index, enrichment factor, contamination factor and the degree of contamination. Health risk assessment like chronic daily intake (CDI) and hazard quotient (HQ) were also calculated. Relatively high levels were noted in surface water with average concentrations during summer and winter seasons showing 16.13 and 11.83 for As, 7.91 and 1.64 for Cd, 88.33 and 32.90 for Cr, 58.11 and 28.26 for Cu, 53.62 and 69.96 for Ni, 173.8 and 118.6 for Pb, and 2,943 and 1,889 μg/L for Zn. While in groundwater, the mean metal levels during two seasons were 18.18 and 3.76 for As, 1.67 and 0.40 for Cd, 29.40 and 5.15 for Cr, 17.03 and 4.19 for Cu, 25.4 and 6.09 for Ni, 81.7 and 2.87 for Pb and 953 and 989 μg/L for Zn, respectively. FA identified two factors with cumulative loadings of F1-60.82 % and F2-76.55 % for pre-monsoon surface water and F1-48.75 % and F2-67.55 % for groundwater. Whereas, three factors with cumulative loadings of F1-39.13 %, F2-66.60 % and F3-81.01 % for post-monsoon surface water and F1

  11. Systematically biological prioritizing remediation sites based on datasets of biological investigations and heavy metals in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yu-Pin; Anthony, Johnathen

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution has adverse effects on not only the focal invertebrate species of this study, such as reduction in pupa weight and increased larval mortality, but also on the higher trophic level organisms which feed on them, either directly or indirectly, through the process of biomagnification. Despite this, few studies regarding remediation prioritization take species distribution or biological conservation priorities into consideration. This study develops a novel approach for delineating sites which are both contaminated by any of 5 readily bioaccumulated heavy metal soil contaminants and are of high ecological importance for the highly mobile, low trophic level focal species. The conservation priority of each site was based on the projected distributions of 6 moth species simulated via the presence-only maximum entropy species distribution model followed by the subsequent application of a systematic conservation tool. In order to increase the number of available samples, we also integrated crowd-sourced data with professionally-collected data via a novel optimization procedure based on a simulated annealing algorithm. This integration procedure was important since while crowd-sourced data can drastically increase the number of data samples available to ecologists, still the quality or reliability of crowd-sourced data can be called into question, adding yet another source of uncertainty in projecting species distributions. The optimization method screens crowd-sourced data in terms of the environmental variables which correspond to professionally-collected data. The sample distribution data was derived from two different sources, including the EnjoyMoths project in Taiwan (crowd-sourced data) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) ?eld data (professional data). The distributions of heavy metal concentrations were generated via 1000 iterations of a geostatistical co-simulation approach. The uncertainties in distributions of the heavy

  12. Electrical active defects in HfO2 based metal/oxide/metal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, F.

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric as well as thermally stimulated current measurements were performed on metal/HfO2/Pt capacitors in order to study the electrical active defects in hafnia thin films. Two thermally activated relaxation processes have been carried out from both measurements. At low temperatures, the relaxation process can be ascribed to the shallow traps level localized at 0.65 eV and generally evidenced by the second ionization of oxygen vacancies. At high temperatures, the relaxation process arises from the diffusion of positively charged oxygen vacancies by overcoming an energetic barrier of about 1 eV.

  13. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis by gold supported on reducible oxides has been extensively studied, yet issues such as the nature of the catalytic site and the role of the reducible support remain fiercely debated topics. Here we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of an unprecedented dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of carbon monoxide by ceria-supported gold clusters. The reported dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism results from the ability of the gold cation to strongly couple with the redox properties of the ceria in a synergistic manner, thereby lowering the energy of redox reactions. The gold cation can break away from the gold nanoparticle to catalyse carbon monoxide oxidation, adjacent to the metal/oxide interface and subsequently reintegrate back into the nanoparticle after the reaction is completed. Our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in catalysis. PMID:25735407

  14. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  15. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  16. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  17. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  18. Regulated incorporation of two different metal ions into programmed sites in a duplex by DNA polymerase catalyzed primer extension.

    PubMed

    Funai, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Junko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Kiriu, Risa; Nakagawa, Osamu; Wada, Shun-ichi; Ono, Akira; Urata, Hidehito

    2014-06-23

    Metal-mediated base pairs formed by the coordination of metal ions to natural or artificial bases impart unique chemical and physical properties to nucleic acids and have attracted considerable interest in the field of nanodevices. Ag(I) ions were found to mediate DNA polymerase catalyzed primer extension through the formation of a C-Ag(I)-T base pair, as well as the previously reported C-Ag(I)-A base pair. The comparative susceptibility of dNTPs to Ag(I)-mediated enzymatic incorporation into the site opposite cytosine in the template was shown to be dATP>dTTP≫dCTP. Furthermore, two kinds of metal ions, Ag(I) and Hg(II), selectively mediate the incorporation of thymidine 5'-triphosphate into sites opposite cytosine and thymine in the template, respectively. In other words, the regulated incorporation of different metal ions into programmed sites in the duplex by DNA polymerase was successfully achieved.

  19. Regulated incorporation of two different metal ions into programmed sites in a duplex by DNA polymerase catalyzed primer extension.

    PubMed

    Funai, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Junko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Kiriu, Risa; Nakagawa, Osamu; Wada, Shun-ichi; Ono, Akira; Urata, Hidehito

    2014-06-23

    Metal-mediated base pairs formed by the coordination of metal ions to natural or artificial bases impart unique chemical and physical properties to nucleic acids and have attracted considerable interest in the field of nanodevices. Ag(I) ions were found to mediate DNA polymerase catalyzed primer extension through the formation of a C-Ag(I)-T base pair, as well as the previously reported C-Ag(I)-A base pair. The comparative susceptibility of dNTPs to Ag(I)-mediated enzymatic incorporation into the site opposite cytosine in the template was shown to be dATP>dTTP≫dCTP. Furthermore, two kinds of metal ions, Ag(I) and Hg(II), selectively mediate the incorporation of thymidine 5'-triphosphate into sites opposite cytosine and thymine in the template, respectively. In other words, the regulated incorporation of different metal ions into programmed sites in the duplex by DNA polymerase was successfully achieved. PMID:24719384

  20. Bioaccumulation and translocation of heavy metals by nine native plant species grown at a sewage sludge dump site.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ebrahem M; Shaltout, Kamal H

