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Sample records for active metal-matrix composites

  1. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  2. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  3. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  4. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  5. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  6. METCAN: The metal matrix composite analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are the subject of intensive study and are receiving serious consideration for critical structural applications in advanced aerospace systems. MMC structural analysis and design methodologies are studied. Predicting the mechanical and thermal behavior and the structural response of components fabricated from MMC requires the use of a variety of mathematical models. These models relate stresses to applied forces, stress intensities at the tips of cracks to nominal stresses, buckling resistance to applied force, or vibration response to excitation forces. The extensive research in computational mechanics methods for predicting the nonlinear behavior of MMC are described. This research has culminated in the development of the METCAN (METal Matrix Composite ANalyzer) computer code.

  7. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  8. METal matrix composite ANalyzer (METCAN): Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript is intended to be a companion volume to the 'METCAN User's Manual' and the 'METAN Demonstration Manual.' The primary purpose of the manual is to give details pertaining to micromechanics and macromechanics equations of high temperature metal matrix composites that are programmed in the METCAN computer code. The subroutines which contain the programmed equations are also mentioned in order to facilitate any future changes or modifications that the user may intend to incorporate in the code. Assumptions and derivations leading to the micromechanics equations are briefly mentioned.

  9. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  10. Biodegradable magnesium-hydroxyapatite metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank; Feyerabend, Frank; Maier, Petra; Fischer, Jens; Störmer, Michael; Blawert, Carsten; Dietzel, Wolfgang; Hort, Norbert

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with adjustable corrosion rates and suitable mechanical properties. An approach to this challenge might be the application of metal matrix composite (MMC) based on magnesium alloys. In this study, a MMC made of magnesium alloy AZ91D as a matrix and hydroxyapatite (HA) particles as reinforcements have been investigated in vitro for mechanical, corrosive and cytocompatible properties. The mechanical properties of the MMC-HA were adjustable by the choice of HA particle size and distribution. Corrosion tests revealed that HA particles stabilised the corrosion rate and exhibited more uniform corrosion attack in artificial sea water and cell solutions. The phase identification showed that all samples contained hcp-Mg, Mg(17)Al(12), and HA before and after immersion. After immersion in artificial sea water CaCO3 was found on MMC-HA surfaces, while no formation of CaCO3 was found after immersion in cell solutions with and without proteins. Co-cultivation of MMC-HA with human bone derived cells (HBDC), cells of an osteoblasts lineage (MG-63) and cells of a macrophage lineage (RAW264.7) revealed that RAW264.7, MG-63 and HBDC adhere, proliferate and survive on the corroding surfaces of MMC-HA. In summary, biodegradable MMC-HA are cytocompatible biomaterials with adjustable mechanical and corrosive properties.

  11. Modeling the Effect of Active Fiber Cooling on the Microstructure of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Q.; Peterson, Sean D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2009-08-01

    A modified pressure infiltration process was recently developed to synthesize carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. In the modified process, the ends of carbon fibers are extended out of the crucible to induce selective cooling. The process is found to be effective in improving the quality of composites. The present work is focused on determining the effect of the induced conductive heat transfer on the composite system through numerical methods. Due to the axisymmetry of the system, a two-dimensional (2-D) model is studied that can be expanded into three dimensions. The variables in this transient analysis include the fiber radius, fiber length, and melt superheat temperature. The results show that the composite system can be tailored to have a temperature on the fiber surface that is lower than the melt, to promote nucleation on the fiber surface. It is also observed that there is a point of inflection in the temperature profile along the particle/melt interface at which there is no temperature gradient in the radial direction. The information about the inflection point can be used to control the diffusion of solute atoms in the system. The result can be used in determining the optimum fiber volume fraction in metal matrix composite (MMC) materials to obtain the desired microstructure.

  12. Evaluation of waterjet-machined metal matrix composite tensile specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Smith, M.T.

    1986-04-01

    Four magnesium/boron carbide metal matrix composite (MMC) tensile specimens fabricated using the waterjet machining method were evaluated in order to determine the effects of the waterjet material removal process on the composite material surface structure and properties. These results were then compared with data from material conventionally machined. Results showed that while waterjet cutting produces a rough surface finish and does not meet specified dimensional tolerances, the technique appears to be suitable for sectioning and rough machining of metal matrix composites.

  13. Metal matrix composite structural panel construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.; Royster, D. M. (Inventor); Bales, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    Lightweight capped honeycomb stiffeners for use in fabricating metal or metal/matrix exterior structural panels on aerospace type vehicles and the process for fabricating same are disclosed. The stiffener stringers are formed in sheets, cut to the desired width and length and brazed in spaced relationship to a skin with the honeycomb material serving directly as the required lightweight stiffeners and not requiring separate metal encasement for the exposed honeycomb cells.

  14. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  15. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  16. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA's Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Elam, S.

    2001-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's on-going activities in MMC components for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike engine and X-34's Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight, low cost, and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each of NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicles and space access vehicles. In order to fabricate structures from MMC, effective joining methods must be developed to join MMC to the same or to different monolithic alloys. Therefore, a qualitative assessment of MMC's welding and joining techniques will be outlined.

  17. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  18. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  19. Arc spray fabrication of metal matrix composite monotape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, L. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Arc metal spraying is used to spray liquid metal onto an array of high strength fibers that were previously wound onto a large drum contained inside a controlled atmosphere chamber. This chamber is first evacuated to remove gaseous contaminants and then backfilled with a neutral gas up to atmospheric pressure. This process is used to produce a large size metal matrix composite monotape.

  20. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  1. Parametric Study Of A Ceramic-Fiber/Metal-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes computer-model parametric study of effects of degradation of constituent materials upon mechanical properties of ceramic-fiber/metal-matrix composite material. Contributes to understanding of weakening effects of large changes in temperature and mechanical stresses in fabrication and use. Concerned mainly with influences of in situ fiber and matrix properties upon behavior of composite. Particular attention given to influence of in situ matrix strength and influence of interphase degradation.

  2. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, James A.; Kattamis, Theodoulos; Chambers, Brent V.; Bond, Bruce E.; Varela, Raul H.

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  3. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  4. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  5. Metal matrix composite fuel for space radioisotope energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. R.; Ning, H.; Reece, M. J.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Stephenson, K.

    2013-02-01

    Radioisotope fuels produce heat that can be used for spacecraft thermal control or converted to electricity. They must retain integrity in the event of destruction or atmospheric entry of the parent spacecraft. Addition of a metal matrix to the actinide oxide could yield a more robust fuel form. Neodymium (III) oxide (Nd2O3) - niobium metal matrix composites were produced using Spark Plasma Sintering; Nd2O3 is a non-radioactive surrogate for americium (III) oxide (Am2O3). Two compositions, 70 and 50 wt% Nd2O3, were mechanically tested under equibiaxial (ring-on-ring) flexure according to ASTM C1499. The addition of the niobium matrix increased the mean flexural strength by a factor of about 2 compared to typical ceramic nuclear fuels, and significantly increased the Weibull modulus to over 20. These improved mechanical properties could result in reduced fuel dispersion in severe accidents and improved safety of space radioisotope power systems.

  6. Method of thermal strain hysteresis reduction in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dries, Gregory A. (Inventor); Tompkins, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for treating graphite reinforced metal matrix composites so as to eliminate thermal strain hysteresis and impart dimensional stability through a large thermal cycle. The method is applied to the composite post fabrication and is effective on metal matrix materials using graphite fibers manufactured by both the hot roll bonding and diffusion bonding techniques. The method consists of first heat treating the material in a solution anneal oven followed by a water quench and then subjecting the material to a cryogenic treatment in a cryogenic oven. This heat treatment and cryogenic stress reflief is effective in imparting a dimensional stability and reduced thermal strain hysteresis in the material over a -250.degree. F. to +250.degree. F. thermal cycle.

  7. Ni-based Metal Matrix Composite Functionally Graded Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, J. M.; Montero, J.; Tobar, M. J.; Yáñez, A.

    Functional graded materials (FGMs) are a class of composites that have a continuous variation of material properties. One of the aims of such variation is to relieve the stress concentrations that appear in laminated materials. Coating techniques using powder as filler material can be adapted for the manufacture of composition gradients by means of a mixing unit in a powder feed system which is the basis of the laser cladding technology. The aim of this paper is to get coats with layers of the highest possible ceramic concentration on a metal matrix composite (MMC) with the help of the FGM methodology.

  8. Emerging Applications of Ceramic and Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Divya; Ramolina, Dheeyana; Sandou, Sherleena

    2012-07-01

    Almost 500 papers were presented during the 43 sessions of the 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference & Exposition on Advanced Ceramics & Composites, which was organized by the Engineering Ceramics Division of the American Ceramic Society and sponsored by several federal agencies: NASA Glenn Research Center, the Army Research Office, the Department of Energy, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Many of these papers focused on composites, both ceramic and metal matrix, and discussed mechanical behavior, design, fibers/interfaces, processing, and applications. Potential applications under development include components for armor, nuclear energy, and automobiles. A few of these applications have reached commercialization.

  9. Pressurized Shell Molds For Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday K.; Lusignea, Richard N.; Cornie, James

    1993-01-01

    Balanced-pressure molds used to make parts in complex shapes from fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite materials. In single step, molding process makes parts in nearly final shapes; only minor finishing needed. Because molding pressure same on inside and outside, mold does not have to be especially strong and can be made of cheap, nonstructural material like glass or graphite. Fibers do not have to be cut to conform to molds. Method produces parts with high content of continuous fibers. Parts stiff but light in weight, and coefficients of thermal expansion adjusted. Parts resistant to mechanical and thermal fatigue superior to similar parts made by prior fabrication methods.

  10. Interphase layer optimization for metal matrix composites with fabrication considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the final matrix microstresses for metal matrix composites by concurrently optimizing the interphase characteristics and fabrication process. Application cases include interphase tailoring with and without fabrication considerations for two material systems, graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium. Results indicate that concurrent interphase/fabrication optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and strong coupling between interphase and fabrication tailoring. The interphase coefficient of thermal expansion and the fabrication consolidation pressure are the most important design parameters and must be concurrently optimized to further reduce the microstresses to more desirable magnitudes.

  11. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  12. Numerical analysis on thermal drilling of aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Maheshwaran, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The work-material deformation is very large and both the tool and workpiece temperatures are high in thermal drilling. Modeling is a necessary tool to understand the material flow, temperatures, stress, and strains, which are difficult to measure experimentally during thermal drilling. The numerical analysis of thermal drilling process of aluminum metal matrix composite has been done in the present work. In this analysis the heat flux of different stages is calculated. The calculated heat flux is applied on the surface of work piece and thermal distribution is predicted in different stages during the thermal drilling process.

  13. Screening of metal matrix composites using ultrasonic C-scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic C-scans can be used to find some types of defects in continuous fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites such as boron/aluminum composites. These defects are related to the fatigue behavior and fracture location of each inspected specimen. The C-scan technique determined the relative amount of defects in boron/aluminum composites. The defects were primarily identified as gaps in the fiber spacing. Those specimens with higher defect densities had shorter fatigue lives, lower fatigue endurance limits, and greater reductions in the elastic unloading modulus (that is, stiffness) because of fatigue cycling. This type of data could be used to set accept/reject levels for a composite panel based on C-scan indications.

  14. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  15. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  16. Metal-Matrix Composites Prepared by Paper-Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Claudia; Aneziris, Christos G.; Pranke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In this work, metal-matrix composites were prepared via paper-manufacturing technology using metastable austenitic steel powder of type 16-7-3 (Cr-Mn-Ni in wt pct) and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia reinforcing particles. The influence of the process parameters on the paper web formation and the resulting properties of the MMCs were studied and solids retention of >90 wt pct was achieved. During filtration of the aqueous fiber-filler suspension, the steel particles were incorporated in the fiber network, and steel clusters were formed. Calendering had a positive influence on the porosity, bulk density, and tensile strength of the green paper sheets. Within this contribution, the debinding process for the metal-matrix paper sheets was in focus. A debinding rate of 0.5 K/min to 733 K (460 °C) with a dwell time of 90 minutes was sufficient to completely remove cellulose fibers. The sintered composites attained a tensile strength of up to 177 N/mm2 at a total porosity of 66 pct.

  17. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  18. Low Cost Cast Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites Have Arrived

    SciTech Connect

    Herling, Darrell R.; Hunt, Warren

    2004-03-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) have found applications in many industries, from aerospace and automotive to sporting goods and electronics packaging [1-5]. Many of the primary applications have been in military components and structures, where advanced high performance materials are necessary to meet vigorous material challenges. Aluminum MMC are attractive due to their lightweight and high specific stiffness. In addition, the ceramic particle reinforcement significantly increases the wear resistance of these materials. Nevertheless, high materials costs relative to conventional aluminum alloys have been the primary limit to widespread use of such a material family. The use of particulate instead of fiber reinforcement has helped to reduce the overall material cost for those applications that do not require the additional strength obtained from fiber reinforced composites. However, for many cost sensitive industries, such as the on-highway transportation industry, widespread application of particulate reinforced MMC is still limited due to cost and availability. There are two primary components that makeup the cost of metal matrix composite feedstock material. The first is the raw material cost, which is somewhat controlled by the cost of aluminum. However, the raw material used for the reinforcement can play a significant role in the overall MMC material cost. This incurred cost can be affected through the use of alternative and less costly ceramic material options. The other source of cost is related to the compositing processes used to make the aluminum MMC materials. If the cost associated with these two aspects can be controlled and reduced, then this could enable widespread use of particle reinforced aluminum MMC materials. Metal Matrix Composites for the 21st Century (MC-21), Inc., in Carson City, Nevada, has developed a novel rapid mixing process for the production of MMC materials. This is a proprietary process, with the focus of rapidly mixing the

  19. Condensation Dynamics on Mimicked Metal Matrix Hydrophobic Nanoparticle-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Use of hydrophobic surfaces promotes condensation in the dropwise mode, which is significantly more efficient than the common filmwise mode. However, limited longevity of hydrophobic surface modifiers has prevented their wide spread use in industry. Recently, metal matrix composites (MMCs) having microscale hydrophobic heterogeneities dispersed in hydrophilic metal matrix have been proposed as durable and self-healing alternative to hydrophobic surface coatings interacting with deposited water droplets. While dispersion of hydrophobic microparticles in MMC is likely to lead to surface flooding during condensation, the effect of dispersion of hydrophobic nanoparticles (HNPs) with size comparable to water nuclei critical radii and spacing is not obvious. To this end, we fabricated highly ordered arrays of Teflon nanospheres on silicon substrates that mimic the top surface of the MMCs with dispersed HNPs. We used light and electron microscopy to observe breath figures resulting from condensation on these surfaces at varied degrees of subcooling. Here, we discuss the relation between the droplet size distribution, Teflon nanosphere diameter and spacing, and condensation mode. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  20. Leveraging metal matrix composites to reduce costs in space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, Ted; Claridge, Rex; Walker, Jim

    1994-01-01

    Advanced metal matrix composites may be one of the most promising technologies for reducing cost in structural components without compromise to strength or stiffness. A microlight 12.50 N (2.81 lb), two-axis, solar array drive assembly (SADA) was made for the Advanced Materials Applications to Space Structures (AMASS) Program flight experiment. The SADA had both its inner and outer axis housings fabricated from silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumimun. Two versions of the housings were made. The first was machined from a solid billet of material. The second was plaster cast to a near net shape that required minimal finish machining. Both manufacturing methods were compared upon completion. Results showed a cost savings with the cast housing was possible for quantities greater than one and probable for quantities greater than two. For quantities approaching ten, casting resulted in a reduction factor of almost three in the cost per part.

  1. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composites cyclic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure was developed and is described which can be used to computationally simulate the cyclic behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMC) and its degradation effects on the structural response. This procedure consists of HTMMC mechanics coupled with a multifactor interaction constituent material relationship and with an incremental iterative nonlinear analysis. The procedure is implemented in a computer code that can be used to computationally simulate the thermomechanical behavior of HTMMC starting from the fabrication process and proceeding through thermomechanical cycling, accounting for the interface/interphase region. Results show that combined thermal/mechanical cycling, the interphase, and in situ matrix properties have significant effects on the structural integrity of HTMMC.

  2. Thermal Fatigue Limitations of Continuous Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    The potential structural benefits of unidirectional, continuous-fiber, metal matrix composites (MMC's) are legendary. When compared to their monolithic matrices, MMC's possess superior properties such as higher stiffness and tensile strength, and lower coefficient of thermal expansion in the direction of the reinforcing fibers. As an added bonus, the MMC density will be lower if the fibers are less dense than the matrix matErial they replace. The potential has been demonstrated unequivocally both analytically and experimentally, especially at ambient temperatures. Successes prompted heavily-funded National efforts within the United States (USAF and NASA) and elsewhere to extend the promise of MMC's into the temperature regime wherein creep, stress relaxation, oxidation, and thermal fatigue damage mechanisms lurk. This is the very regime for which alternative high-temperature materials are becoming mandatory, since further enhancement of state- of-the-art monolithic alloys is rapidly approaching a point of diminishing returns.

  3. Dry sliding wear of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, Mohammed; Khan, A. R. Anwar

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an ever-increasing demand for enhancing mechanical properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMCs), which are finding wide applications in the field of aerospace, automobile, defence etc,. Among all available aluminium alloys, Al6061 is extensively used owing to its excellent wear resistance and ease of processing. Newer techniques of improving the hardness and wear resistance of Al6061 by dispersing an appropriate mixture of hard ceramic powder and whiskers in the aluminium alloy are gaining popularity. The conventional aluminium based composites possess only one type of reinforcements. Addition of hard reinforcements such as silicon carbide, alumina, titanium carbide, improves hardness, strength and wear resistance of the composites. However, these composites possessing hard reinforcement do posses several problems during their machining operation. AMCs reinforced with particles of Gr have been reported to be possessing better wear characteristics owing to the reduced wear because of formation of a thin layer of Gr particles, which prevents metal to metal contact of the sliding surfaces. Further, heat treatment has a profound influence on mechanical properties of heat treatable aluminium alloys and its composites. For a solutionising temperature of 5500C, solutionising duration of 1hr, ageing temperature of 1750C, quenching media and ageing duration significantly alters mechanical properties of both aluminium alloy and its composites. In the light of the above, the present paper aims at developing aluminium based hybrid metal matrix composites containing both silicon carbide and graphite and characterize their mechanical properties by subjecting it to heat treatment. Results indicate that increase of graphite content increases wear resistance of hybrid composites reinforced with constant SiC reinforcement. Further heat treatment has a profound influence on the wear resistance of the matrix alloy as well as its hybrid composites

  4. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  5. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K.; Gensse, Chantal

    1993-01-01

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

  6. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  7. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  8. Micromechanics effects in creep of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.; Allison, J. E.

    1995-12-01

    The creep of metal-matrix composites is analyzed by finite element techniques. An axisymmetric unit-cell model with spherical reinforcing particles is used. Parameters appropriate to TiC particles in a precipitation-hardened (2219) Al matrix are chosen. The effects of matrix plasticity and residual stresses on the creep of the composite are calculated. We confirm (1) that the steady-state rate is independent of the particle elastic moduli and the matrix elastic and plastic properties, (2) that the ratio of composite to matrix steady-state rates depends only on the volume fraction and geometry of the reinforcing phase, and (3) that this ratio can be determined from a calculation of the stress-strain relation for the geometrically identical composite (same phase volume and geometry) with rigid particles in the appropriate power-law hardening matrix. The values of steady-state creep are compared to experimental ones (Krajewski et al.). Continuum mechanics predictions give a larger reduction of the composite creep relative to the unreinforced material than measured, suggesting that the effective creep rate of the matrix is larger than in unreinforced precipitation-hardened Al due to changes in microstructure, dislocation density, or creep mechanism. Changes in matrix creep properties are also suggested by the comparison of calculated and measured creep strain rates in the primary creep regime, where significantly different time dependencies are found. It is found that creep calculations performed for a timeindependent matrix creep law can be transformed to obtain the creep for a time-dependent creep law.

  9. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  10. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  11. Isothermal fatigue mechanisms in Ti-based metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Bhaskar S.; Newaz, Golam M.

    1993-01-01

    Stress-controlled isothermal fatigue experiments were performed at room temperature (RT) and 548 C (in argon) on (0)8 SCS6/Ti 15-3 metal matrix composites (MMC's) with 15 and 41 volume percent SCS6 (SiC) fibers. The primary objectives were to evaluate the mechanical responses, and to obtain a clear understanding of the damage mechanisms leading to failure of the MMC's. The mechanical data indicated that strain ranges attained fairly constant values in the stress-controlled experiments at both RT and 538 C, and remained so for more than 85 percent of life. The fatigue data for MMC's with different volume fraction fibers showed that MMC life was controlled by the imposed strain range rather than the stress range. At RT, and at low and intermediate strain ranges, the dominant fatigue mechanism was matrix fatigue, and this was confirmed metallurgically from fractographic evidence as well as from observations of channel type dislocation structures in the matrix of fatigued MMC specimens. Reaction-zone cracks acted as important crack initiating sites at RT, with their role being to facilitate slip band formation and consequent matrix crack initiation through classical fatigue mechanisms. MMC life agreed with matrix life at the lower strain ranges, but was smaller than matrix life at higher strain ranges. Unlike the case of monotonic deformation, debonding damage was another major damage mechanism during fatigue at RT, and it increased for higher strain ranges. At high strain ranges at RT, fractography and metallography showed an absence of matrix cracks, but long lengths of debonds in the outer layers of the SCS6 fibers. Such debonding and consequent rubbing during fatigue is believed to have caused fiber damage and their failure at high strain ranges. Thus, whereas life was matrix dominated at low and intermediate strain ranges, it was fiber dominated at high strain ranges. At 538 C, the mean stain constantly increased (ratchetting) with the number of cycles. At high

  12. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  13. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  14. Metal Matrix Composites Deposition in Twin Wire Arc Spraying Utilizing an External Powder Injection Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Hagen, L.; Nellesen, J.

    2014-01-01

    The powder injection parameters, the location of the injection port, as well as the metal matrix composites are important features, which determine the deposition efficiency and embedding behavior of hard materials in the surrounding matrix of the twin wire arc-spraying process. This study investigates the applicability of external powder injection and aims to determine whether the powder injection parameters, the location, and the material combination (composition of the matrix as well as hard material) need to be specifically tailored. Therefore, the position of the injection port in relation to the arc zone was altered along the spraying axis and perpendicular to the arc. The axial position of the injection port determines the thermal activation of the injected powder. An injection behind the arc, close to the nozzle outlet, seems to enhance the thermal activation. The optimal injection positions of different hard materials in combination with zinc-, nickel- and iron-based matrices were found to be closer to the arc zone utilizing a high-speed camera system. The powder size, the mass of the particle, the carrier gas flow, and the electric insulation of the hard material affect the perpendicular position of the radial injection port. These findings show that the local powder injection, the wetting behavior of particles in the realm of the molten pool as well as the atomization behavior of the molten pool all affect the embedding behavior of the hard material in the surrounded metallic matrix. Hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation and EDX analysis along transition zones were utilized to estimate the bonding strength. The observation of a diffusion zone indicates a strong metallurgical bonding for boron carbides embedded in steel matrix.

  15. Metal matrix composite micromechanics: In-situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent efforts in computational mechanics methods for simulating the nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites have culminated in the implementation of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer code. In METCAN material nonlinearity is treated at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level where the current material model describes a time-temperature-stress dependency of the constituent properties in a material behavior space. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by virtue of composite micromechanics and macromechanics models. The behavior of metal matrix composites depends on fabrication process variables, in situ fiber and matrix properties, bonding between the fiber and matrix, and/or the properties of an interphase between the fiber and matrix. Specifically, the influence of in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation on the unidirectional composite stress-strain behavior is examined. These types of studies provide insight into micromechanical behavior that may be helpful in resolving discrepancies between experimentally observed composite behavior and predicted response.

  16. Tailored metal matrix composites for high-temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A multi-objective tailoring methodology is presented to maximize stiffness and load carrying capacity of a metal matrix cross-ply laminated at elevated temperatures. The fabrication process and fiber volume ratio are used as the design variables. A unique feature is the concurrent effects from fabrication, residual stresses, material nonlinearity, and thermo-mechanical loading on the laminate properties at the post-fabrication phase. For a (0/90)(sub s) graphite/copper laminate, strong coupling was observed between the fabrication process, laminate characteristics, and thermo-mechanical loading. The multi-objective tailoring was found to be more effective than single objective tailoring. Results indicate the potential to increase laminate stiffness and load carrying capacity by controlling the critical parameters of the fabrication process and the laminate.

  17. Method for alleviating thermal stress damage in laminates. [metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.; Orth, N. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method is provided for alleviating the stress damage in metallic matrix composites, such as laminated sheet or foil composites. Discontinuities are positively introduced into the interface between the layers so as to reduce the thermal stress produced by unequal expansion of the materials making up the composite. Although a number of discrete elements could be used to form one of the layers and thus carry out this purpose, the discontinuities are preferably produced by simply drilling holes in the metallic matrix layer or by forming grooves in a grid pattern in this layer.

  18. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions (V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction (V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  19. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  20. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the effort by Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc. to redesign turbopump housing joints using metal matrix composite material and a toolless net-shape pressure infiltration casting technology. Topics covered include: advantage of metal matrix composites for propulsion components, baseline pump design and analysis, advanced toolless pressure infiltration casting process, subscale pump housing, preform splicing and joining for large components, and fullscale pump housing redesign.

  1. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-06-10

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1,450 C for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  2. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, Joachim H.

    1997-01-01

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1450.degree. C. for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  3. Metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) user's manual, version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Gotsis, P. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) is a computer code developed at Lewis Research Center to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites. An updated version of the METCAN User's Manual is presented. The manual provides the user with a step by step outline of the procedure necessary to run METCAN. The preparation of the input file is demonstrated, and the output files are explained. The sample problems are presented to highlight various features of METCAN. An overview of the geometric conventions, micromechanical unit cell, and the nonlinear constitutive relationships is also provided.

  4. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  5. Microgravity processing of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, Donald E.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The elimination of such gravity-related effects as buoyancy-driven sedimentation can yield more homogeneous microstructures in composite materials whose individual constituents have widely differing densities. A comparison of composite samples consisting of particulate ceramics in a nickel aluminide matrix solidified under gravity levels ranging from 0.01 to 1.8 G indicates that the G force normal to the growth direction plays a fundamental role in determining the distribution of the reinforcement in the matrix. Composites with extremely uniform microstructures can be produced by these methods.

  6. Production of aluminium metal matrix composites by liquid processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Kumar, R.; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga

    2016-05-01

    Owing to high strength to low weight ratio, Aluminium matrix composites are widely used in diverse applications of many industries. This lucrative property is achieved by reinforcing the brittle ceramic particles in the aluminium matrix. Aluminium matrix composites are produced by liquid processing methods and solid processing methods. Nevertheless, liquidprocessing techniques stand out because of its simplicity and its suitability for mass production. In this review article, the production of aluminium matrix composites by different liquid processing technique is discussed and a comparative study is carried out.

  7. Pendulum impact resistance of tungsten fiber/metal matrix composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The impact properties of copper, copper-10 nickel, and a superalloy matrix reinforced with tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases the following increased composite impact strength: increased fiber or matrix toughness, decreased fiber-matrix reaction, increased test temperature, hot working and heat treatment. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber or matrix toughness. The effect of fiber content depended on the relative toughness of the fibers and matrix. Above 530 K a 60 volume per cent superalloy matrix composite had a greater impact strength than a turbine blade superalloy, whereas below 530 K a hot worked 56 volume per cent composite had a greater impact strength than the superalloy.

  8. Superelement methods applications to micromechanics of high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptation of the superelement finite-element method for micromechanics of continuous fiber high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) is described. The method is used to predict the thermomechanical behavior of P100-graphite/copper composites using MSC/NASTRAN and it is also used to validate those predicted by using an in-house computer program designed to perform micromechanics for HT-MMC. Typical results presented in the paper include unidirectional composite thermal properties, mechanical properties, and microstresses.

  9. Metal matrix composite micromechanics - In situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of in situ fiber and matrix properties (such as in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation) of high-temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMCs) on the unidirectional stress-strain behavior of the composite is examined using results of a numerical investigation of a SiC/Ti-15-3-3-3 unidirectional composite. It is shown that a reduction of the in situ matrix strength substantially decreases the transverse and the longitudinal tensile/compressive strengths, as well as the in-plane shear strength, of the composite. The interphase degradation affects the behavior in transverse tension/compression drastically; both the ultimate strength and strain showed significant reductions. The higher use temperature results in a reduction in the ultimate strength and in the initial tangential modulus for compression and for in-plane shear loading.

  10. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  11. Combined thermal and bending fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  12. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  13. Superelement methods in high temperature metal matrix composites. Final Report; M.S. Thesis, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trowbridge, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A study into fiber fracture and debonding in metal matrix composites is conducted using the finite element method. The superelement finite element technique was used to model a metal matrix composite under various loading condition and with varying degrees of fiber debonding. The use of superelement saved many man hours by allowing for alteration of only the primary superelement to manipulate partial bonding for the entire model. The composite's material properties were calculated and the effects of fiber debonding on these properties were noted. The internal stress state of the composite while under various loads was also studied. Special interest was devoted to the change in stress state as a result of increasing fiber debonding.

  14. A viscoplastic constitutive theory for metal matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Ellis, J. R.; Duffy, S. F.

    1987-01-01

    A viscoplastic theory is presented for representing the high-temperature deformation behavior of metal matrix composites. The point of view taken is a continuum one where the composite is considered a material in its own right, with its own properties that can be determined for the composite as a whole. It is presumed that a single preferential (fiber) direction is identifiable at each material point (continuum element) admitting the idealization of local transverse isotropy. A key ingredient in this work is the specification of an experimental program for the complete determination of the material functions and parameters for characterizing a particular metal matrix composite. The parameters relating to the strength of anisotropy can be determined through tension/torsion tests on longitudinally and circumferentially reinforced thin-walled tubes. Fundamental aspects of the theory are explored through a geometric interpretation of some basic features analogous to those of the classical theory of plasticity.

  15. A viscoplastic constitutive theory for metal matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David N.; Duffy, Stephen F.; Ellis, John R.

    1988-01-01

    A viscoplastic constitutive theory is presented for representing the high temperature deformation behavior of metal matrix composites. The point of view taken is a continuum one where the composite is considered a material in its own right, with its own properties that can be determined for the composite as a whole. It is assumed that a single preferential (fiber) direction is identifiable at each material point (continuum element) admitting the idealization of local transverse isotropy. A key ingredient is the specification of an experimental program for the complete determination of the material functions and parameters for characterizing a particular metal matrix composite. The parameters relating to the strength of anisotropy can be determined through tension/torsion tests on longitudinally and circumferentially reinforced thin walled tubes. Fundamental aspects of the theory are explored through a geometric interpretation of some basic features analogous to those of the classical theory of plasticity.

  16. A viscoplastic constitutive theory for metal matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Duffy, S. F.; Ellis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A viscoplastic constitutive theory is presented for representing the high-temperature deformation behavior of metal matrix composites. The point of view taken is a continuum one where the composite is considered a material in its own right, with its own properties that can be determined for the composite as a whole. It is assumed that a single preferential (fiber) direction is identifiable at each material point (continuum element) admitting the idealization of local transverse isotropy. A key ingredient in this work is the specification of an experimental program for the complete determination of the material functions and parameters for characterizing a particular metal matrix composite. The parameters relating to the strength of anisotropy can be determined through tension/torsion tests on longitudinally and circumferentially reinforced thin-walled tubes. Fundamental aspects of the theory are explored through a geometric interpretation of some basic features analogous to those of the classical theory of plasticity.

  17. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental results were obtained for inelastic response of unidirectional and angle ply composite tubes subjected to axial and torsional loading. The composite material consist of silicon carbide fibers in a titanium alloy matrix. This material is known to be susceptible to fiber matrix interfacial damage. A method to distinguish between matrix yielding and fiber matrix interfacial damage is suggested. Biaxial tests were conducted on the two different layup configurations using an MTS Axial/Torsional load frame with a PC based data acquisition system. The experimentally determined elastic moduli of the SiC/Ti system are compared with those predicted by a micromechanics model. The test results indicate that fiber matrix interfacial damage occurs at relatively low load levels and is a local phenomenon. The micromechanics model used is the method of cells originally proposed by Aboudi. Finite element models using the ABACUS finite element program were used to study end effects and fixture specimen interactions. The results to date have shown good correlation between theory and experiment for response prior to damage initiation.

  18. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  19. Combustion synthesis of ceramic and metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John J.; Feng, Heng J.; Hunter, Kevin J.; Wirth, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Combustion synthesis or self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) is effected by heating a reactant mixture, to above the ignition temperature (Tig) whereupon an exothermic reaction is initiated which produces a maximum or combustion temperature, Tc. These SHS reactions are being used to produce ceramics, intermetallics, and composite materials. One of the major limitations of this process is that relatively high levels of porosity, e.g., 50 percent, remain in the product. Conducting these SHS reactions under adiabatic conditions, the maximum temperature is the adiabatic temperature, Tad, and delta H (Tad) = 0, Tad = Tc. If the reactants or products go through a phase change, the latent heat of transformation needs to be taken into account.

  20. Self-Healing Metals and Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2014-06-01

    Self-healing in inorganic materials is a relatively new area in materials science and engineering that draws inspiration from biological systems that can self-repair damage. This article reviews the preliminary attempts to impart self-healing behavior to metals. Several challenges yet exist in the development of metallic alloys that can self-repair damage, including surface bonding issues, such as liquid/solid contact angle (wetting) and oxidation, and practical issues, such as capillary pressure for delivery of a liquid metal to a damaged area or crack, and the overall mechanical properties of a composite system. Although the applied research approaches reviewed have obtained marginal success, the development of self-healing metallic systems has the potential to benefit a wide range of industrial applications and thus deserves greater investment in fundamental research.

  1. Fracture Analysis of Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Cornie, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A fracture analysis of highly loaded particulate reinforced composites was performed using laser moire interferometry to measure the displacements within the plastic zone at the tip of an advancing crack. Ten castings were made of five different particulate reinforcement-aluminum alloy combinations. Each casting included net-shape specimens which were used for the evaluation of fracture toughness, tensile properties, and flexure properties resulting in an extensive materials properties data. Measured fracture toughness range from 14.1 MPa for an alumina reinforced 356 aluminum alloy to 23.9 MPa for a silicon carbide reinforced 2214 aluminum alloy. For the combination of these K(sub Ic) values and the measured tensile strengths, the compact tension specimens were too thin to yield true plane strain K(sub Ic) values. All materials exhibited brittle behavior characterized by very small tensile ductility suggesting that successful application of these materials requires that the design stresses be below the elastic limit. Probabilistic design principles similar to those used with ceramics are recommended when using these materials. Such principles would include the use of experimentally determined design allowables. In the absence of thorough testing, a design allowable stress of 60 percent of the measured ultimate tensile stress is recommended.

  2. Functional Metal Matrix Composites: Self-lubricating, Self-healing, and Nanocomposites-An Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorri Moghadam, Afsaneh; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Ferguson, J. B.; Omrani, Emad; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2014-06-01

    Many different types of advanced metal matrix composites are now available, some of which possess functional properties. Recent work on particle-reinforced, self-lubricating and self-healing metals and metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) synthesized by solidification synthesis is reviewed. Particle-based MMNCs have been developed by several modern processing tools based on either solid- or liquid-phase synthesis techniques that are claimed to exhibit exciting mechanical properties including improvements of modulus, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength. This article presents a brief and objective review of the work done over the last decade to identify the challenges and future opportunities in the area of functional nanocomposites. Increasing interest in lightweight materials has resulted in studies on hollow particle-filled metal matrix syntactic foams. Syntactic foams seem especially suitable for development with functional properties such as self-healing and self-lubrication. The metal matrix micro and nanocomposites, and syntactic foams having combinations of ultrahigh strength and wear resistance, self-lubricating, and/or self-healing properties can lead to increased energy efficiency, reliability, comfort of operation, reparability, and safety of vehicles. The focus of the present review is aluminum and magnesium matrix functional materials.