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, nine native plant species were collected to determine their potential to clean up nine heavy metals from soil of a sewage sludge dump site. Almost all nine plant species grown at sewage sludge dump site showed multifold higher concentrations of heavy metals as compared to plants grown at the reference site. All the investigated species were characterized by a bioaccumulation factor (BF) > 1.0 for some heavy metals. BF was generally higher for Cd, followed by Pb, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Fe. The translocation factor (TF) varied among plant species, and among heavy metals. For most studied heavy metals, TFs were <1.0. The present study proved that the concentrations of all heavy metals (except Cd, Co, and Pb) in most studied species were positively correlated with those in soil. Such correlations indicate that these species reflect the cumulative effects of environmental pollution from soil, and thereby suggesting their potential use in the biomonitoring of most heavy metals examined. In conclusion, all tissues of nine plant species could act as bioindicators, biomonitors, and remediates of most examined heavy metals. Moreover, Bassia indica, Solanum nigrum, and Pluchea dioscoridis are considered hyperaccumulators of Fe; Amaranthus viridis and Bassia indica are considered hyperaccumulators of Pb; and Portulaca oleracea is considered hyperaccumulator of Mn. PMID:27184987

  1. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-04-05

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. Over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals and radionuclides causing transport into the surrounding environment. We propose that fermentative microorganisms are active in these sites and may control metal and radionuclide migration from source zones (Figure 1). The following overarching hypothesis will drive our research: 'Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic compounds can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms.' The objective of our research is to determine the effect of carbon and energy flow through simulated waste environments on metal and radionuclide migration from waste pits and trenches across the DOE complex. Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microorganisms have been chosen as the focus of this research because their activity is a critical first step that we hypothesize will control subsequent fate and transport in contaminated natural systems. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These

  2. Hydrogen Storage and Selective, Reversible O2 Adsorption in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Chromium(II) Sites.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Eric D; Queen, Wendy L; Hudson, Matthew R; Mason, Jarad A; Xiao, Dianne J; Murray, Leslie J; Flacau, Roxana; Brown, Craig M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-18

    A chromium(II)-based metal-organic framework Cr3 [(Cr4 Cl)3 (BTT)8 ]2 (Cr-BTT; BTT(3-) =1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate), featuring coordinatively unsaturated, redox-active Cr(2+) cation sites, was synthesized and investigated for potential applications in H2 storage and O2 production. Low-pressure H2 adsorption and neutron powder diffraction experiments reveal moderately strong Cr-H2 interactions, in line with results from previously reported M-BTT frameworks. Notably, gas adsorption measurements also reveal excellent O2 /N2 selectivity with substantial O2 reversibility at room temperature, based on selective electron transfer to form Cr(III) superoxide moieties. Infrared spectroscopy and powder neutron diffraction experiments were used to confirm this mechanism of selective O2 binding.

  3. Hydrogen Storage and Selective, Reversible O2 Adsorption in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Chromium(II) Sites.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Eric D; Queen, Wendy L; Hudson, Matthew R; Mason, Jarad A; Xiao, Dianne J; Murray, Leslie J; Flacau, Roxana; Brown, Craig M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-18

    A chromium(II)-based metal-organic framework Cr3 [(Cr4 Cl)3 (BTT)8 ]2 (Cr-BTT; BTT(3-) =1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate), featuring coordinatively unsaturated, redox-active Cr(2+) cation sites, was synthesized and investigated for potential applications in H2 storage and O2 production. Low-pressure H2 adsorption and neutron powder diffraction experiments reveal moderately strong Cr-H2 interactions, in line with results from previously reported M-BTT frameworks. Notably, gas adsorption measurements also reveal excellent O2 /N2 selectivity with substantial O2 reversibility at room temperature, based on selective electron transfer to form Cr(III) superoxide moieties. Infrared spectroscopy and powder neutron diffraction experiments were used to confirm this mechanism of selective O2 binding. PMID:27249784

  4. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  5. Spatial variability of metal bioaccumulation in estuarine killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) at the Callahan Mine Superfund site, Brooksville, ME

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Kate L.; Bugge, Deenie M.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2013-01-01

    The former Callahan Mine Site in Brooksville, ME is an open-pit, hardrock mine site in an intertidal system, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate how metal-enriched sediments and overlying water impact estuarine food webs. Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in sediment, whole water, and Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were evaluated at sites in Goose Pond (the Callahan Mine Site) and at reference sites. The metal concentrations of sediment, water, and fish were spatially distinct and significantly higher at the Mine Site than in the reference estuary. Sediment concentrations were particularly elevated and were above probable effects levels (PEL) for all four metals adjacent to the tailings pile. Even in this well-mixed system, water metal concentrations were significantly elevated adjacent to the tailings pile and the concentrations of Cu and Zn were above ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) for chronic marine exposure. Neither organic matter in the sediment nor salinity or pH of the water explained the metal concentrations. Adjacent to the tailings pile, killifish body burdens were elevated and were significantly related to both sediment and aqueous concentrations. In conclusion, (1) the contaminated sediment and seepage from the tailings impoundment and waste rock pile 3 create a continual flux of metals into the water column, (2) the metals are bioavailable and are bioconcentrating as evident in the killifish tissue concentrations, and (3) Callahan Mine is directly affecting metal bioaccumulation in fauna residing in the Goose Pond estuary and, potentially, in Penobscot Bay via the ‘trophic nekton relay.’ PMID:24022459

  6. Vertical Extent of 100 Area Vadose Zone Contamination of Metals at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, R.; Mehta, S.

    2012-12-01

    The 100 Area is part of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington and borders the Columbia River. The primary sources of contamination in the area are associated with the operation of nine former production reactors, the last one shutting down in 1988. The area is undergoing a CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) that will provide data to support final cleanup decisions. During reactor operations, cooling water contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemicals was discharged to both the adjacent Columbia River and infiltration cribs and trenches. Contaminated solid wastes were disposed of in burial grounds; the estimated Lead-Cadmium used as "reactor poison" and disposed of in 100 Area burial grounds is 1103 metric tons, of which up to 1059 metric tons are Lead and 44 metric tons are Cadmium. We summarize vadose zone site characterization data for the recently drilled boreholes, including the vertical distribution of concentration profiles for metals (i.e., Lead, Arsenic and Mercury) under the near neutral pH and oxygenated conditions. The deep borehole measurements targeted in the RI work plan were identified with a bias towards locating contaminants throughout the vadose zone and targeted areas at or near the waste sites; i.e., the drilling as well as the sampling was biased towards capturing contamination within the "hot spots." Unlike non-reactive contaminants such as tritium, Arsenic, Mercury and Lead are known to have a higher distribution coefficient (Kd), expected to be relatively immobile, and have a long residence time within the vadose zone. However, a number of sediment samples located close to the water table exceed the background concentrations for Lead and Arsenic. Three conceptual models are postulated to explain the deeper than expected penetration for the metals.