  3. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, T.W.

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  4. Experimental Research on Ultrasonic Vibration Milling Metal Matrix Composites SiCp/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G. F.; Zhao, B.; Xiang, D. H.; Zhao, M. L.

    2011-01-17

    Although particle reinforced metal matrix composites possess excellent physical properties, its machining performance is rather bad because of its specific structure. It is difficult to obtain good cutting effect by traditional machining method. So machining has become the bottleneck which strictly restricts its industry application. This paper mainly focuses on both wear characteristics of different tool materials and material removal mechanism in ultrasonic milling high volume fraction particle reinforced metal matrix composites SiCp/Al. An acoustic device for ultrasonic vibration milling was developed to introduce the ultrasonic vibration into the traditional machining process. Through the contrast experiment of traditional milling and ultrasonic vibration milling SiCp/Al, the mechanism of tool wear and characteristics of surface topography were analyzed. The experimental results showed that the surface integrity and tool life in the ultrasonic vibration milling SiCp/Al were improved.

  5. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  6. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  7. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  8. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

  9. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  10. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  11. Simulation of metal matrix composite solidification in the presence of cooled fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. K.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2008-09-01

    Metal matrix composite (MMC) has been well known for its superior material properties compared with traditional composite. A new method is introduced to improve the properties of MMC in the sense that the ends of the reinforcement phase of the composite are allowed to extend out of the mold and cooled by a heat sink in order to promote the rate of heat transfer through the fibers and promote the formation of primary alpha phase around the reinforcement. This paper presents the experimental results obtained from the foundry in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and some numerical simulation results of the solidification process in the cast mold.

  12. Thermoelastic response of metal matrix composites with large-diameter fibers subjected to thermal gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    A new micromechanical theory is presented for the response of heterogeneous metal matrix composites subjected to thermal gradients. In contrast to existing micromechanical theories that utilize classical homogenization schemes in the course of calculating microscopic and macroscopic field quantities, in the present approach the actual microstructural details are explicitly coupled with the macrostructure of the composite. Examples are offered that illustrate limitations of the classical homogenization approach in predicting the response of thin-walled metal matrix composites with large-diameter fibers when subjected to thermal gradients. These examples include composites with a finite number of fibers in the thickness direction that may be uniformly or nonuniformly spaced, thus admitting so-called functionally gradient composites. The results illustrate that the classical approach of decoupling micromechanical and macromechanical analyses in the presence of a finite number of large-diameter fibers, finite dimensions of the composite, and temperature gradient may produce excessively conservative estimates for macroscopic field quantities, while both underestimating and overestimating the local fluctuations of the microscopic quantities in different regions of the composite. Also demonstrated is the usefulness of the present approach in generating favorable stress distributions in the presence of thermal gradients by appropriately tailoring the internal microstructure details of the composite.

  13. Local stresses in metal matrix composites subjected to thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.; Shin, Donghee; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1990-01-01

    An elasticity solution has been used to analyze matrix stresses near the fiber/matrix interface in continuous fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composites, modeling the micromechanics in question in terms of a cylindrical fiber and cylindrical matrix sheath which is embedded in an orthotropic medium representing the composite. The model's predictions for lamina thermal and mechanical properties are applied to a laminate analysis determining ply-level stresses due to thermomechanical loading. A comparison is made between these results, which assume cylindrical symmetry, and the predictions yielded by a FEM model in which the fibers are arranged in a square array.

  14. Concurrent tailoring of fabrication process and interphase layer to reduce residual stresses in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the residual matrix stresses in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) by optimizing the fabrication process and interphase layer characteristics. The response of the fabricated MMC was simulated based on nonlinear micromechanics. Application cases include fabrication tailoring, interphase tailoring, and concurrent fabrication-interphase optimization. Two composite systems, silicon carbide/titanium and graphite/copper, are considered. Results illustrate the merits of each approach, indicate that concurrent fabrication/interphase optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and demonstrate the strong coupling between fabrication and interphase tailoring.

  15. Al-based metal matrix composites reinforced with nanocrystalline Al-Ti-Ni particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudino, S.; Ali, F.; Surreddi, K. B.; Prashanth, K. G.; Sakaliyska, M.; Eckert, J.

    2010-07-01

    Al-based metal matrix composites containing different volume fractions of nanocrystalline Al70Ti20Ni10 reinforcing particles have been produced by powder metallurgy and the effect of the volume fraction of reinforcement on the mechanical properties of the composites has been studied. Room temperature compression tests reveal a considerable improvement of the mechanical properties as compared to pure Aluminum. The compressive strength increases from 155 MPa for pure Al to about 200 and 240 MPa for the samples with 20 and 40 vol.% of reinforcement, respectively, while retaining appreciable plastic deformation with a fracture strain ranging between 43 and 28 %.

  16. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites for propulsion components offer high performance and affordability, resulting in low weight and cost. The following sections in this viewgraph presentation describe the pressure infiltration casting of a metal matrix composite LOX turbopump housing: 1) Baseline Pump Design and Stress Analysis; 2) Tool-less Advanced Pressure Infiltration Casting Process; 3) Preform Splicing and Joining for Large Components such as Pump Housing; 4) Fullscale Pump Housing Redesign.

  17. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  18. A differential CDM model for fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxial, isothermal, continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for fatigue of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element is presented. The model is phenomenological, stress based, and assumes a single scalar internal damage variable, the evolution of which is anisotropic. The development of the fatigue damage model, (i.e., evolutionary law) is based on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, a static fracture surface, and a normalized stress amplitude function. The anisotropy of these surfaces and function, and therefore the model, is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. This transversely isotropic model is shown, when taken to it's isotropic limit, to directly simplify to a previously developed and validated isotropic fatigue continuum damage model. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation in attempting to characterize a class of composite materials, and (2) the capability of the formulation in predicting anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Also, specific material parameters representing an initial characterization of the composite system SiC/Ti 15-3 and the matrix material (Ti 15-3) are reported.

  19. Production of metal matrix composite mirrors for tank fire control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Alan L.; Ulph, Eric, Sr.

    1992-09-01

    The first production lot of 50 units of metal matrix composite mirrors for the Leopard I tank fire control system was recently completed by Optical Corporation of America (OCA), Garden Grove, California. The mirror substrates were finish machined from forgings of Optical Grade SXATM metal matrix composite manufactured by Advanced Composite Materials Corporation (ACMC), Greer, South Carolina. Use of forgings rather than hot pressed billet yields more efficient use of material and reduces machining time, resulting in lower cost. The mirrors were fabricated by a process sequence of machining, thermal stabilization, electroless nickel plating, polishing, and coating with a high efficiency, laser damage-resistant optical coating. The mirrors are used in the fire control system for a day channel (direct view) and near infrared (CCD), a muzzle reference system laser transceiver, a laser range finder, and an infrared thermal imaging system. SXA composite was chosen over competitive mirror materials (glass and beryllium) because of its high specific strength and stiffness, good stability, and moderate machining cost. The mirrors exhibit excellent stability and optical performance. Field trials of prototype mirrors in fire control systems have proven successful.

  20. A Study on 3-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 8011 / Graphite Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha Shankar, B.; Anil, K. C.; Patil, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Metals and alloys have found their vital role in many applications like structural, corrosive, tribological, etc., in engineering environment. The alloys/composites having high strength to low weight ratio have gained attention of many researchers recently. In this work, graphite reinforced Aluminium 8011 metal matrix composite was prepared by conventional stir casting route, by varying the weight % of reinforcement. Uniform distribution of Graphite in matrix alloy was confirmed by optical micrographs. Prepared composite specimens were subjected to 3-body abrasive testing by varying applied load and time, the silica particles of 400 grit size were used as abrasive particles. It was observed that with the increase of weight% of Graphite the wear resistance of composite was also increasing and on comparison it was found that reinforced composite gives good wear resistance than base alloy.

  1. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  2. Spray-forming monolithic aluminum alloy and metal matrix composite strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-10-01

    Spray forming with de Laval nozzles is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. Using this approach, aluminum alloys have been spray formed as strip, with technoeconomic advantages over conventional hot mill processing and continuous casting. The spray-formed strip had a flat profile, minimal porosity, high yield, and refined microstructure. In an adaptation to the technique, 6061 Al/SiC particulate-reinforced metal matrix composite strip was produced by codeposition of the phases.

  3. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  4. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  5. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  6. Influence of fiber architecture on the elastic an d inelastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This three part paper focuses on the effect of fiber architecture (i.e., shape and distribution) on the elastic and inelastic response of metal matrix composites. The first part provides an annotative survey of the literature, presented as a historical perspective, dealing with the effects of fiber shape and distribution on the response of advanced polymeric matrix and metal matrix composites. Previous investigations dealing with both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites are included. A summary of the state-of-the-art will assist in defining new directions in this quickly reviving area of research. The second part outlines a recently developed analytical micromechanics model that is particularly well suited for studying the influence of these effects on the response of metal matrix composites. This micromechanics model, referred to as the generalized method of cells (GMC), is capable of predicting the overall, inelastic behavior of unidirectional, multi-phased composites given the properties of the constituents. In particular, the model is sufficiently general to predict the response of unidirectional composites reinforced by either continuous or discontinuous fibers with different inclusion shapes and spatial arrangements in the presence of either perfect or imperfect interfaces and/or interfacial layers. Recent developments regarding this promising model, as well as directions for future enhancements of the model's predictive capability, are included. Finally, the third pan provides qualitative results generated using GMC for a representative titanium matix composite system, SCS-6/TlMETAL 21S. Results are presented that correctly demonstrate the relative effects of fiber arrangement and shape on the longitudinal and transverse stress-strain and creep response, with both strong and weak fiber/matrix interfacial bonds. The fiber arrangements include square, square diagonal, hexagonal and rectangular periodic arrays, as well as a random array. The

  7. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  8. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  9. Combined micromechanical and fabrication process optimization for metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented to minimize the residual matrix stresses in metal matrix composites. Fabrication parameters such as temperature and consolidation pressure are optimized concurrently with the characteristics (i.e., modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, strength, and interphase thickness) of a fiber-matrix interphase. By including the interphase properties in the fabrication process, lower residual stresses are achievable. Results for an ultra-high modulus graphite (P100)/copper composite show a reduction of 21 percent for the maximum matrix microstress when optimizing the fabrication process alone. Concurrent optimization of the fabrication process and interphase properties show a 41 percent decrease in the maximum microstress. Therefore, this optimization method demonstrates the capability of reducing residual microstresses by altering the temperature and consolidation pressure histories and tailoring the interphase properties for an improved composite material. In addition, the results indicate that the consolidation pressures are the most important fabrication parameters, and the coefficient of thermal expansion is the most critical interphase property.

  10. Concurrent micromechanical tailoring and fabrication process optimization for metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented to minimize the residual matrix stresses in metal matrix composites. Fabrication parameters such as temperature and consolidation pressure are optimized concurrently with the characteristics (i.e., modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, strength, and interphase thickness) of a fiber-matrix interphase. By including the interphase properties in the fabrication process, lower residual stresses are achievable. Results for an ultra-high modulus graphite (P100)/copper composite show a reduction of 21 percent for the maximum matrix microstress when optimizing the fabrication process alone. Concurrent optimization of the fabrication process and interphase properties show a 41 percent decrease in the maximum microstress. Therefore, this optimization method demonstrates the capability of reducing residual microstresses by altering the temperature and consolidation pressure histories and tailoring the interphase properties for an improved composite material. In addition, the results indicate that the consolidation pressures are the most important fabrication parameters, and the coefficient of thermal expansion is the most critical interphase property.

  11. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.M.; Moeller, H.H.; Johnson, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  12. Wear Behavior of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composite under various Corrosive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Smrutiranjan; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the wear behavior under corrosive environments of LM6 based metal matrix composite reinforced with 5 wt% SiC prepared through the stir casting method. The experiments are carried out in a pin-on-disk tribotester varying five levels of normal load and sliding speed. The duration of each experiment is fixed for 30 minutes. Three environments viz. dry, deionised and dilute acid environments are considered to carry out the tribological tests. The composite exhibits slightly good wear resistance under low load and speed condition but weight loss increases as these parameters increases in all three environments. Maximum weight loss occurs in case of acid environment as it is more corrosive than dry and deionised environment. The wear surface of the composite is examined through the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX).

  13. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste.

    PubMed

    Xavier, L Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate. PMID:26989764

  14. Micromechanical modeling of damage growth in titanium based metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, James A.; Quimby, Howard M.

    1994-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of continuous-fiber reinforced titanium based metal-matrix composites (MMC) is studied using the finite element method. A thermoviscoplastic unified state variable constitutive theory is employed to capture inelastic and strain-rate sensitive behavior in the Timetal-21s matrix. The SCS-6 fibers are modeled as thermoplastic. The effects of residual stresses generated during the consolidation process on the tensile response of the composites are investigated. Unidirectional and cross-ply geometries are considered. Differences between the tensile responses in composites with perfectly bonded and completely debonded fiber/matrix interfaces are discussed. Model simulations for the completely debonded-interface condition are shown to correlate well with experimental results.

  15. Models for predicting damage evolution in metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Hurtado, L.D.; Helms, K.L.E.

    1995-03-01

    A thermomechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite (MMC) subjected to cyclic loading is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of processing induced residual thermal stresses, matrix inelasticity, and interface cracking. Due to these complexities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modelled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modelled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a four-ply unidirectional SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium composite under high temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue. Results indicate rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for damage propagation, thus contributing to improved ductility of the composite. Results also indicate that the model may be useful for inclusion in life prediction methodologies for MMC`s.

  16. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, L. Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate. PMID:26989764

  17. Processing and characterization of nickel-carbon base metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Tushar Murlidhar

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) are attractive reinforcements for lightweight and high strength metal matrix composites due to their excellent mechanical and physical properties. The present work is an attempt towards investigating the effect of CNT and GNP reinforcements on the mechanical properties of nickel matrix composites. The CNT/Ni (dry milled) nanocomposites exhibiting a tensile yield strength of 350 MPa (about two times that of SPS processed monolithic nickel ˜ 160 MPa) and an elongation to failure ˜ 30%. In contrast, CNT/Ni (molecular level mixed) exhibited substantially higher tensile yield strength (˜ 690 MPa) but limited ductility with an elongation to failure ˜ 8%. The Ni- 1vol%GNP (dry milled) nanocomposite exhibited the best balance of properties in terms of strength and ductility. The enhancement in the tensile strength (i.e. 370 MPa) and substantial ductility (˜40%) of Ni-1vol%GNP nanocomposites was achieved due to the combined effects of grain refinement, homogeneous dispersion of GNPs in the nickel matrix, and well-bonded Ni- GNP interface, which effectively transfers stress across metal-GNP interface during tensile deformation. A second emphasis of this work was on the detailed 3D microstructural characterization of a new class of Ni-Ti-C based metal matrix composites, developed using the laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) process. These composites consist of an in situ formed and homogeneously distributed titanium carbide (TiC) as well as graphite phase reinforcing the nickel matrix. 3D microstructure helps in determining true morphology and spatial distribution of TiC and graphite phase as well as the phase evolution sequence. These Ni-TiC-C composites exhibit excellent tribological properties (low COF), while maintaining a relatively high hardness.

  18. Processing and mechanical properties of aluminium-silicon carbide metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Kamaruzaman, F. F. B.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, aluminium-silicon carbide (Al-SiC) metal matrix composites (MMCs) of different compositions were prepared under different compaction loads. Three different types Al-SiC composite specimens having 10%, 20% and 30% volume fractions of silicon carbide were fabricated using conventional powder metallurgy (PM) route. The specimens of different compositions were prepared under different compaction loads 10 ton and 15 ton. The effect of volume fraction of SiC particulates and compaction load on the properties of Al/SiC composites were investigated. The obtained results show that density and hardness of the composites are greatly influenced by volume fraction of silicon carbide particulates. Results also show that density, hardness and microstructure of Al-SiC composites are significantly influenced depending on the compaction load. The increase in the volume fraction of SiC enhances the density and hardness of the Al/SiC composites. For 15 ton compaction load, the composites show increased density and hardness as well as improved microstructure than the composites prepared under 10 ton compaction load. Furthermore, optical micrographs reveal that SiC particulates are uniformly distributed in the Al matrix.

  19. Size effect in Ni-coated TiC particles for metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, David; Paik, Ungyu; Jung, Yeon-Gil

    2011-02-01

    Nickel (Ni) particles have been coated on the surface of titanium carbide (TiC) particles to enhance the dispersion of TiC particles into a molten metal and to achieve an improvement in the mechanical and thermal properties of the metal matrix. The adhesion of Ni particles on the surface of TiC particles is induced by the attractive force between the TiC with a negative charge and the Ni cation in an aqueous solution. The powders prepared with the relatively large particle sizes of 1, 4, and 40 microm show both TiC and Ni phases, whereas that prepared with a particle size of 0.02 microm shows complex phases of Ni, TiC, and TiO2 (titanium dioxide). The TiO2 phase is caused by the oxidation reaction between the TiC and oxygen. The 1 microm powder shows that the Ni is located only around the TiC without any self-aggregation and the TiC and Ni particles are isolated in the 4 and 40 microm powders, as confirmed in TEM images. The particle size is the essential factor in fabricating highly efficient Ni-coated TiC particles for metal matrix composites. PMID:21456282

  20. A unique set of micromechanics equations for high-temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    A unique set of micromechanic equations is presented for high-temperature metal matrix composites. The set includes expressions to predict mechanical properties, thermal properties and constituent microstresses for the unidirectional fiber reinforced ply. The equations are derived based on a mechanics of materials formulation assuming a square array unit cell model of a single fiber, surrounding matrix and an interphase to account for the chemical reaction which commonly occurs between fiber and matrix. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to perform a preliminary validation of the equations. Excellent agreement between properties predicted using the micromechanics equations and properties simulated by the finite element analyses are demonstrated. Implementation of the micromechanics equations as part of an integrated computational capability for nonlinear structural analysis of high temperature multilayered fiber composites is illustrated.

  1. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  2. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  3. A unique set of micromechanics equations for high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A unique set of micromechanic equations is presented for high temperature metal matrix composites. The set includes expressions to predict mechanical properties, thermal properties and constituent microstresses for the unidirectional fiber reinforced ply. The equations are derived based on a mechanics of materials formulation assuming a square array unit cell model of a single fiber, surrounding matrix and an interphase to account for the chemical reaction which commonly occurs between fiber and matrix. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to perform a preliminary validation of the equations. Excellent agreement between properties predicted using the micromechanics equations and properties simulated by the finite element analyses are demonstrated. Implementation of the micromechanics equations as part of an integrated computational capability for nonlinear structural analysis of high temperature multilayered fiber composites is illustrated.

  4. Metal matrix composite solidification in the presence of cooled fibers: numerical simulation and experimental observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eng-Kwong; Amano, Ryoichi S.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2007-06-01

    Attempts have been made to alter the solidification microstructures of fiber reinforced aluminum composites by cooling the ends of the fibers extending out of the mold. Experimental observations indicate that cooling the extended ends of the reinforcement results in finer microstructures in the matrix and changes the nature of the interface. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model to investigate the solidification process of metal matrix composite (MMC) with the extended ends of the fibers cooled by a heat sink. The numerical simulation is based on the source-based enthalpy method with finite volume discretization. The temperature profiles obtained by simulation are compared to the cooling curves measured experimentally in order to validate the current mathematical model. It is found that the simulation result matches the experimental data with reasonable agreement.

  5. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  6. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements. PMID:23363095

  7. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  8. Numerical homogenization of elastic and thermal material properties for metal matrix composites (MMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Stefan; Mergheim, Julia; Zimmermann, Marco; Aurich, Jan C.; Steinmann, Paul

    2016-07-01

    A two-scale material modeling approach is adopted in order to determine macroscopic thermal and elastic constitutive laws and the respective parameters for metal matrix composite (MMC). Since the common homogenization framework violates the thermodynamical consistency for non-constant temperature fields, i.e., the dissipation is not conserved through the scale transition, the respective error is calculated numerically in order to prove the applicability of the homogenization method. The thermomechanical homogenization is applied to compute the macroscopic mass density, thermal expansion, elasticity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity for two specific MMCs, i.e., aluminum alloy Al2024 reinforced with 17 or 30 % silicon carbide particles. The temperature dependency of the material properties has been considered in the range from 0 to 500°C, the melting temperature of the alloy. The numerically determined material properties are validated with experimental data from the literature as far as possible.

  9. Casting of weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites with built-in metallic inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Kashalikar, Uday; Majkowski, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Technology innovations directed at the advanced development of a potentially low cost and weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites (MMC) through near net shape pressure casting are described. These MMC components uniquely have built-in metallic inserts to provide an innovative approach for joining or connecting other MMC components through conventional joining techniques such as welding, brazing, mechanical fasteners, etc. Moreover, the metallic inserts trapped within the MMC components can be made to transfer the imposed load efficiently to the continuous graphite fiber reinforcement thus producing stronger, stiffer, and more reliable MMC components. The use of low pressure near net shape casting is economical compared to other MMC fabrication processes. These castable and potentially weldable MMC components can provide great payoffs in terms of high strength, high stiffness, low thermal expansion, lightweight, and easily joinable MMC components for several future NASA space structural, industrial, and commercial applications.

  10. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  11. Analysis of steady-state shallow cell solidification in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of capillarity on the near-plane front solidification of metal matrix composites is examined by analysis of the one-sided solidification of a binary alloy in a planar interstice of constant width in the limit of low Peclet number. The authors assume that in this limit, solute isoconcentrates in the liquid are everywhere orthogonal to the growth direction. Capillary causes the alloy to solidify in a cellular mode, even in the absence of constitutional supercooling. Two solution branches are derived for this solidification mode, one for shallow symmetric cells, the other for asymmetric cells. Restricting attention to the former solution branch, as the growth velocity increases, or the temperature gradient decreases, the cell amplitude increases gradually, to reach a critical point which depends strongly on the contact angle along the reinforcement/solidification front triple line.

  12. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  13. Recent Applications Of Metal Matrix Composites In Precision Instruments And Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, Walter R.; Vukobratovich, Daniel

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes three unique metal matrix composite (MMC) material systems that have been developed for use in dimensionally stable platforms, precision mechanical systems, and lightweight reflective optics. These engineered materials, consisting of aluminum alloys reinforced with fine particles of silicon carbide, offer distinctive performance advantages over conventional metals, including greater specific stiffness, higher strength, and better resistance to compressive microcreep. Weighing about the same as aluminum, certain grades of these MMC materials are isotropic and have excellent thermal conductivity, and they can be tailored to match the coefficients of thermal expansion of other materials, including beryllium, stainless steel, and electroless nickel. Such flexibilities in establishing material properties and characteristics present new opportunities to the designer in producing weight-critical, precision hardware. Practical applications of MMC materials in advanced guidance equipment and lightweight optical assemblies are presented and discussed.

  14. Design, analysis, and testing of a metal matrix composite web/flange intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, S. B.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Moran, S. G.; Olliffe, R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program to study the local design details of a typical T-shaped web/flange intersection made from a metal matrix composite is described. Loads creating flange bending were applied to specimens having different designs and boundary conditions. Finite element analyses were conducted on models of the test specimens to predict the structural response. The analyses correctly predict failure load, mode, and location in the fillet material in the intersection region of the web and the flange when specimen quality is good. The test program shows the importance of fabrication quality in the intersection region. The full-scale test program that led to the investigation of this local detail is also described.

  15. Tribological properties of metal-matrix composite materials reinforced by superelastic hard carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, I. N.; Drozdova, E. I.; Chernogorova, O. P.; Blinov, V. M.; Ekimov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-matrix composite materials (CMs) are synthesized from a mixture of a metal powder (Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al-based alloy) and fullerenes (10 wt %). The thermobaric synthesis conditions (700-1000°C, 5-8 GPa) ensure the collapse of fullerene molecules and their transformation into superelastic carbon phase particles with an indentation hardness H IT = 10-37 GPa, an elastic modulus E IT = 60-260 GPa, and an elastic recovery of >80% upon indentation. After reinforcing by superelastic hard carbon, the friction coefficient of CM decreases by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the friction coefficient of the matrix metal, and the abrasive wear resistance increases by a factor of 4-200. Superelastic hard carbon particles are a unique reinforcing material for an increase in the wear resistance and a simultaneous decrease in the friction coefficient of CM.

  16. Effect of reinforcement type and porosity on strength of metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. G.; Lal, Achchhe; Menghani, J. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, experimental investigation and the numerical analysis are carried out for strength analysis of A356 alloy matrix composites reinforced with alumina, fly ash and hybrid particle composites. The combined strengthening effect of load bearing, Hall-Petch, Orowan, coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and elastic modulus mismatch is studied for predicting accurate uniaxial stress-strain behavior of A356 based alloy matrix composite. The unit cell micromechanical approach and nine noded isoparametric finite element analysis (FEA) is used to investigate the yield failure load by considering material defect of porosity as fabrication errors in particulate composite. The Ramberg-Osgood approach is considered for the linear and nonlinear relationship between stress and strain of A356 based metal matrix composites containing different amounts of fly ash and alumina reinforcing particles. A numerical analysis of material porosity on the stress strain behavior of the composite is performed. The literature and experimental results exhibit the validity of this model and confirm the importance of the fly ash as the cheapest and low density reinforcement obtained as a waste by product in thermal power plants.

  17. Brownian Motion Effects on Particle Pushing and Engulfment During Solidification in Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Kaptay, George; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Cho, Kyu; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Particle pushing and/or engulfment by the moving solidification front (SF) is important for the uniform distribution of reinforcement particles in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) synthesized from solidification processing, which can lead to a substantial increase in the strength of the composite materials. Previous theoretical models describing the interactions between particle and moving SF predict that large particles will be engulfed by SF while smaller particles including nanoparticles (NPs) will be pushed by it. However, there is evidence from metal-matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) that NPs can sometimes be engulfed and distributed throughout the material rather than pushed and concentrated in the last regions to solidify. To address this disparity, in this work, an analytical model has been developed to account for Brownian motion effects. Computer simulations employing this model over a range of the SF geometries and time steps demonstrate that NPs are often engulfed rather than pushed. Based on our results, two distinct capture mechanisms were identified: (i) when a high random velocity is imparted to the particle by Brownian motion, large jumps allow the particle to overcome the repulsion of the SF, and (ii) when the net force acting on the particle is insufficient, the particle is not accelerated to a velocity high enough to outrun the advancing SF. This manuscript will quantitatively show the effect of particle size on the steady state or critical velocity of the SF when Brownian motion are taken into consideration. The statistical results incorporating the effects of Brownian motion based on the Al/Al2O3 MMNC system clearly show that ultrafine particles can be captured by the moving SF, which cannot be predicted by any of classical deterministic treatments.

  18. The Application of Metal Matrix Composite Materials in Propulsion System Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laszar, John; Shah, Sandeep; Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2003-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials have been developed and used in many applications to reduce the weight of components where weight and deflection are the driving design requirement. MMC materials are being developed for use in some propulsion system components, such as turbo-pumps and thrust chambers. However, to date, no propulsion system valves have been developed that take advantage of the materials unique properties. The stiffness of MMC's could help keep valves light or improve life where deflection is the design constraint (such as seal and bearing locations). The low CTE of the materials might allow the designer to reduce tolerances and clearances producing better performance and lighter weight valves. Using unique manufacturing processes allow parts to be plated/coated for longer life and allow joining either by welding or threading/bolting. Additionally, casting of multi part pre-forms to form a single part can lead to designs that would be hard or impossible to manufacture with other methods. Therefore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed and tested a prototype propulsion system valve that utilizes these materials to demonstrate these advantages. Through design and testing, this effort will determine the best use of these materials in valves designed to achieve the goal of a highly reliable and lightweight propulsion system. This paper is a continuation of the paper, The Application of Metal Matrix Composite Materials In Propulsion System Valves, presented at the JANNAF Conference held in April, 2002. Fabrication techniques employed, valve development, and valve test results will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Microstructure and Properties of Laser-Deposited Ti6Al4V Metal Matrix Composites Using Ni-Coated Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Smugeresky, J. E.; Zhou, Y.; Baker, D.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2008-05-01

    As a layer additive rapid manufacturing process, laser engineered net shaping (LENS) can fabricate three-dimensional components directly from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. In this work, the LENS process was employed to fabricate Ti6Al4V metal matrix composites using powder mixtures of gas-atomized Ti6Al4V powder and varying volume fractions of Ni nanocoated TiC particles. The as-fabricated microstructures were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analyzer (DTA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The interfaces between the metal matrix and ceramic particles were examined. The presence of intermetallic phases and resolidified TiC particles was rationalized on the basis of the thermal field during deposition. The influence of LENS parameters on the microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of the metal matrix composites (MMCs) was also discussed.

  20. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of syntactic metal foams and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, Dorian Kenneth

    2002-11-01

    Synchrotron x-ray and neutron diffraction can provide both the in-situ elastic phase strains and the phases present in metal matrix composites subjected to thermo-mechanical loading by measuring the lattice spacings parallel and perpendicular to the loading axis, as well as changes in the crystalline structure of the composite constituents. Such measurements can give insight into load transfer between phases, the onset of matrix or reinforcement plasticity or damage, and thermally or mechanically induced phase transformations. Four composite systems are presented: (a) bulk metallic glass composites containing low volume fractions of tungsten and tantalum particles, (b) bulk metallic composites containing low volume fractions of both tantalum particles and crystallized matrix inclusions, (c) copper composites containing high volume fractions of particles of the negative thermal expansion ceramic zirconium tungstate, and (d) aluminum matrix syntactic foams containing high volume fractions of hollow ceramic spheres. In the bulk metallic glass composites, plasticity of the metallic reinforcement was observed during mechanical cycling, leading to residual stresses that may alter the subsequent composite behavior. The zirconium tungstate present in the low thermal expansion copper composites was observed to undergo both thermal and stress induced transformations during thermal cycling, confirming the interpretation of ex-situ thermal expansion measurements. In the aluminum syntactic foams, matrix plasticity and ceramic microsphere damage were seen, as well as relative unloading of the matrix during mechanical testing and an improvement in elastic properties due to presence of the hollow spheres. For all systems, continuum mechanical modeling using the Eshelby method was performed, with good agreement found between predictions and measurements.

  1. General Motors Corporation and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Inspection of case hardened steels and metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Good, M.S.; Rogers, D.D.

    1993-10-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or other mechanisms. The objectives of this report were as follows: for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff to present technology to General Motors (GM) staff on nondestructive measurement of hardened steel components and uniformity of particle dispersion in metal-matrix composites for evaluation for possible application in GM`s manufacturing processes; for GM staff to discuss with PNL staff common manufacturing processes, metallurgy, and flaw criteria for hardening of various components and manufacturing of metal-matrix composites; to provide an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between PNL and GM. Information in this report on the staff exchange of PNL staff with GM Corporation includes the purpose and objectives, a summary of activities, significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefits from that work, and three appendixes. Appendix A is a description of ultrasonic backscatter technology and its applications to the two nondestructive inspection interests defined by GM. Appendix B is a list of key contacts and the schedule of activities pertaining to the staff exchange. Appendix C is an article from American Society for Metals News relating to sensor needs.

  2. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  3. Prediction of damage evolution in continuous fiber metal matrix composites subjected to fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.; Helms, K.; Lagoudas, D.

    1995-08-01

    A life prediction model is being developed by the authors for application to metal matrix composites (MMC`s). The systems under study are continuous silicon carbide fibers imbedded in titanium matrix. The model utilizes a computationally based framework based on thermodynamics and continuum mechanics, and accounts for matrix inelasticity, damage evolution, and environmental degradation due to oxidation. The computational model utilizes the finite element method, and an evolutionary analysis of a unit cell is accomplished via a time stepping algorithm. The computational scheme accounts for damage growth such as fiber-matrix debonding, surface cracking, and matrix cracking via the inclusion of cohesive zone elements in the unit cell. These elements are located based on experimental evidence also obtained by the authors. The current paper outlines the formulation utilized by the authors to solve this problem, and recent results are discussed. Specifically, results are given for a four-ply unidirectional composite subjected to cyclic fatigue loading at 650{degrees}C both in air and inert gas. The effects of oxidation on the life of the composite are predicted with the model, and the results are compared to limited experimental results.

  4. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior.

  5. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2015-09-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  6. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    -sized titanium aluminide powders were rapidly consolidated to form near-net shape titanium aluminide parts in form of small discs and tiles. The rapidly consolidated titanium aluminide parts were found to be fully dense. The microstructure morphology was found to vary with consolidation conditions. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly dependent on microstructure morphology and grain size. Due to rapid consolidation, grain growth during consolidation was limited, which in turn led to enhanced mechanical properties. The high temperature mechanical properties for the consolidated titanium aluminide samples were characterized and were found to retain good mechanical performance up to 700°C. Micron-sized titanium aluminide powders with slightly less Aluminum and small Nb, and Cr additions were rapidly consolidated into near-net shape parts. The consolidated parts were found to exhibit enhanced mechanical performance in terms of ductility and yield strength. The negative effect of Oxygen on the flexural strength at high temperatures was found to be reduced with the addition of Nb. In an effort to further reduce the grain size of the consolidated titanium aluminide samples, the as-received titanium aluminide powders were milled in an attrition mill. The average powder particle size of the powders was reduced by 60% after milling. The milled powders were then rapidly consolidated. The grain size of the consolidated parts was found to be in the sub-micrometer range. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly enhanced due to reduction of grain size in the sub-micrometer range. In order to develop a metal matrix composite based on titanium aluminide matrix reinforced with titanium boride, an experiment to study the effect of rapid consolidation on titanium diboride powders was conducted. Micron-sized titanium diboride powders were consolidated and were found to be 93% dense and exhibited minimal grain growth. The low density of the consolidated part was

  7. Elaboration of metal matrix composites from thixotropic alloy slurries using a new magnetohydrodynamic caster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivès, Charles

    1993-06-01

    The working principle and the peculiarities of a new electromagnetic rheocaster, which is based on the use of rotating permanent magnets and which allows the production of intense three-dimensional (3-D) multiphase flows in solidifying semisolid alloy slurries and metal matrix composites, are described. This process can be applied to the direct continuous casting of billets, tubes, and slabs and is characterized by very low electric power consumption. Local measurement techniques are applied to the study of the evolution of non-Newtonian magnetohydrodynamic multiphase flow phenomena with the rotational speed of the inductor, the solid fraction of the aluminum alloy matrix, and the size and volume percent of SiC particles. An order of magnitude analysis of the various forces acting on the suspended crystals and SiC particles is given. The Theological behavior of electromagnetically rheocast ferrous metals, simulated by a lead-tin alloy, is also investigated. Satisfactory results concerning the microstructure of solidified aluminum slurries and aluminum matrix composites (homogeneity, crystal shape, grain size, fraction of primary solid, and distribution of SiC particles) were obtained. A discussion is presented relating the metallurgical findings to the heat and three-phase flow measurements.

  8. Anomalous Buckling Characteristics of Laminated Metal-Matrix Composite Plates with Central Square Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Compressive buckling analysis was performed on metal-matrix composite (MMC) plates with central square holes. The MMC plates have varying aspect ratios and hole sizes and are supported under different boundary conditions. The finite-element structural analysis method was used to study the effects of plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratio, hole size, and the composite stacking sequence on the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates. Studies show that by increasing the hole sizes, compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates could be considerably increased under certain boundary conditions and aspect ratios ("anomalous" buckling behavior); and that the plate buckling mode could be symmetrical or antisymmetrical, depending on the plate boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and the hole size. For same-sized plates with same-sized holes, the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates with [90/0/0/90]2 lamination could be as much as 10 percent higher or lower than those of the [45/- 45/- 45/45]2 laminations, depending on the plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratios, and the hole size. Clamping the plate edges induces far stronger "anomalous" buckling behavior (enhancing compressive buckling strengths at increasing hole sizes) of the perforated MMC plates than simply supporting the plate edges.