  7. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  8. [Study on pollution evaluation of heavy metal in surface soil of the original site of Qingdao North Station].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Jia, Yong-gang; Pan, Yu-ying

    2013-09-01

    The determination of pollution extent and health risk assessment are the premise of heavy metal contaminated site remediation. The content of Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni in Qingdao North Station was detected, and the correlation of the 6 kinds of heavy metal content was analyzed. The pollution extent in excess of background values was characterized by anthropogenic influence multiple, and the pollution of heavy metal in soil was evaluated using geoaccumulation index and a new method which connects geoaccumulation index with Nemero index. Finally, human health risk assessment was carried out with health risk assessment model for heavy metal content. The results showed that Qingdao North Station soil were polluted by heavy metals. Six heavy metal pollution levels were: Cd > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr > Zn, and Cd had reached the severity pollution level, Cu and Ni followed by, Cr, Pb and Zn were in minor pollution level. The order of coefficient variation in all heavy metals was: Cd > Ni > Cr > Zn > Pb > Cu. Within the study area soil heavy metal distribution was different, but overall discrepancy was small. The order of non-cancer hazards of heavy metals in soil was Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd > Zn, and the order of carcinogen risks of heavy metals was Ni > Cd. The non-cancer hazard and carcinogen risks values of metals were both lower than that their threshold values. They were not the direct threats to human health.

  9. [Study on pollution evaluation of heavy metal in surface soil of the original site of Qingdao North Station].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Jia, Yong-gang; Pan, Yu-ying

    2013-09-01

    The determination of pollution extent and health risk assessment are the premise of heavy metal contaminated site remediation. The content of Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni in Qingdao North Station was detected, and the correlation of the 6 kinds of heavy metal content was analyzed. The pollution extent in excess of background values was characterized by anthropogenic influence multiple, and the pollution of heavy metal in soil was evaluated using geoaccumulation index and a new method which connects geoaccumulation index with Nemero index. Finally, human health risk assessment was carried out with health risk assessment model for heavy metal content. The results showed that Qingdao North Station soil were polluted by heavy metals. Six heavy metal pollution levels were: Cd > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr > Zn, and Cd had reached the severity pollution level, Cu and Ni followed by, Cr, Pb and Zn were in minor pollution level. The order of coefficient variation in all heavy metals was: Cd > Ni > Cr > Zn > Pb > Cu. Within the study area soil heavy metal distribution was different, but overall discrepancy was small. The order of non-cancer hazards of heavy metals in soil was Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd > Zn, and the order of carcinogen risks of heavy metals was Ni > Cd. The non-cancer hazard and carcinogen risks values of metals were both lower than that their threshold values. They were not the direct threats to human health. PMID:24289020

  10. Photoreduction of the active site of the metalloprotein putidaredoxin by synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Mary C; Latimer, Matthew J; Poulos, Thomas L; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt

    2007-09-01

    X-ray damage to protein crystals is often assessed on the basis of the degradation of diffraction intensity, yet this measure is not sensitive to the rapid changes that occur at photosensitive groups such as the active sites of metalloproteins. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the X-ray dose-dependent photoreduction of crystals of the [Fe(2)S(2)]-containing metalloprotein putidaredoxin. A dramatic decrease in the rate of photoreduction is observed in crystals cryocooled with liquid helium at 40 K compared with those cooled with liquid nitrogen at 110 K. Whereas structural changes consistent with cluster reduction occur in the active site of the crystal measured at 110 K, no such changes occur in the crystal measured at 40 K, even after an eightfold increase in dose. When the structural results from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements are compared with those obtained by crystallography on this and similar proteins, it is apparent that X-ray-induced photoreduction has had an impact on the crystallographic data and subsequent structure solutions. These results strongly indicate the importance of using liquid-helium-based cooling for metalloprotein crystallography in order to avoid the subtle yet important changes that can take place at the metalloprotein active sites when liquid-nitrogen-based cooling is used. The study also illustrates the need for direct measurement of the redox states of the metals, through X-ray absorption spectroscopy, simultaneously with the crystallographic measurements.

  11. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  12. Laser beam active brazing of metal ceramic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Bach, Friedrich W.; von Alvensleben, Ferdinand; Kreutzburg, K.

    1996-04-01

    The use of engineering ceramics is becoming more and more important. Reasons for this are the specific properties of these materials, such as high strength, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. To apply the advantages of ceramics, joining techniques of metal ceramic parts are required. In this paper, joining of metal ceramic joints by laser beam brazing is presented. This joining technique is characterized by local heat input, and the minimal thermal stress of the brazed components. During the investigations, an Nd:YAG laser and a vacuum chamber were applied. The advantages of Nd:YAG lasers are the simple mechanical construction, and laser beam guidance via quartz glass fibers, which leads to high handling flexibility. In addition, most of the materials show a high absorption rate for this kind of radiation. As materials, ceramic Al2O3 with a purity of 99.4% and metals such as X5CrNi189 and Fe54Ni29Co17 were used. As a filler material, commercially available silver and silver- copper brazes with chemically active elements like titanium were employed. During this study, the brazing wetting behavior and the formation of diffusion layers in dependence on processing parameters were investigated. The results have shown that high brazing qualities can be achieved by means of the laser beam brazing process. Crack-free joining of metal ceramic parts is currently only possible by the use of metals such as Fe54Ni29Co17 because of its low thermal expansion coefficient, which reduces thermal stresses within the joining zone.

  13. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  14. Abundance, Composition and Activity of Ammonia Oxidizer and Denitrifier Communities in Metal Polluted Rice Paddies from South China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Ding, Yuanjun; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhou, Tong; Pan, Genxing; Crowley, David; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Yu, Xinyan; Wang, Jiafang

    2014-01-01

    While microbial nitrogen transformations in soils had been known to be affected by heavy metal pollution, changes in abundance and community structure of the mediating microbial populations had been not yet well characterized in polluted rice soils. Here, by using the prevailing molecular fingerprinting and enzyme activity assays and comparisons to adjacent non-polluted soils, we examined changes in the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing and denitrifying communities of rice paddies in two sites with different metal accumulation situation under long-term pollution from metal mining and smelter activities. Potential nitrifying activity was significantly reduced in polluted paddies in both sites while potential denitrifying activity reduced only in the soils with high Cu accumulation up to 1300 mg kg−1. Copy numbers of amoA (AOA and AOB genes) were lower in both polluted paddies, following the trend with the enzyme assays, whereas that of nirK was not significantly affected. Analysis of the DGGE profiles revealed a shift in the community structure of AOA, and to a lesser extent, differences in the community structure of AOB and denitrifier between soils from the two sites with different pollution intensity and metal composition. All of the retrieved AOB sequences belonged to the genus Nitrosospira, among which species Cluster 4 appeared more sensitive to metal pollution. In contrast, nirK genes were widely distributed among different bacterial genera that were represented differentially between the polluted and unpolluted paddies. This could suggest either a possible non-specific target of the primers conventionally used in soil study or complex interactions between soil properties and metal contents on the observed community and activity changes, and thus on the N transformation in the polluted rice soils. PMID:25058658