  9. Effects of fiber and interfacial layer architectures on the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    Examined here is the effect of fiber and interfacial layer morphologies on thermal fields in metal matrix composites (MMCs). A micromechanics model based on an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder configuration is used to calculate thermal stress fields in MMCs subjected to spatially uniform temperature changes. The fiber is modelled as a layered material with isotropic or orthotropic elastic layers, whereas the surrounding matrix, including interfacial layers, is treated as a strain-hardening, elastoplastic, von Mises solid with temperature-dependent parameters. The solution to the boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder under the prescribed thermal loading is obtained using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation originally developed for stress analysis of multilayered elastic media. Examples are provided that illustrate how the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber and the use of multiple compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface affect the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites during fabrication cool-down.

  10. A micromechanics model for predicting the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a micromechanics model has been developed to predict the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites (MMC). A simplified shear lag analysis is used to estimate the local stresses in the various constituents (fiber/matrix/interface). In this work, the matrix is assumed to carry both normal and shear stresses. Global matrix plasticity is considered by assuming that the matrix behaves in an elastic-perfectly plastic manner. Local interfacial debonding is assumed to occur when the average interfacial shear stress exceeds the interfacial shear strength value. The shear lag analysis including the effects of interfacial debonding and global matrix plasticity is used to estimate the stress concentration in fibers adjacent to broken fibers and the ineffective length. The tensile strength is estimated by considering the accumulation of fiber fractures. The effects of residual thermal stresses and statistical distribution of strength of the fibers are also included in this analysis. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the influence of various parameters such as fiber volume fraction, temperature, interfacial shear strength, matrix properties and fiber strength, on the unidirectional tensile strength of MMC. The model was also used to predict the effects of volume fraction and temperature, on the strength of SCS6/Ti 24-11 composites. The predicted values compared well with the experimental results.

  11. Microstructures and properties of ceramic particle-reinforced metal matrix composite layers produced by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingmao; He, Jingjiang; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2005-01-01

    Different weight ratio of titanium, zirconium, WC and Fe-based alloy powders were mixed, and cladded onto a medium carbon steel substrate using a 3kW continuous wave CO2 laser, aiming at producing Ceramic particles- reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) layers. The microstructures of the layers are typical hypoeutectic, and the major phases are Ni3Si2, TiSi2, Fe3C, FeNi, MC, Fe7Mo3, Fe3B, γ(residual austenite) and M(martensite). The microstructure morphologies of MMCs layers are dendrites/cells. The MC-type reinforcements are in situ synthesis Carbides which main compositions consist of transition elements Zr, Ti, W. The MC-type particles distributed within dendrite and interdendritic regions with different volume fractions for single and overlapping clad layers. The MMCs layers are dense and free of cracks with a good metallurgical bonding between the layer and substrate. The addition ratio of WC in the mixtures has the remarkable effect on the microhardness of clad layers.

  12. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  13. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  14. The influence of microstructure on the tensile behavior of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, Michael J.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between tensile properties and microstructure of a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy, 2009 was examined. The alloy was investigated both unreinforced and reinforced with 15 v/o SiC whiskers or 15 v/o SiC particulate to form a discontinuous metal matrix composite (MMC). The materials were investigated in the as-fabricated condition and in three different hot-rolled sheet thicknesses of 6.35, 3.18, and 1.8 mm. Image analysis was used to characterize the morphology of the reinforcements and their distributions within the matrix alloy. Fractographic examinations revealed that failure was associated with the presence of microstructural inhomogeneities which were related to both the matrix alloy and to the reinforcement. The results from these observations together with the matrix tensile data were used to predict the strengths and moduli of the MMC's using relatively simple models. The whisker MMC could be modeled as a short fiber composite and an attempt was made to model the particulate MMC as a dispersion/dislocation hardened alloy.

  15. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian F.; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-04-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free energy inside the micro structure is included due to the elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. A unit cell containing a circular elastic fiber is analyzed under macroscopic simple shear in addition to transverse and longitudinal loading. The analyses are carried out under generalized plane strain condition. Micro-macro homogenization is performed observing the Hill-Mandel energy condition, and overall loading is considered such that the homogenized higher order terms vanish. The results highlight the intrinsic size-effects as well as the effect of fiber volume fraction on the overall response curves, plastic strain distributions and homogenized yield surfaces under different loading conditions. It is concluded that composites with smaller reinforcement size have larger initial yield surfaces and furthermore, they exhibit more kinematic hardening. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Fatigue behavior of silicon carbide reinforced titanium (Ti/SCS-6) metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Diaz, E.S.; Chiang, K.T.; Loh, D.H.

    1995-05-15

    Flexure fatigue behavior was investigated on titanium (Ti-15V-3Cr) metal matrix composites reinforced with cross-poly, continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. The Ti/SCS-6 composites had an 8-ply, (0{degree}, 90{degree}, +45{degree}, {minus}45{degree}), symmetric lay-up. During fatigue testing, four stages of flexure deflection behavior were observed. The deflection at stage 1 increased slightly with fatigue cycling, while that at stage 2 increased significantly with cycling. Interestingly, the deflection at stage 3 again increased negligibly with fatigue cycling. Stage 4 was associated with final failure, and the deflection increased abruptly. In the stage 1 region of the deflection behavior, no cracks were observed, the Ti/SiC interface debonding could be present, and the deflection changed slightly with cycling. When the stage 2 region commenced, cracks began to initiate. As stage 2 progressed, both crack density and crack length increased. The increased crack density and crack length contributed to the great increase in the deflection during stage 2. In stage 3, significant crack deflection and branching, and fiber bridging occurred, and crack density remained relatively constant. Crack deflection and branching, and fiber bridging slowed down crack driving force, and little crack extension was observed, which resulted in an insignificant amount of increase in the stage 3 deflection. The breakage of fibers in stage 4 significantly increased deflection.

  17. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  18. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  19. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  20. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  1. Development of a sintering methodology through abnormal glow discharge for manufacturing metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, S.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento, A.; López, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a sintering methodology is presented by using abnormal glow discharge to metal matrix composites (MMC), consisting of 316 steel, reinforced with titanium carbide (TiC). The wear behaviour of these compounds was evaluated according to the standard ASTM G 99 in a tribometer pin-on-disk. The effect of the percentage of reinforcement (3, 6, and 9%), with 40 minutes of mixing in the planetary mill is analysed, using compaction pressure of 700MPa and sintering temperature of 1,100°C±5°C, gaseous atmosphere of H2 - N2, and sintering time of 30 minutes. As a result of the research, it shows that the best behaviour against wear is obtained when the MMC contains 6% TiC. Under this parameter the lowest percentage of pores and the lowest coefficient of friction are achieved, ensuring that the incorporation of ceramic particles (TiC) in 316 austenitic steel matrix significantly improves the wear resistance. Also, it is shown that it is possible to sinter such materials using the abnormal glow discharge, being a novel and effective method in which the working temperature is reached in a short time.

  2. Metal Matrix Superconductor Composites for Flight-Weight Microwave Lightcraft Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Dan A.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-04-28

    Flight-weight superconducting magnets are designed for a 20-m diameter MicroWave LightCraft (MWLC). The twin coil unit with storage capacity of 900 MJ, is made of structural carbon fiber filaments with a superconducting MgCNi{sub 3} high current density film surface layer, imbedded in a beryllium stabilizer matrix of high electrical and thermal conductivity. These 'bucking' magnets run circumferentially about the lightcraft rim, and provide a 2-Tesla magnetic field necessary for the craft's hypersonic MHD slipstream accelerator. Each magnet is comprised of a single 22 cm diameter, hollow cylindrical cable made from metal matrix composites for superconductors (MMC lowbar Sc) with integral coolant passageways for circulating liquid-helium coolant to prevent the magnets from warming above the superconductive transition temperature. Each is suspended inside a 30-cm diameter toroidal vacuum tube, braced by a radial mesh of high-strength insulating fibers loaded in tension. For a coil separation distance of 1.4 m, each coil has a calculated mass of 1365 kg which is within 2x of the ultimate objective.

  3. Micro-strain Evolution and Toughening Mechanisms in a Trimodal Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzheng; Topping, Troy D.; Yang, Hanry; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2015-03-01

    A trimodal metal matrix composite (MMC) based on AA (Al alloy) 5083 (Al-4.4Mg-0.7Mn-0.15Cr wt pct) was synthesized by cryomilling powders followed by compaction of blended powders and ceramic particles using two successive dual mode dynamic forgings. The microstructure consisted of 66.5 vol pct ultrafine grain (UFG) region, 30 vol pct coarse grain (CG) region and 3.5 vol pct reinforcing boron carbide particles. The microstructure imparted high-tensile yield strength (581 MPa) compared to a conventional AA 5083 (242 MPa) and enhanced ductility compared to 100 pct UFG Al MMC. The deformation behavior of the heterogeneous structure and the effects of CG regions on crack propagation were investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests. The micro-strain evolution measured using digital image correlation showed early plastic strain localization in CG regions. Micro-voids due to the strain mismatch at CG/UFG interfaces were responsible for crack initiation. CG region toughening was realized by plasticity-induced crack closure and zone shielding of disconnected micro-cracks. However, these toughening mechanisms did not effectively suppress its brittle behavior. Further optimization of the CG distribution (spacing and morphology) is required to achieve toughness levels required for structural applications.

  4. Multi-Objective Optimization in Hot Machining of Al/SiCp Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, M. R.; Dabade, U. A.

    2016-02-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have been found to be useful in a number of engineering applications and particle reinforced MMCs have received considerable attention due to their excellent engineering properties. These materials are generally regarded as extremely difficult to machine, because of the abrasive characteristics of the reinforced particulates. These characteristics of MMCs affect the machined surface quality and integrity. This paper presents use of Taguchi Grey Relational Analyses (GRA) for optimization of Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs produced by stir casting. Experiments are performed using L16 orthogonal array by using hot machining technique. The objective of this study is to identify the optimum process parameters to improve the surface integrity on Al/SiCp MMCs. The machined surface integrity has been analyzed by process parameters such as speed, feed, depth of cut and preheating temperature. The significance of the process parameters on surface integrity has been evaluated quantitatively by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method and AOM plots. The grey relational analysis shows optimum machining conditions as 0.05 mm/rev feed, 0.4 mm depth of cut and 60 °C preheating temperature to enhance surface integrity for both Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs except for cutting speed 50 and 25 m/min respectively.

  5. Wear Behaviour of Al-6061/SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium Al-6061 base composites, reinforced with SiC particles having mesh size of 150 and 600, which is fabricated by stir casting method and their wear resistance and coefficient of friction has been investigated in the present study as a function of applied load and weight fraction of SiC varying from 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 %. The dry sliding wear properties of composites were investigated by using Pin-on-disk testing machine at sliding velocity of 2 m/s and sliding distance of 2000 m over a various loads of 10, 20 and 30 N. The result shows that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC particulates up to weight percentage of 35 % reduces the wear rate. The result also show that the wear of the test specimens increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction slightly decreases with increasing weight percentage of reinforcements. The wear surfaces are examined by optical microscopy which shows that the large grooved regions and cavities with ceramic particles are found on the worn surface of the composite alloy. This indicates an abrasive wear mechanism, which is essentially a result of hard ceramic particles exposed on the worn surfaces. Further, it was found from the experimentation that the wear rate decreases linearly with increasing weight fraction of SiC and average coefficient of friction decreases linearly with increasing applied load, weight fraction of SiC and mesh size of SiC. The best result has been obtained at 35 % weight fraction and 600 mesh size of SiC.

  6. Production of ceramic nanoparticles through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and their introduction into a metallic matrix to form metal matrix composites (MMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuechterlein, Jacob

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a self-sustaining combustion reaction of reactant powders typically in the form of compacted pellets to form a desired product species. The reactants are ignited in one or more locations by several different techniques. After ignition the reaction travels as a wave through the pellet exothermically converting the reactants into products as it propagates. In this case the products are formed as discrete ceramic particles of TiC, Al2O3 and SiC. The goal of this research was to reduce the size of the particles formed by this technique from a diameter of 1-5μm to less than 100nm with the goal of then incorporating these nanoparticles as reinforcements in Al metal matrix composites. To accomplish this, many different SHS principles were studied and their associated variables were changed to reduce the combustion temperature of each reacting system. Several of these systems were investigated and discarded for a number of reasons such as: low ignition or high combustion temperatures, dangerous reaction conditions, or undesirable product densities and morphologies. The systems chosen exhibited low material costs, low combustion temperatures, and a wide range of stabilities when lowering the reaction temperature. The reacting systems pursued were based around the aluminothermic reduction of TiO2 in the presence of carbon to form TiC and Al2O 3. The combustion temperature of this reaction was reduced from 2053ºC to less than 1100ºC, which had a corresponding effect on the particle size of the products, reducing the average diameter of the particles to less than 100nm. This was accomplished by providing high heating rates, controlling the green density and adding diluents to the reaction such as Al, TiC, SiC or Al2O3. Cooling experiments were also investigated, but the cooling rate was found to have no effect on the particle size.

  7. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and

  8. An investigation of the thermoviscoplastic behavior of a metal matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogacki, John R.; Tuttle, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    This research investigates the response of a fiberless 13 layer hot isostatically pressed Ti-15-3 laminate to creep, constant strain rate, and cyclic constant strain rate loading at temperatures ranging from 482C to 649C. Creep stresses from 48 to 260 MPa and strain rates of .0001 to .01 m/m/sec were used. Material parameters for three unified constitutive models (Bodner-Partom, Miller, and Walker models) were determined for Ti-15-3 from the experimental data. Each of the three models was subsequently incorporated into a rule of mixtures and evaluated for accuracy and ease of use in predicting the thermoviscoplastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composite laminates (both 0 and 90). The laminates were comprised of a Ti-15-3 matrix with 29 volume percent SCS6 fibers. The predicted values were compared to experimentally determined creep and constant strain rate data. It was found that all three models predicted the viscoplastic response of the 0 specimens reasonably well, but seriously underestimated the viscoplastic response of the 90 specimens. It is believed that this discrepancy is due to compliant and/or weak fiber-matrix interphase. In general, it was found that of the three models studied, the Bodner-Partom model was easiest to implement, primarily because this model does not require the use of cyclic constant strain rate tests to determine the material parameters involved. However, the version of the Bodner-Partom model used in this study does not include back stress as an internal state variable, and hence may not be suitable for use with materials which exhibit a pronounced Baushinger effect. The back stress is accounted for in both the Walker and Miller models; determination of the material parameters associated with the Walker model was somewhat easier than in the Miller model.

  9. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Naik, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    A macro-micromechanics analysis was formulated to determine the matrix and fiber behavior near the notch tip in a center-notched metal matrix composite. Results are presented for a boron/aluminum monolayer. The macro-level analysis models the entire notched specimen using a three dimensional finite element program which uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to model the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The micro-behavior is analyzed using a Discrete Fiber-Matrix (DFM) model containing one fabric and the surrounding matrix. The dimensions of the DFM model were determined by the ply thickness and the fiber volume fraction and corresponded to the size of the notch-tip element in the macro-level analysis. The boundary conditions applied to the DFM model were determined from the macro-level analysis. Stress components within the DFM model were calculated and stress distributions are presented along selected planes and surfaces within the DFM model, including the fiber-matrix interface. Yielding in the matrix was examined at the notch tip in both the macro- and micro-level analyses. The DFM model predicted higher stresses (24 percent) in the fiber compared to the global analysis. In the notch-tip element, the interface stresses indicated that a multi-axial criterion may be required to predict interfacial failure. The DFM analysis predicted yielding to initiate in the notch-tip element at a stress level 28 percent lower than predicted by the global analysis.

  10. Nanoceramic -Metal Matrix Composites by In-Situ Pyrolysis of Organic Precursors in a Liquid Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshan; Surappa, M. K.; Ahn, Dongjoon; Raj, Rishi

    2008-12-01

    We show the feasibility of introducing a dispersion of a refractory ceramic phase into metals by stirring a powder of an organic polymer into a magnesium melt and having it convert into a ceramic within the melt by in-situ pyrolysis of the polymer. The pyrolysis is a highly reactive process, accompanied by the evolution of hydrogen, which disperses the ceramic phase into nanoscale constituents. In the present experiments, a polysilazane-based precursor, which is known to yield an amorphous ceramic constituted from silicon, carbon, and nitrogen, was used. Five weight percent of the precursor (which has a nominal ceramic yield of 75 to 85 wt pct) produced a twofold increase in the room-temperature yield strength and reduced the steady-state strain rate at 450 °C by one to two orders of magnitude, relative to pure magnesium. This polymer-based in-situ process (PIP) for processing metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is likely to have great generality, because many different kinds of organic precursors, for producing oxide, carbides, nitrides, and borides, are commercially available. Also, the process would permit the addition of large volume fractions of the ceramic, enabling the nanostructural design, and production of MMCs with a wide range of mechanical properties, meant especially for high-temperature applications. An important and noteworthy feature of the present process, which distinguishes it from other methods, is that all the constituents of the ceramic phase are built into the organic molecules of the precursor ( e.g., polysilazanes contain silicon, carbon, and nitrogen); therefore, a reaction between the polymer and the host metal is not required to produce the dispersion of the refractory phase.

  11. Novel iron metal matrix composite reinforced by quartz sand for the effective dechlorination of aqueous 2-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Yang, Bo; Han, Yanni; Jiang, Chaojin; Wu, Deli; Fan, Jinhong; Ma, Luming

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we tested a novel iron metal matrix composite (MMC) synthesized by mechanically introducing quartz sand (SiO2) into an iron matrix (denoted as SiO2-Fe MMC). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant of the SiO2-Fe MMC (initial pH 5.0) for 20 mg/L of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) was 0.051 × 10(-3) L/m(2)/min, which was even higher than that of some reported Pd/Fe bimetals. This extraordinary high activity was promoted by the quick iron dissolution rate, which was caused by the formation of Fe-C internal electrolysis from carbonization of process control agent (PCA) and the active reinforcement/metal interfaces during the milling process. In addition, pH has slight effect on the dechlorination rate. The SiO2-Fe MMC retained relatively stable activity, still achieving 71% removal efficiency for 2-CP after six consecutive cycles. The decrease in dechlorination efficiency can be attributed to the rapid consumption of Fe(0). A dechlorination mechanism using the SiO2-Fe MMC was proposed by a direct electron transfer from Fe(0) to 2-CP at the quartz sand/iron interface.

  12. Preparation of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Novel In situ Ceramic Composite Particulates, Developed from Waste Colliery Shale Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Siva, S. B.; Sahoo, K. L.; Ganguly, R. I.; Dash, R. R.; Singh, S. K.; Satpathy, B. K.; Srinivasarao, G.

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is adapted to prepare an in situ ceramic composite from waste colliery shale (CS) material. Heat treatment of the shale material, in a plasma reactor and/or in a high temperature furnace at 1673 K (1400 °C) under high vacuum (10-6 Torr), has enabled in situ conversion of SiO2 to SiC in the vicinity of carbon and Al2O3 present in the shale material. The composite has the chemical constituents, SiC-Al2O3-C, as established by XRD/EDX analysis. Particle sizes of the composite range between 50 nm and 200 μm. The shape of the particles vary, presumably rod to spherical shape, distributed preferably in the region of grain boundaries. The CS composite so produced is added to aluminum melt to produce Al-CS composite (12 vol. pct). For comparison of properties, the aluminum metal matrix composite (AMCs) is made with Al2O3 particulates (15 vol. pct) with size <200 μm. The heat-treated Al-CS composite has shown better mechanical properties compared to the Al-Al2O3 composite. The ductility and toughness of the Al-CS composite are greater than that of the Al-Al2O3 composite. Fractographs revealed fine sheared dimples in the Al-CS composite, whereas the same of the Al-Al2O3 composite showed an appearance of cleavage-type facets. Abrasion and frictional behavior of both the composites have been compared. The findings lead to the conclusion that the in situ composite developed from the colliery shale waste material has a good future for its use in AMCs.

  13. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  14. Analysis of thermal residual stress for metal-matrix composite with Al/SiC particles. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, S.H.

    1988-06-01

    When a metal-matrix composite is cooled down to room temperature from the fabrication or annealing temperature, residual stresses are induced in the composite due to the mismatch of the thermal-expansion coefficients between the matrix and fiber. A method can be derived for calculating the particles due to differences in thermal-expansion coefficients. Special attention is paid to creep deformation in the matrix phase. The analysis shows that considerable internal stresses and creep deformation appear in the composites when subjected to cooling.

  15. Carbide coated fibers in graphites-aluminum composites. [(fabrication of metal matrix composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities are described for a NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to develop graphite fiber-aluminum matrix composites. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was constructed for continuously coating graphite fibers with TiC. As much as 150 meters of continuously coated fibers were produced. Deposition temperatures were varied from 1365 K to about 1750 K, and deposition time from 6 to 150 seconds. The 6 sec deposition time corresponded to a fiber feed rate of 2.54 m/min through the coater. Thin, uniform, adherent TiC coats, with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 micrometer were produced on the individual fibers of Thornel 50 graphite yarns without affecting fiber strength. Although coat properties were fairly uniform throughout a given batch, more work is needed to improve the batch-to-batch reproducibility. Samples of TiC-coated Thornel 50 fibers were infiltrated with an aluminum alloy and hot-pressed in vacuum to produce small composite bars for flexure testing. Strengths as high as 90% of the rule-of-mixtures strength were achieved. Results of the examination of the fracture surfaces indicate that the bonding between the aluminum and the TiC-coated fibers is better than that achieved in a similar, commercially infiltrated material made with fibers having no observable surface coats. Several samples of Al-infiltrated, TiC-coated Thornel 50 graphite yarns, together with samples of the commercially infiltrated, uncoated fibers, were heated for 100 hours at temperatures near the alloy solidus. The TiC-coated samples appear to undergo less reaction than do the uncoated samples. Photomicrographs are shown.

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  17. Developing scandium and zirconium containing aluminum boron carbide metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jing

    The study presented in this thesis focuses on developing castable, precipitation-strengthened Al--B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs) for high temperature applications. In the first part, B4C plates were immersed in liquid aluminum alloyed with Sc, Zr and Ti to investigate the interfacial reactions between B4C and liquid aluminum The influences of Sc, Zr and Ti on the interfacial microstructure in terms of individual and combined additions were examined. Results reveal that all three elements reacted with B4C and formed interfacial layers that acted as a diffusion barrier to limit the decomposition of B4C in liquid aluminum. The interfacial reactions and the reaction products in each system were identified. With the combined addition of Sc, Zr and Ti, most of the Ti was found to enrich at the interface, which not only offered appropriate protection of the B4C but also reduced the consumption of Sc and Zr at the interface. In the second part, Sc and Zr were introduced into Al-15vol.% B 4C composites presaturated by Ti, and eight experimental composites with different Sc and Zr levels were prepared via a conventional casting technique. It was found that Sc was involved in the interfacial reactions with B 4C that partially consume Sc. The Sc addition yielded considerable precipitation strengthening in the as-cast and peak aged conditions. To achieve an equivalent strengthening effect of Sc in binary Al-Sc alloys, approximately double the amount of Sc is required in Al-B4C composites. On the contrary, no major Zr reaction products were found at the interfaces and the major part of Zr remained in the matrix for the precipitation strengthening. The combination of Sc and Zr enhanced sthe precipitation strengthening. Two kinds of nanoscale precipitates, Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr), were found in the as-cast microstructure and contributed to the increase in the matrix hardness. In the third part, all the experimental composites were isothermally aged at 300, 350, 400 and 450

  18. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  19. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Sung, Michael; Zhang, Shi-Yu; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  20. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary toolless pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  1. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and Fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub element tests will be presented.

  2. Metal Matrix Composite Coatings Manufactured by Thermal Spraying: Influence of the Powder Preparation on the Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussavy, D.; Costil, S.; El Kedim, O.; Montavon, G.; Bonnot, A.-F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to manufacture metal matrix composite coatings by thermal spraying. In order to improve coating's mechanical properties, it is necessary to increase homogeneity. To meet this objective, the chosen approach was to optimize the powder morphology by mechanical alloying. Indeed, the mechanical alloying method (ball milling) was implemented to synthesize NiCr-Cr3C2 and NiCrBSi-WC composite powders by using cold spraying and high-velocity oxygen fuel process, respectively. After optimizing the process parameters on powder grain size, the composite coatings were compared with standard coatings manufactured from mixed powders. SEM observations, hardness measurements, and XRD analyses were the first technologies implemented to characterize the metal matrix composite coatings. Different characteristics were then observed. When mechanical alloying process is employed to synthesize composite powders strengthened by particle dispersion, the powders tend to fracture into small segments, especially when high content of hard particles is added. Powder microstructures were then refined, which induced thinner coating morphologies and reduced porosity rate. Once an improved microstructure is obtained, manufacturing of coating using milled powders was found suitable in comparison with coatings manufactured only with mixed powders.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviour of Al6061-ZrB2 In-situ Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth Kumar, R.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Perugu, Chandra S.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium matrix composites processed through in-situ molten reaction has emerged as an alternative for eliminating defects existing in ex-situ reinforced metal matrix composites. Development of composites through in-situ method using inorganic salts via liquid metallurgy route is the most widely accepted technique. In the present work, Al6061-ZrB2 in-situ composites have been developed through in-situ reaction of Al-10%Zr and Al-3%B master alloys in Al6061 alloy. Study of microstructure and mechanical properties of in-situ reinforced ZrB2 in Al6061 alloy have been carried out. Composite exhibited grain refinement and improved the mechanical properties of Al6061 alloy. Ductility of composite is reduced with increase in content of ZrB2.

  4. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  5. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    -sized titanium aluminide powders were rapidly consolidated to form near-net shape titanium aluminide parts in form of small discs and tiles. The rapidly consolidated titanium aluminide parts were found to be fully dense. The microstructure morphology was found to vary with consolidation conditions. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly dependent on microstructure morphology and grain size. Due to rapid consolidation, grain growth during consolidation was limited, which in turn led to enhanced mechanical properties. The high temperature mechanical properties for the consolidated titanium aluminide samples were characterized and were found to retain good mechanical performance up to 700°C. Micron-sized titanium aluminide powders with slightly less Aluminum and small Nb, and Cr additions were rapidly consolidated into near-net shape parts. The consolidated parts were found to exhibit enhanced mechanical performance in terms of ductility and yield strength. The negative effect of Oxygen on the flexural strength at high temperatures was found to be reduced with the addition of Nb. In an effort to further reduce the grain size of the consolidated titanium aluminide samples, the as-received titanium aluminide powders were milled in an attrition mill. The average powder particle size of the powders was reduced by 60% after milling. The milled powders were then rapidly consolidated. The grain size of the consolidated parts was found to be in the sub-micrometer range. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly enhanced due to reduction of grain size in the sub-micrometer range. In order to develop a metal matrix composite based on titanium aluminide matrix reinforced with titanium boride, an experiment to study the effect of rapid consolidation on titanium diboride powders was conducted. Micron-sized titanium diboride powders were consolidated and were found to be 93% dense and exhibited minimal grain growth. The low density of the consolidated part was

  6. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  7. A study of the diffusional behavior of a two-phase metal matrix composite exposed to a high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The progress of diffusion-controlled filament-matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite where the filaments and matrix comprise a two-phase binary alloy system was studied by mathematically modeling compositional changes resulting from prolonged elevated temperature exposure. The analysis treats a finite, diffusion-controlled, two-phase moving-interface problem by means of a variable-grid finite-difference technique. The Ni-W system was selected as an example system. Modeling was carried out for the 1000 to 1200 C temperature range for unidirectional composites containing from 6 to 40 volume percent tungsten filaments in a Ni matrix. The results are displayed to show both the change in filament diameter and matrix composition as a function of exposure time. Compositional profiles produced between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were calculated by superposition of finite-difference solutions of the diffusion equations.

  8. Kinetics of gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-solid transfer of particles in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Rana, F.; Moitra, A.; Kacar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical models for transfer of particles from gas to liquid and from liquid to solid are introduced. The model for calculation of the pushing/engulfment transition in directionally solidified particulate metal matrix composites, considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics, thermophysical properties and buoyant forces. Based on processing variables (solidification velocity and direction) and on material variables (interface energies, particle size, particle and liquid density, volume fraction of particles and particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio) four types of behavior were predicted. Also, two numerical models for liquid-to-solid transfer are discussed, as well as the limitations of presently available models.

  9. Wear performance optimization of stir cast Al-TiB2 metal matrix composites using Taguchi design of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poria, Suswagata; Sahoo, Prasanta; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    The present study outlines the use of Taguchi parameter design to minimize the wear performance of Al-TiB2 metal matrix composites by optimizing tribological process parameters. Different weight percentages of micro-TiB2 powders with average sizes of 5-40 micron are incorporated into molten LM4 aluminium matrix by stir casting method. The wear performance of Al-TiB2 composites is evaluated in a block-on-roller type Multitribo tester at room temperature. Three parameters viz. weight percentage of TiB2, load and speed are considered with three levels each at the time of experiment. A L27 orthogonal array is used to carry out experiments accommodating all the factors and their levels including their interaction effects. Optimal combination of parameters for wear performance is obtained by Taguchi analysis. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to find out percentage contribution of each parameter and their interaction also on wear performance. Weight percentage of TiB2 is forced to be the most effective parameter in controlling wear behaviour of Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite.

  10. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder <3 µm and coarse powder of 180 µm was used as a reinforcement. Microstructural investigations included analyses using scanning electron microscopy with an integrated EDS microanalysis system and transmission microscopy. In order to measure the adhesion force (interface strength), we prepared the microwires made of the investigated materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  11. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder <3 µm and coarse powder of 180 µm was used as a reinforcement. Microstructural investigations included analyses using scanning electron microscopy with an integrated EDS microanalysis system and transmission microscopy. In order to measure the adhesion force (interface strength), we prepared the microwires made of the investigated materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  12. Machinability and modeling of cutting mechanism for Titanium Metal Matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejjani, Roland

    Titanium Metal Matrix composites (TiMMC) is a new class of material. However, it is a very difficult to cut material. Therefore, the tool life is limited. In order to optimize the machining of TiMMC, three approaches (stages) were used. First, a TAGUCHI method for the design of experiments was used in order to identify the effects of the machining inputs (speed, feed, depth) to the output (cutting forces, surface roughness). To enhance even further the tool life, Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) was also experimented. In a second approach, and in order to better understand the cutting mechanism of TiMMC, the chip formation was analyzed and a new model for the adiabatic shear band in the chip segment was developed. In the last approach, and in order to have a better analysis tool to understand the cutting mechanism, a new constitutive model for TiMMC for simulation purposes was developed, with an added damage model. The FEM simulations results led to predictions of temperature, stress, strain, and damage, and can be used as an analysis tool and even for industrial applications. Following experimental work and analysis, I found that cutting TiMMC at higher speeds is more efficient and productive because it increases tool life. It was found that at higher speeds, fewer hard TiC particles are broken, resulting in reduced tool abrasion wear. In order to further optimize the machining of TiMMC, an unconventional machining method was used. In fact, Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) was used and was found to increase the tool life by approximately 180%. To understand the effects of the particles on the tool, micro scale observations of hard particles with SEM microscopy were performed and it was found that the tool/particle interaction while cutting can exist under three forms. The particles can either be cut at the surface, pushed inside the material, or even some of the pieces of the cut particles can be pushed inside the material. No particle de-bonding was observed. Some

  13. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  14. A Coupled/Uncoupled Computational Scheme for Deformation and Fatigue Damage Analysis of Unidirectional Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, Thomas E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Saleeb, Atef F.

    1997-01-01

    A fatigue damage computational algorithm utilizing a multiaxial, isothermal, continuum-based fatigue damage model for unidirectional metal-matrix composites has been implemented into the commercial finite element code MARC using MARC user subroutines. Damage is introduced into the finite element solution through the concept of effective stress that fully couples the fatigue damage calculations with the finite element deformation solution. Two applications using the fatigue damage algorithm are presented. First, an axisymmetric stress analysis of a circumferentially reinforced ring, wherein both the matrix cladding and the composite core were assumed to behave elastic-perfectly plastic. Second, a micromechanics analysis of a fiber/matrix unit cell using both the finite element method and the generalized method of cells (GMC). Results are presented in the form of S-N curves and damage distribution plots.

  15. Processing of single-walled carbon-nanotube metal matrix composites and a finite element model for the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kenneth

    In the present investigation, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT or SWNT) reinforced titanium (Ti) matrix composites have been produced by powder metallurgy (PM) and induction heating methods. It has been found that a nickel coating and a fast processing time associated with the induction heating method enables carbon nanotubes to survive the high-temperature (above 1950 K) processing conditions. The result has been a Ti-SWCNT metal-matrix composite (MMC) which is three times stronger and harder than Ti alone, a consequence that has never been accomplished before. This is a promising new development in the application of SWCNT technology to materials science. A mathematical model is given to support the experimental findings.

  16. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  17. Superplasticity in ceramic and metal matrix composites and the role of grain size, segregation, interfaces, and second phase morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1992-10-01

    Structural ceramics and ceramic composites have been shown to exhibit superplasticity in recent times and this discovery has attracted tremendous interest. Although the number of ceramics exhibits superplasticity is now quite large, there are gaps in understanding the requirements for superplasticity in ceramics. Also, superplastic behavior at very high strain rates (1 s{sup {minus}1}) in metallic-based materials is an area of increasing research. In this case, the phenomenon has been observed quite extensively in aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composites and mechanically alloyed aluminum- and nickel-based materials. Again, the details of the structural requirements of this phenomenon are not yet understood. In the present paper, experimental results on superplasticity in ceramic-based materials and on high strain rate behavior in metallic-based materials are presented. The roles of grain size, grain boundary and interface chemistry, and second phase morphology and compatibility with the matrix material will be emphasized.

  18. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of WC particles reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composite produced by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that cracks in metal matrix composites (MMC) parts manufacturing are crucial to the reliable material properties, especially for the reinforcement particles with high volume fraction. In this paper, WC particles (WCp) reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composites (WCp/Fe) were manufactured by laser melting deposition (LMD) technology to investigate the characteristics of cracks formation. The section morphology of composites were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), and microstructure of WCp, matrix and interface were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in order to study the crack initiation and propagation behavior under different laser process conditions. The temperature of materials during the laser melting deposition was detected by the infrared thermometer. The results showed that the cracks often appeared after five layers laser deposition in this experiment. The cracks crossed through WC particles rather than the interface, so the strength of interface obtained by the LMD was relatively large. When the thermal stress induced by high temperature gradient during LMD and the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between WC and matrix was larger than yield strength of WC, the cracks would initiate inside WC particle. Cracks mostly propagated along the eutectic phases whose brittleness was very large. The obtained thin interface was beneficial to transmitting the stress from particle to matrix. The influence of volume fraction of particles, laser power and scanning speed on cracks were investigated. This paper investigated the influence of WC particles size on cracks systematically, and the smallest size of cracked WC in different laser processing parameters was also researched.

  19. Computational investigation on thermal conductivity behavior of Al 6061-SiC-Gr hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S. A. Mohan; Shridhar, T. N.; Krishnamurthy, L.

    2015-10-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are regarded to be one of the most principal classifications in composite materials. The thermal characterization of hybrid MMCs has become increasingly important in a wide range of applications. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties of MMCs. Since nearly all MMCs are used in various temperature ranges, measurement of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature is necessary in order to know the behavior of the material. In the present research, evaluation of thermal conductivity has been accomplished for aluminum alloy (Al) 6061, silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (Gr) hybrid MMCs from room temperature to 300∘C. Al-based composites reinforced with SiC and Gr particles have been prepared by stir casting technique. The thermal conductivity behavior of hybrid composites with different percentage compositions of reinforcements has been investigated using laser flash technique. The results have indicated that the thermal conductivity of the different compositions of hybrid MMCs decreases by the addition of Gr with SiC and Al 6061. Few empirical models have been validated concerning with the evaluation of thermal conductivity of composites. Using the experimental values namely density, thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and enthalpy at varying temperature ranges, computational investigation has been carried out to evaluate the thermal gradient and thermal flux.

  20. Computational investigation on thermal expansivity behavior of Al 6061-SiC-Gr hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Krishna, S. A.; Shridhar, T. N.; Krishnamurthy, L.

    2015-08-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been regarded as one of the most principal classifications in composite materials. The thermal characterization of hybrid MMCs has been increasingly important in a wide range of applications. The coefficient of thermal expansion is one of the most important properties of MMCs. Since nearly all MMCs are used in various temperature ranges, measurement of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as a function of temperature is necessary in order to know the behavior of the material. In this research paper, the evaluation of thermal expansivity has been accomplished for Al 6061, silicon carbide (SiC) and Graphite (Gr) hybrid MMCs from room temperature to 300°C. Aluminum (Al)-based composites reinforced with SiC and Gr particles have been prepared by stir casting technique. The thermal expansivity behavior of hybrid composites with different percentage compositions of reinforcements has been investigated. The results have indicated that the thermal expansivity of the different compositions of hybrid MMCs decreases by the addition of Gr with SiC and Al 6061. Few empirical models have been validated for the evaluation of thermal expansivity of composites. Using the experimental values namely modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio and thermal expansivity, computational investigation has been carried out to evaluate the thermal parameters namely thermal displacement, thermal strain and thermal stress.

  1. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    traditional fiber-reinforced composites. The latter part of this thesis work explores a new method of producing BP comprised of oriented nanotubes through the use of a modified Taylor-Couette setup capable of simultaneously shearing and filtering an aqueous MWCNT dispersion. BP produced with this setup exhibited anisotropic electrical and mechanical properties as a result of the nanotube alignment. Finally, a new technique for producing MWCNT metal matrix composites was developed using the nanotubes as the heating element and carbon source in a microwave-assisted carbothermic reduction of copper oxide. The extremely rapid heating of MWCNTs upon microwave irradiation allowed Cu-MWCNT composites to be produced in times on the order of a minute. Because this approach requires none of the specialized equipment generally used in metal matrix composite processing, it has promise as a scalable fabrication technique.

  2. The Influence of Ni-Coated TiC on Laser-Deposited IN625 Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Topping, Troy; Smugeresky, John E.; Zhou, Yizhang; Biswas, Asit; Baker, Dean; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2010-03-01

    IN625 Ni-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) components were deposited using Laser Engineered Net-Shaping (LENS) with Ni-coated and uncoated TiC reinforcement particles to provide insight into the influence of interfaces on MMCs. The microstructures and spatial distribution of TiC particles in the deposited MMCs were characterized, and the mechanical responses were investigated. The results demonstrate that the flowability of the mixed powders, the integrity of the interface between the matrix and the TiC particles, the interaction between the laser beam and the TiC ceramic particles, and the mechanical properties of the LENS-deposited MMCs were all effectively improved by using Ni-coated TiC particles.

  3. A unified interpretation of threshold stresses in the creep and high strain rate superplasticity of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Langdon, T.G.

    1999-09-29

    The flow behavior of metal matrix composites is characterized by the presence of a threshold stress under both creep conditions at intermediate temperatures and in high strain rate superplasticity (HSR SP) at very high temperatures near the onset of partial melting. Experiments show the measured threshold stresses decrease with increasing temperature and this trend has been interpreted using an Arrhenius-type relationship incorporating an energy term, Q{sub 0}. Typically, the experimental values reported for Q{sub 0} are {approximately}20--30 kJ/mol under creep conditions but up to {approximately}100 kJ/mol in experiments associated with HSR SP. This report resolves this apparent dichotomy by demonstrating that both sets of results become consistent when the analysis is extended to incorporate an additional dependence on temperature associated with load transfer and substructure strengthening.

  4. Development of a Low-Cost Process for Manufacturing of Ti-Metal Matrix Composite by Roll-Diffusion Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testani, C.; Ferraro, F.

    2010-06-01

    Composite materials with titanium-alloy matrix are currently the class of material with the highest specific resistance at temperatures up to 800 °C. The main hurdle to their application is their final cost. Even if it is clear that the costs of constituent materials are decreasing due to volume production effects, the production processing costs remain high due to the batch production approach. Centro Sviluppo Materiali’s (CSM) efforts have focused on the manufacturing process in order to obtain an innovative solution to reduce the manufacturing costs with respect to the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process that represents the standard production process for this class of materials. The new approach can allow a cost reduction of about 40%; this result was obtained by developing an experimental “diffusion bonding” plant for co-rolling at high temperature in a superplastic rolling regime, sheets of titanium alloy and monofilament silicon carbide fabrics. The experimental pilot plant was proposed for patent with RM2006A000261 in May 2006. This paper describes the manufacturing phases and process results. Moreover, has been shown that the diffusion in the solid state was obtained in a process window that was at least 100 times faster than that of HIP. High-temperature tensile tests were carried out on specimens machined from metallic matrix composite materials produced with the roll-diffusion bonding (RDB) process. The samples produced were also submitted to electrochemical dissolution tests of the metallic matrix in order to verify the geometric integrity of the fibers inside the matrix after the bonding phase. The results achieved as well as the process knowledge acquired with the CSM pilot plant are the base for further development of industrial application of the titanium roll-diffusion bonding.

  5. Characterization of anisotropie elastic constants of silicon-carbide participate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites: Part I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Hsu, David K.; Shannon, Robert E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    1994-04-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of silicon-carbide particulate (SiC p ) reinforced Al metal matrix composites were characterized using ultrasonic techniques and microstructural analysis. The composite materials, fabricated by a powder metallurgy extrusion process, included 2124, 6061, and 7091 Al alloys reinforced by 10 to 30 pct of α-SiC p by volume. Results were presented for the assumed orthotropic elastic constants obtained from ultrasonic velocities and for the microstructural data on particulate shape, aspect ratio, and orientation distribution. All of the composite samples exhibited a systematic anisotropy: the stiffness in the extrusion direction was the highest, and the stiffness in the out-of-plane direction was the lowest. Microstructural analysis suggested that the observed anisotropy could be attributed to the preferred orientation of SiC p . The ultrasonic velocity was found to be sensitive to internal defects such as porosity and intermetallic compounds. It has been observed that ultrasonics may be a useful, nondestructive technique for detecting small directional differences in the overall elastic constants of the composites since a good correlation has been noted between the velocity and microstructure and the mechanical test. By incorporating the observed microstructural characteristics, a theoretical model for predicting the anisotropic stiffnesses of the composites has been developed and is presented in a companion article (Part II).

  6. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  7. Parametric Study of Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite Produced by a Novel Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pardeep; Sharma, Satpal; Khanduja, Dinesh

    2015-07-01

    In the present research work, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and graphite (Gr) ceramic powders are ball milled to obtain homogeneous mixing and consistent density of combined powder. The ball-milled powder is used as reinforcement for hybrid composite development by stir casting process in the inert atmosphere. After mixing by ball milling for 100 hours, the density of ball-milled (Si3N4 + Gr) powder is measured as 2.81 g/cm3, which is approximately equal to the density of aluminum (2.7 g/cm3). The microstructures and hardness of the manufactured hybrid composites are analyzed and compared with Si3N4- and Gr-reinforced composites. Scanning electron micrograph reveals a reasonably uniform dispersion of ball-milled (Si3N4 + Gr) reinforcement in the metal matrix composites. Hardness results reveal that hybrid composites have more hardness than Gr-reinforced and lower hardness than Si3N4-reinforced composites. The dry sliding wear behavior of aluminum matrix hybrid composites has also been investigated. Response surface methodology is used to develop wear model of hybrid composites using reinforcement percentage ( R), load ( L), sliding speed ( S), and sliding distance ( D) as the process parameters. The results of wear investigation show that increase in sliding speed ( S) and percentage reinforcement ( R) reduce the wear, while increase in sliding distance ( D) or load ( L) increases the wear of the hybrid composites. Further, the load-sliding distance and load-sliding speed interactions increase the wear, while the wear reduces due to sliding speed-sliding distance interaction in the high range. The errors between the modeled and experimental results are found within 3 to 7 pct.

  8. A simple laminate theory using the orthotropic viscoplasticity theory based on overstress. I - In-plane stress-strain relationships for metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krempl, Erhard; Hong, Bor Zen

    1989-01-01

    A macromechanics analysis is presented for the in-plane, anisotropic time-dependent behavior of metal matrix laminates. The small deformation, orthotropic viscoplasticity theory based on overstress represents lamina behavior in a modified simple laminate theory. Material functions and constants can be identified in principle from experiments with laminae. Orthotropic invariants can be repositories for tension-compression asymmetry and for linear elasticity in one direction while the other directions behave in a viscoplastic manner. Computer programs are generated and tested for either unidirectional or symmetric laminates under in-plane loading. Correlations with the experimental results on metal matrix composites are presented.

  9. Development of a method for fabricating metallic matrix composite shapes by a continuous mechanical process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divecha, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    Attempts made to develop processes capable of producing metal composites in structural shapes and sizes suitable for space applications are described. The processes must be continuous and promise to lower fabrication costs. Special attention was given to the aluminum boride (Al/b) composite system. Results show that despite adequate temperature control, the consolidation characteristics did not improve as expected. Inadequate binder removal was identified as the cause responsible. An Al/c (aluminum-graphite) composite was also examined.

  10. Problems of Development and Application of Metal Matrix Composite Powders for Additive Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosteleva, Elena N.; Pribytkov, Gennadii A.; Krinitcyn, Maxim G.; Baranovskii, Anton V.; Korzhova, Victoria V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper considers the problem of structure formation in composites with carbide phase and a metal binder under self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of powder mixtures. The relation between metal binder content and their structure and wear resistance of coatings was studied. It has been shown that dispersion of the carbide phase and volume content of metal binder in the composite powders structure could be regulated purposefully for all of studied composites. It was found that the structure of surfaced coating was fully inherited of composite powders. Modification or coarsening of the structure at the expense of recrystallization or coagulation carbide phase during deposition and sputtering does not occur.

  11. Tailoring thermal expansion in metal matrix composites blended by antiperovskite manganese nitrides exhibiting giant negative thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, K.; Hamada, T.; Kasugai, D.; Sugimoto, N.

    2012-10-01

    We controlled thermal expansion of metal matrix composites (MMCs) that had been blended using antiperovskite manganese nitrides with giant negative thermal expansion (NTE). The NTE of the manganese nitrides, which is isotopic, is greater than -30 ppm K-1 in α (coefficient of linear thermal expansion), which is several or ten times as large as that of conventional NTE materials. These advantages of nitrides are desirable for practical application as a thermal-expansion compensator, which can suppress thermal expansion of various materials including metals and even plastics. Powder metallurgy using pulsed electric current sintering enables us to reduce temperatures and times for fabrication of MMCs. Consequently, chemical reactions between matrix (Al, Ti, Cu) and filler can be controlled and even high-melting-point metals can be used as a matrix. Thermal expansion of these MMCs is tunable across widely various α values, even negative ones, with high reproducibility. These composites retain a certain amount of voids. Formation of rich and stable interfacial bonding, overcoming large mismatch in thermal expansion, remains as a problem that is expected to hinder better composite performance.

  12. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  13. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  14. A continuum deformation theory for metal-matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the high temperature, time dependent, hereditary deformation behavior of metallic composites that can be idealized as pseudohomogeneous continua with locally definable directional characteristics. Homogenization of textured materials (molecular, granular, fibrous) and applicability of continuum mechanics in structural applications depends on characteristic body dimensions, the severity of gradients (stress, temperature, etc.) in the structure and the relative size of the internal structure (cell size) of the material. The point of view taken here is that the composite is a material in its own right, with its own properties that can be measured and specified for the composite as a whole.

  15. Studies on synthesis of in-situ Al-TiC metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.; Saha, S. C.; Datta, G. L.; Chakraborty, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present research work, synthesis and characterization of in-situ Al-TiC composites reinforced with ceramic phases was carried out. The formation of undesirable TiAl3 particles could be avoided justifying the correct procedural requirement adopted while preparing Al-TiC composites. It was observed that distributions of reinforced particles were uniform along the grain boundaries. It was also observed that the average size of the TiC particles was of 0.5 μm. It was also noted that the presence of TiC particles in the composite enhances the yield strength and hardness substantially.

  16. The impact of LDEF results on the space application of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckel, Gary L.; Le, Tuyen D.

    1993-01-01

    Over 200 graphite/aluminum and graphite/magnesium composites were flown on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF on the Advanced Composites Experiment. The performance of these composites was evaluated by performing scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of exposed surfaces, optical microscopy of cross sections, and on-orbit and postflight thermal expansion measurements. Graphite/aluminum and graphite/magnesium were found to be superior to graphite/polymer matrix composites in that they are inherently resistant to atomic oxygen and are less susceptible to thermal cycling induced microcracking. The surface foils on graphite/aluminum and graphite/magnesium protect the graphite fibers from atomic oxygen and from impact damage from small micrometeoroid or space debris particles. However, the surface foils were found to be susceptible to thermal fatigue cracking arising from contamination embrittlement, surface oxidation, or stress risers. Thus, the experiment reinforced requirements for carefully protecting these composites from prelaunch oxidation or corrosion, avoiding spacecraft contamination, and designing composite structures to minimize stress concentrations. On-orbit strain measurements demonstrated the importance of through-thickness thermal conductivity in composites to minimize thermal distortions arising from thermal gradients. Because of the high thermal conductivity of aluminum, thermal distortions were greatly reduced in the LDEF thermal environment for graphite/aluminum as compared to graphite/magnesium and graphite/polymer composites. The thermal expansion behavior of graphite/aluminum and graphite/magnesium was stabilized by on-orbit thermal cycling in the same manner as observed in laboratory tests.

  17. Micromechanics of metal matrix composites using the Generalized Method of Cells model (GMC) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1992-01-01

    A user's guide for the program gmc.f is presented. The program is based on the generalized method of cells model (GMC) which is capable via a micromechanical analysis, of predicting the overall, inelastic behavior of unidirectional, multi-phase composites from the knowledge of the properties of the viscoplastic constituents. In particular, the program is sufficiently general to predict the response of unidirectional composites having variable fiber shapes and arrays.

  18. Between dreams and reality of metal-matrix composites -- a big gap?

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, H.D.; Kern, H.; Janczak, J.

    1993-12-31

    The potential benefits and the current state-of-the-art in MMCs will be presented through a discussion of their processing and related aspects. The advantages and limitations of most common manufacturing techniques of fiber reinforced metals, e.g. realized property potential and commercial possibilities, will be outlined. The emphasis will be given on novel powder metallurgy techniques such as rapid solidification (e.g. atomization techniques and plasma processes) and new materials systems (e.g. intermetallic matrix composites). The technical barriers which prevent the transition of MMCs from aerospace to a wider range of applications will be highlighted, Special attention will be drawn to the relation between processing parameters, fiber-matrix interface and composite properties. The challenge of composite modeling and design as well as interface controlling for successful processing utilization of MMCs will be mentioned. The benefits of use of computer techniques (databases, simulations, knowledge based systems) to aid the composite design and process control (fuzzy logic) will be shown on several examples. The technical possibilities of adaptation of interface tailoring approaches from the PMC area such as graded interphase or rubber-bumper interface will be studied. In addition, on the basis of recent forecasts by different experts on composite materials the question of the MMCs future will be discussed. Have they a chance in the next few years to meet the requirements of successful commercial applications, especially those of clients? The problems which have to be solved and options for solution will be dealt with.

  19. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  20. An analytical/numerical correlation study of the multiple concentric cylinder model for the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1993-01-01

    The utility of a recently developed analytical micromechanics model for the response of metal matrix composites under thermal loading is illustrated by comparison with the results generated using the finite-element approach. The model is based on the concentric cylinder assemblage consisting of an arbitrary number of elastic or elastoplastic sublayers with isotropic or orthotropic, temperature-dependent properties. The elastoplastic boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder is solved using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation (originally developed for elastic layered media) and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions. These features of the model facilitate efficient investigation of the effects of various microstructural details, such as functionally graded architectures of interfacial layers, on the evolution of residual stresses during cool down. The available closed-form expressions for the field variables can readily be incorporated into an optimization algorithm in order to efficiently identify optimal configurations of graded interfaces for given applications. Comparison of residual stress distributions after cool down generated using finite-element analysis and the present micromechanics model for four composite systems with substantially different temperature-dependent elastic, plastic, and thermal properties illustrates the efficacy of the developed analytical scheme.

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G.G.; Hubbard, C.R.; Misture, S.T.; Wang, X.L.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  2. Computational modeling of structure of metal matrix composite in centrifugal casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagórski, Roman

    2007-04-01

    The structure of alumina matrix composite reinforced with crystalline particles obtained during centrifugal casting process are studied. Several parameters of cast process like pouring temperature, temperature, rotating speed and size of casting mould which influent on structure of composite are examined. Segregation of crystalline particles depended on other factors such as: the gradient of density of the liquid matrix and reinforcement, thermal processes connected with solidifying of the cast, processes leading to changes in physical and structural properties of liquid composite are also investigated. All simulation are carried out by CFD program Fluent. Numerical simulations are performed using the FLUENT two-phase free surface (air and matrix) unsteady flow model (volume of fluid model — VOF) and discrete phase model (DPM).

  3. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  4. Damage development in titanium metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several layups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites were investigated. Fatigue tests were conducted and analyzed for both notched and unnotched specimens at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Thermo-mechanical fatigue results were analyzed. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 degree fibers is the controlling factor in fatigue life. The static and fatigue strength of these materials is shown to be strongly dependent on the level of residual stresses and the fiber/matrix interfacial strength. Fatigue tests of notched specimens showed that cracks can initiate and grow many fiber spacings in the matrix materials without breaking fibers. Fiber bridging models were applied to characterize the crack growth behavior. The matrix cracks are shown to significantly reduce the residual strength of notched composites. The notch strength of these composites was accurately predicted using a micromechanics based methodology.

  5. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  6. Use of spray techniques to synthesize particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Lavernia, E. J.

    1992-11-01

    Spray processing of particulate-reinforced MMCs combines microstructural refinement and compositional modifications with in situ processing and even near-net-shape manufacturing. Representative spray-processing methods encompass spray-atomization and -deposition, low-pressure plasma deposition, modified gas welding, and high velocity oxyfuel thermal spraying. Because they involve the mixing of matrix and reinforcement under nonequilibrium conditions, these processes allow the modification and enhancement of existing alloy systems' properties, as well as to develop novel alloy compositions; this approach precludes the extreme thermal excursions associated with conventional casting, and their concomitant macrosegregation.

  7. Functionally graded coatings on SiC fibers for protection in Ti-based metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    The incorporation of SiC fibers in Ti-based alloys, has led to the development of high strength, low density and high creep resistant properties of titanium-based metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs). These composites have applications in the aerospace industry as structural materials for aerojet components and compressor blades. The processing of Ti-based composites usually involves a consolidation stage using diffusion bonding or hot isostatic pressing where the consolidation temperatures are in excess of 800 C for a significant period of time. Severe interdiffusion and chemical reactions between the SiC and Ti-alloy matrices occur under such processing conditions, leading to the formation of brittle reaction layer and deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the SiC/Ti interfacial reactions can also occur during in service if the operating temperature is above 700 C. A variety of approaches has been examined to prevent or reduce the SiC/Ti interfacial reactions in MMCs at elevated temperatures during material manufacturing and in service. Coating of the SiC fibers prior to incorporation into the Ti matrices seems to be the most viable approach to overcome this technical problem. This has prompted the development of functionally graded coatings onto SiC fibers. Functionally graded coating consists a systematic but continuous variation in the composition and microstructure across the coating thickness, resulting in a gradual change in properties. Consequently, this has led to the distinct multifunction characteristics. This work describes the influence of functionally graded coatings of C/TiC/(Ti,C)/Ti in preserving the surface integrity and strength of the as-received SiC fibers, and effectiveness to prevent deleterious reaction with Ti-matrix as compared with the unprotected SiC fibers.

  8. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-04-01

    In the ninth quarter, investigations in steel matrix composites focused on characterization of abrasive wear and fracture test coupons in order to gain a better understanding of the material attributes contributing to the observed behavior in each test. Both the wear and fracture work found that the performance of the carbide cermet based composites was significantly affected by the dissolution of the hard particles and the elements added in hopes of discouraging dissolution. both thrusts focused on abrasive wear characterization. In abrasive wear this led to increase matrix hardness which increased wear resistance, however the fracture toughness of the composites were significantly reduced. In contrast, the oxide based composites demonstrated good fracture characteristics and the oxide particles provided superior protection to the high stress gouging wear imparted by pin-abrasion testing. For the thermal spray coating effort, modified coatings and fusing parameters were explored on simulated components. Significant improvements appear to have been achieved, and are demonstrated in the lack of observable cracking in the coatings. The abrasive wear characteristics of these components will be explored in the 10th quarter. An overview of the progress during the 9th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  9. Mechanical Properties - Structure Correlation for Commercial Specification of Cast Particulate Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Pradeep Rohatgi

    2002-12-31

    In this research, the effects of casting foundry, testing laboratory, surface conditions, and casting processes on the mechanical properties of A359-SiC composites were identified. To observe the effects, A359-SiC composites with 20 and 305 SiC particles were cast at three different foundries and tested at three different laboratories. The composites were cast in sand and permanent molds and tested as-cast and machined conditions. To identify the effect of the volume fraction and distribution of particles on the properties of the composites, particle distribution was determined using Clemex Image analysis systems, and particle volume fraction was determined using wet chemical analysis and Clemex Image analysis systems. The microstructure and fractured surfaces of the samples were analyzed using SEM, and EDX analysis was done to analyze chemical reaction between the particles and the matrix. The results of the tensile strengths exhibited that the tensile strengths depend on the density and porosity of the composites; in general the higher tensile strength is associated with lower porosity and higher density. In some cases, composites with lower density were higher than these with higher density. In the Al-20% SiC samples, the composites with more inclusions exhibited a lower tensile strength than the ones with fewer inclusions. This suggests that macroscopic casting defects such as micro-porosity, shrinkage porosity and inclusions appear to strongly influence the tensile strength more than the microstructure and particle distribution. The fatigue properties of A359/20 vol.% SiC composites were investigated under strain controlled conditions. Hysteresis loops obtained from strain controlled cyclic loading of 20% SiCp reinforced material did not exhibit any measurable softening or hardening. The fatigue life of Al-20% SiC heat treated alloy at a given total strain showed wide variation in fatigue life, which appeared to be related to factors such as inclusions

  10. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-07-01

    In the 10th quarter no further work was conducted on the steel matrix composite element of this project. For this element work is effectively complete and all that remains is the composition of the final report. For the thermal spray coating effort, components coated and fused in the previous quarter were subject to high stress abrasive wear testing. Some complications were encountered with the wear testing, but the tests which were completed successfully showed that the coatings provided wear resistance 5x that of the baseline material. Further wear testing is planned for the 11th and final quarter. An overview of the progress during the 10th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  11. Analysis of crack propagation as an energy absorption mechanism in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Murphy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The crack initiation and crack propagation capability was extended to the previously developed generalized plane strain, finite element micromechanics analysis. Also, an axisymmetric analysis was developed, which contains all of the general features of the plane analysis, including elastoplastic material behavior, temperature-dependent material properties, and crack propagation. These analyses were used to generate various example problems demonstrating the inelastic response of, and crack initiation and propagation in, a boron/aluminum composite.

  12. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liu; Trent Weaver; F.W. Zok; C.G. Levi; Matthew T. Kiser

    2002-04-01

    In the fifth quarter, tooling for the steel MMC effort was redesigned based on the findings from the pressure casting trials of the previous quarter. While awaiting the arrival of that tooling, gravity casting trials were performed to assess modified performing technology and new hard particle systems. Steel-boride composite systems demonstrated good wetting and infiltration behavior, and fully infiltrated steel-boride composites were obtained under certain conditions. However, preform floating and particle dissolution are challenges which must be overcome. Ceramic oxide composites successfully pressure cast in a hot isostatic press at UC Santa Barbara were characterized and subject to fracture toughness testing. Resulting differences in fracture toughness are believed to be due to differences in matrix hardness, potentially imparted through reaction of the molten steel with the particles. Some evidence of bonding between the steel and oxide particles was noted on fracture surfaces. Arc lamp processing trials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory demonstrated that thermal spray coatings were successfully designed to facilitate fusion. All coatings investigated developed some degree of metallurgical bond after lamp fusion and for most coatings lamp fusion also further increased coating hardness. An overview of the progress during the 1st quarter of this project is given below. Research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  13. Influence of engineered interfaces on residual stresses and mechanical response in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the inherent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between fiber and matrix within metal and intermetallic matrix composite systems, high residual stresses can develop under various thermal loading conditions. These conditions include cooling from processing temperature to room temperature as well as subsequent thermal cycling. As a result of these stresses, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber matrix interface region. A number of potential solutions for reducing this thermally induced residual stress field have been proposed recently. Examples of some potential solutions are high CTE fibers, fiber preheating, thermal anneal treatments, and an engineered interface. Here the focus is on designing an interface (by using a compensating/compliant layer concept) to reduce or eliminate the thermal residual stress field and, therefore, the initiation and propagation of cracks developed during thermal loading. Furthermore, the impact of the engineered interface on the composite's mechanical response when subjected to isothermal mechanical load histories is examined.

  14. Effects of SiC on Properties of Cu-SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efe, G. Celebi; Altinsoy, I.; Ipek, M.; Zeytin, S.; Bindal, C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper was focused on the effects of particle size and distribution on some properties of the SiC particle reinforced Cu composites. Copper powder produced by cementation method was reinforced with SiC particles having 1 and 30 μm particle size and sintered at 700 °C. SEM studies showed that SiC particles dispersed in copper matrix homogenously. The presence of Cu and SiC components in composites were verified by XRD analysis technique. The relative densities of Cu-SiC composites determined by Archimedes' principle are ranged from 96.2% to 90.9% for SiC with 1 μm particle size, 97.0 to 95.0 for SiC with 30 μm particle size. Measured hardness of sintered compacts varied from 130 to 155 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size, 188 to 229 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size. Maximum electrical conductivity of test materials was obtained as 80.0% IACS (International annealed copper standard) for SiC with 1 μm particle size and 83.0% IACS for SiC with 30 μm particle size.

  15. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  16. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  17. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Jeffrey Hawk

    2003-01-01

    In the eighth quarter, investigations in both thrusts focused on abrasive wear characterization. For the steel matrix composites, various systems were tested at DOE Albany Research Center using wear tests which produced low stress scratching, high stress gouging, and gouging and impact wear. Based on the wear results, it is uncertain as to whether the composites created have sufficient wear resistance to provide a 2x life increase in a selectively reinforced component in all applications. High stress component abrasive wear tests were conducted at Caterpillar on arc lamp processed, thermal sprayed components. Testing showed that in many cases, arc lamp processing parameters and resulting fusion were insufficient to prevent coating spallation. Of those coatings which experienced only limited spallation, wear life improvements approached 2x and it is expected that project goals can be met with additional process modifications. An overview of the progress during the 8th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  18. The solidification microstructure of Al-Cu-Si alloys metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Garbellini, O.; Palacio, H.; Biloni, H.

    1998-12-31

    The relationship between solidification microstructure and fluidity in MMC was studied. The composites were fabricated by infiltration of liquid metal into a alumina SAFFIL fibers preform under a gas pressure, using alloys of the AlCuSi system as matrices. The fluidity was measured in terms of classic foundry practice (i.e., the distance of flow liquid metal into the preform, while solidifying). The characterization of solidification microstructure in the cast composite was analyzed and correlated with the results of fluidity. The attention was particularly focused on such effects as the presence or absence of selective nucleation, the refinement of certain solidifying phases in the presence of fibers and their influence on microstructure formation and segregation of certain elements present in the liquid at the fiber matrix interface. By comparing reinforced and non reinforced zones, it was shown that the presence of fibers resulted in a refinement of the dendritic arm spacing of the {alpha}Al phase, with nucleation of Si on the fibers and without nucleation of primary Al dendrites. The results were discussed and compared with the microstructures and fluidity test of the unreinforced Al-Cu-Si alloys.

  19. Action of Cryogenic chill on Mechanical properties of Nickel alloy Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. K. Anil; Ananthaprasad, M. G.; GopalaKrishna, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the area of material science engineering, metallurgists may be at the forefront of new technologies, developing metals for new applications, or involved in the traditional manufacture. By doing so it is possible for metallurgist to apply their knowledge of metals to solve complex problems and looking for ways to improve the mechanical properties of the materials. Therefore, an investigation in the present research was made to fabricate and evaluate the microstructure and mechanical properties of composites developed using cryogenically cooled copper chills, consisting of nickel alloy matrix and garnet particles as the reinforcement. The reinforcement being added ranges from 3 to 12 wt.% in steps of 3%. A stir casting process was used to fabricate the nickel base matrix alloy fused with garnet reinforcement particle. The matrix alloy was melted in a casting furnace at around 1350°C, the garnet particulates which was preheated to 600°C, was introduced evenly into the molten metal alloy. An arrangement was made at one end of the mould by placing copper chill blocks of varying thickness brazed with MS hallow block in which liquid nitrogen was circulated for cryogenic effect. After solidification, the composite materials thus synthesized were examined for microstructural and mechanical properties as per ASTM standards.

  20. Hot isostatic pressing of SiC particulate reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.L.; Wei, Z.; Xu, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Two as-cast SiC particulate reinforced A359-based composites were hot isostatically pressed for a fixed length of time but at various pressures (in the range 100--150 MPa) and temperatures (in the range 450--550 C). It was found that HIP treatment generally increased the ductility but reduced the yield stress drastically. The improvement of ductility was attributed to a reduction of the porosity levels. Quantitative image analyses showed that the HIP treatment reduced the porosity levels significantly. It is of interest to observe that increasing HIP temperature is more effective than increasing HIP pressure in terms of improvement in strength and ductility. Another interesting observation is that most eutectic Si particles were spheroidized during HIP. The spheroidization of Si was believed to contribute to the improvement of mechanical properties, because fracture initiation of the composites was observed to be related to either the breaking of Si particles or the debonding of Si particles from the nearby SiC particles.

  1. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  2. Effect of tool velocity ratio on tensile properties of friction stir processed aluminum based metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayavel, P.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2016-08-01

    In friction stir processing (FSP), tool rotational speed (TRS) and tool traverse speed (TTS) are the two important parameters, known to produce significant changes in the properties of the processed material. Increasing the TRS and TTS beyond a certain level would produce undesirable results. The heat generation will increase with an increase in the TRS and decrease in TTS. Excessive heat generation results in the formation of coarse grains exhibiting poor mechanical properties. The heat generation will decrease with decrease in the TRS and increase in TTS. Low heat generation will lead to inadequate plasticization and improper material flow. Hence a perfect combination of TRS and TTS is required to attain desirable properties in FSPed material. In this investigation FSP was carried out on aluminum based metal matrix composite (LM25AA+5%SiCp) material using five different tool velocity ratios (TVR: TRS/TTS). The FSP was subjected to microstructural characterization and tensile properties, evaluation. The results revealed that the TVR of 2.6 yielded superior tensile properties compared to other conditions.

  3. Effect of Forging Parameters on Low Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of Al/Basalt Short Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, R.; Ranganath, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface. PMID:24298207

  4. Effect of forging parameters on low cycle fatigue behaviour of Al/basalt short fiber metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, R; Ranganath, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface.

  5. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a quasi-isotropic SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, K.A.; Mall, S. . Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

    1995-01-01

    As the speed of new aerospace vehicles pushes the supersonic and hypersonic envelopes, aerodynamic heating and structural strength and weight are becoming even greater design factors. Here, the response of a quasi-isotropic laminate of metal matrix composite, SCS-6/Ti-15-3 in a thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) environment was investigated. To achieve this, three sets of fatigue tests were conducted: (1) in-phase TMF (IP-TMF), (2) out-of-phase TMF (OP-TMF), and (3) isothermal fatigue (IF). The fatigue response was dependent on the test condition and the maximum stress level during cycling. The IF, IP-TMF, and OP-TMF conditions yielded shortest fatigue life at higher, intermediate and lower stress levels, respectively. Examination of the failure mode through the variation of strain or modulus during cycling, and post-mortem microscopic evaluation revealed that it was dependent on the fatigue condition and applied stress level. Higher stresses, mostly with IP-TMF and IF conditions, produced a primarily fiber dominated failure. Lower stresses, mostly with the OP-TMF condition, produced a matrix dominated failure. Also, an empirical model based on the observed damage mechanisms was developed to represent the fatigue lives for the three conditions examined here.

  6. Transient Liquid-Phase Diffusion Bonding of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite Using a Mixed Cu-Ni Powder Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Joydeep; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, the transient liquid-phase diffusion bonding of an aluminum metal matrix composite (6061-15 wt.% SiCp) has been investigated for the first time using a mixed Cu-Ni powder interlayer at 560 °C, 0.2 MPa, for different holding times up to 6 h. The microstructure of the isothermally solidified zone contains equilibrium precipitate CuAl2, metastable precipitate Al9Ni2 in the matrix of α-solid solution along with the reinforcement particles (SiC). On the other hand, the microstructure of the central bond zone consists of equilibrium phases such as NiAl3, Al7Cu4Ni and α-solid solution along with SiC particles (without any segregation) and the presence of microporosities. During shear test, the crack originates from microporosities and propagates along the interphase interfaces resulting in poor bond strength for lower holding times. As the bonding time increases, with continual diffusion, the structural heterogeneity is diminished, and the microporosities are eliminated at the central bond zone. Accordingly, after 6-h holding, the microstructure of the central bond zone mainly consists of NiAl3 without any visible microporosity. This provides a joint efficiency of 84% with failure primarily occurring through decohesion at the SiC particle/matrix interface.

  7. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  8. Fatigue damage in cross-ply titanium metal matrix composites containing center holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of fatigue damage in (0/90) sub SCS-6/TI-15-3 laminates containing center holes was studied. Stress levels required for crack initiation in the matrix were predicted using an effective strain parameter and compared to experimental results. Damage progression was monitored at various stages of fatigue loading. In general, a saturated state of damage consisting of matrix cracks and fiber matrix debonding was obtained which reduced the composite modulus. Matrix cracks were bridged by the 0 deg fibers. The fatigue limit (stress causing catastrophic fracture of the laminates) was also determined. The static and post fatigue residual strengths were accurately predicted using a three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The matrix damage that occurred during fatigue loading significantly reduced the notched strength.

  9. Structural analysis and sizing of stiffened, metal matrix composite panels for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Craig S.

    1992-01-01

    The present method for strength and stability analyses of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite panels to be used in hypersonic vehicle structures is of great generality, and can be linked with planar finite-element analysis (FEA). Nonlinear temperature and load-dependent material data for each laminate are used to 'build-up' the stiffened panel's membrane, bending, and membrane-bending coupling stiffness terms, as well as thermal coefficients. The resulting, FEA-solved thermomechanical forces and moments are used to calculate strain at any location in the panel; this allows an effective ply-by-ply orthotropic strength analysis to be conducted, together with orthotropic instability checks for each laminated segment of the cross-section.

  10. Materials characterization of silicon carbide reinforced titanium (Ti/SCS-6) metal matrix composites. Part 1: Tensile and fatigue behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Diaz, E.S.; Chiang, K.T.; Loh, D.H.