  15. Factors influencing the heavy metal bioaccessibility in soils were site dependent from different geographical locations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Yang, Fen; Wei, Chaoyang

    2015-09-01

    A soil survey was conducted in urban areas from five sites, including Beijing, Baotou, Datong, Fuyang, and Xiantao in China. The objective was to explore the most significant factors that may impact the bioaccessibility of heavy metals (Bio-HMs), including As, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, in soils. Twenty to 30 composite soil samples were collected at each site. The various soil properties, including pH, particle size, Fe/Mn, and organic matter contents, were analyzed. The chemical operated forms of HMs in soils were measured by the Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction scheme, while the Bio-HMs were determined by the simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) procedure. The concentrations of total heavy metals (T-HMs) in soils from different sites (cities) were in the range as As (5.69-9.86), Cr (77.42-230.20), Cu (15.68-36.54), Pb (14.12-58.93), and Zn (38.66-183.46) mg/kg. Cu and Pb had higher relative bioaccessibilities (48-70%) than those of As and Cr (6-15%), indicating higher health risks of the former than the latter two HMs. The Bio-HMs for various HMs were comparable to the first two or three combined BCR extracted fractions, with an exception of Cu, whose Bio-HMs were larger than the combined three BCR fractions, indicating that Cu was highly accessible in soils as compared with other HMs. Factor analysis showed that all variables, including soil property parameters and BCR extracted fractions, could be represented by three common factors extracted with higher than 0.5 loadings and ∼80% cumulative contribution to the total variance. Among the three common factors, factor 1, containing mainly pH, texture, and Fe/Mn variables, and factor 3, containing mainly organic matter variable, could be attributed to geographical regions, while factor 2, containing mainly BCR extracted fractions, could be ascribed to relative bioaccessibility of HMs (R-Bio-HMs). Interactive mapping of the main factors and cluster analysis were consistent, which supported the

  16. Metal concentration and antioxidant activity of edible mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Kocak, Mehmet Sefa; Uren, Mehmet Cemil

    2015-05-15

    This study presents information on the antioxidant activity and heavy metal concentrations of Polyporus sulphureus, Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon perlatum and Gomphus clavatus mushrooms collected from the province of Mugla in the South-Aegean Region of Turkey. Antioxidant activities of mushroom samples were evaluated by four complementary tests. All tests showed L. perlatum and G. clavatus to possess extremely high antioxidant potential. Antioxidant activity of the samples was strongly correlated with total phenolic-flavonoid content. In terms of heavy metal content, L. perlatum exceeded the legal limits for daily intake of Pb, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni and Co contents (0.461, 738.00, 14.52, 1.27, 1.65, 0.417 mg/day, respectively) by a 60-kg consumer. Co contents of M. procera (0.026 mg/day) and P. sulphureus (0.030 mg/day) and Cd contents of G. clavatus (0.071 mg/day) were also above the legal limits. According to these results, L. perlatum should not be consumed, despite the potentially beneficial antioxidant activity. Additionally, M. procera and G. clavatus should not be consumed daily due to their high levels of Cd and Co.

  17. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-07

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω₋⁺|₁ mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω₋⁻|₁ mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω₋⁺|₊ and ω₋⁻|₁ modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag–SiO₂–Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  18. Modelling metal centres, acid sites and reaction mechanisms in microporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Alexander J; Logsdail, A J; Sokol, A A; Catlow, C R A

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the role of QM/MM (embedded cluster) computational techniques in catalytic science, in particular their application to microporous catalysis. We describe the methodologies employed and illustrate their utility by briefly summarising work on metal centres in zeolites. We then report a detailed investigation into the behaviour of methanol at acidic sites in zeolites H-ZSM-5 and H-Y in the context of the methanol-to-hydrocarbons/olefins process. Studying key initial steps of the reaction (the adsorption and subsequent methoxylation), we probe the effect of framework topology and Brønsted acid site location on the energetics of these initial processes. We find that although methoxylation is endothermic with respect to the adsorbed system (by 17-56 kJ mol(-1) depending on the location), there are intriguing correlations between the adsorption/reaction energies and the geometries of the adsorbed species, of particular significance being the coordination of methyl hydrogens. These observations emphasise the importance of adsorbate coordination with the framework in zeolite catalysed conversions, and how this may vary with framework topology and site location, particularly suited to investigation by QM/MM techniques. PMID:27136967

  19. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  20. Identification of catalytic sites for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in N-doped graphene materials: Development of highly efficient metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong Bin; Miao, Jianwei; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Jiazang; Tao, Hua Bing; Wang, Xizu; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Rong; Gao, Jiajian; Chen, Hao Ming; Dai, Liming; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are critical to renewable energy conversion and storage technologies. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have been reported to be efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in fuel cells for energy conversion, as well as ORR and OER in metal-air batteries for energy storage. We reported that metal-free three-dimensional (3D) graphene nanoribbon networks (N-GRW) doped with nitrogen exhibited superb bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for both ORR and OER, with an excellent stability in alkaline electrolytes (for example, KOH). For the first time, it was experimentally demonstrated that the electron-donating quaternary N sites were responsible for ORR, whereas the electron-withdrawing pyridinic N moieties in N-GRW served as active sites for OER. The unique 3D nanoarchitecture provided a high density of the ORR and OER active sites and facilitated the electrolyte and electron transports. As a result, the as-prepared N-GRW holds great potential as a low-cost, highly efficient air cathode in rechargeable metal-air batteries. Rechargeable zinc-air batteries with the N-GRW air electrode in a two-electrode configuration exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 1.46 V, a specific capacity of 873 mAh g(-1), and a peak power density of 65 mW cm(-2), which could be continuously charged and discharged with an excellent cycling stability. Our work should open up new avenues for the development of various carbon-based metal-free bifunctional electrocatalysts of practical significance. PMID:27152333