    1995-12-01

    Flexural fatigue behavior was investigated on titanium (Ti-15V-3Cr) metal matrix composites reinforced with cross-ply, continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. The titanium composites had an eight-ply (0, 90, +45, {minus}45 deg) symmetric layup. Fatigue life was found to be sensitive to fiber layup sequence. Increasing the test temperature from 24 C to 427 C decreased fatigue life. Interface debonding and matrix and fiber fracture were characteristic of tensile behavior regardless of test temperature. In the tensile fracture process, interface debonding between SiC and the graphite coating and between the graphite coating and the carbon core could occur. A greater amount of coating degradation at 427 C than at 24 C reduced the Ti/SiC interface bonding integrity, which resulted in lower tensile properties at 427 C. During tensile testing, a crack could initiate from the debonded Ti/SiC interface and extend to the debonded interface of the neighboring fiber. The crack tended to propagate through the matrix and the interface. Dimpled fracture was the prime mode of matrix fracture. Interface debonding, matrix cracking, and fiber bridging were identified as the prime modes of fatigue mechanisms. To a lesser extent, fiber fracture was observed during fatigue. However, fiber fracture was believed to occur near the final stage of fatigue failure. In fatigued specimens, facet-type fracture appearance was characteristic of matrix fracture morphology. Theoretical modeling of the fatigue behavior of Ti/SCS-6 composites is presented in Part 2 of this series of articles.

  11. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew T. Kiser

    2001-07-01

    First quarter activities were limited to initial project discussions, laboratory preparation, and some initial coupon preparation. Technical discussion were held with the subcontractors to clearly define their roll in the project. Detailed preparation of the pressure casting lab were started. Initial test coupons were sprayed and provided to Oak Ridge National Lab for infrared lamp fusion trials.

  12. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  13. A numerical model for predicting crack path and modes of damage in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G.; Tan, T. M.; Lau, A. C. W.; Awerbuch, J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-based numerical technique has been developed to simulate damage growth in unidirectional composites. This technique incorporates elastic-plastic analysis, micromechanics analysis, failure criteria, and a node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm to create crack surfaces. Any combination of fiber and matrix properties can be used. One of the salient features of this technique is that damage growth can be simulated without pre-specifying a crack path. In addition, multiple damage mechanisms in the forms of matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding and plastic deformation are capable of occurring simultaneously. The prevailing failure mechanism and the damage (crack) growth direction are dictated by the instantaneous near-tip stress and strain fields. Once the failure mechanism and crack direction are determined, the crack is advanced via the node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm. Simulations of the damage growth process in center-slit boron/aluminum and silicon carbide/titanium unidirectional specimens were performed. The simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental observations.

  14. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  15. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  16. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  17. Preparation of SiC based Aluminium metal matrix nano composites by high intensity ultrasonic cavitation process and evaluation of mechanical and tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. V.; Prasad Reddy, A.; Selvaraj, N.; Rao, C. S. P.

    2016-09-01

    Request augments on a worldwide scale for the new materials. The metal matrix nano composites can be used in numerous applications of helicopter structural parts, gas turbine exit guide vane's, space shuttle, and other structural applications. The key mailman to ameliorate performance of composite matrix in aluminium alloy metal reinforces nano particles in the matrix of alloy uniformly, which ameliorates composite properties without affecting limit of ductility. The ultrasonic assisted stir casting helped agitation was successfully used to fabricate Al 2219 metal matrix of alloy reinforced with (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2) wt.% of nano silicon carbide (SiC) particles of different sizes 50nm and 150nm. The micrographs of scanning electron microscopy of nano composite were investigated it reveals that the uniform dispersion of nano particles silicon carbide in aluminium alloy 2219 matrix and with the low porosity. How the specific wear rate was vary with increasing weight percentage of nano particles at constant load and speed as shown in results and discussions. And the mechanical properties showed that the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of metal matrix nano composite AA 2219 / nano SiC of 50nm and 150nm lean to augment with increase weight percentage of silicon carbide content in the matrix alloy.

  18. Effect of the B4C content on the structure and thermal expansion coefficient of the Al-5% Cu alloy-based metal-matrix composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdniakov, A. V.; Lotfy, A.; Qadir, A.; Zolotorevskiy, V. S.

    2016-08-01

    The Al-5% Cu alloy-based metal-matrix composite materials reinforced with 5-μm B4C particles have been produced using mechanical mixing-in method. A process of addition of the B4C particles into the melt has been developed. A homogeneous distribution of the B4C reinforcing particles in the metal-matrix composite matrix was obtained. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, the formation of Al3BC and AlB2 phases has been revealed at the interphase matrix/particle boundary, which indicates a good interaction in the phases. With increasing B4C content in the matrix alloy, an insignificant increase in the porosity (from 1 to 3.1%) occurs. The average linear thermal-expansion coefficient is reduced from 24.5 to 22.6 × 10-6 K-1 in the temperature range of 20-100°C.

  19. Pathways to a family of low-cost, high-performance, metal matrix composites based on aluminum diboride in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher

    The continued development of a new family of metal matrix composites based on the in-situ formation of AlB2 flakes in liquid aluminum is described. First, a new synthesis technique for the preparation of high aspect ratio AlB2 is demonstrated. Borax and B2O 3 were reacted with molten aluminum to prepare high aspect ratio AlB 2. The focus then shifts to further understanding the Al-B alloy system. Work on the Al-B alloy system concentrated on the Al(L) + AlB 2 → Al(L) + AlB12 peritectic transformation and the growth of AlB2 in aluminum. The equilibrium peritectic transformation temperature was redetermined and found to be 950 +/- 5°C. The kinetics of the peritectic transformation were measured and reported for the first time. Cu, Fe, and Si additions were made to the alloy, and their effect on the peritectic reaction was investigated. All three elements shorten the time required for the peritectic reaction to occur. The effect of these three elements on flake growth was also investigated. They each caused a reduction in the size of growing AlB2 flakes. Finally two samples containing more than 30v% AlB2 in aluminum were prepared. Their properties were measured. The sample containing 40v% AlB2 exhibited a flexural strength of 200 MPa. The 35v% sample exhibited a flexural strength of 150 MPa. When the 35v% sample was tested in compression, it exhibited an ultimate strength close to 200 MPa. Its modulus varied from 200--300 GPa depending on the orientation of the loading axis with respect to the flake reinforcement.

  20. Effects of Control Mode and R-Ratio on the Fatigue Behavior of a Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Composite Because of their high specific stiffness and strength at elevated temperatures, continuously reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) are under consideration for a future generation of aeropropulsion systems. Since components in aeropropulsion systems experience substantial cyclic thermal and mechanical loads, the fatigue behavior of MMC's is of great interest. Almost without exception, previous investigations of the fatigue behavior of MMC's have been conducted in a tension-tension, load-controlled mode. This has been due to the fact that available material is typically less than 2.5-mm thick and, therefore, unable to withstand high compressive loads without buckling. Since one possible use of MMC's is in aircraft skins, this type of testing mode may be appropriate. However, unlike aircraft skins, most engine components are thick. In addition, the transient thermal gradients experienced in an aircraft engine will impose tension-compression loading on engine components, requiring designers to understand how the MMC will behave under fully reversed loading conditions. The increased thickness of the MMC may also affect the fatigue life. Traditionally, low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests on MMC's have been performed in load control. For monolithic alloys, low-cycle fatigue tests are more typically performed in strain control. Two reasons justify this choice: (1) the critical volume from which cracks initiate and grow is generally small and elastically constrained by the larger surrounding volume of material, and (2) load-controlled, low-cycle fatigue tests of monolithics invariably lead to unconstrained ratcheting and localized necking--an undesired material response because the failure mechanism is far more severe than, and unrelated to, the fatigue mechanism being studied. It is unknown if this is the proper approach to composite testing. However, there is a lack of strain-controlled data on which to base any decisions. Consequently, this study addresses the

  1. Application of the solution-melt method for obtaining composite materials consisting of a metal matrix and CrSi2 microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomkin, F. Yu.; Novikov, S. V.; Kartenko, N. F.; Kolosova, A. S.; Pshenai-Severin, D. A.; Uryupin, O. N.; Samunin, A. Yu.; Isachenko, G. N.

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining composite materials in which the metal matrix is filled with CrSi2 needle microcrystals is considered. It is shown that it is possible in principle to obtain a regular structure of CrSi2 microcrystals in metal matrices of tin, aluminum, and their alloys. During chemical etching, a part of the matrix volume is dissolved, releasing "rods" of the semiconducting material. The thermoelectric parameters of such a system are estimated on the basis of the measured physical properties.

  2. Effect of shock pressure on the structure and superconducting properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O in explosively fabricated bulk metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C. S.; Pradhan, M.; Schoenlein, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    While it is now well established that copper-oxide-based powder, or virtually any other ceramic superconductor powder, can be consolidated and encapsulated within a metal matrix by explosive consolidation, the erratic superconductivity following fabrication has posed a major problem for bulk applications. The nature of this behavior was found to arise from microstructural damage created in the shock wave front, and the residual degradation in superconductivity was demonstrated to be directly related to the peak shock pressure. The explosively fabricated or shock loaded YBa2Cu3Ox examples exhibit drastically altered rho (or R) - T curves. The deterioration in superconductivity is even more noticeable in the measurement of ac magnetic susceptibility and flux exclusion or shielding fraction which is also reduced in proportion to increasing peak shock pressure. The high-frequency surface resistance (in the GHz range) is also correspondingly compromised in explosively fabricated, bulk metal-matrix composites based on YBa2Cu3O7. Transmission electron microscopy (including lattice imaging techniques) is being applied in an effort to elucidate the fundamental (microstructural) nature of the shock-induced degradation of superconductivity and normal state conductivity. One focus of TEM observations has assumed that oxygen displaced from b-chains rather than oxygen-vacancy disorder in the basal plane of oxygen deficient YBa2Cu3Ox may be a prime mechanism. Shock-wave displaced oxygen may also be locked into new positions or interstitial clusters or chemically bound to displaced metal (possibly copper) atoms to form precipitates, or such displacements may cause the equivalent of local lattice cell changes as a result of stoichiometric changes. While the shock-induced suppression of T(sub c) is not desirable in the explosive fabrication of bulk metal-matrix superconductors, it may be turned into an advantage if the atomic-scale distortion can be understood and controlled as

  3. Effect of shock pressure on the structure and superconducting properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O in explosively fabricated bulk metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C. S.; Pradhan-Advani, M.

    1991-01-01

    While it is now well established that copper-oxide-based power, or virtually any other ceramic superconductor powder, can be consolidated and encapsulated within a metal matrix by explosive consolidation, the erratic superconductivity following fabrication has posed a major problem for bulk applications. The nature of this behavior was found to arise from microstructural damage created in the shock wave front, and the residual degradation in superconductivity was demonstrated to be directly related to the peak shock pressure. The explosively fabricated or shock loaded YBa2Cu3Ox examples exhibit drastically altered rho (or R) - T curves. The deterioration in superconductivity is even more noticeable in the measurement of ac magnetic susceptibility and flux exclusion or shielding fraction which is also reduced in proportion to increasing peak shock pressure. The high frequency surface resistance (in the GHz range) is also correspondingly compromised in explosively fabricated, bulk metal-matrix composites based on YBa2Cu3O7. Transmission electron microscopy (including lattice imaging techniques) is being applied in an effort to elucidate the fundamental (microstructural) nature of the shock-induced degradation of superconductivity and normal state conductivity. One focus of TEM observations has assumed that oxygen displaced from b-chains rather than oxygen-vacancy disorder in the basal plane of oxygen deficient YBa2Cu3Ox may be a prime mechanism. Shock-wave displaced oxygen may also be locked into new positions or interstitial clusters or chemically bound to displaced metal (possibly copper) atoms to form precipitates, or such displacements may cause the equivalent of local lattice cell changes as a result of stoichiometric changes. While the shock-induced suppression of T(sub c) is not desirable in the explosive fabrication of bulk metal-matrix superconductors, it may be turned into an advantage if the atomic-scale distortion can be understood and controlled as local

  4. The Influence of Al4C3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Kolarik, V.; Promakhov, V.; Zhukov, I.; Vorozhtsov, A.; Kuchenreuther-Hummel, V.

    2016-05-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) based on aluminum and reinforced with nonmetallic particles are of great practical interest due to their potentially high physico-mechanical properties. In this work, Al-Al4C3 composites were obtained by a hot-compacting method. Introduction of nanodiamonds produced by detonation to the Al powder in an amount of 10 wt.% led to the formation of ~15 wt.% of aluminum carbide during hot compacting. It was found that composite materials with the diamond content of 10 wt.% in the initial powder mix have an average microhardness of 1550 MPa, whilst the similarly compacted aluminum powder without reinforcing particles shows a hardness of 750 MPa. The mechanical properties of an Al-Al4C3 MMC at elevated test temperatures exceeded those of commercial casting aluminum alloys such as A356.

  5. The interface in tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1989-01-01

    The creep resistance of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites was evaluated. The interface region between the fiber and matrix was characterized by microhardness and electron probe microanalysis measurements which indicated that its properties were between those of fiber and matrix. However, the measured properties of the composite exceeded those calculated by the rule of mixtures even when the interface zone was assumed to retain all the strength of the fiber. The composite structure appeared to enhance the strengths of both the fibers and the matrix above what they exhibited in stand-alone tests. The effect of fiber orientation and matrix alloy composition on the fiber/matrix interface were also evaluated. Small alloying additions of zirconium and tungsten to the niobium matrix affected the creep resistance of the composites only slightly. A decrease in the creep resistance of the composite with increasing zirconium content in the matrix was ascribed to an increase in the diffusion rate of the fiber/matrix interdiffusion reaction, and a slight increase in the creep resistance of the composite was observed with an addition of 9 w percent tungsten to the matrix. In addition, Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis.

  6. Fabrication and Analysis of the Wear Properties of Hot-Pressed Al-Si/SiCp + Al-Si-Cu-Mg Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongil; Oak, Jeong-Jung; Park, Yong Ho

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize microstructures and mechanical properties of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) prepared by powder metallurgy method. Consolidation of mixed powder with gas atomized Al-Si/SiCp powder and Al-14Si-2.5Cu-0.5Mg powder by hot pressing was classified according to sintering temperature and sintering time. Sintering condition was optimized using tensile properties of sintered specimens. Ultimate tensile strength of the optimized sintered specimen was 228 MPa with an elongation of 5.3% in longitudinal direction. In addition, wear properties and behaviors of the sintered aluminum-based MMC's were analyzed in accordance with vertical load and linear speed. As the linear speed and vertical load of the wear increased, change of the wear behavior occurred in order of oxidation of Al-Si matrix, formation of C-rich layer, Fe-alloying to matrix, and melting of the specimen

  7. X-ray diffraction study of residual stresses in metal-matrix composite-jacketed steel cylinders subjected to internal pressure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.L.; Doxbeck, M.; Capsimalis, G.

    1992-03-01

    The study of aluminum/silicon carbide metal matrix composite (MMC)-jacketed steel structural components was made because of their light weight and high stiffness. Steel 'liner' cylinders were wrapped with MMC 'jackets' with an all-hoop layup and put through various degrees of hydraulic autofrettage and thermal soak. In this report, the results from our x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements on cylinders using a position-sensitive scintillation detection system are discussed. Our experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions from a model based on the elastic-plastic analysis of a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal pressure. Interpretation of the interference effect caused by the MMC jacket on the steel liner is also discussed.

  8. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David C.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  9. Influence of Ni-P Coated SiC and Laser Scan Speed on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of IN625 Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sateesh, N. H.; Kumar, G. C. Mohan; Krishna, Prasad

    2015-12-01

    Nickel based Inconel-625 (IN625) metal matrix composites (MMCs) were prepared using pre-heated nickel phosphide (Ni-P) coated silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcement particles by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing process under inert nitrogen atmosphere to obtain interface influences on MMCs. The distribution of SiC particles and microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron micrographs, and the mechanical behaviours were thoroughly examined. The results clearly reveal that the interface integrity between the SiC particles and the IN625 matrix, the mixed powders flowability, the SiC ceramic particles and laser beam interaction, and the hardness, and tensile characteristics of the DMLS processed MMCs were improved effectively by the use of Ni-P coated SiC particles.

  10. Graphene-and-Copper Artificial Nacre Fabricated by a Preform Impregnation Process: Bioinspired Strategy for Strengthening-Toughening of Metal Matrix Composite.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ding-Bang; Cao, Mu; Guo, Qiang; Tan, Zhanqiu; Fan, Genlian; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Di

    2015-07-28

    Metals can be strengthened by adding hard reinforcements, but such strategy usually compromises ductility and toughness. Natural nacre consists of hard and soft phases organized in a regular "brick-and-mortar" structure and exhibits a superior combination of mechanical strength and toughness, which is an attractive model for strengthening and toughening artificial composites, but such bioinspired metal matrix composite has yet to be made. Here we prepared nacre-like reduced graphene oxide (RGrO) reinforced Cu matrix composite based on a preform impregnation process, by which two-dimensional RGrO was used as "brick" and inserted into "□-and-mortar" ordered porous Cu preform (the symbol "□" means the absence of "brick"), followed by compacting. This process realized uniform dispersion and alignment of RGrO in Cu matrix simultaneously. The RGrO-and-Cu artificial nacres exhibited simultaneous enhancement on yield strength and ductility as well as increased modulus, attributed to RGrO strengthening, effective crack deflection and a possible combined failure mode of RGrO. The artificial nacres also showed significantly higher strengthening efficiency than other conventional Cu matrix composites, which might be related to the alignment of RGrO. PMID:26083407

  11. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.

  12. Tensile and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of In-Situ Al3Zr + Al2O3-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, G.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, aluminum-based in-situ intermetallic Al3Zr and Al2O3-reinforced metal matrix composites have been synthesized by direct melt reaction through stir casting of zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl2·8H2O) powder in commercially pure aluminum. The in-situ reaction produces intermetallic Al3Zr needles that change to feathery morphology with increasing ZrOCl2·8H2O, while the Al2O3 is of fine globular shape. The tensile strengths of these composites increase with increasing volume percent reinforcements, attaining a peak value with 18 pct addition. The dry sliding wear behavior of the composites was evaluated with varying parameters, viz. sliding distance, normal load, and sliding velocities. The wear mechanisms are explained based on the microstructure, the topography of the worn surface, and the interfacial strength of the matrix and reinforcement. The tensile and wear properties are compared with widely used wear resistant hypereutectic Al-17 pct Si cast alloy.

  13. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-28

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix–filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  14. Fatigue-life behavior and matrix fatigue crack spacing in unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, G. T.; Herrmann, D. J.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue tests of the SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite system were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior for unnotched conditions. The stress-life behavior of the unnotched (9/90)2s laminates was investigated for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3. The occurrence of matrix cracking was also examined in these specimens. This revealed multiple matrix crack initiation sites throughout the composite, as well as evenly spaced surface cracks along the length of the specimens. No difference in fatigue lives were observed for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3 when compared on a stress range basis. The unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites had shorter fatigue lives than the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites, however the neat Timetal 21S matrix material had a longer fatigue life than the neat Ti-15-3.

  15. Effect of Rhenium Addition on Wear Behavior of Cr-Al2O3 Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Marcin; Piątkowska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Materials for applications in the automotive industry are required to be strong, stiff, hard, light weight, and wear resistant, which is very difficult to achieve in the case of conventional materials. To meet all these diverse requirements, it is necessary to combine various types of materials (such as metals and ceramics). In the present study, the chromium and chromium-rhenium matrices were reinforced with aluminum oxide to obtain composite materials with improved wear resistance. The composites were fabricated by a powder metallurgy method. The effects of the rhenium addition and volume fraction of aluminum oxide on the wear rate and the friction coefficient of the composites at room temperature were examined in a ball-on-surface apparatus under dry conditions. The worn surfaces and debris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The final values of the friction coefficient were 0.9 and 0.8 for the Cr-25%Al2O3 and Cr-40%Al2O3 composites, respectively. Alloying Cr matrix with Re improved wear resistance of composite but, at the same time, it caused an increase in its coefficient of friction.

  16. The Influence of ScF3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of New Metal Matrix Composites Based on A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Zhukov, I.; Promakhov, V.; Naydenkin, E.; Khrustalyov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-10-01

    Abstarct The development of the aerospace and automotive industries demands the development of aluminum alloys and composites reinforced with new nanoparticles. In this work, metal matrix composites (MMC) with an A356 aluminum alloy matrix reinforced with 0.2 wt.% and 1 wt.% of ScF3 nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic dispersion of nanoparticles in the melt followed by casting in a metallic mold. Structure as well as physical and mechanical properties of the cast samples were examined using electron and optical microscopy, hardness and tensile testing. It is shown that nanoparticles clusters are formed during the solidification at grain boundaries and silicon inclusions. Increasing nanoparticles content significantly reduced the grain size in the MMC and increased the mechanical properties—ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms is discussed. It is suggested that the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the nanoparticles ScF3 and the aluminum matrix is a dominant strengthening mechanism.

  17. Internal damping due to dislocation movements induced by thermal expansion mismatch between matrix and particles in metal matrix composites. [Al/SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Girand, C.; Lormand, G.; Fougeres, R.; Vincent, A. )

    1993-05-01

    In metal matrix composites (MMCs), the mechanical 1 of the reinforcement-matrix interface is an important parameter because it governs the load transfer from matrix to particles, from which the mechanical properties of these materials are derived. Therefore, it would be useful to set out an experimental method able to characterize the interface and the adjacent matrix behaviors. Thus, a study has been undertaken by means of internal damping (I.D.) measurements, which are well known to be very sensitive for studying irreversible displacements at the atomic scale. More especially, this investigation is based on the fact that, during cooling of MMC's, stress concentrations originating from differences in coefficients of thermal expansion (C.T.E.) of matrix and particles should induce dislocation movements in the matrix surrounding the reinforcement; that is, local microplastic strains occur. Therefore, during I.D. measurements vs temperature these movements should contribute to MMCs I.D. in a process similar to those involved around first order phase transitions in solids. The aim of this paper is to present, in the case of Al/SiC particulate composites, new developments of this approach that has previously led to promising results in the case of Al-Si alloys.

  18. Materials characterization of silicon carbide reinforced titanium (Ti/SCS-6) metal matrix composites. Part 2: Theoretical modeling of fatigue behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, K.T.; Loh, D.H.; Liaw, P.K.; Diaz, E.S.

    1995-12-01

    Flexural fatigue behavior was investigated on titanium (Ti-15V-3Cr) metal matrix composites reinforced with cross-ply, continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. The titanium composites had an eight-ply (0, 90, +45, {minus}45 deg) symmetric layup. Mechanistic investigation of the fatigue behavior is presented in Part 1 of this series. In Part 2, theoretical modeling of the fatigue behavior was performed using finite element techniques to predict the four stages of fatigue deflection behavior. On the basis of the mechanistic understanding, the fiber and matrix fracture sequence was simulated from ply to ply in finite element modeling. The predicted fatigue deflection behavior was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, it has been shown that the matrix crack initiation starts in the 90 deg ply first, which is in agreement with the experimental observation. Under the same loading condition, the stress in the 90 deg ply of the transverse specimen is greater than that of the longitudinal specimen. This trend explains whey the longitudinal specimen has a longer fatigue life than the transverse specimen, as observed in Part 1.

  19. In-situ scanning electron microscope studies of crack growth in an aluminum metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Edge-notched specimens of a cast and extruded Al alloy-based, alumina particulate-reinforced composite in the annealed condition were tested in situ in a SEM apparatus equipped with a deformation stage permitting the direct observation of crack growth phenomena. Fracture in this composite is seen to proceed by initiation of microcracks ahead of the macrocrack; as deformation proceeds, the microcracks lengthen, and crack propagation occurs when the region of intense plastic straining becomes comparable to the macrocrack-microcrack distance. The sequence is then repeated.

  20. Metal matrix composites: Testing, analysis, and failure modes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 26, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the tension and compression testing of MMCs, the measurement of advanced composites' thermal expansion, plasticity theory for fiber-reinforced composites, a deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry, strength prediction methods for MMCs, and the analysis of notched MMCs under tensile loading. Also discussed are techniques for the mechanical and thermal testing of Ti3Al/SCS-6 MMCs, damage initiation and growth in fiber-reinforced MMCs, the shear testing of MMCs, the crack growth and fracture of continuous fiber-reinforced MMCs in view of analytical and experimental results, and MMC fiber-matrix interface failures.

  1. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  2. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities. PMID:25610944

  3. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of deformation temperature on the mechanical behavior and deformation mechanisms of Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazen, A.A. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    Aluminum-alumina (Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) metal matrix composite (MMC) materials were fabricated using the powder metallurgy (PM) techniques of hot pressing followed by hot extrusion. Different reinforcement weight fractions were used, that is, 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 wt% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The effect of deformation temperature was investigated through hot tensile deformation conducted at different temperatures. The microstructures of the tested specimens were also investigated to characterize the operative softening mechanisms. The yield and tensile strength of the Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] were found to improve as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. With the exception of Al-10wt%Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], the MMC showed better strength and behavior at high temperatures than the unreinforced matrix. The uniform deformation range was found to decrease for the same reinforcement weight fraction, as a function of temperature. For the same deformation temperature, it increases as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. Both dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization were found to be operative in Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] MMC as a function of deformation temperature. Dynamic recovery is dominant in the lower temperature range, while dynamic recrystallization is more dominant at the higher range. The increase in reinforcement weight fraction was found to lead to early nucleation of recrystallization. No direct relationship was established as far as the number of grains nucleated due to each reinforcement particle.

  5. Coating formation by plasma electrolytic oxidation on ZC71/SiC/12p-T6 magnesium metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrabal, R.; Matykina, E.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.

    2009-02-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of a ZC71/SiC/12p-T6 magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) is investigated in relation to coating growth and corrosion behaviour. PEO treatment was undertaken at 350 mA cm -2 (rms) and 50 Hz with a square waveform in stirred 0.05 M Na 2SiO 3.5H 2O/0.1 M KOH electrolyte. The findings revealed thick, dense oxide coatings, with an average hardness of 3.4 GPa, formed at an average rate of ˜1 μm min -1 for treatment times up to 100 min and ˜0.2 μm min -1 for later times. The coatings are composed mainly of MgO and Mg 2SiO 4, with an increased silicon content in the outer regions, constituting <10% of the coating thickness. SiC particles are incorporated into the coating, with formation of a silicon-rich layer at the particle/coating interface due to exposure to high temperatures during coating formation. The distribution of the particles in the coating indicated growth of new oxide at the metal/coating interface. The corrosion rate of the MMC in 3.5% NaCl is reduced by approximately two orders of magnitude by the PEO treatment.

  6. The effect of TiB2 reinforcement on the mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Li alloy-based metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The addition of ceramic particles to aluminum based alloys can substantially improve mechanical properties, especially Young's modulus and room and elevated temperature strengths. However, these improvements typically occur at the expense of tensile ductility. The mechanical properties are evaluated to a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of an ultrahigh strength aluminum lithium alloy, Weldalite (tm) 049, reinforced with TiB2 particles produced by an in situ precipitation technique called the XD (tm) process. The results are compared to the behavior of a nonreinforced Weldalite 049 variant. It is shown that both 049 and 049-TiB2 show very attractive warm temperature properties e.g., 625 MPa yield strength at 150 C after 100 h at temperature. Weldalite 049 reinforced with a nominal 4 v pct. TiB2 shows an approx. 8 pct. increase in modulus and a good combination of strength (529 MPa UTS) and ductility (6.5 pct.) in the T3 temper. And the high ductility of Weldalite 049 in the naturally aged and underaged tempers makes the alloy a good, high strength matrix for ceramic reinforcement.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Inclusions and Precipitation Hardening in Metal Matrix Composites: Application to Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Hesam A.; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-06-30

    In this study, the strengthening effect of inclusions and precipitates in metals is investigated within a multiscale approach that utilizes models at various length scales, namely, Molecular Mechanics (MM), discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DD), and an Eigenstrain Inclusion Method (EIM). Particularly, precipitates are modeled as hardsoft particles whose stress fields interact with dislocations. The stress field resulting from the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix is accounted for through the EIM. While the MM method is employed for the purpose of developing rules for DD for short range interaction between a single dislocation and an inclusion, the DD method is used to predict the strength of the composite resulting from the interaction between ensembles of dislocations and particles. As an application to this method, the mechanical behavior of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) is investigated and the results are then compared to the experimental data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery, as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results show that strengthening due to nano sized particles is a function of the density and size of the precipitates. This size effect is then explained using a mechanistic model developed based on dislocation-particle interaction.

  8. On the role of processing parameters in producing Cu/SiC metal matrix composites via friction stir processing: Investigating microstructure, microhardness, wear and tensile behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Barmouz, Mohsen; Besharati Givi, Mohammad Kazem; Seyfi, Javad

    2011-01-15

    The main aim of this study is to produce copper reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) layers using micron sized SiC particles via friction stir processing (FSP) in order to enhance surface mechanical properties. Microstructural evaluation using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that an increase in traverse speed and a decrease in rotational speed cause a reduction in the grain size of stir zone (SZ) for the specimens friction stir processed (FSPed) without SiC particles. With the aim of determining the optimum processing parameters, the effect of traverse speed as the main processing variable on microstructure and microhardness of MMC layers was investigated. Higher traverse speeds resulted in poor dispersion of SiC particles and consequently reduced the microhardness values of MMC layers. It was found that upon addition of SiC particles, wear properties were improved. This behavior was further supported by SEM images of wear surfaces. Results demonstrated that the microcomposite produced by FSP exhibited enhanced wear resistance and higher average friction coefficient in comparison with pure copper. Tensile properties and fracture characteristics of the specimens FSPed with and without SiC particles and pure copper were also evaluated. According to the results, the MMC layer produced by FSP showed lower strength and elongation than pure copper while a remarkable elongation was observed for FSPed specimen without SiC particles. Research Highlights: {yields} Decrease in traverse speed leads to good dispersion of SiC particles in composites. {yields} No distinct TMAZ in side regions of SZ of FSPed specimens with SiC particles. {yields} Microhardness of FSPed specimens with SiC particles shows a remarkable increase. {yields} Reinforcement of Cu with SiC particles improves wear and friction behavior of surface. {yields} A weak bonding in tensile due to probable agglomeration for SiC containing samples.

  9. Effect of particle concentration on the structure and tribological properties of submicron particle SiC reinforced Ni metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings produced by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, H.; Kılıç, F.; Uysal, M.; Aslan, S.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, a nickel sulfate bath containing SiC submicron particles between 100 and 1000 nm was used as the plating electrolyte. The aim of this work is to obtain Ni-SiC metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with submicron particles on steel surfaces with high hardness and wear resistance for using in anti-wear applications such as dies, tools and working parts for automobiles and vehicles. The influence of the SiC content in the electrolyte on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of nano-composite coatings was studied. During the electroplating process, the proper stirring speed was also determined for sub-micron SiC deposition with Ni matrix. The Ni films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The depositions were controlled to obtain a specific thickness (between 50 and 200 μm) and volume fraction of the particles in the matrix (between 0.02 and 0.10). The hardness of the coatings was measured to be 280-571 HV depending on the particle volume in the Ni matrix. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited SiC nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a tribometer. All the friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (with a relative humidity of 55-65%). The results showed that the wear resistance of the nanocomposites was approximately 2-2.2 times more than those of unreinforced Ni.

  10. Simulation of automotive wrist pin joint and tribological studies of tin coated Al-Si alloy, metal matrix composites and nitrogen ceramics under mixed lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian

    Development of automotive engines with high power output demands the application of high strength materials with good tribological properties. Metal matrix composites (MMC's) and some nitrogen ceramics are of interest to replace some conventional materials in the piston/pin/connecting rod design. A simulation study has been developed to explore the possibility to employ MMC's as bearing materials and ceramics as journal materials, and to investigate the related wear mechanisms and the possible journal bearing failure mechanisms. Conventional tin coated Al-Si alloy (Al-Si/Sn) have been studied for the base line information. A mixed lubrication model for journal bearing with a soft coating has been developed and applied to the contact and temperature analysis of the Al-Si/Sn bearing. Experimental studies were performed to reveal the bearing friction and wear behavior. Tin coating exhibited great a advantage in friction reduction, however, it suffered significant wear through pitting and debonding. When the tin wore out, the Al-Si/steel contact experienced higher friction. A cast and P/M MMC's in the lubricated contact with case hardened steel and ceramic journals were studied experimentally. Without sufficient material removal in the conformal contact situation, MMC bearings in the MMC/steel pairs gained weight due to iron transfer and surface tribochemical reactions with the lubricant additives and contact failure occurred. However, the MMC/ceramic contacts demonstrated promising tribological behavior with low friction and high wear resistance, and should be considered for new journal bearing design. Ceramics are wear resistant. Ceramic surface roughness is very crucial when the journals are in contact with the tin coated bearings. In contact with MMC bearings, ceramic surface quality and fracture toughness seem to play some important roles in affecting the friction coefficient. The wear of silicon nitride and beta sialon (A) journals is pitting due to grain

  11. Composite materials. Volume 3 - Engineering applications of composites. Volume 4 - Metallic matrix composites. Volume 8 - Structural design and analysis, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noton, B. R. (Editor); Kreider, K. G.; Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This volume discusses a vaety of applications of both low- and high-cost composite materials in a number of selected engineering fields. The text stresses the use of fiber-reinforced composites, along with interesting material systems used in the electrical and nuclear industries. As to technology transfer, a similarity is noted between many of the reasons responsible for the utilization of composites and those problems requiring urgent solution, such as mechanized fabrication processes and design for production. Features topics include road transportation, rail transportation, civil aircraft, space vehicles, builing industry, chemical plants, and appliances and equipment. The laminate orientation code devised by Air Force materials laboratory is included. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  12. Protective metal matrix coating with nanocomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    Experience of nanocrystalline chromium, titanium, silicon carbides and borides components application as nickel, zinc, chromium based electrodeposited composite coating is generalized. Electrodepositing conditions are determined. Structure and physicochemical properties of coatings, namely micro-hardness, adhesion to steel base, inherent stresses, heat resistance, corrosion currents, en-during quality, and their change during isothermal annealing are studied. As is shown, nanocomponents act as metal matrix modifier. Technological and economic feasibility study to evaluate expediency of replacing high priced nano-diamonds with nanocrystalline borides and carbides is undertaken.

  13. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  14. Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) code: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M. R.; Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The User's Manual for the Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) program is presented. The code is capable of tailoring the fabrication process, constituent characteristics, and laminate parameters (individually or concurrently) for a wide variety of metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, to improve the performance and identify trends or behavior of MMC's under different thermo-mechanical loading conditions. This document is meant to serve as a guide in the use of the MMLT code. Detailed explanations of the composite mechanics and tailoring analysis are beyond the scope of this document, and may be found in the references. MMLT was developed by the Structural Mechanics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  15. Effects of thermal cycling on density, elastic modulus, and vibrational damping in an alumina particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/2014 Al)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, A.; Tang, H.H.; Chawla, K.; Hermel, T.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the mechanical and physical properties, namely, the density, dynamic elastic modulus and vibrational damping, were measured for a particular reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was made by Duralcan. Specimens were exposed to up thermal cycles from room temperature to 300 C. The density of the material was measured by the Archimedes technique. The dynamic Young`s Modulus and vibrational damping of the material were determined by the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The results showed that the density and elastic modulus of the material increased only slightly due to the thermal cycling while the damping increased significantly. An increase in dislocation concentration near the particle/matrix interfaces caused by the thermal cycling could account for the measured results.

  16. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Thrust Force and Surface Roughness in Drilling of Al-2219/B4C/Gr Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindranath, V. M.; Basavarajappa, G. S. Shiva Shankar S.; Suresh, R.