  1. Identification of catalytic sites for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in N-doped graphene materials: Development of highly efficient metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong Bin; Miao, Jianwei; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Jiazang; Tao, Hua Bing; Wang, Xizu; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Rong; Gao, Jiajian; Chen, Hao Ming; Dai, Liming; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are critical to renewable energy conversion and storage technologies. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have been reported to be efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in fuel cells for energy conversion, as well as ORR and OER in metal-air batteries for energy storage. We reported that metal-free three-dimensional (3D) graphene nanoribbon networks (N-GRW) doped with nitrogen exhibited superb bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for both ORR and OER, with an excellent stability in alkaline electrolytes (for example, KOH). For the first time, it was experimentally demonstrated that the electron-donating quaternary N sites were responsible for ORR, whereas the electron-withdrawing pyridinic N moieties in N-GRW served as active sites for OER. The unique 3D nanoarchitecture provided a high density of the ORR and OER active sites and facilitated the electrolyte and electron transports. As a result, the as-prepared N-GRW holds great potential as a low-cost, highly efficient air cathode in rechargeable metal-air batteries. Rechargeable zinc-air batteries with the N-GRW air electrode in a two-electrode configuration exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 1.46 V, a specific capacity of 873 mAh g−1, and a peak power density of 65 mW cm−2, which could be continuously charged and discharged with an excellent cycling stability. Our work should open up new avenues for the development of various carbon-based metal-free bifunctional electrocatalysts of practical significance. PMID:27152333

  2. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  3. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  4. Stabilization of dissolved trace metals at hydrothermal vent sites: Impact on their marine biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Sylvia G.; Powell, Zach D.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Kuzmanovski, Stefan; Kleint, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vents have long been neglected as a significant source of several bioactive trace metals as it was assumed that elements such as Fe, Mn, and Cu etc., precipitate in extensor forming poly-metallic sulfide and oxy-hydroxy sediments in the relative vicinity of the emanation site. However, recently this paradigm has been reviewed since the stabilization of dissolved Fe and Cu from hydrothermal vents was observed [1, 2] and increased concentrations of trace metals can be traced from their hydrothermal source thousands of kilometres through the ocean basins [3]. Furthermore several independent modelling attempts have shown that not only a stabilization of dissolved hydrothermal Fe and Cu is possible [4] but also that hydrothermalism must be a significant source of Fe to be able to balance the Fe-biogeochemical cycle [5]. Here we present new data that gives further evidence of the presence of copper stabilising organic and inorganic compounds in samples characterized by hydrothermal input. We can show that there are systematic differences in copper-complexing ligands at different vent sites such as 5°S on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, Brother Volcano on the Kermadec Arc, and some shallow hydrothermal CO2 seeps in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand and the Mediterranean Sea. Quantitative and qualitative voltammetric data convincingly indicates that inorganic sulphur and organic thiols form the majority of the strong copper-complexing ligand pool in many of these hydrothermal samples. On average, the high temperature vents had a significantly higher copper binding capacity than the diffuse vents due to higher inorganic sulphur species concentrations. References: [1] Sander, S. G., et al. 2007. Organic complexation of copper in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems. Environmental Chemistry 4: 81-89 [2] Bennett, S. A., et al. 2008. The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 270: 157-167. [3] Wu J

  5. Microbiological-enhanced mixing across scales during in-situ bioreduction of metals and radionuclides at Department of Energy Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Valocchi, Albert; Werth, Charles; Liu, Wen-Tso; Sanford, Robert; Nakshatrala, Kalyan

    2015-10-20

    Bioreduction is being actively investigated as an effective strategy for subsurface remediation and long-term management of DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides (i.e. U(VI)). These strategies require manipulation of the subsurface, usually through injection of chemicals (e.g., electron donor) which mix at varying scales with the contaminant to stimulate metal reducing bacteria. There is evidence from DOE field experiments suggesting that mixing limitations of substrates at all scales may affect biological growth and activity for U(VI) reduction. Although current conceptual models hold that biomass growth and reduction activity is limited by physical mixing processes, a growing body of literature suggests that reaction could be enhanced by cell-to-cell interaction occurring over length scales extending tens to thousands of microns. Our project investigated two potential mechanisms of enhanced electron transfer. The first is the formation of single- or multiple-species biofilms that transport electrons via direct electrical connection such as conductive pili (i.e. ‘nanowires’) through biofilms to where the electron acceptor is available. The second is through diffusion of electron carriers from syntrophic bacteria to dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB). The specific objectives of this work are (i) to quantify the extent and rate that electrons are transported between microorganisms in physical mixing zones between an electron donor and electron acceptor (e.g. U(IV)), (ii) to quantify the extent that biomass growth and reaction are enhanced by interspecies electron transport, and (iii) to integrate mixing across scales (e.g., microscopic scale of electron transfer and macroscopic scale of diffusion) in an integrated numerical model to quantify these mechanisms on overall U(VI) reduction rates. We tested these hypotheses with five tasks that integrate microbiological experiments, unique micro-fluidics experiments, flow cell experiments, and

  6. The effect of metal loading on Cd adsorption onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cell envelopes: The role of sulfhydryl sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Cd onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells with and without blocking of sulfhydryl sites was measured in order to determine the effect of metal loading and to understand the role of sulfhydryl sites in the adsorption reactions. The observed adsorption/desorption behaviors display strong dependence on metal loading. Under a high loading of 40 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, blocking the sulfhydryl sites within the cell envelope by exposure of the biomass to monobromo(trimethylammonio)bimane bromide (qBBr) does not significantly affect the extent of Cd adsorption, and we observed fully reversible adsorption under this condition. In contrast, under a low metal loading of 1.3 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, the extent of Cd adsorption onto sulfhydryl-blocked S. oneidensis cells was significantly lower than that onto untreated cells, and only approximately 50-60% of the adsorbed Cd desorbed from the cells upon acidification. In conjunction with previous EXAFS results, our findings demonstrate that Cd adsorption onto S. oneidensis under low metal loading conditions is dominated by sulfhydryl binding, and thus is controlled by a distinct adsorption mechanism from the non-sulfhydryl site binding which controls Cd adsorption under high metal loading conditions. We use the data to develop a surface complexation model that constrains the values of the stability constants for individual Cd-sulfhydryl and Cd-non-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes, and we use this approach to account for the Cd adsorption behavior as a function of both pH and metal loading. This approach is crucial in order to predict metal adsorption onto bacteria under environmentally relevant metal loading conditions where sulfhydryl binding sites can dominate the adsorption reaction.

  7. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  8. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  9. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  10. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  11. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  12. Active Interrogation Observables for Enrichment Determination of DU Shielded HEU Metal Assemblies with Limited Geometrical Information

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Kirsten E; McConchie, Seth M; Crye, Jason Michael; Mihalczo, John T

    2011-01-01

    Determining the enrichment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal assemblies shielded by depleted uranium (DU) proves a unique challenge to currently employed measurement techniques. Efforts to match time-correlated neutron distributions obtained through active interrogation to Monte Carlo simulations of the assemblies have shown promising results, given that the exact geometries of both the HEU metal assemblies and DU shields are known from imaging and fission site mapping. In certain situations, however, it is desirable to obtain enrichment with limited or no geometrical information of the assemblies being measured. This paper explores the possibility that the utilization of observables in the interrogation of assemblies by time-tagged D-T neutrons, including time-correlated distribution of neutrons and gammas using liquid scintillators operating on the fission chain time scale, can lead to enrichment determination without a complete set of geometrical information.

  13. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  14. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  15. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  16. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  17. Crystal structures of human tissue kallikrein 4: activity modulation by a specific zinc binding site.

    PubMed

    Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Grimminger, Valerie; Sommerhoff, Christian; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Huber, Robert; Friedrich, Rainer; Bode, Wolfram; Goettig, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Human tissue kallikrein 4 (hK4) belongs to a 15-member family of closely related serine proteinases. hK4 is predominantly expressed in prostate, activates hK3/PSA, and is up-regulated in prostate and ovarian cancer. We have identified active monomers of recombinant hK4 besides inactive oligomers in solution. hK4 crystallised in the presence of zinc, nickel, and cobalt ions in three crystal forms containing cyclic tetramers and octamers. These structures display a novel metal site between His25 and Glu77 that links the 70-80 loop with the N-terminal segment. Micromolar zinc as present in prostatic fluid inhibits the enzymatic activity of hK4 against fluorogenic substrates. In our measurements, wild-type hK4 exhibited a zinc inhibition constant (IC50) of 16 microM including a permanent residual activity, in contrast to the zinc-independent mutants H25A and E77A. Since the Ile16 N terminus of wild-type hK4 becomes more accessible for acetylating agents in the presence of zinc, we propose that zinc affects the hK4 active site via the salt-bridge formed between the N terminus and Asp194 required for a functional active site. hK4 possesses an unusual 99-loop that creates a groove-like acidic S2 subsite. These findings explain the observed specificity of hK4 for the P1 to P4 substrate residues. Moreover, hK4 shows a negatively charged surface patch, which may represent an exosite for prime-side substrate recognition. PMID:16950394

  18. Effect of amino acid substitutions in a potential metal-binding site of AnfA on expression from the anfH promoter in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Premakumar, R; Loveless, T M; Bishop, P E

    1994-10-01

    AnfA, an activator required for transcription of the structural genes encoding nitrogenase 3 (anfHDGK) in Azotobacter vinelandii, has a potential metal-binding site [(S19)H(C21)FTGE(C26)R] in its N terminus. Growth studies and expression of an anfH-lacZ fusion in mutants containing amino acid substitutions in this site indicate that Ser-19 is not required for AnfA activity whereas Cys-21 and Cys-26 are required. Residual expression of the anfH-lacZ fusion in AnfA- mutants was found to be due to activation by VnfA, the activator required for expression of genes encoding nitrogenase 2.

  19. Effective removal of field-emitting sites from metallic surfaces by dry ice cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Dangwal, Arti; Mueller, Guenter; Reschke, Detlef; Floettmann, Klaus; Singer, Xenia

    2007-08-15

    Systematic results of the field emission properties of polycrystalline copper and niobium and single-crystal Nb are reported. Dry ice cleaning (DIC) is found to suppress enhanced field emission from metallic surfaces. The cleaning effect on the emitting sites was investigated by means of field emission scanning microscopy up to fields of 250 MV/m and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The number density of emitters at given fields was drastically reduced by dry ice cleaning. Current-voltage measurements and derived Fowler-Nordheim parameters are partially discussed with respect to the morphology and impurity content of localized emitters. No emission from grain boundaries on large-grain Nb samples was observed. The microscopy results prove the effective removal of field-emitting particulates down to 400 nm as well as the partial smoothing of surface protrusions by DIC.

  20. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  1. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  2. Immunologically active metallic ion-containing polysaccharides of Achyrocline satureioides.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, J; Knaus, U; Tubaro, L; Schaefer, W; Wagner, H

    1992-08-01

    Two homogeneous, metallic ion-containing pectic polysaccharides with mean M(r)s of 7600 and 15,000 were isolated from dried aerial parts of Achyrocline satureioides by anion exchange column chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration column chromatography on Fractogel TSK HW-50 (S). The structures, as determined by methylation analysis, carboxyl reduction, and partial acid hydrolysis, were shown to be rhamnogalacturonans. Both pectins show a pronounced anticomplementary effect in vitro. The larger carbohydrate AS 4 of higher M(r) exerts anti-inflammatory activity and a strong enhancement of phagocytosis in vivo.

  3. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were

  4. Role of electrostatics at the catalytic metal binding site in xylose isomerase action: Ca(2+)-inhibition and metal competence in the double mutant D254E/D256E.

    PubMed

    Fuxreiter, M; Böcskei, Z; Szeibert, A; Szabó, E; Dallmann, G; Naray-Szabo, G; Asboth, B

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic metal binding site of xylose isomerase from Arthrobacter B3728 was modified by protein engineering to diminish the inhibitory effect of Ca2+ and to study the competence of metals on catalysis. To exclude Ca2+ from Site 2 a double mutant D254E/D256E was designed with reduced space available for binding. In order to elucidate structural consequences of the mutation the binary complex of the mutant with Mg2+ as well as ternary complexes with bivalent metal ions and the open-chain inhibitor xylitol were crystallized for x-ray studies. We determined the crystal structures of the ternary complexes containing Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ at 2.2 to 2.5 A resolutions, and refined them to R factors of 16.3, 16.6, and 19.1, respectively. We found that all metals are liganded by both engineered glutamates as well as by atoms O1 and O2 of the inhibitor. The similarity of the coordination of Ca2+ to that of the cofactors as well as results with Be2+ weaken the assumption that geometry differences should account for the catalytic noncompetence of this ion. Kinetic results of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme showed that the significant decrease in Ca2+ inhibition was accompanied by a similar reduction in the enzymatic activity. Qualitative argumentation, based on the protein electrostatic potential, indicates that the proximity of the negative side chains to the substrate significantly reduces the electrostatic stabilization of the transition state. Furthermore, due to the smaller size of the catalytic metal site, no water molecule, coordinating the metal, could be observed in ternary complexes of the double mutant. Consequently, the proton shuttle step in the overall mechanism should differ from that in the wild type. These effects can account for the observed decrease in catalytic efficiency of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme. PMID:9188736

  5. Paleomagnetic Determination of Pre-Mining Metal Flux Rates at the Iron Mountain Superfund Site, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, C. N.; Nordstrom, D. K.; Verosub, K. L.; Helm-Clark, C.