    2016-09-01

    In aluminium matrix composites, reinforcement of hard ceramic particle present inside the matrix which causes tool wear, high cutting forces and poor surface finish during machining. This paper focuses on effect of cutting parameters on thrust force, surface roughness and burr height during drilling of MMCs. In the present work, discuss the influence of spindle speed and feed rate on drilling the pure base alloy (Al-2219), mono composite (Al- 2219+8% B4C) and hybrid composite (Al-2219+8%B4C+3%Gr). The composites were fabricated using liquid metallurgy route. The drilling experiments were conducted by CNC machine with TiN coated HSS tool, M42 (Cobalt grade) and carbide tools at various spindle speeds and feed rates. The thrust force, surface roughness and burr height of the drilled hole were investigated in mono composite and hybrid composite containing graphite particles, the experimental results show that the feed rate has more influence on thrust force and surface roughness. Lesser thrust force and discontinuous chips were produced during machining of hybrid composites when compared with mono and base alloy during drilling process. It is due to solid lubricant property of graphite which reduces the lesser thrust force, burr height and lower surface roughness. When machining with Carbide tool at low feed and high speeds good surface finish was obtained compared to other two types of cutting tool materials.

  17. Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture Variations in the Friction-Stir-Welded Al-Al2O3-B4C Metal Matrix Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Shamanian, Morteza; Zabolian, Azam; Taheri, Mahshid; Javaheri, Vahid; Navidpour, Amir Hossein; Nezakat, Majid; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-12-01

    In this research, ultrafine-grained sheets of aluminum matrix composite (Al-Al2O3-B4C) were produced by accumulative roll bonding ARB technique. As-received, ultrafine-grained aluminum composite sheets were joined by friction-stir welding. The microstructure, crystallographic texture, and Vickers hardness in the weld zones were investigated. Electron backscattered diffraction results revealed occurrence of dynamic recrystallization and demonstrated existence of different grain orientations within the weld nugget. Produced composite plates illustrated rotated cubic texture. Moreover, in the nugget, a well-recrystallized grain structure having characteristic strong shear texture component finally developed. However, the texture result in the heat-affected zone illustrated rotated cubic and Goss components that related to the effect of heat input. Friction-stir welding refined the grain size in the weld zone. The hardness also improved with the peak hardness being observed towards the advancing stir welding side.

  18. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  19. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  20. Microstructure and strengthening of Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys and MMCs: II. Modeling of yield strength[Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starink, M.J.; Wang, P.; Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J.

    1999-10-26

    A detailed quantitative model for the strengthening of monolithic alloys and composites due to precipitation strengthening, solution strengthening, grain and subgrain strengthening, strengthening by dislocations and load transfer to ceramic inclusions is presented. The model includes a newly derived description of the effect of a precipitate free zone (PFZ) around the reinforcing phase incorporating strain hardening of the PFZ. The model is successfully applied to model the experimental data for the proof strengths of four Al-Li-Cu-Mg type alloys and composites aged to obtain a wide range of microstructures and all strengthening contributions are quantified. It is shown that PFZ formation in the 8090 MMC causes a drastic reduction in the proof strength (about 100 MPa), but it has little influence on the time required for peak ageing. In all alloys strengthening due to GPB zones is more important than strengthening due to {delta}{prime} (Al{sub 3}Li) phase.

  1. Aluminum-fly ash metal matrix composites for automotive parts. [Reports for October 1 to December 1998, and January 31 to March 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David; Purgert, Robert; Rhudy, Richard; Rohatgi, P.

    1999-04-21

    Some highlights are: (1) Material development, process development, and part validation are occurring simultaneously on a fast track schedule. (2) Prior project activity has resulted in a program emphasis on three components--manifolds, mounting brackets, and motor mounts; and three casting techniques--squeeze casting, pressure die casting, and sand casting. (3) With the project focus, it appears possible to offer manifolds and mounting brackets for automotive qualification testing on a schedule in line with the PNGV Year 2004 goal. (4) Through an iterative process of fly ash treatment, MMC ingot preparation, foundry process refinement, and parts production, both foundries (Eck Industries and Thompson Aluminum Casting Company) are addressing the pre-competitive issues of: (a) Optimum castability with fly ash shapes and sizes; (b) Best mechanical properties derived from fly ash shapes and sizes; (c) Effective fly ash classification processes; (d) Mechanical properties resulting from various casting processes and fly ash formulations. Eck and TAC continued experiments with batch ingot provided by both Eck and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Castings were run that contained varying amounts of fly ash and different size fractions. Components were cast using cenosphere material to ascertain the effects of squeeze casting and to determine whether the pressure would break the cenospheres. Test parts are currently being machined into substandard test bars for mechanical testing. Also, the affect of heat treatments on ashalloy are being studied through comparison to two lots, one heat treated and one in the ''as cast'' condition.

  2. A New Method for Preparation of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhi, Payodhar; Panigrahi, S. C.; Ghosh, Sudipto

    2008-10-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) can involve ceramic particulates ranging in size from few nanometers to 500 μm. Particulates are added to the metal matrix for strengthening. In particular, addition of nanoparticles, even in quantities as small as 2 weight percent can enhance the hardness or yield strength by a factor as high as 2. There are several methods for the production of metal matrix nanocomposites including mechanical alloying , vertex process and spray deposition. However, the above processes are expensive. Solidification processing is a relatively cheaper route. However, during solidification processing nanoparticulates tend to agglomerate as a result of van der Waals forces and thus proper dispersion of the nano-particulate in metal matrix is a challenge. Yang et al dispersed nanoparticles in metal matrix by ultrasonic casting. However their technique has several drawbacks such as the oscillating probe, which is in direct contact with liquid metal, may dissolve in the liquid metal and contaminate it. Moreover, the extent of dispersion is not uniform. It is maximum near the probe and gradually decreases as one move away from the probe. Lastly in the method developed by Yang et al, the oscillating probe is removed from the liquid metal before cooling and solidification begin. This may lead to partial reagglomeration of nanoparticles. To overcome these difficulties a non-contact method, where the ultrasonic probe is not in direct contact with the liquid metal, was attempted to disperse nano-sized Al2O3 particulates in aluminum matrix. In this method the mold was subjected to ultrasonic vibration. Hardness measurements and microstructural studies using HRTEM were carried out on samples taken from different locations of the nanocomposite ingot cast by the non-contact method. Commercially pure liquid aluminum was used as matrix of the composite. The Al2O3 nano-powder was prepared by ball milling for 22 hr. The nanopowders were characterized using

  3. The synthesis, compressive properties, and applications of metal matrix syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Luong, Dung D.

    2011-02-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foams are composites that incorporate hollow particles in a matrix, where enclosing porosity inside the thin shell of the particle leads to low density without large decreases in mechanical properties. Studies on Al, Mg, Pb, and Zn alloy matrix syntactic foams are available in the published literature. A large stress plateau region appears in the compressive stress-strain graphs of metal matrix syntactic foams. The height and length of stress plateau can be tailored by means of particle wall thickness, volume fraction, and size, and the total compressive energy absorption can be controlled. Metal matrix syntactic foams seem promising in various energy absorbing applications including automobile parts since their energy absorption capability per unit weight is better than other foams and lightweight materials.

  4. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  5. Physical properties about metal matrix FGM of molybdenum and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kouichi; Nishida, Shinichi

    1995-11-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) have been made trials to produce by a lot of fabrication processes such as the powder metallurgical method, the plasma spraying, the diffusion bonding, the physical vapor deposition method, the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) etc. In the most cases of these processes, dissimilar materials are combined or bonded directly. The various physical properties are discontinuous at the bonded interface of the dissimilar materials. In order to overcome the problem, functionally gradient materials (FGM) have been considered recently, and have attracted the authors. Its compositions are prepared so that physical properties continuously vary across the bond interface of the dissimilar metals. In this study, a FGM is produced by a new process based on HIP. Copper and molybdenum, which are distinct in the thermo-physical property to each other, are the constitutents for the FGM. This composition have been confirmed by absorbed electron and characteristics X-ray images of each mixed layer for FGM to be uniform or continuous. The following items have been investigated and compared with the linear law of mixture rule: Vickers hardness, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity at a one-dimensional non-steady state. Those physical properties have been identified to depend on the mixing ratios of copper and molybdenum. Pretty good agreements have been obtained between the experimental data and the calculated values according to the linear law of mixture rule.

  6. Microfracture in high temperature metal matrix laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    Computational simulation procedures are described to evaluate the composite microfracture behavior, establish the hierarchy/sequence of fracture modes, and the influence of compliant layers and partial debonding on composite properties and microfracture initiation. These procedures are based upon three-dimensional finite element analysis and composite micromechanics equations. Typical results for the effects of compliant layers and partial debonding, microfracture initiation, and propagation and the thermomechanical cyclic loading on a SiC/Ti15 composite system are presented and discussed. The results show that interfacial debonding follows fiber or matrix fracture, and the thermomechanical cyclic loading severely degrades the composite integrity.

  7. Novel magnesium-nanofluorapatite metal matrix nanocomposite with improved biodegradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Fathi, M H; Meratian, M; Razavi, M

    2011-06-01

    Designing and preparation of magnesium alloys with adjustable biocorrosion rates in the human body and precipitation ability of bone-like apatite layer have been of interest recently. Application of metal matrix composites (MMC) based on magnesium alloys might be an approach to this challenge. The aim of this work was fabrication and evaluation of biocorrosion and bioactivity of a novel MMC made of magnesium alloy AZ91 as matrix and fluorapatite (FA) nano particles as reinforcement. Biodegradable Magnesium-nano fluorapatite metal matrix nanocomposite (AZ91-20FA) was made via a blending-pressing-sintering method. In vitro corrosion tests were performed for evaluation of biocorrosion behavior of produced AZ91-20FA nanocomposite. The results showed that the addition of FA nano particles to magnesium alloy can reduce not only the corrosion rate in a simulated body environment but also accelerate the formation of an apatite layer.

  8. Elevated temperature tensile and creep behavior of a SiC fiber-reinforced titanium metal matrix composite. Final Report, 22 Dec. 1994 M.S. Thesis, 7 May 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Rita J.

    1995-01-01

    In this research program, the tensile properties and creep behavior in air of (0)(sub 4), (0/90)(sub s) and (90)(sub 4) SCS-9/Beta 21S composite layups with 0.24 volume fraction fiber were evaluated. Monotonic tensile tests at 23, 482, 650 and 815 C yielded the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, proportional limit, ultimate tensile strength and total strain at failure. At 650 C, the UTS of the (0)(sub 4) and (0/90)(sub s) layups decreases by almost 50 percent from the room temperature values, indicating that operating temperatures should be less than 650 C to take advantage of the specific tensile properties of these composites.

  9. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  10. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  11. High Frequency Ultrasonic NDE of Titanium Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert A.; Pettigrew, Irene; Kirk, Katherine

    2006-03-06

    Pulse-echo wave propagation through a multi-layered TiMMC with a honeycomb-layered structural arrangement was measured experimentally. Embedded in each of the layers are unidirectional, horizontally positioned, parallel oriented silicon carbide fibers cored with tungsten. During the manufacturing process it has been realised that NDE of TiMMC is necessary because fibers are vulnerable to misalignment and breakage resulting in a reduction in mechanical properties. In this paper, results show that frequency dependence exists within the structure. This paper presents the results of fiber position, waviness and orientation detection in TiMMCs. Influences of step size, transducer frequency, focus and filtering are investigated.

  12. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  13. Pressureless infiltration of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Y.; Nukami, T.; Flemings, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Pressureless infiltration of ceramic preforms by molten aluminum is described. The preforms are SiC with varying amounts of particulate Al, Ti, and Ni. Infiltrants employed are pure Al and Al-12.5 wt pct Si. It is shown that a pressure differential within the preform is required for infiltration, and measurements are made of pressure changes in the preforms during infiltration. Results indicate that atmospheric pressure is essential for infiltration but that capillarity may play a role as well.

  14. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior. Final technical report, December 1984-November 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, D.J.; Buesking, K.W.

    1986-09-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  15. Compressive Properties of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams in Free and Constrained Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbulov, Imre Norbert; Májlinger, Kornél

    2014-06-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foam (MMSF) blocks were produced by an inert gas-assisted pressure infiltration technique. MMSFs are advanced hollow sphere reinforced-composite materials having promising application in the fields of aviation, transport, and automotive engineering, as well as in civil engineering. The produced blocks were investigated in free and constrained compression modes, and besides the characteristic mechanical properties, their deformation mechanisms and failure modes were studied. In the tests, the chemical composition of the matrix material, the size of the reinforcing ceramic hollow spheres, the applied heat treatment, and the compression mode were considered as investigation parameters. The monitored mechanical properties were the compressive strength, the fracture strain, the structural stiffness, the fracture energy, and the overall absorbed energy. These characteristics were strongly influenced by the test parameters. By the proper selection of the matrix and the reinforcement and by proper design, the mechanical properties of the MMSFs can be effectively tailored for specific and given applications.

  16. Tailored metal matrix laminates for high-temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morei, Michael R.; Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A multi-objective tailoring methodology is presented to maximize stiffness and load carrying capacity of a metal matrix cross-ply laminated at elevated temperatures. The fabrication process and fiber volume ratio are used as the design variables. A unique feature is the concurrent effects from fabrication, residual stresses, material nonlinearity, and thermo-mechanical loading on the laminate properties at the post-fabrication phase. For a (0.90) (sub s) graphite/copper laminate, strong coupling was observed between the fabrication process, laminate characteristics, and thermo-mechanical loading. The multi-objective tailoring was found to be more effective than single objective tailoring. Results indicate the potential to increase laminate stiffness and load carrying capacity by controlling the critical parameters of the fabrication process and the laminate.

  17. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fratoni, Massimiliano; Terrani, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be

  18. Data characterizing compressive properties of Al/Al2O3 syntactic foam core metal matrix sandwich

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohammed Yaseer; Xiang, Chongchen; Gupta, Nikhil; Strbik, Oliver M.; Cho, Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural observations and compressive property datasets of metal matrix syntactic foam core sandwich composite at quasi-static and high strain rate (HSR) conditions (525–845 s−1) are provided. The data supplied in this article includes sample preparation procedure prior to scanning electron and optical microscopy as well as the micrographs. The data used to construct the stress–strain curves and the derived compressive properties of all specimens in both quasi-static and HSR regions are included. Videos of quasi-static compressive failure and that obtained by a high speed image acquisition system during deformation and failure of HSR specimen are also included. PMID:26587558

  19. Processing and property evaluation of metal matrix superconducting materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Appajosula S.

    1995-01-01

    Metal - superconductor (YBCO) systems have been prepared and characterized by resistivity, ac susceptibility and dc SQUID magnetic moment measurements. The silver composites showed superconducting transition for all the composites processed and the superconducting transition temperature tends to depend upon the concentration of the silver in the composite. Aluminum composites showed an unusual resistivity results with two transitions around 90 K and 120 K. The superconducting property of silver composites can be explained qualitatively in terms of the proximity theory that has been suggested for the low temperature superconductors.

  20. Lamb waves propagation in a novel metal-matrix phononic crystals plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suobin; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the propagation properties of Lamb waves in a novel phononic crystals (PCs) plate composed of a square array of double-sided composite taper stubs, which are deposited on a 2D locally resonant PC plate that composes of an array of rubber fillers embedded in the steel plate is studied. It is shown that the spring-mass system of the resonator will be decoupled by introducing the rubber filler, and then the out-of-plane band gap (BG) and the in-plane BG can be adjusted into the same lowest frequency range, respectively (the out-of-plane BG is adjusted by the rubber filler and the in-plane BG is adjusted by the taper stub). As a result, the frequency range of the generated complete BG is between 59-93 Hz due to the overlap between the in-plane and out-of-plane BG. Compared with the classic double-sided stubbed PC plate, the relative bandwidth of the BG is enlargement by a factor of 5.5 and the location of the BG is reduced by a factor of 5.5 in the proposed structure. It provides an effective way for metal-matrix PCs to obtain complete BGs in low-frequency range (below 100 Hz), which has potential for the reduction of the vibration at low frequency in practical case.

  1. Impact of Volume Fraction and Size of Reinforcement Particles on the Grain Size in Metal-Matrix Micro and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Lopez, Hugo F.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Cho, Kyu; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2014-08-01

    In metal-matrix micro and nanocomposites (MMCs and MMNCs), the presence and interactions of various strengthening mechanisms are not well understood, but grain boundary strengthening is considered as one of the primary means of improving the yield strength of composites. Owing to the importance of grain size on mechanical properties, it is necessary to be able to describe how incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) in both powder metallurgy (PM) and solidification processing (SP) affects this critical property. In the present work, we provide a basis for an empirical equation that relates particle fraction and particle size to MMNC grain size for both PM and SP synthesis methods. The model suggests that NPs retard grain coarsening in PM MMNCs and also seems to describe the effect of reinforcement concentration on grain size in SP MMCs and MMNCs.

  2. Differential Die-Away Analysis for detection of 235U in metallic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Agrawal, Ashish; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Sinha, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Differential Die-Away Analysis is a powerful tool for detecting small quantity of fissile material even if it is shielded or placed in non-fissile matrix. The technique can be used to monitor and characterize fissile content for nuclear waste assay. In this paper, we have discussed the application of differential die away technique for detection of small quantity of fissile material in nuclear waste assay. Feasibility experiments to optimize various parameters have been carried out for detection of 235U in metallic matrix and reported in this paper. A minimum quantity of 1 g of 235U in 150 kg of metallic matrix has been detected in the experimental configuration being reported.

  3. Abrasion resistant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  4. Composition as a Thermostatic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This essay offers Neil Postman's thermostatic metaphor as a model for critical teaching. In this model, the role of the composition teacher is that of a thermostat that responds to a changing ideological environment by offering counterbalance. Such a stance is an anti-stance since it requires the teachers to enact philosophies and pedagogies,…

  5. The Effect of Gravity on the Combustion Synthesis of Porous Ceramics and Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. J.; Woodger, T. C.; Wolanski, T.; Yi, H. C.; Guigne, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Combustion synthesis (self propagating, high temperature synthesis-SHS) is a novel technique that is capable of producing many advanced materials. The ignition temperature (Tig) of such combustion synthesis reactions is often coincident with that of the lowest melting point reactant. The resultant liquid metal wets and spreads around the other solid reactant particles of higher melting points, thereby improving the reactant contact and kinetics, followed by formation of the required compounds. This ignition initiates a combustion propagating wave whose narrow reaction front rapidly travels through the reactants. Since this process is highly exothermic, the heat released by combustion often melts the reactant particles ahead of the combustion front and ignites the adjacent reactant layer, resulting in a self-sustaining reaction. Whenever a fluid phase (liquid or gas) is generated by the reaction system, gravity-driven phenomena can occur. Such phenomena include convective flows of fluid by conventional or unstable convection and settling of the higher density phases. A combustion process is often associated with various kinds of fluid flow. For instance, if the SHS reaction is carried out under inert or reactive gas atmospheres, or a volatile, e.g., B2O3, is deliberately introduced as a reactant, convective flows of the gas will occur due to a temperature gradient existing in the atmosphere when a combustion wave is initiated. The increased gas flow will produce a porous (or expanded) SHS product. Owing to the highly exothermic nature of many SHS reactions, liquid phase(s) can also form before, at, or after the combustion front. The huge temperature gradient at the combustion front can induce convective flows (conventional or unstable) of the liquid phase. Each of these types of convective fluid flow can change the combustion behavior of the synthesizing reaction, and, therefore, the resultant product microstructure. In addition, when two or more phases of different density are produced at or ahead of the propagating combustion front settling of the higher density phase will occur resulting in a non-uniform product microstructure and properties.

  6. Characterization of unnotched SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composites at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, W. D.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    Ti-15-3 reinforced with SCS-6 silicon carbide fibers, in five different layups, was tested at 650 C to determine monotonic and fatigue strengths, basic mechanical properties, and damage initiation and progression. The elevated temperature results were compared to those obtained at room temperature. Analytical predictions were made of the monotonic stress-strain response as well as cyclic stress-strain hysteresis. The fiber reinforcement was found to significantly increase the static and fatigue strengths of the laminates over that of the matrix material at elevated temperature while the increase was insignificant at room temperature. Initial damage, in either the fibers or the matrix, was partitioned as a function of the life and applied strain range in the constituents. High strains and short lives resulted in multiple fiber failure with no signs of matrix fatigue cracking. Low strains and long lives resulted in extensive matrix cracking and no fiber breaks away from the fracture surface. At 650 C the matrix was too weak to cause fiber-matrix interface failure prior to matrix yielding. Laminate fatigue lives were hypothesized to be a function of the 0 deg fiber stress. More scatter was found in the 0 deg fiber stress vs. high temperature fatigue life data than for the room temperature data. An initial unloading modulus that was greater than the initial loading modulus was observed in the elevated temperature fatigue tests.

  7. A preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic NDE of metal matrix composite test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Lerch, Brad A.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of tensile specimens composed of 8 laminated layers of continuous, SiC fiber reinforced Ti-15-3 matrix. The following subject areas are covered: AU signal analysis; tensile behavior; AU and interrupted tensile tests; AU and thermally cycled specimens; AU and stiffness; and AU and specimen geometry.

  8. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  9. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  10. Effect of fiber-matrix debonding on notched strength of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Two specimen configuration of a (0/90)2s SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminate were tested and analyzed: a center hole (CH) specimen and a double edge notch (DEN) specimen. The two specimen configurations failed at similar stress levels. Two analytical techniques, a 3-D finite-element analysis and a macro-micromechanical analysis were used to predict the overall stress-deformation behavior and the notch-tip fiber-matrix interface stresses in both configurations.

  11. Lightweight Metal Matrix Composite Segmented for Manufacturing High-Precision Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vudler, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    High-precision mirrors for space applications are traditionally manufactured from one piece of material, such as lightweight glass sandwich or beryllium. The purpose of this project was to develop and test the feasibility of a manufacturing process capable of producing mirrors out of welded segments of AlBeMet(Registered Trademark) (AM162H). AlBeMet(Registered Trademark) is a HIP'd (hot isostatic pressed) material containing approximately 62% beryllium and 38% aluminum. As a result, AlBeMet shares many of the benefits of both of those materials for use in high performance mirrors, while minimizing many of their weaknesses.

  12. Behavior of ceramic particles at the solid-liquid metal interface in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Kacar, S. A.; Moitra, A.

    1988-01-01

    Directional solidification results were obtained in order to investigate particle behavior at the solid-liquid interface in Al-2 pct Mg (cellular interface) and Al-6.1 pct Ni (eutectic interface) alloys. It is found that particles can be entrapped in the solid if adequate solidification rates and temperature gradients are used. Model results showed critical velocity values slightly higher than those obtained experimentally.

  13. On 'large-scale' stable fiber displacement during interfacial failure in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrich, R. R.; Koss, D. A.; Hellmann, J. R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to show that interfacial failure in sapphire-reinforced niobium is characterized by 'large-scale' (5-15 microns) plasticity-controlled fiber displacements occurring under increasing loads. The results are based on the responses during thin-slice fiber pushout tests wherein the fiber is supported over a hole twice the fiber diameter. The results describe an interfacial failure process that should also occur near fiber ends during pullout when a fiber is well-bonded to a soft, ductile matrix, such that eventual failure occurs by shear within the matrix near the interface.

  14. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  15. Failure of a titanium metal-matrix composite cylinder shell under internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hooke, D.A.; Armanios, E.A.; Dancila, D.S.; Thakker, A.; Doorbar, P.

    1997-12-31

    An investigation into the failure of a SCS-6/Ti-6-4 thin-walled cylindrical shell subjected to internal pressure is presented. The stress field in the middle section is predicted based on an anisotropic shell solution and the failure based on laminate strength data. An experimental setup is designed to allow the application of an internal pressure to the shell using a hydraulic system while maintaining a zero axial load. Strain gages placed at selected locations on the specimen monitor the state of strain during the test, and acoustic emission is used to monitor damage onset and progression. The results indicate that the ultimate load is in good agreement with theoretical predictions from the anisotropic shell solution and the engineering thin-walled theory. Acoustic emission provides a correlation with damage initiation and progression. Fracture surface analysis gives an insight into the initiation and the progression of failure.

  16. Finite element based simulation on friction stud welding of metal matrix composites to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is a solid state joining technique used for joining similar and dissimilar materials with high integrity. This new technique is being successfully applied to the aerospace, automobile, and ship building industries, and is attracting more and more research interest. The quality of Friction Stud Welded joints depends on the frictional heat generated at the interface. Hence, thermal analysis on friction stud welding of stainless steel (AISI 304) and aluminium silicon carbide (AlSiC) combination is carried out in the present work. In this study, numerical simulation is carried out using ANSYS software and the temperature profiles are predicted at various increments of time. The developed numerical model is found to be adequate to predict temperature distribution of friction stud weld aluminium silicon carbide/stainless steel joints.

  17. In situ SEM thermal fatigue of Al/graphite metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, G. S.; Rabenberg, L.; Marcus, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    Several thermal fatigue-induced failure mechanisms are deduced for unidirectional graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMCs subjected to in situ thermal cycling. These thermal cycling conditions are representative of MMC service cycles in aerospace environments, where thermal fatigue is primarily associated with changes in the stress states near the interfaces due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between fiber and matrix. This in situ SEM thermal-cycling study clarified such factors affecting MMCs' thermal fatigue as local fiber content and distribution, void volume, fiber stiffness, thermal excursion magnitude, and number of thermal cycles. MMC microfailure modes in thermal fatigue have been deduced.

  18. A preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic NDE of metal matrix composite test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.E.; Lerch, B.A.

    1991-05-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of tensile specimens composed of 8 laminated layers of continuous, SiC fiber reinforced Ti{sup -15}- matrix. The following subject areas are covered: AU signal analysis; tensile behavior; AU and interrupted tensile tests; AU and thermally cycled specimens; AU and stiffness; and AU and specimen geometry.

  19. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Kiggans, Jim; Cai, Zhonghou; Shin, Dongwon; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels was examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was least substantial while PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  20. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  1. Writing Composition Activities to Enhance Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Janet T.

    A program of written composition based on reading comprehension can help students gain greater in-depth understanding of reading materials. Once the reading comprehension skill has been clearly defined for the class, the writing activity can provide clarification by allowing for analysis of the definition through written manipulation of language.…

  2. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  3. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  4. Methodologies for the thermomechanical characterization of continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites: A review of test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.

    1994-05-01

    Requirements for thermomechanical characterization of ceramic matrix composite materials are reviewed. Feasibility of adapting existent room temperature test methods for polymer and metal matrix composites to test ceramic matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures is investigated.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  6. [Oregano: properties, composition and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Arcila-Lozano, Cynthia Cristina; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Lecona-Uribe, Salvador; González de Mejía, Elvira

    2004-03-01

    The oregano spice includes various plant species. The most common are the genus Origanum, native of Europe, and the Lippia, native of Mexico. Among the species of Origanum. their most important components are the limonene, gamma-cariofilene, rho-cymenene, canfor, linalol, alpha-pinene, carvacrol and thymol. In the genus Lippia, the same compounds can be found. The oregano composition depends on the specie, climate, altitude, time of recollection and the stage of growth. Some of the properties of this plant's extracts are being currently studied due to the growing interest for substituting synthetic additives commonly found in foods. Oregano has a good antioxidant capacity and also presents antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, among others. These are all characteristics of interest for the food industry because they may enhance the safety and stability of foods. There are also some reports regarding the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effect of oregano; representing an alternative for the potential treatment and/or prevention of certain chronic ailments, like cancer. PMID:15332363

  7. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  8. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  10. ACT/ICAPS: Thermoplastic composite activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, M. P.; Burpo, S. J.; Roundy, L. M.; Todd, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) is teamed with Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) under NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) initiative in a program entitled Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). Efforts at MCAIR have focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. Based on innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldline concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consideration, single diaphragm co-consolidation (SDCC), and roll-forming.

  11. Composite materials flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete E.; Dursch, Harry W.; Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    Organic composite test specimens were flown on several LDEF experiments. Both bare and coated composites were flown. Atomic oxygen eroded bare composite material, with the resins being recessed at a greater rate than the fibers. Selected coating techniques protected the composite substrate in each case. Tensile and optical properties are reported for numerous specimens. Fiberglass and metal matrix composites were also flown.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  13. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  14. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  15. Emission spectrometric arcing procedure with minimal effect of chemical form of sample. [performed on refractory metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Matrix effects related to the chemical form of analyzed materials were studied. An arc in argon was used which was buffered with silver chloride. The effect of chemical form was minimal for a variety of metals, oxides, and carbides representing the most refractory compounds and thermally stable metal-containing molecules. Only four of the most refractory materials known showed significant emission depressions due to incomplete volatilization in the arc system. These results are discussed in terms of vapor pressures of the solid materials placed on the anodes and dissociation reactions of the molecules in the gaseous environment.

  16. Precursor composites for oxygen dispersion hardened silver sheathed superconductor composites

    DOEpatents

    Podtburg, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    An oxide superconductor composite having improved texture and durability. The oxide superconductor composite includes an oxide superconductor phase substantially surrounded with/by a noble metal matrix, the noble metal matrix comprising a metal oxide in an amount effective to form metal oxide domains that increase hardness of the composite. The composite is characterized by a degree of texture at least 10% greater than a comparable oxide superconductor composite lacking metal oxide domains. An oxide superconducting composite may be prepared by oxidizing the precursor composite under conditions effective to form solute metal oxide domains within the silver matrix and to form a precursor oxide in the precursor alloy phase; subjecting the oxidized composite to a softening anneal under conditions effective to relieve stress within the noble metal phase; and converting the oxide precursor into an oxide superconductor.

  17. Precursor composites for oxygen dispersion hardened silver sheathed superconductor composites

    DOEpatents

    Podtburg, E.R.

    1999-06-22

    An oxide superconductor composite having improved texture and durability is disclosed. The oxide superconductor composite includes an oxide superconductor phase substantially surrounded with/by a noble metal matrix, the noble metal matrix comprising a metal oxide in an amount effective to form metal oxide domains that increase hardness of the composite. The composite is characterized by a degree of texture at least 10% greater than a comparable oxide superconductor composite lacking metal oxide domains. An oxide superconducting composite may be prepared by oxidizing the precursor composite under conditions effective to form solute metal oxide domains within the silver matrix and to form a precursor oxide in the precursor alloy phase; subjecting the oxidized composite to a softening anneal under conditions effective to relieve stress within the noble metal phase; and converting the oxide precursor into an oxide superconductor. 1 fig.

  18. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  19. Factors affecting miniature Izod impact strength of tungsten-fiber-metal-matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The miniature Izod and Charpy impact strengths of copper, copper-nickel, and nickel-base superalloy uniaxially reinforced with continuous tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases, impact strength was increased by increasing fiber or matrix toughness, decreasing fibermatrix reaction, increasing test temperature, hot working, or heat treating. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber content or matrix toughness. An equation relating impact strength to fiber and matrix properties and fiber content was developed. Program results imply that tungsten alloy-fiber/superalloy matrix composites can be made with adequate impact resistance for turbine blade or vane applications.

  20. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  1. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  2. EDM machinability of SiCw/Al composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramulu, M.; Taya, M.

    1989-01-01

    Machinability of high temperature composites was investigated. Target materials, 15 and 25 vol pct SiC whisker-2124 aluminum composites, were machined by electrodischarge sinker machining and diamond saw. The machined surfaces of these metal matrix composites were examined by SEM and profilometry to determine the surface finish. Microhardness measurements were also performed on the as-machined composites.

  3. Effect of physical activity on body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzi, I; Ellis, K J; Aloia, J; Cohn, S H

    1980-01-01

    It has been noted that the deleterious effects on bone calcium of prolonged periods of inactivity, such as bed rest, are halted following resumption of activity. It would seem possible in light of the observations that have been made, that exercise may stimulate bone formation and perhaps counter, to some extent, bone loss as observed in the osteoporosis of aging. The present study was designed to determine the relation between total body calcium, total body potassium and bone mineral content of the radius to the degree of physical activity in a population of normal subjects. Measurement of the calcium was made by in-vivo total body neutron activation analysis. Bone mineral content of the radius and total body potassium, (an index of lean body mass) were measured by photon absorptiometry and the whole body counter, respectively.

  4. Forming strengthening nanoparticles in the metal matrix of plasma deposited powder alloys coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alontseva, D. L.; Prokhorenkova, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the generalized results of investigation of the structure-phase compositions of thick coatings on the base of Ni and Co deposited by plasma-jet on steel substrates. Research methodology included transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis, X-ray structure phase analysis, mechanical testing. The phase structures and morphology of precipitation of strengthening nanoparticles from solid solution are defined; factor k is defined in the Hall-Petch equation for the coating materials; the coating structure model was developed. It was found that the exposure to plasma jet during the coating deposition leads to the evolution of the structural-phase state and to substantial improvement of microhardness of modified surfaces. The reason of doing this research is the necessity of the study of the structural and phase structure of these coatings and understanding what phase changes exactly are desirable in order to improve the structural behavior of the coatings at modifying treatment. Based on the experimental study, we plan to develop a scheme of the coating structure for the further use it in modeling processes taking place during additional irradiation treatment, and eventually to give evidence-based recommendations on the selection of modes of further processing.

  5. Applications of magnetically active fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Philip

    2005-05-01

    As the application of fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRP) becomes more widespread there is a desire to add functionality beyond that of simple mechanical properties in order to facilitate the development of 'smart' materials. For example, the functionality being discussed in this paper is the imparting of significant magnetic properties to a FRP. This can take the form of soft magnetic performance for use in electrical machines or hard magnetic performance for novel forms of sensing or power generation. It has been demonstrated that by using hollow glass fibres as a reinforcement, magnetic material can be introduced into these fibres without significant effects on the structural behaviour of the FRP. The current studies have included the assessment of such a magnetic FRP in a variety of applications. The addition of hard magnetic materials, e.g. magnetite and barium ferrite, has been achieved through the use of nanopowders and the resulting FRP has been assessed for morphing structures applications. The magnitude of magnetic performance that can be currently achieved is controlled by the availability of suitable magnetic materials in fine powder form and the volume of magnetic material which can be incorporated within the fibres.

  6. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  7. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  8. Composites applications - The future is now

    SciTech Connect

    Drozda, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The present volume on the development status of advanced composites discusses resin-, ceramic- and metal-matrix composites, as well as tooling practices, testing and inspection methods, and novel applications. Attention is given to interface considerations in ceramic-matrix composites, applications of metal-matrix composites to military aircraft, advanced thermoplastic preforms, tooling for filament-winding processes, trapped-rubber molding methods, pultrusion for automotive applications, and composite-production tooling using CAD/CAM. Also discussed are expert systems for composites inspection and repair, acoustographic high-speed NDE for composites, the design and production of a composite landing gear-retracting beam, braided composite structures, and the uses of composites in orthopedics.

  9. Sedentary Activity and Body Composition of Middle School Girls: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Charlotte; Webber, Larry S.; Baggett, Chris D.; Ward, Dianne; Pate, Russell R.; Murray, David; Lohman, Timothy; Lytle, Leslie; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between sedentary activity and body composition in 1,458 sixth-grade girls from 36 middle schools across the United States. Multivariate associations between sedentary activity and body composition were examined with regression analyses using general linear mixed models. Mean age, body mass index, and…

  10. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  11. High Performance Composites. "Designed" Materials for the New Millennium. 2nd Module in a Series on Advanced Materials. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James A.

    1994-01-01

    This learning module on composites such as polymer matrix, metal matrix, ceramic matrix, particulate, and laminar includes a design brief giving context, objectives, evaluation, student outcomes, and quiz. (SK)

  12. Deformation Mechanisms in NiTi-Al Composites Fabricated by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2015-09-01

    Thermally active NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers can be used to tune or tailor the effective coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a metallic matrix composite. In this paper, a novel NiTi-Al composite is fabricated using ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM). A combined experimental-simulation approach is used to develop and validate a microstructurally based finite element model of the composite. The simulations are able to closely reproduce the macroscopic strain versus temperature cyclic response, including initial transient effects in the first cycle. They also show that the composite CTE is minimized if the austenite texture in the SMA wires is <001>B2, that a fiber aspect ratio >10 maximizes fiber efficiency, and that the UAM process may reduce hysteresis in embedded SMA wires.