    2007-05-01

    Iron Mountain, located near Redding in northern California, hosts a group of mines that were active from the late 1870s to the early 1960s. The mineral deposit is classified as a type-I volcanogenic massive sulfide, similar to the Noranda deposit of Ontario, Canada. Three large, isolated blocks of sulfide mineralization contain 90-95 percent pyrite and a few percent chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and sphalerite (ZnS). Prior to mining, weathering converted parts of the massive sulfide to gossan consisting of hematite, goethite, and silica. Mining further exposed the pyritic masses to water and air, creating optimal conditions for sulfide oxidation and production of acid mine drainage. Because the acidic, metal-rich effluent reached the Sacramento River, the site has been one of the highest priorities on the US EPA's Superfund list since the early 1980s. A crucial area of scientific uncertainty that needed to be resolved was the magnitude of natural background metal flux. We collected 25 paleomagnetic samples from the gossan to determine the polarity of the Earth's magnetic field during pre-mining sulfide weathering. Nineteen samples exhibited stable magnetic endpoints during thermal demagnetization; of these, four were of reversed polarity and the remainder were of normal polarity. This result established that the gossan was already forming 780,000 years ago, and this information made it possible to estimate natural, pre- mining flux rates of copper and zinc. These rates were three orders of magnitude lower than post-mining (pre- remediation) rates. Resolution of the question of the background flux led to one of the largest legal settlements in U.S. history for remediation of an inactive mine site.

  6. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF METALS IN STREAMS ON A DEFENSE MATERIALS PROCESSING SITE IN SOUTH CAROLINA, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.; Dyer, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 780 km{sup 2} U.S. Department of Energy facility near Aiken SC established in 1950 to produce nuclear materials. SRS streams are 'integrators' that potentially receive water transportable contaminants from all sources within their watersheds necessitating a GIS-based watershed approach to organize contaminant distribution data and accurately characterize the effects of multiple contaminant sources on aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediments, fish, and water were elevated in streams affected by SRS operations, but contaminant exposure models for Lontra Canadensis and Ceryle alcyon indicated that toxicological reference values were exceeded only by Hg and Al. Macroinvertebrate community structure was unrelated to sediment metal concentrations. This study indicated that (1) modeling studies and field bioassessments provide a complementary basis for addressing the individual and cumulative effects of contaminants, (2) habitat effects must be controlled when assessing contaminant impacts, (3) sensitivity analyses of contaminant exposure models are helpful in apportioning sampling effort, and (4) contaminants released during fifty years of industrial operations have not resulted in demonstrable harm to aquatic organisms in SRS streams.

  7. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  8. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. PMID:24939240

  9. Effects of organic and inorganic amendments on heavy metal fractionation in soils from the "Cartagena-La Union" mining site (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Rafael; de La Fuente, Carlos; Alburquerque, José Antonio; Martínez-Alcalá, Isabel; Pardo, Tania; Bernal, María. Pilar

    2010-05-01

    The intensive mining activity carried out in the "Cartagena-La Union" district has led to the contamination with heavy metals of the surrounding area. Our aim was to evaluate the heavy metal solubility in soils from this area, in order to optimize the use of different soil amendments for the improvement of soil conditions that would favour plant establishment. Soils collected from abandoned mine sites (n = 8) showed a high heterogeneity in both soil pH (2.5-7.7) and electrical conductivity (1.2-3.1 dS m-1) and they presented low organic matter contents (0.2-2.0%). These soils showed high pseudo-total concentrations of heavy metals, especially Zn and Pb (Zn: 966-10103, Pb: 1572-11426, Cd:

  10. Interactions of the Metalloregulatory Protein SloR from Streptococcus mutans with Its Metal Ion Effectors and DNA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, John; Cornacchione, Louis; Daly, William; Galan, Diego; Wysota, Michael; Tivnan, Patrick; Collins, Justin; Nye, Dillon; Levitz, Talya; Breyer, Wendy A.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans is the causative agent of dental caries, a significant concern for human health, and therefore an attractive target for therapeutics development. Previous work in our laboratory has identified a homodimeric, manganese-dependent repressor protein, SloR, as an important regulator of cariogenesis and has used site-directed mutagenesis to map functions to specific regions of the protein. Here we extend those studies to better understand the structural interaction between SloR and its operator and its effector metal ions. The results of DNase I assays indicate that SloR protects a 42-bp region of DNA that overlaps the sloABC promoter on the S. mutans UA159 chromosome, while electrophoretic mobility shift and solution binding assays indicate that each of two SloR dimers binds to this region. Real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time semi-qRT-PCR) experiments were used to determine the individual base pairs that contribute to SloR-DNA binding specificity. Solution studies indicate that Mn2+ is better than Zn2+ at specifically activating SloR to bind DNA, and yet the 2.8-Å resolved crystal structure of SloR bound to Zn2+ provides insight into the means by which selective activation by Mn2+ may be achieved and into how SloR may form specific interactions with its operator. Taken together, these experimental observations are significant because they can inform rational drug design aimed at alleviating and/or preventing S. mutans-induced caries formation. IMPORTANCE This report focuses on investigating the SloR protein as a regulator of essential metal ion transport and virulence gene expression in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans and on revealing the details of SloR binding to its metal ion effectors and binding to DNA that together facilitate this expression. We used molecular and biochemical approaches to characterize the interaction of SloR with Mn2+ and with its SloR recognition element to gain a clearer picture

  11. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  12. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  13. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  14. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  15. Enhanced Organo-Metal Halide Perovskite Photoluminescence from Nanosized Defect-Free Crystallites and Emitting Sites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuxi; Merdasa, Aboma; Unger, Eva; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zheng, Kaibo; McKibbin, Sarah; Mikkelsen, Anders; Pullerits, Tõnu; Yartsev, Arkady; Sundström, Villy; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2015-10-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) of organo-metal halide perovskite semiconductors can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude by exposure to visible light. We applied PL microscopy and super-resolution optical imaging to investigate this phenomenon with spatial resolution better than 10 nm using films of CH3NH3PbI3 prepared by the equimolar solution-deposition method, resulting in crystals of different sizes. We found that PL of ∼100 nm crystals enhances much faster than that of larger, micrometer-sized ones. This crystal-size dependence of the photochemical light passivation of charge traps responsible for PL quenching allowed us to conclude that traps are present in the entire crystal volume rather than at the surface only. Because of this effect, "dark" micrometer-sized perovskite crystals can be converted into highly luminescent smaller ones just by mechanical grinding. Super-resolution optical imaging shows spatial inhomogeneity of the PL intensity within perovskite crystals and the existence of <100 nm-sized localized emitting sites. The possible origin of these sites is discussed. PMID:26722793

  16. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Chang, Christopher J.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.

  17. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    DOE PAGES

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; et al

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labelingmore » demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.« less

  18. [Numerical simulation and application of electrical resistivity survey in heavy metal contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-ling; Nai, Chang-xin; Wang, Yan-wen; Dong, Lu

    2013-05-01

    In order to analyze the effects of electrical resistivity in heavy metal contaminated sites, we established the resistivity model of typical contaminated sites and simulate the DC resistivity method with Wenner arrays using the finite element method. The simulation results showed that the electrical method was influenced by the contamination concentration and the location of pollution. The more serious the degree of pollution was, the more obvious the low resistivity anomaly, thus the easier the identification of the contaminated area; otherwise, if there was light pollution, Wenner array could not get obvious low resistivity anomalies, so it would be hard to judge the contaminated area. Our simulation results also showed that the closer the contaminated areas were to the surface, the more easily the pollution was detected and the low resistivity anomalies shown in the apparent resistivity diagram were influenced by the Layered medium. The actual field survey results using resistivity method also show that the resistivity method can correctly detect the area with serious pollution. PMID:23914547

  19. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-12-01

    We identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu(+) accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu(+) became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  20. The α-Subunit Regulates Stability of the Metal Ion at the Ligand-associated Metal Ion-binding Site in β3 Integrins*

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Xianliang; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Van Agthoven, Johannes F.; Anand, Saurabh; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2014-01-01

    The aspartate in the prototypical integrin-binding motif Arg-Gly-Asp binds the integrin βA domain of the β-subunit through a divalent cation at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). An auxiliary metal ion at a ligand-associated metal ion-binding site (LIMBS) stabilizes the metal ion at MIDAS. LIMBS contacts distinct residues in the α-subunits of the two β3 integrins αIIbβ3 and αVβ3, but a potential role of this interaction on stability of the metal ion at LIMBS in β3 integrins has not been explored. Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated β3 integrin ectodomains revealed strikingly different conformations of LIMBS in unliganded αIIbβ3 versus αVβ3, the result of stronger interactions of LIMBS with αV, which reduce stability of the LIMBS metal ion in αVβ3. Replacing the αIIb-LIMBS interface residue Phe191 in αIIb (equivalent to Trp179 in αV) with Trp strengthened this interface and destabilized the metal ion at LIMBS in αIIbβ3; a Trp179 to Phe mutation in αV produced the opposite but weaker effect. Consistently, an F191/W substitution in cellular αIIbβ3 and a W179/F substitution in αVβ3 reduced and increased, respectively, the apparent affinity of Mn2+ to the integrin. These findings offer an explanation for the variable occupancy of the metal ion at LIMBS in αVβ3 structures in the absence of ligand and provide new insights into the mechanisms of integrin regulation. PMID:24975416

  1. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  2. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  3. Released polysaccharides (RPS) from Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 as biosorbent for heavy metals bioremediation: interactions between metals and RPS binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mota, Rita; Rossi, Federico; Andrenelli, Luisa; Pereira, Sara Bernardes; De Philippis, Roberto; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms can be advantageous compared to conventional physicochemical methods due to the use of renewable resources and efficiencies of removal particularly cations at low concentrations. In this context, cyanobacteria/cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) emerge as a valid alternative due to the anionic nature and particular composition of these polymers. In this work, various culture fractions of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 were employed in bioremoval assays using three of the most common heavy metal pollutants in water bodies-copper, cadmium, and lead-separately or in combined systems. Our study showed that the released polysaccharides (RPS) were the most efficient fraction, removing the metal(s) by biosorption. Therefore, this polymer was subsequently used to evaluate the interactions between the metals/RPS binding sites using SEM-EDX, ICP-OES, and FTIR. Acid and basic pretreatments applied to the polymer further improve the process efficiency, and the exposure to an alkaline solution seems to alter the RPS conformation. The differences observed in the specific metal bioremoval seem to be mainly due to the RPS organic functional groups available, mainly carboxyl and hydroxyl, than to an ion exchange mechanism. Considering that Cyanothece is a highly efficient RPS-producer and that RPS can be easily separated from the culture, immobilized or confined, this polymer can be advantageous for the establishment/improvement of heavy metal removal systems.

  4. Released polysaccharides (RPS) from Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 as biosorbent for heavy metals bioremediation: interactions between metals and RPS binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mota, Rita; Rossi, Federico; Andrenelli, Luisa; Pereira, Sara Bernardes; De Philippis, Roberto; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms can be advantageous compared to conventional physicochemical methods due to the use of renewable resources and efficiencies of removal particularly cations at low concentrations. In this context, cyanobacteria/cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) emerge as a valid alternative due to the anionic nature and particular composition of these polymers. In this work, various culture fractions of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 were employed in bioremoval assays using three of the most common heavy metal pollutants in water bodies-copper, cadmium, and lead-separately or in combined systems. Our study showed that the released polysaccharides (RPS) were the most efficient fraction, removing the metal(s) by biosorption. Therefore, this polymer was subsequently used to evaluate the interactions between the metals/RPS binding sites using SEM-EDX, ICP-OES, and FTIR. Acid and basic pretreatments applied to the polymer further improve the process efficiency, and the exposure to an alkaline solution seems to alter the RPS conformation. The differences observed in the specific metal bioremoval seem to be mainly due to the RPS organic functional groups available, mainly carboxyl and hydroxyl, than to an ion exchange mechanism. Considering that Cyanothece is a highly efficient RPS-producer and that RPS can be easily separated from the culture, immobilized or confined, this polymer can be advantageous for the establishment/improvement of heavy metal removal systems. PMID:27188779

  5. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  6. Mutational Analysis of Escherichia coli MoeA: Two Functional Activities Map to the Active Site Cleft

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols,J.; Xiang, S.; Schindelin, H.; Rajagopalan, K.

    2007-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is ubiquitous in nature, and the pathway for Moco biosynthesis is conserved in all three domains of life. Recent work has helped to illuminate one of the most enigmatic steps in Moco biosynthesis, ligation of metal to molybdopterin (the organic component of the cofactor) to form the active cofactor. In Escherichia coli, the MoeA protein mediates ligation of Mo to molybdopterin while the MogA protein enhances this process in an ATP-dependent manner. The X-ray crystal structures for both proteins have been previously described as well as two essential MogA residues, Asp49 and Asp82. Here we describe a detailed mutational analysis of the MoeA protein. Variants of conserved residues at the putative active site of MoeA were analyzed for a loss of function in two different, previously described assays, one employing moeA{sup -} crude extracts and the other utilizing a defined system. Oddly, no correlation was observed between the activity in the two assays. In fact, our results showed a general trend toward an inverse relationship between the activity in each assay. Moco binding studies indicated a strong correlation between a variant's ability to bind Moco and its activity in the purified component assay. Crystal structures of the functionally characterized MoeA variants revealed no major structural changes, indicating that the functional differences observed are not due to disruption of the protein structure. On the basis of these results, two different functional areas were assigned to regions at or near the MoeA active site cleft.

  7. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  8. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involve