  13. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  14. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-10-04

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  15. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicycle compound and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2015-06-16

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  16. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  17. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-08-02

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  18. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Matthew; Xu, Feng; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-07-19

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  19. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  20. Piezoelectric ceramic fibers for active fiber composites: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Elsener, Hans-Rudolf

    2003-08-01

    The morphology and the free strain performances of three different piezoelectric ceramic fibers used for the manufacture of active fiber composites (AFCs) have been investigated. The morphology of the fibers has a direct influence on the manufacture of the AFCs. Fibers with non-uniform diameters are more difficult to contact with the interdigitated electrodes and can be the cause of irreparable damages in AFCs. An indirect method requiring the use of a simple analytical model is proposed to evaluate the free strain of active fiber composites. This indirect method presents a relatively good agreement with direct free strain measurements performed with strain gages glued on both sides of an AFC. The results show a systematic difference of ca. 20 % between the indirect and the direct methods. However, the indirect method did not permit to see differences of piezoelectric performance between the types of fibers.

  1. Phospholipid composition and phospholipase A activity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Senff, L M; Wegener, W S; Brooks, G F; Finnerty, W R; Makula, R A

    1976-01-01

    Exponential-phase cells of Neisseria gonorrhaeae 2686 were examined for phospholipid composition and for membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. When cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and lyophilized before extraction, approximately 74% of the total phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine, 18% was phosphatidylglycerol, 2% was cardiolipin, and 10% was lysophosphatidylethanolamine. However, when cells still suspended in growth medium were extracted, the amount of lysophosphatidylethanolamine decreased to approximately 1% of the phospholipid composition. This suggests that a gonococcal phospholipase A may be activated by conditions encountered during centrifugation and/or lyophilization of cells preceding extraction. Phospholipase A activity associated with cell membranes was assayed by measuring the conversion of tritiated phosphatidylethanolamine to lysophosphatidylethanolamine. Optimal activity was demonstrated in 10% methanol at pH 8.0 to 8.5, in the presence of calcium ions. The activity was both detergent sensitive and thermolabile. Comparisons of gonococcal colony types 1 and 4 showed no significant differences between the two types with respect to either phospholipid content or phospholipase A activity. Images PMID:821921

  2. Phospholipid composition and phospholipase A activity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Senff, L M; Wegener, W S; Brooks, G F; Finnerty, W R; Makula, R A

    1976-08-01

    Exponential-phase cells of Neisseria gonorrhaeae 2686 were examined for phospholipid composition and for membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. When cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and lyophilized before extraction, approximately 74% of the total phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine, 18% was phosphatidylglycerol, 2% was cardiolipin, and 10% was lysophosphatidylethanolamine. However, when cells still suspended in growth medium were extracted, the amount of lysophosphatidylethanolamine decreased to approximately 1% of the phospholipid composition. This suggests that a gonococcal phospholipase A may be activated by conditions encountered during centrifugation and/or lyophilization of cells preceding extraction. Phospholipase A activity associated with cell membranes was assayed by measuring the conversion of tritiated phosphatidylethanolamine to lysophosphatidylethanolamine. Optimal activity was demonstrated in 10% methanol at pH 8.0 to 8.5, in the presence of calcium ions. The activity was both detergent sensitive and thermolabile. Comparisons of gonococcal colony types 1 and 4 showed no significant differences between the two types with respect to either phospholipid content or phospholipase A activity.

  3. Development of active and sensitive material systems based on composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes new concepts proposed by the author to realize active and sensitive structural material systems. Two examples of multifunctional composites were fabricated and evaluated in this study as follows: (1) An active laminate of aluminum plate (works as muscle), epoxy film (as insulator), unidirectional CFRP prepreg (as bone and blood vessel) and copper foil electrode (to apply voltage on CFRP) was made with an embedded optical fiber multiply fractured in the CFRP layer (works as nerve), of which curvature change could be effectively monitored with the fractured optical fiber. (2) A stainless steel fiber/aluminum active composite with embedded Ti oxide/Ti composite fiber was fabricated. The Ti oxide/Ti fiber could work as a sensor for temperature by removing a part of the oxide before embedment to make a metallic contact between the embedded titanium fiber and aluminum matrix to be able to generate thermal electromotive force, and also could work as a sensor for strain and as a heater for actuation. In the both cases, the outputs from their embedded sensors can be used to control their actuations.

  4. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  5. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  6. Essential Oil Composition and Antigermination Activity of Artemisia dracunculus (Tarragon).

    PubMed

    Fraternale, Daniele; Flamini, Guido; Ricci, Donata

    2015-08-01

    The chemical composition of an Italian oil of tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) was analyzed by GC/EIMS. The major compound of the oil was estragole (73.3%), followed by limonene (5.4%), (E)-β-ocimene (5.3%), β-pinene (3.4%) and (Z)-β-ocimene (3.0%). The essential oil was tested "in vitro" for its antigermination activity against Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L, Papaver rhoeas L. and Avena fatua L. seeds and demonstrating a good inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent way. PMID:26434144

  7. Essential Oil Composition and Antigermination Activity of Artemisia dracunculus (Tarragon).

    PubMed

    Fraternale, Daniele; Flamini, Guido; Ricci, Donata

    2015-08-01

    The chemical composition of an Italian oil of tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) was analyzed by GC/EIMS. The major compound of the oil was estragole (73.3%), followed by limonene (5.4%), (E)-β-ocimene (5.3%), β-pinene (3.4%) and (Z)-β-ocimene (3.0%). The essential oil was tested "in vitro" for its antigermination activity against Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L, Papaver rhoeas L. and Avena fatua L. seeds and demonstrating a good inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent way.

  8. Carotenoid composition and in vitro pharmacological activity of rose hips.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Radó-Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Kawase, Masami; Satoh, Kazue; Tanaka, Toru; Tani, Satoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Gyémánt, Nóra; Molnár, József

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare carotenoid extracts of Rose hips (Rosa canina L.) with regard to their phytochemical profiles and their in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), cytotoxic, multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal and radical scavenging activity. Carotenoid composition was investigated in the different fractionation of rose hips, using extraction methods. Six main carotenoids - epimers of neochrome, lutein, zeaxanthin, rubixanthin, lycopene, β,β-carotene - were identified from Rose hips by their chromatographic behavior and UV-visible spectra, which is in accordance with other studies on carotenoids in this plant material. The active principles in the carotenoid extract might differ, depending upon the extraction procedures.

  9. Neutron apparatus for measuring strain in composites

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Faber, Jr., John F.; Singh, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for orienting a pulsed neutron source and a multi-angle diffractometer toward a sample of a ceramic-matrix or metal-matrix composite so that the measurement of internal strain (from which stress is calculated) is reduced to uncomplicated time-of-flight measurements.

  10. Materials Research Society Proceedings: Interfaces in Composites, volume 170

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlo G.; Chen, Eric J. H.

    1990-11-01

    Reports on the following topics are presented: (1) micromechanics of interfaces; (2) characterization of interfaces; (3) interface reactions in ceramic and metal systems; (4) interface effects in ceramic and metal matrix composites; and (5) interface effects in polymer matrix composites. A list of the materials research society symposium proceedings is also presented.

  11. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  12. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  13. Geometric Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Active Fibre Composite Bimorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernaghan, Robert

    Active fibre composite-actuated bimorphic actuators were studied in order to measure deflection performance. The deflection of the actuators was a function of the actuating electric potential applied to the active material as well as the magnitude of the axial preload applied to the bimorphic structure. This problem required the use of geometric nonlinear modeling techniques. Geometric nonlinear finite element analysis was undertaken to determine the deflection performance of Macro Fibre Composite (MFC)- and Hollow Active Fibre (HAFC)-actuated bimorphic structures. A physical prototype MFC-actuated bimorphic structure was manufactured in order to verify the results obtained by the finite element analysis. Theses analyses determined that the bimorphic actuators were capable of significant deflection. The analyses determined that the axial preload of the bimorphic actuators significantly amplified the deflection performance of the bimorphic actuators. The deflection performance of the bimorphic actuators suggest that they could be candidates to act as actuators for the morphing wing of a micro unmanned air vehicle.

  14. Flaxseed hull: Chemical composition and antioxidant activity during development.

    PubMed

    Herchi, Wahid; Al Hujaili, Abdullah D; Sakouhi, Faouzi; Sebei, Khaled; Trabelsi, Hajer; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of flaxseed hull during maturation were investigated. P129 hull variety was studied at four maturation stages (St1, St2, St3, and St4). Significant variation in proximate composition and flaxseed hull oil characteristics were observed. A significant increase in the carbohydrates content of the hull was observed during development. The main methyl esters were linolenic acid (48.95 - 51.52 %), oleic acid (20.27-23.41%) and linoleic acid (15.62-17.70%). The highest polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were found to be 67.14 % at the first stage of maturity (St1). Flaxseed hull oil was of good quality, containing an abundance of omega-3 essential fatty acids. The iodine value increased, while the saponification value of oil decreased during seed development. The decrease in ascorbic acid content was steady. The maximum level of total phenolic acid content (128.3 mg/100 g oil) was reached at 7 DAF. The antioxidant activity of oilseed was assessed by means of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay. Radical scavenging activity for green hull was 52.74% and mature hull was 69.32%. PMID:24919478

  15. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  16. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  17. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  18. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  19. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  20. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Soro, Aurea; Guillen-Navarro, Miriam; Mira, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15) and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12) were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci detected confirms that they

  1. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Maria R; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir's exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir's microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  2. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  3. Dispersants having antioxidant activity and lubricating compositions containing them

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.; Hill, G. A.

    1981-02-03

    Lubricating oil additives having both dispersant and antioxidant activity, particularly useful for incorporation in two-stroke petrol engine lubricating oil compositions, are produced when a dispersant having free >n-h groups, E.G., a substituted succinimide, is reacted with an aldehyde and a compound having antioxidant activity containing in its molecular structure a group or groups capable of condensing with the aldehyde and >n-h groups present in the dispersant, thereby chemically bonding the compound to the dispersant. Representative antioxidants are mononuclear and polynuclear substituted phenols having at least one unsubstituted ortho- or para-position, E.G. 2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and secondary aromatic amines. Typical reaction conditions are a temperature in the range 100* to 175/sup 0/C, and atmospheric pressure.

  4. Composition of Satureja kitaibelii essential oil and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Kundaković, Tatjana; Milenković, Marina; Zlatković, Sasa; Kovacević, Nada; Goran, Nikolić

    2011-09-01

    The composition of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Satureja kitaibelii from Rtanj mountain (Serbia), collected during three years, was studied. Thirty-nine components were identified in each sample of S. kitaibelii essential oil, representing about 87% of the oils. p-Cymene was the most dominant compound in all three oils (27.9%, 14.7% and 24.4%, respectively). The simple formulation of a lozenge with 0.2% of S. kitaibelii essential oil was prepared and the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and the lozenge with essential oil was tested using a broth microdilution assay. Both essential oil and lozenge possessed strong antimicrobial activity with MIC values of 0.10-25 microg/mL, and 0.97-15.6 mg/mL, respectively. PMID:21941914

  5. Recent advances in active fiber composites for structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bent, Aaron A.; Pizzochero, Alessandro E.

    2000-06-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFCs) provide a novel method for large scale actuation and sensing in active structures. The composite comprises unidirectionally aligned piezoelectric fibers, a resin matrix system, and interdigital electrode. AFCs have demonstrated distinct advantages over current monolithic piezoceramic actuators, including: higher planar actuation strain, tailorable orthotropic actuation, robustness to damage, conformability to curved surfaces, and potential for large area distributed actuation/sensing system. This manuscript focuses on recent developments in three key areas. The first area describes the completion of a standard AFC baseline material. The baseline AFC consists of 5.5mil diameter PZT-5A fibers laminated with an epoxy film adhesive and silver screen-printed electrodes. A scalable fabrication process based on lamination industry equipment has been implemented. Baseline AFC performance has been characterized, including free strains and blocked force. The send area describes continued work in developing optimized geometry/materials for future AFCs. AFC performance and efficiency can be affected significantly by changes in electrode pitch and fiber diameter and/or cross- sectional geometry. Various improved design have been identified. Third is review of application demonstration that exploit the benefits of AFCs to solve structural control problems.

  6. Microstructure and Tensile Behaviour of B4C Reinforced ZA43 Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adaveesh, B.; Halesh, G. M.; Nagaral, Madeva; Mohan Kumar, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The work is carried out to investigate and study the mechanical properties of B4C reinforced ZA43 alloy metal matrix composites. In the present work ZA43 alloy is taken as the base matrix and B4C particulates as reinforcement material to prepare metal matrix composites by stir casting method. For metal matrix composites the reinforcement material was varied from 0 to 6 wt.% in steps of 3 wt.%. For each composite, the reinforcement particulates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C and dispersed into a vortex of molten ZA43 alloy. The microstructural characterization was done using scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties like hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were evaluated as per ASTM standards. Further, scanning electron microphotographs revealed that there was uniform distribution of B4C particulates in ZA43 alloy matrix. Hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength increased as wt.% of B4C increased in the base matrix.

  7. [Composition and content of biologically active substances in rose hips].

    PubMed

    Dubtsova, G N; Negmatulloeva, R N; Bessonov, V V; Baĭkov, V G; Sheviakova, L V; Makhova, N N; Perederiaev, O I; Bogachuk, M N; Baĭgarin, E K

    2012-01-01

    The paper studies the chemical composition of the powders obtained from the pulp with the skins and seeds of fruits of wild rose hips. Research results have shown that the main fraction of the powder is dietary fiber, powder of seeds of insoluble fiber in 1,6 and 2,3 higher than in the powder of the fruit with a thin skin and pulp, respectively. The greatest amount of carbohydrates and protein found in powders and pulp of the fruit with a thin skin, and lipids predominate in the powder from the seeds. Found that the lipid powder rosehip richest in oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids, the share of oleic acid has 6,4-19,2%, linoleic and linolenic 19,7-45,8 and 23,3-33,9% of the amount of fatty acids. Lipids powders of hips and seeds of rose have higher levels of essential linoleic acid and powder from the pulp with the skins - linolenic acid. In the study established the presence of sterols 7 fractions, the predominant of which is the beta-sitosterol. In the powder from the pulp with the skins found the greatest amount of ascorbic acid, carotenoids, and the powder of seeds - vitamin E. Carotenoids in powders are beta-carotene and lycopene. The high content of ascorbic acid, vitamin E and carotenoids in powder from wild rose hips makes them a good source of antioxidants. Therefore, we studied the possibility of using vegetable powders obtained from hips of wild rose, to enrich biologically active substances such as vitamins C, E and carotenoids, food supply, particularly of health care use. Rosehip powder from the pulp with the skins had the highest antioxidant activity, antioxidant activity of hips powders was 74% of the activity of powder from the pulp with the skins, the lowest antioxidant activity was observed in the powder from the wild rose seeds. That's way, based on the analysis of the chemical composition of rose hip powder found high levels they ascorbic acid, carotenoids, flavonoids,found their high antioxidant activity. It allows to recommend powders

  8. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  9. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  10. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    PubMed Central

    Pérez González, Cuauhtemoc; Serrano Vega, Roberto; González-Chávez, Marco; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  12. Composition and antibacterial activity of Abies balsamea essential oil.

    PubMed

    Pichette, André; Larouche, Pierre-Luc; Lebrun, Maxime; Legault, Jean

    2006-05-01

    The antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Abies balsamea (balsam fir) was evaluated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The essential oil of A. balsamea was found to be inactive against E. coli (>100 microg/mL) and active against S. aureus, with an MIC of 56 microg/mL. The oil composition was analysed by GC-MS and the antibacterial activity of each oil constituent was determined. The essential oil of A. balsamea is essentially constituted of monoterpenes (>96%) and some sesquiterpenes. beta-pinene (29.9%), delta-3-carene (19.6%) and alpha-pinene (14.6%) were the major components. beta-pinene and delta-3-carene were found inactive against both bacteria strains. However, three constituents of the essential oil were active against S. aureus: alpha-pinene, beta-caryophyllene (0.4%) and alpha-humulene (0.2%) with MIC values of 13.6 microg/mL, 5.1 microg/mL and 2.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:16619365

  13. Biological Activities and Composition of Ferulago carduchorum Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Golfakhrabadi, Fereshteh; Khanavi, Mahnaz; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Vatandoost, Hassan; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Hafizi, Mitra; Yousefbeyk, Fatemeh; Rad, Yaghoob Razzaghi; Baghenegadian, Ameneh; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ferulago carduchorum Boiss and Hausskn belongs to the Apiaceae family. This plant grows in west part of Iran that local people added it to dairy and oil ghee to delay expiration date and give them a pleasant taste. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, acetyl cholinesterase inhibition, cytotoxic, larvicidal activities and composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum. Methods: Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory, larvicidal activities and chemical composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum were investigated. Besides, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of essential oil were tested using DPPH, microdilution method and MTT assay, respectively. Results: The major components of essential oil were (z)-β-ocimene (43.3%), α-pinene (18.23%) and bornyl acetate (3.98%). Among 43 identified components, monoterpenes were the most compounds (84.63%). The essential oil had noticeable efficiency against Candida albicans (MIC= 2340 μg ml−1) and it was effective against Anopheles stephensi with LC50 and LC90 values of 12.78 and 47.43 ppm, respectively. The essential oil could inhibit AChE (IC50= 23.6 μl ml−1). The essential oil showed high cytotoxicity on T47D, HEP-G2 and HT-29 cell lines (IC50< 2 μg ml−1). Conclusion: The essential oil of F. carduchorum collected from west of Iran had anti-Candida, larvicidal and cytotoxicity effects and should be further investigated in others in vitro and in vivo experimental models. PMID:26114148

  14. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  16. Relation between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and antihypertensive activity for six essential oils.

    PubMed

    Yvon, Yan; Raoelison, Emmanuel Guy; Razafindrazaka, René; Randriantsoa, Adolphe; Romdhane, Mehrez; Chabir, Naziha; Mkaddem, Mounira Guedri; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2012-08-01

    Six essential oils (EOs), Juniperus phoenicea (leaves and berries), Thymus capitatus, Lauris nobilis, Melaleuca armillaris, and Eucalyptus gracilis, were screened for their antioxidant and antihypertensive activity as well as their chemical compositions. We identified and quantified 24 compounds (representing 99.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea leaves, 14 compounds (representing 98.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea berries, 11 compounds (representing 99.6% of total oil) for T. capitatus, 32 compounds (representing 98.9% of total oil) for L. nobilis, 32 compounds (representing 98.7% of total oil) for M. armillaris, and 26 compounds (representing 99.3% of total oil) for E. gracilis. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, the antioxidant activity was in the range of 0.59 to 2183.6 mg/L, whereas T. capitatus (1.24 ± 0.05 mg/L) gave the best activity in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate assay. Antihypertensive activity was evaluated by testing the vasorelaxing capacity of EOs on rat aorta precontracted by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). T. capitatus and L. nobilis were most active for an antihypertensive activity (29 ± 3 and 59 ± 2 mg/L, respectively). Correlations between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and/or antihypertensive activity were studied. Significant correlation has been found for antihypertensive activity and p-cymene (R(2) = 0.86), β-elemene (R(2) = 0.90), and β-myrcene (R(2) = 0.76). A good correlation has been found between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity by DPPH assay (R(2) = 0.98). Antioxidant activity can contribute to the prevention of the increase of the blood pressure. According to the literature, no study has been reported until now of correlation between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity. Natural EOs can find its interest and application in a medicinal area. PMID:22860587

  17. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Le; Lu, Qingqing; Fei, Fan; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-12-01

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology.

  18. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  19. Study of composites as substrate materials in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    Nonmetallic composites such as the graphite/epoxy system were investigated as possible substrates for the primary mirror of the large space telescope. The possible use of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites was reviewed in the literature. Problems arising out of the use of composites as substrate materials such as grinding, polishing, adherence of reflective coatings, rigidity of substrate, hygrospcopici tendency of the composites, thermal and temporal stability and other related problems were examined.

  20. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  2. Composition and antioxidant activity of Trigona carbonaria honey from Australia.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Livia Persano; Heard, Tim A; Rodríguez-Malaver, Antonio; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Fernández-Muiño, Miguel; Sancho, María Teresa; Sesta, Giulio; Lusco, Lorenzo; Vit, Patricia

    2008-12-01

    Stingless bees (Tribe Meliponini) are a diverse group of highly eusocial bees distributed throughout the tropics and subtropics. Trigona carbonaria honey, from Australia, was characterized by traditional physicochemical parameters (acidity, sugars, diastase, electrical conductivity, hydroxymethylfurfural, invertase, nitrogen, and water content) and other compositional factors (flavonoids, polyphenols, organic acids, and water activity), as well as total antioxidant capacity and radical scavenging activity. For the Australian T. carbonaria, the traditional analytical parameters were similar to those previously reported for neotropical stingless bee honey and confirm that honeys produced by Meliponini bees possess several physicochemical properties that are distinctly different from Apis mellifera honey, with higher values of moisture (26.5 +/- 0.8 g of water/100 g of honey), water activity (0.74 +/- 0.01), electrical conductivity (1.64 +/- 0.12 mS/cm), and free acidity (124.2 +/- 22.9 mEq/kg of honey) and a very low diastase activity (0.4 +/- 0.5 diastase number) and invertase activity (5.7 +/- 1.5 invertase number). The sugar spectrum was quite different from that of A. mellifera honey, with 20.3 +/- 2.9 g of maltose/100 g of honey. The values of pH (4.0 +/- 0.1), lactonic acidity (4.7 +/- 0.8 mEq/kg of honey), sucrose (1.8 +/- 0.4 g/100 g of honey), and fructose/glucose ratio (1.42 +/- 0.13) fell in the same ranges as those of A. mellifera honey. Citric (0.23 +/- 0.09) and malic (0.12 +/- 0.03) acid concentrations (in g/kg of honey) of T. carbonaria honeys were in the range described for A. mellifera honey. D-Gluconic was more concentrated (9.9 +/- 1.3 g/kg of honey), in the range of Italian Castanea, Thymus, Arbutus, and honeydew honeys. Flavonoid content was 10.02 +/- 1.59 mg of quercetin equivalents/100 g of honey, and polyphenol contents were 55.74 +/- 6.11 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g of honey. The antioxidant activity, expressed as percentage of 2

  3. Composition and antioxidant activity of Trigona carbonaria honey from Australia.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Livia Persano; Heard, Tim A; Rodríguez-Malaver, Antonio; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Fernández-Muiño, Miguel; Sancho, María Teresa; Sesta, Giulio; Lusco, Lorenzo; Vit, Patricia

    2008-12-01

    Stingless bees (Tribe Meliponini) are a diverse group of highly eusocial bees distributed throughout the tropics and subtropics. Trigona carbonaria honey, from Australia, was characterized by traditional physicochemical parameters (acidity, sugars, diastase, electrical conductivity, hydroxymethylfurfural, invertase, nitrogen, and water content) and other compositional factors (flavonoids, polyphenols, organic acids, and water activity), as well as total antioxidant capacity and radical scavenging activity. For the Australian T. carbonaria, the traditional analytical parameters were similar to those previously reported for neotropical stingless bee honey and confirm that honeys produced by Meliponini bees possess several physicochemical properties that are distinctly different from Apis mellifera honey, with higher values of moisture (26.5 +/- 0.8 g of water/100 g of honey), water activity (0.74 +/- 0.01), electrical conductivity (1.64 +/- 0.12 mS/cm), and free acidity (124.2 +/- 22.9 mEq/kg of honey) and a very low diastase activity (0.4 +/- 0.5 diastase number) and invertase activity (5.7 +/- 1.5 invertase number). The sugar spectrum was quite different from that of A. mellifera honey, with 20.3 +/- 2.9 g of maltose/100 g of honey. The values of pH (4.0 +/- 0.1), lactonic acidity (4.7 +/- 0.8 mEq/kg of honey), sucrose (1.8 +/- 0.4 g/100 g of honey), and fructose/glucose ratio (1.42 +/- 0.13) fell in the same ranges as those of A. mellifera honey. Citric (0.23 +/- 0.09) and malic (0.12 +/- 0.03) acid concentrations (in g/kg of honey) of T. carbonaria honeys were in the range described for A. mellifera honey. D-Gluconic was more concentrated (9.9 +/- 1.3 g/kg of honey), in the range of Italian Castanea, Thymus, Arbutus, and honeydew honeys. Flavonoid content was 10.02 +/- 1.59 mg of quercetin equivalents/100 g of honey, and polyphenol contents were 55.74 +/- 6.11 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g of honey. The antioxidant activity, expressed as percentage of 2

  4. Composition and Antidiarrheal Activity of Bidens odorata Cav.

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Pérez-Gutierrez, Salud; Escobar-Villanueva, M. Carmen; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The antidiarrheal effects of chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Bidens odorata Cav. were investigated at doses of 200 mg/kg on castor-oil-induced diarrhea. The chloroform extract of B. odorata (CBO) reduced diarrhea by 72.72%. The effect of CBO was evaluated on mice with diarrhea induced by castor oil, MgSO4, arachidonic acid, or prostaglandin E2. CBO inhibited the contraction induced by carbachol chloride on ileum (100 µg/mL) and intestinal transit (200 mg/kg) in Wistar rats. The active fraction of CBO (F4) at doses of 100 mg/kg inhibited the diarrhea induced by castor oil (90.1%) or arachidonic acid (72.9%) but did not inhibit the diarrhea induced by PGE2. The active fraction of F4 (FR5) only was tested on diarrhea induced with castor oil and inhibited this diarrhea by 92.1%. The compositions of F4 and FR5 were determined by GC-MS, and oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids were found. F4 and a mixture of the four fatty acids inhibited diarrhea at doses of 100 mg/kg (90.1% and 70.6%, resp.). The results of this study show that B. odorata has antidiarrheal effects, as is claimed by folk medicine, and could possibly be used for the production of a phytomedicine. PMID:24282432

  5. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalovs, A.; Barkanov, E.; Gluhihs, S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  6. Microbial biomass, activity and community composition in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Truu, Marika; Juhanson, Jaanis; Truu, Jaak

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the current article is to give an overview about microbial communities and their functioning but also about factors affecting microbial activity in the three most common types (surface flow and two types of sub-surface flow) of constructed wetlands. The paper reviews the community composition and structural diversity of the microbial biomass, analyzing different aspects of microbial activity with respect to wastewater properties, specific wetland type, and environmental parameters. A brief introduction about the application of different novel molecular techniques for the assessment of microbial communities in constructed wetlands is also given. Microbially mediated processes in constructed wetlands are mainly dependent on hydraulic conditions, wastewater properties, including substrate and nutrient quality and availability, filter material or soil type, plants, and different environmental factors. Microbial biomass is within similar ranges in both horizontal and vertical subsurface flow and surface flow constructed wetlands. Stratification of the biomass but also a stratified structural pattern of the bacterial community can be seen in subsurface flow systems. Microbial biomass C/N ratio is higher in horizontal flow systems compared to vertical flow systems, indicating the structural differences in microbial communities between those two constructed wetland types. The total activity of the microbial community is in the same range, but heterotrophic growth is higher in the subsurface (vertical flow) system compared to the surface flow systems. Available species-specific data about microbial communities in different types of wetlands is scarce and therefore it is impossible make any general conclusions about the dynamics of microbial community structure in wetlands, its relationship to removal processes and operational parameters.

  7. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; Pereira, Paulo Roberto S.; Campos, Leila C.; Borba, Cintia M.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Marcucci, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp), B (B. dracunculifolia) and C (Araucaria spp). Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM) and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl)-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1) and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4) and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN). When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF) and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3), of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2) and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis. PMID:18830454

  8. Investigation of Laser Generation and Detection of Ultrasound in Ceramic Matrix Composites and Intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to assess the feasibility of using laser based ultrasonic techniques for inspecting and characterizing materials of interest to NASA, specifically those used in propulsion and turbomachinery applications, such as ceramic composites, metal matrix composites, and intermetallics.

  9. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  10. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  11. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  12. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  13. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  14. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  15. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Carlyle, J.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-20

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  16. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  17. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  18. Structure and properties of the Al/SiC composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Michurov, N. S.; Bykova, T. M.

    2016-06-01

    Structure has been studied and the distribution of the filler in the samples of the metal-matrix Al/SiC composite containing 50% SiC has been analyzed. The sizes and shapes of the particles of the filler have been determined; the cohesion of the metallic matrix with the filler has been investigated. The analysis of the mechanism of fracture after tensile tests at 350°C and uniaxial compression of the samples of composite at 300 and 600°C has been carried out.

  19. NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle Technologies: A Composite Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Cook, Steve; Effinger, Mike; Smith, Dennis; Swint, Shayne

    1999-01-01

    A materials overview of the NASA's Earth-to-Orbit Space Transportation Program is presented. The topics discussed are: Earth-to-Orbit Goals and Challenges; Space Transportation Program Structure; Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; Space Transportation Derived Requirements; X 34 Demonstrator; Fastrac Engine System; Airframe Systems; Propulsion Systems; Cryotank Structures; Advanced Materials, Fabrication, Manufacturing, & Assembly; Hot and Cooled Airframe Structures; Ceramic Matrix Composites; Ultra-High Temp Polymer Matrix Composites; Metal Matrix Composites; and PMC Lines Ducts and Valves.

  20. Data characterizing flexural properties of Al/Al2O3 syntactic foam core metal matrix sandwich

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohammed Yaseer; Xiang, Chongchen; Gupta, Nikhil; Strbik, Oliver M.; Cho, Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural observations and flexural property datasets are provided for aluminum alloy matrix syntactic foam core sandwich composites. The tests are conducted in three-point bending configuration. The data supplied includes methods used for conducting microscopy and mechanical testing. Raw load–displacement data, which is used to plot stress–strain graphs, obtained during the flexural test is also included. Images from a DSLR camera are stitched together to form a detailed failure sequencing video. Failure of specimens is captured in sequential images using a digital camera. These images are stitched together to develop a video for visualization of failure mechanisms. Calculations are also included for a theoretical model that is used to estimate the flexural properties of the syntactic foam core sandwich. PMID:26958610

  1. Speaking as a Pre-Writing Activity: Its Application to Teaching Community College Freshman Composition Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, George Douglas

    A study conducted to determine if speaking activities facilitated growth in writing involved approximately 60 community college students enrolled in freshman composition. A review of the literature supported the notions that a definite relationship exists between talking and writing, that prewriting activities affect the quality of composition,…

  2. Quantifying the Relationship between Organic Aerosol Composition and Hygroscopicity/CCN Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-06-30

    The overall objective for this project was to provide the data and underlying process level understanding necessary to facilitate the dynamic treatment of organic aerosol CCN activity in future climate models. The specific objectives were as follows: (1) employ novel approaches to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity, (2) evaluate the effects of temperature and relative humidity on organic aerosol CCN activity, and (3) develop parameterizations to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity.

  3. Microstructure and strengthening of Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys and MMCs: I. Analysis and modeling of microstructural changes[Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starink, M.J.; Wang, P.; Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J.

    1999-10-26

    A complete and detailed analysis of the microstructural development during ageing in an 8090 (Al-2.3Li-1.2Cu-1Mg-0.1Zr) alloy, an 8090/20 wt% SiC{sub p} MMC, an Al-1.5Li-Cu-Mg MMC and an Al-Cu-Mg MMC (all with similar Cu and Mg contents) has been performed. Volume fractions of all precipitates relevant for precipitation strengthening of the alloys ({delta}{prime} phase, S{prime} phase and GPB zones) have been determined using a recently derived method based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The volume fractions have subsequently been successfully fitted using a novel model for transformation kinetics. The sizes of these precipitates have been analyzed using newly derived expressions consistent with the latter model. As a result of dislocation generation around misfitting SiC particles the volume fractions of both GPB zones and S{prime} phase depend strongly on the presence of these particles. Also the amount of Li present in the alloys influences the volume fractions of the phases significantly. The sizes of S{prime} are similar for the four alloys.

  4. Predicting galvanic corrosion rates for SiC monofilament/magnesium metal-matrix composites in chloride, sulfate, and nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hihara, L.H.; Kondepudi, P.K.

    1993-12-31

    The galvanic-corrosion behavior of SiC monofilament (MF) coupled to pure Mg and ZE41A Mg alloy was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique in concert with the mixed-potential theory. Local-corrosion penetration rates of pure Mg and ZE41A Mg were approximately equal to 1 cm/y in deaerated and oxygenated 3.15 wt % NaCl, 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and 0.5 M NaNO{sub 3} (with the exception of pure Mg in the NaCl solution where the local-corrosion rate was approximately 6 to 7 cm/y). Galvanic corrosion between Mg and SiC MFs was under cathodic control. Galvanic-corrosion penetration rates varied from 0.046 to 7.3 cm/y depending on whether solutions were oxygenated and whether the cross section or circumferential surface of the SiC MFs was exposed. Generally, there were no strong correlations between galvanic-corrosion rates and type of electrolyte. The effect of NaF on galvanic-corrosion rates between pure Mg and SiC MF (cross section exposed) was investigated to explore the possibility of inhibiting galvanic corrosion. NaF (in a 5-g/L concentration) was very effective in reducing galvanic corrosion rates in deaerated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.5 M NaNO{sub 3}, and modestly effective in oxygenated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.5 M NaNO{sub 3}. NaF was relatively ineffective in 3.15 wt % NaCl.

  5. The effect of TiB2 reinforcement on the mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Li alloy-based metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langan, T. J.; Pickens, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Weldalite 049, an Al-base Cu-Li-Mg-Ag-Zr alloy, achieves 700 MPa tensile strengths in the near-peak-aged temper in virtue of the nucleation of a T(1)-type platelike strengthening precipitate. Attention is presently given to the possibility that the alloy's modulus could be further increased through the addition of high-modulus TiB2 particles, using the 'XD' process, due to TiB2's good wettability with liquid Al. An 8-percent modulus increase is obtained with 4 vol pct TiB2.

  6. Biocompatible novel starch/polyaniline composites: characterization, anti-cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Jyoti Prasad; Banerjee, Somik; Konwar, Bolin Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-11-01

    Starch/polyaniline composites have been synthesized using oxidative polymerization of polyaniline in an aqueous dispersion of starch isolated from Colocasia esculenta corm. Scanning electron micrographs reveals the growth of polyaniline over the surface of the starch granules. DPPH scavenging and haemolysis prevention assay have been performed to estimate the antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity of the composites. Formation of new properties of the composites as compared to starch and poloyaniline was evident from the X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Characterization done using UV-Vis, FTIR and DSC analysis provide evidence of composite formation. Composite possesses antioxidant nature which increases with the concentration of polyaniline. The haemolysis prevention activity of these novel composite materials is found to increase as compared to the pure polyaniline with minor compromise in the antioxidant activity. The materials show tremendous potential for biomedical applications. PMID:20674287

  7. Textural and electronic characteristics of mechanochemically activated composites with nanosilica and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Zaulychnyy, Ya. V.; Ilkiv, B. I.; Zarko, V. I.; Nychiporuk, Yu. M.; Pakhlov, E. M.; Ptushinskii, Yu. G.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.

    2011-11-01

    Nanosilicas (A-50, A-300, A-500)/activated carbon (AC, SBET = 1520 m2/g) composites were prepared using short-term (5 min) mechanochemical activation (MCA) of powder mixtures in a microbreaker. Smaller silica nanoparticles of A-500 (average diameter dav = 5.5 nm) can more easily penetrate into broad mesopores and macropores of AC microparticles than larger nanoparticles of A-50 (dav = 52.4 nm) or A-300 (dav = 8.1 nm). After MCA of silica/AC, nanopores of non-broken AC nanoparticles remained accessible for adsorbed N2 molecules. According to ultra-soft X-ray emission spectra (USXES), MCA of silica/AC caused formation of chemical bonds Si-O-C; however, Si-C and Si-Si bonds were practically not formed. A decrease in intensity of OKα band in respect to CKα band of silica/AC composites with diminishing sizes of silica nanoparticles is due to both changes in the surface structure of particles and penetration of a greater number of silica nanoparticles into broad pores of AC microparticles and restriction of penetration depth of exciting electron beam into the AC particles.

  8. Perhydrolase-nanotube paint composites with sporicidal and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Navdeep; Douaisi, Marc P; Borkar, Indrakant V; Lee, Lillian; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Kane, Ravi S; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2013-10-01

    AcT (perhydrolase) containing paint composites were prepared leading to broad-spectrum decontamination. AcT was immobilized onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and then incorporated into latex-based paints to form catalytic coatings. These AcT-based paint composites showed a 6-log reduction in the viability of spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) within 60 min. The paint composites also showed >4-log reduction in the titer of influenza virus (X-31) within 10 min (initially challenged with 10(7) PFU/mL). AcT-based paint composites were also tested using various perhydrolase acyl donor substrates, including propylene glycol diacetate (PGD), glyceryl triacetate, and ethyl acetate, with PGD observed to be the best among the substrates tested for generation of peracetic acid and killing of bacillus spores. The operational stability of paint composites was also studied at different relative humidities and temperatures to simulate real-life operation.

  9. Studies on parametric optimization for abrasive water jet machining of Al7075-TiB2 in-situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavya, J. T.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on optimization and determination of significant process parameter for Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Al7075-TiB2metal matrix composite. Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite is synthesized by stir casting using in-situ technique. Optimization of machining parameters is done using Taguchi's L25orthogonal array for the experimental trials, with cutting speed, stand-off distance and Abrasive Flow rate as input parameters at five different levels. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) method is used for identifying the effect of machining parameters on volumetric material removal rate, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. Then the results are validated by conducting verification experiments.

  10. Constituent composition and biological activity of Nepeta manchuriensis essential oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oil present in the aerial parts of the plant Nepeta manchuriensis was prepared by steam distillation using clevenger apparatus. The chemical composition of the oil was studied by GCMS. Sabinene, elemol, selinene, 4-terpineol, menthatriene and neoisothujol are the major components and r...

  11. Pluronic/gelatin composites for controlled release of actives.

    PubMed

    Tatini, Duccio; Tempesti, Paolo; Ridi, Francesca; Fratini, Emiliano; Bonini, Massimo; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the release properties of composite materials based on Pluronic F127 and gelatin hydrogels, which could be of interest in the field of enteral nutrition or drug administration. The composites were prepared by exploiting the opposite responsivity to temperature of a 20% w/w Pluronic F127 aqueous solution (critical gelation temperature around 23 °C) and gelatin (gel-sol temperature transition around 30 °C). Pluronic domains dispersed within a gelatin matrix were obtained by injecting cold Pluronic F127 solutions inside hot gelatin solutions, while homogenizing either with a magnetic stirrer or a high-energy mechanical disperser. Calorimetry indicates that the composites retain the individual gelling properties of Pluronic and gelatin. Different releasing properties were obtained as a function of the preparation protocol, the temperature and the pH. The release profiles have been studied by a Weibull analysis that clearly points out the dominating role of gelatin at 25 °C. At 37 °C the release accounts for a combined effect from both Pluronic F127 and gelatin, showing a more sustained profile with respect to gelatin hydrogels. This behavior, together with the ability of Pluronic F127 to upload both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs and flavors, makes these innovative composite materials very good candidates as FDA-approved carriers for enteral administration.

  12. Phytochemical composition and anticancer activity of germinated wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed germination is a natural method to increase bioactive components that have beneficial effects on human health. Germinated wheat flour samples of a hard red wheat cultivar (Rampart) were prepared after germination of three and five days and investigated for phytochemical composition and anticanc...

  13. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  14. Novel, inorganic composites using porous, alkali-activated, aluminosilicate binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Sean

    Geopolymers are an inorganic polymeric material composed of alumina, silica, and alkali metal oxides. Geopolymers are chemical and fire resistant, can be used as refractory adhesives, and are processed at or near ambient temperature. These properties make geopolymer an attractive choice as a matrix material for elevated temperature composites. This body of research investigated numerous different reinforcement possibilities and variants of geopolymer matrix material and characterized their mechanical performance in tension, flexure and flexural creep. Reinforcements can then be chosen based on the resulting properties to tailor the geopolymer matrix composites to a specific application condition. Geopolymer matrix composites combine the ease of processing of polymer matrix composites with the high temperature capability of ceramic matrix composites. This study incorporated particulate, unidirectional fiber and woven fiber reinforcements. Sodium, potassium, and cesium based geopolymer matrices were evaluated with cesium based geopolymer showing great promise as a high temperature matrix material. It showed the best strength retention at elevated temperature, as well as a very low coefficient of thermal expansion when crystallized into pollucite. These qualities made cesium geopolymer the best choice for creep resistant applications. Cesium geopolymer binders were combined with unidirectional continuous polycrystalline mullite fibers (Nextel(TM) 720) and single crystal mullite fibers, then the matrix was crystallized to form cubic pollucite. Single crystal mullite fibers were obtained by the internal crystallization method and show excellent creep resistance up to 1400°C. High temperature flexural strength and flexural creep resistance of pollucite and polycrystalline/single-crystal fibers was evaluated at 1000-1400°C.

  15. METCAN updates for high temperature composite behavior: Simulation/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The continued verification (comparisons with experimental data) of the METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code is updated. Verification includes comparisons at room and high temperatures for two composites, SiC/Ti-15-3 and SiC/Ti-6-4. Specifically, verification of the SiC/Ti-15-3 composite includes comparisons of strength, modulus, and Poisson's ratio as well as stress-strain curves for four laminates at room temperature. High temperature verification includes comparisons of strength and stress-strain curves for two laminates. Verification of SiC/Ti-6-4 is for a transverse room temperature stress-strain curve and comparisons for transverse strength at three temperatures. Results of the verification indicates that METCAN can be used with confidence to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites.

  16. Hierarchical nonlinear behavior of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Hierarchical computational procedures are described to simulate the multiple scale thermal/mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via MMLT (Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures and accompanying computer codes. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as the entire creep span; MMLT can be used to concurrently tailor the fabrication process and the interphase layer for optimum performance such as minimum residual stresses; and HITCAN can be used to predict the structural behavior such as the deformed shape due to component fabrication. These codes constitute virtual portable desk-top test laboratories for characterizing HT-MMC laminates, tailoring the fabrication process, and qualifying structural components made from them.

  17. Molecular and structural properties of polymer composites filled with activated charcoal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Liong, Syarifuddin; Bakri, Fahrul

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the molecular properties, structural properties, and chemical composition of composites by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, respectively. FTIR spectra shows absorption band of hydroxyl group (-OH), methyl group (-CH3) and aromatic group (C-C). The absorption band for aromatic group (C-C) shows the formation of carbonaceous in composites. XRF shows chemical composition of composites, which the main chemicals are SO3, Cl, and ZnO. The loss on ignition value (LOI) of activated charcoal indicates high carbonaceous matter. The crystallite size for diffraction pattern from hydrogel polymer is about 17 nm and for activated charcoal are about 19 nm. The crystallite size of the polymer is lower than that of activated charcoal, which make possible of the particle from filler in contact with each other to form continuous conducting polymer through polymer matrix.

  18. Investigation of metal and ceramic-matrix composites moduli: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Miriyala, N.; Yu, N.; Hsu, D.K.; Saini, V.; Jeong, H.

    1996-05-01

    The elastic behavior of metal and ceramic-matrix composites were characterized by ultrasonic techniques. While an immersion ultrasonic technique was used to measure the stiffness moduli of silicon carbide (SiC) particulate reinforced aluminium metal-matrix composites, a dry-coupling method was used to determine the elastic constants of woven Nicalon{trademark} fiber reinforced SiC ceramic-matrix composites. A unified micromechanics model was developed to predict the elastic moduli of these composites from the knowledge of their constituent elastic constants. The model quantitatively predicted the effects of microstructural characteristics, such as the reinforcement content and porosity in the material, on the elastic moduli of the composite systems studied. The predicted moduli were in good agreement with the experimental results for both the particulate reinforced metal-matrix composites and woven fiber reinforced ceramic-matrix composites.

  19. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  20. Controlled interphases in composite materials; Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Composite Interfaces (ICCI-III), Cleveland, OH, May 21-24, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Hatsuo )

    1990-01-01

    Topics discussed include the characterization of interface in composites, the surface of reinforcements, controlled interphase, interfacial theories, and the influence of interface on mechanical and physical properties. Papers are presented on NMR imaging of interfaces, interfacial reactions in metal matrix composites studied by a novel technique, carbon fiber surfaces and their analysis, and physicochemical interactions between carbon fibers and PEEK. Consideration is also given to interfacial phenomena in metal matrix composites, unsaturated bifunctional polymeric coupling agents, the influence of CFRP-sizing on processability and interphase properties, and an interlayer model to describe the physical properties of particulate composites. Other papers are on the role of the interface in composite materials during water aging, a transcrystalline interphase in advanced polymer composites, the influence of the adsorption behavior of a silane coupling agent onto silica on viscoelastic properties, and a method for the evaluation of interfacial tension in high-viscosity systems.

  1. Antiviral activity of silver nanoparticle/chitosan composites against H1N1 influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasutaka; Ono, Takeshi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Matsui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chitosan (Ch) composites with antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus were prepared. The Ag NP/Ch composites were obtained as yellow or brown floc-like powders following reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. Ag NPs (3.5, 6.5, and 12.9 nm average diameters) were embedded into the chitosan matrix without aggregation or size alternation. The antiviral activity of the Ag NP/Ch composites was evaluated by comparing the TCID50 ratio of viral suspensions treated with the composites to untreated suspensions. For all sizes of Ag NPs tested, antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus increased as the concentration of Ag NPs increased; chitosan alone exhibited no antiviral activity. Size dependence of the Ag NPs on antiviral activity was also observed: antiviral activity was generally stronger with smaller Ag NPs in the composites. These results indicate that Ag NP/Ch composites interacting with viruses exhibit antiviral activity.

  2. Analyzing Number Composition and Decomposition Activities in Kindergarten from a Numeracy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina; Levenson, Esther; Tabach, Michal; Barkai, Ruthi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores two number composition and decomposition activities from a numeracy perspective. Both activities have the same mathematical structure but each employs different tools and contexts. Twenty kindergarten children engaged individually with these activities. Verbal utterances as well as actions of the child and interviewer were…

  3. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts: Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Work performed during the first two years of this project includes construction of furnace laboratory and calibration of instruments, installation of an electron microprobe, and determination of phase equilibria along a basalt-rhyolite mixing line. This latter study comprises the bulk of work performed to date. We completed approximately 100 experiments on the one-atmosphere phase equilibria of balalt-rhyolite mixtures. Starting materials were an alkali basalt from Pisgah Crater, California, and a high-silica rhyolite from the Bishop Tuff, Owens Valley, California. These materials were chosen because the compositional trend of the mixtures mimics many continental calc-alkaline suites. 5 figs.

  4. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-12-31

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  5. Magnetorheological composites as semi-active elements of dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Jerzy; Lewandowski, Daniel; Zając, Piotr; Kustroń, Pawel

    2009-02-01

    An original magnetorheological composite (MRC) with porous elastomeric matrix and filled with magnetorheological fluid was created at the work. It was used later on to build a damper working in the shearing mode without friction against external surfaces of the so-called skid. This prototype construction was used for damping free vibrations in the beam. An analysis of the effectiveness in the magnetic field function steering the damper was performed. As a result an important relationship between the change of damping in the material under the influence of the magnetic field and the length of time needed for damping the vibrations in the beam was demonstrated.

  6. [Composition, antifungal and radical scavenging activities of 4 propolis].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    HPLC/MS analysis revealed that the main constituents of Brazilian propolis A and B were artepillin C and drupanin, while those of New Zealand propolis C were pinocembrin, galangin and alkylphenol. No flavonoid or phenolic acid was detected in Japanese propolis D. Propolis C showed comparatively potent activity against growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, against filament formation of Candida albicans and potent scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhyrazyl radical, but was less active against growth of C. albicans, as compared with those of thyme thymol essential oil, which was used as a positive control. Propolis A, B, and D were weak in antifungal activity, but showed more potent radical scavenging activity than thyme thymol oil. These results reveal the unique bioactivity of propolis, suggesting a possible application for antifungal therapy. PMID:22123329

  7. Composition and enzyme activities of Spiroplasma citri membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, J B; Ittig, M; Roy, B; Latrille, J; Bové, J M

    1977-01-01

    Spiroplasma citri was cultured in three different media that supplied cholesterol and fatty acids from: (i) horse serum, (ii) pleuropneumonia-like organism (PPLO) serum fraction, or (iii) bovine serum albumin-fatty acid-cholesterol. The ability of PPLO serum fraction to support growth varied by lot number. Neither PPLO serum fraction nor the bovine serum albumin medium supported growth as well as the horse serum medium. Analysis of cholesterol, lipid phosphorus, and membrane protein showed the horse serum- and PPLO-grown cells to be indistinguishable, but the bovine serum albumin-grown cells were deficient in lipid phosphorus. The three cultures did not show markedly different fatty acid compositions, but, in all cases, the cultures preferentially incorporated palmitic acid and discriminated against linoleic acid. Cultures grown for different times from logarithmic growth through a degenerative phase showed relatively constant ratios of cholesterol/protein and lipid phosphorus/protein. Fatty acid composition was also relatively constant at the different stages. Adenosine triphosphatase and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase were mainly associated with the membrane, whereas reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase was either readily removed or not associated with the membrane. The reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase was inactivated at temperatures above 35 degrees C. PMID:191432

  8. Indonesian propolis: chemical composition, biological activity and botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Trusheva, Boryana; Popova, Milena; Koendhori, Eko Budi; Tsvetkova, Iva; Naydenski, Christo; Bankova, Vassya

    2011-03-01

    From a biologically active extract of Indonesian propolis from East Java, 11 compounds were isolated and identified: four alk(en)ylresorcinols (obtained as an inseparable mixture) (1-4) were isolated for the first time from propolis, along with four prenylflavanones (6-9) and three cycloartane-type triterpenes (5, 10 and 11). The structures of the components were elucidated based on their spectral properties. All prenylflavanones demonstrated significant radical scavenging activity against diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radicals, and compound 6 showed significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. For the first time Macaranga tanarius L. and Mangifera indica L. are shown as plant sources of Indonesian propolis.

  9. Some chemical composition and biological activity of northern Argentine propolis.

    PubMed

    Isla, Maria I; Paredes-Guzman, Julio F; Nieva-Moreno, M I; Koo, H; Park, Yong K

    2005-02-23

    Twenty-five samples of propolis were collected from seven different regions in northern Argentina; ethanolic extracts of propolis were prepared from all samples, and the respective samples were examined for UV absorption spectra, RPHPTLC, RPHPLC, antimicrobial activity, antiradical activity, and total phenolic content. It was found that 16 of the 25 samples showed a phenolic profile similar to that found in samples from southern Brazil and corresponding to poplar-based propolis and that the rest of the samples showed a different profile and higher antimicrobial and antiradical activities.

  10. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  11. Foeniculum vulgare essential oils: chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria Graça; Cruz, Cláudia; Faleiro, Leonor; Simões, Mariana T F; Figueiredo, Ana Cristina; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2010-02-01

    The essential oils from Foeniculum vulgare commercial aerial parts and fruits were isolated by hydrodistillation, with different distillation times (30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h), and analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The antioxidant ability was estimated using four distinct methods. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. Remarkable differences, and worrying from the quality and safety point of view, were detected in the essential oils. trans-Anethole (31-36%), alpha-pinene (14-20%) and limonene (11-13%) were the main components of the essentials oil isolated from F. vulgare dried aerial parts, whereas methyl chavicol (= estragole) (79-88%) was dominant in the fruit oils. With the DPPH method the plant oils showed better antioxidant activity than the fruits oils. With the TBARS method and at higher concentrations, fennel essential oils showed a pro-oxidant activity. None of the oils showed a hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity > 50%, but they showed an ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase. The essential oils showed a very low antimicrobial activity. In general, the essential oils isolated during 2 h were as effective, from the biological activity point of view, as those isolated during 3 h.

  12. Antioxidant activity and phenolic composition of Corylus colurna.

    PubMed

    Riethmüller, Eszter; Tóth, Gergo; Alberti, Agnes; Sonati, Mirella; Kéry, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    Corylus colurna L. (Turkish hazel), a common hazel species in Europe, could be considered as a source of pharmacologically important natural compounds, since other members of the Corylus genus have been reported to contain several constituents with beneficial biological activity. Nevertheless, its phytochemical exploration is still incomplete. In this study the potent antioxidant phenolic compounds in different parts of the plant were investigated. The phenolics in the leaves, bark, catkins and involucre of C. colurna possess notable scavenger activity on both DPPH and ABTS free radicals. The total polyphenol content shows significant correlation with the antioxidant activity of the samples. Twenty-three phenolic compounds - hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoid derivatives and diarylheptanoids - were characterized in the C. colurna extracts by LC-DAD, LC-ESI-TOF and LC-ESI-QQQ-MS.

  13. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems.

  14. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems. PMID:24768063

  15. The Craft of Composition: Activities and Advice for College Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Kris

    This book features rhetorically-arranged activities and assignments that connect students' everyday lives to the writing process. The individual and group assignments in the book appeal to different student learning styles and encourage an interactive approach to writing. The text is divided into four main parts: The Narrative Essay; The…

  16. Essential oil from Artemisia phaeolepis: chemical composition and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ben Hsouna, Anis; Ben Halima, Nihed; Abdelkafi, Slim; Hamdi, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    Artemisia phaeolepis, a perennial herb with a strong volatile odor, grows on the grasslands of Mediterranean region. Essential oil obtained from Artemisia phaeolepis was analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 79 components representing 98.19% of the total oil were identified, and the main compounds in the oil were found to be eucalyptol (11.30%), camphor (8.21%), terpine-4-ol (7.32%), germacrene D (6.39), caryophyllene oxide (6.34%), and caryophyllene (5.37%). The essential oil showed definite inhibitory activity against 10 strains of test microorganisms. Eucalyptol, camphor, terpine-4-ol, caryophyllene, germacrene D and caryophyllene oxide were also examined as the major components of the oil. Camphor showed the strongest antimicrobial activity; terpine-4-ol, eucalyptol, caryophyllene and germacrene D were moderately active and caryophyllene oxide was weakly active. The study revealed that the antimicrobial properties of the essential oil can be attributed to the synergistic effects of its diverse major and minor components. PMID:24292348

  17. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  18. Advanced low-activation materials. Fibre-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenici, P.; Scholz, H. W.

    1994-09-01

    A serious safety and environmental concern for thermonuclear fusion reactor development regards the induced radioactivity of the first wall and structural components. The use of low-activation materials (LAM) in a demonstration reactor would reduce considerably its potential risk and facilitate its maintenance. Moreover, decommissioning and waste management including disposal or even recycling of structural materials would be simplified. Ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC materials offer highly appreciable low activation characteristics in combination with good thermomechanical properties. This class of materials is now under experimental investigation for structural application in future fusion reactors. An overview on the recent results is given, covering coolant leak rates, thermophysical properties, compatibility with tritium breeder materials, irradiation effects, and LAM-consistent purity. SiC/SiC materials present characteristics likely to be optimised in order to meet the fusion application challenge. The scope is to put into practice the enormous potential of inherent safety with fusion energy.

  19. The composition and tail activity of Sun-grazing comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Dong; Russell, Cristopher; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Sun-grazing comets dive into the low corona to reveal the ambient plasma and field conditions with its very active EUV and X-ray radiation patterns. In this study we model the charging-balanced cometary plasma, and its transportation in the solar magnetic field. We study the comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) event seen by SDO, Stereo and SOHO. Our model provides line-of-sight integrated emission intensity calculated via each emission lines of each charge state of O, and Fe ions. Such intensity is then compared with the observed EUV and X-ray images. Typical structures of the coronal magnetic field are studied to investigate their effects on the comet tail, and to model the observed tail activity.

  20. Human Urinary Composition Controls Antibacterial Activity of Siderocalin* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Shields-Cutler, Robin R.; Crowley, Jan R.; Hung, Chia S.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Marschall, Jonas; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    During Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, cells in the human urinary tract release the antimicrobial protein siderocalin (SCN; also known as lipocalin 2, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin/NGAL, or 24p3). SCN can interfere with E. coli iron acquisition by sequestering ferric iron complexes with enterobactin, the conserved E. coli siderophore. Here, we find that human urinary constituents can reverse this relationship, instead making enterobactin critical for overcoming SCN-mediated growth restriction. Urinary control of SCN activity exhibits wide ranging individual differences. We used these differences to identify elevated urinary pH and aryl metabolites as key biochemical host factors controlling urinary SCN activity. These aryl metabolites are well known products of intestinal microbial metabolism. Together, these results identify an innate antibacterial immune interaction that is critically dependent upon individualistic chemical features of human urine. PMID:25861985

  1. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  2. Composition and antioxidant activity of red fruit liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Wińska, Katarzyna; Szumny, Antoni; Nawirska-Olszańska, Agnieszka; Mizgier, Paulina; Wyspiańska, Dorota

    2014-08-15

    Fruits traditionally used for liqueurs are a good source of phenolic compounds endowed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to compare the content of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins and the antioxidant capacity of liqueurs made from red fruits. The liqueurs were made from fruits of 10 species: chokeberry, cornelian cherry, black rose, blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, mahonia, sloe, strawberry, and sour cherry. The liqueurs from black rose, chokeberry, sloe and mahonia fruits contained the most of substances which react with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (671, 329, 271 and 218 mg GAE/100 mL, respectively) and had the highest antioxidant activity. The samples stored at a temperature of 30 °C had antioxidant activity from 3% to 11% lower than the fresh samples. After 6 months, anthocyanins degraded almost completely in the samples stored at 30 °C and at 15 °C there was from 0% (blackcurrant liqueurs) to 47% (sloe liqueurs) of their initial content and slightly more in sweet liqueurs. PMID:24679815

  3. Composition and antioxidant activity of red fruit liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Wińska, Katarzyna; Szumny, Antoni; Nawirska-Olszańska, Agnieszka; Mizgier, Paulina; Wyspiańska, Dorota

    2014-08-15

    Fruits traditionally used for liqueurs are a good source of phenolic compounds endowed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to compare the content of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins and the antioxidant capacity of liqueurs made from red fruits. The liqueurs were made from fruits of 10 species: chokeberry, cornelian cherry, black rose, blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, mahonia, sloe, strawberry, and sour cherry. The liqueurs from black rose, chokeberry, sloe and mahonia fruits contained the most of substances which react with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (671, 329, 271 and 218 mg GAE/100 mL, respectively) and had the highest antioxidant activity. The samples stored at a temperature of 30 °C had antioxidant activity from 3% to 11% lower than the fresh samples. After 6 months, anthocyanins degraded almost completely in the samples stored at 30 °C and at 15 °C there was from 0% (blackcurrant liqueurs) to 47% (sloe liqueurs) of their initial content and slightly more in sweet liqueurs.

  4. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  5. Walking Activity, Body Composition and Blood Pressure in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanish, Heidi I.; Draheim, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disabilities engage in limited physical activity which places their health at risk. This study examined the walking activity, body composition and blood pressure of adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods: A group of male and female adults (n = 103) wore a pedometer for 7 days and were categorized…

  6. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  7. Effect of nanostructured graphene oxide on electrochemical activity of its composite with polyaniline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Phan, Thi; Thanh Luong, Thi; Mai, Thi Xuan; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Tot Pham, Thi

    2016-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) significantly affects the electrochemical activity of its composite with polyanline titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work various composites with different GO contents have been successfully synthesized by chemical method to compare not only their material properties but also electrochemical characteristics with each other. The results of an electrochemical impedance study showed that their electrochemical property has been improved due to the presence of GO in a composite matrix. The galvanodynamic polarization explained that among them the composite with GO/Ani ratio in the range of 1-14 exhibits a better performance compared to the other due to yielding a higher current desity (280 μA cm-2). The TEM and SEM images which presented the fibres of a composite bundle with the presence of PANi and TiO2 were examined by IR-spectra and x-ray diffraction, respectively.

  8. Sr effect on the microstructure and tensile properties of A357 aluminum alloy and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC-A357 cast composites

    SciTech Connect

    Razaghian, A.; Emamy, M.; Najimi, A.A.; Ebrahimi, S.H. Seyed

    2009-11-15

    The effect of strontium as a modifier on the microstructures and tensile properties of two castable particulate metal matrix composites has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites had similar matrix alloy (A357) but different reinforcing fine particles (silicon carbide and alumina). Results showed that the addition of 0.03% strontium makes a modest improvement to the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage values, and the scatter of these properties, but makes a significant improvement to minimum strength and elongation results. Microstructural examinations by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of metal matrix composites showed segregation of strontium on both the silicon carbide and alumina particles. Further results showed that the addition of higher strontium levels contributes to the over-modification of the eutectic silicon and promotes the formation of an Al-Si-Sr intermetallic compound on the particle/matrix interface.

  9. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  10. Recyclable Fe3O4/ZnO/PPy composite photocatalyst: Fabrication and photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Liang; Wang, Guanghui; Shi, Xiaoming; Su, Min; Gao, Fang; Cheng, Yang

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a magnetically separable polypyrrole (PPy) modified Fe3O4/ZnO composite photo-catalyst was synthesized and its photocatalytic activity was tested. The as-prepared Fe3O4/ZnO/PPy nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Furthermore, three different photocatalysts including the Fe3O4/ZnO/PPy composite were tested using methyl orange (MO) degradation reaction under UV light irradiation. The relative results demonstrated that the Fe3O4/ZnO/PPy composite has the highest photochemical activity after 4 h photocatalytic experiment. It can be easily separated using an external magnetic field. This kind of composite photocatalysts with easiness of separation can have potential applications in the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants.

  11. Osteogenic activity of cyclodextrin-encapsulated doxycycline in a calcium phosphate PCL and PLGA composite.

    PubMed

    Trajano, V C C; Costa, K J R; Lanza, C R M; Sinisterra, R D; Cortés, M E

    2016-07-01

    Composites of biodegradable polymers and calcium phosphate are bioactive and flexible, and have been proposed for use in tissue engineering and bone regeneration. When associated with the broad-spectrum antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), they could favor antimicrobial action and enhance the action of osteogenic composites. Composites of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and a bioceramic of biphasic calcium phosphate Osteosynt® (BCP) were loaded with DOX encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and were evaluated for effects on osteoblastic cell cultures. The DOX/βCD composite was prepared with a double mixing method. Osteoblast viability was assessed with methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays after 1day, 7day, and 14days of composite exposure; alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and collagen production were evaluated after 7days and 14days, and mineral nodule formation after 14days. Composite structures were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoblasts exposed to the composite containing 25μg/mL DOX/βCD had increased cell proliferation (p<0.05) compared to control osteoblast cultures at all experimental time points, reaching a maximum in the second week. AP activity and collagen secretion levels were also elevated in osteoblasts exposed to the DOX/βCD composite (p<0.05 vs. controls) and reached a maximum after 14days. These results were corroborated by Von Kossa test results, which showed strong formation of mineralization nodules during the same time period. SEM of the composite material revealed a surface topography with pore sizes suitable for growing osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that osteoblasts are viable, proliferative, and osteogenic in the presence of a DOX/βCD-containing BCP ceramic composite.

  12. Compositions and methods for adoptive and active immunotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Fahmy, Tarek; Steenblock, Erin

    2014-01-14

    Modular aAPCs and methods of their manufacture and use are provided. The modular aAPCs are constructed from polymeric microparticles. The aAPCs include encapsulated cytokines and coupling agents which modularly couple functional elements including T cell receptor activators, co-stimulatory molecules and adhesion molecules to the particle. The ability of these aAPCs to release cytokines in a controlled manner, coupled with their modular nature and ease of ligand attachment, results in an ideal, tunable APC capable of stimulating and expanding primary T cells.

  13. Composition-controlled PtCo alloy nanocubes with tuned electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Il; Lee, Su-Un; Kim, Woo Youn; Choi, Ran; Hong, Kwangwoo; Nam, Ki Min; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Joon T

    2012-11-01

    Modification of the electronic structure and lattice contraction of Pt alloy nanocatalysts through control over their morphology and composition has been a crucial issue for improving their electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. In the present work, we synthesized PtCo alloy nanocubes with controlled compositions (Pt(x)Co NCs, x = 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9) by regulating the ratio of surfactants and the amount of Co precursor to elucidate the effect of the composition of nanocatalysts on their ORR activity. Pt(x)Co NCs had a Pt-skin structure after electrochemical treatment. The electrocatalysis experiments revealed a strong correlation between ORR activity and Co composition. Pt₃Co NCs exhibited the best ORR performance among the various Pt(x)Co NCs. From density functional theory calculations, a typical volcano-type relationship was established between ORR activity and oxygen binding energy (E(OB)) on NC surfaces, which showed that Pt₃Co NCs had the optimal E(OB) to achieve the maximum ORR activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrated that the electronic structure and lattice contraction of the Pt(x)Co NCs could be tuned by controlling the composition of NCs, which are highly correlated with the trends of E(OB) change.

  14. Novel composite plastics containing silver(I) acylpyrazolonato additives display potent antimicrobial activity by contact.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Fabio; Palmucci, Jessica; Pettinari, Claudio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Condello, Francesca; Ferraro, Stefano; Marangoni, Mirko; Crispini, Alessandra; Scuri, Stefania; Grappasonni, Iolanda; Cocchioni, Mario; Nabissi, Massimo; Chierotti, Michele R; Gobetto, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    New silver(I) acylpyrazolonato derivatives displaying a mononuclear, polynuclear, or ionic nature, as a function of the ancillary azole ligands used in the synthesis, have been fully characterized by thermal analysis, solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state IR and NMR spectroscopies, and X-ray diffraction techniques. These derivatives have been embedded in polyethylene (PE) matrix, and the antimicrobial activity of the composite materials has been tested against three bacterial strains (E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus): Most of the composites show antimicrobial action comparable to PE embedded with AgNO3 . Tests by contact and release tests for specific migration of silver from PE composites clearly indicate that, at least in the case of the PE, for composites containing polynuclear silver(I) additives, the antimicrobial action is exerted by contact, without release of silver ions. Moreover, PE composites can be re-used several times, displaying the same antimicrobial activity. Membrane permeabilization studies and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation tests confirm the disorganization of bacterial cell membranes. The cytotoxic effect, evaluated in CD34(+) cells by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide) and CFU (colony forming units) assays, indicates that the PE composites do not induce cytotoxicity in human cells. Studies of ecotoxicity, based on the test of Daphnia magna, confirm tolerability of the PE composites by higher organisms and exclude the release of Ag(+) ions in sufficient amounts to affect water environment.

  15. Genetic influences on composite neural activations supporting visual target identification.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, Lauren E; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G; Clementz, Brett A

    2013-02-01

    Behavior genetic studies of brain activity associated with complex cognitive operations may further elucidate the genetic and physiological underpinnings of basic and complex neural processing. In the present project, monozygotic (N=51 pairs) and dizygotic (N=48 pairs) twins performed a visual oddball task with dense-array EEG. Using spatial PCA, two principal components each were retained for targets and standards; wavelets were used to obtain time-frequency maps of eigenvalue-weighted event-related oscillations for each individual. Distribution of inter-trial phase coherence (ITC) and single trial power (STP) over time indicated that the early principal component was primarily associated with ITC while the later component was associated with a mixture of ITC and STP. Spatial PCA on point-by-point broad sense heritability matrices revealed data-derived frequency bands similar to those well established in EEG literature. Biometric models of eigenvalue-weighted time-frequency data suggest a link between physiology of oscillatory brain activity and patterns of genetic influence. PMID:23201034

  16. Research in active composite materials and structures: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Devendra P.; Anderson, Gary L.

    2000-06-01

    During the past several years, the Materials Science Division and the Mechanical and Environmental Sciences Division of the Army Research Office have been supporting projects focusing on basic resaserch in the area of smart materials and structures. The major emphasis of the ARO Structures and Dynamics Program has been on the theoretical, computational, and experimental analysis of smart structures and structural dynamics, damping, active control, and health monitoring as applied to rotor craft, electromagnetic antenna structures, missiles, land vehicles, and weapon systems. The research projects supported by the program have been primarily directed towards improving the ability to predict, control, and optimize the dynamic response of complex, multi-body deformable structures. The projects in the field of smart materials and structures have included multi-disciplinary research conducted by teams of several faculty members as well as research performed by individual investigators.

  17. Composition and antimicrobial activity of Seseli globiferum essential oil.

    PubMed

    Janaćković, Peda; Soković, Marina; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Vajs, Vlatka; Vucković, Ivan; Krivosej, Zoran; Marin, Petar D

    2011-08-01

    The essential oil from aerial parts of Seseli globiferum Vis. obtained by hydrodistillation with Clevenger-type apparatus was analyzed by GC-MS. Twenty-eight compounds were identified, representing 99.4% of the total oil. The main components of the oil were sabinene (38.0%), alpha-pinene (21.2%) and beta-phellandrene (13.5%). The microbial growth inhibitory properties of the isolated essential oil were determined using the broth microdilution method against seven bacterial species: Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC 13311), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Enterobacter cloacae (clinical isolates), Bacillus cereus (clinical isolates), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228), Micrococcus flavus (ATCC 10240) and three fungal species: Aspergillus niger (ATCC 6275), Aspergillus versicolor (ATCC 11730), Trichoderma viride (IAM 5061) and Penicillium funiculosum (ATCC 36839). The essential oil showed activity against bacteria P. aeruginosa, followed by M flavus, L. monocytigenes and E. coli, and all investigated fungal species. PMID:21922927

  18. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of three-dimensional ZnS/CdS composites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuling Li, Honglin; Yan, Lu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D urchin-like ZnS/CdS composites were synthesized via a two-step method. • The CdS nanoparticles were assembled on the thorns of 3D ZnS urchins. • The ZnS/CdS composites show excellent photocatalytic degradation activities. • The modification of CdS on ZnS is responsible for the enhanced property. - Abstract: Urchin-like ZnS/CdS semiconductor composites were successfully synthesized by combining solvothermal route with homogeneous precipitation process. The as-obtained samples were characterized by means of XRD, EDX, TEM, HR-TEM, ED and FE-SEM techniques. The results show that the as-obtained composites were comprised of the hexagonal structure ZnS and CdS, and CdS nanoparticles were assembled on the surfaces of the thorns of urchin-like ZnS. In addition, the optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared ZnS/CdS composites toward some organic dyes (such as Methyl Orange, Pyronine B, Rhodamine B and Methylene Blue) were separately investigated. It is found that the ZnS/CdS composites exhibit excellent photocatalytic degradation activity for these dyes under UV irradiation, as compared to corresponding pure ZnS urchins and commercial anatase TiO{sub 2} (P-25). This enhanced activity may be related to the modification of CdS nanoparticles on the surfaces of thorns of ZnS urchins and a tentative mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic degradation activities of the ZnS/CdS composite catalyst was proposed.

  19. Composites; Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Composite Materials (ICCM/8), Honolulu, HI, July 15-19, 1991. Sections 1-39

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.W.; Springer, G.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on state-of-the-art composite material technologies discusses topics in the fields of design methodologies, unique applications, sandwich construction, buckling behavior, hybrid composites, fabric-reinforced composites, biomedical materials, bonded and bolted joints, composite processing, organic matrix/reinforcement interfaces, matrix materials, pultrusion processing, filament-winding, transfer molding, environmental effects, metal-matrix composite (MMC) processing and modeling methods, MMC interfaces, MMC strengths, and MMC fracture phenomena. Also discussed are carbon-carbon composites, ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), CMC analyses, intermetallic-matrix composites, composite materials modeling, composite fracture behavior, composite delamination, micromechanics of composites, thick laminates, composite strength, dynamic and impact behavior of composites, viscoelasticity and creep, vibration and damping, compression behavior, composite test methods, biaxial testing, composite fatigue behavior, and NDT methods for composites.

  20. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a nitrogen-containing compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a nitrogen-containing compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.